WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromium conversion coatings

  1. Studies on Chromium-free Conversion coatings on Aluminum | Oki ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of a chromium-free conversion coating on aluminum has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Auger Electron (AES) and Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) techniques. Within the limits of the resolution of the TEM, the coating is uniformly clear and featureless. It is composed ...

  2. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion...00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates 5a...to MRAP II Acquisition Pretreatment /conversion coatings omitted: • Hex- chrome pretreatments prohibited for new ground vehicles • Hydrogen

  3. Preparation of Trivalent Chromium and Rare Earth Composite Conversion Coating on Aluminum Alloy Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianzhen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the surface conversion film on 6063 aluminum alloy was prepared by chemical plating process with chromium sulfate, lanthanum sulfate and sodium phosphate as film forming agent. The corrosion resistance and surface morphology of the conversion film were analyzed by pitting corrosion test of copper sulfate and SEM. The results show that when Cr2(SO4)3 is 10 g/L, La2(SO4)3 is 2 g/L, Na3PO4 is 8 g/L, pH value is 3, temperature is 40 °C, reaction time is 10 min, the corrosion resistance of the surface conversion film is the best. The conversion coating is light green, composed of Cr, La, P, Al, O and other elements.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM-BASED CONVERSION COATINGS ON ELECTROGALVANISED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Tomachuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The passivation process of electrogavanised steel is very important, especially for improving of the corrosion protection and the thickness of the layer obtained can further enhance such protection. In the market exists Cr(III‑based thick layers passivation, however, are operated around 60°C. In order to attend market demands a new process with only 20% of the chromium content is developed, which operates at room temperature. The corrosion behavior was investigated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique in chloride solution and accelerated tests in salt spray chamber. The combination of these tests provides a more complete assessment of the behavior against corrosion of layer passivation obtained. The results with respect to appearance, brightness, uniformity, layer thickness and corrosion resistance are similar to those presented by Cr(III based passivation existing market and Cr(VI based conversion treatment.

  5. Study on the deterioration process of a chromium-free conversion coating on AZ91D magnesium alloy in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ming; Wu Shusen; An Ping; Luo Jirong

    2006-01-01

    The morphology of a chromium-free conversion coating for AZ91D magnesium alloy was observed with an Atomic Force Microscopy. The results showed the uniform conversion coating has a relatively smooth appearance with shallow valleys. The EDX results indicated that the compositions of the coating were mainly compounds of Mg, Al, Mn, P, Ca and O. The XRD result showed that the coating contained amorphous materials and a small quantity of crystalline compound. The pitting product of the coating in NaCl water solution mainly composed of Mg, Cl, Mn, P, Ca and O. The corrosion behavior of the samples in NaCl solution was also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which was characterized by one capacitive loop and one inductive loop. Based upon study on both a mathematical model for Faradic admittance of coating in NaCl solution and EIS, it could be considered that the inductive loop was caused by the adsorption of Cl anion and the appearance of pitting corrosion. A degradation mechanism of the coating in NaCl solution is set forth: dissolution velocity of the Cl - adsorption regions of the coating is higher than those non-adsorption regions, for Cl - anions are selective adsorption at some regions of coating surface. When the adsorption regions of coating layer are penetrated by dissolution, the pitting comes into being. The degradation mechanism of conversion coating and the mathematical model are consistent with the EIS results, polarization measurement results and coating's corrosion test results

  6. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santa Coloma, P.; Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J.B.; Cano, F.J.; Lapeña, N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Chromium-free conversion coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. • Salt spray and potentiodynamic sweep tests to study the corrosion behavior. • Local deposits on Cu-rich intermetallic particles enhanced corrosion resistance. • Surface characterization to relate bath's composition and corrosion resistance. • Best corrosion protection with conversion baths without titanium salts. - Abstract: Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an

  7. Chromium-free conversion coatings based on inorganic salts (Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo) for aluminum alloys used in aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Coloma, P., E-mail: patricia.santacoloma@tecnalia.com [TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, E-20009 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Izagirre, U.; Belaustegi, Y.; Jorcin, J.B.; Cano, F.J. [TECNALIA Research & Innovation, Parque Tecnológico de San Sebastián, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, E-20009 Donostia-San Sebastián, Gipuzkoa (Spain); Lapeña, N. [Boeing Research & Technology Europe, S.L.U., Avenida Sur del Aeropuerto de Barajas 38, Building 4 – 3rd Floor, E-28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • Chromium-free conversion coatings for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. • Salt spray and potentiodynamic sweep tests to study the corrosion behavior. • Local deposits on Cu-rich intermetallic particles enhanced corrosion resistance. • Surface characterization to relate bath's composition and corrosion resistance. • Best corrosion protection with conversion baths without titanium salts. - Abstract: Novel chromium-free conversion coatings based on Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo compounds were developed at a pilot scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AA2024-T3 and AA7075-T6 aluminum alloys for aircraft applications. The influence of the presence of Zr and Ti in the Zr/Ti/Mn/Mo conversion bath's formulation on the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys was investigated. The corrosion resistance provided by the conversion coatings was evaluated by salt spray exposure and potentiodynamic sweeps. Optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) operating in the Kelvin Probe mode (SKPFM) were used to provide microstructural information of the coated samples that achieved the best results in the corrosion tests. The salt spray test evidenced the higher corrosion resistance of the coated samples compared to the bare surfaces for both alloys. The potentiodynamic tests showed that the corrosion current density decreased for coated AA7075-T6 and AA2024-T3 alloys, which indicated an obvious improvement of the corrosion resistance with all the processes for both alloys. Although the corrosion resistance of the coated samples appeared to be higher for the alloy AA7075-T6 than for the alloy AA2024-T3, both alloys achieved the best corrosion protection with the coatings deposited from conversion bath formulations containing no titanium salts. The microscopy analysis on the coated AA7075-T6 samples revealed that a local deposition of Zr compounds and, possibly, an

  8. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    laboratory qualification of a total hexavalent chrome free coating systems for use on magnesium transmission housings. This project will leverage... hexavalent chrome free coating system by utilizing a hexavalent chrome free topcoat, primer, and pretreatment for magnesium parts used on Army...of the hexavalent chrome free conversion coatings. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coating System for Magnesium Housings on Aviation Systems Desert

  9. Using Fluorescence XANES Measurement to Correct the Content of Hexavalent Chromium in Chromate Conversion Coatings Determined by Diphenyl Carbazide Color Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Junichi; Ofuchi, Hironori; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Honma, Tetsuo; Sekikawa, Toshikazu; Otani, Haruka; Bando, Akio

    2007-01-01

    The Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive will take effect on July 1 of this year. From that date, the use of chromate conversion coatings containing hexavalent chromium will not be permitted. By comparing the concentration of Cr6+ determined by the diphenyl carbazide color test and by fluorescence XANES (X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) measurement, we can correct for the Cr6+ content of the color test. This will enable the use of the diphenyl carbazide color test to check product shipments in compliance with the RoHS directive

  10. Steam generated conversion coating on aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    Aluminium and its alloys are widely used in aerospace industry owing to their high strength to weight ratio. The surface of aluminium under normal conditions has a thin oxide film (2.5-10 nm) responsible for its inherent corrosion resistance. This oxide film can further be converted or transformed...... into functional conversion coatings in order to enhance corrosion resistance and adhesion to paint systems. Chromium based conversion coatings have been extensively used on aluminium alloys to improve adhesion of subsequent paint layers and corrosion resistance. However, the use of hexavalent chromium is strictly...... regulated due to its toxic nature and suspected carcinogenicity. So, it is highly imperative to develop other alternatives for chrome conversion coatings. Treatment of aluminium with natural water at elevated temperatures results in the formation of different forms of aluminium oxide (γ-AlO(OH) , Al(OH)3...

  11. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  12. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10...... chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive...

  13. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chromate conversion coatings and their current application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formation, composition and possible production technologies of application chromate coatings. Summation of common examples of applications of these coatings in corrosion protection of metals and alloys is provided. Individual chromate coatings are divided by their dominant anions either with CrVI or CrIII. Restrictions of chromate coatings with dominantly CrVI and related toxicity of hexavalent chromium is discussed in detail. In conclusion, examples of both chromium and other, alternative coatings are summed up. Application of these coatings as a protection for concrete hot-dip galvanized reinforcement is also reviewed.

  15. ASTM B 117 Screening of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075 Using DOD Paint Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Placzankis, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the corrosion resistance of eight nonchromate conversion coatings versus hexavalent chromium-based Alodine 1200S controls on scribed coated test panels of aluminum alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075...

  16. Composite Coatings of Chromium and Nanodiamond Particles on Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidikova N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrome plating is used to improve the properties of metal surfaces like hardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance in machine building. To further improve these properties, an electrodeposited chromium coating on steel, modified with nanodiamond particles is proposed. The nanodiamond particles (average size 4 nm measured by TEM are produced by detonation synthesis (NDDS. The composite coating (Cr+NDDS has an increased thickness, about two times greater microhardness and finer micro-structure compared to that of unmodified chromium coating obtained under the same galvanization conditions. In the microstructure of specimen obtained from chrome electrolyte with concentration of NDDS 25 g/l or more, “minisections” with chromium shell were found. They were identified by metallographic microscope and X-ray analyser on etched section of chromium plated sample. The object of further research is the dependence of the presence of NDDS in the composite coating from the nanodiamond particles concentration in the chroming electrolyte.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  18. GM 9540P Cyclic Accelerated Corrosion Analysis of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075 Using DOD Paint Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Placzankis, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study examines corrosion resistance of eight nonchromate conversion coatings versus hexavalent chromium based Alodine 1200 controls on scribed coated test panels of aluminum alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075...

  19. GM 9540P Cyclic Accelerated Corrosion Analysis of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075 Using DoD Paint Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Placzankis, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study examines corrosion resistance of eight nonchromate conversion coatings versus bexavalent chromium based Alodine 1200 controls on scribed coated test panels of aluminum alloys 2024, 2219, 5083, and 7075...

  20. Cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt coatings processed by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giren, B.G.; Szkodo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt clads were tested, each of them for three cases: (1) without additional processing; (2) after laser heating of the solid state and (3) after laser remelting of the material. Armco iron, carbon steel 45 and chromium-nickel steel 0H18N9T were used as substrates. C.W. CO 2 laser with a beam power of 1000 W was used as a source of radiation. The investigated samples were subjected to cavitation impingement in a rotating disk facility. The results indicate that laser processing of the thick, electrode deposited coatings by laser beam leads in some cases to an increase of their cavitation resistance. Strong dependence of the coatings performance on the substrate, both for the laser processed or unprocessed parts of the materials was also discovered. (author)

  1. Study of chromate coatings by radioisotope tracing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozda, T.; Maleczki, E.; Farkas, G.

    1984-01-01

    New radioactive tracer methods were developed to determine chromium(III) and total chromium [chromium(III)+chromium(VI)] content simultaneously. They are capable of investigating solutions and the conversion coating itself in the solid phase, respectively. The increase of chromium(III) concentration in the yellow chromate coating, and the chromium(III) to total chromium ratio in the conversion coating were determined as a function of the treating period. (author)

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed Ultrafine Chromium Oxide Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Jiang Xianliang; Yu Yueguang; Zeng Keli; Ren Xianjing; Li Zhenduo

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were prepared by plasma spraying with ultrafine feedstock. Processing parameters of plasma spraying were optimized. Optical microscope (OM) was used to observe the microstructure of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology and particle size of ultrafine powder feedstock as well as to examine the microstructure of the chromium oxide coating. In addition, hardness and bonding strength of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were measured. The results showed that the optimized plasma spraying parameters were suitable for ultrafine chromium oxide coating and the properties and microstructure of the optimized ultrafine chromium oxide coating were superior compared to conventional chromium oxide wear resistant coatings

  3. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  4. Chromium-nanodiamond coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering and their tribological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamanov, M. V.; Khrushchov, M. M.; Marchenko, E. A.; Shevchenko, N. V.; Levin, I. S.; Petrzhik, M. I.; Miroshnichenko, V. I.; Relianu, M. D.

    2017-07-01

    Peculiarities of structure, chemical and phase composition, micromechanical and tribological properties of chromium-based coatings obtained by magnetron-sputtering of composite and/or compacted chromium-nanodiamond targets have been investigated.

  5. A Novel Nonelectrolytic Process for Chromium and Nickel Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    chromium (CrVI) has been regarded as the “ gold standard” against corrosion in military applications for decades [2]. Its uses range from electronics to...silver or gold . Furthermore, these researchers discovered that for centuries, the metal plating industry was dominated by mercury-based coating...generation of metal and metal alloy particles, including nanoparticles, from a physical mixture of metal nitrate, oxide or hydroxide species and urea. This

  6. Reduction Expansion Synthesis of Chromium and Nickel Metal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Garth V. Hobson Chair, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This thesis represents a...chromium and nickel coatings,” Plating and Surface Finishing, vol. 92, no. 4, pp. 42–48, Apr. 2005. [43] S. I. Sandler, Chemical and Engineering ...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. REDUCTION EXPANSION SYNTHESIS OF

  7. Formation and properties of chromium nitride coatings on martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendala, B.; Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of coatings obtained by ARC-PVD method on martensitic E1961 (13H12NWMFA) steel, which is used on compressor blades in the aircraft engines, were presented. The chemical composition of E1961 was given. The PVT-550 device was used for coating. The protective chromium nitride coatings were tested. The influence of ARC-PVD method parameters for example: bias, pressure and flow rate of reactive gases on the structure and properties of the CrN coatings in corrosion tests were investigated. Technical parameters of obtained CrN coatings were given. The phase analysis of chromium nitride coatings obtained with different technical parameters were tested. The results of phase analysis are given. The pitting corrosion resistance tests in 10% FeCl 3 solution was conducted. The corrosion rate for CrN coated samples were defined. It was found that 50 V and 100 V bias, about 0.5 and 0.7 Pa pressure and 140 sccm (standard cubic centimeter) flow rate of nitride during coating favour the CrN monophase structure while increasing bias to 150 V, decreasing the pressure to about 0.5 Pa and 0.3 Pa and increasing the flow rate of nitride to 160 - 180 sccm favour the CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure. On the basis of corrosion investigations for CrN coatings obtained with different ARC-PVD parameters the best corrosion resistance in 10% FeCl 3 solution for CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure was found. (author)

  8. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb 3 Sn strand

  9. 77 FR 32998 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ...-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4325 (May 2012), entitled Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan...

  10. Unconventional fluoride conversion coating preparation and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drábiková, J.; Fintová, Stanislava; Tkacz, J.; Doležal, P.; Wasserbauer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2017), s. 613-619 ISSN 0003-5599 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fluoride conversion coating * magnesium * corrosion Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2016 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ACMM-02-2017-1757

  11. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  12. Steam initiated hydrotalcite conversion coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik; Roefzaad, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    A facile process of exploiting high-temperature steam to deposit nvironmentally friendly hydrotalcite (HT) coatings on Al alloy 6060 was developed in a spray system. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formationf a continuous and conformal coating comprised of a compact mass of crystallites. ...

  13. Influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour on 13% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K G; Meisel, H; Sessler, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour of 13% chromium steel has been studied. There have been selected different coating systems: Barrier coating (enamel), diffusion coatings, (aluminizing, chromizing) and anodic coating, (aluminium, zinc, tin, cadmium). The corrosion fatigue limits of coated with uncoated specimens in neutral NaCl-solution are compared. Salt-concentrations were 0,01 and 22% (=0,38 M) NaCl at 80/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C. The tests were carried out with alternating tensions and a constant frequency of 50 Hz. Only the use of anodic coatings improved the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the chromium steel.

  14. 76 FR 58536 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Notice of Commission Determination To Conduct a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan AGENCY: United.... 1675(c)(5)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated...

  15. Initiation and Performance of a Coating for Countering Chromium Poisoning in a SOFC-stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Agersted; Persson, Åsa Helen; Beeaff, Dustin

    2007-01-01

    Minimising transport of chromium from the metallic interconnect (e.g. of Crofer 22APU) to the cathode in a planar solid oxide fuel cell is done by application of a coating between the two parts. The coating is applied by slurry coating, and taken through stack initialisation it transforms...... into a stable and densely grown barrier layer, which minimises both the evaporation of chromium from the interconnect surface and the electrical contact resistance between the interconnect and the cathode. Between comparable stack element tests with and without coatings at 750 degrees C, the degradation rate...

  16. Chemical state analysis of conversion coatings by SR-XPS and TEY-XANES

    CERN Document Server

    Noro, H; Nagoshi, M

    2002-01-01

    Chromate coatings on galvanized steel have been studied by Synchrotron Radiation (SR) based techniques that include X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Total-Electron-Yield X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (TEY-XANES). Non-destructive depth profiling of the coatings by SR-XPS reveals the enhancement of Cr sup 6 sup + in the outer surface. TEY-XANES spectroscopy based on simple specimen current measurement is demonstrated as an effective technique for analyzing chemical states of conversion coatings on general bulk substrates. The sampling depth of this technique, which exceeds several tens of nanometer, is determined by the penetration length of Auger electrons excited by X-ray and the inelastic mean free path of secondary electrons excited by inelastically scattered Auger electrons. The chemical states of phosphoric acid added chromate coatings are studied using this technique. The phosphoric acid is taken into the chromate coatings as partially changed into zinc and chromium phosphates, and the r...

  17. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Whole wheat bread, 2 slices 2 Red wine, 5 ounces 1–13 Apple, unpeeled, 1 medium ... chromium or a placebo) might simply show the benefits of supplementation in a chromium-deficient population. Overall, ...

  18. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  19. Frictional properties of self-adaptive chromium doped tungsten–sulfur–carbon coatings at nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zekonyte, J., E-mail: j.zekonyte@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC – Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, P-3030 788 Coimbra (Portugal); Polcar, T. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Department of Control Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are excellent dry lubricants forming thin (∼10 nm) tribolayer that simultaneously protects the coating from environmental attack and provides low friction. In this paper, we focus on nanoscale frictional properties of chromium doped tungsten–sulfur–carbon (WSC–Cr) coatings with various Cr content. Friction force microscopy was used to investigate friction force as a function of load. A non-linear contact area dependence on the normal force was observed. The calculated interfacial shear strength was relatively low in the region of 70–99 MPa. Friction coefficient decreased with increased applied load independently of chromium content in the coatings.

  20. A comparative tribological study of chromium coatings with different specific hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Barthole, M.; Belliard, P.; Lelait, L.

    1995-06-01

    The wear resistance in dry friction of two electrolytic and two pVD hard chromium coatings deposited on construction steel substrates is studied by means of standard pin on disc multi-pass, unidirectional operation. For both of these friction modes low cycle high load operation with cemented carbide pins leads to essentially coatings hardness controlled, abrasive wear. For these well adhering commercial coatings (both for through thickness cracking and for spalling failure) assessed by standard testing, are inadequate for quality ranking with respect to wear resistance. Steady state friction corresponds to a stabilised third body essentially composed of chromium oxide. (authors). 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Lai, G.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10 -3 and 7.9 mm/s at 816 0 C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  2. Plasma Spraying and Characterization of Chromium Carbide-Nickel Chromium Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Prantnerová, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 281-290, č. článku PCCC-2016-09-16-339. ISSN 2008-2134 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Chromium carbide * Slurry abrasion * Dry rubber wheel test * Friction * Microhardness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://www.pccc.icrc.ac.ir/?xid=0113010121000001804&id=976

  3. Annealing of chromium oxycarbide coatings deposited by plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) for aluminum die casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; He, X.M.; Trkula, M.; Nastasi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Chromium oxycarbide coatings have been investigated for use as non-wetting coatings for aluminum die casting. This paper examines Cr-C-O coating stability and non-wetability at elevated temperatures for extended periods. Coatings were deposited onto 304 stainless steel from chromium carbonyl [Cr(CO) 6 ] by plasma immersion ion processing. The coatings were annealed in air at an aluminum die casting temperature of 700 deg. C up to 8 h. Coatings were analyzed using resonant ion backscattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometry. Molten aluminum was used to determine coating wetting and contact angle. Results indicate that the surface oxide layer reaches a maximum thickness of 900 nm. Oxygen concentrations in the coatings increased from 24% to 34%, while the surface concentration rose to almost 45%. Hardness values ranged from 22.1 to 6.7 GPa, wear coefficients ranged from 21 to 8x10 -6 mm 3 /Nm and contact angles ranged from 156 deg. to 127 deg

  4. Mechanical properties of composite coatings of chromium and nanodiamonds on aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidikova Nelly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum offers engineers weight saving advantages in their product design. However, aluminum has poor wear and friction properties. In addition, the surface oxide layer of this chemically active metal, which gives it the corrosion resistance, makes it a very difficult metal to plate [1]. Specific pre-treatment must be applied to remove the oxide layer from the aluminum surface. The nanodiamond particles additionally facilitates the process of chromium deposition. The object of this study is to evaluate the impact of nanodiamonds on the mechanical properties of the chromium coating plated on

  5. Study of electrochemical phosphate conversion coating of metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougelin, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    After an overview on phosphate conversion coating processes, on models of iron electrochemical dissolution, on the passivation phenomenon, and on the phosphate conversion coating treatment, this research thesis reports a detailed study of this last process. The author presents the experimental method, reports the study of this process and of passivation under constant polarization. He reports the use of various techniques and conditions: chrono-amperometry, chrono-potentiometry, cyclic volt-amperometry

  6. 76 FR 31633 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... the antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead...

  7. Zr-based conversion coatings for multi-metal substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerezo Palacios, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this PhD work, a new surface treatment based on the application of Zr-based conversion coatings by immersion in a Cu containing Zr-based conversion solution was investigated as a replacement of the traditional phosphating process for the automotive industry. Nowadays most of the cars are made of

  8. Trivalent Chromium Process (TCP) as a Sealer for MIL-A-8625F Type II, IIB, and IC Anodic Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matzdorf, Craig; Beck, Erin; Hilgeman, Amy; Prado, Ruben

    2008-01-01

    This report documents evaluations of trivalent chromium compositions (TCP) as sealers for MIL-A-8625F Type II, IIB, and IC anodic coatings conducted from March 2001 through December 2007 by Materials Engineering...

  9. Adhesion and corrosion studies of a lithium based conversion coating film on the 2024 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M.R.S.; Nogueira, J.C.; Thim, G.P.; Oliveira, M.A.S.

    2004-01-01

    AA2024-T3-aluminum alloy surfaces were coated using non-chromate and chromate conversion coatings. All coatings were painted with the 10P4-2-primer epoxy resin. Independent on the film formation process, films passed on the substrate/conversion coating wet tape adhesion test. However, only the chromate conversion coating passed on the conversion coating/primer epoxy resin adhesion test. Electrochemical corrosion measurements showed that non-chromate conversion coated surfaces present lower corrosion current density, bigger polarization resistance and less negative corrosion potential than chromate conversion coated surfaces

  10. Electrical conductivity of chromate conversion coating on electrodeposited zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tencer, Michal

    2006-01-01

    For certain applications of galvanized steel protected with conversion coatings it is important that the surface is electrically conductive. This is especially important with mating surfaces for electromagnetic compatibility. This paper addresses electrical conductivity of chromate conversion coatings. A cross-matrix study using different zinc plating techniques by different labs showed that the main deciding factor is the type of zinc-plating bath used rather than the subsequent chromating process. Thus, chromated zinc plate electrodeposited from cyanide baths is non-conductive while that from alkaline (non-cyanide) and acid baths is conductive, even though the plate from all the bath types is conductive before conversion coating. The results correlate well with the microscopic structure of the surfaces as observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and could be further corroborated and rationalized using EDX and Auger spectroscopies

  11. Stannate conversion coatings on Mg-8Li alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lihui; Zhang Milin; Li Junqing; Yu Xiang; Niu Zhongyi

    2009-01-01

    The stannate conversion coatings (SnCC) on Mg-8Li alloy were investigated by simple immersion method. The surface morphology and composition were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) techniques. The corrosion resistance was assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The effects of time of a stannate bath on the quality of stannate conversion coatings were investigated by SEM and EIS. It was found that the coating particles were mainly composed of hemispherical particles MgSnO 3 .3H 2 O. A comparison of results revealed the coating treated for 60 min exhibited the most uniform, dense and corrosion-resistant

  12. Chemical conversion coating for protecting magnesium alloys from corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Gaurang; Allen, Fred M.; Skandan, Ganesh; Hornish, Peter; Jain, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A chromate-free, self-healing conversion coating solution for magnesium alloy substrates, composed of 10-20 wt. % Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2.6H.sub.2O, 1-5 wt. % Al(NO.sub.3).sub.3.9H.sub.2O, and less than 1 wt. % of [V.sub.10O.sub.28].sup.6- or VO.sub.3.sup.- dissolved in water. The corrosion resistance offered by the resulting coating is in several hundreds of hours in salt-spray testing. This prolonged corrosion protection is attributed to the creation of a unique structure and morphology of the conversion coating that serves as a barrier coating with self-healing properties. Hydroxoaluminates form the backbone of the barrier protection offered while the magnesium hydroxide domains facilitate the "slow release" of vanadium compounds as self-healing moieties to defect sites, thus providing active corrosion protection.

  13. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  14. Adsorption of Radioactive Chromium onto Iron Oxide Coated Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadros, N.

    2008-01-01

    Iron oxide coated sand (IOCS) has been prepared and used as granular sorbent for 51 Cr radionuclide at different and specified concentration Ievels in aqueous solutions of constant ph value. Effect of different parameters such as: ph variation, contact time, 51 Cr ion concentration and variation of temperature on the adsorption of the radionuclide onto IOCS material have been discussed. At high ph value about 9()% of 51 Cr is adsorbed onto IOCS from the aqueous solution, The sorption capability of 51 Cr and the effect of ion concentration on the adsorbitivity have been discussed. Adsorption isotherms of Langmuir and Freundlich were expressed and their adsorption isotherm parameters are tabulated

  15. Adhesion of epoxy primer to hydrotalcite conversion coated AA2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Robert Benton, III

    Hydrotalcite-based (HT) conversion coatings are being developed as an environmentally benign alternative to chromate conversion coatings (CCC). Accelerated exposure tests were conducted on epoxy primed, HT-modified AA2024 to gauge service performance. HT-based conversion coatings did not perform as well as the CCC when used with an epoxy primer. The current HT chemistries are optimized for stand-alone corrosion protection, however additional research into the primer/HT interactions is necessary before they can be implemented within a coating scheme. The relative contribution of mechanical and physico-chemical interactions in controlling adhesion has been investigated in this study. Practical adhesion tests were used to assess the dry and wet bond strength of epoxy primer on HT coatings using the pull-off tensile strength (POTS) as the figure of merit. The practical adhesion of HT coated samples generally fell between that observed for the CCC and bare AA2024. Laboratory testing was done to assess the physical and chemical properties of HT coatings. Contact angle measurements were performed using powders representative of different HT chemistries to evaluate the dispersive and acid-base character of the surface. The wet POTS correlated with the electrodynamic (dipole + dispersive) parameter of the surface tension. The HT surfaces were found to be predominantly basic. Given the basicity of epoxy, these results indicate that increasing the acidic character of HT coatings may increase the adhesion performance. This was supported by electrokinetic measurements in which the dry POTS was found to increase with decreasing conversion coating iso-electric point. The correlations with the dry and wet state adhesion are interpreted as indicating that dry state adhesion is optimized by minimizing unfavorable polar interactions between the basic epoxy and HT interfaces. Wet state adhesion, where polar interactions are disrupted, is dictated by non-polar bonding. FTIR

  16. Growth of permanganate conversion coating on 2024-Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinich, S.A.; Akhtar, A.S.; Wong, P.C.; Wong, K.C.; Mitchell, K.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of permanganate conversion coating on aluminum 2024-T3 alloy has been studied by characterizing, with scanning Auger microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the coatings formed by immersion of the alloy in the coating bath (containing KMnO 4 and Na 2 B 4 O 7 , pH 9.1) for different periods of time and at different temperatures. At room temperature, during the first 1-5 min of immersion, MnO 2 deposits are formed only on the second-phase intermetallic particles (of Al-Cu-Mg and Al-Cu-Fe-Mn types), but the coating starts to develop on the Al matrix surface after 5-10 min. The coating slows down and stops after about 150 min, with a thinner deposit over the alloy matrix. The process is accelerated at higher temperatures, for example at 68 deg. C it self-limits after about 3 min. The electrochemical growth process appears to follow that established for the chromate conversion coatings, although XPS does not detect significant MnO 4 - incorporation into the permanganate coatings

  17. Effect of coatings obtanied by sputtering of chromium catode on the corrosion resistance of AISI H13 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, A; Peña, D; Piratoba, U

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of coatings obtained by sputtering a chromium target were evaluated. The films were deposited on substrates of disk-shaped AISI H13 steel. By means of potentiodynamic polarization curves were able to determine the current density vs. potential for the coated and uncoated substrate and the difference in the corrosion potential Ecorr. All samples with coating showed an increase in Ecorr respect to substrate. The electrochemical tests were conducted in an electrolytic solution of 3% NaCl

  18. Protective coatings on structural materials for energy conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.T.; De, P.K.; Srinivasa, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Structural Materials and Components used in coal fired energy conversion systems, crude oil refineries and coal gasification plants are subjected to degradation due to oxidation, sulfidation, carbonization and halogenation. Suitable protective coatings can significantly enhance their life. Protective coatings work by forming a highly stable, self-healing and slow growing protective scale at the operating temperatures. These scales act as barriers between the corrosive environment and the alloy and prevent degradation of the substitute. Three types of scales that provide such protection are based on Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 and SiO 2 . Aluminide coatings are major alumina forming protecting coatings, applied on nickel, cobalt and iron base alloys. Aluminide coatings are prepared by enriching the surface of a component by aluminum. In this paper the formation of aluminide coatings of nickel, IN738, Alloy 800, Zircaloy-2 and pure iron by chemical vapor deposition has been described. In this technique, Aluminum chloride vapors from bath kept at 353-373 K are carried in a stream of hydrogen gas into a Hot Walled CVD chamber kept at 1173-1373 K. The AlCl 3 vapors were allowed to react with pure aluminum whereby aluminum sub-chlorides like AlCl and AlCl 2 are produced which deposit aluminum on the substrates. At the high temperature of the deposition, aluminum diffuses into the substrate and forms the aluminide coating. The process can be represented by the reaction Al (i) + AlCl 3(g) AlCl 2(s) + AlCl 2 (g) . XRD and optical microscopic studies have characterized the coatings. On pure nickel and Alloy 800 the coating consists of Ni 2 Al 3 and NiAl respectively. On pure iron the coatings consisted of FeAl. On Zircaloy-2, ZrAl 2 was also detected. The CVD coating process, XRD and optical microscopy data will be discussed further

  19. Effect of Silicon Addition on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Chromium and Titanium Based Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos Ardila-Téllez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The changes in the microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stresses of AlTiN, AlTiSiN, AlCrN and AlCrSiN coatings, has been studied before and after annealing at 900 ºC and 1100 ºC, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, along with nano-indentation and X-ray diffraction techniques. The As-deposited coatings show a columnar structure, with a crystallite size between 18 nm and 28 nm. Despite the silicon addition, no effect on the crystallite size refinement was observed.However, the addition of silicon increases hardness, elastic modulus and compressive residual stresses. After annealing at 900 ºC, the crystallite size growth and the residual stress relaxes; therefore, the coating hardness decreases. At 1100 ºC, the oxide layers formed in AlTiN and AlTiSiN, which act as protective layers enhancing oxidation resistance; meanwhile, a complete oxidation of AlCrN and AlCrSiN coatings take place. The Titanium based coatings present some superior mechanical properties and oxidation resistance than the chromium based coatings at 900 ºC and 1100 ºC.

  20. Effect of coating parameters on the microstructure of cerium oxide conversion coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Benedict Y.; Edington, Joe; O' Keefe, Matthew J

    2003-11-25

    The microstructure and morphology of cerium oxide conversion coatings prepared under different deposition conditions were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The coatings were formed by a spontaneous reaction between a water-based solution containing CeCl{sub 3} and aluminum alloy 7075-T6 substrates. Microstructural characterization was performed to determine the crystallinity of the coatings and to obtain a better understanding of the deposition parameters on coating microstructure. The results of TEM imaging and electron diffraction analysis indicated that the as-deposited coating was composed of nanocrystalline particles of a previously unreported cerium compound. The particles of the coatings produced using glycerol as an additive were found to be much finer than those of the coatings prepared in the absence of glycerol. This indicates that glycerol may act as a grain refiner and/or growth inhibitor during coating deposition. After deposition, the coated panels were treated for 5 min in a phosphate sealing solution. The sealing treatment converted the as-deposited coating into hydrated cerium phosphate. Panels coated from solutions containing no glycerol followed by phosphate sealing performed poorly in salt fog tests. With glycerol addition, the corrosion resistance of the coatings that were phosphate sealed improved considerably, achieving an average passing rate of 85%.

  1. Preconcentration and determination of trace chromium using 1-(2-pyridylazo-2 -naphthol) immobilization on surfactant- coated alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemirani, F.; Zamani, M

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Chromium is one of the essential elements for all vertebrates, as it appears to play a role in the metabolism of glucose and some lipids such as cholesterol. Since chromium is used widely in various industries, such as in the galvanization, steel, leather and paint industries, the resulting anthropogenic contamination of chromium is observed in the coastal sediments and seawater. Chromium in natural waters is normally present at low concentration levels, typically 0.3 - 1.0 μg/L in river water, and 0.1.5 μg/L in sea water. In many cases, the separation and preconcentration techniques are generally required to determined chromium at low concentration levels in natural waters, even when the most sensitive techniques, for instance electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP - MS), are used. In the present work, the column of alumina modified with SDS and PAN was prepared in order to achieve a simple, low - cost and effective method for the improvement of the detection limit of ETAAS by preconcentration of chromium from a large volume of the aqueous through immobilization of PAN on surfactant coated alumina. The influence of P H, flow rate of sample solution and eluent, amount of eluent and effect of cationic interferences on percent recovery of chromium were studied. A concentration factor of 100 can be achieved by passing 500 ml of sample through the column. The method was applied to the determination of chromium in waste and mineral waters

  2. Stimulus responsive hydrogel-coated etched fiber Bragg grating for carcinogenic chromium (VI) sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Pabbisetti Vayu Nandana; Madhuvarasu, Sai Shankar; Moru, Satyanarayana

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a chemo-mechanical-optical sensing approach for the detection of carcinogenic chromium (VI) metal ion using an etched fiber Bragg grating (FBG) coated with stimulus responsive hydrogel. Hydrogel synthesized from the blends of (3-acrylamidopropyl)-trimethylammonium chloride, which is highly responsive to chromium ions suffers a volume change when placed in Cr solution. When the proposed sensor system is exposed to various concentrations of Cr (VI) ion solution, FBG peak shifts due to the mechanical strain induced by the swelling of the hydrogel. The peak shift is correlated with the concentration of the Cr (VI) metal ion. Due to the reduction in the cladding diameter of FBG, wastage of swelling force due to hydrogel on FBG is lowered and utilized for more wavelength peak shift of FBG resulting in the increase in the sensitivity. The resolution of the sensor system is found to be 0.072 ppb. Trace amounts of chromium (VI) ion as low as 10 ppb can be sensed by this method. The sensor has shown good sensitivity, selectivity, and repeatability. The salient features of the sensors are its compact size, light weight, and adoptability for remote monitoring.

  3. 76 FR 77013 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  4. Modification of NiAl intermetallic coatings processed by PTA with chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Diogo Henrique Sepel; Brunetti, Cristiano; Pintaude, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Ana Sofia Climaco Monteiro d'

    2010-01-01

    Equipment that operate under high-temperatures can be protected with NiAl intermetallic coatings mainly because of their metallurgical stability. This study as it evaluates the effect of chromium carbide added to Ni-Al intermetallic coatings processed by PTA. Three Ni-Al-Cr23C6 powder mixtures with different carbide fractions (15, 30 and 45 wt%) and another without carbides were deposited by PTA on an AISI 304 stainless steel plate, using two different current intensities (100 and 150A). Coatings were evaluated regarding the presence of welding defects, and resultant microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness and EDS chemical composition were also determined. NiAl and Cr_7C_3 development was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. A combination of NiAl/Cr-Fe-Ni phases was identified. The hardness was strongly related to the formed phases and their amounts. Besides presenting advances toward the development of coatings which can withstand severe operation conditions, the present study shows that PTA hardfacing is able to produce reinforced intermetallic coatings for high-temperature applications. (author)

  5. Anti-corrosive Conversion Coating on Aluminium Alloys Using High Temperature Steam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    or convert to a functional conversion coating. In the last several decades chromate conversion coating (CrCCs) have been the most common conversion coatings used for aluminium alloys. Due to the toxicity of the hexavalent chrome, however, environmental friendly alternatives to CrCCs have been investigated...

  6. Advanced materials and coatings for energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St Pierre, George R. [Ohio State Univ., Materials Science and Engineering Dept., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Following an historical review of the development of high-temperature alloys for energy conversion systems including turbine engines, some of the current advances in single crystal materials, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites are discussed. Particular attention is directed at creep phenomena, fatigue properties and oxidation resistance. Included within the discussions is the current status of carbon/carbon composites as potential high-temperature engineering materials and the development of coating systems for thermal barrier and oxidation protection. The specific influences of combustion gas compositions, i.e., oxidation potential, sulfur, halides, etc. are discussed. A current list of eligible advanced materials and coatings systems is presented and assessed. Finally, the critical failure mechanism and life-prediction parameters for some of the new classes of advanced structural materials are elaborated with the view to achieving affordability and extended life with a high degree of reliability. Examples are drawn from a variety of energy conversion systems. (Author)

  7. Effect of the pretreatment of silicone penetrant on the performance of the chromium-free chemfilm coated on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Shiuan-Ho; Niu, Liyuan; Su, Yichang; Wang, Wenquan; Tong, Xian; Li, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reported a new pretreatment of silicone penetrant for forming the chromium-free chemfilm (chemical conversion coating) on the surface of an AZ91D magnesium (Mg) alloy. Through applying micro current on the pretreatment solution, an uniform mask membrane was created on the surface of a Mg alloy. By using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) analyses, the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy was examined to analyze the performance during initial, middle, and final deposition periods. As a result, the pretreatment of silicone penetrant can effectively prevent the chemfilm from cracking, improve the anticorrosion ability and nucleation rate of the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy, and make the surface crystallization transform a long strip into short axis shape. - Highlights: • An AZ91D Mg alloy was pretreated by using silicone penetrant. • Surface crystallization of the chemfilm on a silicone-pretreated Mg alloy is smooth. • The pretreatment of silicone penetrant for a Mg alloy enhanced the anticorrosion ability.

  8. Effect of the pretreatment of silicone penetrant on the performance of the chromium-free chemfilm coated on AZ91D magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Shiuan-Ho, E-mail: 1802186169@qq.com [College of Electronic Information and Mechatronic Engineering, Zhaoqing University, Zhaoqing Road, Duanzhou District, Zhaoqing, Guangdong, 526061 (China); Niu, Liyuan [Department of Material Engineer, Zhejiang Industry & Trade Vocational Colledge, WenZhou, 325000 (China); Su, Yichang [Department of Material Engineer, Zhejiang Industry & Trade Vocational Colledge, WenZhou, 325000 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Nanling Campus, Changchun, 130025 (China); Wang, Wenquan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Nanling Campus, Changchun, 130025 (China); Tong, Xian [Department of Material Engineer, Zhejiang Industry & Trade Vocational Colledge, WenZhou, 325000 (China); Li, Guangyu [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Nanling Campus, Changchun, 130025 (China)

    2016-03-01

    This paper reported a new pretreatment of silicone penetrant for forming the chromium-free chemfilm (chemical conversion coating) on the surface of an AZ91D magnesium (Mg) alloy. Through applying micro current on the pretreatment solution, an uniform mask membrane was created on the surface of a Mg alloy. By using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) analyses, the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy was examined to analyze the performance during initial, middle, and final deposition periods. As a result, the pretreatment of silicone penetrant can effectively prevent the chemfilm from cracking, improve the anticorrosion ability and nucleation rate of the chromium-free chemfilm on a Mg alloy, and make the surface crystallization transform a long strip into short axis shape. - Highlights: • An AZ91D Mg alloy was pretreated by using silicone penetrant. • Surface crystallization of the chemfilm on a silicone-pretreated Mg alloy is smooth. • The pretreatment of silicone penetrant for a Mg alloy enhanced the anticorrosion ability.

  9. Mechanical and tribological characterization of the Al 6061-T651 and the Al 6061-T651 with chromium phosphate coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena B, A.

    2002-01-01

    This work consist of two parts. The first one, related with theoretic concepts of tribology, condensed the friction and wear phenomena, considering aspects to bring something relevant into a process. In this conditions, to add lubricant cause a significant performance change during the phenomena mentioned above. The second part of this work, described experimental aspects as how we do a chromium phosphate coating in immersion cell, using 6061-T651 aluminum as substrate. In the process, we consider values of parameters in optimum conditions, obtained by commercial aluminum during previous investigations made in National Institute of Nuclear Research. Here, we characterized chromium phosphate coating and, 6061-T651 aluminum alloy using Sem and X-Ray Diffraction techniques. The measurement of some chromium phosphate characteristic as thickness, weight for area unit, density, roughness, microhardness, adhesion and corrosion resistant were made with appropriately equipment and, in accordance with international standards procedures. In tribological aspect, we determinate adhesive wear resistance and abrasive wear resistance for 6061-T651 aluminum alloy and chromium phosphate coating. Adhesive wear resistance was made for dry condition while abrasive wear resistance were made for dry and wet conditions. Tests are to guide by ASTM G99, G65 and G105 designations respectively. (Author)

  10. Chromium(VI Removal from Aqueous Solution by Magnetite Coated by a Polymeric Ionic Liquid-Based Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thania Alexandra Ferreira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the chromium(VI adsorption capacity of four magnetite sorbents coated with a polymer phase containing polymethacrylic acid or polyallyl-3-methylimidazolium is presented. Factors that influence the chromium(VI removal such as solution pH and contact time were investigated in batch experiments and in stirred tank reactor mode. Affinity and rate constants increased with the molar ratio of the imidazolium. The highest adsorption was obtained at pH 2.0 due to the contribution of electrostatic interactions.

  11. Chromium(VI) Removal from Aqueous Solution by Magnetite Coated by a Polymeric Ionic Liquid-Based Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Thania Alexandra; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Paez-Hernandez, María Elena; Guevara-Lara, Alfredo; Barrado, Enrique; Hernandez, Prisciliano

    2017-01-01

    An evaluation of the chromium(VI) adsorption capacity of four magnetite sorbents coated with a polymer phase containing polymethacrylic acid or polyallyl-3-methylimidazolium is presented. Factors that influence the chromium(VI) removal such as solution pH and contact time were investigated in batch experiments and in stirred tank reactor mode. Affinity and rate constants increased with the molar ratio of the imidazolium. The highest adsorption was obtained at pH 2.0 due to the contribution of electrostatic interactions. PMID:28772865

  12. Comparison of Heavy-Duty Scuffing Behavior between Chromium-Based Ceramic Composite and Nickel-Chromium-Molybdenum-Coated Ring Sliding against Cast Iron Liner under Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A running-in and starved lubrication experiment is designed to investigate the heavy-duty scuffing behavior of piston ring coatings against cast iron (Fe cylinder liner using the piston ring reciprocating liner test rig. The scuffing resistance of the piston ring with the chromium-based ceramic composite coating (CKS, and that with the thermally sprayed nickel-chromium-molybdenum coating (NCM is compared at different nominal pressures (40~100 MPa and temperatures (180~250 °C. With the failure time as a criterion, the rank order is as follows: NCM/Fe > CKS/Fe. Before the scoring occurs at the interface of the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL, the cast iron liner enters into a “polish wear” stage, and iron-based adhesive materials begin to form on the piston ring surface. With the macroscopic adhesion formation, the plastic shearing cycle causes surface damages mainly due to abrasive effects for the CKS/Fe pairs and adhesive effects for the NCM/Fe pairs.

  13. Molybdate and molybdate/permanganate conversion coatings on Mg-8.5Li alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guixiang, E-mail: wgx0357@126.com [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology, College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Milin; Wu Ruizhi [Key Laboratory of Superlight Material and Surface Technology, College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-01-15

    A novel environment-friendly conversion coating for Mg-8.5Li alloy was obtained by immersing in a solution of molybdate. The concentration of ammonium molybdate and the addition of potassium permanganate were discussed in this experiment. The surface morphology of the conversion coatings was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical composition was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of Mg-8.5Li alloy and conversion coatings were investigated by means of potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and weight loss measurement. The results showed that the coatings with cracked morphology were homogeneous and uniform. The conversion coatings were mainly composed of metal-oxide as detected by XPS. The results of electrochemical measurement and weight loss measurement revealed that the molybdate conversion coating had better corrosion resistance than bare alloy and chromate conversion coating, and the molybdate/permanganate conversion coating had lower corrosion current density and higher coating resistance than the molybdate conversion coating.

  14. Molybdate and molybdate/permanganate conversion coatings on Mg-8.5Li alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guixiang; Zhang Milin; Wu Ruizhi

    2012-01-01

    A novel environment-friendly conversion coating for Mg-8.5Li alloy was obtained by immersing in a solution of molybdate. The concentration of ammonium molybdate and the addition of potassium permanganate were discussed in this experiment. The surface morphology of the conversion coatings was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical composition was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion resistance of Mg-8.5Li alloy and conversion coatings were investigated by means of potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and weight loss measurement. The results showed that the coatings with cracked morphology were homogeneous and uniform. The conversion coatings were mainly composed of metal-oxide as detected by XPS. The results of electrochemical measurement and weight loss measurement revealed that the molybdate conversion coating had better corrosion resistance than bare alloy and chromate conversion coating, and the molybdate/permanganate conversion coating had lower corrosion current density and higher coating resistance than the molybdate conversion coating.

  15. Method for electrodeposition of nickel--chromium alloys and coating of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromatt, R.W.; Lundquist, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    High-quality electrodeposits of nickel-chromium binary alloys in which the percentage of chromium is controlled can be obtained by the addition of a complexing agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic disodium salt to the plating solution. The nickel-chromium alloys were found to provide an excellent hydrogen barrier for the protection of uranium fuel elements. (U.S.)

  16. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ce–V conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xiao; Guo, Ruiguang; Jiang, Shuqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Through simple chemical conversion process, a Ce–V conversion coating is prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The coating (∼2 μm thick) has a duplex structure and is composed of Mg, Al, Ce, V and O in the outer layer and Mg, Al, V, F and O in the inner layer. • The Ce–V conversion coating can increase the E corr by 157 mV and decrease the i corr by 80 times compared to AZ31 magnesium alloy substrate. Moreover, the performance of the Ce–V conversion coating excels the chromate conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy. • The EIS results of Ce–V conversion coating indicate an increase of 10× in the corrosion resistance and a delay in the corrosion process kinetics compared to uncoated AZ31 magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. • The ball cratering is a simple and effective technique of thickness measurement for chemical conversion coating. - Abstract: A Ce–V conversion coating was developed to improve the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the ball cratering test were adopted to study the morphology, chemical composition, structure and thickness of the coating. The coating has duplex structure with network and its thickness is about 2 μm. The coating contains high contents of Ce and V, which exhibits amorphous structure. Potentiodynamic polarization shows the coating can increase the corrosion potential and reduce the corrosion current density of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Moreover, the electrochemical impedance spectra exhibit the coating significantly improves the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Results indicate that the Ce–V conversion coating can provide effective protection to AZ31 magnesium alloy

  17. Microstructure and corrosion resistance of Ce–V conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiao, E-mail: xiaoxiao217@126.com; Guo, Ruiguang; Jiang, Shuqin

    2015-06-30

    Highlights: • Through simple chemical conversion process, a Ce–V conversion coating is prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The coating (∼2 μm thick) has a duplex structure and is composed of Mg, Al, Ce, V and O in the outer layer and Mg, Al, V, F and O in the inner layer. • The Ce–V conversion coating can increase the E{sub corr} by 157 mV and decrease the i{sub corr} by 80 times compared to AZ31 magnesium alloy substrate. Moreover, the performance of the Ce–V conversion coating excels the chromate conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy. • The EIS results of Ce–V conversion coating indicate an increase of 10× in the corrosion resistance and a delay in the corrosion process kinetics compared to uncoated AZ31 magnesium alloy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. • The ball cratering is a simple and effective technique of thickness measurement for chemical conversion coating. - Abstract: A Ce–V conversion coating was developed to improve the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the ball cratering test were adopted to study the morphology, chemical composition, structure and thickness of the coating. The coating has duplex structure with network and its thickness is about 2 μm. The coating contains high contents of Ce and V, which exhibits amorphous structure. Potentiodynamic polarization shows the coating can increase the corrosion potential and reduce the corrosion current density of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Moreover, the electrochemical impedance spectra exhibit the coating significantly improves the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy. Results indicate that the Ce–V conversion coating can provide effective protection to AZ31 magnesium alloy.

  18. Molybdate/phosphate composite conversion coating on magnesium alloy surface for corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Zhiyi; Zhu Jin; Qiu Cheng; Liu Yali

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a new conversion coating-molybdate/phosphate (Mo/P) coating on magnesium alloy was prepared and investigated by electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and salt-water immersion experiments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the Mo/P coating contained composite phases, which were consisted of metaphosphate as well as molybdate oxide with an 'alveolate-crystallized' structure. The composite Mo/P conversion coating had better corrosion resistance performance than molybdate (Mo) coating, and even had almost comparable corrosion protection for Mg alloy to the traditional chromate-based coating.

  19. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions Using Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Alumina and Modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The development of an effective method regarding chromium removal from the environment is of great importance. Therefore, the present study aimed to examiner magnetic nanoparticles coated with alumina modified by Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB in the removal of Cr6+ through magnetic solid phase extraction method. Materials & Methods: At first, iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized, coated with alumina, modified with CTAB and characterized with suitable instruments. The factors affecting the process of chromium removal were investigated, including the concentration of CTAB, the pH, the amount of nanoparticles, the sample volume, a proper eluent, the adsorption and desorption time, and the effect of interfering ions. Moreover, the chromium concentration was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS technique. The adsorption isotherm, adsorption capacity, and recoverability of the adsorbent were further examined. Results: The modified magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to be homogeneous, spherical, with a size lower than 20 nanometer having a magnetic property. The optimal conditions for chromium removal entailed 7*10-6 mol/L concentration of CTAB, pH range of 6-8, 0.1 g of the nanoparticles, 10 mL volume of the chromium sample (5 &mug mL-1, nitric acid 2 M as a suitable eluent, 15 minutes of adsorption and desorption, and no interference of interfering ions in the process of chromium separation. The process efficiency under optimal conditions was determined to be over 95%, which this process followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The adsorption capacity proved to be 23.8 mg/g. Reusing after four times of adsorbent recovering was effective in the chromium removal (80%. The method accuracy for five measurement times was 4.155% and the method’s LOD was 0.081 mg/L. Conclusion: The method enjoys the benefits of convenient preparation of the adsorbent, high selectivity, high accuracy, short process

  20. Performance Comparison of Steam-Based and Chromate Conversion Coatings on Aluminum Alloy 6060

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oxide layers generated on aluminum alloy 6060(UNS A96060) using a steam-based process were compared with conventional chromate and chromate-phosphate conversion coatings. Chemical composition and microstructure of the conversion coatings were investigated and their corrosion perfor...

  1. MnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel chromium barrier coatings for SOFC interconnect by HVOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerbom, J.; Varis, T.; Pihlatie, M.; Himanen, O.; Saarinen, V.; Kiviaho, J.; Turunen, E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Puranen, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Inst. of Materials Science

    2010-07-01

    Chromia released from steel parts used for interconnect plates by evaporation and condensation can quickly degrade the cell (cathode) performance in solid oxide fuel cell SOFC. Coatings on top of the IC plate can work as a chromium evaporation barrier. The coating material should have good electrical conductivity, high temperature stability and nearly the same coefficient of thermal expansion as the cell materials. One candidate for the coating material is MnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel because of its suitable properties. High velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) spraying was used for the coating application on Crofer 22 APU steel samples. Using commercial and self made spray dried powders together with an HV2000 spray gun it was possible to successfully manufacture, well adhering, dense and reasonably uniform coatings. The samples were tested in oxidation exposure tests in air followed by post analysis in SEM. Powders and coatings microstructures are presented here, both before and after exposure. It was found out that together with spraying parameters the powder characteristics used influence clearly to the coating quality. Especially as very thin coatings was aimed with dense structure fine powders was found to be essential. (orig.)

  2. Conversion chimique des surfaces d'alliages d'aluminium sans chrome hexavalent

    OpenAIRE

    Ely , Marion

    2016-01-01

    Conversion coatings are used in aerospace industry to protect the metal from corrosion and to promote paint adhesion. Currently, chromate conversion coatings are used, but chromate is toxic and carcinogenic and its use will be forbidden by the European REACh regulation. TCP (Trivalent Chromium Protection) conversion coatings, are considered as a promising alternative to replace chromate conversion coating. This work focuses on the characterisation of the TCP layer and considers each step of t...

  3. The formation of neodymium conversion coating and the influence of post-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Xiufang [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 145 Nantong St., Harbin 150001 (China); Jin Guo, E-mail: jg97721@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 145 Nantong St., Harbin 150001 (China); Yang Yuyun; Liu Erbao; Lin Lili; Zhong Jinggao [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 145 Nantong St., Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-01-15

    In this paper, neodymium-based conversion coating is used as a substitute for toxic chromate conversion coating on AZ91D magnesium alloys. Its formation and growth were observed via SEM, EDS, XPS, electrochemical tests and weighting experiment. The influence of post-treatment on neodymium conversion coating was measured by FTIR and electrochemical experiments in terms of morphology, component, surface functional group and corrosion resistance. The dissolution of matrix and the deposition of neodymium/magnesium oxides compete with each other in initial time. Then the deposition of neodymium oxides dominates the process. Compact coating is obtained after 20 min immersion and it is mainly made of neodymium oxides and a small amount of magnesium oxides/hydroxides. The coating post-treated is rich in OH{sup -} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3+}. The post-treatment can improve the corrosion resistance of the neodymium conversion coating effectually examined by EIS.

  4. The formation of neodymium conversion coating and the influence of post-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiufang; Jin Guo; Yang Yuyun; Liu Erbao; Lin Lili; Zhong Jinggao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, neodymium-based conversion coating is used as a substitute for toxic chromate conversion coating on AZ91D magnesium alloys. Its formation and growth were observed via SEM, EDS, XPS, electrochemical tests and weighting experiment. The influence of post-treatment on neodymium conversion coating was measured by FTIR and electrochemical experiments in terms of morphology, component, surface functional group and corrosion resistance. The dissolution of matrix and the deposition of neodymium/magnesium oxides compete with each other in initial time. Then the deposition of neodymium oxides dominates the process. Compact coating is obtained after 20 min immersion and it is mainly made of neodymium oxides and a small amount of magnesium oxides/hydroxides. The coating post-treated is rich in OH - and PO 4 3+ . The post-treatment can improve the corrosion resistance of the neodymium conversion coating effectually examined by EIS.

  5. Influence of a powder feed rate on the properties of the plasma sprayed chromium carbide- 25% nickel chromium coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The plasma spray process is a leading technology of powder depositing in the production of coatings widely used in the aerospace industry for the protection of new parts and for the repair of worn ones. Cermet 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings based on Cr3C2 carbides are widely used to protect parts as they retain high values of hardness, strength and resistance to wear up to a temperature of 850°C. This paper discusses the influence of the parameters of the plasma spray deposition of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr powder on the structure and mechanical properties of the coating. The powder is deposited using plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. The plasma gas is He, which is an inert gas and does not react with the powder; it produces dense plasma with lower heat content and less incorporated ambient air in the plasma jet thus reducing temperature decomposition and decarburization of Cr3C2 carbide.. In this study, three groups of coatings were deposited with three different powder feed rates of: 30, 45 and 60 g/min. The  coating with the best properties was deposited on the inlet flange parts of the turbo - jet engine TV2-117A to reduce the influence of vibrations and wear. The structures and the mechanical properties of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings are analyzed in accordance with the Pratt & Whitney standard. Studies have shown that powder feed rates have an important influence on the mechanical properties and structures of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings

  6. In situ removal of carbon contamination from a chromium-coated mirror: ideal optics to suppress higher-order harmonics in the carbon K-edge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Akio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Mase, Kazuhiko; Amemiya, Kenta

    2015-11-01

    Carbon-free chromium-coated optics are ideal in the carbon K-edge region (280-330 eV) because the reflectivity of first-order light is larger than that of gold-coated optics while the second-order harmonics (560-660 eV) are significantly suppressed by chromium L-edge and oxygen K-edge absorption. Here, chromium-, gold- and nickel-coated mirrors have been adopted in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray branch beamline BL-13B at the Photon Factory in Tsukuba, Japan. Carbon contamination on the chromium-coated mirror was almost completely removed by exposure to oxygen at a pressure of 8 × 10(-2) Pa for 1 h under irradiation of non-monochromated synchrotron radiation. The pressure in the chamber recovered to the order of 10(-7) Pa within a few hours. The reflectivity of the chromium-coated mirror of the second-order harmonics in the carbon K-edge region (560-660 eV) was found to be a factor of 0.1-0.48 smaller than that of the gold-coated mirror.

  7. Lithium salts as leachable corrosion inhibitors and potential replacement for hexavalent chromium in organic coatings for the protection of aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P; Liu, Y; Terryn, H.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium salts are being investigated as leachable corrosion inhibitor and potential replacement for hexavalent chromium in organic coatings. Model coatings loaded with lithium carbonate or lithium oxalate demonstrated active corrosion inhibition and the formation of a protective layer in a

  8. Comparison of high temperature wear behaviour of plasma sprayed WC–Co coated and hard chromium plated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamurugan, G.M.; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan; Anandakrishnan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► WC–12wt.%Co powders were deposited to a thickness of 300 μm on to steel substrates. ► The micro hardness of the above coatings was lower than that of chromium plating. ► Wear resistance of chromium coating was increased up to five times of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel. ► Wear resistance of chromium coat higher than plasma coat at different temperatures. -- Abstract: The wear behaviour of plasma sprayed coating and hard chrome plating on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel substrate is experimentally investigated in unlubricated conditions. Experiments were conducted at different temperatures (room temp, 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C) with 50 N load and 1 m/s sliding velocity. Wear tests were carried out by dry sliding contact of EN-24 medium carbon steel pin as counterpart on a pin-on-disc wear testing machine. In both coatings, specimens were characterised by hardness, microstructure, coating density and sliding wear resistance. Wear studies showed that the hard chromium coating exhibited improved tribological performance than that of the plasma sprayed WC–Co coating. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) of the coatings showed that the better wear resistance at high temperature has been attributed to the formation of a protective oxide layer at the surface during sliding. The wear mechanisms were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. It was observed that the chromium coating provided higher hardness, good adhesion with the substrate and nearly five times the wear resistance than that obtained by uncoated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  9. Rare earth conversion coating on Mg-8.5Li alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaowei; Wang Guixiang; Dong Guojun; Gong Fan; Zhang Milin

    2009-01-01

    The conversion coating formed by immersion in a solution containing rare earth salt on Mg-8.5Li alloy was studied and the corrosion resistance was evaluated as well. The surface morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical composition was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The corrosion behaviors of Mg-8.5Li alloy and conversion coating were assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and immersion tests. The experimental results indicated that the coating with cracked morphology was homogeneous. It was mainly composed of La 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , Mn 2 O 3 and MnO 2 as detected by XPS. The results of electrochemical measurements and immersion tests revealed that the rare earth conversion coating possessed better corrosion resistance than bare alloy and chromate conversion coating.

  10. Examination of Nonchromate Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Armor From Three Final Candidates Using Accelerated Corrosion and Adhesion Test Methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Placzankis, Brian

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of three final candidate nonchromate conversion coatings on aluminum alloys 5083, 7039, and 6061 coated with standard solvent-based Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) system...

  11. Composition and Performance of Nanostructured Zirconium Titanium Conversion Coating on Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-xue Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured conversion coating of Al-Mg alloy was obtained via the surface treatment with zirconium titanium salt solution at 25°C for 10 min. The zirconium titanium salt solution is composed of tannic acid 1.00 g·L−1, K2ZrF6 0.75 g·L−1, NaF 1.25 g·L−1, MgSO4 1.0 g/L, and tetra-n-butyl titanate (TBT 0.08 g·L−1. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR were used to characterize the composition and structure of the obtained conversion coating. The morphology of the conversion coating was obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results exhibit that the zirconium titanium salt conversion coating of Al-Mg alloy contains Ti, Zr, Al, F, O, Mg, C, Na, and so on. The conversion coating with nm level thickness is smooth, uniform, and compact. Corrosion resistance of conversion coating was evaluated in the 3.5 wt.% NaCl electrolyte through polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectrum (EIS. Self-corrosion current density on the nanostructured conversion coating of Al-Mg alloy is 9.7×10-8A·cm-2, which is only 2% of that on the untreated aluminum-magnesium alloy. This result indicates that the corrosion resistance of the conversion coating is improved markedly after chemical conversion treatment.

  12. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce D; Legg, Keith O; Schell, Jerry; Bondaruk, Bob; Alford, Charles; Natishan, Paul; Lawrence, Steven; Shubert, Gary; Bretz, Philip; Kaltenhauser, Anne

    2005-01-01

    .... However, chrome plating utilizes hexavalent chromium, which is a highly toxic carcinogen, and increasingly, stringent environmental and worker-safety regulations are making chrome plating more expensive for the DoD...

  13. Diamondlike carbon coating as a galvanic corrosion barrier between dental implant abutments and nickel-chromium superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkomur, Ahmet; Erbil, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy, to investigate the effect of diamondlike carbon (DLC) coating over titanium on galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and Ni-Cr alloy, and to evaluate the effect of DLC coating over titanium abutments on the fit and integrity of prosthetic assemblies by scanning electron microcopy (SEM). Five Ni-Cr and 10 titanium disks with a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 3 mm were prepared. DLC coating was applied to five titanium disks. Electrode samples were prepared, and open circuit potential measurements, galvanic current measurements over platinum electrodes, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out. For the SEM evaluation, 20 Ni-Cr alloy and 10 gold alloy superstructures were cast and prepared over 30 abutments. DLC coating was applied to 10 of the abutments. Following the fixation of prosthetic assemblies, the samples were embedded in acrylic resin and cross sectioned longitudinally. Internal fit evaluations were carried out through examination of the SEM images. Titanium showed more noble and electrochemically stable properties than Ni-Cr alloy. DLC coating over the cathode electrode served as an insulating film layer over the surface and prevented galvanic coupling. Results of the SEM evaluations indicated that the DLC-coated and titanium abutments showed no statistically significant difference in fit. Hence, no adverse effects on the adaptation of prosthetic components were found with the application of DLC coating over abutment surfaces. DLC coating might serve as a galvanic corrosion barrier between titanium abutments and Ni-Cr superstructures.

  14. Vacuum-arc chromium coatings for Zr-1%Nb alloy protection against high-temperature oxidation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprin, A.S.; Belous, V.A.; Bryk, V.V.; Vasilenko, R.L.; Voevodin, V.N.; Ovcharenko, V.D.; Tolmacheva, G.N.; Kolodij, I.V.; Lunev, V.M.; Klimenko, I.O.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of vacuum-arc Cr coatings on the alloy E110 resistance to the oxidation in air at temperatures 1020 and 1100 deg C for 3600 s has been investigated. The methods of scanning electron microscope, X-ray analysis and nanoindentation were used to determine the thickness, phase, mechanical properties of coatings and oxide layers. The results show that the chromium coating can effectively protect fuel tubes against high-temperature oxidation in air for one hour. In the coating during oxidation at T = 1100 deg C a Cr 2 O 3 oxide layer of 5 μm thickness is formed preventing further oxygen penetration into the coating, and thus the tube shape is conserved. Under similar test conditions the oxidation of uncoated tubes with formation of a porous monocline oxide of ZrO 2 of a thickness more than ≥ 250 μm is observed, then the deformation and cracking of samples occur and the oxide layer breaks away

  15. Adhesion and differentiation of Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells on chromium-doped diamond-like carbon coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filova, Elena; Vandrovcova, Marta; Jelinek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Houdkova, Jana; Jan Remsa; Kocourek, Tomas; Stankova, Lubica; Bacakova, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are promising for use in coating orthopaedic, dental and cardiovascular implants. The problem of DLC layers lies in their weak layer adhesion to metal implants. Chromium is used as a dopant for improving the adhesion of DLC films. Cr-DLC layers were prepared by a hybrid technology, using a combination of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) from a graphite target and magnetron sputtering. Depending on the deposition conditions, the concentration of Cr in the DLC layers moved from zero to 10.0 at.%. The effect of DLC layers with 0.0, 0.9, 1.8, 7.3, 7.7 and 10.0 at.% Cr content on the adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells was assessed in vitro. The DLC samples that contained 7.7 and 10.0 at.% of Cr supported cell spreading on day 1 after seeding. On day three after seeding, the most apparent vinculin-containing focal adhesion plaques were also found on samples with higher concentrations of chromium. On the other hand, the expression of type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase at the mRNA and protein level was the highest on Cr-DLC samples with a lower concentration of Cr (0-1.8 at.%). We can conclude that higher concentrations of chromium supported cell adhesion; however DLC and DLC doped with a lower concentration of chromium supported osteogenic cell differentiation.

  16. Implementing New Non-Chromate Coatings Systems (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    Initiate Cr6+ authorization process for continued Cr6+ use using the form, Authorization to Use Hexavalent Chromium. YES NO • Approval of...Aluminum and magnesium anodizing • Hard Chrome Plating • Type II conversion coating on aluminum alloys under chromated primer • Type II conversion coating...Elimination of Hexavalent Chromium 80% 5% 14% 1% Type II Type III Type IC Type IC Fatigue Critical 50% 50% Type II Type IC FRC-SE (JAX) Fully Integrated FRC

  17. The role of phosphate conversion coatings in make-up of casing connections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernens, D; van Riet, E.J.; de Rooij, M.B.; Pasaribu, H.R.; van Haaften, W.M.; Schipper, D.J.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphate conversion coatings are widely used on (premium) casing connections for protection against corrosion. Next to that, in conjunction with the lubricant these coatings provide galling protection. The friction and wear that occurs during make-up and subsequent load cycling determines the

  18. Effect of heat treatment, top coatings and conversion coatings on the corrosion properties of black electroless Ni-P films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y., E-mail: liu_yunli@hotmail.com [R and D Department, MacDermid plc, 198 Golden Hillock Road, Birmingham B11 2PN (United Kingdom); Beckett, D.; Hawthorne, D. [R and D Department, MacDermid plc, 198 Golden Hillock Road, Birmingham B11 2PN (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Electroless black nickel-phosphorus plating is an advanced electroless nickel plating process formulated to deposit a black finish when processed through an oxidizing acid solution. Heat treatment, five types of top organic coating techniques and one conversion coating technique with three different experimental conditions were investigated to stabilize the black film and increase the hardness and corrosion resistance. Morphology and compositions of electroless nickel-phosphorous films with or without heat treatment, with five types of top organic coatings, and with three conversion coatings were compared to examine nickel, phosphorus, oxygen, carbon, silicon and chrome contents on the corrosion resistance of black surfaces by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscope. Corrosion resistance of black electroless nickel-phosphorus coatings with or without heat treatment, with five types of top organic coatings, and with three conversion coatings was investigated by the polarization measurements and the salt spray test in 5% NaCl solution, respectively. HydroLac as the top organic coating from MacDermid showed the excellent corrosion resistance and the black EN film did not lose the black color after 48 h salt spray test. Electrotarnil B process with 0.5 ASD for 1 min stabilized the black Ni-P film immediately and increased the hardness and corrosion performance of the black Ni-P film. The black Ni-P coating with Electroarnil B process passed the 5% NaCl salt spray test for 3000 h in the black color and had a minimal corrosion current 0.8547 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} by the polarization measurement.

  19. Catalytic conversion of cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural over chromium trichloride in ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shui; Du, Yizhen; Zhang, Wenqian; Cheng, Xiaowei; Wang, Jidong [Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing (China)

    2014-10-15

    An efficient method for converting cellulose into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) using an inexpensive ionic liquid tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC) and relatively low-toxicity catalyst of chromium (Ⅲ) trichloride (CrCl{sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O) was developed. The effects of hydrochloric acid loading, catalyst dosage, reaction temperature and time on the yield of 5-HMF were surveyed to achieve optimal reaction conditions. A 5-HMF yield of 43.7% was obtained within 90 min at 140 .deg. C using oil-bath heating. Glucose and starch were also investigated as feedstock to produce 5-HMF in TBAC/CrCl{sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O system, in which the 5-HMF yield was considerable. After 5-HMF was extracted, TBAC/CrCl{sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O could be used for several runs.

  20. Anticorrosive Behavior and Porosity of Tricationic Phosphate and Zirconium Conversion Coating on Galvanized Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Camilo S.; Pimenta, Egnalda P. S.; Lins, Vanessa F. C.

    2018-05-01

    This work evaluates the corrosion resistance of galvanized steel treated with tricationic phosphate and zirconium conversion coating after painting, by using electrochemical techniques, accelerated and field corrosion tests. A non-uniform and heterogeneous distribution of zirconium on the steel surface was observed due to preferential nucleation of the zirconium on the aluminum-rich sites on the surface of galvanized steel. The long-term anti-corrosion performance in a saline solution was better for the phosphate coating up to 120 days. The coating capacitance registered a higher increase for the zirconium coatings than the phosphate coatings up to 120 days of immersion. This result agrees with the higher porosity of zirconium coating in relation to the phosphate coating. After 3840 h of accelerated corrosion test, and after 1 year of accelerated field test, zirconium-treated samples showed an average scribe delamination length higher than the phosphate-treated samples.

  1. Corrosion behaviors in physiological solution of cerium conversion coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiufang; Yang Yuyun; Liu Erbao; Jin Guo; Zhong Jinggao; Li Qingfen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a non-toxic Ce-based conversion coating was obtained on the surface of bio-medical AZ31 magnesium alloys. The micro-morphology of the coating prepared with optimal technical parameters and immersed in physiological solution (Hank's solution) in different time was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), composition of the cerium conversion coating and corrosion products in Hank's solution were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. In addition, the corrosion property in Hank's solution was studied by electrochemical experiment and immersion test. The results show that the dense Ce-based conversion coating is obtained on the surface of AZ31 magnesium alloys in optimal technical parameters and the conversion coating consists of a mass of trivalent and tetravalent cerium oxides. The cerium conversion coating can provide obvious protection of magnesium alloys and can effectively reduce the degradation speed in Hank's solution. Also the degradation products have little influence on human body.

  2. Microstructure and electrochemical behavior of cerium conversion coating modified with silane agent on magnesium substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Shi, Jing; Wang, Xin; Liu, Dan; Xu, Haigang

    2016-07-01

    The cerium conversion coating with and without different concentrations of silane agent bis-(γ-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulfide (BTESPT) modification is obtained on magnesium alloys. Detailed properties of the coatings and the role of BTESPT as an additive are studied and followed with careful discussion. The coating morphology, wettability, chemical composition and corrosion resistance are characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), water contact-angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical behavior of the coatings is investigated using EIS. The results indicate that the coating morphology and composition can be controlled by changing silane concentration. The combination of cerium ions and silane molecules could promote the formation of more homogenous and higher hydrophobic coating. The coating turns to be more compact and the adhesive strength between the coating and the magnesium substrate are strongly improved with the formation of Sisbnd Osbnd Si and Sisbnd Osbnd M chemical bonds. The optimum corrosion resistance of the coating in the corrosive media is obtained by 25 ml L-1 BTESPT modification. This whole study implies that the cerium conversion coating modified with certain silane agent deserves cautiousness before its application for corrosion resistance.

  3. Evaluation of self-healing ability of Ce–V conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of cerium nitrate in vanadate solutions on the properties of Ce–V conversion coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloys, and evaluated the self-healing behavior of the Ce–V conversion coating for AZ31 magnesium alloy. The results showed that the additions of cerium nitrate prevented pentavalent vanadium from reducing to tetravalent vanadium in the coatings during conversion reaction process. Adding appropriate cerium nitrate to vanadate solution led to a thicker coating with a more compact CeVO4 layer. The corrosion behavior of the Ce–V conversion coating was investigated by the electrochemical tests and the scratch immersion test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The self-healing ability of the coating was confirmed from all tests. The surface analysis revealed that the self-healing effect of the Ce–V conversion coating was only provided by the release and migration of vanadium compounds.

  4. A new type of Ce-Mo based conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Di; Li Guoqiang; Guo Baolan; Peng Mingxia [Coll. of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Univ. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing, BJ (China)

    2002-07-01

    A new type of process for forming Ce-Mo conversion coatings on Al-alloys has been developed. Conversion coatings about 3.6 {mu}m thickness were obtained by immersing Al-alloys for 20 minutes in boiling film forming solutions containing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} 2.5 g/l, NaKC{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 6}.4H{sub 2}O 2.5 g/l, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} 7.5 g/l and Na{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} 5.0 g/l. In the case of LF4 Al-alloy, polarization curves and immersion tests in 5% NaCl indicated that the conversion coatings exhibited more excellent resistance to localized corrosion than the conventional chromate conversion coatings. However, its resistance to localized corrosion was not satisfactory on LC4 Al alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersion analyzer of X-ray (EDAX) analysis revealed that the conversion coatings having complex surface microstructure on both LC4 and LF6 Al alloys consist mainly of O, Al and other alloying elements in addition to significant Ce and Mo. A mechanism of film formation was proposed to explain the experimental results. (orig.)

  5. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  6. Preparation of micro/nano-fibrous brushite coating on titanium via chemical conversion for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250061 (China); Suzhou Institute, Shandong University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Guo, Yong-yuan [Orthopedic Department, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250012 (China); Xiao, Gui-yong [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250061 (China); Suzhou Institute, Shandong University, Suzhou, 215123 (China); Lu, Yu-peng, E-mail: biosdu@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Ji’nan 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Ji’nan, 250061 (China); Suzhou Institute, Shandong University, Suzhou, 215123 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • A chemical conversion brushite coating was prepared on titanium. • The coating exhibits fibrous morphology in micro/nano-scale. • The surface of the coating shows high hydrophilicity and corrosion resistance in the simulated body fluid. • An improvement of cell response was observed on the surface of coated Ti compared to that of the uncoated. - Abstract: Calcium phosphate coatings have been applied on the surface of Ti implants to realize better osseointegration. The formation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O), mineralogically named brushite on pure Ti substrate has been investigated via chemical conversion method. Coating composition and microstructure have been investigated by X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and field emission scanning electron microscope. The results reveal that the coatings are composed of high crystalline brushite with minor scholzite (CaZn{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O). A micro/nano-scaled fibrous morphology can be produced in the acidic chemical conversion bath with pH 5.00. The surface of the fibrous brushite coating exhibits high hydrophilicity and corrosion resistance in the simulated body fluid. The osteoblast cells grow and spread actively on the coated samples and the proliferation numbers and alkaline phosphate activities of the cells improve significantly compared to the uncoated Ti. It is suggested that the micro/nano-fibrous brushite coating can be a potential approach to improve the osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of Ti implant, due to its similarity in morphology and dimension to inorganic components of biological hard tissues, and favorable responses to the osteoblasts.

  7. Friction Modifier Using Adherent Metallic Multilayered or Mixed Element Layer Conversion Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Starks, Lloyd L., Sr. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The process comprises forming an aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The aqueous solution forms an anti-friction multilayer conversion and/or mixed element coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly without the use of applied external electromotive force, or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  8. Lanthanide based conversion coatings for long term wet storage of aluminium-clad spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; De Souza, J.A.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    Spent fuels from research reactors are stored in basins with water of less than desirable quality at many facilities around the world and instances of cladding failure caused by pitting corrosion have been reported. Conversion coatings have been used in many industries to protect different metals, including aluminium alloys. This paper presents the results of an ongoing investigation in which the corrosion resistance of lanthanide (cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium) based conversion coated RR fuel cladding alloys has been studied. Electrochemical tests in the laboratory revealed higher corrosion resistance of CeO 2 , La 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 coated AA 1100 and AA 6061 alloys in NaCl solutions. Uncoated and CeO 2 coated coupons of these alloys exposed for 50 days to the spent fuel basin of the IEA-R1 research reactor in IPEN, Brazil, revealed marked reductions in the extent of pitting corrosion. (author)

  9. Microstructure and electrochemical behavior of cerium conversion coating modified with silane agent on magnesium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Li; Shi, Jing, E-mail: shijing@ouc.edu.cn; Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangxin.hd@163.com; Liu, Dan; Xu, Haigang

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: The unmodified coating shows averaged static water contact angles of a little more than 50º, which is clearly hydrophilic for water solutions. With the silane concentration increases, the water contact angles show an increase tendency. Especially, when the silane addition is increased to 25 ml L-1, the coating surface presents a hydrophobic feature, with static water contact angle of more than 110º. - Highlights: • BTESPT modification can effectively improve the uniformity, hydrophobic performance, chemical stability and corrosion inhibition capability of traditional cerium conversion coating. • Si-O-Si linkage builds a robust structure to increase of the coating density. Si−O−Mg bonds strengthen the adhesion between the coating/substrate. • The system modified with 25 ml L{sup −1} BTESPT displays the optimum corrosion protection performance. - Abstract: The cerium conversion coating with and without different concentrations of silane agent bis-(γ-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulfide (BTESPT) modification is obtained on magnesium alloys. Detailed properties of the coatings and the role of BTESPT as an additive are studied and followed with careful discussion. The coating morphology, wettability, chemical composition and corrosion resistance are characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), water contact-angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical behavior of the coatings is investigated using EIS. The results indicate that the coating morphology and composition can be controlled by changing silane concentration. The combination of cerium ions and silane molecules could promote the formation of more homogenous and higher hydrophobic coating. The coating turns to be more compact and the adhesive strength between the coating and the magnesium substrate are strongly improved with the formation of Si−O−Si and Si

  10. Microstructure and electrochemical behavior of cerium conversion coating modified with silane agent on magnesium substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Li; Shi, Jing; Wang, Xin; Liu, Dan; Xu, Haigang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The unmodified coating shows averaged static water contact angles of a little more than 50º, which is clearly hydrophilic for water solutions. With the silane concentration increases, the water contact angles show an increase tendency. Especially, when the silane addition is increased to 25 ml L-1, the coating surface presents a hydrophobic feature, with static water contact angle of more than 110º. - Highlights: • BTESPT modification can effectively improve the uniformity, hydrophobic performance, chemical stability and corrosion inhibition capability of traditional cerium conversion coating. • Si-O-Si linkage builds a robust structure to increase of the coating density. Si−O−Mg bonds strengthen the adhesion between the coating/substrate. • The system modified with 25 ml L"−"1 BTESPT displays the optimum corrosion protection performance. - Abstract: The cerium conversion coating with and without different concentrations of silane agent bis-(γ-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulfide (BTESPT) modification is obtained on magnesium alloys. Detailed properties of the coatings and the role of BTESPT as an additive are studied and followed with careful discussion. The coating morphology, wettability, chemical composition and corrosion resistance are characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), water contact-angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical behavior of the coatings is investigated using EIS. The results indicate that the coating morphology and composition can be controlled by changing silane concentration. The combination of cerium ions and silane molecules could promote the formation of more homogenous and higher hydrophobic coating. The coating turns to be more compact and the adhesive strength between the coating and the magnesium substrate are strongly improved with the formation of Si−O−Si and Si−O−M chemical

  11. A Chromium-Free Coating System for DoD Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    brushing • The coating is translucent allowing direct inspection of both the film and substrate 60 • The coating is thermally stable to at least 250˚C for...for steel in concrete it is preferable to re-establish passivity. In sacrificial anode cathodic protection, a galvanic cell is set up by connecting

  12. Corrosion of AZ91D magnesium alloy with a chemical conversion coating and electroless nickel layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Hongwei; Li Ying; Wang Fuhui

    2004-01-01

    A chemical conversion treatment and an electroless nickel plating were applied to AZ91D alloy to improve its corrosion resistance. By conversion treatment in alkaline stannate solution, the corrosion resistance of the alloy was improved to some extent as verified by immersion test and potentiodynamic polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution at pH 7.0. X-ray diffraction patterns of the stannate treated AZ91D alloy showed the presence of MgSnO 3 · H 2 O, and SEM images indicated a porous structure, which provided advantage for the adsorption during sensitisation treatment prior to electroless nickel plating. A nickel coating with high phosphorus content was successfully deposited on the chemical conversion coating pre-applied to AZ91D alloy. The presence of the conversion coating between the nickel coating and the substrate reduced the potential difference between them and enhanced the corrosion resistance of the alloy. An obvious passivation occurred for the nickel coating during anodic polarization in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution

  13. Study of vanadium-based chemical conversion coating on the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.H.; Ger, M.D.; Hwu, W.H.; Sung, Y.; Liu, Y.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, magnesium alloy (AZ61) was immersed in vanadium containing bath with various conditions, such as the vanadium concentration, immersion time and bath temperature. The results indicate that increase of both vanadium concentration and immersion time produces a thicker conversion layer. However, when immersion time is too long, it will worsen the corrosion resistance due to the increasing of the crack density. The experimental parameter of bath temperature has no significant effect on corrosion resistance. Our results demonstrated that the better corrosion resistance coating can be obtained when the samples are submitted to an immersion in the conversion bath containing NaVO 3 with concentration of 30 g l -1 for 10 min at 80 deg. C. The presented conversion treatment has its potential to replace the chrome-based conversion coating treatment

  14. Conversion Coatings Produced on AZ61 Magnesium Alloy by Low-Voltage Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resultes of anodic oxide conversion coatings on wrought AZ61 magnesium alloy production are describe. The studies were conducted in a solution containing: KOH (80 g/l and KF (300 g/l using anodic current densities of 3, 5 and 10 A/dm2 and different process durations. The obtained coatings were examined under a microscope and corrosion tests were performed by electrochemical method. Based on these results, it was found that the low-voltage process produces coatings conferring improved corrosion resistance to the tested magnesium alloy.

  15. Corrosion of chromatic conversion coatings on Aluminium Alloys in electrical and electronic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.Sh.; Shahrabi, T.; Mozafarnia, R.

    2002-01-01

    Chromate conversion coating is applied on aluminum 6061. The optimum conditions for chromate bath composition and immersion time are also obtained for standard requirements provision such as corrosion resistance in salt spray test, electrical resistance and coating quality. The applied coatings are electrochemically tested in sea and distilled water. According to Tafel and cyclic polarization curves, the protection mechanism are evaluated in said environments. This evaluation has shown the formation of passive film layer, contains chromate and alumina on the base. The proper behavior of corrosion and electrical conductivity is probably due to this mechanism

  16. A Black Phosphate Conversion Coating on Steel Surface Using Antimony(III)-Tartrate as an Additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Guiping

    2016-05-01

    A novel black phosphate conversion coating was formed on steel surface through a Zn-Mn phosphating bath containing mainly ZnO, H3PO4, Mn(H2PO4)2, and Ca(NO3)2, where antimony(III)-tartrate was used as the blackening agent of phosphatization. The surface morphology and composition of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance of the coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pH value of the solution had significant influence on the formation and corrosion resistance of the coating. The experimental results indicated that the Sb plays a vital role in the blackening of phosphate conversion coating. The optimal concentration of antimony(III)-tartrate in the phosphating bath used in this experiment was 1.0 g L-1, as higher values reduced the corrosion resistance of the coating. In addition, by saponification and oil seals, the corrosion duration of the black phosphate coating in a copper sulfate spot test can be as long as 20 min.

  17. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce D; Legg, Keith O; Schell, Jerry; Bondaruk, Bob; Alford, Charles; Natishan, Paul; Lawrence, Steven; Shubert, Gary; Bretz, Philip; Kaltenhauser, Anne

    2005-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to qualify high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) and plasma thermal spray coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on gas turbine engine components...

  18. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings

  19. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings.

  20. Mono-carboxylate conversion coatings for AZ31 Mg alloy protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frignani, A.; Grassi, V.; Zucchi, F.; Zanotto, F. [Corrosion Study Centre A. Dacco, University of Ferrara (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Conversion coatings on a magnesium alloy were obtained by dipping AZ31 specimens in aqueous solutions of sodium salts of mono-carboxylic acids (stearic, palmitic, myristic, lauric, mono-carboxylate ion concentration from 1 to 5 mM, depending on the salt solubility) for 24 and 72 h at room temperature, or 24 h at 50 C. The influence exerted by the treatment time, bath temperature and alkyl chain length on the efficiency of these coatings was studied. The performances of the coatings were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization curve recording after 1 h immersion in 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution, while their temporal evolution was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) spectra during 24 h. Further and long lasting tests were carried out also in 0.1 M NaCl solution. The efficiency of the coatings depended on the aliphatic chain length, and increased as the treatment time and the bath temperature were increased. The coating of lower homologue only hindered the cathodic process, while those of the higher homologues markedly inhibited the anodic process too. The best performances were displayed by 24 h-50 C stearic conversion coating, which maintained a very high efficiency for over 800 h immersion in 0.05 M sulphate solution. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Effects of vacuum and ageing on Zr4/Cr3 based conversion coatings on aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirupathi, Kalaivanan; Bárczy, Pál; Vad, Kálmán; Csik, Attila; Somosvári, Béla Márton

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we investigate the impact of ageing and high vacuum on existing environmentally friendly Zr4/Cr3-based conversion coatings. The freshly formed coating undergoes several changes during ageing and exposure to high vacuum. Based on the present data, we propose that the coating formed over AA6082 and AA7075 alloys is sol-gel in nature, confirmed by secondary neutral mass spectroscopy (SNMS) using the depth profiling technique. Our findings reveal that there are elemental level changes that result in shrinkage of the coating. Most Zr ions in the coating are in the solute form, with lesser number of Cr and Al ions that disappear under high vacuum over a certain period of time. The remaining Cr, Zr and O atoms exist in a gelatinous state. During ageing, there is a continuous transition of ions from solute to gelatinous state. In addition, the deposition of coating ions is directly influenced by the substrates and their constituents. The extent of dissolution of aluminium in the conversion bath determines both Zr and Cr ion deposition. For a highly alloyed metal like AA7075, the dissolution rate is disturbed by copper and zinc.

  2. SiC Conversion Coating Prepared from Silica-Graphite Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Back-Sub Sung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The β-SiC conversion coatings were successfully synthesized by the SiO(v-graphite(s reaction between silica powder and graphite specimen. This paper is to describe the effects on the characteristics of the SiC conversion coatings, fabricated according to two different reaction conditions. FE-SEM, FE-TEM microstructural morphologies, XRD patterns, pore size distribution, and oxidation behavior of the SiC-coated graphite were investigated. In the XRD pattern and SAD pattern, the coating layers showed cubic SiC peak as well as hexagonal SiC peak. The SiC coatings showed somewhat different characteristics with the reaction conditions according to the position arrangement of the graphite samples. The SiC coating on graphite, prepared in reaction zone (2, shows higher intensity of beta-SiC main peak (111 in XRD pattern as well as rather lower porosity and smaller main pore size peak under 1 μm.

  3. Thick sputtered tantalum coatings for high-temperature energy conversion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmakh, Veronika, E-mail: stelmakh@mit.edu; Peykov, Daniel; Chan, Walker R.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan [Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Castillo, Robert; Coulter, Kent; Wei, Ronghua [Materials Engineering Department, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Thick sputtered tantalum (Ta) coatings on polished Inconel were investigated as a potential replacement for bulk refractory metal substrates used for high-temperature emitters and absorbers in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion applications. In these applications, high-temperature stability and high reflectance of the surface in the infrared wavelength range are critical in order to sustain operational temperatures and reduce losses due to waste heat. The reflectance of the coatings (8 and 30 μm) was characterized with a conformal protective hafnia layer as-deposited and after one hour anneals at 700, 900, and 1100 °C. To further understand the high-temperature performance of the coatings, the microstructural evolution was investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the texture and residual stress in the coatings at four reflections (220, 310, 222, and 321), as-deposited and after anneal. No significant changes in roughness, reflectance, or stress were observed. No delamination or cracking occurred, even after annealing the coatings at 1100 °C. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the thick Ta coatings are a promising alternative to bulk substrates and pave the way for a relatively low-cost and easily integrated platform for nanostructured devices in high-temperature energy conversion applications.

  4. Effect of HCl pre-treatment on corrosion resistance of cerium-based conversion coatings on magnesium and magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelli, Katya; Dabala, Manuele; Calliari, Irene; Magrini, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded by a cerium conversion coating, formed by immersion in a solution containing rare earth salt and hydrogen peroxide, on pure magnesium and two magnesium alloys, AZ91 and AM50, has been studied. The effect of HCl pre-treatments on the morphology and on the corrosion resistance of the cerium conversion layer was investigated. A thicker and more homogeneous distribution of the conversion coating was obtained when the sample surface was pre-treated with acid. Higher amounts of cerium on the surface of the pre-treated samples were detected. The cerium conversion coating increased the corrosion resistance of the alloys because it ennobled the corrosion potential and decreased both the anodic and cathodic current. The acid pre-treatment further increased the corrosion resistance of the coated alloys. After five days of immersion in chloride environment the untreated samples showed localized corrosion while the chemical conversion coated samples appeared unaffected

  5. Corrosion behavior of Al-Fe-sputtering-coated steel, high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics in high temperature Pb-Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khalid, Rivai; Minoru, Takahashi

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion tests of Al-Fe-coated steel, high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics were carried out in high temperature Pb-Bi at 700 C degrees. Oxygen concentrations in this experiment were 6.8*10 -7 wt.% for Al-Fe-coated steels and 5*10 -6 wt.% for high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics. All specimens were immersed in molten Pb-Bi in a corrosion test pot for 1.000 hours. Coating was done with using the unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) technique to protect the steel from corrosion. Sputtering targets were Al and SUS-304. Al-Fe alloy was coated on STBA26 samples. The Al-Fe alloy-coated layer could be a good protection layer on the surface of steel. The whole of the Al-Fe-coated layer still remained on the base surface of specimen. No penetration of Pb-Bi into this layer and the matrix of the specimen. For high chromium steels i.e. SUS430 and Recloy10, the oxide layer formed in the early time could not prevent the penetration of Pb-Bi into the base of the steels. Refractory metals of tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) had high corrosion resistance with no penetration of Pb-Bi into their matrix. Penetration of Pb-Bi into the matrix of niobium (Nb) was observed. Ceramic materials were SiC and Ti 3 SiC 2 . The ceramic materials of SiC and Ti 3 SiC 2 had high corrosion resistance with no penetration of Pb-Bi into their matrix. (authors)

  6. Proteomic Responses of BEAS-2B Cells to Nontoxic and Toxic Chromium: Protein Indicators of Cytotoxicity Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is an environmental human carcinogen which primarily targets lungs. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of biological pathways via translational and post-translational modifications represents a key mechanism through which Cr (VI) induces...

  7. The role of hexafluorozirconate in the formation of chromate conversion coatings on aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Clayton, Clive R.; Halada, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum based surfaces are routinely coated with a chromate based layer that provides unparalleled corrosion protection. Widely used conversion coating treatment formulations contain hexafluorozirconate as a major constituent besides chromate, ferricyanide, fluoride, and fluoborate. The function of hexafluorozirconate is the subject of this study as its function is still largely unknown. Hydrophobicity, surface morphology, and the chemistry of the surface, resulting from treatment with hexafluorozirconate, were studied using contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was extensively utilized to determine the chemistry of the surface resulting from the hexafluorozirconate pretreatment. Our results indicate that fluoride ion containing hexafluorozirconate complex does not attack the oxide film in a manner that uncomplexed simple fluoride ion does. Hexafluorozirconate is involved in the formation of an Al-Zr-O-F based hydrated layer that increases the hydrophilicity of the surface, activates the surface, and lowers the corrosion resistance. These factors enhance the interaction of chromate with the alloy surface to result in the formation of a uniform conversion coating. Based on these results, a new model has been proposed for the formation of chromate conversion coatings

  8. Sodium compatibility of aluminide and chromium nitride coatings on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler-Latge, P.; Ardellier, A.; Depierre, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The present study is a part of a more general research and development program which is presented in another session of this meeting. The main aim of this program was the selection of coatings or treatments able to improve the tribological behaviour of austenitic stainless steel intended to use as structural material for subassemblies and diagrid of a LMFBR in project. Among this environmental conditions imposed for that application, we can retain: in normal conditions of operation, a purified sodium flow at about 400 0 C with a certain number of accidental cold thermal shocks, during the 30 years period of life of the reactor, and also with some hot variations of the sodium temperature from 400 0 C to 550 0 C. Some coatings which had been preselected for that use having not yet been tested in compatibility with liquid sodium for a long period, it was necessary to proceed to corrosion resistance tests in sodium environment almost for the thinner of them, in order to see if they were able to bear the environment conditions required for the project. Consecutively of these tests, metallurgical examinations have been made on samples, firstly after a 4000 hours period of dwell in sodium flowing at 400 0 C, and secondly after an additional dwelling period in flowing sodium of 500 hours at 550 0 C. The main metallurgical observations relative to three coatings or treatments are related thereafter

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of lanthanum conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy and its corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Dalei; Jing Xiaoyan; Wang Jun; Lu Shanshan; Yang Piaoping; Wang Yanli; Zhang Milin

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → The method of microwave is used to synthesize lanthanum conversion coating. → Lanthanum conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy was studied. → Different conditions between room temperature and microwave were compared. → The corrosion behavior of lanthanum conversion coatings was studied. → The corrosion mechanism of lanthanum conversion coatings was studied. - Abstract: Lanthanum-based conversion coating on Mg-Li alloy has been prepared by a microwave-assisted method. X-ray diffractions (XRD) indicate that the intermetallic compounds of lanthanum are formed on Mg-Li alloy surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the coating has different morphologies and special structures. The corrosion resistance was assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The results indicate that this coating significantly reduces the corrosion rate of Mg-Li alloy in NaCl solution. A comparing experiment indicates that the coating prepared by microwave-assisted process has superior corrosion resistance to the coating obtained at room temperature.

  10. Fabrication of silica-coated gold nanorods and investigation of their property of photothermal conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inose, Tomoya; Oikawa, Takahiro; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Tokunaga, Masayuki; Hatoyama, Keiichiro; Nakashima, Kouichi; Kamei, Takashi; Gonda, Kohsuke; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    This study described the preparation of silica-coated Au nanorods (AuNR/SiO 2 ) in a colloidal solution, assessed their property of photothermal conversion, and investigated their ability to kill cancer cells using photothermal conversion. Au-seed nanoparticles were produced by reducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl 4 ) with sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) in aqueous n-hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) solution. AuNRs were then fabricated by reducing HAuCl 4 and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ) with L-ascorbic acid in the aqueous CTAB solution in the presence of Au-seed nanoparticles. The as-prepared AuNRs were washed by a process composed mainly of centrifugation to remove the CTAB. The washed AuNRs were coated with silica by mixing the AuNR colloidal solution, an aqueous solution of (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and tetraethylorthosilicate/ethanol solution with a water/ethanol solution. We found that the addition of AuNR/SiO 2 in water, in mice, and in a culture medium with cancer cells, followed by irradiation with a laser, cause an increase in temperature, demonstrating that AuNR/SiO 2 have the ability of photothermal conversion. In addition, the cancer cells in the culture medium were found to be killed due to the increase in temperature caused by the photothermal conversion. - Highlights: • This study described the preparation of silica-coated Au nanorods (AuNR/SiO 2 ) colloidal solution. • The AuNR/SiO 2 had the ability of photothermal conversion. • The AuNR/SiO 2 also had the ability to kill cancer cells using the photothermal conversion.

  11. Optimization of process factors for self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Liu, Junyao; Lei, Ting; Xiao, Tao

    2015-10-01

    A self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating was prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The optimum operating conditions including vanadia solution concentration, pH and treating temperature for obtaining the best corrosion protective vanadia coatings and improved localized corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate were determined by an orthogonal experiment design. Surface morphology and composition of the resultant conversion coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The self-healing behavior of the coating was investigated by cross-cut immersion test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  12. Mitigation of chromium poisoning of cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells employing CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating on metallic interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruofan; Sun, Zhihao; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Basu, Soumendra N.

    2018-02-01

    Chromium poisoning is one of the major reasons for cathode performance degradation in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). To mitigate the effect of Cr-poisoning, a protective coating on the surface of interconnect for suppressing Cr vaporization is necessary. Among the various coating materials, Cu-Mn spinel coating is considered to be a potential candidate due to their good thermal compatibility, high stability and good electronic conductivity at high temperature. In this study, Crofer 22 H meshes with no protective coating, those with commercial CuMn2O4 spinel coating and the ones with lab-developed CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating were investigated. The lab-developed CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating were deposited on Crofer 22 H mesh by electrophoretic deposition and densified by a reduction and re-oxidation process. With these different Crofer 22 H meshes (bare, CuMn2O4-coated, and CuMn1.8O4-coated), anode-supported SOFCs with Sr-doped LaMnO3-based cathode were electrochemically tested at 800 °C for total durations of up to 288 h. Comparing the mitigating effects of the two types of Cu-Mn spinel coatings on Cr-poisoning, it was found that the performance of the denser lab-developed CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating was distinctly better, showing no degradation in the cell electrochemical performance and significantly less Cr deposition near the cathode/electrolyte interface after the test.

  13. On the growth of conversion chromate coatings on 2024-Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinich, S.A.; Akhtar, A.S.; Susac, D.; Wong, P.C.; Wong, K.C.; Mitchell, K.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    The initial growth of chromate conversion coatings on aluminium 2024-T3 alloy has been investigated by scanning Auger microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The coating initiation is shown to be influenced by the alloy microstructure. In agreement with previously proposed growth models, Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reduction begins on the Al-Cu-Fe-Mn intermetallic second-phase particles, which act as cathodic sites, and then over the entire Al matrix surface. The less noble Al-Cu-Mg second-phase particles demonstrate dual behaviour during the initial stage of coating; some dealloy, with formation of a Cu-rich sponge-like structure, while others show no evidence for etching during the first few seconds and coating deposits on them similar to the situation for the Al-Cu-Fe-Mn particles. XPS measurements show more Cr(III) at the very initial stage of nucleation and growth, whereas the amount of Cr(VI) in the coating increases with the length of the chromating treatment. This is discussed in relation to Raman spectroscopy measurements made in a separate study

  14. Effects of chromium addition on microstructure and properties of TiC–VC reinforced Fe-based laser cladding coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zou, Yong; Zou, Zengda; Shi, Chuanwei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • In situ TiC–VC reinforced Fe-based coatings with different Cr addition were obtained. • Some long strip Cr 3 C 2 synthesized while the Cr addition was 12.0% or more. • A moderate amount of Cr improved hardness and corrosion resistance significantly. • The cladding layer microhardness could reach as high as 1090HV 0.2 with 3.0% Cr. • The corrosion resistance could improve 4.5 times with 12.0% Cr. - Abstract: Effects of different addition of Cr on microstructure and properties (especially the corrosion resistance) of cladding layers were investigated by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that Fe–Ti–V–C alloy powders with different addition of Cr formed good cladding layers without defects such as cracking and porosity. Phases of the cladding layers were α-Fe, γ-Fe, TiC, VC and TiVC 2 . A certain amount of long strip Cr 3 C 2 synthesized while the addition of Cr was 12.0% or more. Microhardness and corrosion resistance of cladding layer both improved greatly with a moderate amount of Cr. The cladding layer with 3.0% Cr showed a highest microhardness 1090HV 0.2 , and the variation tendency of the hardness is not a linearly relationship with increasing the chromium addition. The cladding layer with 12.0% Cr addition showed the best corrosion resistance, which was about 4.5 times than that of the cladding layer without Cr. EIS spectrum of the cladding layer without Cr was composed of an inductive arc at low frequency and a capacitive arc at high frequency. However, the inductive arc at low frequency transformed into a capacitive arc gradually with the addition of Cr increasing

  15. Effects of chromium addition on microstructure and properties of TiC–VC reinforced Fe-based laser cladding coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui; Zou, Yong, E-mail: yzou@sdu.edu.cn; Zou, Zengda; Shi, Chuanwei

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • In situ TiC–VC reinforced Fe-based coatings with different Cr addition were obtained. • Some long strip Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} synthesized while the Cr addition was 12.0% or more. • A moderate amount of Cr improved hardness and corrosion resistance significantly. • The cladding layer microhardness could reach as high as 1090HV{sub 0.2} with 3.0% Cr. • The corrosion resistance could improve 4.5 times with 12.0% Cr. - Abstract: Effects of different addition of Cr on microstructure and properties (especially the corrosion resistance) of cladding layers were investigated by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that Fe–Ti–V–C alloy powders with different addition of Cr formed good cladding layers without defects such as cracking and porosity. Phases of the cladding layers were α-Fe, γ-Fe, TiC, VC and TiVC{sub 2}. A certain amount of long strip Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} synthesized while the addition of Cr was 12.0% or more. Microhardness and corrosion resistance of cladding layer both improved greatly with a moderate amount of Cr. The cladding layer with 3.0% Cr showed a highest microhardness 1090HV{sub 0.2}, and the variation tendency of the hardness is not a linearly relationship with increasing the chromium addition. The cladding layer with 12.0% Cr addition showed the best corrosion resistance, which was about 4.5 times than that of the cladding layer without Cr. EIS spectrum of the cladding layer without Cr was composed of an inductive arc at low frequency and a capacitive arc at high frequency. However, the inductive arc at low frequency transformed into a capacitive arc gradually with the addition of Cr increasing.

  16. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) is responsible for non-quantitative H2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer–Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems.

  17. Influence of phytic acid concentration on performance of phytic acid conversion coatings on the AZ91D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiufang; Li Ying; Li Qingfen; Jin Guo; Ding Minghui; Wang Fuhui

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the phytic acid conversion coating, a new environmentally friendly chemical protective coating for magnesium alloys, was prepared. The influences of phytic acid concentration on the formation process, microstructure, chemical state and corrosion resistance of the conversion coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy were investigated by means of weight gain measurement, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. And the depth profile of all elements in the optimal conversion coatings was analyzed by auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that the growth, microstructure, chemical state and corrosion resistance of the conversion coatings are all obviously affected by the phytic acid concentration. The concentration of 5 g l -1 corresponds to the maximum weight gain. The main elements of the coating are Mg, Al, O, P, and C, which are distributed gradually in depth. The functional groups of conversion coatings formed in higher concentration phytic acid solution are closer to the constituent of phytic acid than those formed in lower concentration phytic acid solution. The coatings formed in 1-5 g l -1 are integrated and uniform. However, those formed in 20-50 g l -1 have some micro-cracks on the α phase. The coating formed in 5 g l -1 has the best corrosion resistance, whose open circuit current density decreases about six orders than that of the untreated sample, although the coatings deposited in 1-20 g l -1 can all improve the corrosion resistance of AZ91D

  18. Simple down conversion nano-crystal coatings for enhancing Silicon-solar cells efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Mittelman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing self-assembled nano-structured coatings on top of existing solar cells has thepotential to increase the total quantum efficiency of the cell using a simple and cheap process. In ourwork we have exploited the controlled absorption of nano-crystal with different band gaps to realizedown conversion artificial antennas that self-assembled on the device surface. The UV sun light isconverted to the visible light enhancing the solar cell performance in two complementary routes; a.protecting the solar cell and coatings from the UV illumination and therefore reducing the UVradiation damage. b. enhancing the total external quantum efficiency of the cell by one percent. Thisis achieved using a simple cheap process that can be adjusted to many different solar cells.

  19. Preparation and properties of chrome-free colored Ti/Zr based conversion coating on aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Aihua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li Wenfang, E-mail: mewfl@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Du Jun; Mu Songlin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-06-01

    A golden conversion coating on the surface of aluminum alloy was prepared by adding tannic acid and coating-forming accelerator in the treatment solution containing titanium and zirconium ions. The growth process, main component and corrosion resistance of the conversion coating were characterized by EDS, SEM, XRD, XPS, FIIR and electrochemical workstation. The results showed that the main components of the conversion coating were Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} and the conversion coating owns a double-layer structure. The outer layer consists of metal-organic complex and the inner layer is mainly made up of Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6}. The mechanism of the formation of the golden conversion coating can be deemed as nucleation, growth of Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} crystal and formation of metal-organic complex. In potentiodynamic polarization test, the corrosion current density decreases to 0.283 {mu}A cm{sup -2} from 5.894 {mu}A cm{sup -2}, which indicates an obvious improvement of corrosion resistance.

  20. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  1. Establishment of Wear Resistant HVOF Coatings for 50CrMo4 Chromium Molybdenum Alloy Steel as an Alternative for Hard Chrome Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppasamy, S.; Sivan, V.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Duraiselvam, M.; Dhanuskodi, R.

    2018-05-01

    High cost imported components of seamless steel tube manufacturing plants wear frequently and need replacement to ensure the quality of the product. Hard chrome plating, which is time consuming and hazardous, is conventionally used to restore the original dimension of the worn-out surface of the machine components. High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with NiCrBSi super alloy powder and Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 alloy powder applied on a 50CrMo4 (DIN-1.7228) chromium molybdenum alloy steel, the material of the wear prone machine component, were evaluated for use as an alternative for hard chrome plating in this present work. The coating characteristics are evaluated using abrasive wear test, sliding wear test and microscopic analysis, hardness test, etc. The study results revealed that the HVOF based NiCrBSi and Cr3C2NiCr75/25 coatings have hardness in the range of 800-900 HV0.3, sliding wear rate in the range of 50-60 µm and surface finish around 5 microns. Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 coating is observed to be a better option out of the two coatings evaluated for the selected application.

  2. Zr-based conversion layer on Zn-Al-Mg alloy coated steel sheets: insights into the formation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lostak, Thomas; Maljusch, Artjom; Klink, Björn; Krebs, Stefan; Kimpel, Matthias; Flock, Jörg; Schulz, Stephan; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Zr-based conversion layers are considered as environmentally friendly alternatives replacing trication phosphatation in the automotive industry. Based on excellent electronic barrier properties they provide an effective corrosion protection of the metallic substrate. In this work, thin protective layers were grown on novel Zn-Al-Mg alloy coated steel sheets by increasing the local pH-value at the sample surface leading to deposition of a Zr-based conversion layer. For this purpose Zn-Al-Mg alloy (ZM) coated steel sheets were treated in an aqueous model conversion solution containing well-defined amounts of hexafluorozirconic acid (H 2 ZrF 6 ) and characterized after different immersion times with SKPFM and field emission SEM (FE-SEM)/EDX techniques. A deposition mechanism of Zr-based conversion coatings on microstructural heterogeneous Zn-Al-Mg alloy surfaces was proposed

  3. The preparation and corrosion behaviors of MAO coating on AZ91D with rare earth conversion precursor film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jingshun; Cao Fahe; Chang Linrong; Zheng Junjun; Zhang Jianqing; Cao Chunan

    2011-01-01

    A novel kind of micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coating was prepared on magnesium alloy surface coated with rare earth conversion film (RE-film) in an alkaline aluminum oxidation electrolyte by AC power source. Inspection of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, the structure and composition of MAO coating formed on AZ91D with RE-film under different applied voltages were investigated and the performance of the optimized MAO coating compared with the MAO coating directly formed on magnesium alloy. As the pretreatment of magnesium alloy with RE-film, the cerium oxides can be incorporated into the MAO coatings, reduce porosity of the MAO coating surface and enhance the thickness of MAO coating. These structure features and the cerium oxides incorporated into the MAO coating result in greatly improved corrosion resistance. Base on electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement, the electronic structure and composition analysis of the MAO coating, a double-layer structure, with a compact inner layer and a porous outer layer, of the coating was proposed for understanding its corrosion process.

  4. The preparation and corrosion behaviors of MAO coating on AZ91D with rare earth conversion precursor film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Jingshun [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road 38, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Cao Fahe, E-mail: nelson_cao@zju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road 38, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Chang Linrong; Zheng Junjun [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road 38, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zhang Jianqing; Cao Chunan [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Zheda Road 38, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A novel kind of micro-arc oxidation (MAO) coating was prepared on magnesium alloy surface coated with rare earth conversion film (RE-film) in an alkaline aluminum oxidation electrolyte by AC power source. Inspection of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, the structure and composition of MAO coating formed on AZ91D with RE-film under different applied voltages were investigated and the performance of the optimized MAO coating compared with the MAO coating directly formed on magnesium alloy. As the pretreatment of magnesium alloy with RE-film, the cerium oxides can be incorporated into the MAO coatings, reduce porosity of the MAO coating surface and enhance the thickness of MAO coating. These structure features and the cerium oxides incorporated into the MAO coating result in greatly improved corrosion resistance. Base on electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement, the electronic structure and composition analysis of the MAO coating, a double-layer structure, with a compact inner layer and a porous outer layer, of the coating was proposed for understanding its corrosion process.

  5. Titanium composite conversion coating formation on CRS In the presence of Mo and Ni ions: Electrochemical and microstructure characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eivaz Mohammadloo, H.; Sarabi, A.A., E-mail: Sarabi@aut.ac.ir

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Eco-friendly protective thin films for covering the CRS substrates were presented. • Comprehensive analyses were performed to evaluate the surface characteristics. • Promising approach for the surface modification of CRS substrate by Ti-based conversion coatings. - Abstract: There have been an increasing interest in finding a replacement for the chromating process due to environmental and health concerns. Hence, in this study Chrome-free chemical conversion coatings were deposited on the surface of cold-rolled steel (CRS) on the basis of Titanium (TiCC), Titanium-Nickel (TiNiCC) and titanium-molybdate (TiMoCC) based conversion coating solutions. The surface characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measuring device. Also, the corrosion behavior was assessed by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. FESEM and AFM study show that the TiNiCC is denser and more uniform than that TiCC and TiMoCC since, TiMoCC conversion coating presents network feature, and there were abundant micro-cracks on the surface of the coating. XPS results confirmed the precipitation of Ti and Ni oxide/hydroxide, Mn dioxide/trioxide on the surface of different Ti-based conversion coatings. Electrochemical results revealed that all Ti-based conversion coatings have better anti-corrosion properties than bare CRS. Moreover, TiNiCC treatment inhibited the corrosion of CRS to a significant degree (polarization resistance (R{sub p}) = 5510 Ω cm{sup 2}) in comparison with TiCC (R{sub p} = 2705 Ω cm{sup 2}) and TiMoCC (R{sub p} = 805 Ω cm{sup 2}).

  6. Assessment of Some Advanced Protective Schemes, Including Chromate and Non-Chromate Conversion Coatings for Mg Alloy ZE41A-T5 Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chang, Frank

    1994-01-01

    .... Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray tests have been employed to compare the corrosion behavior in chloride containing solutions of Mg alloy ZE41A-T5 which has been coated with various combinations of a conversion coating...

  7. Exclusive Hydrogen Generation by Electrocatalysts Coated with an Amorphous Chromium-Based Layer Achieving Efficient Overall Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Muhammad

    2017-08-08

    Successful conversion of renewable energy to useful chemicals requires efficient devices that can electrocatalyze or photocatalyze redox reactions, e.g., overall water splitting. Excellent electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), such as Pt, can also cause other side-reactions, including the water-forming back-reaction from H2 and O2 products. A Cr-based amorphous layer coated on catalysts can work as a successful surface modifier that avoids the back-reaction, but its capabilities and limitations toward other species have not been studied. Herein, we investigated the Cr-based layer on Pt from perspectives of both electrocatalysis and photocatalysis using redox-active molecules/ions (O2, ferricyanide, IO3–, S2O82–, H2O2, and CO gas). Our systematic study revealed that utilization of the Cr-based layer realized an exclusive cathodic reaction only to HER, even in the presence of the aforementioned reactive species, suggesting that Cr-based layers work as membranes, as well as corrosion and poison inhibition layers. However, the Cr-based layer experienced self-oxidation and dissolved into the aqueous phase when a strong oxidizing agent or low pH was present. Presented herein are fundamental and critical aspects of the Cr-based modifier, which is essential for the successful and practical development of solar fuel production systems.

  8. Exclusive Hydrogen Generation by Electrocatalysts Coated with an Amorphous Chromium-Based Layer Achieving Efficient Overall Water Splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Muhammad; Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Tsiapis, Nikolaos; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Successful conversion of renewable energy to useful chemicals requires efficient devices that can electrocatalyze or photocatalyze redox reactions, e.g., overall water splitting. Excellent electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), such as Pt, can also cause other side-reactions, including the water-forming back-reaction from H2 and O2 products. A Cr-based amorphous layer coated on catalysts can work as a successful surface modifier that avoids the back-reaction, but its capabilities and limitations toward other species have not been studied. Herein, we investigated the Cr-based layer on Pt from perspectives of both electrocatalysis and photocatalysis using redox-active molecules/ions (O2, ferricyanide, IO3–, S2O82–, H2O2, and CO gas). Our systematic study revealed that utilization of the Cr-based layer realized an exclusive cathodic reaction only to HER, even in the presence of the aforementioned reactive species, suggesting that Cr-based layers work as membranes, as well as corrosion and poison inhibition layers. However, the Cr-based layer experienced self-oxidation and dissolved into the aqueous phase when a strong oxidizing agent or low pH was present. Presented herein are fundamental and critical aspects of the Cr-based modifier, which is essential for the successful and practical development of solar fuel production systems.

  9. Optimization of process factors for self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kun; Liu, Junyao [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lei, Ting, E-mail: tlei@mail.csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Xiao, Tao [2nd Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410011 (China)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • The optimum operating conditions were determined by an orthogonal experiment. • The coating is composed of oxides and hydroxides of V{sup 5+}, V{sup 4+} and Mg(OH){sub 2}. • The self-healing performance was investigated by cross-cut immersion test. • The vanadia conversion coating provided active corrosion protection to AZ31 alloy. - Abstract: A self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating was prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The optimum operating conditions including vanadia solution concentration, pH and treating temperature for obtaining the best corrosion protective vanadia coatings and improved localized corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate were determined by an orthogonal experiment design. Surface morphology and composition of the resultant conversion coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The self-healing behavior of the coating was investigated by cross-cut immersion test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  10. Optimization of process factors for self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Kun; Liu, Junyao; Lei, Ting; Xiao, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The optimum operating conditions were determined by an orthogonal experiment. • The coating is composed of oxides and hydroxides of V"5"+, V"4"+ and Mg(OH)_2. • The self-healing performance was investigated by cross-cut immersion test. • The vanadia conversion coating provided active corrosion protection to AZ31 alloy. - Abstract: A self-healing vanadium-based conversion coating was prepared on AZ31 magnesium alloy. The optimum operating conditions including vanadia solution concentration, pH and treating temperature for obtaining the best corrosion protective vanadia coatings and improved localized corrosion resistance to the magnesium substrate were determined by an orthogonal experiment design. Surface morphology and composition of the resultant conversion coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The self-healing behavior of the coating was investigated by cross-cut immersion test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  11. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Roguin, Ariel; Schroeder, Erwin; Philipp, Sebastian; Heitzer, Thomas; Schwacke, Harald; Ayzenberg, Oded; Serra, Antonio; Delarche, Nicolas; Luchner, Andreas; Slagboom, Ton

    2014-01-01

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  12. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbel, Raimund, E-mail: erbel@uk-essen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eggebrecht, Holger [Cardioangiological Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Roguin, Ariel [Department of Cardiology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Schroeder, Erwin [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Philipp, Sebastian [Department Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Elbe Klinikum Stade, Stade (Germany); Heitzer, Thomas [Department of Cardiology, Heart Center Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Schwacke, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonissen-Stiftungs- Krankenhaus Speyer (Germany); Ayzenberg, Oded [The Heart Institute, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Serra, Antonio [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España (Spain); Delarche, Nicolas [Cardiology unit, Pau General Hospital, Pau (France); Luchner, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Slagboom, Ton [Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  13. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics; Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this testing is to determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. This project will evaluate the ability of coated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals. Testing will assess performance of the trivalent chromium coatings against the known control hexavalent chromium MIL-DTL-5541 Type I Class 3 before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings.

  14. Adhesion and differentiation of Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells on chromium-doped diamond-like carbon coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filová, Elena; Vandrovcová, Marta; Jelínek, Miroslav; Zemek, Josef; Houdková, Jana; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Staňková, Ľubica; Bačáková, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 17. ISSN 0957-4530 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05864S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04790S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : osteocalcin * osteogenic differentiation * hexavalent chromium * focal adhesion contact * cell spreading area Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Biomaterials (as related to medical implants, devices, sensors) Impact factor: 2.325, year: 2016

  15. Characterization of the corrosion protection mechanism of cerium-based conversion coatings on high strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinc, William Ross

    The aim of the work presented in this dissertation is to investigate the corrosion protection mechanism of cerium-based conversion coatings (CeCCs) used in the corrosion protection of high strength aluminum alloys. The corrosion resistance of CeCCs involves two general mechanisms; barrier and active. The barrier protection mechanism was influenced by processing parameters, specifically surface preparation, post-treatment, and the use of gelatin. Post-treatment and the addition of gelatin to the coating solution resulted in fewer cracks and transformation of the coating to CePO4, which increased the corrosion resistance by improving the barrier aspect of CeCCs. CeCCs were found to best act as barriers when crack size was limited and CePO4 was present in the coating. CeCCs were found to protect areas of the substrate that were exposed in the coating, indicating that the coatings were more than simple barriers. CeCCs contained large cracks, underneath which subsurface crevices were connected to the surface by the cracks. Despite the observation that no cerium was present in crevices, coatings with crevices exhibited significant corrosion protection. The impedance of post-treated coatings with crevices increased during salt spray exposure. The increase in impedance was associated with the formation of protective oxides / hydroxides; however, crevice-free coatings also exhibited active protection leading to the conclusion that the formation of interfacial layers between the CeCC and the substrate also contributed to the active protection. Based on the overall results of the study, the optimal corrosion protection of CeCCs occurred when processing conditions produced coatings with morphologies and compositions that facilitated both the barrier and active protection mechanisms.

  16. Self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating modified with aspartic acid for 6N01 Al alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Caixia; Luo, Xiaohu; Pan, Xinyu; Liao, Liying; Wu, Xiaosong; Liu, Yali, E-mail: yaliliu@hnu.edu.cn

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • A self-healing chrome-free Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating modified with Aspartic acid was prepared. • One-step conversion coating formed by simple immersion in a conversion solution for a short time and a low temperature. • The conversion coating had excellent corrosion resistance. • The possible mechanism via exchange/self-assembly of the conversion coating was proposed in this paper. - Abstract: A self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating (LCC) modified with aspartic acid (ALCC) was prepared on 6N01 Al alloy for corrosion protection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that a compact thin film has been successfully formed on the alloy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra proved that species of aspartic acid anions were successfully intercalated into LCC. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and neutral salt spray (NSS) testing showed that the resultant ALCC could provide effective corrosion protection for the Al alloy. During immersion of the ALCC-coated alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution, new film was formed in the area of artificially introduced scratch, indicating its self-healing capability. XPS results demonstrated that Cl- anions exchange partial Asp anions according to the change content of element on conversion coating. From the above results, the possible mechanism via exchange/self-assembly was proposed to illustrate the phenomenon of self-healing.

  17. Self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating modified with aspartic acid for 6N01 Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Caixia; Luo, Xiaohu; Pan, Xinyu; Liao, Liying; Wu, Xiaosong; Liu, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A self-healing chrome-free Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating modified with Aspartic acid was prepared. • One-step conversion coating formed by simple immersion in a conversion solution for a short time and a low temperature. • The conversion coating had excellent corrosion resistance. • The possible mechanism via exchange/self-assembly of the conversion coating was proposed in this paper. - Abstract: A self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating (LCC) modified with aspartic acid (ALCC) was prepared on 6N01 Al alloy for corrosion protection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that a compact thin film has been successfully formed on the alloy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra proved that species of aspartic acid anions were successfully intercalated into LCC. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and neutral salt spray (NSS) testing showed that the resultant ALCC could provide effective corrosion protection for the Al alloy. During immersion of the ALCC-coated alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution, new film was formed in the area of artificially introduced scratch, indicating its self-healing capability. XPS results demonstrated that Cl- anions exchange partial Asp anions according to the change content of element on conversion coating. From the above results, the possible mechanism via exchange/self-assembly was proposed to illustrate the phenomenon of self-healing.

  18. Development of analytical procedures for the determination of hexavalent chromium in corrosion prevention coatings used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Castetbon, A; Ortega, R; Guimon, C; Niveau, F; Barrois-Oudin, N; Garraud, H; Donard, O F X

    2008-05-01

    The European directive 2000/53/EC limits the use of Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. Although a maximum of 2 g of Cr(VI) was authorised per vehicle for corrosion prevention coatings of key components, since July 2007 its use has been prohibited except for some particular applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to develop direct analytical procedures for Cr(VI) determination in the different steel coatings used for screws. Instead of working directly with screws, the optimisation of the procedures was carried out with metallic plates homogeneously coated to improve the data comparability. Extraction of Cr(VI) from the metallic parts was performed by sonication. Two extraction solutions were tested: a direct water extraction solution used in standard protocols and an ammonium/ammonia buffer solution at pH 8.9. The extracts were further analysed for Cr speciation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry or HPLC ICP mass spectrometry depending on the concentration level. When possible, the coatings were also directly analysed by solid speciation techniques (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure, XANES) for validation of the results. Very good results between the different analytical approaches were obtained for the sample of coating made up of a heated paint containing Zn, Al and Cr when using the extracting buffer solution at pH 8.9. After a repeated four-step extraction procedure on the same portion test, taking into account the depth of the surface layer reached, good agreement with XPS and XANES results was obtained. In contrast, for the coatings composed of an alkaline Zn layer where Cr(VI) and Cr(III) are deposited, only the extraction procedure using water allowed the detection of Cr(VI). To elucidate the Cr(VI) reduction during extraction at pH 8.9, the reactivity of Cr(VI) towards different species of Zn generally present in the

  19. Mechanical failure of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy implants. An animal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimb, L; Gotfredsen, K; Steen Jensen, J

    1993-01-01

    Defects in the hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic coatings applied to metallic implant systems may occur at the time of insertion or at the time of in vivo loading. However, defects may also occur with time because of interaction with physiological fluids. A canine study was performed to make a histolog......Defects in the hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic coatings applied to metallic implant systems may occur at the time of insertion or at the time of in vivo loading. However, defects may also occur with time because of interaction with physiological fluids. A canine study was performed to make...

  20. Chemical and structural analyses of subsurface crevices formed during spontaneous deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Daimon K, E-mail: dkheller@mmm.com; Fahrenholtz, William G., E-mail: billf@mst.edu; O' Keefe, Matthew J., E-mail: mjokeefe@mst.edu

    2011-11-15

    Subsurface crevices formed during the deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings were analyzed in cross-section to assess the effect of deposition and post-treatment on the structure and chemistry of phases present. An Al-O containing phase, believed to be amorphous Al(OH){sub 3}, was formed in crevices during coating deposition. Analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of up to 1.6 at.% chlorine within the Al-O phase, which was likely a product of soluble chlorides that were present in the coating solution. Cerium was not detected within crevices. After post-treatment in an 85 deg. C aqueous phosphate solution, the chloride concentration was reduced to {<=} 0.30 at.% and electron diffraction of the Al-O phase produced ring patterns, indicating it had crystallized. Some diffraction patterns could be indexed to gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), but others are believed to be a combination of hydrated aluminum hydroxides and/or oxides. Aluminum phosphate was not identified. Separately from its effect on cerium-based conversion coatings, phosphate post-treatment improved the corrosion resistance of Al 2024-T3 substrates by acting to crystallize Al(OH){sub 3} present on interior surfaces of crevices and by reducing the chloride concentration in this phase. - Highlights: {yields} Analysis of subsurface crevices formed during deposition of Ce-based conversion coatings. {yields} Phosphate post-treatment improved corrosion protection in salt spray testing. {yields} Post-treatment affected the composition and structure of regions within crevices. {yields} Crystallized Al(OH){sub 3} within crevices acted as a more effective barrier to chloride ions.

  1. Cerium oxide as conversion coating for the corrosion protection of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA GULICOVSKI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CeO2 coatings were formed on the aluminum after Al surface preparation, by dripping the ceria sol, previously prepared by forced hydrolysis of Ce(NO34. The anticorrosive properties of ceria coatings were investigated by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS during the exposure to 0.03 % NaCl. The morphology of the coatings was examined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM. EIS data indicated considerably larger corrosion resistance of CeO2-coated aluminum than for bare Al. The corrosion processes on Al below CeO2 coating are subjected to more pronounced diffusion limitations in comparison to the processes below passive aluminum oxide film, as the consequence of the formation of highly compact protective coating. The results show that the deposition of ceria coatings is an effective way to improve corrosion resistance for aluminum.

  2. Corrosion resistance of sodium sulfate coated cobalt-chromium-aluminum alloys at 900 C, 1000 C, and 1100 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    The corrosion of sodium sulfate coated cobalt alloys was measured and the results compared to the cyclic oxidation of alloys with the same composition, and to the hot corrosion of compositionally equivalent nickel-base alloys. Cobalt alloys with sufficient aluminum content to form aluminum containing scales corrode less than their nickel-base counterparts. The cobalt alloys with lower aluminum levels form CoO scales and corrode more than their nickel-base counterparts which form NiO scales.

  3. A new strategy for improvement of the corrosion resistance of a green cerium conversion coating through thermal treatment procedure before and after application of epoxy coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahidashti, Z. [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahrabi, T., E-mail: tshahrabi34@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), P.O. 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • The Ce conversion coating was post-heated at various conditions. • The corrosion resistance of post-heated Ce films was evaluated. • A crack free and denser Ce film were obtained after post-heating. • The corrosion resistance of Ce film noticeably increased. • Post-heated Ce film resulted better protection performance of epoxy coating. - Abstract: The effect of post-heating of CeCC on its surface morphology and chemistry has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The corrosion protection performance of the coatings was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of thermal treatment of CeCC on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating was investigated by EIS. Results showed that the heat treatment of Ce film noticeably improved its corrosion resistance and adhesion properties compared to that of untreated samples. The CeCC deposited on the steel substrate at room temperature had a highly cracked structure, while the amount of micro-cracks significantly reduced after post-heating procedure. Results obtained from EIS analysis confirmed the effect of post-heating of CeCC on its corrosion protection performance enhancement. The increase of post-heating temperature and time up to 140 °C and 3 h led to better results.

  4. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.; Vallejo, G.; Horton, E.S.; Cotter, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than at baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss

  5. Roll-coating fabrication of flexible large area small molecule solar cells with power conversion efficiency exceeding 1%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenqing; Liu, Shiyong; Zawacka, Natalia Klaudia

    2014-01-01

    All solution-processed flexible large area small molecule bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated via roll-coating technology. Our devices were produced from slot-die coating on a lab-scale mini roll-coater under ambient conditions without the use of spin-coating or vacuum evaporation.......01%, combined with an open circuit voltage of 0.73 V, a short-circuit current density of 3.13 mA cm (2) and a fill factor of 44% were obtained for the device with SM1, which was the first example reported for efficient roll-coating fabrication of flexible large area small molecule solar cells with PCE exceeding...... methods. Four diketopyrrolopyrrole based small molecules (SMs 1-4) were utilized as electron donors with (6,6)phenyl- C61-butyric acid methyl ester as an acceptor and their photovoltaic performances based on roll-coated devices were investigated. The best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1...

  6. Effects of acid and alkaline based surface preparations on spray deposited cerium based conversion coatings on Al 2024-T3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinc, W. [Department of Materials Science Engineering, Materials Research Center, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)], E-mail: wrphw5@mst.edu; Geng, S.; O' Keefe, M.; Fahrenholtz, W.; O' Keefe, T. [Department of Materials Science Engineering, Materials Research Center, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Cerium based conversion coatings were spray deposited on Al 2024-T3 and characterized to determine the effect of surface preparation on the deposition rate and surface morphology. It was found that activation of the panel using a 1-wt.% sulfuric acid solution increased the coating deposition rate compared to alkaline cleaning alone. Analysis of the surface morphology of the coatings showed that the coatings deposited on the acid treated panels exhibited fewer visible cracks compared to coatings on alkaline cleaned panels. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling showed that the acid activation decreased the thickness of the aluminum oxide layer and the concentration of magnesium on the surface of the panels compared to the alkaline treatment. Additionally, acid activation increased the copper concentration at the surface of the aluminum substrate. Based on the results, the acid based surface treatment appeared to expose copper rich intermetallics, thus increasing the number of cathodic sites on the surface, which led to an overall increase in the deposition rate.

  7. Mg substituted apatite coating from alkali conversion of acidic calcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro da Rocha, Daniel, E-mail: dnr.navarro@gmail.com [Military Institute of Engineering-IME, Pça. Gen. Tiburcio, 80, P. Vermelha, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, R.J. (Brazil); Cruz, Leila Rosa de Oliveira [Military Institute of Engineering-IME, Pça. Gen. Tiburcio, 80, P. Vermelha, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, R.J. (Brazil); Campos, José Brant de [Rio de Janeiro State University - UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, R.J. (Brazil); Marçal, Rubens L. Santana Blazutti [Military Institute of Engineering-IME, Pça. Gen. Tiburcio, 80, P. Vermelha, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, R.J. (Brazil); Mijares, Dindo Q.; Coelho, Paulo G. [Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry (NYU), New York, NY (United States); Prado da Silva, Marcelo H. [Military Institute of Engineering-IME, Pça. Gen. Tiburcio, 80, P. Vermelha, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, R.J. (Brazil)

    2017-01-01

    In this work, two solutions were developed: the first, rich in Ca{sup 2+}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions and the second, rich in Ca{sup 2+}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and Mg{sup 2+}, defined as Mg-modified precursor solution. For each Mg-modified precursor solution, the concentrations of Mg{sup 2+} ions were progressively increased by 5%, 10% and 15%wt. The aims of this research were to investigate the influence of magnesium ions substitution in calcium phosphate coatings on titanium surface and to evaluate these coatings by bioactivity assay in McCoy culture medium. The obtained coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, and the presence of Mg ions was confirmed by the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP) analysis. In vitro bioactivity assay in McCoy culture medium showed bioactivity after 14 days in incubation for the HA and 10% Mg-monetite coatings. The high chemical stability of Mg-HA coatings was verified by the bioactivity assays, and no bone-like apatite deposition, characteristic of bioactivity, was observed for Mg-HA coatings, for the time period used in this study. - Highlights: • The presence of Mg ions influenced the final apatite phase present in the produced coatings. • A lower efficiency in heterogeneous deposition and an exposure of Ti substrate in 5% Mg-monetite coatings was soon verified. • McCoy culture medium was effective in predicting the coatings bioactivity.

  8. The effect of post-treatment time and temperature on cerium-based conversion coatings on Al 2024-T3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Daimon K [Missouri University of Science and Technology, 101 Straumanis Hall, 401 West 16th Street, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)], E-mail: dkhvwb@mst.edu; Fahrenholtz, William G. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, 101 Straumanis Hall, 401 West 16th Street, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)], E-mail: billf@mst.edu; O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, 101 Straumanis Hall, 401 West 16th Street, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Corrosion performance, morphology, and electrochemical characteristics of cerium-based conversion coatings on Al 2024-T3 were examined as a function of phosphate post-treatment time and temperature. Corrosion resistance improved after post-treatment in 2.5 wt.% NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} for times up to 10 min or temperatures up to 85 deg. C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and polarization testing correlated to neutral salt spray corrosion performance. Hydrated cerium oxide and peroxide species present in the as-deposited coatings were transformed to CePO{sub 4}.H{sub 2}O for post-treatments at longer times and/or higher temperatures. Based on these results, processes active during post-treatment are kinetically dependent and strongly influenced by the post-treatment time and temperature.

  9. Inhibition of the corrosion of mild steel by phosphate conversion coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, W.; Khalid, S.; Rashid, A.; Arshad, M.

    1993-01-01

    Phosphating is the treatment of a metal surface to provide a coating of insoluble metal phosphate crystals which strongly adhere to the base material. Such coatings affect the appearance, surface hardness, and electrical conductivity of the metal. Phosphating is major industrial importance in the production of iron and steel surfaces, e.g., in automotive and appliance industries. The present article discusses a novel description of process controlling parameters. The process may be termed as hot phosphate (95-100 deg. C) and it employs the use of low cost chemicals and entirely new accelerator. Effective layer thickness is found to be 0.72 mg/cm /sup 2/ and can withstand moist and mild chemical conditions. The thickness of coating depends upon dipping time and temperature of the working bath. It seems to increase with increasing dipping time but then reaches a maxima. Any more dipping causes stripping and uneven coating layers. In our system most appropriate dipping time was found to be 45 minutes. The stability and completeness of coating was tested by Ferro Test and Tape Pull Test and was found to be satisfactory. The quality control parameters, such as free and total acidity have been controlled for optimum coating thickness and stability. (author)

  10. Chromium allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M B; Johansen, J D; Menné, Torkil

    2003-01-01

    Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-sensitive ......Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr......(III) was concluded to play an important role in chromium allergy, because Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were both capable of eliciting eczema at low concentrations. Rather than regarding chromium dermatitis as a result of Cr(VI) allergy alone, it may be more correct to consider it as a result of a combined Cr(III) and Cr......(VI) allergy....

  11. 77 FR 6627 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... aluminum to provide resistance to corrosion. The chromium anodizing process is used to coat aircraft parts... Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel Pickling-HCl Process Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel Pickling-HCl Process Facilities...

  12. Effects of pH and temperature on the deposition properties of stannate chemical conversion coatings formed by the potentiostatic technique on AZ91 D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsentriecy, Hassan H.; Azumi, Kazuhisa; Konno, Hidetaka

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pH and temperature of a stannate bath on the quality of stannate chemical conversion coatings formed on AZ91 D magnesium alloy by using the potentiostatic polarization technique at E = -1.1 V were investigated in order to improve uniformity and corrosion protection performance of the coating films. It was found that the uniformity and corrosion resistance of coating films deposited by potentiostatic polarization were closely associated with pH and temperature of the coating bath. The pH and temperature to obtain the best coating film were investigated as a function of corrosion protection performance evaluated by curves of potentiodynamic anodic polarization conducted in borate buffer solution. Scanning electron microscope observation and electrochemical corrosion tests of the stannate-coated samples confirmed significant improvement in uniformity and corrosion resistivity of coating films deposited by the potentiostatic technique by modifying the pH and temperature of the coating bath. It was also found that uniformity and corrosion resistivity of the coating films deposited by the potentiostatic technique were considerably improved compared to those of coatings deposited by the simple immersion method at the best conditions of pH and temperature of the coating bath

  13. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachetti S, S. B. [Instituto Tecnologico de Ciudad Madero, Av. 1o. de Mayo y Sor Juana I. de la Cruz, Col. Los Mangos, 89440 Ciudad Madero, Tanaulipas (Mexico); Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada - Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira Km. 14.5, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); De la Cruz H, W., E-mail: mdominguezc@ipn.mx [UNAM, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Apdo. Postal 2681, 22800 Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and La(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  14. Rare earth conversion coatings grown on AA6061 aluminum alloys. Corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachetti S, S. B.; Dominguez C, M. A.; Torres H, A. M.; Onofre B, E.; De la Cruz H, W.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is aimed to investigate the corrosion resistance of rare earth protective coatings deposited by spontaneous deposition on AA6061 aluminum alloy substrates. Coatings were deposited from water-based Ce(NO 3 ) 3 and La(NO 3 ) 3 solutions by varing parameters such as rare earth solution concentration, bath temperature and immersion time. The values of the Tafel slopes indicate that the cathodic process is favored by concentration polarization rather than activation polarization. Chemical and morphological characterizations of the surface before and after electrochemical evaluations were performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (Author)

  15. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on C-2, E-2, P-3 and C-130 Propeller Hub Components Using HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... However, chrome plating utilizes hexavalent chromium, winch is a highly toxic carcinogen, and increasingly stringent environmental and worker-safety regulations are making chrome plating more expensive for the DoD...

  16. The effects of addition of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) as a green corrosion inhibitor to the phosphate conversion coating on the anticorrosion and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating on the steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir; Vakili, H.; Amini, R.

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Room temperature zinc phosphate coating was applied on the surface of steel sample. • Poly(vinyl) alcohol was added to the phosphating bath as a green corrosion inhibitor. • The adhesion and anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coating were investigated. • PVA decreased the phosphate crystal size and porosity. • PVA enhanced the corrosion protection and adhesion properties of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: Steel substrates were chemically treated by room temperature zinc phosphate conversion coating. Poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) was added to the phosphate solution as a green corrosion inhibitor. Finally, the epoxy/polyamide coating was applied on the untreated and surface treated steel samples. The effects of PVA on the morphological properties of the phosphate coating were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measuring device. The adhesion properties of the epoxy coatings applied on the surface treated samples were investigated by pull-off and cathodic delamination tests. Also, the anticorrosion properties of the epoxy coatings were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results showed that addition of PVA to the phosphate coating increased the population density of the phosphate crystals and decreased the phosphate grain size. The contact angle of the steel surface treated by Zn-PVA was lower than Zn treated one. The corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating was considerably increased on the steel substrate treated by zinc phosphate conversion coating containing PVA. PVA also enhanced the adhesion properties of the epoxy coating to the steel surface and decreased the cathodic delamination significantly.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of binder-free Cr3C2 coatings on nickel-based alloys for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brupbacher, Michael C.; Zhang, Dajie; Buchta, William M.; Graybeal, Mark L.; Rhim, Yo-Rhin; Nagle, Dennis C.; Spicer, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Under various conditions, chromium carbides appear to be relatively stable in the presence of molten fluoride salts and this suggests that their use in corrosion resistant coatings for fluoride salt environments could be beneficial. One method for producing these coatings is the carburization of sprayed Cr coatings using methane-containing gaseous precursors. This process has been investigated for the synthesis of binder-free chromium carbide coatings on nickel-based alloy substrates for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance. The effects of the carburization process on coating microstructure have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both plasma-sprayed and cold-sprayed Cr coatings have been successfully converted to Cr 3 C 2 , with the mechanism of conversion being strongly influenced by the initial porosity in the as-deposited coatings

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of MgF2 coatings by chemical conversion on magnesium alloys for producing biodegradable orthopedic implants of temporary use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, P Y; Jaimes, K J; Parada, N J; Viejo, F; Hernández-Barrios, C A; Aparicio, M; Coy, A E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work was the synthesis of biodegradable MgF 2 coatings by chemical conversion on the commercial Elektron 21 and AZ91D magnesium alloys, in aqueous HF solutions for different concentrations and temperatures. The chemical composition and morphology of the coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the other hand, their corrosion behavior was evaluated by gravimetric and electrochemical measurements in Hank's solution at 37°C for different immersion times. The experimental results revealed that chemical conversion in HF produced MgF 2 coatings which corrosion resistance was enhanced by increasing the HF concentration. Further, the microstructure and composition of the base alloy played a key role on the growth and degradation mechanisms of the MgF 2 coatings

  19. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-01-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  20. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Simescu and Hassane Idrissi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO46(OH2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  1. Appearance of a conductive carbonaceous coating in a CO2 dielectric barrier discharge and its influence on the electrical properties and the conversion efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, Igor; Paulussen, Sabine; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-01-01

    This work examines the properties of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor, built for CO 2 decomposition, by means of electrical characterization, optical emission spectroscopy and gas chromatography. The discharge, formed in an electronegative gas (such as CO 2 , but also O 2 ), exhibits clearly different electrical characteristics, depending on the surface conductivity of the reactor walls. An asymmetric current waveform is observed in the metal-dielectric (MD) configuration, with sparse high-current pulses in the positive half-cycle (HC) and a more uniform regime in the negative HC. This indicates that the discharge is operating in two alternating regimes with rather different properties. At high CO 2 conversion regimes, a conductive coating is deposited on the dielectric. This so-called coated MD configuration yields a symmetric current waveform, with current peaks in both the positive and negative HCs. In a double-dielectric (DD) configuration, the current waveform is also symmetric, but without current peaks in both the positive and negative HC. Finally, the DD configuration with conductive coating on the inner surface of the outer dielectric, i.e. so-called coated DD, yields again an asymmetric current waveform, with current peaks in the negative HC. These different electrical characteristics are related to the presence of the conductive coating on the dielectric wall of the reactor and can be explained by an increase of the local barrier capacitance available for charge transfer. The different discharge regimes affect the CO 2 conversion, more specifically, the CO 2 conversion is lowest in the clean DD configuration. It is somewhat higher in the coated DD configuration, and still higher in the MD configuration. The clean and coated MD configuration, however, gave similar CO 2 conversion. These results indicate that the conductivity of the dielectric reactor walls can highly promote the development of the high-amplitude discharge current pulses and

  2. Modelling of solar cells with down-conversion of high energy photons, anti-reflection coatings and light trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, Alexis de; Szymanska, Aleksandra; Badescu, Viorel

    2009-01-01

    In classical solar cells, each absorbed photon gives rise to one electron-hole pair, irrespective of the photon energy. By applying an appropriate photoluminescent layer in front of the solar cell semiconductor, one can convert one high energy photon into two low energy photons (so-called down-conversion). In the present study, we do not consider photoluminescent layers that merely shift down photon energies (without enhancing the number of photons). In principle, these two photons can then generate two electron-hole pairs in the solar cell, thus increasing the efficiency of the device. However, the two photons emitted by the converter, are not necessarily emitted in the direction of the semiconductor: they can also be emitted in the direction 'back to the sun'. As most semiconductors have a high refractive index, in case the luminescent material has a low refractive index, more than half of the photoluminescence emission is lost in the sun direction, resulting in a net loss of light current generated by the solar cell instead of an increase. On the other hand, a high refractive index of the conversion layer (e.g. equal to the solar cell refractive index) will lead to a bad optical coupling with the air and a good optical coupling with the semiconductor, and therefore, more than 50% of the emitted low energy photons will actually reach the solar cell. However, in the latter case, many solar photons do not reach the converter in the first place because of reflection at the air-converter interface. As a result, it turns out that, in the absence of any anti-reflection coating, a refractive index n 2 of the converting layer in the range between n 1 1/2 and n 1 is optimal, where n 1 is the refractive index of the solar cell material. If, however, an anti-reflection coating is applied between air and the converter, the best choice for n 2 is n 1 . Finally, if two anti-reflection coatings are applied (the former between air and the converter, the latter between the

  3. Microstructure, in vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity of Ca-P coatings on ZK60 magnesium alloy prepared by simple chemical conversion and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaikai; Wang, Bing; Yan, Biao; Lu, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Magnesium alloys are potential biodegradable materials for biomedical application. But their poor corrosion resistance may result in premature failure of implants. In this study, to solve this problem, Ca-P coatings were prepared on ZK60 magnesium alloy by a simple chemical conversion process and heat treatment. Surface characterization showed that a flake-like Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) (CaHPO₄·2H₂O) coating was formed on ZK60 alloy by the chemical conversion process. DCPD transformed into Dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPa) (CaHPO₄) and Ca₂P₂O₇ after heat treatment. Results of potentiodynamic polarization showed the corrosion potential of ZK60 was increased from -1666 mV to -1566 mV with DCPD coating, while -1515 mV was obtained after heat treatment. The corrosion current density of ZK60 was measured to be reduced from 35 µA/cm² to 3.5 µA/cm² with DCPD coating, while a further reduction to 1 µA/cm² was observed after heat treatment. This indicated that the coatings improved the substrate corrosion resistance significantly, and apparently, the heat-treated coating had a higher corrosion resistance. Immersion test demonstrated that both the coatings could provide protection for the substrate and the heat-treated coating could induce deposition of bone-like apatite. Cytotoxicity evaluation revealed that none of the samples induced toxicity to L-929 cells after 1- and 3-day culture. The cytocompatibility of ZK60 was improved by the coatings, with the following sequence: uncoated ZK60 < DCPD-coated ZK60 < heat-treated coating.

  4. Comparative study on Ti/Zr/V and chromate conversion treated aluminum alloys: Anti-corrosion performance and epoxy coating adhesion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Wenfang, E-mail: mewfli@163.com; Mu, Songlin; Fu, Nianqing; Liao, Zhongmiao

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • The surface roughness and surface free energy of the AA6063 are significantly increased after TZVCC treatment. • The anti-corrosion performance of the AA6063 is effectively enhanced after TZVCC treatment. • Both the corrosion resistance and wet adhesion properties of the epoxy coating on the AA6063 are noticeably improved after TZVCC treatment. - Abstract: In this study, a Ti/Zr/V conversion coating (TZVCC) was deposited on the surface of aluminum alloy 6063 (AA6063) as an alternative of the chromate conversion coating (CCC). Both the TZVCC treated AA6063 (TZVCC/AA6063) and CCC treated AA6063 (CCC/AA6063) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle measuring device. The anti-corrosion performance of the TZVCC/AA6063 and CCC/AA6063 was evaluated by electrochemical measurements and neutral salt spray tests. It showed that both the surface roughness and surface free energy of the AA6063 were significantly increased after TZVCC treatment. The anti-corrosion performance of TZVCC/AA6063 was superior to that of CCC/AA6063. In addition, the effects of the TZVCC and CCC on the adhesion properties and anti-corrosion performance of epoxy coating applied on samples were examined by pull-off tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The dry, wet and recovery adhesive strengths of the epoxy coating on TZVCC treated samples (epoxy coated TZVCC/AA6063) were very close to those of epoxy coating on CCC treated ones (epoxy coated CCC/AA6063). The epoxy coated TZVCC/AA6063 showed better corrosion resistance than the epoxy coated CCC/AA6063 and epoxy coated AA6063.

  5. Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects Date (12 May 2011) Gene McKinley ASC/WNV (937) 255-3596 Gene.McKinley@wpafb.af.mil Aeronautical Systems...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent ...A-10) – AETC (T-6, T-38 and T1A) • Both Cr Primers & Non-Cr primers as well as Cr Surface Treatment – F-22 8 Non- Chrome Tie-coat & touch-up

  6. Transition Metal Coatings for Energy Conversion and Storage; Electrochemical and High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falola, Bamidele Daniel

    sequestration easier. One complication of oxyfuel coal combustion is that corrosion problems can be exacerbated due to flue gas recycling, which is employed to dilute the pure O2 feed and reduce the flame temperature. Refractory metal diffusion coatings of Ti and Zr atop P91 steel were created and tested for their ability to prevent corrosion in an oxidizing atmosphere at elevated temperature. Using pack cementation, diffusion coatings of thickness approximately 12 and 20 microm are obtained for Ti and Zr, respectively. The effects of heating to 950°C for 24 hr in 5% O2 in He are studied in situ by thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), and ex situ by SEM analyses and depth profiling by EDX. For Ti-coated, Zr-coated and uncoated P91 samples, extended heating in an oxidizing environment causes relatively thick oxide growth, but extensive oxygen penetration greater than 2.7 mm below the sample surface, and eventual oxide exfoliation, are observed only for the uncoated P91 sample. For the Ti- and Zr-coated samples, oxygen penetrates approximately 16 and 56 microm, respectively, below the surface. in situ TGA verifies that Ti-and Zr-coated P91 samples undergo far smaller mass changes during corrosion than uncoated samples, reaching close to steady state mass after approximately four hours.

  7. Corrosion mitigation of rare-earth metals containing magnesium EV31A-T6 alloy via chrome-free conversion coating treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdy, Abdel Salam; Butt, Darryl P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Protective stannate coatings have been proposed for rare-earth-EV31A-T6 magnesium alloy. • A simple coating method based on direct treatment of EV31A-T6 in a diluted stannate was found promising. • Surface modification prior to stannate coating offer no substantial advantage over directly coating. • Stannate conversion coatings decrease corrosion rates by a factor of 1/7. • The coating does not display any self-healing characteristics as shown in AZ91D. -- Abstract: Magnesium alloys posses unique mechanical and physical characteristics making them attractive light-weight materials for several strategic industries such as electronics, computer, automotive and aerospace. Due to their high chemical reactivity and poor corrosion resistance, the protection of magnesium alloys from corrosion is one of the hottest topics in materials science and engineering. Addition of rare-earth metals (RE) as alloying elements to magnesium alloys is one of the common approaches to improve their mechanical properties and, sometimes, the corrosion resistance. However, the potential difference between the RE metals phase formed in the Mg matrix enhances the galvanic corrosion at the interfaces where RE metals inert phase acts as cathode and the active Mg matrix acts as anode. This paper introduces a simple one-step clean conversion coating treatment for improving the protection of RE containing magnesium EV31A-T6 alloy in Cl − media

  8. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer-chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-03-30

    Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) is responsible for non-quantitative H 2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer-Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems. The EA-Cr/HTC reactor was substantially modified for the conversion of halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples. The performance of the novel conversion setup for solid and liquid samples was monitored and optimized using a simultaneously operating dual-detection system of IRMS and ion trap MS. The method with several variants in the reactor, including the addition of manganese metal chips, was evaluated in three laboratories using EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (on-line method) and compared with traditional uranium-reduction-based conversion combined with manual dual-inlet IRMS analysis (off-line method) in one laboratory. The modified EA-Cr/HTC reactor setup showed an overall H 2 -recovery of more than 96% for all halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds. All results were successfully normalized via two-point calibration with VSMOW-SLAP reference waters. Precise and accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis was achieved for a variety of organics containing F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, and S-bearing heteroelements. The robust nature of the on-line EA-Cr/HTC technique was demonstrated by a series of 196 consecutive measurements with a single reactor filling. The optimized EA-Cr/HTC reactor design can be implemented in existing analytical equipment using commercially available material and

  9. Investigation of the chromate conversion coating on Alclad 2024 aluminium alloy: effect of the pH of the chromate bath

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campestrini, P.; Westing, E.P.M. van; Hovestad, A.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    2002-01-01

    The parameters of the chromate bath, like temperature, pH, and fluoride content, strongly affect the morphology and chemical composition of the chromate conversion coating and as a consequence have a large influence on its corrosion performance. In this paper, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

  10. Research of boron conversion coating in neutron detector with boron deposited GEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Di; Sun Zhijia; Zhou Jianrong; Wang Yanfeng; Yang Guian; Xu Hong; Chen Yuanbai; Xiao Yu; Diao Xungang

    2014-01-01

    GEM is a flourishing new gas detector and nowadays its technology become more mature. It has outstanding properties, such as excellent position resolution, high counting rate, radiation resistance, simple and flexible signal readout, can be large-area detector, wide application range. Detector with boron deposited GEM uses multilayer GEM with deposited boron film as neutron conversion carrier which reads out the information of neutron shot from the readout electrode with gas amplification from every GEM layer. The detector is high performance which can meet the demands of neutron detector of a new generation. Boron deposited neutron conversion electrode with boron deposited cathode and GEM included is the core part of the detector. As boron is a high-melting-point metalloid (> 2 000 ℃), electroplating and thermal evaporation are inappropriate ways. So finding a way to deposit boron on electrode which can meet the demands become a key technology in the development of neutron detector with boron deposited GEM. Compared with evaporation, sputtering has features such as low deposition temperature, high film purity, nice adhesive, thus is appropriate for our research. Magnetron sputtering is a improved way of sputtering which can get lower sputtering air pressure and higher target voltage, so that we can get better films. Through deposit process, the research uses magnetron sputtering to deposit pure boron film on copper electrode and GEM film. This method can get high quality, nice adhere, high purity, controllable uniformity, low cost film with high speed film formation. (authors)

  11. In Vitro Corrosion and Cytocompatibility of ZK60 Magnesium Alloy Coated with Hydroxyapatite by a Simple Chemical Conversion Process for Orthopedic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Huang, Ping; Ou, Caiwen; Li, Kaikai; Yan, Biao; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys—a new class of degradable metallic biomaterials—are being increasingly investigated as a promising alternative for medical implant and device applications due to their advantageous mechanical and biological properties. However, the high corrosion rate in physiological environments prevents the clinical application of Mg-based materials. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on ZK60 magnesium alloy substrates to mediate the rapid degradation of Mg while improving its cytocompatibility for orthopedic applications. A simple chemical conversion process was applied to prepare HA coating on ZK60 magnesium alloy. Surface morphology, elemental compositions, and crystal structures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The corrosion properties of samples were investigated by immersion test and electrochemical test. Murine fibroblast L-929 cells were harvested and cultured with coated and non-coated ZK60 samples to determine cytocompatibility. The degradation results suggested that the HA coatings decreased the degradation of ZK60 alloy. No significant deterioration in compression strength was observed for all the uncoated and coated samples after 2 and 4 weeks’ immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Cytotoxicity test indicated that the coatings, especially HA coating, improved cytocompatibility of ZK60 alloy for L929 cells. PMID:24300096

  12. Ceramic coatings by ion irradiation of polycarbosilanes and polysiloxanes. Pt. 1: Conversion mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivin, J.C.; Colombo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Changes of composition and structure of various types of polysiloxanes and polycarbosilanes when submitted to irradiation with ions of increasing mass, were analysed by means of several ion-beam analytical techniques, Raman and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopes. Ion irradiations is as efficient as annealing at temperatures above 1000 o C for releasing hydrogen from these organic-inorganic polymers, and the radiolytic evolution of hydrogen is selective, whereas methane, silanes and carbon monoxide are also evolved during heat treatments. The kinetics of the polymer conversion into amorphous ceramics depends strongly on the linear density of energy transferred by ions to electron shells of target atoms, according to the ion energy per nucleon and to the nature of the side groups. Some of the carbon atoms segregate in clusters exhibiting a diamond-like hybridization state, in contrast to the clusters of turbostatic graphite formed in pyrolysed films. (Author)

  13. High-velocity-oxidation performance of metal-chromium-aluminum (MCrAl), cermet, and modified aluminide coatings on IN-100 and type VIA alloys at 1093 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Cermet, MCrAl, and modified aluminide types of coatings applied to IN-100 and NASA-TRW-VIA alloy specimens were cyclically oxidation tested in a high velocity (Mach 1) gas flame at 1093 C. Several coating compositions of each type were evaluated for oxidation resistance. The modified aluminide coating, Pt-Al, applied to alloy 6A proved to be the best, providing oxidation protection to approximately 750 hours based on weight change measurements. The second best, a CoCrAlY coating applied to 6A, provided protection to 450 hours. The third best was a cermet + aluminide coating on 6A with a protection time to 385 hours.

  14. The effects to the structure and electrochemical behavior of zinc phosphate conversion coatings with ethanolamine on magnesium alloy AZ91D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qing; Xu Shuqiang; Hu Junying; Zhang Shiyan; Zhong Xiankang; Yang Xiaokui

    2010-01-01

    This paper discussed a zinc phosphate conversion coating formed on magnesium alloy AZ91D from the phosphating bath with varying amounts of ethanolamine (MEA). The effects of MEA on the form, structure, phase composition and electrochemical behavior of the phosphate coatings were examined using an scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Interpretations of the electrical elements of the equivalent circuit were obtained from the SEM structure of the coatings, assumed to be formed of two layers: an outer porous crystal layer and an inner flat amorphous layer. The result showed that adding MEA refined the microstructure of the crystal layer and that the phosphate coating, derived at the optimal content of 1.2 g/L, with the most uniform and compact outer crystal layer provided the best corrosion protection.

  15. Effect of Thickness on the Morphology and Corrosion Behavior of Cerium-Based Conversion Coatings on AZ31B Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Carlos E.; Maddela, Surender; O'Keefe, Matthew J.; Wang, Yar-Ming

    Cerium-based conversion coatings (CeCCs) were deposited onto AZ31B magnesium alloy substrates using a spontaneous reaction of CeCl3, H2O2 and gelatin in a water-based solution. The coating thickness was adjusted by controlling the immersion time in the deposition solution. Prior to deposition, the AZ31B substrates were treated using an acid pickling in nitric acid and then an alkaline cleaning in sodium metasilicate pentahydrate. After deposition, the coated samples were immersed in a phosphate bath that converted cerium oxide/hydroxide into cerium phosphate. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and neutral salt spray testing studies indicated that 100 nm thick CeCC had better corrosion performance than 400 nm coatings. Characterization of the CeCCs by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed a three layer structure with different compositions.

  16. Nanostructured Metal Oxide Coatings for Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Isvar Abraxas

    The realization of an energy future based on safe, clean, sustainable, and economically viable technologies is one of the grand challenges facing modern society. Electrochemical energy technologies underpin the potential success of this effort to divert energy sources away from fossil fuels, whether one considers alternative energy conversion strategies through photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of chemical fuels or fuel cells run with sustainable hydrogen, or energy storage strategies, such as in batteries and supercapacitors. This dissertation builds on recent advances in nanomaterials design, synthesis, and characterization to develop novel electrodes that can electrochemically convert and store energy. Chapter 2 of this dissertation focuses on refining the properties of TiO2-based PEC water-splitting photoanodes used for the direct electrochemical conversion of solar energy into hydrogen fuel. The approach utilized atomic layer deposition (ALD); a growth process uniquely suited for the conformal and uniform deposition of thin films with angstrom-level thickness precision. ALD's thickness control enabled a better understanding of how the effects of nitrogen doping via NH3 annealing treatments, used to reduce TiO2's bandgap, can have a strong dependence on TiO2's thickness and crystalline quality. In addition, it was found that some of the negative effects on the PEC performance typically associated with N-doped TiO2 could be mitigated if the NH 3-annealing was directly preceded by an air-annealing step, especially for ultrathin (i.e., transparent electrode based on a network of solution-processed Cu/Ni cores/shell nanowires (NWs) were activated by electrochemically converting the Ni metal shell into Ni(OH)2. Furthermore, an adjustment of the molar percentage of Ni plated onto the Cu NWs was found to result in a tradeoff between capacitance, transmittance, and stability of the resulting nickel hydroxide-based electrode. The nominal area capacitance and power

  17. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M; Hoehlich, D; Scharf, I; Lampke, T; Hollaender, U; Maier, H J

    2016-01-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W 2 N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing. (paper)

  18. Formation of a cerium conversion coating on magnesium alloy using ascorbic acid as additive. Characterisation and anticorrosive properties of the formed films

    OpenAIRE

    A.P. Loperena; I.L. Lehr; S.B. Saidman.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium-based conversion coatings were formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy by immersion of the substrate in solutions containing Ce(NO3)3, H2O2 and ascorbic acid (HAsc). The characterisation of the films was performed by electrochemical and surface analysis techniques such as SEM, EDS, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The degree of corrosion protection achieved was evaluated in simulated physiological solution by the open circuit potential monitoring, polarisation tech...

  19. Microstructure and corrosion performance of steam-based conversion coatings produced in the presence of TiO2 particles on aluminium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    The steam-based conversion coatings containing TiO2 particleswere prepared using a two-step process comprising of spin coating of particles onto an aluminiumsubstrate followed by a high-pressure steam treatment. Process has resulted in the formation of aluminium oxide layer (~1.3 μm thick) embedded...... to the coatings without TiO2 particles, while the shift in thepitting potential was a function of the steam treatment time and degree of particle incorporation into the oxide....... with TiO2 particles. The electrochemical measurements showthe beneficial effect of TiO2 particles in the oxide layer by exhibiting lowestanodic and cathodic activities, and reduced pit depth. The presence of TiO2 particles shifts the corrosion potentialvalues to positive side (noble side) when compared...

  20. Effects of combined organic and inorganic corrosion inhibitors on the nanostructure cerium based conversion coating performance on AZ31 magnesium alloy: Morphological and corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saei, E.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Amini, R.; Kalajahi, M. Salami

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Cn-Mn-polyvinyl alcohol conversion coating led to more uniform and crack free film deposition. •The corrosion resistance of Ce film was noticeably improved by using combination of polyvinyl alchol and Mn2+ cations. •A synergistic effect between polyvinyl alchol-Mn2+ resulted in Ce film with enhanced morphology and corrosion resistance. -- Abstract: Magnesium (Mg) AZ31 samples were chemically treated by a series of room temperature nanostructure cerium based conversion coatings containing Mn(NO 3 ) 2 ·4H 2 O, Co(NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The microstructure and corrosion protection properties of different samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Results demonstrated that the AZ31 Mg alloy sample treated by Ce-Mn-PVA showed the highest corrosion resistance. A denser Ce film with lower crack was precipitated on the sample treated by Ce-Mn-PVA conversion coating.

  1. Characterization and corrosion behavior of phytic acid coatings, obtained by chemical conversion on magnesium substrates in physiological solution; Caracterizacion y comportamiento frente a la corrosion de recubrimientos de acido fitico, obtenidos por conversion quimica, sobre substratos de magnesio en solucion fisiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Alvarado, L. A.; Lomeli, M. A.; Hernandez, L. S.; Miranda, J. M.; Narvaez, L.; Diaz, I.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.

    2014-10-01

    In order to improve the corrosion resistance of biodegradable magnesium and AZ31 magnesium alloy implants, a phytic acid coating has been applied on both substrates and their protective effect against corrosion has been assessed. The morphology and the chemical nature of the conversion coating were analyzed by SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR. The spectra showed that the conversion coating was amorphous, and it was composed of Mg, O, and P on magnesium surface, along with Al, Zn and C on AZ31 alloy. The main coating components were chelate compounds formed by phytic acid and metallic ions. The corrosion resistance of bare and coated samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization technique in Hank's solution at 37 degree centigrade. The results indicate that phytic acid conversion coatings provided a very effective protection to the magnesium substrates studied. (Author)

  2. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on C-2, E-2, P-3 and C-130 Propeller Hub Components Using HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to qualify high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on propeller hub components from various military aircraft...

  3. Characteristics and corrosion studies of vanadate conversion coating formed on Mg–14 wt%Li–1 wt%Al–0.1 wt%Ce alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yibin; Li Ning; Li Deyu; Zhang Milin; Huang Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vanadate film forms on the surface of Mg–Li–Al–Ce alloy. ► Vanadate coating improves the corrosion resistance. ► Vanadate coating is composed of Mg(OH) 2 , Li 2 O and V 2 O 5 . - Abstract: Mg–14Li–1Al–0.1Ce alloy is immersed in NH 4 VO 3 + K 3 (Fe(CN) 6 ) solutions with different NH 4 VO 3 and/or K 3 (Fe(CN) 6 ) concentrations, and different immersion time. The surface morphology and composition of the vanadate coating are then characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the corrosion behavior of the conversion coating is studied by polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results indicate that the vanadate film with better corrosion resistance forms on Mg–Li–Al–Ce surface after the sample is immersed in 30 g L −1 NH 4 VO 3 + 3.75 g L −1 K 3 (Fe(CN) 6 ) solution at 80 °C for 10 min. The coating consists of V 2 O 5 , Li 2 O and Mg(OH) 2 .

  4. Characteristics and corrosion studies of vanadate conversion coating formed on Mg-14 wt%Li-1 wt%Al-0.1 wt%Ce alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yibin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Ning, E-mail: lininghit@263.net [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Deyu [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Milin; Huang Xiaomei [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vanadate film forms on the surface of Mg-Li-Al-Ce alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vanadate coating improves the corrosion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vanadate coating is composed of Mg(OH){sub 2}, Li{sub 2}O and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. - Abstract: Mg-14Li-1Al-0.1Ce alloy is immersed in NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} + K{sub 3}(Fe(CN){sub 6}) solutions with different NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} and/or K{sub 3}(Fe(CN){sub 6}) concentrations, and different immersion time. The surface morphology and composition of the vanadate coating are then characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the corrosion behavior of the conversion coating is studied by polarization technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results indicate that the vanadate film with better corrosion resistance forms on Mg-Li-Al-Ce surface after the sample is immersed in 30 g L{sup -1} NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} + 3.75 g L{sup -1} K{sub 3}(Fe(CN){sub 6}) solution at 80 Degree-Sign C for 10 min. The coating consists of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Li{sub 2}O and Mg(OH){sub 2}.

  5. Electroplating chromium on CVD SiC and SiCf-SiC advanced cladding via PyC compatibility coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Caen; Kemery, Craig; Katoh, Yutai

    2018-05-01

    Electroplating Cr on SiC using a pyrolytic carbon (PyC) bond coat is demonstrated as an innovative concept for coating of advanced fuel cladding. The quantification of coating stress, SEM morphology, XRD phase analysis, and debonding test of the coating on CVD SiC and SiCf-SiC is shown. The residual tensile stress (by ASTM B975) of electroplated Cr is > 1 GPa prior to stress relaxation by microcracking. The stress can remove the PyC/Cr layer from SiC. Surface etching of ∼20 μm and roughening to Ra > 2 μm (by SEM observation) was necessary for successful adhesion. The debonding strength (by ASTM D4541) of the coating on SiC slightly improved from 3.6 ± 1.4 MPa to 5.9 ± 0.8 MPa after surface etching or machining. However, this improvement is limited due to the absence of an interphase, and integrated CVI processing may be required for further advancement.

  6. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, T.; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U.

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  7. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, T. E-mail: marek@para.chem.elte.hu; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U

    2000-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  8. In-situ phosphatizing coatings for aerospace, OEM and coil coating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuder, Heather Aurelia

    The current metal coating process is a multi-step process. The surface is cleaned, primered, dried and then painted. The process is labor intensive and time consuming. The wash primer is a conversion coating, which prepares metal surface for better paint adhesion. The wash primers currently used often contain hexavalent chromium (Cr6+), which seals the pores in the conversion coating. The presence of hexavalent chromium, a known carcinogen, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) make waste disposal expensive and pose dangers to workers. The novel technique of in-situ phosphatizing coating (ISPC) is a single-step, chrome-free alternative to the present coating practice. Formulation of an ISPC involves predispersal of an in-situ phosphatizing reagent (ISPR) into the paint system to form a stable formulation. The ISPR reacts with the metal surface and bonds with the paint film simultaneously, which eliminates the need for a conversion coating. In acid catalyzed paint systems, such as polyester-melamine paints, the ISPR also catalyzes cross-linking reactions between the melamine and the polyester polyols. ISPCs are formulated using commercially available coating systems including: polyester-melamine, two-component epoxy, polyurethane and high-hydroxy content polyester-melamine coil coating. The ISPCs are applied to metal substrates and their performances are evaluated using electrochemical, thermal and standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) testing methods. In addition, ISPCs were designed and formulated based on: (1) phosphate chemistry, (2) polymer chemistry, (3) sol-gel chemistry, and (4) the ion-exchange principle. Organo-functionalized silanes, which serve as excellent coupling and dispersion agents, are incorporated into the optimized ISPC formula and evaluated using standard ASTM testing methods and electrochemical spectroscopy. Also, an ion-exchange pigment, which leads to better adhesion by forming a mixed metal silicate surface, is

  9. Self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating modified with aspartic acid for 6N01 Al alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caixia; Luo, Xiaohu; Pan, Xinyu; Liao, Liying; Wu, Xiaosong; Liu, Yali

    2017-02-01

    A self-healing Li-Al layered double hydroxide conversion coating (LCC) modified with aspartic acid (ALCC) was prepared on 6N01 Al alloy for corrosion protection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that a compact thin film has been successfully formed on the alloy. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra proved that species of aspartic acid anions were successfully intercalated into LCC. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and neutral salt spray (NSS) testing showed that the resultant ALCC could provide effective corrosion protection for the Al alloy. During immersion of the ALCC-coated alloy in 3.5% NaCl solution, new film was formed in the area of artificially introduced scratch, indicating its self-healing capability. XPS results demonstrated that Cl- anions exchange partial Asp anions according to the change content of element on conversion coating. From the above results, the possible mechanism via exchange/self-assembly was proposed to illustrate the phenomenon of self-healing.

  10. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  11. Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Logistics 4 Initiative - DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Non- Chrome Primer IIEXAVAJ ENT CHRO:M I~UMI CHROMIUM (VII Oil CrfVli.J CANCEfl HAnRD CD...Management Office of the Secretary of Defense Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  12. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  13. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopic studies on the chemical states of surface layers of corroded tin plates and tin-coated iron plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Akinori; Endo, Kazutoyo; Sano, Hirotoshi

    1980-01-01

    By means of the conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS), we studied surface layers of ''tin'' plates and tin-coated iron plates corroded by various acids. Transmission Moessbauer spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns were also measured. Metastannic acid was formed, when the ''tin'' plate was corroded by nitric acid solution. In corrosion by phosphoric acid solution, the X-ray diffractometry revealed the formation of tin(IV) pyrophosphate. In corrosion by various organic acid solutions, the formation of oxides was identified by the 119 Sn CEMS, but not by the X-ray diffractometry because of the too thin corrosion layer. In corrosion of tin-coated iron plates, maleic acid, malonic acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid were used. It was determined by CEMS that the corrosion products caused by these acids were tin(IV) oxides, although they could not be identified by the X-ray diffractometry. CEMS also confirmed that the surface of uncorroded tin-coated iron plate was already oxidized by air. Colorimetric determinations of Sn and Fe dissolved from tin-coated iron plates to various acid solutions confirmed that maleic acid had the strongest corrosion effect among the organic acids studied. (author)

  14. Characterization of ceramic sol-gel coatings as an alternative chemical conversion treatment on commercial carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A.; Garcia-Murillo, A.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Carrillo-Romo, F.J.; Onofre-Bustamante, E.; Yanez-Zamora, C.

    2009-01-01

    Sol-gel yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films were prepared on commercial carbon steel sheets by dip-coating technique followed by a low temperature heat treatment (473, 573, and 673 K for 1 h) in order to improve both corrosion properties and adhesion. For comparison, zirconia (ZrO 2 ) coatings have been also analyzed. Electrochemical techniques, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the anticorrosion behavior of the coatings in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. The adhesion with a polyester organic coating was evaluated by the pull-off technique. The typical thickness of the deposited layers ranged from 1 to 1.3 μm depending on process parameters. The obtained results indicated that sol-gel ZrO 2 and YSZ coatings without an organic coating can act as protective barriers against wet corrosion during the first hours, but they fail when the time exposure is longer than 1 day. However, when synthesized films were used as a pre-treatment and an organic coating was added (top-coated), the anticorrosive and adhesion properties were strongly affected by the temperature of the treatment, and an increase in both properties was observed at higher temperatures. The structural and morphological characteristics of the coating provide an explanation of the role of each film in the electrochemical behavior in this aggressive medium. Comparing both systems, YSZ displayed greater protective and adhesion values than exhibited for ZrO 2 which can be correlated with the stabilization of the cubic phase

  15. Biocompatibility and mechanical properties of diamond-like coatings on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum steel and titanium-aluminum-vanadium biomedical alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinüber, C; Kleemann, C; Friederichs, R J; Haubold, L; Scheibe, H J; Schuelke, T; Boehlert, C; Baumann, M J

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are favored for wear components because of diamond-like hardness, low friction, low wear, and high corrosion resistance (Schultz et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2004;35:924-928; Lappalainen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2003;66B:410-413; Tiainen, Diam Relat Mater 2001;10:153-160). Several studies have demonstrated their inertness, nontoxicity, and the biocompatibility, which has led to interest among manufacturers of surgical implants (Allen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2001;58:319-328; Uzumaki et al., Diam Relat Mater 2006;15:982-988; Hauert, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:583-589; Grill, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:166-170). In this study, hydrogen-free amorphous, tetrahedrally bonded DLC films (ta-C) were deposited at low temperatures by physical vapor deposition on medical grade Co28Cr6Mo steel and the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Scheibe et al., Surf Coat Tech 1996;85:209-214). The mechanical performance of the ta-C was characterized by measuring its surface roughness, contact angle, adhesion, and wear behavior, whereas the biocompatibility was assessed by osteoblast (OB) attachment and cell viability via Live/Dead assay. There was no statistical difference found in the wettability as measured by contact angle measurements for the ta-C coated and the uncoated samples of either Co28Cr6Mo or Ti6Al4V. Rockwell C indentation and dynamic scratch testing on 2-10 μm thick ta-C films on Co28Cr6Mo substrates showed excellent adhesion with HF1 grade and up to 48 N for the critical load L(C2) during scratch testing. The ta-C coating reduced the wear from 3.5 × 10(-5) mm(3)/Nm for an uncoated control sample (uncoated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) to 1.1 × 10(-7) mm(3)/Nm (coated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) in reciprocating pin-on-disk testing. The lowest wear factor of 3.9 × 10(-10) mm(3)/Nm was measured using a ta-C coated steel ball running against a ta-C coated and polished Co28Cr6Mo disk

  16. DMF as an Additive in a Two-Step Spin-Coating Method for 20% Conversion Efficiency in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jionghua; Xu, Xin; Zhao, Yanhong; Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Yuzhuan; Luo, Yanhong; Li, Dongmei; Wu, Huijue; Meng, Qingbo

    2017-08-16

    DMF as an additive has been employed in FAI/MAI/IPA (FA= CH 2 (NH 2 ) 2 , MA = CH 3 NH 3 , IPA = isopropanol) solution for a two-step multicycle spin-coating method in order to prepare high-quality FA x MA 1-x PbI 2.55 Br 0.45 perovskite films. Further investigation reveals that the existence of DMF in the FAI/MAI/IPA solution can facilitate perovskite conversion, improve the film morphology, and reduce crystal defects, thus enhancing charge-transfer efficiency. By optimization of the DMF amount and spin-coating cycles, compact, pinhole-free perovskite films are obtained. The nucleation mechanisms of perovskite films in our multicycle spin-coating process are suggested; that is, the introduction of DMF in the spin-coating FAI/MAI/IPA solution can lead to the formation of an amorphous phase PbX 2 -AI-DMSO-DMF (X = I, Br; A = FA, MA) instead of intermediate phase (MA) 2 Pb 3 I 8 ·2DMSO. This amorphous phase, similar to that in the one-step method, can help FAI/MAI penetrate into the PbI 2 framework to completely convert into the perovskite. As high as 20.1% power conversion efficiency (PCE) has been achieved with a steady-state PCE of 19.1%. Our work offers a simple repeatable method to prepare high-quality perovskite films for high-performance PSCs and also help further understand the perovskite-crystallization process.

  17. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Dual-enhanced photothermal conversion properties of reduced graphene oxide-coated gold superparticles for light-triggered acoustic and thermal theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Sen; Yang, Xiangyu; Niu, Gang; Song, Jibin; Yang, Huang-Hao; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    A rational design of highly efficient photothermal agents that possess excellent light-to-heat conversion properties is a fascinating topic in nanotheranostics. Herein, we present a facile route to fabricate size-tunable reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated gold superparticles (rGO-GSPs) and demonstrate their dual-enhanced photothermal conversion properties for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. For the first time, graphene oxide (GO) was directly used as an emulsifying agent for the preparation of gold superparticles (GSPs) with near-infrared absorption by the emulsion method. Moreover, GO spontaneously deposited on the surface of GSPs could also act as the precursor of the rGO shell. Importantly, both the plasmonic coupling of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles and the interaction between GSPs and rGO endow rGO-GSPs with enhanced photothermal conversion properties, allowing rGO-GSPs to be used for sensitive photoacoustic detection and efficient photothermal ablation of tumours in vivo. This study provides a facile approach to prepare colloidal superparticles-graphene hybrid nanostructures and will pave the way toward the design and optimization of photothermal nanomaterials with improved properties for theranostic applications.A rational design of highly efficient photothermal agents that possess excellent light-to-heat conversion properties is a fascinating topic in nanotheranostics. Herein, we present a facile route to fabricate size-tunable reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-coated gold superparticles (rGO-GSPs) and demonstrate their dual-enhanced photothermal conversion properties for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy. For the first time, graphene oxide (GO) was directly used as an emulsifying agent for the preparation of gold superparticles (GSPs) with near-infrared absorption by the emulsion method. Moreover, GO spontaneously deposited on the surface of GSPs could also act as the precursor of the rGO shell. Importantly, both the

  19. The effect of surface pre-conditioning treatments on the local composition of Zr-based conversion coatings formed on aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, J.; Vandendael, I.; Posner, R.; de Wit, J. H. W.; Mol, J. M. C.; Terryn, H.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of different alkaline, acidic and thermal pre-conditioning treatments applied to different Al alloy surfaces. The obtained results are compared to the characteristics of Zr-based conversion coatings that were subsequently generated on top of these substrates. Focus is laid on typical elemental distributions on the sample surfaces, in particular on the amount of precipitated functional additives such as Cu species that are present in the substrate matrix as well as in the conversion bath solutions. To this aim, Field Emission Auger Electron spectra, depth profiles and surface maps with superior local resolution were acquired and compared to scanning electron microscopy images of the sample. The results show how de-alloying processes, which occur at and around intermetallic particles in the Al matrix during typical industrial alkaline or acidic cleaning procedures, provide a significant source of crystallization cores for any following coating processes. This is in particular due for Cu-species, as the resulting local Cu structures on the surface strongly affect the film formation and compositions of state-of-the-art Zr-based films. The findings are highly relevant for industrial treatments of aluminium surfaces, especially for those that undergo corrosion protection and painting process steps prior to usage.

  20. Up-conversion luminescence application in Er3+: TiO2 thin film prepared by dip coating sol-gel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, Y.; Battisha, I.K.; Salah, A.; Salem, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Sol-gel derived nano-crystalline titanium dioxide films doped with 1 up to 5% Er 3+ ions were prepared by dip coating sol-gel method. The coating sol was obtained by hydrolysis of Ti(OC 4 H 9 ) 4 in ethanol/HCI solution. The FT-Raman and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) were carried out to determine the crystal structure of the prepared samples. The morphology SEM and the cross-sectional of the film were used to characterize the microstructure and the thickness of the prepared film. It is shown that relative homogeneous, crack-free and transparent film was achieved via dipping process at 500 deg C. After the excitation with laser diode at wavelength 808 nm, visible (Vis) and infrared (IR) up-conversion emissions were evidenced in the thin film samples under investigation. The up-conversion was found to depend strongly on the Er 3+ ion concentrations. The visible emission was found to be at 540, 560, 590 and 640 nm for thin film. They are attributed to intra-4f transition of Er 3+ ions and assigned to the ( 2 H 11/2 + 4 S 3/2 ) and 4 F 9/2 , which are populated through excited state absorption (ESA) for 808 nm excitation. (author)

  1. A Method for Effective Conversion of Saccharides to Furfural Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for the effective conversion of one or more mono-, di-, oligo- or polysaccharides to hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), in an ionic liquid by means of a chromium catalyst mixture comprising chromium (II) and chromium (III) species. The invention also provides a...

  2. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Carciello, Neal R.

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80.degree. C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5-5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150.degree. C. to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2.times.10.sup.5 gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  3. Corrosion Performance of Composite Galvanic Coatings with Variable Concentration of Polymeric Nanoaggregates and/or Cr(III) Conversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Taheri, P.; Tsvetkova, N.; Boshkov, N.; Van Breugel, K.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the corrosion performance of composite zinc layers (~ 8µm) on a steel substrate, considering the influence of nano-aggregates and Cr(III) conversion layers, compared to control (only Zn layers) conditions. The main factors, influencing the corrosion performance of Zn in this

  4. Phosphate conversion coating reduces the degradation rate and suppresses side effects of metallic magnesium implants in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Muhammad Imran; Tavares, Ana; Evertz, Florian; Kieke, Marc; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Eifler, Rainer; Weizbauer, Andreas; Willbold, Elmar; Jürgen Maier, Hans; Glasmacher, Birgit; Behrens, Peter; Hauser, Hansjörg; Mueller, Peter P

    2017-08-01

    Magnesium alloys have promising mechanical and biological properties for the development of degradable implants. However, rapid implant corrosion and gas accumulations in tissue impede clinical applications. With time, the implant degradation rate is reduced by a highly biocompatible, phosphate-containing corrosion layer. To circumvent initial side effects after implantation it was attempted to develop a simple in vitro procedure to generate a similarly protective phosphate corrosion layer. To this end magnesium samples were pre-incubated in phosphate solutions. The resulting coating was well adherent during routine handling procedures. It completely suppressed the initial burst of corrosion and it reduced the average in vitro magnesium degradation rate over 56 days almost two-fold. In a small animal model phosphate coatings on magnesium implants were highly biocompatible and abrogated the appearance of gas cavities in the tissue. After implantation, the phosphate coating was replaced by a layer with an elemental composition that was highly similar to the corrosion layer that had formed on plain magnesium implants. The data demonstrate that a simple pre-treatment could improve clinically relevant properties of magnesium-based implants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1622-1635, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Microstructural and electrochemical characterization of environmentally friendly conversion layers on aluminium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomino Luis Enrique M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium conversion layers (CeCL have been investigated as a replacement for chromium conversion layers to protect Al alloys against corrosion. In this work the microstructure and the electrochemical behaviour of aluminium alloy 2024 with and without CeCL were investigated using, respectively, SEM-EDX and EIS. EDX results have shown that the presence of dispersed plated Cu particles on the alloy surface enhances the formation of the CeCL increasing the intensity of Ce peaks in the EDX spectra. EIS measurements on conversion-coated samples have shown that the presence of the layer increases the impedance, and that its presence is detected by the presence of a high frequency time constant. Results of potentiodynamic experiments have shown that the corrosion protection afforded by the conversion layer is due to the hindrance of the oxygen reduction reaction and that the pitting potential of the alloy is not changed.

  6. A two layer coating system for metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Plasma deposited cermet coatings are used for protecting components in sodium or helium cooled reactors. An inner layer of cermet made from a powder mixture of chromium carbide and a nickel -20% chromium and an outer layer of chromium carbide is preferred. (UK)

  7. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Jasulaitienė, V.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) bath is composed of oxide, hydroxide and metallic chromium. • Metallic phase is absent in black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) + ZnO bath. • The near-surface layer is rich in hydroxides, whereas oxides of both metals predominate in the depth of the coatings. - Abstract: The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers

  8. Work Environment Factors and Their Influence on Urinary Chromium Levels in Informal Electroplating Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningsih, Yuliani; Husodo, Adi Heru; Astuti, Indwiani

    2018-02-01

    One of the informal sector which absorbs labor was electroplating business. This sector uses chromium as coating material because it was strong, corrosion resistant and strong. Nonetheless hexavalent chromium is highly toxic if inhaled, swallowed and contact with skin. Poor hygiene, the lack of work environment factors and sanitation conditions can increase the levels of chromium in the body. This aimed of this study was to analyze the association between work environment factors and levels of urinary chromium in informal electroplating worker. A Purposive study was conducted in Tegal Central Java. The research subjects were 66 male workers. Chi Square analysis was used to establish an association between work environment factors and level of urinary chromium. There is a relationship between heat stress and wind direction to the chromium levels in urine (p 0.05). This explains that work environment factors can increase chromium levels in the urine of informal electroplating workers.

  9. Work Environment Factors and Their Influence on Urinary Chromium Levels in Informal Electroplating Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyaningsih Yuliani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the informal sector which absorbs labor was electroplating business. This sector uses chromium as coating material because it was strong, corrosion resistant and strong. Nonetheless hexavalent chromium is highly toxic if inhaled, swallowed and contact with skin. Poor hygiene, the lack of work environment factors and sanitation conditions can increase the levels of chromium in the body. This aimed of this study was to analyze the association between work environment factors and levels of urinary chromium in informal electroplating worker. A Purposive study was conducted in Tegal Central Java. The research subjects were 66 male workers. Chi Square analysis was used to establish an association between work environment factors and level of urinary chromium. There is a relationship between heat stress and wind direction to the chromium levels in urine (p 0.05. This explains that work environment factors can increase chromium levels in the urine of informal electroplating workers.

  10. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  11. Chromium carcinogenicity: California strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeff, G V; Satin, K; Painter, P; Zeise, L; Popejoy, C; Murchison, G

    1989-10-01

    Hexavalent chromium was identified by California as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in January 1986. The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) concurred with the findings of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate the carcinogenicity of chromium in both animals and humans. CDHS did not find any compelling evidence demonstrating the existence of a threshold with respect to chromium carcinogenesis. Experimental data was judged inadequate to assess potential human reproductive risks from ambient exposures. Other health effects were not expected to occur at ambient levels. The theoretically increased lifetime carcinogenic risk from a continuous lifetime exposure to hexavalent chromium fell within the range 12-146 cancer cases per nanogram hexavalent chromium per cubic meter of air per million people exposed, depending on the potency estimate used. The primary sources found to contribute significantly to the risk of exposure were chrome platers, chromic acid anodizing facilities and cooling towers utilizing hexavalent chromium as a corrosion inhibitor. Evaluation of genotoxicity data, animal studies and epidemiological studies indicates that further consideration should be given to the potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium via the oral route.

  12. Synthesis of polystyrene coated SiC nanowires as fillers in a polyurethane matrix for electromechanical conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybak, Andrzej; Warde, Micheline; Bechelany, Mikhael; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Berangere; Cornu, David; Miele, Philippe [Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, UMR 5615 CNRS, Universite Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Beyou, Emmanuel; Chaumont, Philippe [Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres, UMRCNRS 5223, Laboratoire des Materiaux Polymeres et des Biomateriaux, Universite Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 15 Boulevard Latarget, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Guiffard, Benoit; Seveyrat, Laurence; Guyomar, Daniel, E-mail: beyou@univ-lyon1.fr, E-mail: David.Cornu@iemm.univ-montp2.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF-INSA Lyon, Batiment Gustave Ferrie, 8 rue de la Physique, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2010-04-09

    Grafting of polystyrene (PS) from silica coating of silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) has been performed by a two-step nitroxide mediated free radical polymerization (NMP) of styrene. First, an alkoxyamine based on N-tert-butyl-N-(1-diethylphosphono-2,2-dimethylpropyl) nitroxide (DEPN) was covalently attached onto NWs through free surface silanol groups. To immobilize the alkoxyamine initiator on the silica surface, alkoxylamine was formed in situ by the simultaneous reaction of polymerizable acryloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS), azobis isobutyronitrile (AIBN), and DEPN, which was used as a radical trap. Polystyrene chains with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersity were then grown from the alkoxyamine-functionalized NWs surface in the presence of a 'free' sacrificial styrylDEPN alkoxyamine. Both the initiator and polystyrene chains were characterized by FTIR and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR and quantified by TGA. Ensuing nanocomposites were characterized by FEG-SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy. EDX analysis performed on functionalized nanowires during FEG-SEM analysis also gave evidence of grafting by a strong increase in the average C/Si atomic ratio. Incorporation of 2 wt% NWs into the polyurethane (PU) matrix has been carried out to prepare homogeneous nanocomposite films. The electric field induced thickness strain response has been investigated for the polystyrene-grafted silica coated SiC NWs (PU-SiC-SiO{sub 2}-PS) nanocomposites and compared to pure polyurethane film and PU-SiC-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite without polystyrene grafting. At a moderate electric field of 10 V {mu}m{sup -1}, SiC-SiO{sub 2}-PS loading increased the strain level of pure PU by a factor of 2.2. This improvement came partially due to polystyrene grafting since PU-SiC-SiO{sub 2} films showed only a 1.7 times increase. The observed higher strain response of these nanocomposites makes them very attractive for micro-electromechanical applications.

  13. Coatings for fast breeder reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    Several types of metallurgical coatings are used in the unique environments of the fast breeder reactor. Most of the coatings have been developed for tribological applications, but some also serve as corrosion barriers, diffusion barriers, or radionuclide traps. The materials that have consistently given the best performance as tribological coatings in the breeder reactor environments have been coatings based on chromium carbide, nickel aluminide, or Tribaloy 700 (a nickel-base hard-facing alloy). Other coatings that have been qualified for limited applications include chromium plating for low temperature galling protection and nickel plating for radionuclide trapping

  14. Environmentally Friendly Anticorrosion Coating for High Strength Fasteners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    electroplated coatings followed by a hexavalent chrome rinse. The environmental and health hazards associated with cadmium and hexavalent chromium are...have been used with cadmium (Cd) electroplated coatings, followed by a hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) rinse. The environmental and human health hazards...followed by a hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) rinse. The environmental and human health hazards associated with both cadmium and chromates are well

  15. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, T.; Kudo, K.

    1980-01-01

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  16. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC; de Bruijn PJ; van Keulen A; Verburgh JJ; van der Woerd KF

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  17. Super-adiabatic combustion in Al2O3 and SiC coated porous media for thermoelectric power conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Kyle T.; Waters, Oliver; Bubnovich, Valeri; Orlovskaya, Nina; Chen, Ruey-Hung

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of ultra-lean fuel/air mixtures provides an efficient way to convert the chemical energy of hydrocarbons and low-calorific fuels into useful power. Matrix-stabilized porous medium combustion is an advanced technique in which a solid porous medium within the combustion chamber conducts heat from the hot gaseous products in the upstream direction to preheat incoming reactants. This heat recirculation extends the standard flammability limits, allowing the burning of ultra-lean and low-calorific fuel mixtures and resulting a combustion temperature higher than the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature of the mixture (i.e., super-adiabatic combustion). The heat generated by this combustion process can be converted into electricity with thermoelectric generators, which is the goal of this study. The design of a porous media burner coupled with a thermoelectric generator and its testing are presented. The combustion zone media was a highly-porous alumina matrix interposed between upstream and downstream honeycomb structures with pore sizes smaller than the flame quenching distance, preventing the flame from propagating outside of the central section. Experimental results include temperature distributions inside the combustion chamber and across a thermoelectric generator; along with associated current, voltage and power output values. Measurements were obtained for a catalytically inert Al 2 O 3 medium and a SiC coated medium, which was tested for the ability to catalyze the super-adiabatic combustion. The combustion efficiency was obtained for stoichiometric and ultra-lean (near the lean flammability limit) mixtures of CH 4 and air. - Highlights: • Design of a porous burner coupled with a thermoelectric module. • Super-adiabatic combustion in a highly-porous ceramic matrix was investigated. • Both alumina and silicon carbide ceramic surfaces were used as porous media. • Catalytic properties of Al 2 O 3 and SiC ceramic surfaces were studied

  18. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... removed in multiple batch extractions from the leach liquor and titanium losses were minimal (< 1%). The chromium content of extracted solutions was reduced to less than 1 ppm and thermal hydrolysis of these solutions yielded white titanium(IV) oxide pigments that are suitable for use in the coatings pigment industry.

  19. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  20. Investigation of Plasma Spray Coatings as an Alternative to Hard Chrome Plating on Internal Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Legg, Keith O; Sartwell, Bruce D; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel; Nestler, Montia; Dambra, Christopher; Wang, Daming; Quets, John; Natishan, Paul; Bretz, Philip; Devereaux, Jon

    2006-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on an investigation of deposition of coatings using miniature plasma spray guns that could replace hard chromium on internal surfaces where conventional...

  1. Influence of silane films in the zinc coating post-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Marlla Vallerius da; Menezes, Tiago Lemos; Malfatti, Celia de Fraga; Muller, Iduvirges Lourdes; Oliveira, Claudia Trindade; Bonino, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The sol-gel process based on silanes precursors appeared in recent years as a strong alternative for post-treatment to provide an optimization of the protective efficacy of zinc. Moreover, this process has been used to replace chemical chromating conversion based on hexavalent chromium. The silane films are hybrid compounds that provide characteristics of both polymeric materials, such as flexibility and functional compatibility, and ceramic materials, such as high strength and durability. The present work aimed to evaluate the influence of silane films obtained by dip-coating, on the characteristics of electrodeposited zinc coatings. The xerogel films showed a homogeneous surface and a better performance on the corrosion resistance than zinc coating without post-treatment, what can be confirmed by the electrochemical impedance results. These tests showed that application of the silane film promotes the occurrence of one more time constant compared to pure zinc system, hindering the corrosion process. (author)

  2. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddard-Gilbert, K.; Blincoe, C.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate ( 51 Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  3. Ultra low nanowear in novel chromium/amorphous chromium carbide nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yate, Luis; Martínez-de-Olcoz, Leyre; Esteve, Joan; Lousa, Arturo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we report the first observation of novel nanocomposite thin films consisting of nanocrystalline chromium embedded in an amorphous chromium carbide matrix (nc-Cr/a-CrC) with relatively high hardness (∼22,3 GPa) and ultra low nanowear. The films were deposited onto silicon substrates using a magnetic filtered cathodic arc deposition system at various negative bias voltages, from 50 to 450 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggested the co-existence of chromium and chromium carbide phases, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the presence of the nc-Cr/a-CrC structure. The friction coefficient measured with the ball-on disk technique and the nanowear results showed a strong correlation between the macro and nano-tribological properties of the samples. These novel nanocomposite films show promising properties as solid lubricant and wear resistant coatings with relatively high hardness, low friction coefficient and ultra low nanowear.

  4. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  5. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  6. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R R

    1980-11-01

    Occupational exposure represents the main source of human contamination by chromium. For non-occupationally exposed people the major environmental exposure to chromium occurs as a consequence of its presence in food. Chromium must be considered as an essential element. Its deficiency impairs glucose metabolism. Trivalent chromium salts are poorly absorbed through the gastro-intestinal and respiratory tracts because they do not cross membranes easily. Hexavalent chromium can be absorbed by the oral and pulmonary routes and probably also through the skin. After its absorption, hexavalent chromium is rapidly reduced to the trivalent form which is probably the only form to be found in biological material. Epidemiological studies have shown that some chromium salts (mainly the slightly soluble hexavalent salts) are carcinogens. Lung cancers have, indeed, often been reported among workers in chromate-producing industry and, to a lesser extent, in workers from the chrome-pigment industry. The first attempts to produce cancers in experimental animals by inhalation or parenteral introduction gave negative or equivocal results but, from 1960, positive results have been obtained with various chromium compounds. As for the carcinogenic activity, the mutagenicity of chromium has mainly been found with hexavalent salts. In the majority of assay systems used, trivalent chromium appears inactive. It can be considered as evident, however, that the ultimate mutagen which binds to the genetic material is the trivalent form produced intracellularly from hexavalent chromium, the apparent lack of activity of the trivalent form being due to its poor cellular uptake.

  7. An environment-friendly phosphate chemical conversion coating on novel Mg-9Li-7Al-1Sn and Mg-9Li-5Al-3Sn-1Zn alloys with remarkable corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rita; Siddiqui, Abdul Rahim; Balani, Kantesh

    2018-06-01

    An environment-friendly phosphate chemical conversion (PCC) coating has been deposited on novel LAT971 (Mg-9 wt%Li-7 wt%Al-1 wt%Sn) and LATZ9531 (Mg-9 wt%Li-5 wt%Al-3 wt%Sn-1 wt%Zn) alloys for improving their corrosion resistance. A dense and homogeneous flower like morphology (∼30 μm thick) was observed on the PCC coated Mg-Li based alloys. The presence of calcium hydrogen phosphate hydrate, tricalcium phosphate and trimagnesium phosphate were confirmed from the X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. A lower corrosion current density of 6.74 × 10-7 mA/cm2 and 5.39 × 10-7 mA/cm2 was obtained for PCC coated alloys in 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution than that of uncoated LAT971 (0.82 mA/cm2) and LATZ9531 (0.34 mA/cm2) alloys, respectively, which offers corrosion protection efficiency of >99%. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has revealed that the inner PCC coating (at coating/substrate interface) delay the direct contact between electrolyte and substrate, which offered higher charge transfer resistance (>4 orders of magnitude) than that of uncoated alloys. Thus, the PCC coating provides an effective corrosion protection to the ultra-lightweight LAT971 and LATZ9531 alloys surface and may be helpful in proving good anchoring with the top organic coatings or paints.

  8. Effect of supplementing finishing pigs with different sources of chromium on performance and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Manha Peres

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the dietary supplementation of different sources of chromium (inorganic: chromium sulfate and chelated: chromium-methionine during the finishing period of pigs to obtain improvements in the animal performance, and carcass and meat quality. The statistical design was randomized blocks, where 44 barrows, with an initial weight 60.49±5.12 kg, were divided into four blocks (heavier, heavy, light and lighter according to initial weight. The experimental diets were isoenergetic and isonutrient, except for the chromium level. The treatments were divided as follows: control (without chromium, control + 200 ppb of inorganic chromium (chromium sulfate, and control + 200 ppb of chelated chromium (chromium-methionine. In the performance measures, the stall was considered the experimental unit and in the blood parameters, carcass and meat evaluations each animal constituted the experimental unit. Animals were slaughtered when they reached the final average weight of 107.23±5.23 kg. Blood samples were collected and tested for blood parameters (cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose as well as carcass quality (hot and cold weights, yield, loin-eye area, muscle depth and backfat thickness and meat quality (initial and final pH, drip loss, color, chemical composition and lipid oxidation parameters. Chromium-methionine supplementation provides a greater daily weight gain only compared with the animals that are not supplemented with chromium, because feed conversion is better as compared with the other treatments. After 24 hours of storage, the meat from pigs supplemented either with chromium-methionine or with chromium sulfate presents lower lipid oxidation than that from non-supplemented animals. However, after three days of storage, only chromim-methionine is effective in reducing lipid oxidation.

  9. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  10. Development of control system of coating of rod hydraulic cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizhambaeva, S. Zh; Maximova, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, requirements to materials of hydraulic cylinders and methods of eliminating the main factors affecting the quality of the applied coatings rod hydraulic cylinders. The chromium plating process - one of ways of increase of anti-friction properties of coatings rods, stability to the wear and corrosion. The article gives description of differences of the stand-speed chromium plating process from other types of chromium plating that determines a conclusion about cutting time of chromium plating process. Conducting the analysis of technological equipment suggested addressing the modernization of high-speed chromium plating processes by automation and mechanization. Control system developed by design of schematic block diagram of a modernized and stand-speed chromium plating process.

  11. Cavitation Erosion of Plasma -sprayed Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. J.; Park, J. S.; Jeon, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten Carbide, chromium carbide and chromium oxide coatings were obtained on a 304 stainless steel substrate by plasma spraying technique. The coated samples were exposed to cavitation generated in distilled water by a 20KHz ultrasonic horn. The results of investigation reveal that all the samples tested are significantly eroded even within ten minutes of exposure, indicative of a short incubation period. The eroded surfaces can be characterized as having large pits and flat smooth areas. The latter may be associated with the poor cohesive strength of the coatings, which leads to the failures between individual lamellae

  12. [Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, M; Gatto, M P; Gordiani, A; Paci, E; Proietto, A

    2007-01-01

    Hygienists are interested in hexavalent chromium due to its genotoxic and carcinogenic effect on humans. The use of products containing hexavalent chromium is decreasing in many industrial fields because of the substitution with less-toxic compounds. In the aeronautical industry, however, the chromate are added to primer paint as a corrosion inhibitor of aircrafts surfaces: so hexavalent chromium compounds are available in many primers with a composition ranging from 10% to 13%. The application of these primers by using electrostatic guns potentially exposes painting and coating workers at high concentrations of aerosols containing Cr(VI). The aim of the present study is the evaluation of professional exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting, by adopting both environmental personal sampling and biological monitoring. To valuate workers exposure levels the personal measurements results have been compared with the exposure limit values (TLV-TWA) and the urinary chromium contents with the biological exposure indices (IBE). Moreover the strategy of coupling environmental sampling with biological monitoring seems to be a useful instrument to measure the validity of the individual protection devices.

  13. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics: Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Determine the suitability of trivalent chromium conversion coatings that meet the requirements of MIL-DTL-5541, Type II, for use in applications where high-frequency electrical performance is important. Evaluate the ability of hexavalent chrome free pretreated aluminum to form adequate EMI seals, and maintain that seal while being subjected to harsh environmental conditions. Assess the performance of trivalent chromium pretreatments against a known control hexavalent chrome pretreatment before and after they have been exposed to a set of environmental conditions. It is known that environmental testing causes a decrease in shielding effectiveness when hexavalent chrome pretreatments are used (Alodine 1200s). Need to determine how shielding effectiveness will be affected with the use of hexavalent chrome free pretreatments. Performance will be assessed by evaluating shielding effectiveness (SE) test data from a variety of test samples comprised of different aluminum types and/or conversion coatings. The formation of corrosion will be evaluated between the mating surfaces and gasket to assess the corrosion resistant properties of the pretreatments, comparing the hexavalent control to the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments.

  14. Nanomagnetic domains of chromium deposited on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Andrew C.; Faulkner, Michael K.; Harris, Robert C.; Goddard, Alex; Abbott, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The drive to create ever smaller magnetic memory devices has led to the development of new nanomagnetic domains on surfaces. This paper reports the development of nano-chromium magnetic domains obtained using electrodeposition on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers arrays. Attempts to achieve this using conventional aqueous solutions were unsuccessful even after thin nickel underlayers were applied. The use of a novel electrolyte, a deep eutectic solvent, made from choline chloride: chromium (III) chloride enabled highly conformal overcoatings of chromium on individual bare carbon nanotubes to be obtained. Very high aspect ratio metal microstructures could be obtained by this novel technology. Magnetic imaging of the coated nanoarrays showed there to be clear magnetic character to the coating when the thin coatings were applied but this disappeared when the deposits were thicker and more contiguous. - Highlights: ► Nanoscale chromium deposited from non-aqueous electrolyte shows magnetic behavior. ► Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes conformally coated with chromium metal. ► Ionic liquid electrolyte superior to chromic acid for plating high aspect ratio structures.

  15. Nanomagnetic domains of chromium deposited on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Andrew C., E-mail: a.wright@glyndwr.ac.uk [Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Materials Science Research Center, Glyndwr University, Wrexham LL11 2AW (United Kingdom); Faulkner, Michael K., E-mail: m.faulkner@manchester.ac.uk [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Harris, Robert C.; Goddard, Alex; Abbott, Andrew P., E-mail: apa1@le.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    The drive to create ever smaller magnetic memory devices has led to the development of new nanomagnetic domains on surfaces. This paper reports the development of nano-chromium magnetic domains obtained using electrodeposition on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers arrays. Attempts to achieve this using conventional aqueous solutions were unsuccessful even after thin nickel underlayers were applied. The use of a novel electrolyte, a deep eutectic solvent, made from choline chloride: chromium (III) chloride enabled highly conformal overcoatings of chromium on individual bare carbon nanotubes to be obtained. Very high aspect ratio metal microstructures could be obtained by this novel technology. Magnetic imaging of the coated nanoarrays showed there to be clear magnetic character to the coating when the thin coatings were applied but this disappeared when the deposits were thicker and more contiguous. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoscale chromium deposited from non-aqueous electrolyte shows magnetic behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes conformally coated with chromium metal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ionic liquid electrolyte superior to chromic acid for plating high aspect ratio structures.

  16. Chromium carbide-CNT nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Virendra; Diaz, Rene; Balani, Kantesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Seal, Sudipta

    2009-01-01

    Chromium carbide is widely used as a tribological coating material in high-temperature applications requiring high wear resistance and hardness. Herein, an attempt has been made to further enhance the mechanical and wear properties of chromium carbide coatings by reinforcing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a potential replacement of soft binder matrix using plasma spraying. The microstructures of the sprayed CNT-reinforced Cr 3 C 2 coatings were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were assessed using micro-Vickers hardness, nanoindentation and wear measurements. CNT reinforcement improved the hardness of the coating by 40% and decreased the wear rate of the coating by almost 45-50%. Cr 3 C 2 reinforced with 2 wt.% CNT had an elastic modulus 304.5 ± 29.2 GPa, hardness of 1175 ± 60 VH 0.300 and a coefficient of friction of 0.654. It was concluded that the CNT reinforcement increased the wear resistance by forming intersplat bridges while the improvement in the hardness was attributed to the deformation resistance of CNTs under indentation

  17. Advanced Powder Coating Systems for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    UVCPC • Conclusions • DoD spends billions of dollars annually on protective organic coatings – Hexavalent chrome primer use still widespread – Contains...Elimination of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) • Reduction/Elimination of ESOH Concerns – Elimination of hexavalent chromium – Elimination of free...production and release; hexavalent chromium; free isocyanates; up to 72 hrs “dry to fly” time Longer cure times than traditional primers and

  18. Advances In Hexavalent Chromium Removal At Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshem, D.O.; Riddelle, J.

    2012-01-01

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  19. Processing and properties of electrodeposited layered surface coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    Hard chromium, produced by conventional dir ect curl ent (DC) electrodeposition, cannot be deposited to thicknesses gl enter than about 5 mu m because of the buildup of processing stresses which cause channel cracks in the coating. Much thicker chromium coatings map be produced by depositing a la...... geometry is almost always analogous to bending, and fracture resistance is provided through deviation of the channel crack by weak interfaces, resulting in 'terrace cracking'....

  20. Chromium in Postmortem Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Lech, Teresa; Konopka, Tomasz; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2018-04-17

    Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the negative effects caused by the presence and constant increase in concentration of heavy metals in the environment, as well as to the determination of their content in human biological samples. In this paper, the concentration of chromium in samples of blood and internal organs collected at autopsy from 21 female and 39 male non-occupationally exposed subjects is presented. Elemental analysis was carried out by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Reference ranges of chromium in the blood, brain, stomach, liver, kidneys, lungs, and heart (wet weight) in the population of Southern Poland were found to be 0.11-16.4 ng/mL, 4.7-136 ng/g, 6.1-76.4 ng/g, 11-506 ng/g, 2.9-298 ng/g, 13-798 ng/g, and 3.6-320 ng/g, respectively.

  1. Formation of a cerium conversion coating on magnesium alloy using ascorbic acid as additive. Characterisation and anticorrosive properties of the formed films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Loperena

    2016-12-01

    The presence of HAsc in the conversion solution causes changes in the morphology, adherence and anticorrosive performance of the films. The improvement in the corrosion resistance is closely associated with the corrosion inhibition properties of HAsc.

  2. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  3. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  4. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  5. Differences in proliferation, differentiation, and cytokine production by bone cells seeded on titanium-nitride and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, R.P.; Nolte, P.A.; Semeins, C.M.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium-nitride coating is used to improve cobalt-chromium-molybdenum implant survival in total knee arthroplasty, but its effect on osteoconduction is unknown. Chromium and cobalt ions negatively affect the growth and metabolism of cultured osteoblasts while enhancing osteoclastogenic cytokine

  6. Structure and corrosion properties of Cr coating deposited on aerospace bearing steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Fengxiang; Zheng, Lijing; Zhang, Hu

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion protection of chromium coating deposited on aerospace bearing steels by using the Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc deposition- Metal Evaporation Vacuum Arc duplex technique (MEVVA-FCVA) had been investigated. The protection efficiency of chromium coating on different substrate materials had also been evaluated. The chromium coating was mainly composed of nanocrystallineα-Cr in a range of 50-200 nm. The orientation distributions of α-Cr film on substrates with different composition had a certain difference to each other. Electrochemical experimental results indicated that the chromium coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of experimental bearing steels in 3.5% NaCl solution. The protective efficiency of chromium films were all over 98%. The corrosion resistance of chromium coating was influenced by the chemical composition of substrate material. The chromium coatings on higher Cr-containing substrate displayed lower corrosion current density and more positive corrosion potential. The increase of passive film thickness and the formation of a mass of chromium oxide and hydroxide on the surface are responsible for the improved corrosion properties.

  7. Corrosion behaviour of Arc-PVD coatings and hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichel, K.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve a comprehensive protective effect against corrosion and wear stresses, coating systems are increasingly being developed, in which there is a separation of the tasks of the coating materials regarding the protective effect. On the one hand, pure PVD coating systems are used, on the other hand hybrid coatings are examined, where galvanic processes are combined with PVD technique. The results of experiments introduced in this article were determined on Arc-PVD coatings. By this process, titanium nitride and chromium nitride coatings are both deposited directly on the basic material and are also deposited as combination coatings of Ti/TiN and chemical nickel/TiN. (orig.) [de

  8. The effect of cerium-based conversion treatment on the cathodic delamination and corrosion protection performance of carbon steel-fusion-bonded epoxy coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostami, M. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Steel surface was treated by Ce and acid phosphoric solutions. • Ce treatment considerably enhanced the surface energy and produce nanoscale roughness. • Ce treated samples showed enhanced adhesion to FBE coating. • Ce treatment of steel significantly reduced the FBE cathodic delamination rate. • Ce treated sample showed enhanced corrosion resistance. - Abstract: The effect of surface pre-treatment of pipe surface by green cerium compound and phosphoric acid solution on the fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) coating performance was studied. The composition and surface morphology of the steel samples treated by acid and Ce solutions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Also, the surface free energy was evaluated on these samples through contact angle measurements. In addition, the effect of Ce and acid washing procedures on the adhesion properties and corrosion protection performance of the FBE was examined by pull-off, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results showed that compared to acid washing, the chemical treatment by Ce solution noticeably increased the surface free energy of steel, improved the adhesion properties of FBE, decreased the cathodic delamination rate of FBE, and enhanced the coating corrosion resistance compared to the acid washed samples.

  9. Electronic structure of chromium-doped lead telluride-based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skipetrov, E.P.; Pichugin, N.A.; Slyn'ko, E.I.; Slyn'ko, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structure, composition, galvanomagnetic and oscillatory properties of the Pb 1-x-y Sn x Cr y Te (x = 0, 0.05-0.30, y ≤ 0.01) alloys have been investigated with varying matrix composition and chromium impurity concentration. It is shown that the chromium impurity atoms dissolve in the crystal lattice at least up to 1 mol.%. The following increase of the chromium concentration leads to the appearance of microscopic regions enriched with chromium and inclusions of Cr-Te compounds. A decrease of the hole concentration, a p-n-conversion of the conductivity type and a pinning of the Fermi level by the chromium resonant level are observed with increasing chromium content. Initial rates of changes in the free carrier concentration on doping are determined. The dependences of electron concentration and Fermi level on tin content are calculated by the two-band Kane dispersion relation. A diagram of electronic structure rearrangement for the chromium-doped alloys with varying the matrix composition is proposed.

  10. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    the δ53Cr value of continental runoff into the ocean. The major findings were that river water is characterised by heavy δ53Cr values (+0.1‰ to +1.6‰), while soils are characterised by light δ53Cr values (-0.3‰), relative to the catchment bedrock (-0.17‰ to -0.21‰), indicating that Cr isotopes......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify......Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  11. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite ore by solvent extraction with trioctylamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Olanipekun

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The selective removal of chromium, a trace impurity that degrades the whiteness of titanium(IV oxide pigments, from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite, was investigated by solvent extraction with xylene solutions of trioctylamine. Important factors of commercial significance affecting the extraction operation have been examined. More than 99% of the chromium was selectively removed in multiple batch extractions from the leach liquor and titanium losses were minimal (< 1%. The chromium content of extracted solutions was reduced to less than 1 ppm and thermal hydrolysis of these solutions yielded white titanium(IV oxide pigments that are suitable for use in the coatings pigment industry.

  12. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  13. Contribution of Titanium, Chromium and Carbon Buffer Interlayers to Bio-Tribological Properties of Multilayer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Ł

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research studies on bio-tribological protective coatings of titanium, chromium and carbon based have been performed. Thin films were fabricated by hybrid PLD technique (PLD supported by magnetron sputtering. Coatings consisted of two parts; the inner part (first from the substrate in each case was formed by titanium or chromium/titanium nitride or chromium nitride (Ti/TiN or Cr/Cr2N. The outer part was formed by pure DLC or multilayer DLC/Ti or Cr. No delamination was found at the interface. Titanium or chromium metallic layer was deposited as a first layer directly on the metallic substrate to avoid delamination. All individual layers were built of columnar nano-crystallites. Mechanisms of the mechanical wear of analyzed systems were presented, focusing on the cracking propagation in ball-on-disc tests using an 1 N and 5 N applied loads for 5 000 cycles. Complex microstructure analysis of presented nano-multilayer coatings, before and after mechanical tests, were performed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The highest stress concentration during mechanical uploading was moved through the multilayer coating by breaking only one layer at the time. The microstructure characterization revealed that cracking propagating in the outer part of the coating was stopped at the interface. In the case of the inner part of the coating Ti/TiN; Cr/Cr2N, ceramic layers showed brittle cracking, while metallic (Ti or Cr ones deformed plastically. Fabricated coatings were subjected under the analysis in the biomechanical system optimized to test for the direct contact with a human whole blood. The study considered physiological conditions mainly related to the temperature and humidity and the frequency of cyclic deformation of the artificial vessel into which the tested sample was introduced.

  14. Corrosion resistance of Cr(III) conversion treatments applied on electrogalvanised steel and subjected to chloride containing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomachuk, C.R.; Elsner, C.I.; Di Sarli, A.R.; Ferraz, O.B.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of pure zinc coatings can be improved through the application of suitable chemical passivation treatments. Hexavalent chromium compounds have widely been used to formulate conversion layers providing better anticorrosive protection as well as anchorage properties to painting systems. However, taking into account that they are produced using hazardous chemical compounds, the development of alternative and 'green' technologies with equivalent protective performance is a paramount purpose of many R and D laboratories working around the world. In the present paper, the corrosion behavior of zinc coatings obtained from free-cyanide alkaline baths and later subjected to a Cr 3+ based passivation treatment, with and without a sealing treatment, was studied. The experimental work involved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 0.5 M NaCl solution, surface microstructural and morphological characterization by electronic microscopy as well as chemical analysis by EDXS. The salt spray test was also performed. The analysis and interpretation of all the data coming from this battery of tests allowed inferring that both the Cr 3+ based conversion treatment + adequate sealer presented a good corrosion resistance and, therefore, they could be used as neither a polluting nor toxic alternative to the traditional chromate coatings.

  15. Corrosion resistance of Cr(III) conversion treatments applied on electrogalvanised steel and subjected to chloride containing media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomachuk, C.R., E-mail: celia@br.surtec.com [Corrosion and Degradation Division, National Institute of Technology, Av. Venezuela, 82 sala 608, CEP 20081-312, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Elsner, C.I. [CIDEPINT: Research and Development Center in Paint Technology (CIC-CCT-CONICET-La Plata), Av. 52 s/n entre 121 y 122, CP B1900AYB, La Plata (Argentina); Di Sarli, A.R., E-mail: direccion@cidepint.gov.ar [CIDEPINT: Research and Development Center in Paint Technology (CIC-CCT-CONICET-La Plata), Av. 52 s/n entre 121 y 122, CP B1900AYB, La Plata (Argentina); Ferraz, O.B. [Corrosion and Degradation Division, National Institute of Technology, Av. Venezuela, 82 sala 608, CEP 20081-312, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    The corrosion resistance of pure zinc coatings can be improved through the application of suitable chemical passivation treatments. Hexavalent chromium compounds have widely been used to formulate conversion layers providing better anticorrosive protection as well as anchorage properties to painting systems. However, taking into account that they are produced using hazardous chemical compounds, the development of alternative and 'green' technologies with equivalent protective performance is a paramount purpose of many R and D laboratories working around the world. In the present paper, the corrosion behavior of zinc coatings obtained from free-cyanide alkaline baths and later subjected to a Cr{sup 3+} based passivation treatment, with and without a sealing treatment, was studied. The experimental work involved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements in 0.5 M NaCl solution, surface microstructural and morphological characterization by electronic microscopy as well as chemical analysis by EDXS. The salt spray test was also performed. The analysis and interpretation of all the data coming from this battery of tests allowed inferring that both the Cr{sup 3+} based conversion treatment + adequate sealer presented a good corrosion resistance and, therefore, they could be used as neither a polluting nor toxic alternative to the traditional chromate coatings.

  16. Chromium Uptake Efficiency of Spinacea olaracea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of chromium by Spinacea olaracea and its accumulation in roots and shoots of plants grown in pots at various concentrations of chromium (30, 60, 90,120,150 mg/l). The results revealed that the levels of chromium accumulation in roots and shoots were higher at minimum ...

  17. Magnesium analysis. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Chromium determination in magnesium used in uranium fabrication by magnesiothermics, applicable for chromium content between 2 to 10 ppm. Magnesium is dissolved in sulfuric acid, oxidized by potassium permanganate, the excess of permanganate is eliminated by sodium nitride. Spectrophotometry at 540 nm of the chromium (VI)-diphenylcarbazide complex [fr

  18. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...

  19. Chrome - Free Aluminum Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John H.; Gugel, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation concerns the program to qualify a chrome free coating for aluminum. The program was required due to findings by OSHA and EPA, that hexavalent chromium, used to mitigate corrosion in aerospace aluminum alloys, poses hazards for personnel. This qualification consisted of over 4,000 tests. The tests revealed that a move away from Cr+6, required a system rather than individual components and that the maximum corrosion protection required pretreatment, primer and topcoat.

  20. Biocompatible wear-resistant thick ceramic coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensitisation to immunologically active elements like chromium, cobalt or nickel and debris particle due to wear are serious problems for patients with metallic implants. We tested the approach of using a hard and thick ceramic coating as a wear-resistant protection of titanium implants, avoiding those sensitisation and foreign body problems. We showed that the process parameters strongly influence the coating porosity and, as a consequence, also its hardness.

  1. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  2. Characterization of black and white chromium electrodeposition films. Surface and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, M.; Palomar-Pardave, M. [Departamento de Materiales, UAM-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, Mexico D.F. 02200 (Mexico); Barrera, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Av. Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Huerta, L.; Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2003-11-01

    Thin films of black and white chromium have been prepared by electrodeposition on stainless steel substrates. The potentiodynamic and potentiostatic technique was used in order to prepare these materials. XRD, XPS, SEM and spectral reflectance in the UV-Visible-near IR and medium IR ranges, for both films coatings were characterized. From the SEM analysis, it was found while the black chromium has a lamellar morphology that leads to a strong dispersion level, the white one has a flat morphology. The chemical composition of these thin films was determined by XRD and XPS technique. The XRD results showed that in both cases chromium is the main bulk chemical compound in both films. However, from XPS analysis of these surfaces, it was possible to determine that the most external layers of the films are made of different kinds of chromium compounds. The black chromium film has better optical properties to transform solar energy into thermal energy, and these properties remain practically constant even when heat treated to a high temperature, 400 C. On the other hand the white chromium film is a better substrate for hydrogen evolution reactions than the black one.

  3. The electrochemistry of chromium, chromium-boron and chromium-phosphorus alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, T.P.; Ruf, R.R.; Latanision, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    It is fairly well established that chromium-metalloid interactions represent the key to understanding the remarkable corrosion behavior of TM-Cr-M glasses; (Fe, Ni, Co,...)-Cr-(P, Si, C, S). The character and kinetics of passive film growth on the glasses are being studied ni order to assess the role of the film former, chromium, and the metalloids in the passivation process. A series of thin film microcrystalline chromium, Cr-B and Cr-P binary alloys have been fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. Vacuum melted conventionally processed chromium has also been studied. Examination of these materials in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and lM HCl by voltammetry, potentiostatic and impedance techniques yields the following conclusion: 1. Pure chromium with a grain size varying from < 400 A to 0.5 mm exhibits no well defined differences in electrochemical behavior in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. 2. The tremendous corrosion resistance of Cr-B alloys has been confirmed. 3. The beneficial effects observed for boron alloyed with chromium may be considered surprising in view of the neutral/negative influence of alloying boron with iron, i.e. Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/. 4. The interaction of the electrochemistry of the metalloid constituent with that of the transition base element determines the corrosion behavior. 5. Preliminary work with Cr-P alloys indicates that certain compositions exhibit promising properties - certain films were found to be intact after two days of immersion in concentrated HCl. Further work is in progress

  4. Hard Chrome-Coated and Fullerene-Doped Metal Surfaces in Orthopedic Bearings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Robert; Feige, Katja; Dos Santos, Claudia Beatriz; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2017-12-20

    Metal-on-metal bearings for total hip replacements have been introduced as an alternative to polyethylene in young and more active patients. These have, however, been shown to be prone to implant malpositioning and have been limited by some specific design features. In that context, coatings present an option to increase wear resistance by keeping the high fracture strength of the metal substrate. A custom-made electroplating setup was designed for the coating of CoCr substrates using (a) an industrial standard chromium electrolyte; (b) a custom-made hexavalent chromium (Cr 6+ ) electrolyte with a reduced chromium trioxide (CrO₃) content, both without solid additives and (c) with the addition of fullerene (C 60 ) nanoparticles; and (d) a trivalent chromium (Cr 3+ ) electrolyte with C 60 addition. All coatings showed an increase in microhardness compared with the metal substrate. Trivalent coatings were thinner (10 µm) than the hexavalent coatings (23-40 µm) and resulted in increased roughness and crack density. Wear was found to be reduced for the hexavalent chromium coatings by 70-84% compared with the CoCr-CoCr reference bearing while the trivalent chromium coating even increased wear by more than 300%. The addition of fullerenes to the electrolyte did not show any further tribological effect.

  5. Hard Chrome-Coated and Fullerene-Doped Metal Surfaces in Orthopedic Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sonntag

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-on-metal bearings for total hip replacements have been introduced as an alternative to polyethylene in young and more active patients. These have, however, been shown to be prone to implant malpositioning and have been limited by some specific design features. In that context, coatings present an option to increase wear resistance by keeping the high fracture strength of the metal substrate. A custom-made electroplating setup was designed for the coating of CoCr substrates using (a an industrial standard chromium electrolyte; (b a custom-made hexavalent chromium (Cr6+ electrolyte with a reduced chromium trioxide (CrO3 content, both without solid additives and (c with the addition of fullerene (C60 nanoparticles; and (d a trivalent chromium (Cr3+ electrolyte with C60 addition. All coatings showed an increase in microhardness compared with the metal substrate. Trivalent coatings were thinner (10 µm than the hexavalent coatings (23–40 µm and resulted in increased roughness and crack density. Wear was found to be reduced for the hexavalent chromium coatings by 70–84% compared with the CoCr–CoCr reference bearing while the trivalent chromium coating even increased wear by more than 300%. The addition of fullerenes to the electrolyte did not show any further tribological effect.

  6. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  7. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  8. Treatment of chromium contaminated soil using bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwanti, Ipung Fitri; Putri, Tesya Paramita; Kurniawan, Setyo Budi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium contamination in soil occurs due to the disposal of chromium industrial wastewater or sludge that excess the quality standard. Chromium concentration in soil is ranged between 1 to 300 mg/kg while the maximum health standard is 2.5 mg/kg. Bioremediation is one of technology that could be used for remediating heavy metal contamination in soil. Bacteria have an ability to remove heavy metal from soil. One bacteria species that capable to remove chromium from soil is Bacillus subtilis. The aim of this research was to know the chromium removal percentage in contaminated soil by Bacillus subtilis. Artificial chromium contaminated soil was used by mixing 425gram sand and chromium trichloride solution. Concentration of chromium added into the spiked soil were 50, 75, and 100 mg/L. During 14 days, pH, soil temperature and soil moisture were tested. Initial and final number of bacterial colony and chromium concentration analysed. The result showed that the highest percentage of chromium removal was 11% at a chromium concentration of 75 mg/L

  9. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wenjun; Qian Qinfang; Hou Xiaolin; Feng Weiyue; Chai Zhifang

    2000-01-01

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  10. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  11. Reactions of N2O5 with Salty and Surfactant-Coated Glycerol: Interfacial Conversion of Br- to Br2 Mediated by Alkylammonium Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaloski, Michael A; Gord, Joseph R; Staudt, Sean; Quinn, Sarah L; Bertram, Timothy H; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2017-05-18

    Gas-liquid scattering and product-yield experiments are used to investigate reactions of N 2 O 5 with glycerol containing Br - and surfactant ions. N 2 O 5 oxidizes Br - to Br 2 for every solution tested: 2.7 M NaBr, 0.03 M tetrahexylammonium bromide (THABr), 0.03 M THABr + 0.5 M NaBr, 0.03 M THABr + 0.5 M NaCl, 0.03 M THABr + 0.01 M sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 0.01 M cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr). N 2 O 5 also reacts with glycerol itself to produce mono- and dinitroglycerin. Surface tension measurements indicate that 0.03 M THABr and 2.7 M NaBr have similar interfacial Br - concentrations, though their bulk Br - concentrations differ by 90-fold. We find that twice as much Br 2 is produced in the presence of THA + , implying that the conversion of Br - to Br 2 is initiated at the interface, perhaps mediated by the charged, hydrophobic pocket within the surface THA + cation. The addition of 0.5 M NaBr, 0.5 M NaCl, or 0.01 M SDS to 0.03 M THABr lowers the Br 2 production rate by 23%, 63%, and 67% of the THABr value, respectively. When CTA + is substituted for THA + , Br 2 production drops to 12% of the THABr value. The generation of Br 2 under such different conditions implies that trace amounts of surface-active alkylammonium ions can catalyze interfacial N 2 O 5 reactions, even when salts and other surfactants are present.

  12. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1994-01-01

    According to the measurements made in this study, the only situation in which chromium (+6) could exist in a plutonium process solution is one in which a feed containing chromium is dissolved in a glass pot dissolver in high nitric acid concentration and at high temperature. But when the resulting feed is prepared for ion exchange, the chemical treatment reduces chromium to the +3 state. Any solution being processed through the evaporator will only contain chromium in the +3 state and any chromium salts remaining in the evaporator bottoms will be chromium +3 salts

  13. Ecologically sustainable coating technology. BehrOxal process; Oekologisch nachhaltige Beschichtungstechnologie. BehrOxal-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-10-15

    Since 1st July, 2007, any more hexavalent chromium (chromium(VI)) has to be used in vehicles. Two years ago, Behr GmbH and Co. KG (Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany) developed a new procedure in order to coat evaporators in air conditioners perfectly chrome-free. Since one year, the coating process is used serially. The resonance of the customers is positively throughout - so the manufacturer.

  14. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  15. Chromium base high performance materials: Where and how do they come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Kap

    1996-08-01

    The origin of chromium base performance materials (CBPM) is described. CBPM may include (1) trivalent chromium chemicals such as chromic acetate, chromic chloride, chromic bromide, chromic fluoride, chromic iodide, chromic phosphate, and chromic sulfate; (2) hexavalent chromium chemicals such as chromic acid, lithium chromate, sodium chromate, sodium dichromate, and potassium dichromate; (3) oxide forms of chromium such as black chrome, chromium dioxide, chromium oxide, and chromium hydroxide; and (4) other chromium compounds such as chromium aluminide, chromium boride, chromium carbide, chromium molybdate, chromium nitride, chromium silicide, chromium tungstate and lanthanum chromite. Extensive reviews of production processes, properties, and applications/end uses of CBPM are made.

  16. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L.; Bondioli, F.; Cannio, M.; Ferrari, A.M.; Lancellotti, I.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr 0.04 Sn 0.97 SiO 5 and green Ca 3 Cr 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr 2 O 3 . The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr 2 O 3

  17. X-ray diffraction on nanoparticles chromium and nickel oxides obtained by gelatin using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Alan Silva de; Medeiros, Angela Maria de Lemos; Miranda, Marcus Aurelio Ribeiro; Almeida, Juliana Marcela Abraao; Remedios, Claudio Marcio Rocha; Silva, Lindomar R.D. da; Gouveia, S.T.; Sasaki, Jose Marcos; Jardim, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles has many applications like green pigments, wear resistance, and coating materials for thermal protection. Several methods to produce chromium oxide nanoparticles have already been studied, gas condensation, laser induced pyrolysis, microwave plasma, sol-gel and gamma radiation methods. Many applications for this kind of material can be provide concerning the particle size. For instance, particle size approximately of 200 nm are preferable as pigment due to its opacity and below 50 nm can be used as transparent pigment. In this work we have demonstrated that chromium and nickel oxide nanoparticles can be prepared by gelatin method. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) show that mean particle size for chromium oxide of 15-150 nm and nickel oxide of 90 nm were obtained for several temperature of sintering. The X-Ray powder diffraction pattern were performed using Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray source at XRD1 beamline in National Laboratory of Light Synchrotron (LNLS). (author)

  18. Dietary inclusion of chromium to improve growth performance and immune-competence of broilers under heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagwa M. Norain

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with chromium chloride, CrCl3.6H2O (2mg kg–1 basal diet on the performance and immune response of broiler chickens under heat stress condition (25-43°C. A total of 80 one-day-old broiler chicks (Ross-308 were assigned to two treatment groups according to a completely randomized design. Each treatment consisted of four equal replicates, each contained ten chicks. Chicks were fed on basal diets supplemented with different concentrations of chromium (0 and 2 mg kg–1 CrCl3 from 1 to 35 days of age. Chromium supplementation as feed additives resulted in a slightly lower rectal temperature, and significantly (P<0.05 lower respiration rate for the broiler chickens received diet supplemented with chromium compared to the control (0 mg kg–1 CrCl3. Dietary chromium supplementation increased final body weight (BW at the end of the production period (5 weeks. Average weight gain was significantly (P<0.05 higher in chickens fed on chromium supplemented diet. Feed intake was not influenced by dietary chromium supplementation, however, the efficiency of feed conversion was improved (P<0.05 in chromium supplemented chickens. Furthermore, dressing percentage was significantly (P<0.05 higher in Cr-treated chickens compared to control chickens. Chromium supplementation significantly (P<0.05 improved the immune response to Newcastle Disease Virus vaccine (NDV. The present results suggest that dietary chromium supplementation provides a good nutritional management approach to ameliorate heat stress induced depression in production performance and immune response of broiler chickens. 

  19. Effect of chromium on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuissello, N.; Novo, P.

    1976-01-01

    Chromium as K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, was tested for its toxicity, in Petri dishes, on 10 species of crop plants at 1 - 10 - 100 ppm. The total number of germinated seeds is not affected by Chromium salts up to 100 ppm, but the toxicity, measured as diminution of growth, is evident for all the tested plants, at 100 ppm, both with Cr/sup +3/ and Cr/sup +6/. Cr/sup +6/ at 1 ppm shows a negative effect on growth only for Linum usitatissimum, that could be used in phyto-test for polluted waters. Cr/sup +6/ was revealed more toxic than Cr/sup +3/ for plants, as reported for animals. 14 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  1. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  2. Correlative scanning electron and confocal microscopy imaging of labeled cells coated by indium-tin-oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Rodighiero, Simona

    2015-03-22

    Confocal microscopy imaging of cells allows to visualize the presence of specific antigens by using fluorescent tags or fluorescent proteins, with resolution of few hundreds of nanometers, providing their localization in a large field-of-view and the understanding of their cellular function. Conversely, in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the surface morphology of cells is imaged down to nanometer scale using secondary electrons. Combining both imaging techniques have brought to the correlative light and electron microscopy, contributing to investigate the existing relationships between biological surface structures and functions. Furthermore, in SEM, backscattered electrons (BSE) can image local compositional differences, like those due to nanosized gold particles labeling cellular surface antigens. To perform SEM imaging of cells, they could be grown on conducting substrates, but obtaining images of limited quality. Alternatively, they could be rendered electrically conductive, coating them with a thin metal layer. However, when BSE are collected to detect gold-labeled surface antigens, heavy metals cannot be used as coating material, as they would mask the BSE signal produced by the markers. Cell surface could be then coated with a thin layer of chromium, but this results in a loss of conductivity due to the fast chromium oxidation, if the samples come in contact with air. In order to overcome these major limitations, a thin layer of indium-tin-oxide was deposited by ion-sputtering on gold-decorated HeLa cells and neurons. Indium-tin-oxide was able to provide stable electrical conductivity and preservation of the BSE signal coming from the gold-conjugated markers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unceta, N. [University of the Basque Country, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Seby, F. [Ultra Traces Analyses Aquitaine (UT2A), Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Malherbe, J.; Donard, O.F.X. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, IPREM, UMR CNRS 5254, Pau (France)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. (orig.)

  4. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  5. Nanophase hardfaced coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisgen, U.; Stein, L.; Balashov, B.; Geffers, C. [RWTH Aachen University (Germany). ISF - Welding and Joining Institute

    2009-08-15

    This paper demonstrates the possibility of producing iron or chromium-based nanophase hardfaced coatings by means of common arc welding methods (TIG, PTA). The appropriate composition of the alloys to be deposited allows to control the structural properties and thus also the coating properties of the weld metal. Specific variations of the alloying elements allow also the realisation of a nanostructured solidification of the carbides and borides with cooling rates that are common for arc surfacing processes. The hardfaced coatings, which had been thus produced, showed phase dimensions of approximately 100-300 nm. Based on the results it is established that the influence of the surfacing parameters and of the coating thickness and thus the influence of the heat control on the nanostructuring process is, compared with the influence of the alloy composition, of secondary importance. The generation of nanoscale structures in hardfaced coatings allows the improvement of mechanical properties, wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Potential applications for these types of hardfaced coatings lie, in particular, in the field of cutting tools that are exposed to corrosion and wear. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Diese Arbeit demonstriert die Moeglichkeit zur Herstellung Eisen- und Chrom-basierter nanophasiger Hartauftragschweissschichten mithilfe ueblicher Lichtbogenschweissverfahren (WIG-, Plasma-Pulver-Auftragschweissen - PPA). Eine geeignete Zusammensetzung der aufzutragenden Legierungen ermoeglicht es, die Gefuegeeigenschaften und damit die Schichteigenschaften des Schweissgutes zu kontrollieren. Gezielte Variationen der Legierungselemente erlauben die Realisierung einer nanostrukturierten Erstarrung der Karbide und Boride bei fuer Lichtbogen-Auftragschweissprozessen ueblichen Abkuehlgeschwindigkeiten. In den so erzeugten Hartschichten werden Phasengroessen von ca. 100-300 nm erreicht. Auf Basis der gewonnenen Ergebnisse kann

  6. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  7. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: black chromium.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kotsedi, L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available -porous a-Cr(sub2)O(sub3) layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the a-Cr(sub2)O(sub3) layer. The a-Cr(sub2)O(sub3) layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a...

  8. Functional coatings: the sol-gel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belleville, Ph.

    2010-01-01

    CEA's sol-gel laboratory is specialized in the development of innovative sol-gel optical coatings and has extended its application field to membrane materials and coatings for energy conversion, to electric coatings for microelectronics devices and to thin films for gas sensing. This article describes, by way of examples, the laboratory's research on sol-gel functional coatings, including nano-material synthesis, organic-inorganic hybrid-based solution preparation as well as deposition process development and prototyping. (author)

  9. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium +6 could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 by nitric. acid; and the reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the +6 oxidation state and would not exist in the +6 state in the final process waste solutions

  10. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  11. Calculated electronic structure of chromium surfaces and chromium monolayers on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victora, R.H.; Falicov, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the magnetic and electronic properties of the chromium (100) and (110) surfaces and of a chromium monolayer on the (100) and (110) iron surfaces is presented. It is found that (i) the (100) chromium surface is ferromagnetic with a greatly enhanced spin polarization (3.00 electrons); (ii) a substantial enhancement of the spin imbalance exists several (>5) layers into the bulk; (iii) the (110) chromium surface is antiferromagnetic with a large (2.31) spin imbalance; (iv) the (100) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is ferromagnetic, with a huge spin imbalance (3.63), and aligned antiferromagnetically with respect to the bulk iron; (v) the (110) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is also ferromagnetic, with a spin imbalance of 2.25 and antiferromagnetically aligned to the iron. The spin imbalance of chromium on iron (100) is possibly the largest of any transition-metal system

  12. Roentgenoelectronic investigation into oxidation of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, A.G.; Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Kazanskij, L.P.; Machavariani, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloy oxidation (of the Kh13 and Kh18N10T steels) in oxygen was investigated using X-ray electron spectroscopy. It was found that according to X-ray electron spectra chromium oxidation kinetics in the iron-chromium alloy differs significantly from oxidation kinetics of chromium pattern. Layer by layer X-ray electron analysis showed that chromium is subjected to a deeper oxidation as compared to iron, and accordingly, Cr 2 O 3 layer with pure iron impregnations is placed between the layer of mixed oxide (Fe 3 O 4 +Cr 2 O 3 ) and metal. A model of the iron-chromium alloy surface is suggested. The mixed oxide composition on the steel surface is presented as spinel Fesub(2+x)Crsub(1-x)Osub(y)

  13. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  14. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial ... number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel and zinc. The ion ... through filter paper to determine the concentration ... liquid and solid phases were separated by.

  15. Chromium tolerance and reduction potential of Staphylococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the microbiology of chromium tolerance and reduction at a fly ash dumping site in South Africa, 15 core samples were investigated. It was shown that the 30 year old dumping site exhibited high concentrations of Cr (VI) ranging from 1.6 to 9.6 mg/g. From this contaminated fly ash dumping site, 67 chromium ...

  16. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    be used again to adsorb heavy metal ions. ... Among these heavy metals are chromium, copper and ... poisoning can result from high exposure to hexavalent chromium [2]. Most of the ..... At low pH, the sorbent is positively charged because of.

  17. Biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) in wastewater using Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. bacterial strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Muhammad [Department of Chemical Engineering, American University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates)

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of toxic metal compounds is a deep concern in all industries. Hexavalent chromium is particularly worrying because of its toxic influence on human health. In this paper, biodegradation of hexavalent chromium (Cr+6) present in wastewater has been studied using two different bacterial strains; Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. A chemostat (with and without recycle of cells) with 10 L liquid culture volume was used to study the substrate and the biomass cell concentrations with time. Also, the degree of substrate conversion was studied by the varying the dilution rate as an independent parameter. The dilution rate (ratio of feed flow rate to the culture volume) was varied by varying the feed volumetric rate from 110-170 mL/h for inlet hexavalent chromium concentrations of 70 mg/dm3. The results show that a chemostat with recycle gives a better performance in terms of substrate conversion than a chemostat without a recycle. Moreover, the degree of substrate conversion decreases as the dilution rate is increased. Also, Bacillus sp. was found to give higher conversions compared to pseudomonas sp.

  18. Mechanical stability and adhesion of ceramic coatings deposited on steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat, M.; Armann, A.; Moberg, L.; Sibieude, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two sorts of deformation experiment performed on coating/substrate systems. The coating/substrate systems were constituted by coatings of titanium nitride and chromium carbide, deposited in both cases on steel substrates. The formation experiments were cyclic bending tests on macroscopic samples with chromium carbide coatings, and straining experiments performed in a scanning electron microscope on samples with titanium nitride coatings. By the analysis of our experimental results we develop an attempt to correlate the mechanical stability of the systems with the interfacial adhesion, by taking into account the internal residual stresses as an adhesion parameter. For the samples with chromium carbide coatings, the evolution of internal stresses is detected from X-ray diffractometry and discussed in terms of the observed induced damaging mechanisms, in the cyclic tests. For the samples with titanium nitride coatings, we discussed the adhesion from the microstructural observations and from the critical parameters determined during the in-situ straining experiments. (orig.)

  19. Tribological coatings for liquid metal and irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Several metallurgical coatings have been developed that provide good tribological performances in high-temperature liquid sodium and that are relatively unaffected by neutron fluences to 6 X 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). The coatings that have consistently provided the best tribological performance have been the nickel aluminide diffusion coatings created by the pack cementation process, chromium carbide or Tribaloy 700 trade mark (a nickel-base hardfacing alloy) applied by the detonation-gun process, and chromium carbide and other hardfacing alloy) applied by the detonation-gun process, and chromium carbide and other hardfacing materials applied by the electro-spark deposition process. The latter process is a relatively recent development for nuclear applications and is expected to find wide usage. Other coating processes, such as plasma-spray coating, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition, were candidates for use on various components, but the coatings did not pass the required qualification tests or were not economically competitive. The advantages and limitations of the three selected processes are discussed, the tribological performance of the coatings is reviewed, and representative applications and their performance requirements are described

  20. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  1. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined

  2. Effect of mechanical pre-loadings on corrosion resistance of chromium-electroplated steel rods in marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubina Helbert, Varvara; Dhondt, Matthieu; Homette, Remi; Arbab Chirani, Shabnam; Calloch, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    Providing high hardness, low friction coefficient, as well as, relatively good corrosion resistance, chromium-plated coatings (∼20 μm) are widely used for steel cylinder rods in marine environment. However, the standardized corrosion test method (ISO 9227, NSS) used to evaluate efficiency of this type of coatings does not take into account in-service mechanical loadings on cylinder rods. Nevertheless, the uniform initial network of microcracks in chromium coating is changing under mechanical loadings. Propagation of these microcracks explains premature corrosion of the steel substrate. The aim of the study was to evaluate relationship between mechanical loadings, propagation of microcracks network and corrosion resistance of chromium coatings. After monotonic pre-loading tests, it was demonstrated by microscopic observations that the microcracks propagation started at stress levels higher than the substrate yield stress (520 MPa). The microcracks become effective, i.e. they have instantly undergone through the whole coating thickness to reach the steel substrate. The density of effective microcracks increases with the total macroscopic level, i.e. the intercrack distance goes from 60 ± 5 μm at 1% of total strain to approximately 27 ± 2 μm at 10%. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the higher the plastic strain level applied during mechanical loading, the more the corrosion potential of the sample decreased until reaching the steel substrate value of approximately ‑0.65 V/SCE after 2 h of immersion. The polarization curves have also highligthed an increase in the corrosion current density with the strain level. Therefore, electrochemical measurements could be used to realize quick and comprehensive assesment of the effect of monotonic pre-loadings on corrosion properties of the chromium coating.

  3. Testing Cadmium-Free Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    Secretary of Defense Directive • “Approve the use of alternatives [to hexavalent chromium (Cr6+)] where they can perform adequately for the intended...Effect of corrosion on breakaway torque 12 OPSEC approved for public release Fastener Finish Study FINISH POST-TREATMENT LUBRICANT Cadmium Hexavalent ...Past Testing Electrical Connectors Coatings Al / TCP ZnNi / TCP ZnNi / Non- Chrome Passivation (NCP) Ni-PTFE 1 Ni-PTFE 2 Note: SnZn tested on flat

  4. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, E.

    1994-01-01

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  5. Influence of Mn-Co Spinel Coating on Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic SS Alloys for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Molin, Sebastian; Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    Chromia forming ferritic stainless steels (SS) are being considered for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications. However, protective coatings are in general needed to avoid chromium volatilization and poisoning of cathodes from chromium species. Mn-Co spinel is one...... of the promising candidates to prevent chromium outward diffusion, improve oxidation resistance and ensure high electrical conductivity over the lifetime of interconnects. In the present study, uniform and well adherent Mn-Co spinel coatings were produced on Crofer 22APU using electrophoretic deposition (EPD...

  6. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  7. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  8. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  9. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of a former, positively fractionated and mobile chromium pool has been experimentally constrained in circumneutral and basic leachates of powdered tonalite bedrock where δ53Cr of + 0.21 to + 0.48‰ was measured. Our results show that mobilization of chromium is effective under highly oxidative conditions...

  10. Pictorial Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Kristina

    1982-01-01

    Provides the rationale for considering communication in a graphic domain and suggests a specific goal for designing work stations which provide graphic capabilities in educational settings. The central element of this recommendation is the "pictorial conversation", a highly interactive exchange that includes pictures as the central elements.…

  11. Solid-state dewetting of continuous thin platinum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanief, N. [University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Topić, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Thermal stability of coatings is of crucial importance for reliability of electronic devices operating at high temperature. Thus, we investigated the Cr–Pt system where a thin platinum coating of 0.1 μm was deposited on chromium substrate and annealed at 1000 °C for 8 h. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that a continuous and uniformly deposited Pt coating experienced the formation of “islands” after annealing. The grain-boundary grooving, dewetting and agglomeration were the main mechanisms of degradation of thermally annealed coatings. Results by μ-PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed the presence of Cr{sub 3}Pt phase in “islands” and the coating thickness was approximately 0.5 μm. The surrounding regions were left uncovered due to coating agglomeration at the expense of initially deposited coating.

  12. Ultraviolet (UV)-Curable Coatings for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    implement hexavalent chromium reduction, any new primers introduced would have to be chrome -free. Formulating a chrome -free primer that can provide...5955 All painting was done on panels of 2024-T3 Aluminum (4" x 6" x 0.020") with ¼” hole in center of short side, coated with an Alodine 1200S chrome

  13. Reaction of Oxygen with Chromium and Chromium Carbide at Low O2 Pressures and High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Dong O.; Kang, Sung G.; Paik, Young N.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation rate of chromium carbide has been measured continuously using thermogravimetric analysis at different oxygen pressures ranging from 1.33x10 -2 to 2.67x10 -1 Pa O 2 at 1000-1300 .deg. C. The oxidation of pure chromium has also been studied between 1000-1300 .deg. C under 6.67x10 -2 Pa O 2 and compared with that of chromium carbide. The oxidation of chromium carbide showed a linear behavior which was different from that of chromium. The oxidation rate of chromium carbide increased with increasing temperature and oxygen pressure was lower than of pure chromium. Above 1200 .deg. C, the volatile oxide was formed and evaporated causing a weight loss. The compositions and morphology of the oxide were studied with X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. The morphology of oxide changed with varying temperature and pressure. The oxide scale was consisted of mainly two different layers of Cr 2 O 3 and CrO, and the properties of oxide scale were correlated with oxidation behavior. The oxide film formed in the above test condition has been detached from the carbide surface. The crack and pore were thought to be from CO gas evolving at the interface of chromium carbide and its oxide and the major factor of the linear behavior of chromium carbide

  14. Sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide was investigated in dependence on pH, time of sorption, and on the concnetrations of sorbate and sorbent. The mechanisms of the sorption of Crsup(3+) and CrOsub(4)sup(2-) traces on lead sulfide are discussed; a difference between CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption on PbS and α-Fesub(2)Osub(3) was found. Sulfates and molybdates affect the removal of chromates from aqueous solutions. Lead sulfide carrier prepared in this work was also used for the preconcentration of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from tap water. (author)

  15. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in marine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, M J [WRc, Henley Road, Medmenham, Marlow SL7 2HD (United Kingdom); Ravenscroft, J E [WRc, Henley Road, Medmenham, Marlow SL7 2HD (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The development of an analytical technique is described which may be used to determine chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in estuarine and coastal waters. The method is based on selective micro-solvent extraction with subsequent GFAAS. The technique has been applied in a major North Sea estuary. The results obtained confirm that thermodynamic factors alone cannot be relied upon to describe the form of chromium in estuaries. Kinetic factors appear to have a strong influence over speciation and lead to the persistence of Cr(III) species in environments where Cr(VI) would be expected to be present. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Nanostructure of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, E.I.; Klechkovskaya, V.V.; Bobrovsky, V.V.; Khamchukov, Yu.D.; Klubovich, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium phosphate coatings were studied by high-resolution transmission microscopy, microdiffraction, and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Coatings were prepared by spraying hydroxyapatite targets onto copper, nickel, and chromium substrates and onto NaCl and BaF 2 single crystals in an argon plasma at a gas pressure of ∼1 Pa; the sputter power was about 200 W; and the RF-generator frequency was 13.56 MHz. Under the conditions used, thin layers of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite were formed regardless of the nature of the substrate

  17. Examination of Internally and Externally Coated Cr3C2 Exhaust Pipe of a Diesel Engine via Plasma Spray Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Hazar; S. Sap

    2017-01-01

    In this experimental study; internal and external parts of an exhaust pipe were coated with a chromium carbide (Cr3C2) material having a thickness of 100 micron by using the plasma spray method. A diesel engine was used as the test engine. Thus, the results of continuing chemical reaction in coated and uncoated exhaust pipes were investigated. Internally and externally coated exhaust pipe was compared with the standard exhaust system. External heat transfer occurring as a result of coating th...

  18. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods and bare electrodes - approved 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    This specification covers corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods for use with the atomic hydrogen and gas-tungsten-arc welding processes and bare electrodes for use with the submerged arc and gas metal-arc welding processes. These welding rods and electrodes include those alloy steels designated as corrosion- or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4% and nickel does not exceed 50%

  19. Auxiliary Electrodes for Chromium Vapor Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Jeffrey; Shahzad, Moaiz; Britt, Tommy

    2018-05-15

    Measurement of chromia-containing vapors in solid oxide fuel cell systems is useful for monitoring and addressing cell degradation caused by oxidation of the chomia scale formed on alloys for interconnects and balance-of-plant components. One approach to measuring chromium is to use a solid electrolyte with an auxiliary electrode that relates the partial pressure of the chromium containing species to the mobile species in the electrolyte. One example is YCrO3 which can equilibrate with the chromium containing vapor and yttrium in yttria stabilized zirconia to establish an oxygen activity. Another is Na2CrO4 which can equilibrate with the chromium-containing vapor to establish a sodium activity.

  20. Acute and chronic systemic chromium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, S C

    1989-10-01

    Although chromium and compounds containing it have been recognized as having potential severe adverse effects on health for more than 160 years, understanding of the systemic toxicology and true hazard of these compounds is still not complete. A review of the current state of knowledge is attempted in this paper, with appropriate attention given to the complications of multiple valence states and solubility. Selected chromium compounds, particularly hexavalent ones, are carcinogens, corrosives, delayed contact sensitizers, and have the kidney as their primary target organ. But chromium is also an essential element for humans. The body clearly possesses some effective detoxification mechanisms for some degree of exposure to hexavalent chrome compounds. The significant features of acute and chronic chromium toxicity are presented in view of these considerations.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allows employees to consume food or beverages at a worksite where chromium (VI) is present, the employer... effect on productivity. 2. Plating Bath Surface Tension Management and Fume Suppression • Lower surface...

  2. Ductile-brittle transition of thoriated chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. A.; Veigel, N. D.; Clauer, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Unalloyed chromium and chromium containing approximately 3 wt % ThO2 were prepared from powder produced by a chemical vapor deposition process. When rolled to sheet and tested in tension, it was found that the thoriated material had a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) than unalloyed chromium. This ductilizing was evident both in the as-rolled condition and after the materials had been annealed for 1 hour at 1200 C. The improved ductility in thoriated chromium may be associated with several possible mechanisms: (1) particles may disperse slip, such that critical stress or strain concentrations for crack nucleation are more difficult to achieve; (2) particles may act as dislocation sources, thus providing mobile dislocations in this normally source-poor material, in a manner similar to prestraining; and (3) particles in grain boundaries may help to transmit slip across the boundaries, thus relieving stress concentrations and inhibiting crack nucleation.

  3. Uptake and transport of chromium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.; D'souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of chromium, an important soil and water pollutant, by five different plant species was examined in nutrient culture experiments using chromium-51 as a tracer. The concentration in aerial tissues of both trivalent and hexavalent forms of chromium was the greatest in peas followed by beans, tomato and the cereals over identical uptake periods. The uptake of 51 Cr 3+ was, in general, greater than 51 CrO 4 2- . Studies with bean plants indicated that shoot uptake of both forms of chromium decreased with increasing pH and salt concentration of the external solution. Concentrations of 10 -4 M and 10 -5 M DNP inhibited 51 Cr uptake by bean shoots. (author)

  4. Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Takeyoshi; Yoshii, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Kohzo

    2007-01-01

    Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility

  5. Electrochemistry of chromium(0)-aminocarbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskovcova, Irena; Rohacova, Jana; Meca, Ludek; Tobrman, Tomas; Dvorak, Dalimil; Ludvik, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    Two series of chromium(0)-(aryl)aminocarbene complexes substituted on the ligand phenyl ring were prepared and electrochemically investigated: pentacarbonyl((N,N-dimethylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (Ia-e) and chelated tetracarbonyl((η 2 -N-allyl-N-allylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (IIa, c-e). For comparison, a tungsten analogue of IIc (III) and a chromium chelate bearing a methyl substituent instead of the phenyl group IV were taken into the study. The intramolecular interactions of p-substituents on the ligand phenyl ring with the reduction and oxidation centres of the molecule of complex (followed electrochemically using LFER [P. Zuman, Substituent Effects in Organic Polarography, Plenum Press, New York, 1967]) enabled to localize the corresponding electron transfer. The influence of the type of coordination, the substituent on the ligand phenyl ring and the central metal atom on oxidation and reduction potentials is discussed

  6. Hexavalent Chromium reduction by Trichoderma inhamatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is a useful and attractive process for remediation of ecosystems and industrial effluents contaminated with Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(II) can be achieved by both chemical and biological methods; however, the biological reduction is more convenient than the chemical one since costs are lower, and sludge is generated in smaller amounts. (Author)

  7. Quantum conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Mazilu, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ICOAM 2015 The electromagnetic momentum transferred transferred to scattering particles is proportional to the intensity of the incident fields, however, the momentum of single photons ℏk does not naturally appear in these classical expressions. Here, we discuss an alternative to Maxwell's stress tensor that renders the classical electromagnetic field momentum compatible to the quantum mechanical one. This is achieved through the introduction of the quantum conversion which allows the tran...

  8. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  9. Conversational sensemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  10. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  11. Magnetic field effects on coating deposition rate and surface morphology coatings using magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yu-Sen; Huang, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    Chromium nitride coatings exhibit superior hardness, excellent wear and oxidation resistance, and are widely applied in the die and mold industries. The aim of this study was to investigate magnetic field effects on the deposition rate and surface morphology of chromium nitride coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. Four types of magnetic field configurations, including the magnetron sputtering system, SNSN, SNNN, and intermediate magnetron modification, are discussed in this paper. SKD11 cold work die steel and a silicon (100) chip were used as substrates in the chromium nitride depositions. The process parameters, such as target current, substrate bias, and the distance between the substrate and target, are at fixed conditions, except for the magnetic arrangement type. The experimental results showed that the deposition rates of the four types of magnetic field configurations were 1.06, 1.38, 1.67 and 1.26 µm h −1 , respectively. In these cases, the SNNN type performs more than 58% faster than the unbalanced magnetron configuration does for the deposition rate. The surface morphology of chromium nitride films was also examined by SEM and is discussed in this paper

  12. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  13. Ceramic protective coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbach, F.; Nicoll, A.

    1987-01-01

    The basic material of the above-mentioned layer consists of pure aluminium oxide or essentially aluminium oxide. To improve this protective layer metal oxides from the groups IIA, IIIA, IIIB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIII of the periodic system are added to its basic material before the said protective coating is applied. In this way a corundum structure is formed in the case of aluminium oxide. Gallium oxide, vanadium oxide, chromium oxide or iron oxide are particularly suited for the correlation of such a corundum structure. The formation of the corundum structure increases the resistance of the protective coating to the corrosive effects of vanadium pentoxide and sodium sulfate. By the addition of a specific quantity of magnesium oxide it is possible not only to stimulate the formation of corundum but also to reduce the increase in grain size in the case of the aluminium oxide. The other metallic oxides are especially favorable to the formation of the corundum structure, so that preferably magnesium oxide is to be added to these metallic oxides in order to reduce the increase in grain size. (author)

  14. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  15. Tribological study of lubricious DLC biocompatible coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizuela, M; Garcia-Luis, A; Viviente, J L; Braceras, I; Oñate, J I

    2002-12-01

    DLC (diamond-like carbon) coatings have remarkable tribological properties due mainly to their good frictional behavior. These coatings can be applied in many industrial and biomedical applications, where sliding can generate wear and frictional forces on the components, such as orthopaedic metal implants. This work reports on the development and tribological characterization of functionally gradient titanium alloyed DLC coatings. A PVD-magnetron sputtering technique has been used as the deposition method. The aim of this work was to study the tribological performance of the DLC coating when metal to metal contact (cobalt chromium or titanium alloys) takes place under dry and lubricated test conditions. Prior work by the authors demonstrates that the DLC coating reduced considerably the wear of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). The DLC coating during mechanical testing exhibited a high elastic recovery (65%) compared to the values obtained from Co-Cr-Mo (15%) and Ti-6Al-4V (23%). The coating exhibited an excellent tribo-performance against the Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys, especially under dry conditions presenting a friction value of 0.12 and almost negligible wear. This coating has passed biocompatibility tests for implant devices on tissue/bone contact according to international standards (ISO 10993).

  16. Development of analytical procedures for determination of total chromium by quadrupole ICP-MS and high-resolution ICP-MS, and hexavalent chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS, in different materials used in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séby, F; Gagean, M; Garraud, H; Castetbon, A; Donard, O F X

    2003-10-01

    A European directive was recently adopted limiting the use of hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, and Cr(VI) in vehicle manufacturing. From July 2003 a maximum of 2 g Cr(VI) will be authorised per vehicle in corrosion-preventing coatings of key components. As no standardised procedures are available to check if produced vehicles are in agreement with this directive, the objective of this work was to develop analytical procedures for total chromium and Cr(VI) determination in these materials. The first step of this study was to optimise digestion procedures for total chromium determination in plastic and metallic materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). High resolution (HR) ICP-MS was used to examine the influence of polyatomic interferences on the detection of the (52)Cr(+) and (53)Cr(+) isotopes. If there was strong interference with m/ z 52 for plastic materials, it was possible to use quadrupole ICP-MS for m/ z 53 if digestions were performed with HNO(3)+H(2)O(2). This mixture was also necessary for digestion of chromium from metallic materials. Extraction procedures in alkaline medium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3) buffer solution at pH 8.9) assisted by sonication were developed for determining Cr(VI) in four different corrosion-preventing coatings by HPLC-ICP-MS. After optimisation and validation with the only solid reference material certified for its Cr(VI) content (BCR 545; welding dusts), the efficiency of this extraction procedure for screw coatings was compared with that described in the EN ISO 3613 standard generally used in routine laboratories. For coatings comprising zinc and aluminium passivated in depth with chromium oxides the extraction procedure developed herein enabled determination of higher Cr(VI) concentrations. This was also observed for the screw covered with a chromium passivant layer on zinc-nickel. For coating comprising a chromium passivant layer on alkaline zinc the standardized extraction procedure was more efficient

  17. Separation of valent forms of chromium (3) and chromium (6) by coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Soption 9.62x10 -5 mol/l of 51 Cr radioactive isotope in oxidation states 3 and 6 by iron(3) hydroxide in 1 mol/l of KNO 3 and KCl depending on pH medium is investigated. The region of practically total concentration of Cr(3) and Cr(6 + ) (pH=3-6.5) is determined. The results of spectrophotometric investigations, calculational data on distribution of hydroxocation forms of chromium (3) and of chromium (6) anions and sorption by iron (3) hydroxide permit to characterize sorption of chromium forms in different stages of oxidation. The methods of chromium (3) and chromium (6) separation by coprecipitation of iron (3) hydroxide and their precipitation from it is developed on the above foundation

  18. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure is mitigated by reduction in the gut, however a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  19. Chromium getter studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the effects of the deposition of thin films (approx.0.1 μm) of chromium onto approx.70% of the torus area of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The purpose of these experiments was to test the difference between high surface coverage and high pumping speed gettering schemes with respect to minimizing oxygen impurity generation in high power tokamak discharges. The initial Cr deposition had significant effects on vessel outgassing and subsequent plasma performance: the outgassing of H 2 O, CO, and CO 2 decreased by a factor of ten, oxygen impurity radiation decreased by a factor of two, the plasma Z/sub eff/ decreased from 1.3 to 1.1, and the plasma density limit increased by 20%. This improvement correlates with a significant reduction of the edge radiation as the density limit is approached. The effects of the initial and subsequent Cr depositions were relatively long lasting, exhibiting time constants of the order of weeks. We attribute the observed impurity reduction to a modification of the oxide surface on the vessel wall, which is apparently a significant impurity source for oxygen. 17 refs., 6 figs

  20. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid by Metal Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beixiao Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl3, FeCl3 and CuCl2 and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl3, exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 °C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  1. Chromium-induced skin damage among Taiwanese cement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Po-Chih; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Shiann-Cherng

    2016-10-01

    Little research has been done on the relationships between chromium exposure, skin barrier function, and other hygienic habits in cement workers. Our purpose was to investigate chromium-induced skin barrier disruption due to cement exposure among cement workers. One hundred and eight cement workers were recruited in this study. Urinary chromium concentration was used to characterize exposure levels. The biological exposure index was used to separate high and low chromium exposure. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used to assess the skin barrier function. TEWL was significantly increased in workers with high chromium exposure levels than those with low chromium exposure levels (p = 0.048). A positive correlation was also found between urinary chromium concentration and TEWL (R = 0.28, p = 0.004). After adjusting for smoking status and glove use, a significant correlation between urinary chromium concentrations and TEWL remained. Moreover, workers who smoked and had a high chromium exposure had significantly increased TEWL compared to nonsmokers with low chromium exposure (p = 0.01). Skin barrier function of cement workers may have been disrupted by chromium in cement, and smoking might significantly enhance such skin barrier perturbation with chromium exposure. Decreased chromium skin exposure and smoking cessation should be encouraged at work. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Reduction of hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y C; Paik, N W

    2000-01-01

    Chromium exists at various valences, including elemental, trivalent, and hexavalent chromium, and undergoes reduction-oxidation reactions in the environment. Since hexavalent chromium is known as a human carcinogen, it is most important to evaluate the oxidation-reduction characteristics of the hexavalent chromium species. Although hexavalent chromium can be reduced to trivalent state, the detailed information on this in workplace environments is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate hexavalent chromium reduction in time in various conditions. A pilot chrome plating operation was prepared and operated in a laboratory for this study. There was evidence that the hexavalent chromium was reduced by time after mist generation. The percentage ratio (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of hexavalent chromium to total chromium was almost 100% (99.1 approximately 102.3) immediately after mist generation, and was reduced to 87.4% (84.8 approximately 89.9) at 1 hour and 81.0% (78.3 approximately 83.5) at 2 hours, respectively. Another test indicated that hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters was also reduced by time after sampling. Hexavalent chromium was reduced to 90.8% (88.2 approximately 93.3) at 2 hours after sampling. It also was found that hexavalent chromium was reduced during storage in air. It is recommended that air samples of hexavalent chromium be protected against reduction during storage.

  3. Wear-resistant EBW coatings based on a TiB{sub 2}-Fe SHS composite with a high-alloy matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galchenko, Nina K.; Kolesnikova, Ksenia A.; Belyuk, Sergei I. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Semenov, Grigoriy V., E-mail: Kolesnikova_KsAl@mail.ru [Tomsky Instrument Manufacturing Company, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    In the work, we studied the structure and properties of “titanium diboride – high-chromium cast iron binder” coatings obtained by electron beam welding. It is demonstrated that the phase and structure formation of the composite coatings depends on the content of high-chromium cast iron in the deposited mixture. Varying the volume fraction of the hardening compounds and the chemical composition of the metal binder makes possible wear-resistant coatings with specified operating characteristics. Key words: electron beam technology, composite coatings.

  4. Corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel bipolar plate with chromiumcarbide coating in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Huang

    Full Text Available Stainless steel with chromium carbide coating is an ideal candidate for bipolar plates. However, the coating still cannot resist the corrosion of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC environment. In this work, the corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel with chromium carbide is investigated in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment by combining electrochemical tests with morphology and microstructure analysis. SEM results reveal that the steel’s surface is completely coated by Cr and chromium carbide but there are pinholes in the coating. After the coated 316L stainless steel is polarized, the diffraction peak of Fe oxide is found. EIS results indicate that the capacitive resistance and the reaction resistance first slowly decrease (2–32 h and then increase. The potentiostatic transient curve declines sharply within 2000 s and then decreases slightly. The pinholes, which exist in the coating, result in pitting corrosion. The corrosion kinetics of the coated 316L stainless steel are modeled and accords the following equation: i0 = 7.6341t−0.5, with the corrosion rate controlled by ion migration in the pinholes. Keywords: PEMFC, Metal bipolar plate, Chromium carbide coating, Corrosion kinetics, Pitting corrosion

  5. Irradiation effects on low-friction coatings for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Johnson, R.N.; Guthrie, G.L.; Aungst, R.C.

    1975-11-01

    A variety of wear-resistant low-friction materials has been irradiated in the EBR-II in order to assess their reponse to LMFBR environments. Pre- and postirradiation testing and examination efforts have concentrated on candidate materials for application to the wear pads on FTR ducts (fuel, control, and reflector assemblies), and a significant result has been qualification of a proprietary detonation-gun-applied chromium carbide coating which employs a Ni Cr binder. Additional materials such as Inconel-718, Haynes-273, aluminides, and various chromium carbide/binder combinations, and other application processes such as plasma-spray, weld-overlays, diffusion bonding and explosive bonding, have also been studied. The most detailed examinations were conducted on selected chromium carbide coatings and included visual inspection, weight and dimensional measurements, metallography, electron microprobe, epoxy-lift-off, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Chromium carbide coatings applied by the detonation-gun process have demonstrated a marked superiority to those applied by plasma-spray techniques

  6. Electrochemical characterization of ceramic coatings on steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, Patricia M.; Haddad, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of low chromium steels coated with TiN by plasma CVD, was studied in neutral medium chloride, in sulfuric solution and in alkaline buffer solution, at ambient temperature. Polarization potentiokinetic curves of coated and uncoated probes (M2 HSS) in NaCl 0,1 N and Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 (1:1) 0,5 M (pH=10), H 2 SO 4 al 5% solutions deaerated with nitrogen gas in conventional corrosion cells were obtained. The passive current measured for coated samples was nearly two orders of magnitude lower than for the uncoated ones. (author)

  7. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  8. Studies of ion implanted thermally oxidised chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of 99.99% pure chromium containing precise amounts of foreign elements has been studied and compared to the oxidation of pure chromium. Thirty-three foreign elements including all of the naturally occurring rare earth metals were ion implanted into chromium samples prior to oxidation at 750 0 C in oxygen. The role of radiation induced damage, inherent in this doping technique, has been studied by chromium implantations at various energies and doses. The repair of the damage has been studied by vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 800 0 C prior to oxidation. Many of the implants caused an inhibition of oxidation, the greatest being a 93% reduction for 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 of praseodymium. The distribution of the implant was investigated by the use of 2 MeV alpha backscattering and ion microprobe analysis. Differences in the topography and structure of the chromic oxide on and off the implanted area were studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate if a rare earth-chromium compound of a perovskite-type structure had been formed. Lastly, the electrical conductivity of chromic oxide on and off the implanted region was examined at low voltages. (author)

  9. Effect of chromium toxicity on germination and early seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... germination and early seedling growth of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Chromium ... chromium on seed germination and seedling growth- biomass in early ..... such critical regulatory mechanisms are likely to operate in seeds at ...

  10. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  11. Chromium: a review of environmental and occupational toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencko, V

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are covered in this brief review on the environmental and occupational toxicology of chromium: occurrence, production and uses of chromium and chromium compounds; experimental toxicology; chromium toxicity for man; hygienic and ecologic aspects of chromium contamination of the environment. The review provides a conclusive evidence which suggests that chromium, especially its hexavalent form, is both toxic and carcinogenic, but its trivalent form is physiologically essential in the metabolism of insulin. It is also emphasized that among the major sources of environmental chromium today are the cement industry and the increasingly widespread use of chromium compounds added as an anticorrosion admixture to a variety of cooling systems, e.g. in large power plants, which may greatly contribute to the overall pollution of outdoor air at the sites.

  12. Chromium: a review of environmental and occupational toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencko, V

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are covered in this brief review on the environmental and occupational toxicology of chromium: occurrence, production and uses of chromium and chromium compounds; experimental toxicology; chromium toxicity for man; hygienic and ecologic aspects of chromium contamination of the environment. The review provides a conclusive evidence which suggests that chromium, especially its hexavalent form, is both toxic and carcinogenic, but its trivalent form is physiologically essential in the metabolism of insulin. It is also emphasized that among the major sources of environmental chromium today are the cement industry and the increasingly widespread use of chromium compounds added as an anticorrosion admixture to a variety of cooling systems, e.g. in large power plants, which may greatly contribute to the overall pollution of outdoor air at the sites. 108 references.

  13. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  14. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents .... Chromium (Cleseari and Green, 1995) included the oxidation of .... like uranium in its cells might also match with its tendency.

  15. Corrosion-resistant coating technique for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ando, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are attractive materials for application as fuel cladding in fast reactors and first-wall material of fusion blanket. Recent studies have focused more on high-chromium ferritic (12-18 wt% Cr) ODS steels with attractive corrosion resistance properties. However, they have poor material workability, require complicated heat treatments for recrystallization, and possess anisotropic microstructures and mechanical properties. On the other hand, low-chromium ferritic/martensitic (8-9 wt% Cr) ODS steels have no such limitations; nonetheless, they have poor corrosion resistance properties. In our work, we developed a corrosion-resistant coating technique for a low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. The ODS steel was coated with the 304 or 430 stainless steel, which has better corrosion resistances than the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steels. The 304 or 430 stainless steel was coated by changing the canning material from mild steel to stainless steel in the conventional material processing procedure for ODS steels. Microstructural observations and micro-hardness tests proved that the stainless steels were successfully coated without causing a deterioration in the mechanical property of the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. (author)

  16. Laboratory and field evaluations of a methodology for determining hexavalent-chromium emissions from stationary sources. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, A.C.

    1991-10-01

    The study was initiated to determine whether chromium emissions should be regulated under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP). To support stationary source regulations, it is important that (1) the sampling procedure not change the chromium valence state during sampling and (2) an analytical technique for measuring low concentration levels of chromium be available. These goals are achieved with the current EPA 'Draft Method for Sampling and Analysis of Hexavalent Chromium at Stationary Sources.' The draft method utilizes a recirculating system to flush impinger reagent into the sampling nozzle during sample collection. Immediate contact of the stack gas with impinger reagent 'fixes' the chromium valence state. Ion chromatography coupled with post column derivatization and ultraviolet visible detector is used to analyze Cr(VI) in the parts per trillion range. Field tests were conducted at metal plating facilities, industrial cooling towers, municipal waste incinerators, sewage sludge incinerators, and hazardous waste incinerators. It was at the hazardous waste facility that the new method was proven to have acceptable precision and essentially no conversion in the sample train

  17. Synthesis, Characterization and Application of A Novel Carbon Bridged Half-metallocene Chromium Catalyst for Methyl Methacrylate Polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhengzai; GONG Kai; WANG Yang; ZHOU Xue; ZHANG Weixing; LI Yin; SUN Junquan; LI Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    A new carbon bridged cyclopentadienyl chromium complex of the type [(C5H4)C(CH3)2 CH2(C5H4N)]CrCl2 was prepared by treatment of CrCl3•(THF)3 in THF solution with the lithium salt of ligand containing cyclopentadienyl and pyridyl groups. The chromium complex was characterized by 1H NMR and elemental analysis(EA), and the crystal structure was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Activated by Al(i-Bu)3, the chromium complex displayed a very high activity for methyl methacrylate (MMA) polymerization. After 24 hours,more than 95.5%MMA was converted to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with a viscosity average molecular weight (Wη) of 416000 g•mol-1 at 60℃for MMA/Al(i-Bu)3/chromium catalyst molar ratio of up to 2000:20:1. Effects of temperature, molar ratios of MMA/catalyst and catalyst/cocatalyst on the polymerization have been studied. The high conversion of MMA and high molecular weight of PMMA with narrow molecular weight distribution is caused by the unique stable active site formed by the new chromium complex and aluminum cocatalyst.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, D.P.S.; Tarafder, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the determination of chromium is presented, based on the oxidation of hydroxylamine hydrochloride to nitrous acid by chromium(VI) in acetic acid medium followed by diazotization of the nitrite produced with p-aminophenylmercaptoacetic acid and subsequent coupling of the diazonium salt with N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine di-hydrochloride in acidic medium to form a stable blueish azo dye. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium(VI) from 0.04 to 1.2 mg l -1 in a 1.0-cm cuvette. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity are 3.65x10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.0014μg cm -2 , respectively. (author). 17 refs.; 3 figs

  19. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  20. Chromium Stable Isotope Fractionation - An Indicator of Hexavalent Chromium Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T. M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in surface water and ground water, and is also of interest in oceanography. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions thus control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is the most important reaction controlling attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our results show that Cr(VI) reduction favors the lighter isotopes and leads to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the remaining Cr(VI). Cr isotope measurements thus show great promise as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction. We report here the first measurements of the magnitude of Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction and variations in δ 53Cr values obtained from three contaminated sites. Experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by suspensions of magnetite and unamended sediments from a local pond, Urbana, IL and San Francisco Estuary near Martinez, CA. Suspensions were incubated anaerobically with constant shaking, and complete Cr(VI) reduction occurred within a few days. Cr(VI) from intermediate time points in the experiments was purified via ion exchange and 53Cr/52Cr ratios were measured via TIMS with a double isotope spike. The instantaneous per mil fractionation, ɛ , was calculated assuming a Rayleigh fractionation model. The ɛ for Cr(VI) reduction on magnetite surfaces yielded a fractionation of -3.5 ‰ . The ɛ values for the pond and estuary sediments were -3.5 ‰ and -3.3 ‰ respectively. The size of this Cr isotope fractionation is encouraging, as current precision is 0.2 \\permil. δ 53Cr values in dissolved Cr(VI) from three contaminated sites range from 1.1 ‰ to 5.8 ‰ , suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred and has induced isotopic fractionation in these settings. δ 53Cr values measured from Cr(VI) in plating baths show little or no

  1. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.J.; Qian, Q.F.; Hou, X.L.; Feng, W.Y.; Chai, Z.F.

    2000-01-01

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  2. Recovery of Proteins and Chromium Complexes from Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gutti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW constitutes an environmental pollution problem to leather industries disposing the waste by landfill. The waste mainly consists of collagen and chromium III complexes. This work is a design of reactors to recover gelatin, polypeptides and chromium from CCLW. The results of the experiment shows that 68% of protein, based on dry weight of leather scraps, could be recovered. Three reactors with a total volume of 18 m3 was designed to handle 10,431 kg of waste generated from the tanning industries.

  3. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan. SUMMARY... order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  4. Native Chromium Resistant Staphylococci Species from a Fly Ash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-six chromium-resistant Staphylococci species belonging to S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus and S. arlettae were previously isolated from a chromium-polluted Fly ash (FA) dumping site in South Africa. However the genetic mechanisms responsible for chromium resistance were not known. Polymerase chain ...

  5. Quantitative determination of chromium in some vegetables in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium has been known to be a micronutrient for mammals for more than four decades. Deficiency in the body results to diabetes, infertility and cardiovascular diseases. However, progress in elucidating the role of chromium has proceeded slowly. Recent studies have shown a potential role of chromium in maintaining ...

  6. Assessment of the level of chromium species in the discharged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of chromium species in the discharged effluents of selected tanneries in the Amhara Region; Haik and Debre Berhan tanneries. The level of total chromium, and hexavalent chromium in the discharged effluent of the studied tanneries were determined using the ICP-OES, and ...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.2327 Section 73.2327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens shall conform in identify and specifications to the...

  8. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No. 1308-38-9...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  12. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  13. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  15. Radiation stability of chromium low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation effect on the behaviour of mechanical properties and structure of chromium low alloys such as VKh-2K, KhP-3, VKhM in the wide range of temperatures and neutron fluences is studied. Radiation stability of the alloys is shown to be limited by low-temperature radiation embrittlement (LTRE), caused by radiation hardening as a result of formation of radiation-induced defects such as dislocation loops and vacancy voids in the structure. The methods for prevention LTRE of chromium alloys are suggested. 8 refs.; 8 figs

  16. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  17. Effect of carbon and silicon on nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyakkinen, V.I.; Bezobrazov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The study is aimed at specifying the role of carbon and silicon in high-chromium melts nitridation processes. It is shown that in high-chromium melts of the Cr-Fe-C system the nitrogen solubility is reduced with the growth of carbon content and in the chromium concentration range of 70-100% at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa it is described by the lg[%N] Cr-Fe-C =lg[%N] cr-fe -0.098[%C] equation. While decreasing the temperature the nitrogen solubility in alloys is increased. Silicon essentially decreases the nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium. For the 0-10% silicon concentration range the relation between the equilibrium content of nitrogen and silicon at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa is described by the straight line equation [%N] Cr-Si =6.1-0.338 [%Si

  18. Thin coatings for heavy industry: Advanced coatings for pipes and valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernhes, Luc

    Pipes and valves are pressure vessels that regulate the flow of materials (liquids, gases, and slurries) by controlling the passageways. To optimize processes, reduce costs, and comply with government regulations, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) must maintain their products in state-of-the-art condition. The first valves were invented over 3,000 years ago to supply water to farms and cities. They were made with bronze alloys, providing good corrosion resistance and acceptable tribological performance. The industrial revolution drove manufacturers to develop new and improved tribological materials. In the 20th century, innovative alloys such as Monel copper-nickel and Stellite cobalt-chrome as well as hard chrome plating were introduced to better control tribological properties and maximize in-service life. Since then, new materials have been regularly introduced to extend the range of applications for valves. For example, Teflon fluoropolymers are used in corrosive chemical and petrochemical processes, the nickel-based superalloys Hastelloy and Inconel for petrochemical applications, and creep-resistant chromium-rich F91 steel for supercritical power plants. Recently, the valve industry has embraced the use of hard thermal sprayed coatings for the most demanding applications, and is investing heavily in research to develop the most suitable coatings for specific uses. There is increasing evidence that the optimal solution to erosive, corrosive, and fretting wear problems lies in the design and manufacture of multi-layer, graded, and/or nanostructured coatings and coating systems that combine controlled hardness with high elastic modulus, high toughness, and good adhesion. The overall objectives of this thesis were 1) to report on advances in the development of structurally controlled hard protective coatings with tailored mechanical, elastoplastic, and thermal properties; and 2) to describe enhanced wear-, erosion-, and corrosion-resistance and other

  19. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  20. Chromium Tolerance and Bioremoval by Cyanobacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cyanobacterial species Nostoc calcicola HH-12 and Chroococcus minutus HH-11 isolated from a textile mill oxidation pond were examined individually and as consortium for their chromium(VI) tolerance and bioremoval from aqueous solutions. Both species were tolerant to the metal and showed significant increase ...

  1. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial pH, solution temperature, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations on the adsorption efficiency was investigated using batch equilibrium assays. From the results obtained for the adsorption ...

  2. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  3. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest w...

  4. Chromium fractionation and speciation in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catarinie Diniz; Techy, João Gabriel; Ganzarolli, Edgard Moreira; Quináia, Sueli Pércio

    2012-05-01

    It is common for leather industries to dump chromium-contaminated effluent into rivers and other bodies of water. Thus, it is crucial to know the impacts caused by this practice to the environment. A study on chromium partitioning and speciation, with determination at trace levels, was carried out in a potentially contaminated creek. Chromium fractionation and speciation was performed using a flow-injection preconcentration system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. High levels of this element were found in the particulate material (449-9320 mg kg(-1)), which indicates its compatibility with this fraction. The concentration of Cr(iii) in the water samples collected ranged from 5.2-105.2 μg L(-1). Cr(vi) was always below of the DL (0.3 μg L(-1)). Chromium accumulation observed in the sediment (873-1691 mg kg(-1)) may confirm contamination due to the long term release of contaminated effluents in the creek.

  5. Chromium removal from aqueous media by superparamagnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Introduction. Industrial wastewater often contains substantial amount ... sion, it is imperative that industries reduce chromium in their effluents to this ..... in standard Gibb's free energy ( Go), enthalpy ( Ho), ... ideal gas constant and T is temperature. Table 3 dis ... sequence of increase in access to functional groups afforded ...

  6. Effects of chromium on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2002-09-06

    Chromium is a naturally occurring heavy metal found commonly in the environment in trivalent, Cr(III), and hexavalent, Cr(VI), forms. Cr(VI) compounds have been declared as a potent occupational carcinogen among workers in chrome plating, stainless steel, and pigment industries. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) results in the formation of reactive intermediates that together with oxidative stress oxidative tissue damage and a cascade of cellular events including modulation of apoptosis regulatory gene p53, contribute to the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Cr(VI)-containing compounds. On the other hand, chromium is an essential nutrient required to promote the action of insulin in body tissues so that the body can use sugars, proteins and fats. Chromium is of significant importance in altering the immune response by immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive processes as shown by its effects on T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, cytokine production and the immune response that may induce hypersensitivity reactions. This review gives an overview of the effects of chromium on the immune system of the body. Copyright 2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies

  7. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  8. Stabilization of chromium: an alternative to make safe leathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ying; Liu, Xiaoling; Huang, Li; Chen, Wuyong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the original causes for hexavalent chromium presence in the leather were first evaluated by ageing of chromium(III) solutions and chrome tanned hide powder (50 degrees C, UV lightening at 340 nm, 0-36 h). The results showed that the trivalent chromium at instable coordination state was easy to convert into hexavalent chromium in high pH environment, and the probability of the oxidation increased in this order: multi-coordinate chromium, mono-coordinate chromium, and free chromium. For this reason, the process for stabilizing chromium in the leather was designed with the specific material, which was mostly consisted of the reducers and the chelating agents. After treated with the developed process, these leathers were aged (50 degrees C, UV irradiance as 0.68 W/m(2) at 340 nm, 0-72 h) to estimate chromium(VI) presence. Hexavalent chromium was not found in these treated leathers even if the leathers were aged for 72 h. Moreover, the physical and mechanical properties for the leathers varied little after treating. In a word, an inherent safe and effective process was proved to avoid the formation of hexavalent chromium in the leather. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of low-chromium, chromium-tungsten steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    High-chromium (9-12% Cr) Cr-Mo and Cr-W ferritic steels are favored as candidates for fusion applications. In early work to develop reduced-activation steels, an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C steel (designated 2.25Cr-2WV) had better strength than an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel (compositions are in weight percent). However, the 2.25Cr-2WV had poor impact properties, as determined by the ductile-brittle transition temperature and upper-shelf energy of subsize Charpy impact specimens. Because low-chromium steels have some advantages over high-chromium steels, a program to develop low-chromium steels is in progress. Microstructural analysis indicated that the reason for the inferior impact toughness of the 2.25Cr-2WV was the granular bainite obtained when the steel was normalized. Properties can be improved by developing an acicular bainite microstructure by increasing the cooling rate after austenitization. Alternatively, acicular bainite can be promoted by increasing the hardenability. Hardenability was changed by adding small amounts of boron and additional chromium to the 2.25Cr-2WV composition. A combination of B, Cr, and Ta additions resulted in low-chromium reduced-activation steels with mechanical properties comparable to those of 9Cr-2WVTa. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of resistant starch, glycemic index and fortificants content of premix rice coated with various concentrations and types of edible coating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, W. A.; Susiati, A. M.; Adhini, H. A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes in Indonesia has been increasing year by year. Diets with a low glycemic index and high resistant starch foods can assist diabetics in controlling their blood glucose levels. Diabetics are known to have micro-nutrient deficiencies of chromium, magnesium and vitamin D that can be overcome by consuming parboiled rice fortified by use of a coating method. The fortification of parboiled rice (premix rice) can be achieved by coating with HPMC (hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose), MC (methyl cellulose), CMC (carboxyl methyl cellulose), gum arabic and rice starch. This research aimed to evaluate the levels of resistant starch, glycemic index and fortificants of premix rice coated with different concentrations and types of edible coating materials. This research used completely randomized design, with treatments to the concentrations and the types of edible coating (HPMC, CMC, MC, gum arabic and rice starch). The concentrations of edible coating were 0.15%, 0.2% and 0.25% for cellulose derivative coatings; 25%, 30%, 35% for gum arabic and 2%, 3.5% and 5% for rice starch. This research shows that fortified premix rice coated with various concentrations and types of edible coating materials is high in resistant starch and has a low glycemic index. The coating treatment affects the levels of magnesium and vitamin D, but does not affect the levels of chromium in parboiled rice. The premix rice with a low glycemic index and high nutrient content (chromium, magnesium and vitamin D) was premix rice coated by CMC 0.25% and HPMC 0.25% with glycemic indeces of 39.34 and 38.50, respectively.

  11. Tribology and Microstructure of PS212 with a Cr2O3 Seal Coat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Benoy, Patricia A.; Korenyi-Both, Andras; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    PS212 is a plasma sprayed metal bonding chrome carbide coating with solid lubricant additives which has lubricating properties at temperatures up to about 900 deg C. The coating is diamond ground to achieve an acceptable tribological surface. But, as with many plasma spray coatings, PS212 is not fully-dense. In this study, a chromium oxide base seal coating is used in an attempt to seal any porosity that is open to the surface of the PS212 coating, and to study the effect of the sealant on the tribological properties of PS212. The results indicate that the seal coating reduces friction and wear when it is applied and then diamond ground leaving a thin layer of seal coating which fills in the surface pits of the PS212 coating.

  12. Characterization of coatings and the low cycle fatigue behaviour of 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, P.; Horsten, M.G.; Tjoa, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    In the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme ECN participates in a NET task PSM-8 'Coatings and Surface Effects on Stainless Steel 316L'. High emissivity coatings were developed for enhanced heat transfer from graphite tiles to a Stainless Steel First Wall. Four candidate materials, Cr 2 O 3 , Black Cr, Al 2 O 3 /TiO 2 and TiC were tested as candidate high emissivity coatings. These coatings were manufactured by atmospheric and vacuum plasma spraying technique and the Black Chromium coatings were manufactured by a galvanic coating technique. The tests included total emissivity measurements and Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) experiments. The total emissivity of two TiC coatings at 525 K appeared to be 0.62 and 0.64. The total emissivity of the TiC and 5 wt% TiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 coating was about 0.7. (orig.)

  13. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado Gamez, A.; Blanco Saenz, R.; Mora Morales, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author) [es

  14. Chromium-doped DLC for implants prepared by laser-magnetron deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Zemek, Josef; Mikšovský, Jan; Kubinová, Šárka; Remsa, Jan; Kopeček, Jaromir; Jurek, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films are frequently used for coating of implants. The problem of DLC layers lies in bad layer adhesion to metal implants. Chromium is used as a dopant for improvement of adhesion of DLC films. DLC and Cr-DLC layers were deposited on silicon, Ti6Al4V and CoCrMo substrates by a hybrid technology using combination of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and magnetron sputtering. The topology of layers was studied using SEM, AFM and mechanical profilometer. Carbon and chromium content and concentration of trivalent and toxic hexavalent chromium bonds were determined by XPS and WDS. It follows from the scratch tests that Cr doping improved adhesion of DLC layers. Ethylene glycol, diiodomethane and deionized water were used to measure the contact angles. The surface free energy (SFE) was calculated. The antibacterial properties were studied using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The influence of SFE, hydrophobicity and surface roughness on antibacterial ability of doped layers is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomedical coatings on magnesium alloys - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, H; Virtanen, S; Boccaccini, A R

    2012-07-01

    This review comprehensively covers research carried out in the field of degradable coatings on Mg and Mg alloys for biomedical applications. Several coating methods are discussed, which can be divided, based on the specific processing techniques used, into conversion and deposition coatings. The literature review revealed that in most cases coatings increase the corrosion resistance of Mg and Mg alloys. The critical factors determining coating performance, such as corrosion rate, surface chemistry, adhesion and coating morphology, are identified and discussed. The analysis of the literature showed that many studies have focused on calcium phosphate coatings produced either using conversion or deposition methods which were developed for orthopaedic applications. However, the control of phases and the formation of cracks still appear unsatisfactory. More research and development is needed in the case of biodegradable organic based coatings to generate reproducible and relevant data. In addition to biocompatibility, the mechanical properties of the coatings are also relevant, and the development of appropriate methods to study the corrosion process in detail and in the long term remains an important area of research. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical-thermal synthesis of chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Favilla, Eliane Aparecida Peixoto; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the synthesis of chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 ), starting from metallic chromium (obtained from the reduction of Cr 2 O 3 with Al) and carbon (graphite). The synthesis was carried out via high energy milling, followed by heat-treating of pellets made of different milled mixtures at 800 o C, for 2 h, under an atmosphere of argon. A SPEX CertPrep 8000 Mixer/Mill was used for milling under argon atmosphere. A tool steel vat and two 12.7 mm diameter chromium steel balls were used. The raw materials used and the products were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, electronic microscopy and X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis. The following variables were investigated: the quantity of carbon in the mixture, the milling time and the milling power. Mechanical activation of the reactant mixture depends upon the milling power ratio used for processing. The energy liberated by the reduction of the chromium oxide with aluminium exhibits a maximum for milling power ratio between 5:1 and 7.5:1. Self-propagating reaction occurred for all heat-treated samples whatever the carbon content of the sample and the milling power ratio used. Bearing carbon samples exhibited hollow shell structures after the reaction. The level of iron contamination of the milled samples was kept below 0.3% Fe. The self-propagated reaction caused high temperatures inside the samples as it may be seen by the occurrence of spherules, dendrites and whiskers. The carbon content determines the type of chromium carbide formed

  17. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.

  18. Antibacterial Functionalization of PVD Coatings on Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Osés

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The application of surface treatments that incorporate silver or copper as antibacterial elements has become a common practice for a wide variety of medical devices and materials because of their effective activity against nosocomial infections. Ceramic tiles are choice materials for cladding the floors and walls of operation rooms and other hospital spaces. This study is focused on the deposition of biocide physical vapor deposition (PVD coatings on glazed ceramic tiles. The objective was to provide antibacterial activity to the surfaces without worsening their mechanical properties. Silver and copper-doped chromium nitride (CrN and titanium nitride (TiN coatings were deposited on samples of tiles. A complete characterization was carried out in order to determine the composition and structure of the coatings, as well as their topographical and mechanical properties. The distribution of Ag and Cu within the coating was analyzed using glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GD-OES and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM. Roughness, microhardness, and scratch resistance were measured for all of the combinations of coatings and dopants, as well as their wettability. Finally, tests of antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were carried out, showing that all of the doped coatings had pronounced biocide activity.

  19. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbinsek, Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2014-01-01

    The phosphating processes are widely used in industry as surface treatments for metals, especially for low thickness plates, improving the adhesion between the metallic surface and the paint coating, and increasing the durability of paint systems against corrosion attacks. The tricationic phosphates containing zinc, nickel and manganese are commonly applied on steel. There is much discussion about the replacement of nickel by another element in order to have an environmentally friendly phosphating process. Niobium as a replacement for nickel has been evaluated. The most significant environmental impacts of phosphating processes are related to the presence of nickel and hexavalent chromium used in the process, this last as a passivation treatment. Nickel and hexavalent chromium are harmful to human and environment leading to contamination of water and soil. In the present study phosphate layers containing zinc, manganese and niobium have been evaluated and characterized on galvanized steel, and the results were compared with phosphates containing zinc, manganese and nickel, or a bicationic phosphate layer with zinc and manganese. Although the use of hexavalent chromium is not recommended worldwide, it is still used in processes for sealing the porosity of phosphate layers. This element is carcinogenic and has been associated with various diseases. Due to the passivation characteristics of niobium, this study also evaluated the tricationic bath containing niobium ammonium oxalate as a passivation treatment. The results showed that it could act as a replacement for the hexavalent chromium. The results of the present study showed that formulations containing niobium are potential replacements for hexavalent chromium and similar corrosion protection was obtained for the phosphate containing nickel or that with niobium. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric tests, porosity and adhesion evaluation results indicated that the phosphate

  20. Aluminum and Other Coatings for the Passivation of Tritium Storage Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Korinko, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-16

    Using a highly sensitive residual gas analyzer, the off-gassing of hydrogen, water, and hydrocarbons from surface-treated storage vessels containing deuterium was measured. The experimental storage vessels were compared to a low-off-gassing, electro-polished 304L canister. Alternative vessels were made out of aluminum, or were coatings on 304L steel. Coatings included powder pack aluminide, electro-plated aluminum, powder pack chromide, dense electro-plated chromium, copper plated, and copper plated with 25 and 50 percent nano-diamond. Vessels were loaded with low pressure deuterium to observe exchange with protium or hydrogen as observed with formation of HD and HDO. Off gas of D2O or possible CD4 was observed at mass 20. The main off-gas in all of the studies was H2. The studies indicated that coatings required significant post-coating treatment to reduce off-gas and enhance the permeation barrier from gases likely added during the coating process. Dense packed aluminum coatings needed heating to drive off water. Electro-plated aluminum, chromium and copper coatings appeared to trap hydrogen from the plating process. Nano-diamond appeared to enhance the exchange rate with hydrogen off gas, and its coating process trapped significant amounts of hydrogen. Aluminum caused more protium exchange than chromium-treated surfaces. Aluminum coatings released more water, but pure aluminum vessels released small amounts of hydrogen, little water, and generally performed well. Chromium coating had residual hydrogen that was difficult to totally outgas but otherwise gave low residuals for water and hydrocarbons. Our studies indicated that simple coating of as received 304L metal will not adequately block hydrogen. The base vessel needs to be carefully out-gassed before applying a coating, and the coating process will likely add additional hydrogen that must be removed. Initial simple bake-out and leak checks up to 350° C for a few hours was

  1. Direct conversion of glucose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural in ionic liquids with lanthanide catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Tim; Sørensen, Mathilde Grau; Riisager, Anders

    2010-01-01

    The direct conversion of glucose to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) in ionic liquids with lanthanide catalysts was examined in search of a possibly more environmentally feasible process not involving chromium. The highest HMF yield was obtained with ytterbium chloride or triflate together...

  2. Study of Thermal Fatigue Resistance of a Composite Coating Made by a Vacuum Fusion Sintering Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Thermal fatigue behavior of a Ni-base alloy chromium carbide composite coating made by a vacuum fusion sintering method are discussed. Results show that thermal fatigue behavior is associated with cyclic upper temperature and coating thickness. As the thickness of the coating decreases, the thermal fatigue resistance increases. The thermal fatigue resistance cuts down with the thermal cyclic upper temperature rising. The crack growth rate decreases with the increase in cyclic number until crack arrests. Thermal fatigue failure was not found along the interface of the coating/matrix. The tract of thermal fatigue crack cracks along the interfaces of phases.

  3. Plasma boriding of a cobalt–chromium alloy as an interlayer for nanostructured diamond growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Jubinsky, Matthew; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Metal-boride layer creates a compatible surface for NSD deposition. • PECVD boriding on CoCrMo produces robust metal-boride layer. • Deposition temperature comparison shows 750 °C boriding masks surface cobalt. • EDS shows boron diffusion as well as deposition. • Nanoindentation hardness of CoCrMo substantially increases after boriding. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings can potentially improve the wear resistance of cobalt–chromium medical implant surfaces, but the high cobalt content in these alloys acts as a catalyst to form graphitic carbon. Boriding by high temperature liquid baths and powder packing has been shown to improve CVD diamond compatibility with cobalt alloys. We use the microwave plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD process to deposit interlayers composed primarily of the borides of cobalt and chromium. The use of diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) in the plasma feedgas allows for the formation of a robust boride interlayer for suppressing graphitic carbon during subsequent CVD of nano-structured diamond (NSD). This metal–boride interlayer is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings on a CoCrMo alloy. Migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer is significantly reduced and undetectable on the surface of the subsequently-grown NSD coating. The effects of PECVD boriding are compared for a range of substrate temperatures and deposition times and are evaluated using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Boriding of CoCrMo results in adhered nanostructured diamond coatings with low surface roughness.

  4. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  5. Corrosion properties of chromia based eco - friendly coatings on mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brozek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic nanocrystalline coatings of chromium oxide (III on steel S235JRH-1.0038 (EN 10025-1 were prepared using the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS method from ammonia dichromate (VI. Their structure and anti – corrosion properties were compared to the standard chromium oxide (III coating prepared by thermal spraying. The newly prepared coatings had very high adhesion and minimal porosity. Anticorrosion properties were characterized by the means of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, measuring the charge transfer resistance Rct and capacitance of electrical double layer CPEdl in the 0,5 mol/l NaCl. Coatings of Cr2 O3 prepared by the LPPS method showed unambiguously improved anti - corrosion properties.

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  7. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmaz, M., E-mail: mdurmaz@sakarya.edu.tr; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Kilinc, B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Institute of Arts and Sciences, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr{sub 2}N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV{sub 0.025}. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  8. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.; Kilinc, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr 2 N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV 0.025 . For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results

  9. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, M.; Kilinc, B.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr2N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV0.025. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  10. Removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater using a new composite chitosan biosorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Veera M; Abburi, Krishnaiah; Talbott, Jonathan L; Smith, Edgar D

    2003-10-01

    A new composite chitosan biosorbent was prepared by coating chitosan, a glucosamine biopolymer, onto ceramic alumina. The composite bioadsorbent was characterized by high-temperature pyrolysis, porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Batch isothermal equilibrium and continuous column adsorption experiments were conducted at 25 degrees C to evaluate the biosorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from synthetic as well as field samples obtained from chrome plating facilities. The effect of pH, sulfate, and chloride ion on adsorption was also investigated. The biosorbent loaded with Cr(VI) was regenerated using 0.1 M sodium hydroxide solution. A comparison of the results of the present investigation with those reported in the literature showed that chitosan coated on alumina exhibits greater adsorption capacity for chromium(VI). Further, experimental equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms, and values of the parameters of the isotherms are reported. The ultimate capacity obtained from the Langmuir model is 153.85 mg/g chitosan.

  11. Magnetite nanoparticle (NP) uptake by wheat plants and its effect on cadmium and chromium toxicological behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Luna, J., E-mail: jlol_24@hotmail.com [Instituto de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad de la Sierra Juárez, Ixtlán de Juárez 68725, Oaxaca (Mexico); Silva-Silva, M.J. [Instituto de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad de la Sierra Juárez, Ixtlán de Juárez 68725, Oaxaca (Mexico); Martinez-Vargas, S. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Carmen, Ciudad del Carmen 24115, Campeche (Mexico); Mijangos-Ricardez, O.F. [Instituto de Estudios Ambientales, Universidad de la Sierra Juárez, Ixtlán de Juárez 68725, Oaxaca (Mexico); González-Chávez, M.C. [Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agrícolas, Carr. México–Texcoco km 36.5, Montecillo 56230, Estado de México (Mexico); Solís-Domínguez, F.A. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali 21280, Baja California Norte (Mexico); Cuevas-Díaz, M.C. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Veracruzana, Coatzacoalcos 96535, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work was to assess the uptake of citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) by wheat plants and its effect on the bioaccumulation and toxicity of individual and joint Cd{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 6+} levels. Seven-day assays were conducted using quartz sand as the plant growth substrate. The endpoints measured were seed germination, root and shoot lengths, and heavy metal accumulation. Magnetite exhibited very low toxicity, regardless of the wheat seedling NP uptake and distribution into roots and shoots. The seed germination and shoot length were not sensitive enough, while the root length was a more sensitive toxicity endpoint. The root length of wheat seedlings exposed to individual metals decreased by 50% at 2.67 mg Cd{sup 2+} kg{sup −1} and 5.53 mg Cr{sup 6+} kg{sup −1}. However, when magnetite NPs (1000 mg kg{sup −1}) were added, the root length of the plants increased by 25 and 50%. Cd{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 6+} showed similar and noninteractive joint action, but strongly impaired the wheat seedlings. In contrast, an interactive infra-additive or antagonistic effect was observed upon adding magnetite NPs. Thus, cadmium and chromium accumulation in vegetable tissues was considerately diminished and the toxicity alleviated. - Highlights: • We assessed the effect of nanomagnetite on heavy metal toxicity in wheat plants. • Citrate-coated magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) exerted very low toxicity to plants. • Cadmium was more toxic than chromium and toxicity was mitigated by magnetite NPs. • Cadmium and chromium had a similar and noninteractive joint action on plants. • Metals showed an interactive infra-additive joint effect by adding magnetite NPs.

  12. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, J.P.; Boving, H.J.; Hintermann, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many processes have been developed which are variations and/or combinations of the basic CVD and PVD methods. The main difference between these two families of deposition techniques is that the CVD is an elevated temperature process (≥ 700 C), while the PVD on the contrary, is rather a low temperature process (≤ 500 C); this of course influences the choice of substrates and properties of the coating/substrate systems. Fundamental aspects of the vapor phase deposition techniques and some of their influences on coating properties will be discussed, as well as the very important interactions between deposit and substrate: diffusions, internal stress, etc. Advantages and limitations of CVD and PVD respectively will briefly be reviewed and examples of applications of the layers will be given. Parallel to the development and permanent updating of surface modification technologies, an effort was made to create novel characterisation methods. A close look will be given to the coating adherence control by means of the scratch test, at the coating hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation, at the coating wear resistance by means of a pin-on-disc tribometer, and at the surface quality evaluation by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Finally, main important trends will be highlighted. (orig.)

  14. Citric-acid preacidification enhanced electrokinetic remediation for removal of chromium from chromium-residue-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fansheng; Xue, Hao; Wang, Yeyao; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Juling

    2018-02-01

    Electrokinetic experiments were conducted on chromium-residue-contaminated soils collected from a chemical plant in China. Acidification-electrokinetic remediation technology was proposed in order to solve the problem of removing inefficient with ordinary electrokinetic. The results showed that electrokinetic remediation removal efficiency of chromium from chromium-contaminated soil was significantly enhanced with acidizing pretreatment. The total chromium [Cr(T)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal rate of the group acidized by citric acid (0.9 mol/L) for 5 days was increased from 6.23% and 19.01% in the acid-free experiments to 26.97% and 77.66% in the acidification-treated experiments, respectively. In addition, part of chromium with the state of carbonate-combined will be converted into water-soluble state through acidification to improve the removal efficiency. Within the appropriate concentration range, the higher concentration of acid was, the more chromium was released. So the removal efficiency of chromium depended on the acid concentration. The citric acid is also a kind of complexing agent, which produced complexation with Cr that was released by the electrokinetic treatment and then enhanced the removal efficiency. The major speciation of chromium that was removed from soils by acidification-electrokinetics remediation was acid-soluble speciation, revivification speciation and oxidation speciation, which reduced biological availability of chromium.

  15. Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Applications: Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of the corrosivity of the environment, all metals require periodic maintenance activity to guard against the insidious effects of corrosion and thus ensure that alloys meet or exceed design or performance life. The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates is the application of a coating system. Applied coating systems work via a variety of methods (barrier, galvanic, and/or inhibitor) and adhere to the substrate through a combination of chemical and physical bonds. For years hexavalent chromium has been a widely used element within applied coating systems because of its self healing and corrosion resistant properties. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) studies have concluded that hexavalent chromium (hex chrome) is carcinogenic and poses significant risk to human health. On May 5, 2011 amendments to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) were issued in the Federal Register. Subpart 223.73 prohibits contracts from requiring hexavalent chromium in deliverables unless certain exceptions apply. These exceptions include authorization from a general or flag officer and members of the Senior Executive Service from a Program Executive Office, and unmodified legacy systems. Otherwise, Subpart 252.223-7008 provides the contract clause prohibiting contractors from using or delivering hexavalent chromium in a concentration greater than 0.1 percent by weight for all new contracts and to be included down to subcontractors for supplies, maintenance and repair services, and construction materials. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), and industry stakeholders continue to search for alternatives to hex chrome in coatings applications that meet their performance requirements in corrosion protection, cost, operability, and health and safety, while typically specifying that performance must be equal to or greater than existing systems.

  16. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed with excellent corrosion resistance and neutron absorption. These coatings, with further development, could be cost-effective options to enhance the corrosion resistance of drip shields and waste packages, and limit nuclear criticality in canisters for the transportation, aging, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten have shown the corrosion resis...

  17. Self-adapting metal-ceramic coating for biomass and waste incineration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulstich, Martin [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Fehr, Karl Thomas; Ye, Ya-Ping [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany); Loeh, Ingrid; Mocker, Mario; Wolf, Gerhard [ATZ Entwicklungszentrum, Sulzbach-Rosenberg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings might become a reasonable alternative to cost-intensive cladding of heat exchangers in biomass and waste incineration. Shortcomings of these coatings might be overcome by a double-layer system, consisting of Alloy 625 covered with yttria-stabilized zirconia. Under appropriate conditions, re-crystallized zirconium oxide and chromium oxide form a dense, self-adapting and self-healing barrier against further infiltration of gaseous species. (orig.)

  18. Quaternized wood as sorbent for hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, K S; Lee, C K; Lee, C Y

    2001-01-01

    The potential of quaternized wood (QW) chips in removing hexavalent chromium from synthetic solution and chrome waste under both batch and continuous-flow conditions was investigated. Sorption was found to be dependent on pH, metal concentration, and temperature. QW chips provide higher sorption capacity and wider pH range compared with untreated wood chips. The equilibrium data could be fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model, and maximum sorption capacities were calculated to be 27.03 and 25.77 mg/g in synthetic chromate solution and chrome waste, respectively. The presence of sulfate in high concentration appeared to suppress the uptake of chromium by QW chips. Column studies showed that bed depth influenced the breakthrough time greatly whereas flow rate of influent had little effect on its sorption on the column.

  19. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    reduction data and the specific growth rate constant value was calculated as 0.082 and the ... Key words: Hexavalent chromium, Rhizopus Oryzae, leather tanning, Monod and Haldane models. ... composition; Glucose 1 g; K2HPO4 0.5 g; NaCl 0.5 g; MgCl2 1.0 g; ... ficantly, because of the inhibitor role of high concentration.

  20. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  1. Determination of chromium in biological matrices by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClendon, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    Chromium is recognized to be an essential trace element in several biological systems. It exists in many biological materials in a variety of chemical forms and very low concentration levels which cause problems for many analytical techniques. Both instrumental and destructive neutron activation analysis were used to determine the chromium concentration in Orchard Leaves, SRM 1571, Brewers Yeast, SRM 1569, and Bovine Liver, SRM 1577. Some of the problems inherent with determining chromium in certain biological matrices and the data obtained here at the National Bureau of Standards using this technique are discussed. The results obtained from dissolution of brewers yeast in a closed system as described in the DNAA procedure are in good agreement with the INAA results. The same phenomenon existed in the determination of chromium in bovine liver. The radiochemical procedure described for chromium (DNAA) provides the analyst with a simple, rapid and selective technique for chromium determination in a variety of matrices. (T.G.)

  2. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on the substrate of steel by pack cementation process for two hours at the temperature of 850ºC, 950ºC and 1050ºC, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that chromium was successfully deposited at all temperatures. Somehow, SEM cross sectional image showed that continuous layer of chromium was not continuously formed at 850oC. Therefore, this research clarify that chromium enrichment by pack cementation may be conducted at the temperature above 950°C.

  3. Diffusion of Cr, Fe, and Ti ions from Ni-base alloy Inconel-718 into a transition alumina coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, M., E-mail: martin.dressler@bam.de; Nofz, M.; Doerfel, I.; Saliwan-Neumann, R.

    2012-04-30

    Heat treating metals at high temperatures trigger diffusion processes which may lead to the formation of oxide layers. In this work the diffusion of Cr, Fe and Ti into an alumina coating applied to Inconel-718 is being investigated. Mass gain measurements, UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied in order to study the evolution of the diffusion process. It was found that mainly Cr as well as minor amounts of Fe and Ti are being incorporated into the alumina coating upon prolonged heat treatment at 700 Degree-Sign C. It could be shown that alumina coatings being void of Cr have the same oxidation related mass gain as uncoated samples. However, incorporation of Cr into the alumina coating decreased their mass gain below that of uncoated substrates forming a Cr oxide scale only. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the diffusion of Cr into alumina coatings applied on IN-718. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ingress of Cr led to the formation of mixed alumina/chromium coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mass gain of mixed alumina/chromium coatings was compared to uncoated IN-718. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mixed alumina/chromium coatings improved the oxidation resistance of IN-718.

  4. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi F. A.; Kurniawan T.; Salwani M. S.; Bin Y. S.; Harun W. S. W.

    2016-01-01

    The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on...

  5. Environmental exposure to arsenic and chromium in an industrial area

    OpenAIRE

    Vimercati, Luigi; Gatti, Maria F; Gagliardi, Tommaso; Cuccaro, Francesco; De Maria, Luigi; Caputi, Antonio; Quarato, Marco; Baldassarre, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic and chromium are widespread environmental contaminants that affect global health due to their toxicity and carcinogenicity. To date, few studies have investigated exposure to arsenic and chromium in a population residing in a high-risk environmental area. The aim of this study is to evaluate the exposure to arsenic and chromium in the general population with no occupational exposure to these metals, resident in the industrial area of Taranto, Southern Italy, through biological monitor...

  6. Determination of tracer quantities of chromium in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huart, A.

    1959-01-01

    A method is described for the photometric determination of chromium in uranium by absorbency at 540 mμ of the Cr(VI) diphenylcarbazide combination. After attack by nitric acid, the solution is made perchloric, and the chromium oxidised at the boiling point by permanganate. Excess oxidant is removed by hydrochloric acid. Study of operating conditions resulted in a method with an accuracy of ± 0,5 ppm for 0,5 to 15 ppm chromium in the metal. (author) [fr

  7. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zand, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  8. Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    General Magnaplate Corporation's pharmaceutical machine is used in the industry for high speed pressing of pills and capsules. Machine is automatic system for molding glycerine suppositories. These machines are typical of many types of drug production and packaging equipment whose metal parts are treated with space spinoff coatings that promote general machine efficiency and contribute to compliance with stringent federal sanitation codes for pharmaceutical manufacture. Collectively known as "synergistic" coatings, these dry lubricants are bonded to a variety of metals to form an extremely hard slippery surface with long lasting self lubrication. The coatings offer multiple advantages; they cannot chip, peel or be rubbed off. They protect machine parts from corrosion and wear longer, lowering maintenance cost and reduce undesired heat caused by power-robbing friction.

  9. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  10. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Hales, R.

    1977-01-01

    During selective chromium oxidation of stainless steels the changes in chromium concentration at the metal surface and in the metal have an important bearing on the overall oxidation performance. It has been proposed that an analogue of chromium behaviour during selective oxidation is obtained from volatilisation of chromium during high temperature vacuum annealing. In the present report the evaporation of chromium from 316 type of steel, vacuum annealed at 1,000 0 C, has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels is rate controlled by interdiffusion in the alloy. As predicted the chromium concentration at the metal surface decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in good agreement with the previously derived model apart from an anomalous region near the surface. Here the higher resolution of the neutron activation technique indicated a zone within approximately 2μm of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (orig.) [de

  11. Laboratory Automatic Titration of Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric acids...

  12. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments

  13. Molybdate Coatings for Protecting Aluminum Against Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    2005-01-01

    Conversion coatings that comprise mixtures of molybdates and several additives have been subjected to a variety of tests to evaluate their effectiveness in protecting aluminum and alloys of aluminum against corrosion. Molybdate conversion coatings are under consideration as replacements for chromate conversion coatings, which have been used for more than 70 years. The chromate coatings are highly effective in protecting aluminum and its alloys against corrosion but are also toxic and carcinogenic. Hexavalent molybdenum and, hence, molybdates containing hexavalent molybdenum, have received attention recently as replacements for chromates because molybdates mimic chromates in a variety of applications but exhibit significantly lower toxicity. The tests were performed on six proprietary formulations of molybdate conversion coatings, denoted formulations A through F, on panels of aluminum alloy 2024-T3. A bare alloy panel was also included in the tests. The tests included electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measurements of corrosion potentials, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  14. Protection of zirconium and its alloys by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loriers, H.; Lafon, A.; Darras, R.; Baque, P.

    1968-01-01

    At 600 deg. C in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, zirconium and its alloys undergo corrosion which presents two aspects simultaneously: - formation of a surface layer of zirconia, - dissolution of oxygen in the alloy sub-layer leading to brittleness. The two phenomena greatly restrict the possibilities of using zirconium alloys as a canning material for fuel elements in CO 2 cooled nuclear reactors. An attempt has thus been made to limit, and perhaps to suppress, the corrosion effects in zirconium under these conditions by protecting it with metallic coatings. A first attempt to obtain a protection using copper-based coatings did not produce the result hoped for. Aluminium coatings produced by vacuum evaporation, followed by a consolidating thermal treatment make it possible to prevent the formation of the zirconia layer, but they do not eliminate the hardening effect produced by oxygen diffusion. On the other hand, electrolytically produced chromium deposits whose adherence is improved by a thermal vacuum treatment, counteract both these phenomena simultaneously. A similar result has been obtained with coatings of molybdenum produced by the technique of high-frequency inductive plasma sputtering. The particular effectiveness of the last two types of coatings is due to their structures characterized by the existence of an adherent film of chromium or molybdenum in the free state. (authors) [fr

  15. Thermal spray coatings replace hard chrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, M.; Unger, R.

    1997-01-01

    Hard chrome plating provides good wear and erosion resistance, as well as good corrosion protection and fine surface finishes. Until a few years ago, it could also be applied at a reasonable cost. However, because of the many environmental and financial sanctions that have been imposed on the process over the past several years, cost has been on a consistent upward trend, and is projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, it is very important to find a coating or a process that offers the same characteristics as hard chrome plating, but without the consequent risks. This article lists the benefits and limitations of hard chrome plating, and describes the performance of two thermal spray coatings (tungsten carbide and chromium carbide) that compared favorably with hard chrome plating in a series of tests. It also lists three criteria to determine whether plasma spray or hard chrome plating should be selected

  16. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, J. P.; Vite T, J.; Castillo S, M.; Vite T, M.

    2009-01-01

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  17. Pyrolysis of chromium rich tanning industrial wastes and utilization of carbonized wastes in metallurgical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tôrres Filho, Artur; Lange, Liséte Celina; de Melo, Gilberto Caldeira Bandeira; Praes, Gustavo Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Pyrolysis is the thermal degradation of organic material in oxygen-free or very lean oxygen atmosphere. This study evaluates the use of pyrolysis for conversion of leather wastes from chromium tanning processes into Carbonized Leather Residues (CLR), and the utilization of CLR in metallurgical processes through the production of iron ore pellets. CLR was used to replace mineral coal in proportions of 10% and 25% on fixed carbon basis content in the mixtures for pellets preparation. Experimental conversions were performed on a pilot scale pyrolysis plant and a pelletizing reactor of the "pot grate" type. The results demonstrated the technical feasibility of using the charcoal product from animal origin as an energy source, with recovery of up to 76.47% of chromium contained in CLR in the final produced of iron ore pellets. Pellets with 25% replacement of fixed carbon in the coal showed an enhanced compressive strength, with an average value of 344kgfpellet(-1), compared to 300kgfpellet(-1) for standard produced pellets. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  19. Less-Toxic Coatings for Inhibiting Corrosion of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minevski, Zoran; Clarke, Eric; Eylem, Cahit; Maxey, Jason; Nelson, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Two recently invented families of conversion- coating processes have been found to be effective in reducing or preventing corrosion of aluminum alloys. These processes offer less-toxic alternatives to prior conversion-coating processes that are highly effective but have fallen out of favor because they generate chromate wastes, which are toxic and carcinogenic. Specimens subjected to these processes were found to perform well in standard salt-fog corrosion tests.

  20. Influence of acids on the zinc conversion process with molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cosmelina Goncalves da; Margarit-Mattos, Isabel Cristina Pereira; Mattos, Oscar Rosa; Barcia, Oswaldo Esteves

    2010-01-01

    Molybdate conversion coatings have been evaluated as possible alternative to the chromate ones. The acid used in the pH adjustment of the conversion baths exerts great influence on the anti corrosive properties of these coatings. The aim of this work was to verify the role of phosphoric and sulfuric acids on the zinc conversion process with molybdate. The techniques used were: chronopotentiometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and interfacial pH measurements. The surface characterization was made with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The chronopotentiometry results have shown that the influence of the variation of the electrode rotation speed on the conversion process is acid-dependent: the acid influences the mass transport during the conversion. The EIS measures have suggested that the conversion mechanism does not change with the acid, being the coatings thicker when H_2SO_4 is used than the obtained with H_3PO_4. The pH interfacial results have shown a pH increase more significant for the bath with H_2SO_4, indicating a fastest kinetic of zinc dissolution. It was identified the presence of Mo in all analyzed coatings, for both acids, and P in those obtained with H_3PO_4. (author)

  1. Doctor Blade-Coated Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2016-10-25

    In this work, we report polymer solar cells based on blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM and PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM bulk heterojunction photoactive layers. Enhanced power conversion efficiency of 2.75 (conventional structure) and 3.03% (inverted structure) with improved reproducibility was obtained from blade-coated P3HT:PC71BM solar cells, compared to spin-coated ones. Furthermore, by demonstrating 3.10% efficiency flexible solar cells using blade-coated PBDTTT-EFT:PC71BM films on the plastic substrates, we suggest the potential applicability of blade coating technique to the high throughput roll-to-roll fabrication systems.

  2. Hexavalent chromium exposures and exposure-control technologies in American enterprise: results of a NIOSH field research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blade, L M; Yencken, M Story; Wallace, M E; Catalano, J D; Khan, A; Topmiller, J L; Shulman, S A; Martinez, A; Crouch, K G; Bennett, J S

    2007-08-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted 21 field surveys in selected industries to characterize workers' exposures to hexavalent chromium-containing airborne particulate and to evaluate existing technologies for controlling these exposures. Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is a respiratory irritant and chronic inhalation may cause lung cancer. Primary evaluation methods included collection of full work shift, personal breathing-zone (PBZ) air samples for Cr(VI), measurement of ventilation system parameters, and documentation of processes and work practices. This study emphasized evaluation of engineering exposure control measures, so PBZ exposures were measured on the outside of personal protective equipment, for example, respirators. Field surveys were conducted in two chromium electroplating facilities, including one where full-shift PBZ exposures to Cr(VI) ranged from 3.0 to 16 times the 1 micro g/m(3)NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) despite several engineering controls on the plating tanks. At a painting and coating facility that used Cr(VI)-containing products, full-shift exposures of painters and helpers (2.4 to 55 micro g/m(3)) exceeded the REL, but LEV effectiveness was limited. Other operations evaluated included welding in construction; metal cutting operations on chromium-containing materials in ship breaking; chromate-paint removal with abrasive blasting; atomized alloy-spray coating; foundry operations; printing; and the manufacture of refractory brick, colored glass, prefabricated concrete products, and treated wood products. NIOSH researchers concluded that, in many of the evaluated processes, Cr(VI) exposures at or below the current NIOSH REL are achievable. However, for some processes, it is unclear whether controlling exposures to this range is consistently achievable without respirator use. Some operations involving the application of coatings and finishes may be among those most difficult to control to this

  3. COST EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AIR EMISSIONS FROM FUNCTIONAL CHROMIUM ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper will summrize thie pollution prevention (p2) method to control stack emissions from hard chromium plating operations performed by the USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) over the last four years. During literature research and user surveys, it...

  4. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-01-01

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  5. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  6. Dephosphorization of melts with chromium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of the results of laboratory and pilot plant research into the dephosphorization of high-chromium melts reported in the literature, mostly Japanese. The use of high-alloy chromium and chromium-nickel steels in nuclear power engineering showed the negative impact of phosphorus on stress corrosion at high temperatures and on the development of cracks under overlays during welding. For a number of years attention is therefore being devoted to the attainment of a low phosphorus content in these steels. Current dephosphorization methods may be divided into oxidation and reduction methods. Oxidation dephosphorization may be carried out using synthetic mixtures: in the use of CaO-FeCl 2 , BaO-BaCl 2 -Cr 2 O 3 , Li 2 CO 3 -CaO-CaF 2 -FeO and Na 2 CO 3 /K 2 CO 3 -NaCl/KCl/KF/CaCl 2 /FeCl 2 a high initial C content, low content of Cr and Si and a low temperature of the melt are advantageous for dephosphorization. Experiments have also been made with dephosphorization in a bottom-blown oxygen converter and in an AOD converter. The most frequently used substances for reduction dephosphorization are calcium and calcium carbide; the best C content ranges between 0.5 and 1.8%, a high Cr content and a high bath temperature are also advantageous. The use of the reduction procedure is greatly limited by the generation of highly toxic phosphine. Another tested method - electroslag remelting is not suitable for commercial application for its economic exactingness. (A.K.)

  7. Ultracold chromium: a dipolar quantum gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfau, T.; Stuhler, J.; Griesmaier, A.; Fattori, M.; Koch, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our recent achievement of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a gas of chromium atoms. Peculiar electronic and magnetic properties of chromium require the implementation of novel cooling strategies. We observe up to ∼ 10 5 condensed 52 Cr atoms after forced evaporation within a crossed optical dipole trap. Due to its large magnetic moment (6μ B ), the dipole-dipole interaction strength in chromium is comparable with the one of the van der Waals interaction. We prove the anisotropic nature of the dipolar interaction by releasing the condensate from a cigar shaped trap and observe, in time of flight measurements, the change of the aspect-ratio for different in-trap orientations of the atomic dipoles. We also report on the recent observation of 14 Feshbach resonances in elastic collisions between polarized ultra-cold 52 Cr atoms. This is the first Ballistic expansion of a dipolar quantum gas: The anisotropic interaction leads to a different expansion dynamics for the case of the magnetic dipoles aligned with the symmetry axis of the cigar shaped trap as compared with the dipoles oriented perpendicular to the axis of the cigar. The straight lines correspond to the theoretical expectation according to mean field theory without free parameters. observation of collisional Feshbach resonances in an atomic species with more than one valence electron. Moreover, such resonances constitute an important tool towards the realization of a purely dipolar interacting gas because they can be used to change strength and sign of the van der Waals interaction. (author)

  8. Recent developments in high temperature coatings for gas turbine airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goward, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of coatings for hot section airfoils has increased with the drive for more cost-effective use of fuel in a wide variety of gas turbine engines. Minor additions of silicon have been found to appreciably increase the oxidation resistance of plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY coatings on a single crystal nickel-base superalloy. Increasing the chromium content of MCrAlY coatings substantially increases the resistance to acidic (Na2SO4-SO3) hot corrosion at temperatures of about 1300 F (704 C) but gives no significant improvement beyond contemporary coatings in the range of 1600 F (871 C). Surface enrichment of MCrAlY coatings with silicon also gives large increases in resistance to acidic hot corrosion in the 1300 F region. The resistance to the thermal stress-induced spalling of zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings has been improved by lowering coating stresses with segmented structures and by controlling the substrate temperature during coating fabrication.

  9. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the ... time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited .... Lead (II) and nickel (II) adsorption kinetics .... heavy metal by Talaromyces helicus: a trained fungus for copper and.

  10. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents. In the present work the chromium remediation ability of Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in consortia and in their immobilized forms was studied and their efficiencies were compared.

  11. The commensurate spin excitation in chromium: A polarised neutron investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Stirling, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A polarised neutron experiment with neutron energy analysis has been performed with a single-Q sample of chromium in a large magnetic field. The 4-meV ''commensurate'' mode is found to involve spin fluctuations parallel to the ordered chromium moments. 8 refs., 3 figs

  12. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five-year... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  13. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  14. Biosorption of chromium by mangrove-derived Aplanochytrium sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbial dried biomass of Thraustochytrids is used as bioadsorbent for the removal of the chromium in aqueous solution. In this investigation, three species of Thraustochydrids namely Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium sp. and Schizochytrium sp. were tested for the efficiency of chromium accumulation by culturing ...

  15. Optimization of chromium biosorption in aqueous solution by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of a chromium biosorption process was performed by varying three independent variables pH (0.5 to 3.5), initial chromium ion concentration (10 to 30 mg/L), and Yarrowia lipolytica dosage (2 to 4 g/L) using a Doehlert experimental design (DD) involving response surface methodology (RSM). For the maximum ...

  16. Serum chromium concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly refined diet that contains too few micronutrients has been recognized as the dominant factor in the rising incidence of diabetes and other insulin related conditions. Among the missing micronutrients, chromium has the greatest impact on insulin response. The objective of this study was to determine serum chromium ...

  17. Increased chromium uptake in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from burned patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Illner, H.; Dineen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Following thermal injury neutrophil function is severely impaired and thought to be hypometabolic; however, the host is considered to be hypermetabolic. To further investigate the metabolism and the function of neutrophils following thermal injury, neutrophil migration and chromium uptake were studied using radio-labelled neutrophils. Random and directed migration were found to be significantly reduced compared to control values. Neutrophil lysozyme content was also reduced in these burn cells while serum lysozyme from the same patients was significantly elevated over control values. These data suggest lysozyme is released by the neutrophil into the circulatory system. The influx of chromium in cells from burned patients was much greater than the influx in normal cells used in studies for chemotaxis. Influx of chromium over time and over varying concentrations of chromium was linear in cells from burned patients and normals. Cells from burned patients, however, took up more chromium than normals. Influx velocity of chromium was also determined and found to be greater in burn cells than normal cells. Since it has been shown that chromium influx is an energy-dependent reaction it is suggested that cellular energy stores are being depleted by the influx of chromium. Whether this is a response to an intracellular deficit or uncoupling of metabolic pathways is not known at this time

  18. The removal of chromium from wastewaters by activated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, A.; Chegrouche, S.; Ait Ghezala, H.; Douar, L.

    1994-12-01

    The adsorption of chromium onto activated bentonite has been investigated. Adsorption isotherms were analysed to obtain the Langmuir and freundlich constants. The operating parameters (i.e pH, contact time, solid/liquid ratio, temperatureand initial chromium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption have been studied

  19. The oxidation of titanium nitride- and silicon nitride-coated stainless steel in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.; Stott, F.H.

    1992-01-01

    A study has been undertaken into the effects of thin titanium nitride and silicon nitride coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition and chemical vapour deposition processes, on the oxidation resistance of 321 stainless steel in a simulated advanced gas-cooled reactor carbon dioxide environment for long periods at 550 o C and 700 o C under thermal-cycling conditions. The uncoated steel contains sufficient chromium to develop a slow-growing chromium-rich oxide layer at these temperatures, particularly if the surfaces have been machine-abraded. Failure of this layer in service allows formation of less protective iron oxide-rich scales. The presence of a thin (3-4 μm) titanium nitride coating is not very effective in increasing the oxidation resistance since the ensuing titanium oxide scale is not a good barrier to diffusion. Even at 550 o C, iron oxide-rich nodules are able to develop following relatively rapid oxidation and breakdown of the coating. At 700 o C, the coated specimens oxidize at relatively similar rates to the uncoated steel. A thin silicon nitride coating gives improved oxidation resistance, with both the coating and its slow-growing oxide being relatively electrically insulating. The particular silicon nitride coating studied here was susceptible to spallation on thermal cycling, due to an inherently weak coating/substrate interface. (Author)

  20. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  1. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  2. Development & characterization of alumina coating by atmospheric plasma spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Jobin; Scaria, Abyson; Kurian, Don George

    2018-03-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on metals to prevent them from oxidation and corrosion at room as well as elevated temperatures. The service environment, mechanisms of protection, chemical and mechanical compatibility, application method, control of coating quality and ability of the coating to be repaired are the factors that need to be considered while selecting the required coating. The coatings based on oxide materials provides high degree of thermal insulation and protection against oxidation at high temperatures for the underlying substrate materials. These coatings are usually applied by the flame or plasma spraying methods. The surface cleanliness needs to be ensured before spraying. Abrasive blasting can be used to provide the required surface roughness for good adhesion between the substrate and the coating. A pre bond coat like Nickel Chromium can be applied on to the substrate material before spraying the oxide coating to avoid chances of poor adhesion between the oxide coating and the metallic substrate. Plasma spraying produces oxide coatings of greater density, higher hardness, and smooth surface finish than that of the flame spraying process Inert gas is often used for generation of plasma gas so as to avoid the oxidation of the substrate material. The work focuses to develop, characterize and optimize the parameters used in Al2O3 coating on transition stainless steel substrate material for minimizing the wear rate and maximizing the leak tightness using plasma spray process. The experiment is designed using Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array. The parameters that are to be optimized are plasma voltage, spraying distance and the cooling jet pressure. The characterization techniques includes micro-hardness and porosity tests followed by Grey relational analysis of the results.

  3. New Evidence against Chromium as an Essential Trace Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John B

    2017-12-01

    Nearly 60 y ago, chromium, as the trivalent ion, was proposed to be an essential element, but the results of new studies indicate that chromium currently can only be considered pharmacologically active and not an essential element. Regardless, articles still continue to appear in the literature claiming chromium is an essential element. Chromium has been marketed as an agent to reduce body mass and develop muscle; however, such marketing claims are no longer allowed in the United States because these claims, similar to claims of essential status, are not supported by experiments. Trivalent chromium has also been proposed as a therapeutic agent to increase insulin sensitivity and affect lipid metabolism. Although effective in certain rodent models, beneficial effects in humans have not been unequivocally established. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the beneficial effects but have not been definitively shown to occur in animals. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnárné Hamvas, L.; Németh, K.; Stipta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  5. Review of occupational epidemiology of chromium chemicals and respiratory cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R B

    1988-06-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have investigated the association between cancer risk and employment in chromium producing and using industries. Strong and consistent associations have been found between employment in the primary chemical producing industry and the risk for respiratory cancer. Workers employed in chromate pigment production and possibly spray painters of chromate pigment paints appear to be at excess risk of respiratory cancer. Chrome platers may also be at excess risk, although the evidence is limited. A few studies indicate that chromium alloy welding may also be an exposure source of concern. Some studies of ferrochromium alloy workers have shown an excess risk for respiratory cancer, although the risk may in part be due to concomitant exposures. The evidence indicates that the hexavalent form of chromium is the primary agent of chromium carcinogenesis. Solubility and other characteristics of chromium compounds may also play a role in determining risk.

  6. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  7. Anticorrosion performance of chromized coating prepared by pack cementation in simulated solution with H2S and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Behnamian, Yashar; Luo, Hong; Wang, Xian-Zong; Leitch, Michael; Zeng, Hongbo; Luo, Jing-Li

    2017-10-01

    A hash service environment containing H2S and CO2 in oil industry usually causes corrosion of carbon steel. In this study, the chromized coatings with different deposited time were prepared on the surface of carbon steel by the method of pack cementation to enhance its corrosion resistance. Then the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance as well as the semiconductor behavior of coatings in the simulated solution with saturated H2S and CO2 were investigated. The results show that the content of Cr in coating was increased by prolonging deposited time, and both chromium carbides and chromium nitrides were formed. Furthermore, coatings display higher polarization resistance, Rp, than that of the substrate, indicating a higher resistance to charge transfer on coating surface. The corrosion rates of coatings with different deposited time were significantly lower than that of substrate. Chemical analysis showed the formation of heavy sulfides on the surface of substrates after corrosion, while the least corrosion products were detected on the surface of coating with deposited time of 12 h. Mott-Schottky results indicated that coating of 12 h displayed less defects than the other two coatings with deposited time of 4 h and 8 h, which will be beneficial to improve corrosion resistance. The investigation showed that chromized coatings exhibited high corrosion resistance and owned a potential application in oil industry for corrosion prevention.

  8. CrCuAgN PVD nanocomposite coatings: Effects of annealing on coating morphology and nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingguang, E-mail: xingguangliu1@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Iamvasant, Chanon, E-mail: ciamvasant1@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Liu, Chang, E-mail: chang.liu@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Matthews, Allan, E-mail: allan.matthews@manchester.ac.uk [Pariser Building - B24 ICAM, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Leyland, Adrian, E-mail: a.leyland@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Coatings with nitrogen content up to 16 at.% exhibit a metallic Cr solid solution, even after post-coat annealing at 300 °C and 500 °C. • At higher N/Cr atomic ratios (approaching Cr{sub 2}N stoichiometry), chromium was still inclined to exist in solid solution with nitrogen, rather than as a ceramic nitride phase, even after annealing at 500 °C. • Transportation of Cu and Ag to the surface depends on annealing temperature, annealing duration, nitrogen concentration and ‘global’ Cu + Ag concentration. • Incorporation of copper appears to be a powerful strategy to enhance Ag mobility at low concentration (∼3 at.% Ag in this study) under moderately high service temperature. • A significant decrease in friction coefficient was obtained at room temperature after annealing, or during sliding wear testing at elevated temperature. - Abstract: CrCuAgN PVD nanocomposite coatings were produced using pulsed DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering. This investigation focuses on the effects of post-coat annealing on the surface morphology, phase composition and nanostructure of such coatings. In coatings with nitrogen contents up to 16 at.%, chromium exists as metallic Cr with N in supersaturated solid solution, even after 300 °C and 500 °C post-coat annealing. Annealing at 300 °C did not obviously change the phase composition of both nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing coatings; however, 500 °C annealing resulted in significant transformation of the nitrogen-containing coatings. The formation of Ag aggregates relates to the (Cu + Ag)/Cr atomic ratio (threshold around 0.2), whereas the formation of Cu aggregates relates to the (Cu + Ag + N)/Cr atomic ratio (threshold around 0.5). The primary annealing-induced changes were reduced solubility of Cu, Ag and N in Cr, and the composition altering from a mixed ultra-fine nanocrystalline and partly amorphous phase constitution to a coarser, but still largely nanocrystalline structure. It was also

  9. Role of oxides and porosity on high temperature oxidation of liquid fuelled HVOF thermal sprayed Ni50Cr coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K.T.; Hussain, Tanvir

    2017-01-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid fuelled high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using...

  10. On the influence of Ti-Al intermetallic coating architecture on mechanical properties and wear resistance of end mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanyan, E. L.; Budilov, V. V.; Ramazanov, K. N.; Ataullin, Z. R.

    2017-07-01

    Thin-film wear-resistant coatings are widely used to increase life and efficiency of metal cutting tools. This paper shows the results of a study on the influence of architecture (number, sequence and thickness of layers) of wear-resistant coatings on physical, mechanical and operational properties of end mills. Coatings consisting of alternating Ti-Al/Ti-Al-N layers of equal thickness demonstrated the best physical and mechanical properties. Durability of coated tools when processing materials from chromium-vanadium steel increased twice as compared to uncoated tools.

  11. Interaction of Cr-Ti-Si coating on VN-3 niobium alloy with air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, Eh.M.; Kozlov, A.T.; Monakhova, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Investigation of heat-resistance, microstructure and phase composition of Cr-Ti-Si coating on VN-3 niobium alloy with air oxidation in the temperature interval of 1200-1600 deg C is conducted. Thermogravimetry, metallography, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis methods are used. It is ascertained that the coating is a dense niobium disilicide layer, luriched on the surface with chromium and titanium disilicides and separated and from the protected alloy by a narrow zone of the lowest niobium silicide Nb 5 Si 3 . The coating protective junctions are provided by a selective chromium and titanium disilicides oxidation as well as niobium disilicide oxidation at the temperature of 1600 deg C, and by the rates of niobium and silicon diffusion through Nb 5 SI 3 and NbSi 2 and oxygen diffusion through the amorphous SiO 2

  12. Production of metal and metal-ceramic coatings on D-Gun Ob

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilenko, T.P.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Ulianitsky, V.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Optimization of the detonation spraying process has been made for the production of metal and metal-ceramics coatings with the D-Gun Ob. Owing to the ability of Ob to work with several fuels and an inert diluent simultaneously, variation of detonation regimes in a wide range is possible, and because of localized powder injection in the D-Gun barrel, high uniformity of parameters of powder particles is achieved. The best conditions for particle heating and acceleration were calculated with the help of mathematical simulation, and the corresponding regimes were realized on D-Gun Ob. High-quality aluminum, copper, nickel, and nickel-chromium-silicon-carbon-boron alloy coatings were produced by using only propane fuel. Chromium carbide with nickel and tungsten carbide with cobalt coatings were produced with addition of acetylene. Optimal efficiency and high bonding strength were achieved for all powders. Data on microhardness, bonding strength, and efficiency are presented

  13. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  14. Microstructural and electrical characterization of Mn-Co spinel protective coatings for solid oxide cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, S.; Sabato, A. G.; Bindi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition, thermal co-evaporation and RF magnetron sputtering methods are used for the preparation of Mn-Co based ceramic coatings for solid oxide fuel cell steel interconnects. Both thin and relatively thick coatings (1–15 μm) are prepared and characterised for their potential...... protective behaviour. Mn-Co coated Crofer22APU samples are electrically tested for 5000 h at 800 °C under a 500 mA cm−2 current load to determine their Area Specific Resistance increase due to a growing chromia scale. After tests, samples are analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy....... Analysis is focused on the potential chromium diffusion to or through the coating, the oxide scale thickness and possible reactions at the interfaces. The relationships between the coating type, thickness and effectiveness are reviewed and discussed. Out of the three Mn-Co coatings compared in this study...

  15. Evaluation of electrodeposited Mn-Co protective coatings on Crofer 22 APU steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Interconnects used in Solid Oxide Cells stacks require protective coatings to lower their parabolic rate constant and block chromium evaporation (on the air side). In this work four different protective coatings on steel are evaluated for their high temperature corrosion resistance and electrical...... conductivity. A commercial electroplating process was used for the preparation of coatings with different Mn/Co ratios on Crofer 22 APU steel. Oxidation of samples was performed in air at 800°C for 1000 hours. Postmortem analysis of the coated samples was performed by scanning electron microscopy and x......-ray diffractomettry. Based on the results, influence of the Co/Mn ratio on the resulting corrosion properties are discussed. Parabolic rate constant of the coated samples is the lowest for the MnCo sample, whereas electrical resistance is the lowest for the Co sample, which has a corrosion rate similar to the not-coated...

  16. CrAlN coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation at different substrate bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.; Gomez, M.A.; Esteve, J.; Montala, F.; Carreras, L.; Grifol, M.; Lousa, A.

    2006-01-01

    CrAlN is a good candidate as an alternative to conventional CrN coatings especially for high temperature oxidation-resistance applications. Different CrAlN coatings were deposited on hardened steel substrates by cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) from chromium-aluminum targets in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere at negative substrate bias between - 50 and - 400 V. The negative substrate bias has important effects on the deposition growth rate and crystalline structure. All our coatings presented hardness higher than conventional CrN coatings. The friction coefficient against alumina and tungsten carbide balls was around 0.6. The sliding wear coefficient of the CrAlN coatings was very low while an important wear was observed in the balls before a measurable wear were produced in the coatings. This effect was more pronounced as the negative substrate bias was increased

  17. Phosphate solubilization and chromium (VI) remediation potential of Klebsiella sp. strain CPSB4 isolated from the chromium contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin; Usmani, Zeba; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an effort was made to identify an efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial strain from chromium contaminated agricultural soils. Based on the formation of a solubilized halo around the colonies on Pikovskaya's agar amended with chromium (VI), 10 strains were initially screened out. Out of 10, strain CPSB4, which showed significantly high solubilization zone at different chromium concentrations, was selected for further study. The strain CPSB4 showed significant plant growth promotion traits with chromium (VI) stress under in-vitro conditions in broth. The plant growth promotion activities of the strain decreased regularly, but were not completely lost with the increase in concentration of chromium up to 200 mg L -1 . On subjected to FT-IR analysis, the presence of the functional group, indicating the organic acid aiding in phosphate solubilization was identified. At an optimal temperature of 30  ° C and pH 7.0, the strain showed around 93% chromium (VI) reduction under in-vitro conditions in broth study. In soil condition, the maximum chromium (VI) reduction obtained was 95% under in-vitro conditions. The strain CPSB4 was identified as Klebsiella sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This study shows that the diverse role of the bacterial strain CPSB4 would be useful in the chromium contaminated soil as a good bioremediation and plant growth promoting agent as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of chromium in treated crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by electrothermal ASS: study of chromium accumulation in different tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, F.; Diaz, J.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.

    1986-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of chromium in muscle, hepatopancreas, antennal glands, and gills of Procambarus clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following Cr(VI)-exposure. Determinations of chromium were made by using Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and the standard additions method.

  19. Chromium removal from tanning industries effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, M.A.; Ahmad, S.

    1997-01-01

    Air and water are the basic needs of human being and other living entities on the earth. Tanning industry uses water and some chemicals and so creates environmental problems, depending basically on two principal sources, hide and water. The processes of tanning are based on chromium sulphate and vegetable treatment of hide. According to the national environmental quality standards (NEQS) the effluent or disposed water should contain phenol less than 0.5 ppm, Cr, sulphates, chloride and other salts content. About 30-40 liters of water are used to process one Kg of raw hide into finished goods. Total installed capacity of hides and skins chrome tanning is 53.5 million square meter, earning a large amount of foreign exchange for our country. In the present work, seven tanning industries effluents from the suburbs of Multan city have been collected and analysed. The pH of the liquors have been found to vary from 2.72 to 4.4 and the constituent Cr have been found to be from zero to 8000 ppm from vegetable to chrome tanning industrial effluents studied. The stages involved in tanning and treatment of the effluent water waste including chemical treatment of Cr has been described with a special reference to supported liquid membranes process for removal of chromium ions. (author)

  20. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.