WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromium borides

  1. Plasma boriding of a cobalt–chromium alloy as an interlayer for nanostructured diamond growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Jubinsky, Matthew; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Metal-boride layer creates a compatible surface for NSD deposition. • PECVD boriding on CoCrMo produces robust metal-boride layer. • Deposition temperature comparison shows 750 °C boriding masks surface cobalt. • EDS shows boron diffusion as well as deposition. • Nanoindentation hardness of CoCrMo substantially increases after boriding. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings can potentially improve the wear resistance of cobalt–chromium medical implant surfaces, but the high cobalt content in these alloys acts as a catalyst to form graphitic carbon. Boriding by high temperature liquid baths and powder packing has been shown to improve CVD diamond compatibility with cobalt alloys. We use the microwave plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD process to deposit interlayers composed primarily of the borides of cobalt and chromium. The use of diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) in the plasma feedgas allows for the formation of a robust boride interlayer for suppressing graphitic carbon during subsequent CVD of nano-structured diamond (NSD). This metal–boride interlayer is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings on a CoCrMo alloy. Migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer is significantly reduced and undetectable on the surface of the subsequently-grown NSD coating. The effects of PECVD boriding are compared for a range of substrate temperatures and deposition times and are evaluated using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Boriding of CoCrMo results in adhered nanostructured diamond coatings with low surface roughness.

  2. Surface decoration through electrostatic interaction leading to enhanced reactivity: Low temperature synthesis of nanostructured chromium borides (CrB and CrB2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaka,; Kumar, Bharat; Kumar, Sandeep; Ganguli, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes a novel low temperature route at ambient pressure for the synthesis of nanocrystalline chromium borides (CrB and CrB 2 ) without using any flux or additives. The favorable and intimate mixing of nanoparticles of chromium acetate (Cr source) and boron forms an active chromium–boron precursor which decomposes at much lower temperature (400 °C) to form CrB (which is ∼1000 °C less than the known ambient pressure synthesis). The chromium acetate nanoparticles (∼5 nm) decorate the larger boron particles (150–200 nm) due to electrostatic interactions resulting from opposing surface charges of boron (zeta potential:+48.101 mV) and chromium acetate (zeta potential:−4.021 mV) in ethanolic medium and is evident in the TEM micrographs. The above method leads to the formation of pure CrB film like structure at 400 °C and nanospheres (40–60 nm) at 600 °C. Also, chromium diboride (CrB 2 ) nanoparticles (25 nm) could be obtained at 1000 °C. - Graphical abstract: Variation of surface charge of reactants, precursor and the products, chromium borides (CrB and CrB 2 ). Highlights: ► Novel borothermal reduction process for synthesis of chromium boride. ► Significant lowering of reaction temperature to obtain nanocrystalline chromium boride. ► Enhanced reactivity due to appropriate surface interactions

  3. Kinetics of borided gear steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ration (FeB + Fe2B) due to the high intensity stress states generally situated at the ... performed molten salt boriding of AISI D2 steel with borax (Na2B4O7) as the ... the borided layer thickness; silicon, chromium and aluminium have moderate.

  4. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Whole wheat bread, 2 slices 2 Red wine, 5 ounces 1–13 Apple, unpeeled, 1 medium ... chromium or a placebo) might simply show the benefits of supplementation in a chromium-deficient population. Overall, ...

  5. Electrochemical boriding and characterization of AISI D2 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sista, V.; Kahvecioglu, O.; Eryilmaz, O.L.; Erdemir, A.; Timur, S.

    2011-01-01

    D2 is an air-hardening tool steel and due to its high chromium content provides very good protection against wear and oxidation, especially at elevated temperatures. Boriding of D2 steel can further enhance its surface mechanical and tribological properties. Unfortunately, it has been very difficult to achieve a very dense and uniformly thick boride layers on D2 steel using traditional boriding processes. In an attempt to overcome such a deficiency, we explored the suitability and potential usefulness of electrochemical boriding for achieving thick and hard boride layers on this tool steel in a molten borax electrolyte at 850, 900, 950 and 1000 °C for durations ranging from 15 min to 1 h. The microstructural characterization and phase analysis of the resultant boride layers were performed using optical, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. Our studies have confirmed that a single phase Fe 2 B layer or a composite layer consisting of FeB + Fe 2 B is feasible on the surface of D2 steel depending on the length of boriding time. The boride layers formed after shorter durations (i.e., 15 min) mainly consisted of Fe 2 B phase and was about 30 μm thick. The thickness of the layer formed in 60 min was about 60 μm and composed mainly of FeB and Fe 2 B. The cross sectional micro-hardness values of the boride layers varied between 14 and 22 GPa, depending on the phase composition.

  6. Chromium base high performance materials: Where and how do they come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Kap

    1996-08-01

    The origin of chromium base performance materials (CBPM) is described. CBPM may include (1) trivalent chromium chemicals such as chromic acetate, chromic chloride, chromic bromide, chromic fluoride, chromic iodide, chromic phosphate, and chromic sulfate; (2) hexavalent chromium chemicals such as chromic acid, lithium chromate, sodium chromate, sodium dichromate, and potassium dichromate; (3) oxide forms of chromium such as black chrome, chromium dioxide, chromium oxide, and chromium hydroxide; and (4) other chromium compounds such as chromium aluminide, chromium boride, chromium carbide, chromium molybdate, chromium nitride, chromium silicide, chromium tungstate and lanthanum chromite. Extensive reviews of production processes, properties, and applications/end uses of CBPM are made.

  7. Some mechanical properties of borided AISI H13 and 304 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taktak, Sukru

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, mechanical properties of borides formed on AISI H13 hot work tool and AISI 304 stainless steels have been investigated. Both steels have high chromium content and have a widespread use in the engineering application. Boriding treatment was carried out in slurry salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, and ferrosilicon at temperature range of 800-950 deg. C for 3, 5, and 7 h. X-ray diffraction analysis of boride layers on the surface of steels revealed various peaks of FeB, Fe 2 B, CrB, and Ni 3 B. Metallographic studies showed that the boride layer has a flat and smooth morphology in the 304 steel while H13 steel was a ragged morphology. The characterization of the boride layer is also carried out by means of the micro-hardness, surface roughness, adhesion, and fracture toughness studies

  8. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    ) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe......Thermo-reactive deposition and diffusion (TRD) and boriding are thermochemical processes that result in very high surface hardness by conversion of the surface into carbides/nitrides and borides, respectively. These treatments offer significant advantages in terms of hardness, adhesion, tribo...... subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3...

  9. Nanodispersed boriding of titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, K.O.; Kostyuk, V.O.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of improving the operational reliability of machines is becoming increasingly important due to the increased mechanical, thermal and other loads on the details. There are many surface hardening methods for machines parts which breakdown begins with surface corruption. The most promising methods are chemical-thermal treatment. The aim of this work is to study the impact of boriding on the structure and properties of titanium alloy. Materials and Methods: The material of this study is VT3-1 titanium alloy. The boriding were conducted using nanodispersed powder blend based on boric substances. It is established that boriding of paste compounds allows obtaining the surface hardness within 30 - 29 GPa and with declining to 27- 26 GPa in layer to the transition zone (with total thickness up to 110 μm) owing to changes of the layer phase composition where T 2 B, TiB, TiB 2 titanium borides are formed. The increasing of chemical-thermal treatment time from 15 minutes to 2 hours leads to thickening of the borated layer (30 - 110 μm) and transition zone (30 - 190 μm). Due to usage of nanodispersed boric powder, the boriding duration is decreasing in 2 - 3 times. This allows saving time and electric energy. The developed optimal mode of boriding the VT3-1 titanium alloy allows obtaining the required operational characteristics and to combine the saturation of the surface layer with atomic boron and hardening

  10. Superconductivity in borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    It was thought that intermetallic superconductors do not exhibit superconductivity at temperatures over 30 K because of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limit; therefore, researchers have been interested in high-T c cuprates. Our group discovered high-T c superconductivity in MgB 2 at 39 K in 2001. This discovery has initiated a substantial interest in the potential of high-T c superconductivity in intermetallic compounds that include 'light' elements (borides, carbides, etc.). (author)

  11. Boride particles in a powder metallurgy superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, M C; Charles, J A

    1985-12-01

    Using optical and electron metallography, the composition, morphology, and distribution of M/sub 3/B/sub 2/ borides in as-hipped (hot isostatically pressed) samples of the powder metallurgy superalloy Nimonic AP1 have been determined. Two types of boride are present depending on the HIP temperature. Hipping below the boride solvus results in low-aspect ratio particles, distributed both inter- and intragranularly. Hipping above the boride solvus produces high-aspect ratio particles which are exclusively intergranular. A small difference in both lattice parameter and composition has been measured. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the particles has confirmed the presence of boron, and laser ion-induced mass analysis has indicated a low carbon level. The higher susceptibility to edge cracking during forging of material hipped above the boride solvus is related to the boride morphology. Studies of the subsequent recrystallization of the forged samples have indicated that necklace formation is neither inhibited nor accelerated by the presence of grain boundary borides. 18 references.

  12. New superhard boride composite materials. Part 1; Neue superharte Borid-Verbundwerkstoffe. Teil 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachariev, Z.

    2001-07-01

    Contents: Investigations of diffusion coupling between steels and borides (ZrB{sub 2}, TiB{sub 2}, CrB, MoB); Diffusion saturation of armco iron inpowdered borides; Gaseous phase transport intensivation of the transition metal using suitable activators (vapour phase process); boron circonisation of steels; High-temperature oxidation studies on boride composite coatings on iron and steel; Corrosion resistance of boride coated iron base composites; Superhard boride coatings on hard metals and on cermet plates with reduced tungsten contents. [German] Dieser Beitrag ist wie folgt gegliedert: Untersuchung der Diffusionskopplung zwischen Staehlen und den Boriden (ZrB{sub 2}, TiB{sub 2}, CrB, MoB); Diffusionssaettigung von Armcoeisen in Pulverboride; Gasphasentransport-Intensivierung des Uebergangsmetalls mittels geeigneter Akivatoren (vapour phase process); Borzirkonieren von Staehlen; Hochtemperaturoxidationuntersuchungen von Borid-Composite-Schichten auf Eisen und Stahl; Korrosionsbestaendigkeit der boridbeschichteten Verbundwerkstoffe auf Eisenbasis; Superharte Boridbeschichtungen auf Hartmetall und auf Metallkeramikplatten mit reduziertem Wolframgehalt.

  13. Characterization of AISI 4140 borided steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Lopez-Perrusquia, N.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Escobar-Galindo, R.; Martinez-Trinidad, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present study characterizes the surface of AISI 4140 steels exposed to the paste-boriding process. The formation of Fe 2 B hard coatings was obtained in the temperature range 1123-1273 K with different exposure times, using a 4 mm thick layer of boron carbide paste over the material surface. First, the growth kinetics of boride layers at the surface of AISI 4140 steels was evaluated. Second, the presence and distribution of alloying elements on the Fe 2 B phase was measured using the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry (GDOES) technique. Further, thermal residual stresses produced on the borided phase were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The fracture toughness of the iron boride layer of the AISI 4140 borided steels was estimated using a Vickers microindentation induced-fracture testing at a constant distance of 25 μm from the surface. The force criterion of fracture toughness was determined from the extent of brittle cracks, both parallel and perpendicular to the surface, originating at the tips of an indenter impression. The fracture toughness values obtained by the Palmqvist crack model are expressed in the form K C (π/2) > K C > K C (0) for the different applied loads and experimental parameters of the boriding process.

  14. Characterization of AISI 4140 borided steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Domínguez, M.; López-Perrusquia, N.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Escobar-Galindo, R.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.

    2010-02-01

    The present study characterizes the surface of AISI 4140 steels exposed to the paste-boriding process. The formation of Fe 2B hard coatings was obtained in the temperature range 1123-1273 K with different exposure times, using a 4 mm thick layer of boron carbide paste over the material surface. First, the growth kinetics of boride layers at the surface of AISI 4140 steels was evaluated. Second, the presence and distribution of alloying elements on the Fe 2B phase was measured using the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry (GDOES) technique. Further, thermal residual stresses produced on the borided phase were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The fracture toughness of the iron boride layer of the AISI 4140 borided steels was estimated using a Vickers microindentation induced-fracture testing at a constant distance of 25 μm from the surface. The force criterion of fracture toughness was determined from the extent of brittle cracks, both parallel and perpendicular to the surface, originating at the tips of an indenter impression. The fracture toughness values obtained by the Palmqvist crack model are expressed in the form KC( π/2) > KC > KC(0) for the different applied loads and experimental parameters of the boriding process.

  15. Characterization of AISI 4140 borided steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos-Silva, I., E-mail: icampos@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Grupo Ingenieria de Superficies, SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F., 07738 (Mexico); Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Lopez-Perrusquia, N.; Meneses-Amador, A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Grupo Ingenieria de Superficies, SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F., 07738 (Mexico); Escobar-Galindo, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Trinidad, J. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Grupo Ingenieria de Superficies, SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F., 07738 (Mexico)

    2010-02-01

    The present study characterizes the surface of AISI 4140 steels exposed to the paste-boriding process. The formation of Fe{sub 2}B hard coatings was obtained in the temperature range 1123-1273 K with different exposure times, using a 4 mm thick layer of boron carbide paste over the material surface. First, the growth kinetics of boride layers at the surface of AISI 4140 steels was evaluated. Second, the presence and distribution of alloying elements on the Fe{sub 2}B phase was measured using the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry (GDOES) technique. Further, thermal residual stresses produced on the borided phase were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The fracture toughness of the iron boride layer of the AISI 4140 borided steels was estimated using a Vickers microindentation induced-fracture testing at a constant distance of 25 {mu}m from the surface. The force criterion of fracture toughness was determined from the extent of brittle cracks, both parallel and perpendicular to the surface, originating at the tips of an indenter impression. The fracture toughness values obtained by the Palmqvist crack model are expressed in the form K{sub C}({pi}/2) > K{sub C} > K{sub C}(0) for the different applied loads and experimental parameters of the boriding process.

  16. Ultra-fast boriding of metal surfaces for improved properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timur, Servet; Kartal, Guldem; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Erdemir, Ali

    2015-02-10

    A method of ultra-fast boriding of a metal surface. The method includes the step of providing a metal component, providing a molten electrolyte having boron components therein, providing an electrochemical boriding system including an induction furnace, operating the induction furnace to establish a high temperature for the molten electrolyte, and boriding the metal surface to achieve a boride layer on the metal surface.

  17. Kinetics of electrochemical boriding of low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartal, G.; Eryilmaz, O.L.; Krumdick, G.; Erdemir, A.; Timur, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of the boride layers forming on low carbon steel substrates was investigated during electrochemical boriding which was performed at a constant current density of 200 mA/cm 2 in a borax based electrolyte at temperatures ranging from 1123 K to 1273 K for periods of 5-120 min. After boriding, the presence of both FeB and Fe 2 B phases were confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method. Cross-sectional microscopy revealed a very dense and thick morphology for both boride phases. Micro hardness testing of the borided steel samples showed a significant increase in the hardness of the borided surfaces (i.e., up to (1700 ± 200) HV), while the hardness of un-borided steel samples was approximately (200 ± 20) HV. Systematic studies over a wide range of boriding time and temperature confirmed that the rate of the boride layer formation is strongly dependent on boriding duration and has a parabolic character. The activation energy of boride layer growth for electrochemical boriding was determined as (172.75 ± 8.6) kJ/mol.

  18. Boriding with boron carbide base pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an advanced technique of boriding using pastes under the conditions of furnace heating. The research is carried out on flat specimens of 20 and U8 steels pre-annealed in vacuum. B 4 C base pastes were used as saturating media, and the glue prepared by dissolving of nitrocellulose in the mixture of butylacetate and acetone was used as a bond. Measured was the depth of diffusion layers, produced on the 20 and u8 steels after boriding with the pastes under different temperatures and saturation times. The results of metallographic analysis show that borided layers have a specific needle-like structure. The surface of the specimens is clean and free from any paste residues and traces of partial melting

  19. Production and properties of boride powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinskaya, N.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Petrunichev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of plasma metallization of boride powders 40-80 μ diam. are presented. Peculiarities of changes of granulometric powder composition and of metallic cover on refractory cores were investigated. There are shown size- and compositional cores effects on metallization level of poders and on cover structure

  20. Interlayer utilization (including metal borides) for subsequent deposition of NSD films via microwave plasma CVD on 316 and 440C stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jared

    . Surface boriding was implemented using the novel method of microwave plasma CVD with a mixture of hydrogen and diborane gases. On 440C bearings, dual phase boride layers of Fe2B and FeB were formed which supported adhered nanostructured diamond films. Continuity of the films was not seamless with limited regions remaining uncoated potentially corresponding to delamination of the film as evidenced by the presence of tubular structures presumably composed of sp2 bonded carbon. Surface boriding of 316 stainless steel discs was conducted at various powers and pressures to achieve temperatures ranging from 550-800 °C. The substrate boriding temperature was found to substantially influence the resultant interlayer by altering the metal boride(s) present. The lowest temperatures produced an interlayer where CrB was the single detected phase, higher temperatures yielded the presence of only Fe2B, and a combination of the two phases resulted from an intermediate boriding temperature. Compared with the more common, commercialized boriding methods, this a profound result given the problems posed by the FeB phase in addition to other advantages offered by CVD processes and microwave generated plasmas in general. Indentation testing of the boride layers revealed excellent adhesion strength for all borided interlayers, and above all, no evidence of cracking was observed for a sole Fe2B phase. As with boriding of 440C bearings, subsequent diamond deposition was achieved on these interlayers with substantially improved adhesion strength relative to diamond coated TiN interlayers. Both XRD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed a nanostructured diamond film with interfacial chromium carbides responsible for enhanced adhesion strength. Interlayers consisting solely of Fe2B have displayed an ability to support fully continuous nanostructured diamond films, yet additional study is required for consistent reproduction. This is in good agreement with initial work on pack borided high alloy steels

  1. Synthesis and investigation of CrB{sub 4}, MnB{sub 4} and new ternary chromium and rhenium manganese borides; Synthese und Untersuchung von CrB{sub 4}, MnB{sub 4} sowie neuen ternaeren Chrom- und Rheniummanganboriden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knappschneider, Arno

    2014-10-13

    In the present work single crystals of the tetraborides of chromium and manganese have been grown and allowed a structure refinement of the compounds. Furthermore the physical characteristics for example hardness, electronic properties and magnetism were been determined. Also the ternary tetraboride phase of chromium and manganese was synthesized and a new ternary rhenium manganese diboride could be obtained.

  2. Preparation of single phase molybdenum boride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camurlu, Hasan Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Formation of Mo and a mixture of molybdenum boride phases take place in preparation of molybdenum borides. → It is intricate to prepare single phase molybdenum borides. → Formation of single phase MoB from MoO 3 + B 2 O 3 + Mg mixtures has not been reported previously. → Single phase MoB was successfully prepared through a combination of mechanochemical synthesis and annealing process. - Abstract: The formation of MoB through volume combustion synthesis (VCS), and through mechanochemical synthesis (MCS) followed by annealing has been investigated. MoO 3 , B 2 O 3 and Mg were used as reactants while MgO and NaCl were introduced as diluents. Products were leached in dilute HCl solution and were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations. Mo was the major phase component in the VCS products under all the experimental conditions. Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 and Mo 2 B 5 were found as minor phases. Products of MCS contained a mixture of Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 and Mo. After annealing the MCS product at 1400 deg. C for 3 h, single phase α-MoB was obtained.

  3. Growth kinetics of boride coatings formed at the surface AISI M2 during dehydrated paste pack boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doñu Ruiz, M.A., E-mail: mdonur0800@alumno.ipn.mx [Universidad Politécnica del Valle de México UPVM, Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Av. Mexiquense S/N Esquina Av. Universidad Politécnica, Col Villa Esmeralda, 54910 Tultitlan (Mexico); López Perrusquia, N.; Sánchez Huerta, D. [Universidad Politécnica del Valle de México UPVM, Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Av. Mexiquense S/N Esquina Av. Universidad Politécnica, Col Villa Esmeralda, 54910 Tultitlan (Mexico); Torres San Miguel, C.R.; Urriolagoitia Calderón, G.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, SEPI-ESIME, Unidad Profesional Adolfo López Mateos Zacatenco, Edificio 5, 2do. Piso, Col. Lindavista, CP 07738 México, D.F. (Mexico); Cerillo Moreno, E.A. [Universidad Politécnica del Valle de México UPVM, Grupo Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales, Av. Mexiquense S/N Esquina Av. Universidad Politécnica, Col Villa Esmeralda, 54910 Tultitlan (Mexico); Cortes Suarez, J.V. [Univerisdad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180 Azcapotzalco 02200, Área de Ciencia de los Materiales, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    The growth kinetics of the boride coatings (FeB and Fe{sub 2}B) at the surface of AISI M2 high speed steels were studied in this work. Boriding thermochemical treatment was carried out by dehydrated paste pack at three different temperatures 1173, 1223, and 1273 K and four exposure times 1, 3, 5, and 7 h, respectively. The presence of FeB and Fe{sub 2}B phases was identified by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction method. In order to obtain the boron diffusion coefficients at the FeB/Fe{sub 2}B boride coatings, a mathematical model based on the mass balance at the growing interfaces was proposed under certain assumptions. Likewise the parabolic growth constants and the boride incubation time were established as a function of the parameters η (T) and ε (T). The activation energy values estimated for the FeB and Fe{sub 2}B layers were 233.42 and 211.89 kJ mol{sup −1} respectively. A good agreement was obtained between the simulated values of boride layer thicknesses and the experimental results. Finally, empirical relationships of boride coating thickness as a function of boriding temperature and time are presented. - Highlights: • Formed boride coatings at the surface of AISI M2 high speed steels by new process dehydrated paste pack boriding. • The model was based on the mass balance equation at the FeB/Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 2}B/Fe interfaces by considering the boride incubation time. • A good agreement was obtained between the simulated values of boride layers coatings and the experimental results.

  4. Preparation of iron boride layers from the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, G.; Plaenitz, H.; Treffer, G.; Koenig, H.; Altenburger, S.

    1980-01-01

    Coating of Armco iron, steel-C100W1, and steel-100Cr6 with borides by decomposition of boron tribromide on the surface of the specimens is described. The experiments were carried out in a laboratory apparatus at temperatures between 923 and 1223 K. The dependence of the thickness of the boride layers on time and temperature is presented in graphs

  5. Low-temperature heat capacity of molybdenum borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolgar, A.S.; Klinder, A.V.; Novoseletskaya, L.M.; Turov, V.P.; Klochkov, L.A.; Lyashchenko, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat capacity of molybdenum borides Mo 2 B, MoB, Mo 2 B 5 is studied for the first time in the 60-300 K range using the adiabatic method. Standard (at 298.15 K) thermodynamic functions (enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, reduced Gibbs energy) of molybdenum borides are calculated

  6. Pulsed nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic boriding as a novel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to test borided CP-Ti, treated by a relatively new method called pulsed plasma electrolytic boriding. The results show excellent corrosion resistance for modified CP-Ti. The effect of frequency and duty cycle of pulsed current was ...

  7. Pulsed nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic boriding as a novel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    borided CP-Ti, treated by a relatively new method called pulsed plasma electrolytic boriding. The results ... ratio, high stiffness and strength (Donachie 2000; Lutjer- ing and Albrecht ..... both direct current and a.c. techniques. Although the main ...

  8. Investigation of diffusion kinetics of plasma paste borided AISI 8620 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Henríquez 2009), plasma boriding (Rodríguez et al 1999) and plasma paste boriding (Gunes et al 2011; Yoon et al ... symmetric geometry with monochromatized radiation (Cu Kα, λ = 0.15418 nm). ..... cate the degree of reliability of the predicted results, when compared with that of the experiments. ... low alloy steels. Surf.

  9. Fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman; Koksal, Sakip; Yilmaz, Fevzi

    2005-01-01

    In this study, fracture toughness properties of boronized ductile iron were investigated. Boronizing was realized in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon. Boronizing heat treatment was carried out between 850 and 950 deg. C under the atmospheric pressure for 2-8 h. Borides e.g. FeB, Fe 2 B formed on ductile iron was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, SEM and optical microscope. Experimental results revealed that longer boronizing time resulted in thicker boride layers. Optical microscope cross-sectional observation of borided layers showed dentricular morphology. Both microhardness and fracture toughness of borided surfaces were measured via Vickers indenter. The harnesses of borides formed on the ductile iron were in the range of 1160-2140 HV 0.1 and fracture toughness were in the range of 2.19-4.47 MPa m 1/2 depending on boronizing time and temperature

  10. Surface oxidation phenomena of boride coatings grown on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbucicchio, M.; Palombarini, G.; Sambogna, G.

    1992-01-01

    Very hard boride coatings are grown on various metals using thermochemical as well as chemical vapour deposition techniques. In this way many surface properties, and in particular the wear resistance, can be considerably improved. Usually, also the corrosion behaviour of the treated components is important. In particular, oxidizing atmospheres are involved in many applications where, therefore, coating-environment interactions can play a relevant role. In a previous work, the early stages of the oxidation of iron borides were studied by treating single phase compacted powders in flowing oxygen at low temperatures (300-450deg C). In the present paper, the attention is addressed to the oxidation of both single phase and polyphase boride coatings thermochemically grown on iron. The single phase boride coatings were constituted by Fe 2 B, while the polyphase coatings were constituted by an inner Fe 2 B layer and an outer FeB-base layer. All the boride layers displayed strong (002) preferred crystallographic orientations. (orig.)

  11. Hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, W.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds of metals with non-metals such as C, N, and B show different hardness. Wagner's interaction parameter characterizes manner and extent of the interaction between the atoms of the substance dissolved and the additional elements in metallic mixed phases. An attempt has been made to correlate the hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides (data taken from literature) with certain interaction parameters and associated thermodynamic quantities (ΔH, ΔG). For some metals of periods 4, 5, and 6 corresponding relations were found between microhardness, interaction parameters, heat of formation, and atomic number

  12. Magnesium Aluminum Borides as Explosive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    pestle and screened -325 mesh to remove the filter paper. However, some of the filter paper remained in this powder. Table 13 Compositions of...Property of Si-B System Ceramics,” J. Japan Soc. Pow. and Pow. Met., 41[11] 1299-1303 (1994). 53. H. Nakamura, K. Murata, T. Anan, and Y. Hara...Oxidation of Zirconium Borides,” J. Japan Explosives Society, 55[4] 142-146 (1994). 54. M. Woerle, R.Nesper, G. Mair, M. Schwarz, and H. G. von Schnering

  13. Platinum boride nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhanhui; Qiu Lixia; Zhang Jian; Yao Bin; Cui Tian; Guan Weiming; Zheng Weitao; Wang Wenquan; Zhao Xudong; Liu Xiaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Platinum boride nanowires have been synthesized via the direct current arc discharge method. ► XRD, TEM and SAED indicate that the nanowires are single-crystal PtB. ► Two broad photoluminescence emission peaks at about 586 nm and 626 nm have been observed in the PL spectroscopy of PtB nanowires. - Abstract: Platinum boride (PtB) nanowires have been successfully fabricated with direct current arc discharge method using a milled mixture of platinum (Pt) and boron nitride (BN) powders. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the compositions, morphology, and structures of the samples. The results show that PtB nanowires are 30–50 nm thick and 20–30 μm long. TEM and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns identify that the PtB nanowires are single-crystalline in nature. A growth mechanism based on vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) process is proposed for the formation of nanowires.

  14. Borides of the group 1 metals of the periodic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonov, G.V.; Serebryakova, T.I.; Neronov, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    The borides of alkali metals (lithium, sodium, potassium) and the metals of a copper subgroup (copper, silver, gold) are described. Consideration is given to the crystalline structure and state diagrams of the metal systems within the first group of the Periodic Table with boron. Existence, formation conditions and physico-chemical properties of binary boride phases are characterized. Conclusion is made as to the absence of interaction between boron and silver. Information on the interaction between gold and boron is scanty and conflicting. Methods are described suitable for the production of the borides of the metals within the first group of the Periodic Table [ru

  15. Properties of boride-added powder metallurgy magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Syota; Fujima, Takuya; Takagi, Ken-ichi

    2009-06-01

    Magnesium alloys with metallic borides, magnesium diboride (MgB2) or aluminum diboride (AlB2), were investigated regarding their mechanical properties, transverse rupture strength (TRS) and micro Vickers hardness (HV). The alloys were made from pure Mg, Al and B powders by mechanical alloying and hot pressing to have boride content of between 2.0 and 20 vol%. The alloy with AlB2 exhibited an obvious improvement of HV around a boride content of 6 vol% though the other alloy, with MgB2, did not. TRS showed moderate maxima around the same boride content region for the both alloys. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated an intermetallic compound, Mg17Al12, formed in the alloy with AlB2, which was consistent with its higher hardness.

  16. Properties of boride-added powder metallurgy magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Syota; Fujima, Takuya; Takagi, Ken-ichi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo City University 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan)], E-mail: ktakagi@tcu.ac.jp

    2009-06-01

    Magnesium alloys with metallic borides, magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) or aluminum diboride (AlB{sub 2}), were investigated regarding their mechanical properties, transverse rupture strength (TRS) and micro Vickers hardness (HV). The alloys were made from pure Mg, Al and B powders by mechanical alloying and hot pressing to have boride content of between 2.0 and 20 vol%. The alloy with AlB{sub 2} exhibited an obvious improvement of HV around a boride content of 6 vol% though the other alloy, with MgB{sub 2}, did not. TRS showed moderate maxima around the same boride content region for the both alloys. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated an intermetallic compound, Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}, formed in the alloy with AlB{sub 2}, which was consistent with its higher hardness.

  17. Properties of boride-added powder metallurgy magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Syota; Fujima, Takuya; Takagi, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium alloys with metallic borides, magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) or aluminum diboride (AlB 2 ), were investigated regarding their mechanical properties, transverse rupture strength (TRS) and micro Vickers hardness (HV). The alloys were made from pure Mg, Al and B powders by mechanical alloying and hot pressing to have boride content of between 2.0 and 20 vol%. The alloy with AlB 2 exhibited an obvious improvement of HV around a boride content of 6 vol% though the other alloy, with MgB 2 , did not. TRS showed moderate maxima around the same boride content region for the both alloys. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated an intermetallic compound, Mg 17 Al 12 , formed in the alloy with AlB 2 , which was consistent with its higher hardness.

  18. Tetragonal ternary borides: superconductivity, ferromagnetism and the role of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthias, B.T.; Patel, C.K.N.; Barz, H.; Corenzwit, E.; Vandenberg, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The authors report and discuss two discoveries made while studying the condensation phenomena of ternary rhodium borides, MRh 4 B 4 . M is generally a trivalent transition metal, usually a rare earth element RE. An exception is scandium which by itself does not form an isomorphous boride, but in combination with many other elements will do just that. A suprising correlation between ferromagnetic and superconducting transition temperatures has been found. (Auth.)

  19. Structure, microstructure and residual stresses in borided steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pala, Z.; Mušálek, Radek; Kyncl, J.; Harcuba, P.; Stráský, J.; Kolařík, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2013), s. 93-95 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura 2013 - Kolokvium Krystalografické společnosti. Češkovice (Blansko), 09.09.2013-13.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : boriding * surface hardening * iron borides * tooth-shaped microstructure * residual stresses Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://www.xray.cz/ms/bul2013-2/s6.pdf

  20. Formation of boride layers on steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stergioudis, G.

    2006-01-01

    Boronizing coatings were prepared by means of pack cementation technique. It was found that using the appropriate substrate and controlling parameters of the boribing process such as boron activity of the mixture, temperature and time of treatment, it is possible to obtain a structure predominantly consisting of the Fe 2 B phase. In the present study low alloy ferritic steels were chosen as substrates. Changing the boron carbide concentration in the mixture and the temperature and time of boronizing process the conditions of the boronizing were altered. As a result the formation of the Fe 2 B phase is enhanced. Characterization of the as-borided steels is discussed based on X-ray diffraction and Curie temperature measurements. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Synthesis of cobalt boride nanoparticles using radio frequency thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapitan, Jr. Lorico DS.; Ying Ying Chen; Seesoek Choe; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Nano size cobalt boride particles were synthesized from vapor phase using a 30 kw-4 MHz radio frequency (RF) thermal plasma. Cobalt and boron powder mixtures used as precursors in different composition and feed rate were evaporated immediately in the high temperature plasma and cobalt boride nanoparticles were produced through the quenching process. The x-ray diffractometry (XRD) patterns of cobalt boride nanoparticles prepared from the feed powder ratio of 1:2 and 1:3 for Co: B showed peaks that are associated with the Co 2 B and CoB crystal phases of cobalt boride. The XRD analysis revealed that increasing the powder feed rate results in a higher mass fraction and a larger crystalline diameter of cobalt boride nanoparticles. The images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) revealed that cobalt boride nanoparticles have a spherical morphology. The crystallite size of the particles estimated with XRD was found to be 18-22 nm. (author)

  2. Mechanochemically Driven Syntheses of Boride Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Richard G.

    Solid state metathesis reactions have proven to be a viable route to the production of unfunctionalized nanomaterials. However, current implementations of this approach are limited to self-propagating reactions. We have been investigating mechanically driven metathesis reactions. The use of high-energy ball mills allows control of crystallite sizes without the use of a capping group. Reinforcement materials with crystallite sizes on the order of 5-30 nm can be produced in such a manner. Borides are of particular interest due to their strength, high melting point, and electrical conductivity. The ultimate goal of this work is to prepare oxide and capping group-free nanoparticles suitable for incorporation in thermoelectric, polymer, and ceramic composites. Ultimately this work will facilitate the production of improved thermoelectric materials that will provide robust, deployable, power generation modules to supplement or replace fuel cell, Stirling, and battery-derived power sources. It will also result in scalable, bulk syntheses of tough, refractory, conductive nanomaterials for polymer composites with improved electrical properties, ceramic composites with enhanced fracture toughness, and composites with enhanced neutron reflectance and/or absorbance.

  3. Chromium allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M B; Johansen, J D; Menné, Torkil

    2003-01-01

    Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-sensitive ......Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr......(III) was concluded to play an important role in chromium allergy, because Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were both capable of eliciting eczema at low concentrations. Rather than regarding chromium dermatitis as a result of Cr(VI) allergy alone, it may be more correct to consider it as a result of a combined Cr(III) and Cr......(VI) allergy....

  4. Corrosion behavior of boride layers evaluated by the EIS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, I. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional. SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: icampos@ipn.mx; Palomar-Pardave, M. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Materials Department, Avenue San Pablo 180 Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, Mexico D.F. 02200 (Mexico); Amador, A. [Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222 Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, Mexico D.F. 14380 (Mexico); VillaVelazquez, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional. SEPI-ESIME U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Mexico D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Hadad, J. [Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico, Calle del Puente 222 Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, Mexico D.F. 14380 (Mexico)

    2007-09-30

    The corrosion behavior of boride layers at the AISI 304 steel surface is evaluated in the present study. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique was used for the evaluation of the polarization resistance at the steel surface, with the aid of AUTOLAB potentiostat. Samples were treated with boron paste thickness of 4 and 5 mm, in the range of temperatures 1123 {<=} T {<=} 1273 K and exposed time of 4 and 6 h. The electrochemical technique employed 10 mV AC with a frequency scan range from 8 kHz to 3 mHz in deaerated 0.1 M NaCl solution. Nyquist diagrams show that the highest values of corrosion resistance are present in the samples borided at the temperature of 1273 K, with treatment time of 4 h and 4 mm of boron paste thickness. The values of corrosion resistance on borided steels are compared with the porosity exhibited in the layers.

  5. Synthesis of Magnesium Nickel Boride Aggregates via Borohydride Autogenous Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mahboobeh; Cathey, Henrietta E; Mackinnon, Ian D R

    2018-03-23

    We demonstrate synthesis of the ternary intermetallic MgNi₃B₂ using autogenous pressure from the reaction of NaBH₄ with Mg and Ni metal powder. The decomposition of NaBH₄ to H₂ and B₂H₆ commences at low temperatures in the presence of Mg and/or Ni and promotes formation of Ni-borides and MgNi₃B₂ with the increase in temperature. MgNi₃B₂ aggregates with Ni-boride cores are formed when the reaction temperature is >670 °C and autogenous pressure is >1.7 MPa. Morphologies and microstructures suggest that solid-gas and liquid-gas reactions are dominant mechanisms and that Ni-borides form at a lower temperature than MgNi₃B₂. Magnetic measurements of the core-shell MgNi₃B₂ aggregates are consistent with ferromagnetic behaviour in contrast to stoichiometric MgNi₃B₂ which is diamagnetic at room temperature.

  6. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of molybdenum borides at temperatures above 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolgar, A.S.; Blinder, A.V.; Serbova, M.I.

    1990-01-01

    Enthalpy of Mo 2 B, MoB, Mo 2 B 5 borides within the range of temperatures above 300 K has been experimentally studied. Parameters of temperature dependences of enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy and the reduced Gibbs energy of the studied substances are calculated within a wide range. It is stated that high-temperature heat capacity of the studied borides can be presented as a sum of the electron component, a harmonic part of the lattice component and a contribution caused by anharmonic oscillations of lattice atoms. Values of coefficients of isothermal compressibility of Mo 2 , MoB, Mo 2 B 5 within the high temperature range are estimated

  8. Swelling and fracturing of borides under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krainy, A.G.; Ogorodnikov, V.V.; Grinik, E.U.; Chirko, L.I.; Shinakov, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    The neutron irradiation of high temperature borides, which are included in boron-containing reactor materials, results in high internal stresses, leading to considerable swelling and micro- and macro-fracturing. Experimental results over a large range of temperature and fluences, show a change of damage mechanism for borides within 400-530 C: the macro-cracking with formation of annular and radial cracks is observed below this temperature zone. The accumulation of micro-fractures and the process of gas swelling take place at irradiation temperatures above 530 C. The effect of the high internal stresses is compared to external pressure. 12 refs., 4 figs

  9. Development and application of high strength ternary boride base cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Ken-ichi

    2006-01-01

    Reaction boronizing sintering is a novel strategy to form a ternary boride coexisting with a metal matrix in a cermet during liquid phase sintering. This new sintering technique has successfully developed world first ternary boride base cermets with excellent mechanical properties such as Mo 2 FeB 2 , Mo 2 NiB 2 and WCoB base ones. In these cermets Mo 2 FeB 2 and Mo 2 NiB 2 base ones consist of a tetragonal M 3 B 2 (M: metal)-type complex boride as a hard phase and a transition metal base matrix. The cermets have already been applied to wear resistant applications such as injection molding machine parts, can making tools, and hot copper extruding dies, etc. This paper focuses on the characteristics, effects of the additional elements on the mechanical properties and structure, and practical applications of the ternary boride base cermets. - Graphical abstract: TRS and hardness of Ni-5B-51Mo-17.5Cr and Ni-5B-51Mo-12.5Cr-5V-xMn mass% cermets as functions of Mn content (Fig. 17)

  10. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...

  11. Assessment of polyphase sintered iron-cobalt-iron boride cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowacki, J.; Pieczonka, T.

    2004-01-01

    Sintering of iron, cobalt and boron powders has been analysed. As a result iron-iron boride, Fe-Fe 2 B and iron/cobalt boride with a slight admixture of molybdenum, Fe - Co - (FeMoCo) 2 B cermets have been produced. Iron was introduced to the mixture as the Astalloy Mo Hoeganaes grade powder. Elemental amorphous boron powder was used, and formation of borides occurred both during heating and isothermal sintering periods causing dimensional changes of the sintered body. Dilatometry was chosen to control basic phenomena taking place during multiphase sintering of investigated systems. The microstructure and phase constituents of sintered compacts were controlled as well. The cermets produced were substituted to: metallographic tests, X-ray analysis, measurements of hardness and of microhardness, and of wear in the process of sliding dry friction. Cermets are made up of two phases; hard grains of iron - cobalt boride, (FeCo) 2 B (1800 HV) constituting the reinforcement and a relatively soft and plastic eutectic mixture Fe 2 B - Co (400-500 HV) constituting the matrix. (author)

  12. Nanosize boride particles in heat-treated nickel base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.R.; Ojo, O.A.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Grain boundary microconstituents in aged nickel-based superalloys were studied by transmission electron microscopy techniques. A nanosized M 5 B 3 boride phase, possibly formed by intergranular solute desegregation-induced precipitation, was positively identified. The presence of these intergranular nanoborides provides reasonable clarification of a previously reported reduction of grain boundary liquation temperature during the weld heat affected zone thermal cycle

  13. Bonding and doping of simple icosahedral-boride semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, David

    2004-01-01

    A simple model of the bonding and doping of a series of icosahedral-boride insulators is presented. Icosahedral borides contain clusters of boron atoms that occupy the 12 vertices of icosahedra. This particular series of icosahedral borides share both the stoichiometry B 12 X 2 , where X denotes a group V element (P or As), and a common lattice structure. The inter-icosahedral bonding of these icosahedral borides is contrasted with that of B 12 O 2 and with that of α-rhombohedral boron. Knowledge of the various types of inter-icosahedral bonding is used as a basis to address effects of inter-icosahedral atomic substitutions. The inter-icosahedral bonding is maintained when an atom of a group V element is replaced with an atom of a group IV element, thereby producing a p-type dopant. However, changes of inter-icosahedral bonding occur upon replacing an atom of a group V element with an atom of a group VI element or with a vacancy. As a result, these substitutions do not produce effective n-type dopants. Moreover, partial substitution of boron atoms for atoms of group V elements generally renders these materials p-type semiconductors

  14. Subminiature eddy current transducers for studying boride coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, S. F.; Ishkov, A. V.; Malikov, V. N.; Sagalakov, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Strengthening of parts and units of machines, increased reliability and longer service life is an important task of modern mechanical engineering. The main objects of study in the work were selected steel 65G and 50HGA, wear-resistant boride coatings ternary system Fe-B-Fe n B which were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and eddy-current nondestructive methods.

  15. Borides and vitreous compounds sintered as high-energy fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, J.M.; Abenojar, J.; Martinez, M.A.; Velasco, F.; Criado, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Boron was chosen as fuel in view of its excellent thermodynamic values for combustion, as compared to traditional fuels. The problem of the boron in combustion is the formation of a surface layer of oxide, which delays the ignition process, reducing the performance of the rocket engine. This paper presents a high-energy fuel for rocket engines. It is composed of sintered boron (borides and carbides and vitreous compounds) with a reducing chemical agent. Borides and boron carbide were prepared since the combustion heat of the latter is similar to that of the amorphous boron (in: K.K. Kuo (Ed.), Boron-Based Solid Propellant and Solid Fuel, Vol. 427, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1993). Several chemical reducing elements were used, such as aluminum, magnesium, and coke. As the raw material for boron, different compounds were used: amorphous boron, boric acid and boron oxide

  16. Catalytic activity of metal borides in the reaction of decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labodi, I.; Korablev, L.I.; Tavadyan, L.A.; Blyumberg, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic effect of CoB, MoB 2 , ZrB 2 and NbB 2 , prepared by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, on decomposition of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide has been studied. A technigue of determination of action mechanism of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid-phase process is suggested. It is established that CoB in contrast to other metal borides catalyzes only hydroperoxide decomposition into radicals

  17. Novel boride base cermets with very high strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken-ichi Takagi; Mari Yonetsu; Yuji Yamasaki

    2001-01-01

    Mo 2 NiB 2 boride base cermets consist of a Mo 2 NiB 2 type complex boride as a hard phase and a Ni base binder. The addition of Cr and V to the cermets changed the boride structure from orthorhombic to tetragonal and resulted in the improvement of mechanical properties and microstructural refinement. The tetragonal Mo 2 NiB 2 was formed through the orthorhombic Mo 2 NiB 2 by the solid state reaction during sintering and not formed directly from the raw material powders. Ni-4.5B-46.9Mo-12.5V-xMn (wt.%) model cermets with five levels of Mn content from 0 to 10 wt.% were prepared to investigate the effects of Mn on the mechanical properties and microstructure Of Mo 2 NiB 2 base cermets. The transverse rupture strength (TRS) of the cermets depended strongly on the microstructure, which varied significantly with Mn content. The maximum TRS obtained at 2.5 wt.%Mn were 3.5 Gpa with hardness of 87 R A . (author)

  18. Characterization and diffusion model for the titanium boride layers formed on the Ti6Al4V alloy by plasma paste boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keddam, Mourad, E-mail: keddam@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Technologie des Matériaux, Faculté de Génie Mécanique et Génie des Procédés, USTHB, B.P. No. 32, 16111 El-Alia, Bab-Ezzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Taktak, Sukru [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Technology, Afyon Kocatepe University, ANS Campus, 03200, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Titanium boride layers were produced by plasma paste boriding on Ti6Al4V at 973–1073 K. • Formation rates of the Ti boride layers have parabolic character at all temperatures. • Boron diffusivities were estimated using a diffusion model including incubation times. • Activation energies of boron in TiB{sub 2} and TiB were 136 and 63 kJ/mol respectively. - Abstract: The present study is focused on the estimation of activation energy of boron in the plasma paste borided Ti6Al4V alloy, which is extensively used in technological applications, using an analytical diffusion model. Titanium boride layers were successfully produced by plasma paste boriding method on the Ti6Al4V alloy in the temperature range of 973–1073 K for a treatment time ranging from 3 to 7 h. The presence of both TiB{sub 2} top-layer and TiB whiskers sub-layer was confirmed by the XRD analysis and SEM observations. The surface hardness of the borided alloy was evaluated using Micro-Knoop indenter. The formation rates of the TiB{sub 2} and TiB layers were found to have a parabolic character at all applied process temperatures. A diffusion model was suggested to estimate the boron diffusivities in TiB{sub 2} and TiB layers under certain assumptions, by considering the effect of boride incubation times. Basing on own experimental data on boriding kinetics, the activation energies of boron in TiB{sub 2} and TiB phases were estimated as 136.24 ± 0.5 and 63.76 ± 0.5 kJ mol{sup −1}, respectively. Finally, the obtained values of boron activation energies for Ti6Al4V alloy were compared with the data available in the literature.

  19. Evaluation of High Temperature Particle Erosion Resistance of Vanadium-Boride Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, S. I.; Lee, S. H.; Eum, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The components in ultra super critical (USC) steam turbine, which is under development for high efficient power generation, are encountering harsher solid particle erosion by iron oxide scales than ones in the existing steam turbines. Therefore, the currently used boride coating will not be able to hold effective protection from particle erosion in USC system and should be replaced by new particle erosion resistant coatings. One of the best protective coatings developed for USC steam turbine parts was found to be vanadium-boride (V-boride) coating which has a hardness of about 3000 HV, much higher than that of boride, 1600∼2000 HV. In order to evaluate particle erosion resistance of the various coatings such as V-boride, boride and Cr-carbide coatings at high temperature, particle erosion test equipment were designed and manufactured. In addition, erosion particle velocity was simulated using FLUENT software based on semi-implicity method for pressure linked equations revised (SIMPLER). Based on experimental results of this work, the vanadium-boride coating was found to be superior to others and to be a candidate coating to replace the boride coating

  20. Evaluation of High Temperature Particle Erosion Resistance of Vanadium-Boride Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Jeong, S. I. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S. H.; Eum, G. W. [Corporate R and D Institute Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co., Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The components in ultra super critical (USC) steam turbine, which is under development for high efficient power generation, are encountering harsher solid particle erosion by iron oxide scales than ones in the existing steam turbines. Therefore, the currently used boride coating will not be able to hold effective protection from particle erosion in USC system and should be replaced by new particle erosion resistant coatings. One of the best protective coatings developed for USC steam turbine parts was found to be vanadium-boride (V-boride) coating which has a hardness of about 3000 HV, much higher than that of boride, 1600∼2000 HV. In order to evaluate particle erosion resistance of the various coatings such as V-boride, boride and Cr-carbide coatings at high temperature, particle erosion test equipment were designed and manufactured. In addition, erosion particle velocity was simulated using FLUENT software based on semi-implicity method for pressure linked equations revised (SIMPLER). Based on experimental results of this work, the vanadium-boride coating was found to be superior to others and to be a candidate coating to replace the boride coating.

  1. Standard entropy for borides of non-transition metals, rare-earth metals and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikova, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    Using as initial data the most reliable values of standard entropy for 10 compounds, the entropies for 40 compounds of non-transition metals, rare-earth metals and actinides have been evaluated by the method of comparative calculation. Taking into account the features of boride structures, two methods, i.e. additive and proportional, have been selected for the entropy calculations. For the range of borides the entropies were calculated from the linear relation of the latter to the number of boron atoms in the boride. For borides of rare-earth metals allowance has been made for magnetic contributions in conformity with the multiplicity of the corresponding ions. Insignificant differences in the electronic contributions to the entropy for borides and metals have been neglected. For dodecaborides only the additive method has been used. This is specified by the most rigid network that provides the same contribution to compound entropy. (orig.)

  2. Borides - a new generation of highly resistant materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle, R.

    1988-01-01

    High-duty ceramics are on advance in all sectors where materials with extremely good resistance to high temperatures and wear are required. The group of oxides, nitrides and carbides in use for quite a time now recently has been increased by the metal borides which offer among others economic advantages in certain applications. The drawbacks of these materials still to be reduced are their brittleness and susceptibility to oxidation and corrosion. Current research work on the thermodynamics of such systems, on the interaction between structure and properties, and on means to improve strength and resistance to wear are expected to soon open up new applications. (orig.) [de

  3. Transition metal borides. Synthesis, characterization and superconducting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayhan, Mehmet

    2013-07-12

    A systematic study was done on the synthesis and superconducting properties of metal rich transition metal borides. Five different binary systems were investigated including the boride systems of niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium. High temperature solid state methods were used in order to synthesize samples of different transition metal borides of the composition M{sub 2}B, MB, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, MB{sub 2}, and M{sub 2}B{sub 4}. The reactions were carried out in three different furnaces with different sample containers: the electric arc (copper crucible), the high frequency induction furnace (boron nitride, tantalum or glassy carbon crucibles), and the conventional tube furnace (sealed evacuated quartz ampoules). The products obtained were characterized with X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analyses and crystal structure refinements using the Rietveld method and based on structure models known from literature were performed. A neutron diffraction measurement was done for W{sub 2}B{sub 4} to allow for a complete crystal structure determination, because of the presence of a heavy element like tungsten and a light element like boron that made it difficult to determine the accurate determination of the boron atom positions and occupancies from X-ray data. A new structure model for W{sub 2}B{sub 4} was proposed. Magnetic measurements in a SQUID magnetometer down to temperatures as low as 1.8 K were performed to several of the products in order to see if the transition metal borides become superconducting at low temperatures, and the results were compared with data from literature. Superconducting properties were found for the following compounds: NbB{sub 2} (T{sub C} = 3.5 K), β-MoB (T{sub C} = 2.4 K), β-WB (T{sub C} = 2.0 K), α-WB (T{sub C} = 4.3 K), W{sub 2}B{sub 4} (T{sub C} = 5.4 K), Re{sub 7}B{sub 3} (T{sub C} = 2.4 K). A relationship between the superconducting properties

  4. Deposition and characterization of aluminum magnesium boride thin film coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun

    Boron-rich borides are a special group of materials possessing complex structures typically comprised of B12 icosahedra. All of the boron-rich borides sharing this common structural unit exhibit a variety of exceptional physical and electrical properties. In this work, a new ternary boride compound AlMgB14, which has been extensively studied in bulk form due to its novel mechanical properties, was fabricated into thin film coatings by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technology. The effect of processing conditions (laser operating modes, vacuum level, substrate temperature, and postannealing, etc.) on the composition, microstructure evolution, chemical bonding, and surface morphology of AlMgB14 thin film coatings has been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry; the mechanical, electrical, and optical properties of AlMgB14 thin films have been characterized by nanoindentation, four-point probe, van der Pauw Hall measurement, activation energy measurement, and UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer. Experimental results show that AlMgB14 films deposited in the temperature range of 300 K - 873 K are amorphous. Depositions under a low vacuum level (5 x 10-5 Torr) can introduce a significant amount of C and O impurities into AlMgB14 films and lead to a complex oxide glass structure. Orthorhombic AlMgB14 phase cannot be obtained by subsequent high temperature annealing. By contrast, the orthorhombic AlMgB 14 crystal structure can be attained via high temperature-annealing of AlMgB14 films deposited under a high vacuum level (boride films, high vacuum level-as deposited AlMgB14 films also possess a low n-type electrical resistivity, which is a consequence of high carrier concentration and moderate carrier mobility. The operative electrical transport mechanism and doping behavior for high vacuum level-as deposited AlMgB14

  5. Transition metal borides. Synthesis, characterization and superconducting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayhan, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study was done on the synthesis and superconducting properties of metal rich transition metal borides. Five different binary systems were investigated including the boride systems of niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium. High temperature solid state methods were used in order to synthesize samples of different transition metal borides of the composition M 2 B, MB, M 3 B 2 , MB 2 , and M 2 B 4 . The reactions were carried out in three different furnaces with different sample containers: the electric arc (copper crucible), the high frequency induction furnace (boron nitride, tantalum or glassy carbon crucibles), and the conventional tube furnace (sealed evacuated quartz ampoules). The products obtained were characterized with X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analyses and crystal structure refinements using the Rietveld method and based on structure models known from literature were performed. A neutron diffraction measurement was done for W 2 B 4 to allow for a complete crystal structure determination, because of the presence of a heavy element like tungsten and a light element like boron that made it difficult to determine the accurate determination of the boron atom positions and occupancies from X-ray data. A new structure model for W 2 B 4 was proposed. Magnetic measurements in a SQUID magnetometer down to temperatures as low as 1.8 K were performed to several of the products in order to see if the transition metal borides become superconducting at low temperatures, and the results were compared with data from literature. Superconducting properties were found for the following compounds: NbB 2 (T C = 3.5 K), β-MoB (T C = 2.4 K), β-WB (T C = 2.0 K), α-WB (T C = 4.3 K), W 2 B 4 (T C = 5.4 K), Re 7 B 3 (T C = 2.4 K). A relationship between the superconducting properties and the compositional and structural features was discussed for metal diborides. Also it was

  6. Anisotropic elastic and thermal properties of titanium borides by first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Liang; Gao, Yimin [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xiao, Bing [Department of Physics and Quantum Theory Group, School of Science and Engineering, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Li, Yefei, E-mail: yefeili@126.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Guoliang [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Elastic properties of titanium borides are calculated by first principles calculation. •Thermodynamical stability of titanium borides is analyzed. •Heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient for titanium borides are calculated and compared. •Grüneisen parameters of titanium borides are calculated. -- Abstract: The anisotropic elastic and thermal expansions of the titanium borides (TiB{sub 2}, Ti{sub 3}B{sub 4}, TiB{sub P}nma and TiB{sub F}m3{sup ¯}m) are calculated from first-principles using density functional theory. All borides show different anisotropic elastic properties; the bulk, shear and Young’s moduli are consistent with those determined experimentally. The temperature dependence of thermal expansions is mainly caused by the restoration of thermal energy due to phonon excitations at low temperature. When the temperature is higher than 500 K, the volumetric coefficient is increased linearly by increasing temperature. Meanwhile, the heat capacities of titanium borides are obtained based on the knowledge of thermal expansion coefficient and the elasticity, the calculations are in good agreement with the experiments.

  7. Electron momentum distribution and electronic response of ceramic borides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heda, N.L. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324005 (India); Meena, B.S.; Mund, H.S. [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, Manipal University, Jaipur 303007 (India); Kumar, Kishor [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001 (India)

    2017-03-15

    Isotropic Compton profiles of transition metal based ceramics TaB and VB have been measured using {sup 137}Cs (661.65 keV) γ-ray Compton spectrometer. The experimental momentum densities are compared with those deduced using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) with Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional theory (DFT) with Wu-Cohen generalized gradient approximation (WCGGA) and also the hybridization of HF and DFT (namely B3PW and PBE0) schemes. It is found that LCAO-DFT-WCGGA scheme based profiles give an overall better agreement with the experimental data, for both the borides. In addition, we have computed the Mulliken's population (MP) charge transfer data, energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface topology of both the borides using full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) and LCAO methods with DFT-WCGGA scheme. Cross-overs of Fermi level by the energy bands corresponding to B-2p and valence d-states of transition metals lead to metallic character in both the compounds. Equal-valence-electron-density profiles and MP analysis suggest more ionic character of VB than that of TaB.

  8. A Simple, General Synthetic Route toward Nanoscale Transition Metal Borides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi, Palani R; Yubuta, Kunio; Fokwa, Boniface P T

    2018-04-01

    Most nanomaterials, such as transition metal carbides, phosphides, nitrides, chalcogenides, etc., have been extensively studied for their various properties in recent years. The similarly attractive transition metal borides, on the contrary, have seen little interest from the materials science community, mainly because nanomaterials are notoriously difficult to synthesize. Herein, a simple, general synthetic method toward crystalline transition metal boride nanomaterials is proposed. This new method takes advantage of the redox chemistry of Sn/SnCl 2 , the volatility and recrystallization of SnCl 2 at the synthesis conditions, as well as the immiscibility of tin with boron, to produce crystalline phases of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metal nanoborides with different morphologies (nanorods, nanosheets, nanoprisms, nanoplates, nanoparticles, etc.). Importantly, this method allows flexibility in the choice of the transition metal, as well as the ability to target several compositions within the same binary phase diagram (e.g., Mo 2 B, α-MoB, MoB 2 , Mo 2 B 4 ). The simplicity and wide applicability of the method should enable the fulfillment of the great potential of this understudied class of materials, which show a variety of excellent chemical, electrochemical, and physical properties at the microscale. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparative NMR investigation of the Re-based borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, C. S.; Tao, Y. F.; Su, T. H.

    2008-07-01

    We report a systematic study of the rhenium-based borides, ReB2 , Re7B3 , and Re3B , by means of the B11 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. While Re7B3 and Re3B are superconductors, ReB2 exhibits no superconducting signature but is of current interest due to its superhard mechanical property. Since the major focus of this investigation is their electronic characteristics in the normal states, we performed the measurements at temperatures between 77 and 295 K. For Re7B3 and Re3B , s -character electrons were found to be responsible for the observed B11 NMR Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) . From T1 analysis, we thus deduce the partial Bs Fermi-level density of states (DOS) of both borides. On the other hand, the relaxation rate of ReB2 is mainly associated with p electrons, similar to the cases of OsB2 and RuB2 . In addition, the extracted B2p Fermi-level DOS is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction from band-structure calculations.

  10. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  11. Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Logistics 4 Initiative - DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Non- Chrome Primer IIEXAVAJ ENT CHRO:M I~UMI CHROMIUM (VII Oil CrfVli.J CANCEfl HAnRD CD...Management Office of the Secretary of Defense Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  12. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  13. Characterisation of Wear Resistant Boride Layers on a Tool Steel by Activity Controlled Pack Boronising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work addresses the production and characterisation of iron boride layers by pack boronising of a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The boride layers were produced at 900°C for 2h using different pack compositions in order to obtain a single-phase boride layer. The layers were characterized...... by electron microscopy, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Vickers hardness tests and wear testing with a pin-on-disc tribometer. It was found that the type of boride phases (FeB and/or Fe2B) present in the treated layer can be controlled by changing the boron activity...... by pack boronising for all conditions as compared to the heat treated tool steel....

  14. Quantitative electron probe microanalysis of borides in aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karduck, P.; Schuerhoff, H.J.; Burchard, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the quantitative analysis of borides in aluminium was introduced. For this purpose the optimal apparative boundary conditions for the EPMA of boron were worked out. With these conditions a satisfactory peak to background ratio of 57 could be achieved for B-Kα-radiation. By application of this method the following conclusion should be drawn concerning the kind of nuclei during grain refinement of aluminium with titanium and boron: For grain refinement of aluminium with titanium and boron in the hypoperitectic region of the binary system Al-Ti TiB 2 -particles in clusters provide the high efficiency of refinement. This entails that the TiB 2 -particles already present in the master alloy remain inert in the melt. Hence, the good efficiency of refinement in this region cannot be attributed to the presence of particles like Al 3 Ti, AlB 2 or (Al, Ti) B 2 . (Author)

  15. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of Refractory Hard-Metal Borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew Thomas

    As the limits of what can be achieved with conventional hard compounds, such as tungsten carbide, are nearing reach, super-hard materials are an area of increasing industrial interest. The refractory hard metal borides, such as ReB2 and WB4, offer an increasingly attractive alternative to diamond and cubic boron nitride as a next-generation tool material. In this Thesis, a thorough discussion is made of the progress achieved by our laboratory towards understanding the synthesis, structure, and properties of these extremely hard compounds. Particular emphasis is placed on structural manipulation, solid solution formation, and the unique crystallographic manifestations of what might also be called "super-hard metals".

  16. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ≥11 wt% and ≥80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (≤100 °C) and pressures (≤100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement.

  17. Thermal properties of zirconium diboride -- transition metal boride solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClane, Devon Lee

    This research focuses on the thermal properties of zirconium diboride (ZrB2) based ceramics. The overall goal was to improve the understanding of how different transition metal (TM) additives influence thermal transport in ZrB2. To achieve this, ZrB2 with 0.5 wt% carbon, and 3 mol% of individual transition metal borides, was densified by hot-press sintering. The transition metals that were investigated were: Y, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Re. The room temperature thermal diffusivities of the compositions ranged from 0.331 cm2/s for nominally pure ZrB2 to 0.105 cm2/s for (Zr,Cr)B2 and converged around 0.155cm2/s at higher temperatures for all compositions. Thermal conductivities were calculated from the diffusivities, using temperature-dependent values for density and heat capacity. The electron contribution to thermal conductivity was calculated from measured electrical resistivity according to the Wiedemann-Franz law. The phonon contribution to thermal conductivity was calculated by subtracting the electron contribution from the total thermal conductivity. Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data was used to determine the lattice parameters of the compositions. The decrease in thermal conductivity for individual additives correlated directly to the metallic radius of the additive. Additional strain appeared to exist for additives when the stable TM boride for that metal had different crystal symmetries than ZrB2. This research provided insight into how additives and impurities affect thermal transport in ZrB2. The research potentially offers a basis for future modeling of thermal conductivity in ultra-high temperature ceramics based on the correlation between metallic radius and the decrease in thermal conductivity.

  18. Preparation of boron-rich aluminum boride nanoparticles by RF thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sooseok [Inha University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (Korea, Republic of); Matsuo, Jiro; Cheng, Yingying [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering (Japan); Watanabe, Takayuki, E-mail: watanabe@chemenv.titech.ac.jp [Kyushu University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Boron-rich compounds of AlB{sub 12} and AlB{sub 10} nanoparticles were synthesized by a radiofrequency thermal plasma. Aluminum and boron raw powders were evaporated in virtue of high enthalpy of the thermal plasma in upstream region, followed by the formation of aluminum boride nanoparticles in the tail region of plasma flame with rapid quenching. A high production rate of aluminum boride was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction measurement in the case of high input power, high boron content in raw material and helium inner gas. Polyhedral nanoparticles of 20.8 nm in mean size were observed by a transmission electron microscope. In the raw powder mixture of aluminum, titanium, and boron, titanium-boride nanoparticles were synthesized preferentially, because the Gibbs free energy for the boridation of titanium is lower than that of aluminum. Since the nucleation temperature of boron is higher than that of aluminum, the condensation of metal monomers onto boron nuclei results in the formation of boron-rich aluminum boride nanoparticles.

  19. Some physical properties of the higher borides of molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chenko, M.S.; Bodrova, L.G.; Nemchenko, V.F.; Kolotun, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the thermal conductivity, the specific electrical resistance, the thermo-e.m.f. and the magnetic susceptibility, together with the variation of magnetic resistance and of Hall constant with the magnetic field strength at liquid nitrogen temperature and at room temperature, for the higher borides Mo 2 B 5 , MoB 4 , W 2 B 5 and WB 4 were studied. Some features of the physical properties of these metallic borides were established. In contrast with the corresponding metals the higher borides are diamagnetic and the Hall constants are negative. The values of the magnetic susceptibility and the Hall constant are larger for the higher borides than for the low borides. As the temperature increased an inversion of the thermo-e.m.f. sign took place and the signs of the thermo-e.m.f. and the Hall constant are different. The values of the magnetic susceptibility of Mo 2 B 5 , MoB 4 and WB 4 were temperature independent. The electronic structure of the compounds studied is discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  20. Characterization and wear performance of boride phases over tool steel substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E Vera Cárdenas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work was conducted to characterize boride phases, obtained from the powder-pack process, on AISI H13 and D2 steel substrates, and investigate their tribological behavior. The boriding was developed at a temperature of 1273 K with an exposure time of 8 h. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were conducted on the borided material to characterize the presence of the FeB, Fe2B, and CrB phases and the distribution of heavy elements on the surface of the substrates. The adherence of the boride layers was evaluated, in a qualitative form, through the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C indentation technique. Sliding wear tests were then performed using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were conducted in dry conditions at room temperature. A frequency of 10 Hz and 15-mm sliding distance were used. The applied Hertzian pressure was 2.01 GPa. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe and analyze the wear mechanisms. Additionally, the variation of the friction coefficient versus the number of cycles was obtained. Experimental results showed that the characteristic wear mechanism for the borided surface was plastic deformation and mild abrasive wear; for unborided substrates, cracking and spalling were observed.

  1. Study of microcracks morphology produced by Vickers indentation on AISI 1045 borided steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, I.; Ramirez, G.; VillaVelazquez, C.; Figueroa, U.; Rodriguez, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we analyzed the roughness morphology of indentation microcracks produced by the Vickers microindentation in the iron boride Fe 2 B. Using the paste boriding process, the boride layers were formed at the surface of AISI 1045 steels. The diffusion processes were carried out with 5 mm of boron paste thickness over the substrate surface at three different temperatures (1193, 1223 and 1273 K) with two different time exposures. The indentations in each Fe 2 B layer were made using a constant load of 200 g at four different distances from the surface. The fracture behavior of the Fe 2 B borided phase is found to be brittle in nature. The profiles of microcracks formed at the corners of the indentations were obtained using the scanning electronic microscopy and were analyzed within the framework of fractal geometry. We found that all indentation microcracks display a self-affine invariance characterized by the same roughness (Hurst) exponent H = 0.8 ± 0.1. The effect of the self-affine roughness of indentation microcracks on the measured fracture toughness is discussed within the framework of the mechanics of self-affine cracks. It is pointed out that the arrest of indentation microcracks is controlled by the fractal fracture toughness, which for the Fe 2 B borided phase is found to be K fc = 0.42 ± 0.02 MPa m 0.75 at all distances from the surface

  2. Quantitative electron probe microanalysis of boron in binary borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastin, G.F.; Heijligers, H.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative electron probe microanalysis has been performed in 27 binary borides in the range of 4-30 keV, both for the metals as well as for Boron. The procedures along which accurate intensity measurements for B-K α must be carried out are discussed in detail. A total of 196 k-ratios with respect to elemental standards for the metal X-ray lines and 180 k-ratios for B-K α relative to elemental Boron have been obtained. These data have been used to arrive at an improved parameterization for the φ(ρz) approach in matrix correction. The resulting new program (BAS861) was compared to 5 other current correction programs. At the same occasion the available set of mass absorption coefficients for Boron was tested on its consistency and better values suggested where necessary. Finally it is shown that the modified version of the Gaussian φ(ρz) approach (BAS861 program) is highly successful in the matrix correction for B-K α : a relative root-mean-square value of 6.30% was obtained. (Auth.)

  3. Metal Immiscibility Route to Synthesis of Ultrathin Carbides, Borides, and Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixing; Kochat, Vidya; Pandey, Prafull; Kashyap, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Soham; Samanta, Atanu; Sarkar, Suman; Manimunda, Praveena; Zhang, Xiang; Asif, Syed; Singh, Abhisek K; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2017-08-01

    Ultrathin ceramic coatings are of high interest as protective coatings from aviation to biomedical applications. Here, a generic approach of making scalable ultrathin transition metal-carbide/boride/nitride using immiscibility of two metals is demonstrated. Ultrathin tantalum carbide, nitride, and boride are grown using chemical vapor deposition by heating a tantalum-copper bilayer with corresponding precursor (C 2 H 2 , B powder, and NH 3 ). The ultrathin crystals are found on the copper surface (opposite of the metal-metal junction). A detailed microscopy analysis followed by density functional theory based calculation demonstrates the migration mechanism, where Ta atoms prefer to stay in clusters in the Cu matrix. These ultrathin materials have good interface attachment with Cu, improving the scratch resistance and oxidation resistance of Cu. This metal-metal immiscibility system can be extended to other metals to synthesize metal carbide, boride, and nitride coatings. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hardness optimization of boride diffusion layer on Astm F-75 alloy using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguelles O, J. L.; Corona R, M. A. [Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Doctorado Institucional en Ingenieria y Ciencia de Materiales, San Luis Potosi 78000, SLP (Mexico); Marquez H, A.; Saldana R, A. L.; Saldana R, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Ingenieria Mecanica Agricola DICIVA, Irapuato, Guanajuato 36500 (Mexico); Moreno P, J., E-mail: amarquez@ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Minas, Metalurgia y Geologia, Ex-Hacienda San Matias s/n, Guanajuato, Guanajuato 36020 (Mexico)

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the Response Surface Methodology (Rsm) and Central Composite Design (Ccd) were used to optimize the hardness of boride diffusion layer on Astm F-75 alloy (also called Haynes alloy). A boronizing thermochemical treatment was carried out at different temperatures and for different time periods. Hardness tests were conducted. The boride diffusion layer was verified by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicating the formation of Co B, Co{sub 2}B, Cr B and Mo{sub 2}B phases. An optimal hardness of 3139.7 Hv was obtained for the samples subjected to the boriding process for a duration of 6.86 h at 802.4 degrees Celsius. (Author)

  5. Wear behavior of tempered and borided tool steels under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haidary, T. J.; Faleh, M. N.

    2000-01-01

    . Tool steel 61CrV5, 50 NiCr13 and X1000Cr MoV51 were used in the first stage of this investigation. They have been treated as follows: boriding, boriding and tempering and hardening and tempering. The wear tests were conducted under fixed conditions (150 N/mm 2 , 0.48m/sec) with and without lubricant. The wear rate and coefficient of friction of 61Cr Si V5 steel have been studied in the second stage hoping to find the influence of working conditions on these parameters and then to compare these results with the case of hardening and tempering which is the usual case in the actual working field. The study gives a good indication about the improvement achieved in boriding and tempering cases (∼ 30%) as compared with hardening tempering cases in dry sliding conditions -∼5% with lubricating ones. (authors). 13 refs., 19 figs., 1 table

  6. The effect of boriding on wear resistance of cold work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzawa, Y; Koyama, S; Shohji, I

    2017-01-01

    Recently, boriding has attracted extensive attention as surface stiffening processing of plain steel. In this research, the influence of processing time on the formation layer of cold work tool steel (KD11MAX) by Al added fused salt bath was examined. In addition, in order to improve the abrasion resistance of KD11MAX, the effect of the treatment of boronization on the formation layer has been investigated. Boriding were performed in molten borax which contained about 10 mass% Al at processing time of 1.8 ∼ 7.2 ks (processing temperature of 1303 K). As a result of the examination, the hardness of the boriding layer becomes about 1900 HV when the processing time of 3.6 ks. Also the abrasion resistance has improved remarkably. Furthermore, it was revealed that the formation layer was boronized iron from the Vickers hardness and analysis of the X-ray diffraction measurement. (paper)

  7. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2}. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  8. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  9. Boride-based nano-laminates with MAX-phase-like behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telle, Rainer; Momozawa, Ai; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01

    MAX-phases being usually composed of transition metals, group A elements and carbon/nitrogen are considered interesting materials for many applications because of their tremendous bulk modulus, 'reversible' plasticity, and machinability. This is mainly due to their unique kind of bonding comprising covalent, ionic as well as metallic bonds providing 'easy' planes of rupture and deformability due to the layered crystal structures. In transition metal boride systems, similar types of bonding are available. In particular the W 2 B 5 -structure type and its stacking variations allow the synthesis of strongly layered crystal structures exhibiting unique delamination phenomena. The paper presents ab initio calculations showing the similarities of bonding between the ternary carbides and the corresponding ternary or quaternary borides. Formation of boride-based nano-laminates from auxiliary liquid phases, from the melt as well as during sintering and precipitation from supersaturated solid solutions will be discussed by means of SEM and TEM studies. The role of impurities weakening the interlayer bonding will be addressed in particular. The pronounced cleavage parallel to the basal plane gives rise for crack deflection and pull-out mechanisms if the laminates are dispersed in brittle matrices such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or other transition metal borides. - Graphical abstract: Some transition metal borides crystallise in a layered structure of alternating stacks of metal and boron atoms giving rise for strongly anisotropic properties. Their preferred cleavage parallel and the deformability perpendicular to the basal plan are similar to the peculiar mechanical behaviour recently described for MAX-phases. Ab initio calculations of the crystal structure prove the weak bonds between the layers for a variety of borides which can be used to reinforce ceramic materials on a nano-scale level

  10. Chromium carcinogenicity: California strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeff, G V; Satin, K; Painter, P; Zeise, L; Popejoy, C; Murchison, G

    1989-10-01

    Hexavalent chromium was identified by California as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in January 1986. The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) concurred with the findings of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate the carcinogenicity of chromium in both animals and humans. CDHS did not find any compelling evidence demonstrating the existence of a threshold with respect to chromium carcinogenesis. Experimental data was judged inadequate to assess potential human reproductive risks from ambient exposures. Other health effects were not expected to occur at ambient levels. The theoretically increased lifetime carcinogenic risk from a continuous lifetime exposure to hexavalent chromium fell within the range 12-146 cancer cases per nanogram hexavalent chromium per cubic meter of air per million people exposed, depending on the potency estimate used. The primary sources found to contribute significantly to the risk of exposure were chrome platers, chromic acid anodizing facilities and cooling towers utilizing hexavalent chromium as a corrosion inhibitor. Evaluation of genotoxicity data, animal studies and epidemiological studies indicates that further consideration should be given to the potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium via the oral route.

  11. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, T.; Kudo, K.

    1980-01-01

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  12. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC; de Bruijn PJ; van Keulen A; Verburgh JJ; van der Woerd KF

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  13. Electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in oxygen-free and oxygen-containing fluoride melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyakova, L.P.; Polyakov, E.G.; Makarova, O.V.

    2001-01-01

    Results of electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in fluoride and oxyfluoride melts are compared. It is shown that the single-phase X-ray-amorphous micro-layered coatings form only in the latter case. Linear and square-wave voltammetry, complemented by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy...

  14. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  15. Growth kinetics of boride layers formed on 99.0% purity nickel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    abrasion wear, corrosion and high oxidation resistance com- pared with other ... Ni and Ni-base alloys are used in various industrial plants and equipment for their high ... with 1000-grit emery paper before the boronizing process. The boriding ...

  16. Kinetics of boride layers formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Sen, U.; Bindal, C.

    2004-01-01

    The present study reports on boride layer growth kinetics of borided AISI 4140 steel. Steels were boronized in molten borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon bath at 1123 K 1173 K and 1223 K for 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours. Boride layer thickness ranged from 38.4 to 225 μm. Layer growth kinetics were analysed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe 2 B sublayers as a function of boronizing time and temperature in the range of 1123-1223 K. The depth of the tips of the most deeply penetrated FeB and Fe 2 B needles are taken as measures for diffusion in the fast directions. The kinetics of the reaction, K=K 0 exp(-Q/RT) have also been determined by varying the boriding temperature and time. The results showed that K increase with boronizing temperature. Activation energy (Q) for present study was determined as 215 kj.mol -1 . The diffusion coefficient (K) ranged from 3 x 10 -9 cm 2 s -1 to 2 x 10 -8 cm 2 s -1 . Also temperature-dependent constant (K 0 ) at temperatures 1123 K, 1173 K and 1223 K was 179.4 cm 2 s -1 . (orig.)

  17. Kinetics of boride layers formed on the surface of AISI 4140 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, S.; Sen, U. [Sakarya Univ., Dept. of Metal Education, Sakarya (Turkey); Bindal, C. [Sakarya Univ., Dept. of Materials and Metallurgy, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    The present study reports on boride layer growth kinetics of borided AISI 4140 steel. Steels were boronized in molten borax, boric acid and ferro-silicon bath at 1123 K 1173 K and 1223 K for 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours. Boride layer thickness ranged from 38.4 to 225 {mu}m. Layer growth kinetics were analysed by measuring the extent of penetration of FeB and Fe{sub 2}B sublayers as a function of boronizing time and temperature in the range of 1123-1223 K. The depth of the tips of the most deeply penetrated FeB and Fe{sub 2}B needles are taken as measures for diffusion in the fast directions. The kinetics of the reaction, K=K{sub 0} exp(-Q/RT) have also been determined by varying the boriding temperature and time. The results showed that K increase with boronizing temperature. Activation energy (Q) for present study was determined as 215 kj.mol{sup -1}. The diffusion coefficient (K) ranged from 3 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} to 2 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1}. Also temperature-dependent constant (K{sub 0}) at temperatures 1123 K, 1173 K and 1223 K was 179.4 cm{sup 2}s{sup -1}. (orig.)

  18. Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Lishan; Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang; Qian, Yitai; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB 2 , ZrB 2 , NbB 2 , CeB 6 , PrB 6 , SmB 6 , EuB 6 , LaB 6 ), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN 2 , VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN 3 with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to ∼850 °C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 °C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: ► An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. ► The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. ► The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

  19. Ni/boride interfaces and environmental embrittlement in Ni-based superalloys: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Suchismita; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Hanlon, Timothy; Hall, Ernest L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fracture strengths of Ni/boride interfaces through first-principles calculations. ► Fracture strengths of Ni/boride interfaces are higher than Ni/Ni 3 Al and NiΣ5 grain boundaries. ► Ni/boride interfaces have higher resistance to O-embrittlement than Ni/Ni 3 Al and NiΣ5 grain boundaries. ► CrMo-borides are more effective than Cr-borides in resisting O-embrittlement. ► Electronegativity differences between alloying elements correlate with fracture strengths. - Abstract: Motivated by the vital role played by boride precipitates in Ni-based superalloys in improving mechanical properties such as creep rupture strength, fatigue crack growth rates and improved resistance towards environmental embrittlement , we estimate fracture strength of Ni/boride interfaces through determination of their work of separation using first-principles simulations. We find that the fracture strength of Ni/boride interfaces is higher than that of other commonly occurring interfaces in Ni-alloys, such as Ni Σ-5 grain boundaries and coherent Ni/Ni 3 Al interfaces, and is less susceptible to oxygen-induced embrittlement. Our calculations show how the presence of Mo in Ni/M 5 B 3 (M = Cr, Mo) interfaces leads to additional reduction in oxygen-induced embrittlement. Through Electron-Localization-Function based analyses, we identify the electronic origins of effects of alloying elements on fracture strengths of these interfaces and observe that chemical interactions stemming from electronegativity differences between different atomic species are responsible for the trends in calculated strengths. Our findings should be useful towards designing Ni-based alloys with higher interfacial strengths and reduced oxygen-induced embrittlement.

  20. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddard-Gilbert, K.; Blincoe, C.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate ( 51 Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  1. A crossover from high stiffness to high hardness. The case of osmium and its borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian, Yongming; Li, Anhu; Liu, Xiaomei; Shanghai Univ. of Engineering Science; Liang, Yongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Transition-metal light-element compounds are currently raising great expectations for hard and superhard materials. Using the widely attracting osmium (Os) and its borides (OsB, Os_2B_3 and OsB_2) as prototypes, we demonstrate by first-principles calculations that heavy transition metals, which possess high stiffness but low hardness, can be converted into highly hard materials by incorporating of light elements to form compounds. Such a crossover is a manifestation that the underlying sources of high stiffness and high hardness are fundamentally different. The stiffness is related to elastic deformation that is closely associated with valence electron density, whereas the hardness depends strongly on plastic deformation that is determined by bonding nature. Therefore, the incorporation of light atoms into transition metal should be a valid pathway of designing hard and superhard materials. This strategy is in principle also applicable to other transition-metal borides, carbides, and nitrides.

  2. A crossover from high stiffness to high hardness. The case of osmium and its borides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Yongming; Li, Anhu [Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Liu, Xiaomei [Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Shanghai Univ. of Engineering Science (China). College of Mechanical Engineering; Liang, Yongcheng [Shanghai Ocean Univ. (China). College of Engineering Science and Technology

    2016-07-01

    Transition-metal light-element compounds are currently raising great expectations for hard and superhard materials. Using the widely attracting osmium (Os) and its borides (OsB, Os{sub 2}B{sub 3} and OsB{sub 2}) as prototypes, we demonstrate by first-principles calculations that heavy transition metals, which possess high stiffness but low hardness, can be converted into highly hard materials by incorporating of light elements to form compounds. Such a crossover is a manifestation that the underlying sources of high stiffness and high hardness are fundamentally different. The stiffness is related to elastic deformation that is closely associated with valence electron density, whereas the hardness depends strongly on plastic deformation that is determined by bonding nature. Therefore, the incorporation of light atoms into transition metal should be a valid pathway of designing hard and superhard materials. This strategy is in principle also applicable to other transition-metal borides, carbides, and nitrides.

  3. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  4. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  5. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R R

    1980-11-01

    Occupational exposure represents the main source of human contamination by chromium. For non-occupationally exposed people the major environmental exposure to chromium occurs as a consequence of its presence in food. Chromium must be considered as an essential element. Its deficiency impairs glucose metabolism. Trivalent chromium salts are poorly absorbed through the gastro-intestinal and respiratory tracts because they do not cross membranes easily. Hexavalent chromium can be absorbed by the oral and pulmonary routes and probably also through the skin. After its absorption, hexavalent chromium is rapidly reduced to the trivalent form which is probably the only form to be found in biological material. Epidemiological studies have shown that some chromium salts (mainly the slightly soluble hexavalent salts) are carcinogens. Lung cancers have, indeed, often been reported among workers in chromate-producing industry and, to a lesser extent, in workers from the chrome-pigment industry. The first attempts to produce cancers in experimental animals by inhalation or parenteral introduction gave negative or equivocal results but, from 1960, positive results have been obtained with various chromium compounds. As for the carcinogenic activity, the mutagenicity of chromium has mainly been found with hexavalent salts. In the majority of assay systems used, trivalent chromium appears inactive. It can be considered as evident, however, that the ultimate mutagen which binds to the genetic material is the trivalent form produced intracellularly from hexavalent chromium, the apparent lack of activity of the trivalent form being due to its poor cellular uptake.

  6. Preparation of molybdenum borides by combustion synthesis involving solid-phase displacement reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.L.; Hsu, W.S.

    2008-01-01

    Preparation of molybdenum borides of five different phases in the Mo-B binary system (including Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 , Mo 2 B 5 , and MoB 4 ) was performed by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) with two kinds of the reactant samples. When elemental powder compacts with an exact stoichiometry corresponding to the boride phase were employed, self-sustaining reaction was only achieved in the sample with Mo:B = 1:1 and nearly single-phase MoB was yielded. Therefore, the other four boride compounds were prepared from the reactant compacts composed of MoO 3 , Mo, and B powders, within which the displacement reaction of MoO 3 with boron was involved in combustion synthesis. Experimental evidence shows that the extent of displacement reaction in the overall reaction has a significant impact on sustainability of the synthesis reaction, combustion temperature, reaction front velocity, and composition of the end product. An increase in the solid-phase displacement reaction taking place during the SHS process contributes more heat flux to the synthesis reaction, thus resulting in the increase of combustion temperature and enhancement of the reaction front velocity. Based upon the XRD analysis, formation of Mo 2 B, MoB 2 , and Mo 2 B 5 as the dominant boride phase in the end product was successful through the SHS reaction with powder compacts under appropriate stoichiometries between MoO 3 , Mo, and B. However, a poor conversion was observed in the synthesis of MoB 4 . The powder compact prepared for the production of MoB 4 yielded mostly Mo 2 B 5

  7. Growth kinetics of borided layers: Artificial neural network and least square approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, I.; Islas, M.; Ramírez, G.; VillaVelázquez, C.; Mota, C.

    2007-05-01

    The present study evaluates the growth kinetics of the boride layer Fe 2B in AISI 1045 steel, by means of neural networks and the least square techniques. The Fe 2B phase was formed at the material surface using the paste boriding process. The surface boron potential was modified considering different boron paste thicknesses, with exposure times of 2, 4 and 6 h, and treatment temperatures of 1193, 1223 and 1273 K. The neural network and the least square models were set by the layer thickness of Fe 2B phase, and assuming that the growth of the boride layer follows a parabolic law. The reliability of the techniques used is compared with a set of experiments at a temperature of 1223 K with 5 h of treatment time and boron potentials of 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm. The results of the Fe 2B layer thicknesses show a mean error of 5.31% for the neural network and 3.42% for the least square method.

  8. Structure of superhard tungsten tetraboride: A missing link between MB2 and MB12 higher borides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T.; Turner, Christopher L.; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Superhard metals are of interest as possible replacements with enhanced properties over the metal carbides commonly used in cutting, drilling, and wear-resistant tooling. Of the superhard metals, the highest boride of tungsten—often referred to as WB4 and sometimes as W1–xB3—is one of the most promising candidates. The structure of this boride, however, has never been fully resolved, despite the fact that it was discovered in 1961—a fact that severely limits our understanding of its structure–property relationships and has generated increasing controversy in the literature. Here, we present a new crystallographic model of this compound based on refinement against time-of-flight neutron diffraction data. Contrary to previous X-ray–only structural refinements, there is strong evidence for the presence of interstitial arrangements of boron atoms and polyhedral bonding. The formation of these polyhedra—slightly distorted boron cuboctahedra—appears to be dependent upon the defective nature of the tungsten-deficient metal sublattice. This previously unidentified structure type has an intermediary relationship between MB2 and MB12 type boride polymorphs. Manipulation of the fractionally occupied metal and boron sites may provide insight for the rational design of new superhard metals. PMID:25733870

  9. Synthesis of borides in molybdenum implanted by B+ ions under thermal and electron annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Akchulakov, M.T.; Bayadilov, E.M.; Ehngel'ko, V.I.; Lazarenko, A.V.; Chebukov, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of formation of borides in the near surface layers of monocrystalline molybdenum implanted by boron ions at 35 keV energy under thermal and pulsed electron annealing by an electon beam at 140 keV energy is investigated. It is found that implantation of boron ions into molybdenum with subsequent thermal annealing permits to produce both molybdenum monoboride (α-MoB) and boride (γ-Mo 2 B) with rather different formation mechanisms. Formation of the α-MoB phase occurs with the temperature elevation from the centers appeared during implantation, while the γ-Mo 2 B phase appears only on heating the implanted layers up to definite temperature as a result of the phase transformation of the solid solution into a chemical compound. Pulsed electron annealing instead of thermal annealing results mainly in formation of molybdenum boride (γ-Mo 2 B), the state of structure is determined by the degree of heating of implanted layers and their durable stay at temperatures exceeding the threshold values

  10. Microstructure of a high boron 9-12% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andren, H.O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2008-07-01

    Additions of small amounts of boron (10-100 ppm) to 9-12% chromium steels are often made since they have been found to be beneficial for the creep strength up to and above 600 C. The effect of boron is to restrict the coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates during service. It was found that increasing the boron content from 9 to 40 ppm gave a decrease in coarsening constant at 600 C by a factor of 2. The present understanding of boron solution, non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation, incorporation into M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, and diffusion is reviewed in the paper. A very high boron addition (300 ppm) was made in the trial TAF steel already in the 1950'ies. The microstructure of a similar trial steel, FT3B, has been studied detail. In this steel large Mo, Cr, Fe and V containing metal borides are formed rather than the expected BN, with the crystal structure M{sub 2}B{sub 2}. Nitrogen is therefore still available for the formation of VN. Due to tempering at a low temperature (690 C) to a high strength (830 MPa), this steel contained a dense distribution of very small VN precipitates, 5-15 nm in size. A similar VN distribution is probably the cause of the still unsurpassed creep strength of the TAF steel. (orig.)

  11. Identification of an eta boride phase as a crystallization product of a NiMoFeB amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.W.; Rabenberg, L.; Bourell, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A new, apparently metastable, Mo--Ni boride phase has been observed in transmission electron microscope samples of rapidly consolidated MoNiFeB metallic glass powders. The phase is cubic with lattice parameter 1.083 nm. Its space group as determined by electron diffraction is Fd3-barm and its approximate composition is Mo 3 Ni 3 B. Because its structure, its composition, and its role as a transition phase are analogous to those of eta carbide (M 6 C) in steels and cemented carbides, this phase has tentatively been named ''eta boride.''

  12. Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects Date (12 May 2011) Gene McKinley ASC/WNV (937) 255-3596 Gene.McKinley@wpafb.af.mil Aeronautical Systems...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent ...A-10) – AETC (T-6, T-38 and T1A) • Both Cr Primers & Non-Cr primers as well as Cr Surface Treatment – F-22 8 Non- Chrome Tie-coat & touch-up

  13. Successive determinations of metals and boron in metal borides by chelatometric and alkalimetric titrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo; Higashi, Iwami; Atoda, Tetzuzo

    1976-01-01

    Based on the investigation of chemical reactivities of metal borides and of the metal chelate effects on the alkalimetric titration of boron, a method of successive determinations of metals and boron of Mn-, Fe-, Cu- and Al-borides has been developed. The procedure is as follows: (1) Mn-, Fe- and Cu-borides: Dissolve 10 to 30 mg of a sample in a mixture of 3 ml of 3N HNO 3 , 3 ml of 3N H 2 SO 4 and 0.3 ml of 10% H 2 O 2 by heating in a quartz flask equipped with a reflux condenser. Cool the solution obtained, add 0.02M CyDTA solution in excess and neutralize to pH 3 with 2N NaOH solution. Boil the solution for several minutes to ensure the formation of the metal chelate. After cooling, adjust the pH exactly to 6.7 with 0.5 M NaHCO 3 solution, and then determine the metal concentration by back-titrating the excess CyDTA with 0.01M ZnSO 4 solution using MTB as an indicator. After the titration is over, make the solution to pH 3 with 2N H 2 SO 4 and boil for several minutes to expel CO 2 . Cool the solution, adjust the pH exactly to 7.0 with 0.1N CO 2 -free NaOH solution and add 5 g of mannite and ten drops of 0.1% phenolphthalein solution. Finally, titrate the mannite-boric acid complex with 0.05N NaOH solution until the pink tinge is observed (pH 8.2). (2) Al-boride: Fuse 10 to 30 mg of a sample with a mixture of 1.5 g of Na 2 CO 3 and 0.3 g of KNO 3 in a nickel crucible. Digest the melt with water and filter off the residue (nickel oxide). Add 0.01 M EDTA solution in excess to the filterate and make it to pH 3 with 2N H 2 SO 4 . Analytical Results obtained by the present method agree well with those by other methods. The present method takes only 40 minutes, whereas several hours are required to determine metal and boron by other methods. (auth.)

  14. Chromium in Postmortem Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Lech, Teresa; Konopka, Tomasz; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2018-04-17

    Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the negative effects caused by the presence and constant increase in concentration of heavy metals in the environment, as well as to the determination of their content in human biological samples. In this paper, the concentration of chromium in samples of blood and internal organs collected at autopsy from 21 female and 39 male non-occupationally exposed subjects is presented. Elemental analysis was carried out by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Reference ranges of chromium in the blood, brain, stomach, liver, kidneys, lungs, and heart (wet weight) in the population of Southern Poland were found to be 0.11-16.4 ng/mL, 4.7-136 ng/g, 6.1-76.4 ng/g, 11-506 ng/g, 2.9-298 ng/g, 13-798 ng/g, and 3.6-320 ng/g, respectively.

  15. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  16. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  17. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  18. Boron-dependency of molybdenum boride electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyounmyung; Encinas, Andrew; Fokwa, Boniface P.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Scheifers, Jan P.; Zhang, Yuemei [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-05-08

    Molybdenum-based materials have been considered as alternative catalysts to noble metals, such as platinum, for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We have synthesized four binary bulk molybdenum borides Mo{sub 2}B, α-MoB, β-MoB, and MoB{sub 2} by arc-melting. All four phases were tested for their electrocatalytic activity (linear sweep voltammetry) and stability (cyclic voltammetry) with respect to the HER in acidic conditions. Three of these phases were studied for their HER activity and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the first time; MoB{sub 2} and β-MoB show excellent activity in the same range as the recently reported α-MoB and β-Mo{sub 2}C phases, while the molybdenum richest phase Mo{sub 2}B show significantly lower HER activity, indicating a strong boron-dependency of these borides for the HER. In addition, MoB{sub 2} and β-MoB show long-term cycle stability in acidic solution. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Characterization of boride-based powders and detonation gun sprayed cermet coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keraenen, J.; Stenberg, T.; Maentylae, T.

    1995-01-01

    Detonation gun sprayed (DGS) cermet coatings containing complex ternary transition metal boride as hard particles dispersed in a stainless steel or nickel based superalloy matrix have been characterized. Microstructure of the coatings, as well as powders, were studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM). X-ray microanalysis of the coatings were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) attached to the SEM and AEM. Moreover, abrasion wear resistance of the coatings was evaluated with a rubber wheel abrasion test equipment. The general microstructure of studied coatings appeared to be heterogeneous in the terms of the distribution, size and crystallographic nature of the phases. Nonetheless, very low porosities were obtained and in the coatings the oxide phase as well as the unmelted particles and the formation of oxide phase were avoided by optimization of DGS parameters. So far the abrasive wear resistance of boride-based cermet coatings is not so good as that of the WC-12Co coatings

  20. Boron-dependency of molybdenum boride electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyounmyung; Encinas, Andrew; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.; Scheifers, Jan P.; Zhang, Yuemei

    2017-01-01

    Molybdenum-based materials have been considered as alternative catalysts to noble metals, such as platinum, for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We have synthesized four binary bulk molybdenum borides Mo_2B, α-MoB, β-MoB, and MoB_2 by arc-melting. All four phases were tested for their electrocatalytic activity (linear sweep voltammetry) and stability (cyclic voltammetry) with respect to the HER in acidic conditions. Three of these phases were studied for their HER activity and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for the first time; MoB_2 and β-MoB show excellent activity in the same range as the recently reported α-MoB and β-Mo_2C phases, while the molybdenum richest phase Mo_2B show significantly lower HER activity, indicating a strong boron-dependency of these borides for the HER. In addition, MoB_2 and β-MoB show long-term cycle stability in acidic solution. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Synthesis of molybdenum borides and molybdenum silicides in molten salts and their oxidation behavior in an air-water mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.; Rebrov, E.V.; Mies, M.J.M.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of various coatings in molybdenum-boron and molybdenum-silicon systems was investigated. Boronizing and siliciding treatments were conducted in molten salts under inert gas atm. in the 850-1050 DegC temp. range for 7 h. The presence of boride (e.g. Mo2B, MoB, Mo2B5) and silicide

  2. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel: Effect of boride dispersion on strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper has documented the increase in strain to fracture and yield strength obtained with Grade A versions of types 304B5 and 304B7 relative to their respective Grade B, counterparts. The apparent microstructural reason for these property increases is the finer dispersion of boride in the Grade A material, obtained by means of a Powder Metallurgy process, relative to the conventional Grade B material which is produced using an Ingot Metallurgy process. The area size distribution of borides can be well approximated using a log-normal distribution, with the largest boride particles in the Grade B material having areas in the range of 450--600 μm 2 . By comparison, the largest boride particles in the Grade A material have areas nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the largest particles in their Grade B counterparts. A Section III ASME B ampersand PV code case inquiry has been initiated for non-welded versions of 304B4A, 3045A and 3046A ,material

  3. Wear resistance of laser-deposited boride reinforced Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloy composites for orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, Sonia; Nag, Soumya; Scharf, Thomas W.; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2008-01-01

    The inherently poor wear resistance of titanium alloys limits their application as femoral heads in femoral (hip) implants. Reinforcing the soft matrix of titanium alloys (including new generation β-Ti alloys) with hard ceramic precipitates such as borides offers the possibility of substantially enhancing the wear resistance of these composites. The present study discusses the microstructure and wear resistance of laser-deposited boride reinforced composites based on Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloys. These composites have been deposited using the LENS TM process from a blend of elemental Ti, Nb, Zr, Ta, and boron powders and consist of complex borides dispersed in a matrix of β-Ti. The wear resistance of these composites has been compared with that of Ti-6Al-4V ELI, the current material of choice for orthopedic femoral implants, against two types of counterfaces, hard Si 3 N 4 and softer SS440C stainless steel. Results suggest a substantial improvement in the wear resistance of the boride reinforced Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta alloys as compared with Ti-6Al-4V ELI against the softer counterface of SS440. The presence of an oxide layer on the surface of these alloys and composites also appears to have a substantial effect in terms of enhanced wear resistance

  4. Effect of borides on hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of powder metallurgy high borated stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, Mingjia, E-mail: mingjiawangysu@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Fu, Yifeng [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, Zixi; Li, Yanmei [Yanming Alloy Roll Co. Ltd, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang, Shunkai; Zhao, Hongchang; Li, Hangbo [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate borides effect on the hot deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of powder metallurgy high borated stainless steel, hot compression tests at the temperatures of 950– 1150 °C and the strain rates of 0.01– 10 s{sup −1} were performed. Flow stress curves indicated that borides increased the material's stress level at low temperature but the strength was sacrificed at temperatures above 1100 °C. A hyperbolic-sine equation was used to characterize the dependence of the flow stress on the deformation temperature and strain rate. The hot deformation activation energy and stress exponent were determined to be 355 kJ/mol and 3.2, respectively. The main factors leading to activation energy and stress exponent of studied steel lower than those of commercial 304 stainless steel were discussed. Processing maps at the strains of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 showed that flow instability mainly concentrated at 950– 1150 °C and strain rate higher than 0.6 s{sup −1}. Results of microstructure illustrated that dynamic recrystallization was fully completed at both high temperature-low strain rate and low temperature-high strain rate. In the instability region cracks were generated in addition to cavities. Interestingly, borides maintained a preferential orientation resulting from particle rotation during compression. - Highlights: •The decrement of activation energy was affected by boride and boron solution. •The decrease of stress exponent was influenced by composition and Cottrell atmosphere. •Boride represented a preferential orientation caused by particle rotation.

  5. High Temperature Sliding Wear of NiAl-based Coatings Reinforced by Borides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr UMANSKYI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of composite materials (CM in the systems “metal-refractory compound” is one of the up-to-date trends in design of novel materials aimed at operating under the conditions of significant loads at high temperature. To design such material, NiAl, which is widely used for deposition of protective coatings on parts of gas-turbine engines, was selected for a matrix. To strengthen a NiAl under the conditions of intense wear and a broad temperature range (up to 1000 °C, it is reasonable to add refractory inclusions. Introduction of refractory borides into matrix leads to a marked increase in metal wear resistance. In order to research the behavior of the designed composites at high temperatures and to study the influence of oxides on the friction processes, the authors carried out high temperature oxidation of CM of the above systems at 1000 °С for 90 min. It was determined that all of the composites were oxidized selectively and that the thickness of oxide layers formed on the boride inclusions is 3 – 7 times that on the oxides formed on the NiAl matrix. The mechanism of wear of gas-thermal coatings of the NiAl – МеB2 systems was studied for conditions of high temperature tribotests using the «pin-on-disc» technique. The obtained results indicate that introduction of TiB2, CrB2 and ZrB2 leads to their more intense oxidation during high temperature tribotests as compared to the matrix. The oxides formed on refractory borides act as solid lubricants, which promote a decrease in wear of the contact friction pairs. For more detailed investigation of the effect of tribo-oxidation products on the friction processes, tribotests were conducted for prior oxidized (at 900 °С coatings NiAl – 15 wt.% CrB2 (TiB2, ZrB2.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.8093

  6. Electronic Structure Properties and a Bonding Model of Thermoelectric Half-Heusler and Boride Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Jack William

    Half-Heusler alloys MNiSn and MCoSb (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) and layered boride intermetallics with structure types YCrB4 and Er 3CrB7 were designed, synthesized, and characterized. The thermoelectric properties of these two classes of alloys were measured from room temperature to 1100 K with the intent of indirectly studying their electronic structure properties and gauging not only their suitability but that of related alloys for high temperature thermoelectric power generation. In the case of the half-Heusler alloys, transition metals were substituted to both the M and Ni/Co sites to study the resultant modifications of the d-orbital-rich portion of the electronic structure near the Fermi energy. This modification and subsequent pinning of the Fermi energy within the gap is discussed herein in terms of first principles electronic structure calculations from the literature. In the half-Heusler alloys, it was found that substitution of transition metals invariably led to a decrease in the thermopower, while the resistivity typically maintained its semiconducting trend. On the other hand, Sn doping in MCoSb type alloys -- a dopant that has been known for some time to be efficient -- was shown to result in high ZT at temperatures in excess of 1000 K. Moreover, the band gaps of the transition metal-doped alloys measured in this work offer insight into the discrepancy between the predicted and measured band gaps in the undoped parent compositions. In the case of the layered boride alloys, on the other hand, few electronic calculations have been published, thus prompting the generalization of a well-known electron counting rule -- which is typically used to study molecular organometallics, boranes, and metallocenes -- to predict the trends in the densities of states of crystalline solids that possess the requisite deltahedral bonding geometry. In accordance with these generalized electronic counting rules, alloys of the form RMB4 (R = Y, Gd, Ho; M = Cr, Mo, W) were measured to

  7. Thermo-emf of cermet films based on rare earth borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islamgaliev, R.K.; Zyrin, A.V.; Shulishova, O.I.; Shcherbak, I.A

    1987-01-01

    Thermo-emf and electric conductivity of granulated films which contain a solid solution of europium and praseodymium borides Eu 0.5 Pr 0.5 B 6 as a conducting phase, and glass-crystal binder on the base of alummomagnesial fluosilicates as a dielectric phase are studied within the temperature range of 100-1100 K. Thermo-emf of films has a negative sign within the temperature range of 100-500 K and does not exceed 5 μkV/K according to the absolute value which is close to the value of the conducting phase thermo-emf. A negative sign and a small value of thermo-emf are indicative of the charge transfer in granulated films by electrons. Contribution of each of the components into the general thermo-emf is different at high temperatures in different temperature ranges and depends on the individual physico-chemical properties of the used materials

  8. New ternary transition metal borides containing uranium and rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogl, P.; Delong, L.

    1983-01-01

    The new ternary actinide metal diborides U 2 MoB 6 , U 2 ReB 6 , U 2 OsB 6 , URuB 4 and UOsB 4 were prepared and found to crystallize with either the Y 2 ReB 6 or the ThMoB 4 type of structure. LuRuB 4 and LuOsB 4 crystallize with the YCrB 4 type of structure. In a ternary series of solid solutions YRh 3 Bsub(1-x) (0 0 C), boron was found to stabilize a Cu 3 Au type of structure. The superconductivity of the new uranium compounds and of a series of ternary transition metal borides was investigated; no superconductivity was observed for temperatures as low at 1.3-1.5 K. The cubic perovskite or filled Cu 3 Au structure is discussed as a type which is very unfavorable for the occurrence of superconductivity. (Auth.)

  9. Structure-chemical and metallurgical investigations in boride- and boron nitride systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic phase equilibria in the systems (Ti, Zv, Hf)-B-N were determined in an isothermal cut at 1500 O C and 1 atm. The phase field separation is dominated by the high stability of the metal mononitrides and metal diborides. No ternery compounds were found. There are varying solubilities of B and N in the nitrides and borides. The system Cr-B-N was investigated at 1000 O C under 1 atm argon and vacuum, and at 1400 O C at 1 atm argon and 1 atm nitrogen. For the system Mn-B-N the phase field separation was determined at 900 O C under 1 atm Ar and under vacuum. The properties of hard metals with various binding phases and TiBr as hard constituents were investigated. 6 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs. (qui)

  10. Structural, electronic and thermal properties of super hard ternary boride, WAlB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpoot, Priyanka; Rastogi, Anugya; Verma, U. P.

    2018-04-01

    A first principle study of the structural, electronic and thermal properties of Tungsten Aluminum Boride (WAlB) using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) in the frame work of density function theory (DFT) have been calculated. The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in excellent agreement with available experimental results. The calculated electronic band structure reveals that WAlB is metallic in nature. The quasi-harmonic Debye model is applied to study of the temperature and pressure effect on volume, Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure. To the best of our knowledge theoretical investigation of these properties of WAlB is reported for the first time.

  11. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    the δ53Cr value of continental runoff into the ocean. The major findings were that river water is characterised by heavy δ53Cr values (+0.1‰ to +1.6‰), while soils are characterised by light δ53Cr values (-0.3‰), relative to the catchment bedrock (-0.17‰ to -0.21‰), indicating that Cr isotopes......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify......Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  12. PREFACE: The 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains invited and contributed peer-reviewed papers that were presented at the 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008), which was held on 7-12 September 2008, at Kunibiki Messe, Matsue, Japan. This triennial symposium has a half-century long history starting from the 1st meeting in 1959 at Asbury Park, New Jersey. We were very pleased to organize ISBB 2008, which gathered chemists, physicists, materials scientists as well as diamond and high-pressure researchers. This meeting had a strong background in the boron-related Japanese research history, which includes the discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 and development of Nd-Fe-B hard magnets and of YB66 soft X-ray monochromator. The scope of ISBB 2008 spans both basic and applied interdisciplinary research that is centered on boron, borides and related materials, and the collection of articles defines the state of the art in research on these materials. The topics are centered on: 1. Preparation of new materials (single crystals, thin films, nanostructures, ceramics, etc) under normal or extreme conditions. 2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding (new crystal structures, nonstoichiometry, defects, clusters, quantum-chemical calculations). 3. Physical and chemical properties (band structure, phonon spectra, superconductivity; optical, electrical, magnetic, emissive, mechanical properties; phase diagrams, thermodynamics, catalytic activity, etc) in a wide range of temperatures and pressures. 4. Applications and prospects (thermoelectric converters, composites, ceramics, coatings, etc) There were a few discoveries of new materials, such as nanomaterials, and developments in applications. Many contributions were related to 4f heavy Fermion systems of rare-earth borides. Exotic mechanisms of magnetism and Kondo effects have been discussed, which may indicate another direction of development of boride. Two special sessions

  13. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  14. Quantity, size and distribution of borides for aluminium grain refinement by neutron-induced autoradiography (NIAR). Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachlitz, R.; Gaertner, S.; Holze, J.; Krumnacker, M.

    1990-01-01

    Al-Ti-B grain refiners improve the cast structure of aluminium and its alloys, but also cause problems related to the great hardness of the borides and their tendency to agglomerate and settle. Accurate information about the distribution, quantity and size of the TiB 2 particles is needed if material properties are to be improved and the quantity of additives minimized. This information is obtained mostly by NIAR. In laboratory-scale tests Al 99.8 and Al 99.5 were refined using different master alloys added in various quantities. In all cases the commercial master alloy gave the best refining effect. Besides boride particle size distribution and the presence of nuclei and nucleus stabilizers, morphological properties (duplex particles) are obviously of essential importance. It has been demonstrated that the TiB 2 size distribution values determined by NIAR are comparable with those established by optical microscopy measurements. (orig.) [de

  15. Chromium Uptake Efficiency of Spinacea olaracea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of chromium by Spinacea olaracea and its accumulation in roots and shoots of plants grown in pots at various concentrations of chromium (30, 60, 90,120,150 mg/l). The results revealed that the levels of chromium accumulation in roots and shoots were higher at minimum ...

  16. Magnesium analysis. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Chromium determination in magnesium used in uranium fabrication by magnesiothermics, applicable for chromium content between 2 to 10 ppm. Magnesium is dissolved in sulfuric acid, oxidized by potassium permanganate, the excess of permanganate is eliminated by sodium nitride. Spectrophotometry at 540 nm of the chromium (VI)-diphenylcarbazide complex [fr

  17. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...

  18. Effects of process parameters on tungsten boride production from WO{sub 3} by self propagating high temperature synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, Sertac [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey); Derin, Bora, E-mail: bderin@itu.edu.tr [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, Istanbul 34469 (Turkey)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced tungsten boride compounds by SHS method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg containing byproducts were leached out by using a hot aqueous HCl media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ratio of W{sub 2}B{sub 5}/WB was found to be {approx}2.0 containing minor phases of W{sub 2}B and W. - Abstract: In the present study, the production parameters of tungsten boride compounds by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) method and following leaching process were investigated. In the SHS stage, the products consisting of tungsten borides, magnesium oxide, magnesium borate, and also minor compounds were obtained by using different initial molar ratios of WO{sub 3}, Mg and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} as starting materials. In the leaching step, Mg containing byproducts, i.e. MgO and Mg{sub 3}B{sub 2}O{sub 6}, existed in the selected SHS product synthesized at 1:8:2.5 initial molar ratio of WO{sub 3}:Mg:B{sub 2}O{sub 3} were leached out by using aqueous HCl solution to obtain clean tungsten boride compounds at different experimental parameters which are time, acid concentration and temperature. The acid leaching experiments of the SHS product showed that optimum leaching conditions could be achieved by using 5.8 M HCl at 1/10 S/L ratio and the temperature of 80 Degree-Sign C for 60 min.

  19. On magnetic properties of thorium and uranium borides and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chachkhiani, L.G.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Slovyanskikh, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of magnetic susceptibility on temperature of UB 4 compound and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) alloy system in the 140-1300 K temperature range is investigated. It has been found that paramagnetic susceptibility does not obeys the Curie-Weiss law. The interpretation of experimental results is performed on the basis of Stoner model of collectivized electrons which permits also to explain the magnetic properites of other thorium and uranium borides

  20. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  1. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  2. The electrochemistry of chromium, chromium-boron and chromium-phosphorus alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, T.P.; Ruf, R.R.; Latanision, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    It is fairly well established that chromium-metalloid interactions represent the key to understanding the remarkable corrosion behavior of TM-Cr-M glasses; (Fe, Ni, Co,...)-Cr-(P, Si, C, S). The character and kinetics of passive film growth on the glasses are being studied ni order to assess the role of the film former, chromium, and the metalloids in the passivation process. A series of thin film microcrystalline chromium, Cr-B and Cr-P binary alloys have been fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. Vacuum melted conventionally processed chromium has also been studied. Examination of these materials in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and lM HCl by voltammetry, potentiostatic and impedance techniques yields the following conclusion: 1. Pure chromium with a grain size varying from < 400 A to 0.5 mm exhibits no well defined differences in electrochemical behavior in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. 2. The tremendous corrosion resistance of Cr-B alloys has been confirmed. 3. The beneficial effects observed for boron alloyed with chromium may be considered surprising in view of the neutral/negative influence of alloying boron with iron, i.e. Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/. 4. The interaction of the electrochemistry of the metalloid constituent with that of the transition base element determines the corrosion behavior. 5. Preliminary work with Cr-P alloys indicates that certain compositions exhibit promising properties - certain films were found to be intact after two days of immersion in concentrated HCl. Further work is in progress

  3. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  4. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  5. Treatment of chromium contaminated soil using bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwanti, Ipung Fitri; Putri, Tesya Paramita; Kurniawan, Setyo Budi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium contamination in soil occurs due to the disposal of chromium industrial wastewater or sludge that excess the quality standard. Chromium concentration in soil is ranged between 1 to 300 mg/kg while the maximum health standard is 2.5 mg/kg. Bioremediation is one of technology that could be used for remediating heavy metal contamination in soil. Bacteria have an ability to remove heavy metal from soil. One bacteria species that capable to remove chromium from soil is Bacillus subtilis. The aim of this research was to know the chromium removal percentage in contaminated soil by Bacillus subtilis. Artificial chromium contaminated soil was used by mixing 425gram sand and chromium trichloride solution. Concentration of chromium added into the spiked soil were 50, 75, and 100 mg/L. During 14 days, pH, soil temperature and soil moisture were tested. Initial and final number of bacterial colony and chromium concentration analysed. The result showed that the highest percentage of chromium removal was 11% at a chromium concentration of 75 mg/L

  6. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wenjun; Qian Qinfang; Hou Xiaolin; Feng Weiyue; Chai Zhifang

    2000-01-01

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  7. Suppression of Boride Formation in Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Pairings of Parent Superalloy Materials with Different Compositions and Grain Structures and Resulting Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Susanne; Singer, Robert F.

    2014-07-01

    Two Ni-based superalloys, columnar grained Alloy 247 and single-crystal PWA1483, are joined by transient liquid phase bonding using an amorphous brazing foil containing boron as a melting point depressant. At lower brazing temperatures, two different morphologies of borides develop in both base materials: plate-like and globular ones. Their ratio to each other is temperature dependent. With very high brazing temperatures, the deleterious boride formation in Alloy 247 can be totally avoided, probably because the three-phase-field moves to higher alloying element contents. For the superalloy PWA1483, the formation of borides cannot be completely avoided at high brazing temperatures as incipient melting occurs. During subsequent solidification of these areas, Chinese-script-like borides precipitate. The mechanical properties (tensile tests at room and elevated temperatures and short-term creep rupture tests at elevated temperatures) for brazed samples without boride precipitation are very promising. Tensile strengths and creep times to 1 pct strain are comparable, respectively, higher than the ones of the weaker parent material for all tested temperatures and creep conditions (from 90 to 100 pct rsp. 175 to 250 pct).

  8. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1994-01-01

    According to the measurements made in this study, the only situation in which chromium (+6) could exist in a plutonium process solution is one in which a feed containing chromium is dissolved in a glass pot dissolver in high nitric acid concentration and at high temperature. But when the resulting feed is prepared for ion exchange, the chemical treatment reduces chromium to the +3 state. Any solution being processed through the evaporator will only contain chromium in the +3 state and any chromium salts remaining in the evaporator bottoms will be chromium +3 salts

  9. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  10. A superconducting battery material: Lithium gold boride (LiAu3B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sezgin; Şimşek, Mehmet

    2018-04-01

    The superconducting and potential cathode material properties of ternary boride of LiAu3B have been investigated by density functional first principles. The Li-concentration effects on the actual electronic and structural properties, namely the properties of LixAu9B3 (x = 0, 1, 2) sub-systems are studied. It is remarkably shown that the existence of Li-atoms has no considerable effect on the structural properties of Au-B skeleton in LiAu3B. Then, it can be offered as a potential cathode material for Li-ion batteries with the very small volume deviation of 0.42%, and the suitable average open circuit voltage of ∼1.30 V. Furthermore, the vibrational and superconducting properties such as electron-phonon coupling constant (λ) and critical temperature (Tc) of LiAu3B are studied. The calculated results suggest that LiAu3B should be a superconductor with Tc ∼5.8 K, also.

  11. Boride Formation Induced by pcBN Tool Wear in Friction-Stir-Welded Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Hwan C.; Sato, Yutaka S.; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Kazutaka; Hirano, Satoshi; Inagaki, Masahisa

    2009-03-01

    The wear of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (pcBN) tool and its effect on second phase formation were investigated in stainless steel friction-stir (FS) welds. The nitrogen content and the flow stress were analyzed in these welds to examine pcBN tool wear. The nitrogen content in stir zone (SZ) was found to be higher in the austenitic stainless steel FS welds than in the ferritic and duplex stainless steel welds. The flow stress of austenitic stainless steels was almost 1.5 times larger than that of ferritic and duplex stainless steels. These results suggest that the higher flow stress causes the severe tool wear in austenitic stainless steels, which results in greater nitrogen pickup in austenitic stainless steel FS welds. From the microstructural observation, a possibility was suggested that Cr-rich borides with a crystallographic structure of Cr2B and Cr5B3 formed through the reaction between the increased boron and nitrogen and the matrix during FS welding (FSW).

  12. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L.; Bondioli, F.; Cannio, M.; Ferrari, A.M.; Lancellotti, I.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr 0.04 Sn 0.97 SiO 5 and green Ca 3 Cr 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr 2 O 3 . The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr 2 O 3

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure investigation and magnetism of the complex metal-rich boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) with Th{sub 7}Fe{sub 3}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misse, Patrick R.N.; Mbarki, Mohammed [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 52066 Aachen (Germany); Fokwa, Boniface P.T., E-mail: boniface.fokwa@ac.rwth-aachen.de [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 52066 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Powder samples and single crystals of the new complex boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) have been synthesized by arc-melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere on a water-cooled copper crucible. The products, which have metallic luster, were structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction as well as EDX measurements. Within the whole solid solution range the hexagonal Th{sub 7}Fe{sub 3} structure type (space group P6{sub 3}mc, no. 186, Z=2) was identified. Single-crystal structure refinement results indicate the presence of chromium at two sites (6c and 2b) of the available three metal Wyckoff sites, with a pronounced preference for the 6c site. An unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors in the solid solution: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region. - Graphical abstract: The new complex boride series Cr{sub x}(Rh{sub 1-y}Ru{sub y}){sub 7-x}B{sub 3} (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) has been synthesized by arc melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere. Beside the 3d/4d site preference within the whole solid solution, an unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of a new boride series fulfilling Vegard Acute-Accent s rule. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3d/4d site preference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unexpected Ru/Rh site preference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rh-rich region is Pauli paramagnetic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ru-rich region is Pauli and temperature-dependent paramagnetic.

  14. Computer simulation of monolayer growth kinetics of Fe2B phase during the paste-boriding process: Influence of the paste thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keddam, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of boron paste thickness on the study of the monolayer growth kinetics of Fe 2 B phase forming on AISI 1045 steel by the paste-boriding process. A mathematical diffusion model based on the Fick's phenomenological equations was applied in order to estimate the growth rate constant at (Fe 2 B/γ-Fe) interface, the layer thickness of iron boride as well as the associated mass gain depending on the boriding parameters such as time, temperature and surface boron concentration related to the boron paste thickness. The simulation results are found to be in a fairly good agreement with the experimental data derived from the literature

  15. Effect of chromium on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuissello, N.; Novo, P.

    1976-01-01

    Chromium as K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, was tested for its toxicity, in Petri dishes, on 10 species of crop plants at 1 - 10 - 100 ppm. The total number of germinated seeds is not affected by Chromium salts up to 100 ppm, but the toxicity, measured as diminution of growth, is evident for all the tested plants, at 100 ppm, both with Cr/sup +3/ and Cr/sup +6/. Cr/sup +6/ at 1 ppm shows a negative effect on growth only for Linum usitatissimum, that could be used in phyto-test for polluted waters. Cr/sup +6/ was revealed more toxic than Cr/sup +3/ for plants, as reported for animals. 14 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  17. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  18. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  19. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lkhamsuren Bayarjargal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p; T stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments.

  20. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Alexandra; Winkler, Björn; Juarez-Arellano, Erick A.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p,T) stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments. PMID:28824101

  1. Possible multigap type-I superconductivity in the layered boride RuB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaskaran; Jayaraj, Anooja; Srivastava, D.; Gayen, S.; Thamizhavel, A.; Singh, Yogesh

    2018-02-01

    The structure of the layered transition-metal borides A B2 (A =Os,Ru ) is built up by alternating T and B layers with the B layers forming a puckered honeycomb. Here we report superconducting properties of RuB2 with a Tc≈1.5 K using measurements of the magnetic susceptibility versus temperature T , magnetization M versus magnetic field H , resistivity versus T , and heat capacity versus T at various H . We observe a reduced heat capacity anomaly at Tc given by Δ C /γ Tc≈1.1 suggesting multigap superconductivity. Strong support for this is obtained by the successful fitting of the electronic specific heat data to a two-gap model with gap values Δ1/kBTc≈1.88 and Δ2/kBTc≈1.13 . Additionally, M versus H measurements reveal a behavior consistent with type-I superconductivity. This is confirmed by comparing the experimental critical field ≈122 Oe obtained from extrapolation to T =0 of the H -T phase diagram, with an estimate of the T =0 thermodynamic critical field ≈114 Oe. Additionally, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter was estimated to be κ ≈0.1 -0.66 . These results strongly suggest multigap type-I superconductivity in RuB2. We also calculate the band structure and obtain the Fermi surface for RuB2. The Fermi surface consists of one quasi-two-dimensional sheet and two concentric ellipsoidal sheets very similar to OsB2. An additional small fourth sheet is also found for RuB2. RuB2 could thus be an example of a multigap type-I superconductor.

  2. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium +6 could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 by nitric. acid; and the reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the +6 oxidation state and would not exist in the +6 state in the final process waste solutions

  3. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  4. Calculated electronic structure of chromium surfaces and chromium monolayers on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victora, R.H.; Falicov, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the magnetic and electronic properties of the chromium (100) and (110) surfaces and of a chromium monolayer on the (100) and (110) iron surfaces is presented. It is found that (i) the (100) chromium surface is ferromagnetic with a greatly enhanced spin polarization (3.00 electrons); (ii) a substantial enhancement of the spin imbalance exists several (>5) layers into the bulk; (iii) the (110) chromium surface is antiferromagnetic with a large (2.31) spin imbalance; (iv) the (100) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is ferromagnetic, with a huge spin imbalance (3.63), and aligned antiferromagnetically with respect to the bulk iron; (v) the (110) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is also ferromagnetic, with a spin imbalance of 2.25 and antiferromagnetically aligned to the iron. The spin imbalance of chromium on iron (100) is possibly the largest of any transition-metal system

  5. Roentgenoelectronic investigation into oxidation of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, A.G.; Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Kazanskij, L.P.; Machavariani, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloy oxidation (of the Kh13 and Kh18N10T steels) in oxygen was investigated using X-ray electron spectroscopy. It was found that according to X-ray electron spectra chromium oxidation kinetics in the iron-chromium alloy differs significantly from oxidation kinetics of chromium pattern. Layer by layer X-ray electron analysis showed that chromium is subjected to a deeper oxidation as compared to iron, and accordingly, Cr 2 O 3 layer with pure iron impregnations is placed between the layer of mixed oxide (Fe 3 O 4 +Cr 2 O 3 ) and metal. A model of the iron-chromium alloy surface is suggested. The mixed oxide composition on the steel surface is presented as spinel Fesub(2+x)Crsub(1-x)Osub(y)

  6. Microstructural evaluation of a low carbon steel submitted to boriding treatment pre and post GTAW welding; Avaliacao microestrutural de um aco de baixo carbono submetido ao tratamento de boretacao pre e pos-soldagem GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollnow, Edilson Nunes; Osorio, Alice Goncalves, E-mail: edilson.pollnow@hotmail.com, E-mail: osorio.alice@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (CDTec/UFPel), Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico; Araujo, Douglas Bezerra de, E-mail: dbaraujo@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (FEMEC/UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Passos, Thais Andrezza dos; Souza, Daniel, E-mail: thais.andrezza.passos@gmail.com, E-mail: danielsouza@furg.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (EE/FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-04-15

    Studies on surface engineering area are given great importance due to the improvement that surface modifications provide to materials. With a global market that has the need to provide parts and equipment with extended service life and low cost, to support stringent requests and thus maintain its high performance, surface treatments may bring what was impossible into reality. Among the surface treatments that have received attention recently, we have the thermochemical process of boriding. The boriding process consists of saturate the surface of steels and metal alloys with boron. This saturation provides an increase in the surface properties not inherent to the base metal, such as hardness, resistance to abrasion and corrosion. Although the properties of boriding steels have already been studied, the effects that the boriding process perform on the steel during or after the welding processes are not known. Hence, it is the purpose of this study to evaluate the microstructure of a low carbon steel treated with boriding before and after GTAW welding. The results indicated poor metallurgical weldability of low carbon steel with boride layer, with the presence of solidification cracks. Nonetheless, the steel welded previous to boring treatment presented a more ductile nucleus, with harder surface. Although the values of hardness within the nucleus of the steel had dropped drastically at the welded zone after the boring, the surface of this steel showed higher values of hardness due to the boriding layer. This fact should be considered when applications where wear resistance is needed. (author)

  7. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial ... number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel and zinc. The ion ... through filter paper to determine the concentration ... liquid and solid phases were separated by.

  8. Chromium tolerance and reduction potential of Staphylococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the microbiology of chromium tolerance and reduction at a fly ash dumping site in South Africa, 15 core samples were investigated. It was shown that the 30 year old dumping site exhibited high concentrations of Cr (VI) ranging from 1.6 to 9.6 mg/g. From this contaminated fly ash dumping site, 67 chromium ...

  9. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    be used again to adsorb heavy metal ions. ... Among these heavy metals are chromium, copper and ... poisoning can result from high exposure to hexavalent chromium [2]. Most of the ..... At low pH, the sorbent is positively charged because of.

  10. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  11. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined

  12. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10...... chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive...

  13. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, E.

    1994-01-01

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  14. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  15. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  16. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  17. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of a former, positively fractionated and mobile chromium pool has been experimentally constrained in circumneutral and basic leachates of powdered tonalite bedrock where δ53Cr of + 0.21 to + 0.48‰ was measured. Our results show that mobilization of chromium is effective under highly oxidative conditions...

  18. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Reaction of Oxygen with Chromium and Chromium Carbide at Low O2 Pressures and High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Dong O.; Kang, Sung G.; Paik, Young N.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation rate of chromium carbide has been measured continuously using thermogravimetric analysis at different oxygen pressures ranging from 1.33x10 -2 to 2.67x10 -1 Pa O 2 at 1000-1300 .deg. C. The oxidation of pure chromium has also been studied between 1000-1300 .deg. C under 6.67x10 -2 Pa O 2 and compared with that of chromium carbide. The oxidation of chromium carbide showed a linear behavior which was different from that of chromium. The oxidation rate of chromium carbide increased with increasing temperature and oxygen pressure was lower than of pure chromium. Above 1200 .deg. C, the volatile oxide was formed and evaporated causing a weight loss. The compositions and morphology of the oxide were studied with X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. The morphology of oxide changed with varying temperature and pressure. The oxide scale was consisted of mainly two different layers of Cr 2 O 3 and CrO, and the properties of oxide scale were correlated with oxidation behavior. The oxide film formed in the above test condition has been detached from the carbide surface. The crack and pore were thought to be from CO gas evolving at the interface of chromium carbide and its oxide and the major factor of the linear behavior of chromium carbide

  20. Sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide was investigated in dependence on pH, time of sorption, and on the concnetrations of sorbate and sorbent. The mechanisms of the sorption of Crsup(3+) and CrOsub(4)sup(2-) traces on lead sulfide are discussed; a difference between CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption on PbS and α-Fesub(2)Osub(3) was found. Sulfates and molybdates affect the removal of chromates from aqueous solutions. Lead sulfide carrier prepared in this work was also used for the preconcentration of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from tap water. (author)

  1. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in marine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, M J [WRc, Henley Road, Medmenham, Marlow SL7 2HD (United Kingdom); Ravenscroft, J E [WRc, Henley Road, Medmenham, Marlow SL7 2HD (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The development of an analytical technique is described which may be used to determine chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in estuarine and coastal waters. The method is based on selective micro-solvent extraction with subsequent GFAAS. The technique has been applied in a major North Sea estuary. The results obtained confirm that thermodynamic factors alone cannot be relied upon to describe the form of chromium in estuaries. Kinetic factors appear to have a strong influence over speciation and lead to the persistence of Cr(III) species in environments where Cr(VI) would be expected to be present. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium in system Ti-B-Si-C, synthesis and phases composition of borides and carbides layers on titanic alloyVT-1 at electron beam treatment in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Lapina, A. E.; Dasheev, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VT-1 are generated at diffused saturation in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  3. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods and bare electrodes - approved 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    This specification covers corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods for use with the atomic hydrogen and gas-tungsten-arc welding processes and bare electrodes for use with the submerged arc and gas metal-arc welding processes. These welding rods and electrodes include those alloy steels designated as corrosion- or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4% and nickel does not exceed 50%

  4. Tunable field emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires coated with varied thickness of lanthanum boride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, C.X.; Li, Y.F.; Chen, Jun; Deng, S.Z.; Xu, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Lanthanum boride (LaB x ) thin films with various thicknesses were deposited on ZnO nanowire arrays by electron beam evaporation. Field emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires show close dependence on LaB x coating thickness. The turn-on field increases with increasing LaB x coating thickness from 10 nm to 50 nm. The observed phenomena were explained by a model that the tunneling at ZnO/LaB x interface dominates the emission process. - Highlights: ► Coating thickness dependence of field emission characteristics of ZnO nanowires was observed from LaB x coated ZnO nanowires. ► More stable field emission was observed from ZnO nanowires with LaB x coating. ► A model was proposed that the tunneling at ZnO/LaB x interface dominates the emission process

  5. The low-lying quartet electronic states of group 14 diatomic borides XB (X = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Marcelo A. P.; de Oliveira, Marcos H.; Fernandes, Gabriel F. S.; Da Motta Neto, Joaquim D.; Ferrão, Luiz F. A.; Machado, Francisco B. C.

    2018-04-01

    The present work focuses in the characterization of the low-lying quartet electronic and spin-orbit states of diatomic borides XB, in which X is an element of group 14 (C, Si, Ge, Sn, PB). The wavefunction was obtained at the CASSCF/MRCI level with a quintuple-ζ quality basis set. Scalar relativistic effects were also taken into account. A systematic and comparative analysis of the spectroscopic properties for the title molecular series was carried out, showing that the (1)4Π→X4Σ- transition band is expected to be measurable by emission spectroscopy to the GeB, SnB and PbB molecules, as already observed for the lighter CB and SiB species.

  6. Auxiliary Electrodes for Chromium Vapor Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Jeffrey; Shahzad, Moaiz; Britt, Tommy

    2018-05-15

    Measurement of chromia-containing vapors in solid oxide fuel cell systems is useful for monitoring and addressing cell degradation caused by oxidation of the chomia scale formed on alloys for interconnects and balance-of-plant components. One approach to measuring chromium is to use a solid electrolyte with an auxiliary electrode that relates the partial pressure of the chromium containing species to the mobile species in the electrolyte. One example is YCrO3 which can equilibrate with the chromium containing vapor and yttrium in yttria stabilized zirconia to establish an oxygen activity. Another is Na2CrO4 which can equilibrate with the chromium-containing vapor to establish a sodium activity.

  7. Acute and chronic systemic chromium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, S C

    1989-10-01

    Although chromium and compounds containing it have been recognized as having potential severe adverse effects on health for more than 160 years, understanding of the systemic toxicology and true hazard of these compounds is still not complete. A review of the current state of knowledge is attempted in this paper, with appropriate attention given to the complications of multiple valence states and solubility. Selected chromium compounds, particularly hexavalent ones, are carcinogens, corrosives, delayed contact sensitizers, and have the kidney as their primary target organ. But chromium is also an essential element for humans. The body clearly possesses some effective detoxification mechanisms for some degree of exposure to hexavalent chrome compounds. The significant features of acute and chronic chromium toxicity are presented in view of these considerations.

  8. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allows employees to consume food or beverages at a worksite where chromium (VI) is present, the employer... effect on productivity. 2. Plating Bath Surface Tension Management and Fume Suppression • Lower surface...

  9. Ductile-brittle transition of thoriated chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. A.; Veigel, N. D.; Clauer, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Unalloyed chromium and chromium containing approximately 3 wt % ThO2 were prepared from powder produced by a chemical vapor deposition process. When rolled to sheet and tested in tension, it was found that the thoriated material had a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) than unalloyed chromium. This ductilizing was evident both in the as-rolled condition and after the materials had been annealed for 1 hour at 1200 C. The improved ductility in thoriated chromium may be associated with several possible mechanisms: (1) particles may disperse slip, such that critical stress or strain concentrations for crack nucleation are more difficult to achieve; (2) particles may act as dislocation sources, thus providing mobile dislocations in this normally source-poor material, in a manner similar to prestraining; and (3) particles in grain boundaries may help to transmit slip across the boundaries, thus relieving stress concentrations and inhibiting crack nucleation.

  10. Uptake and transport of chromium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.; D'souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of chromium, an important soil and water pollutant, by five different plant species was examined in nutrient culture experiments using chromium-51 as a tracer. The concentration in aerial tissues of both trivalent and hexavalent forms of chromium was the greatest in peas followed by beans, tomato and the cereals over identical uptake periods. The uptake of 51 Cr 3+ was, in general, greater than 51 CrO 4 2- . Studies with bean plants indicated that shoot uptake of both forms of chromium decreased with increasing pH and salt concentration of the external solution. Concentrations of 10 -4 M and 10 -5 M DNP inhibited 51 Cr uptake by bean shoots. (author)

  11. Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Takeyoshi; Yoshii, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Kohzo

    2007-01-01

    Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility

  12. Electrochemistry of chromium(0)-aminocarbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskovcova, Irena; Rohacova, Jana; Meca, Ludek; Tobrman, Tomas; Dvorak, Dalimil; Ludvik, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    Two series of chromium(0)-(aryl)aminocarbene complexes substituted on the ligand phenyl ring were prepared and electrochemically investigated: pentacarbonyl((N,N-dimethylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (Ia-e) and chelated tetracarbonyl((η 2 -N-allyl-N-allylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (IIa, c-e). For comparison, a tungsten analogue of IIc (III) and a chromium chelate bearing a methyl substituent instead of the phenyl group IV were taken into the study. The intramolecular interactions of p-substituents on the ligand phenyl ring with the reduction and oxidation centres of the molecule of complex (followed electrochemically using LFER [P. Zuman, Substituent Effects in Organic Polarography, Plenum Press, New York, 1967]) enabled to localize the corresponding electron transfer. The influence of the type of coordination, the substituent on the ligand phenyl ring and the central metal atom on oxidation and reduction potentials is discussed

  13. Synthesis, characterization and investigation of thermoelectric properties of selected metal borides; Synthese, Charakterisierung und Untersuchung thermoelektrischer Eigenschaften ausgewaehlter Metallboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stober, Frederick

    2012-06-04

    The present work deals with the high-temperature thermoelectric properties of transition metal [eg V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu] and lanthanide [e.g. Sc, Y, Gd, Er, Dy]-borides. In particular, intercalation compounds of beta-rhombohedral boron, compounds of the type MB{sub 66}, dodecaborides and hexaborides were examined. In the case of intercalation compounds of beta-rhombohedral boron it was found that the incorporation of metals such as Sc, Mn or Cu result in favorable thermoelectric properties. The reason is most likely the preferred occupation of the metal position M2 instead of M4. Composites, for example, DyB{sub 66}-DyB{sub 12} show high electrical conductivities, high Seebeck effects at high temperatures due to the presence of DyB{sub 12} and low thermal conductivities as a result of the DyB{sub 66} matrix. At 1100K the composite DyB{sub 66}-DyB{sub 12} shows a ZT value of 0.55, thus exceeding the ZT of boron carbide (B{sub 13}C{sub 2}) at this temperature which is considered the best p-type boride material. A composite of ErB{sub 12}-ErB{sub 4}-ErB{sub 2} has negative Seebeck coefficients and shows a ZT value of 0.5 at 840K. Furthermore, the structure of tetragonal Scandiumdodecaboride ScB{sub 12} was solved on the basis of synchrotron data from a crystalline powder, after it has been debated for decades but never fully resolved.

  14. Co3O4 nanoneedle@electroactive nickel boride membrane core/shell arrays: A novel hybrid for enhanced capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tingting; Zhu, Congxu; Yang, Xiaogang; Gao, Yuanhao; He, Weiwei; Yue, Hongwei; Zhao, Hongxiao

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Active nickel boride membrane anchored Co 3 O 4 nanoneedle arrays hybrid is synthesized via rapid interface reaction. The optimized core/shell nanostructure demonstrates greatly enhanced electrochemical properties. Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Active nickel boride membrane anchored Co 3 O 4 nanoneedle arrays core-shell hybrid architectures was fabricated via rapid interface reaction. •Specific capacity was improved by synergy between highly active components and optimized electron transfer microstructure. •The assembled asymmetric supercapacitor device exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. -- Abstract: Exploring novel hybrid materials with efficient microstructure using facile approaches is highly urgent in designing supercapacitor electrodes. Here, the Ni-B membrane was used for coating the porous Co 3 O 4 nanoneedle arrays which supported on the nickel foam (NF) frameworks through a rapid chemical reduction process (denoted as NF/Co 3 O 4 @NiB). The Ni-B membrane both provided sufficient active sites for redox reactions and inhibited the aggregation of formed hybrid architectures. Benefiting from the unique structural design and strongly coupled effects between porous Co 3 O 4 arrays and Ni-B membrane, the resulted NF/Co 3 O 4 @NiB electrode exhibited high areal capacitance of 3.47 F cm −2 (0.48 mAh cm −2 ) at a current density of 2.5 mA cm −2 , an excellent rate capability while maintaining 95.5% capacity retention after 2000 cycles. The asymmetric supercapacitor constructed with the NF/Co 3 O 4 @NiB as positive electrode and hierarchical porous carbon (HPC) as negative electrode also showed ideal capacitive behavior, and simultaneously delivered high energy and power densities. The easily decoration of Ni-B membrane on various active nanoarrays may arouse more novel design about hybrid architectures for large-scale applications.

  15. Synthesis, crystal structure investigation and magnetism of the complex metal-rich boride series Crx(Rh1-yRuy)7-xB3 (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) with Th7Fe3-type structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misse, Patrick R. N.; Mbarki, Mohammed; Fokwa, Boniface P. T.

    2012-08-01

    Powder samples and single crystals of the new complex boride series Crx(Rh1-yRuy)7-xB3 (x=0.88-1; y=0-1) have been synthesized by arc-melting the elements under purified argon atmosphere on a water-cooled copper crucible. The products, which have metallic luster, were structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction as well as EDX measurements. Within the whole solid solution range the hexagonal Th7Fe3 structure type (space group P63mc, no. 186, Z=2) was identified. Single-crystal structure refinement results indicate the presence of chromium at two sites (6c and 2b) of the available three metal Wyckoff sites, with a pronounced preference for the 6c site. An unexpected Rh/Ru site preference was found in the Ru-rich region only, leading to two different magnetic behaviors in the solid solution: The Rh-rich region shows a temperature-independent (Pauli) paramagnetism whereas an additional temperature-dependent paramagnetic component is found in the Ru-rich region.

  16. Hexavalent Chromium reduction by Trichoderma inhamatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is a useful and attractive process for remediation of ecosystems and industrial effluents contaminated with Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(II) can be achieved by both chemical and biological methods; however, the biological reduction is more convenient than the chemical one since costs are lower, and sludge is generated in smaller amounts. (Author)

  17. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  18. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  19. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  20. Separation of valent forms of chromium (3) and chromium (6) by coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Soption 9.62x10 -5 mol/l of 51 Cr radioactive isotope in oxidation states 3 and 6 by iron(3) hydroxide in 1 mol/l of KNO 3 and KCl depending on pH medium is investigated. The region of practically total concentration of Cr(3) and Cr(6 + ) (pH=3-6.5) is determined. The results of spectrophotometric investigations, calculational data on distribution of hydroxocation forms of chromium (3) and of chromium (6) anions and sorption by iron (3) hydroxide permit to characterize sorption of chromium forms in different stages of oxidation. The methods of chromium (3) and chromium (6) separation by coprecipitation of iron (3) hydroxide and their precipitation from it is developed on the above foundation

  1. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure is mitigated by reduction in the gut, however a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  2. Chromium getter studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the effects of the deposition of thin films (approx.0.1 μm) of chromium onto approx.70% of the torus area of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The purpose of these experiments was to test the difference between high surface coverage and high pumping speed gettering schemes with respect to minimizing oxygen impurity generation in high power tokamak discharges. The initial Cr deposition had significant effects on vessel outgassing and subsequent plasma performance: the outgassing of H 2 O, CO, and CO 2 decreased by a factor of ten, oxygen impurity radiation decreased by a factor of two, the plasma Z/sub eff/ decreased from 1.3 to 1.1, and the plasma density limit increased by 20%. This improvement correlates with a significant reduction of the edge radiation as the density limit is approached. The effects of the initial and subsequent Cr depositions were relatively long lasting, exhibiting time constants of the order of weeks. We attribute the observed impurity reduction to a modification of the oxide surface on the vessel wall, which is apparently a significant impurity source for oxygen. 17 refs., 6 figs

  3. Chromium-induced skin damage among Taiwanese cement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Po-Chih; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Shiann-Cherng

    2016-10-01

    Little research has been done on the relationships between chromium exposure, skin barrier function, and other hygienic habits in cement workers. Our purpose was to investigate chromium-induced skin barrier disruption due to cement exposure among cement workers. One hundred and eight cement workers were recruited in this study. Urinary chromium concentration was used to characterize exposure levels. The biological exposure index was used to separate high and low chromium exposure. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used to assess the skin barrier function. TEWL was significantly increased in workers with high chromium exposure levels than those with low chromium exposure levels (p = 0.048). A positive correlation was also found between urinary chromium concentration and TEWL (R = 0.28, p = 0.004). After adjusting for smoking status and glove use, a significant correlation between urinary chromium concentrations and TEWL remained. Moreover, workers who smoked and had a high chromium exposure had significantly increased TEWL compared to nonsmokers with low chromium exposure (p = 0.01). Skin barrier function of cement workers may have been disrupted by chromium in cement, and smoking might significantly enhance such skin barrier perturbation with chromium exposure. Decreased chromium skin exposure and smoking cessation should be encouraged at work. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Reduction of hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y C; Paik, N W

    2000-01-01

    Chromium exists at various valences, including elemental, trivalent, and hexavalent chromium, and undergoes reduction-oxidation reactions in the environment. Since hexavalent chromium is known as a human carcinogen, it is most important to evaluate the oxidation-reduction characteristics of the hexavalent chromium species. Although hexavalent chromium can be reduced to trivalent state, the detailed information on this in workplace environments is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate hexavalent chromium reduction in time in various conditions. A pilot chrome plating operation was prepared and operated in a laboratory for this study. There was evidence that the hexavalent chromium was reduced by time after mist generation. The percentage ratio (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of hexavalent chromium to total chromium was almost 100% (99.1 approximately 102.3) immediately after mist generation, and was reduced to 87.4% (84.8 approximately 89.9) at 1 hour and 81.0% (78.3 approximately 83.5) at 2 hours, respectively. Another test indicated that hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters was also reduced by time after sampling. Hexavalent chromium was reduced to 90.8% (88.2 approximately 93.3) at 2 hours after sampling. It also was found that hexavalent chromium was reduced during storage in air. It is recommended that air samples of hexavalent chromium be protected against reduction during storage.

  5. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  7. Studies of ion implanted thermally oxidised chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of 99.99% pure chromium containing precise amounts of foreign elements has been studied and compared to the oxidation of pure chromium. Thirty-three foreign elements including all of the naturally occurring rare earth metals were ion implanted into chromium samples prior to oxidation at 750 0 C in oxygen. The role of radiation induced damage, inherent in this doping technique, has been studied by chromium implantations at various energies and doses. The repair of the damage has been studied by vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 800 0 C prior to oxidation. Many of the implants caused an inhibition of oxidation, the greatest being a 93% reduction for 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 of praseodymium. The distribution of the implant was investigated by the use of 2 MeV alpha backscattering and ion microprobe analysis. Differences in the topography and structure of the chromic oxide on and off the implanted area were studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate if a rare earth-chromium compound of a perovskite-type structure had been formed. Lastly, the electrical conductivity of chromic oxide on and off the implanted region was examined at low voltages. (author)

  8. Effect of chromium toxicity on germination and early seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... germination and early seedling growth of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Chromium ... chromium on seed germination and seedling growth- biomass in early ..... such critical regulatory mechanisms are likely to operate in seeds at ...

  9. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  10. Chromium: a review of environmental and occupational toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencko, V

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are covered in this brief review on the environmental and occupational toxicology of chromium: occurrence, production and uses of chromium and chromium compounds; experimental toxicology; chromium toxicity for man; hygienic and ecologic aspects of chromium contamination of the environment. The review provides a conclusive evidence which suggests that chromium, especially its hexavalent form, is both toxic and carcinogenic, but its trivalent form is physiologically essential in the metabolism of insulin. It is also emphasized that among the major sources of environmental chromium today are the cement industry and the increasingly widespread use of chromium compounds added as an anticorrosion admixture to a variety of cooling systems, e.g. in large power plants, which may greatly contribute to the overall pollution of outdoor air at the sites.

  11. Chromium: a review of environmental and occupational toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencko, V

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are covered in this brief review on the environmental and occupational toxicology of chromium: occurrence, production and uses of chromium and chromium compounds; experimental toxicology; chromium toxicity for man; hygienic and ecologic aspects of chromium contamination of the environment. The review provides a conclusive evidence which suggests that chromium, especially its hexavalent form, is both toxic and carcinogenic, but its trivalent form is physiologically essential in the metabolism of insulin. It is also emphasized that among the major sources of environmental chromium today are the cement industry and the increasingly widespread use of chromium compounds added as an anticorrosion admixture to a variety of cooling systems, e.g. in large power plants, which may greatly contribute to the overall pollution of outdoor air at the sites. 108 references.

  12. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  13. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents .... Chromium (Cleseari and Green, 1995) included the oxidation of .... like uranium in its cells might also match with its tendency.

  14. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, D.P.S.; Tarafder, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the determination of chromium is presented, based on the oxidation of hydroxylamine hydrochloride to nitrous acid by chromium(VI) in acetic acid medium followed by diazotization of the nitrite produced with p-aminophenylmercaptoacetic acid and subsequent coupling of the diazonium salt with N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine di-hydrochloride in acidic medium to form a stable blueish azo dye. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium(VI) from 0.04 to 1.2 mg l -1 in a 1.0-cm cuvette. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity are 3.65x10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.0014μg cm -2 , respectively. (author). 17 refs.; 3 figs

  15. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  16. Chromium Stable Isotope Fractionation - An Indicator of Hexavalent Chromium Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T. M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in surface water and ground water, and is also of interest in oceanography. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions thus control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is the most important reaction controlling attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our results show that Cr(VI) reduction favors the lighter isotopes and leads to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the remaining Cr(VI). Cr isotope measurements thus show great promise as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction. We report here the first measurements of the magnitude of Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction and variations in δ 53Cr values obtained from three contaminated sites. Experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by suspensions of magnetite and unamended sediments from a local pond, Urbana, IL and San Francisco Estuary near Martinez, CA. Suspensions were incubated anaerobically with constant shaking, and complete Cr(VI) reduction occurred within a few days. Cr(VI) from intermediate time points in the experiments was purified via ion exchange and 53Cr/52Cr ratios were measured via TIMS with a double isotope spike. The instantaneous per mil fractionation, ɛ , was calculated assuming a Rayleigh fractionation model. The ɛ for Cr(VI) reduction on magnetite surfaces yielded a fractionation of -3.5 ‰ . The ɛ values for the pond and estuary sediments were -3.5 ‰ and -3.3 ‰ respectively. The size of this Cr isotope fractionation is encouraging, as current precision is 0.2 \\permil. δ 53Cr values in dissolved Cr(VI) from three contaminated sites range from 1.1 ‰ to 5.8 ‰ , suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred and has induced isotopic fractionation in these settings. δ 53Cr values measured from Cr(VI) in plating baths show little or no

  17. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.J.; Qian, Q.F.; Hou, X.L.; Feng, W.Y.; Chai, Z.F.

    2000-01-01

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  18. Recovery of Proteins and Chromium Complexes from Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gutti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW constitutes an environmental pollution problem to leather industries disposing the waste by landfill. The waste mainly consists of collagen and chromium III complexes. This work is a design of reactors to recover gelatin, polypeptides and chromium from CCLW. The results of the experiment shows that 68% of protein, based on dry weight of leather scraps, could be recovered. Three reactors with a total volume of 18 m3 was designed to handle 10,431 kg of waste generated from the tanning industries.

  19. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan. SUMMARY... order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  20. Native Chromium Resistant Staphylococci Species from a Fly Ash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-six chromium-resistant Staphylococci species belonging to S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus and S. arlettae were previously isolated from a chromium-polluted Fly ash (FA) dumping site in South Africa. However the genetic mechanisms responsible for chromium resistance were not known. Polymerase chain ...

  1. Quantitative determination of chromium in some vegetables in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium has been known to be a micronutrient for mammals for more than four decades. Deficiency in the body results to diabetes, infertility and cardiovascular diseases. However, progress in elucidating the role of chromium has proceeded slowly. Recent studies have shown a potential role of chromium in maintaining ...

  2. Assessment of the level of chromium species in the discharged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of chromium species in the discharged effluents of selected tanneries in the Amhara Region; Haik and Debre Berhan tanneries. The level of total chromium, and hexavalent chromium in the discharged effluent of the studied tanneries were determined using the ICP-OES, and ...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.2327 Section 73.2327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens shall conform in identify and specifications to the...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive...

  5. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No. 1308-38-9...

  6. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  8. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  9. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  11. Radiation stability of chromium low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation effect on the behaviour of mechanical properties and structure of chromium low alloys such as VKh-2K, KhP-3, VKhM in the wide range of temperatures and neutron fluences is studied. Radiation stability of the alloys is shown to be limited by low-temperature radiation embrittlement (LTRE), caused by radiation hardening as a result of formation of radiation-induced defects such as dislocation loops and vacancy voids in the structure. The methods for prevention LTRE of chromium alloys are suggested. 8 refs.; 8 figs

  12. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  13. Effect of carbon and silicon on nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyakkinen, V.I.; Bezobrazov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The study is aimed at specifying the role of carbon and silicon in high-chromium melts nitridation processes. It is shown that in high-chromium melts of the Cr-Fe-C system the nitrogen solubility is reduced with the growth of carbon content and in the chromium concentration range of 70-100% at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa it is described by the lg[%N] Cr-Fe-C =lg[%N] cr-fe -0.098[%C] equation. While decreasing the temperature the nitrogen solubility in alloys is increased. Silicon essentially decreases the nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium. For the 0-10% silicon concentration range the relation between the equilibrium content of nitrogen and silicon at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa is described by the straight line equation [%N] Cr-Si =6.1-0.338 [%Si

  14. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  15. Chromium Tolerance and Bioremoval by Cyanobacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cyanobacterial species Nostoc calcicola HH-12 and Chroococcus minutus HH-11 isolated from a textile mill oxidation pond were examined individually and as consortium for their chromium(VI) tolerance and bioremoval from aqueous solutions. Both species were tolerant to the metal and showed significant increase ...

  16. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial pH, solution temperature, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations on the adsorption efficiency was investigated using batch equilibrium assays. From the results obtained for the adsorption ...

  17. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  18. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest w...

  19. Chromium fractionation and speciation in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catarinie Diniz; Techy, João Gabriel; Ganzarolli, Edgard Moreira; Quináia, Sueli Pércio

    2012-05-01

    It is common for leather industries to dump chromium-contaminated effluent into rivers and other bodies of water. Thus, it is crucial to know the impacts caused by this practice to the environment. A study on chromium partitioning and speciation, with determination at trace levels, was carried out in a potentially contaminated creek. Chromium fractionation and speciation was performed using a flow-injection preconcentration system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. High levels of this element were found in the particulate material (449-9320 mg kg(-1)), which indicates its compatibility with this fraction. The concentration of Cr(iii) in the water samples collected ranged from 5.2-105.2 μg L(-1). Cr(vi) was always below of the DL (0.3 μg L(-1)). Chromium accumulation observed in the sediment (873-1691 mg kg(-1)) may confirm contamination due to the long term release of contaminated effluents in the creek.

  20. Chromium removal from aqueous media by superparamagnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Introduction. Industrial wastewater often contains substantial amount ... sion, it is imperative that industries reduce chromium in their effluents to this ..... in standard Gibb's free energy ( Go), enthalpy ( Ho), ... ideal gas constant and T is temperature. Table 3 dis ... sequence of increase in access to functional groups afforded ...

  1. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, T.; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U.

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  2. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, T. E-mail: marek@para.chem.elte.hu; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U

    2000-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  3. Effects of chromium on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2002-09-06

    Chromium is a naturally occurring heavy metal found commonly in the environment in trivalent, Cr(III), and hexavalent, Cr(VI), forms. Cr(VI) compounds have been declared as a potent occupational carcinogen among workers in chrome plating, stainless steel, and pigment industries. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) results in the formation of reactive intermediates that together with oxidative stress oxidative tissue damage and a cascade of cellular events including modulation of apoptosis regulatory gene p53, contribute to the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Cr(VI)-containing compounds. On the other hand, chromium is an essential nutrient required to promote the action of insulin in body tissues so that the body can use sugars, proteins and fats. Chromium is of significant importance in altering the immune response by immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive processes as shown by its effects on T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, cytokine production and the immune response that may induce hypersensitivity reactions. This review gives an overview of the effects of chromium on the immune system of the body. Copyright 2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies

  4. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  5. Stabilization of chromium: an alternative to make safe leathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ying; Liu, Xiaoling; Huang, Li; Chen, Wuyong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the original causes for hexavalent chromium presence in the leather were first evaluated by ageing of chromium(III) solutions and chrome tanned hide powder (50 degrees C, UV lightening at 340 nm, 0-36 h). The results showed that the trivalent chromium at instable coordination state was easy to convert into hexavalent chromium in high pH environment, and the probability of the oxidation increased in this order: multi-coordinate chromium, mono-coordinate chromium, and free chromium. For this reason, the process for stabilizing chromium in the leather was designed with the specific material, which was mostly consisted of the reducers and the chelating agents. After treated with the developed process, these leathers were aged (50 degrees C, UV irradiance as 0.68 W/m(2) at 340 nm, 0-72 h) to estimate chromium(VI) presence. Hexavalent chromium was not found in these treated leathers even if the leathers were aged for 72 h. Moreover, the physical and mechanical properties for the leathers varied little after treating. In a word, an inherent safe and effective process was proved to avoid the formation of hexavalent chromium in the leather. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of low-chromium, chromium-tungsten steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    High-chromium (9-12% Cr) Cr-Mo and Cr-W ferritic steels are favored as candidates for fusion applications. In early work to develop reduced-activation steels, an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C steel (designated 2.25Cr-2WV) had better strength than an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel (compositions are in weight percent). However, the 2.25Cr-2WV had poor impact properties, as determined by the ductile-brittle transition temperature and upper-shelf energy of subsize Charpy impact specimens. Because low-chromium steels have some advantages over high-chromium steels, a program to develop low-chromium steels is in progress. Microstructural analysis indicated that the reason for the inferior impact toughness of the 2.25Cr-2WV was the granular bainite obtained when the steel was normalized. Properties can be improved by developing an acicular bainite microstructure by increasing the cooling rate after austenitization. Alternatively, acicular bainite can be promoted by increasing the hardenability. Hardenability was changed by adding small amounts of boron and additional chromium to the 2.25Cr-2WV composition. A combination of B, Cr, and Ta additions resulted in low-chromium reduced-activation steels with mechanical properties comparable to those of 9Cr-2WVTa. (orig.)

  7. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado Gamez, A.; Blanco Saenz, R.; Mora Morales, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author) [es

  8. Mechanical-thermal synthesis of chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Favilla, Eliane Aparecida Peixoto; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the synthesis of chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 ), starting from metallic chromium (obtained from the reduction of Cr 2 O 3 with Al) and carbon (graphite). The synthesis was carried out via high energy milling, followed by heat-treating of pellets made of different milled mixtures at 800 o C, for 2 h, under an atmosphere of argon. A SPEX CertPrep 8000 Mixer/Mill was used for milling under argon atmosphere. A tool steel vat and two 12.7 mm diameter chromium steel balls were used. The raw materials used and the products were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, electronic microscopy and X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis. The following variables were investigated: the quantity of carbon in the mixture, the milling time and the milling power. Mechanical activation of the reactant mixture depends upon the milling power ratio used for processing. The energy liberated by the reduction of the chromium oxide with aluminium exhibits a maximum for milling power ratio between 5:1 and 7.5:1. Self-propagating reaction occurred for all heat-treated samples whatever the carbon content of the sample and the milling power ratio used. Bearing carbon samples exhibited hollow shell structures after the reaction. The level of iron contamination of the milled samples was kept below 0.3% Fe. The self-propagated reaction caused high temperatures inside the samples as it may be seen by the occurrence of spherules, dendrites and whiskers. The carbon content determines the type of chromium carbide formed

  9. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.

  10. A novel route to nanosized molybdenum boride and carbide and/or metallic molybdenum by thermo-synthesis method from MoO3, KBH4, and CCl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuanzhi; Fan Yining; Chen Yi

    2003-01-01

    Nanosized molybdenum boride and carbide were synthesized from MoO 3 , KBH 4 , and CCl 4 by thermo-synthesis method at lower temperature. The relative content of Mo, Mo 2 C, and molybdenum boride in the product was decided by the molar ratio between MoO 3 , KBH 4 , and CCl 4 . Increasing the molar ratio of CCl 4 to MoO 3 was favorable to the production of Mo 2 C. Increasing the molar ratio of KBH 4 to MoO 3 was favorable to the production of molybdenum boride. By carefully adjusting the reaction conditions and annealing in Ar at 900 deg. C, a single phase of MoB could be obtained

  11. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  12. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel: Effect of boride dispersion on strength and ductility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional cast and wrought (open-quotes Ingot Metallurgyclose quotes) borated 304 stainless steel has been used for a number of years in spent fuel storage applications where a combination of structural integrity and neutron criticality control are required. Similar requirements apply for materials used in transport cask baskets. However, in the high boron contents (>1.0 wt. %) which are most useful for criticality control, the conventional cast and wrought material suffers from low ductility as well as low impact toughness. The microstructural reason for these poor properties is the relatively coarse size of the boride particles in these alloys, which act as sites for crack initiation. Recently, a open-quotes premiumclose quotes grade of borated 304 stainless steel has been introduced (Strober and Smith, 1988) which is made by a Powder Metallurgy (PM) process. This material has greatly improved ductility and impact properties relative to the conventional cast and wrought product. In addition, an ASTM specification (ATSM A887) has been developed for borated stainless steel, containing 8 different material Types with respect to boron content - with the highest level (Type B7) having permissible range from 1.75 to 2.25 wt. % boron - and each Type contains two different Grades of material based on tensile and impact properties. While the ASTM specification is properties-based and does not require a specific production process for a particular grade of material, the PM material qualifies as open-quotes Grade Aclose quotes material while the conventional Ingot Metallurgy (IM) material generally qualifies as open-quotes Grade Bclose quotes material. This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of PM open-quotes Grade Aclose quotes material with that of the conventional IM open-quotes Grade Bclose quotes material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7

  13. The effect of lanthanum boride on the sintering, sintered microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium and titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.F.; Luo, S.D.; Qian, M.

    2014-01-01

    An addition of ≤0.5 wt% lanthanum boride (LaB 6 ) to powder metallurgy commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti), Ti–6Al–4V and Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al (all in wt%) resulted in improved sintered density, substantial microstructural refinement, and noticeably increased tensile elongation. The addition of LaB 6 led to scavenging of both oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) from the titanium powder during sintering, evidenced by the formation of La 2 O 3 and LaCl x O y . The pinning effect of La 2 O 3 , LaCl x O y and TiB inhibited prior-β grain growth and resulted in subsequent smaller α-laths. The formation of nearly equiaxed α-Ti phase is partially attributed to the nucleation effect of α-Ti on TiB. The improved sintered density was caused by B from LaB 6 rather than La, while excessive formation of La 2 O 3 and TiB with an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB 6 resulted in a noticeable decrease in sintered density. The improved tensile elongation with an addition of ≤0.5 wt% LaB 6 was mainly attributed to the scavenging of oxygen by LaB 6 , partially assisted by the improved sintered density. However, an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB 6 led to the formation of large La 2 O 3 aggregates and more brittle TiB whiskers and therefore decreased tensile elongation. Balanced scavenging of O is thus important. The optimal addition of LaB 6 was 0.5 wt% but this may change depending on the powder size of the LaB 6 to be used

  14. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  16. Citric-acid preacidification enhanced electrokinetic remediation for removal of chromium from chromium-residue-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fansheng; Xue, Hao; Wang, Yeyao; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Juling

    2018-02-01

    Electrokinetic experiments were conducted on chromium-residue-contaminated soils collected from a chemical plant in China. Acidification-electrokinetic remediation technology was proposed in order to solve the problem of removing inefficient with ordinary electrokinetic. The results showed that electrokinetic remediation removal efficiency of chromium from chromium-contaminated soil was significantly enhanced with acidizing pretreatment. The total chromium [Cr(T)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal rate of the group acidized by citric acid (0.9 mol/L) for 5 days was increased from 6.23% and 19.01% in the acid-free experiments to 26.97% and 77.66% in the acidification-treated experiments, respectively. In addition, part of chromium with the state of carbonate-combined will be converted into water-soluble state through acidification to improve the removal efficiency. Within the appropriate concentration range, the higher concentration of acid was, the more chromium was released. So the removal efficiency of chromium depended on the acid concentration. The citric acid is also a kind of complexing agent, which produced complexation with Cr that was released by the electrokinetic treatment and then enhanced the removal efficiency. The major speciation of chromium that was removed from soils by acidification-electrokinetics remediation was acid-soluble speciation, revivification speciation and oxidation speciation, which reduced biological availability of chromium.

  17. Quaternized wood as sorbent for hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, K S; Lee, C K; Lee, C Y

    2001-01-01

    The potential of quaternized wood (QW) chips in removing hexavalent chromium from synthetic solution and chrome waste under both batch and continuous-flow conditions was investigated. Sorption was found to be dependent on pH, metal concentration, and temperature. QW chips provide higher sorption capacity and wider pH range compared with untreated wood chips. The equilibrium data could be fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model, and maximum sorption capacities were calculated to be 27.03 and 25.77 mg/g in synthetic chromate solution and chrome waste, respectively. The presence of sulfate in high concentration appeared to suppress the uptake of chromium by QW chips. Column studies showed that bed depth influenced the breakthrough time greatly whereas flow rate of influent had little effect on its sorption on the column.

  18. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    reduction data and the specific growth rate constant value was calculated as 0.082 and the ... Key words: Hexavalent chromium, Rhizopus Oryzae, leather tanning, Monod and Haldane models. ... composition; Glucose 1 g; K2HPO4 0.5 g; NaCl 0.5 g; MgCl2 1.0 g; ... ficantly, because of the inhibitor role of high concentration.

  19. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  20. Determination of chromium in biological matrices by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClendon, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    Chromium is recognized to be an essential trace element in several biological systems. It exists in many biological materials in a variety of chemical forms and very low concentration levels which cause problems for many analytical techniques. Both instrumental and destructive neutron activation analysis were used to determine the chromium concentration in Orchard Leaves, SRM 1571, Brewers Yeast, SRM 1569, and Bovine Liver, SRM 1577. Some of the problems inherent with determining chromium in certain biological matrices and the data obtained here at the National Bureau of Standards using this technique are discussed. The results obtained from dissolution of brewers yeast in a closed system as described in the DNAA procedure are in good agreement with the INAA results. The same phenomenon existed in the determination of chromium in bovine liver. The radiochemical procedure described for chromium (DNAA) provides the analyst with a simple, rapid and selective technique for chromium determination in a variety of matrices. (T.G.)

  1. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on the substrate of steel by pack cementation process for two hours at the temperature of 850ºC, 950ºC and 1050ºC, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that chromium was successfully deposited at all temperatures. Somehow, SEM cross sectional image showed that continuous layer of chromium was not continuously formed at 850oC. Therefore, this research clarify that chromium enrichment by pack cementation may be conducted at the temperature above 950°C.

  2. Cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt coatings processed by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giren, B.G.; Szkodo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt clads were tested, each of them for three cases: (1) without additional processing; (2) after laser heating of the solid state and (3) after laser remelting of the material. Armco iron, carbon steel 45 and chromium-nickel steel 0H18N9T were used as substrates. C.W. CO 2 laser with a beam power of 1000 W was used as a source of radiation. The investigated samples were subjected to cavitation impingement in a rotating disk facility. The results indicate that laser processing of the thick, electrode deposited coatings by laser beam leads in some cases to an increase of their cavitation resistance. Strong dependence of the coatings performance on the substrate, both for the laser processed or unprocessed parts of the materials was also discovered. (author)

  3. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi F. A.; Kurniawan T.; Salwani M. S.; Bin Y. S.; Harun W. S. W.

    2016-01-01

    The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on...

  4. Environmental exposure to arsenic and chromium in an industrial area

    OpenAIRE

    Vimercati, Luigi; Gatti, Maria F; Gagliardi, Tommaso; Cuccaro, Francesco; De Maria, Luigi; Caputi, Antonio; Quarato, Marco; Baldassarre, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic and chromium are widespread environmental contaminants that affect global health due to their toxicity and carcinogenicity. To date, few studies have investigated exposure to arsenic and chromium in a population residing in a high-risk environmental area. The aim of this study is to evaluate the exposure to arsenic and chromium in the general population with no occupational exposure to these metals, resident in the industrial area of Taranto, Southern Italy, through biological monitor...

  5. Determination of tracer quantities of chromium in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huart, A.

    1959-01-01

    A method is described for the photometric determination of chromium in uranium by absorbency at 540 mμ of the Cr(VI) diphenylcarbazide combination. After attack by nitric acid, the solution is made perchloric, and the chromium oxidised at the boiling point by permanganate. Excess oxidant is removed by hydrochloric acid. Study of operating conditions resulted in a method with an accuracy of ± 0,5 ppm for 0,5 to 15 ppm chromium in the metal. (author) [fr

  6. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zand, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  7. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  8. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Hales, R.

    1977-01-01

    During selective chromium oxidation of stainless steels the changes in chromium concentration at the metal surface and in the metal have an important bearing on the overall oxidation performance. It has been proposed that an analogue of chromium behaviour during selective oxidation is obtained from volatilisation of chromium during high temperature vacuum annealing. In the present report the evaporation of chromium from 316 type of steel, vacuum annealed at 1,000 0 C, has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels is rate controlled by interdiffusion in the alloy. As predicted the chromium concentration at the metal surface decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in good agreement with the previously derived model apart from an anomalous region near the surface. Here the higher resolution of the neutron activation technique indicated a zone within approximately 2μm of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (orig.) [de

  9. Laboratory Automatic Titration of Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric acids...

  10. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments

  11. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  12. The effect of lanthanum boride on the sintering, sintered microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium and titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y.F. [RMIT University, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); Luo, S.D. [The University of Queensland, School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Qian, M., E-mail: ma.qian@rmit.edu.au [RMIT University, Centre for Additive Manufacturing, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2014-11-17

    An addition of ≤0.5 wt% lanthanum boride (LaB{sub 6}) to powder metallurgy commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti), Ti–6Al–4V and Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al (all in wt%) resulted in improved sintered density, substantial microstructural refinement, and noticeably increased tensile elongation. The addition of LaB{sub 6} led to scavenging of both oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) from the titanium powder during sintering, evidenced by the formation of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and LaCl{sub x}O{sub y}. The pinning effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, LaCl{sub x}O{sub y} and TiB inhibited prior-β grain growth and resulted in subsequent smaller α-laths. The formation of nearly equiaxed α-Ti phase is partially attributed to the nucleation effect of α-Ti on TiB. The improved sintered density was caused by B from LaB{sub 6} rather than La, while excessive formation of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiB with an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB{sub 6} resulted in a noticeable decrease in sintered density. The improved tensile elongation with an addition of ≤0.5 wt% LaB{sub 6} was mainly attributed to the scavenging of oxygen by LaB{sub 6}, partially assisted by the improved sintered density. However, an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB{sub 6} led to the formation of large La{sub 2}O{sub 3} aggregates and more brittle TiB whiskers and therefore decreased tensile elongation. Balanced scavenging of O is thus important. The optimal addition of LaB{sub 6} was 0.5 wt% but this may change depending on the powder size of the LaB{sub 6} to be used.

  13. Ultra low nanowear in novel chromium/amorphous chromium carbide nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yate, Luis; Martínez-de-Olcoz, Leyre; Esteve, Joan; Lousa, Arturo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we report the first observation of novel nanocomposite thin films consisting of nanocrystalline chromium embedded in an amorphous chromium carbide matrix (nc-Cr/a-CrC) with relatively high hardness (∼22,3 GPa) and ultra low nanowear. The films were deposited onto silicon substrates using a magnetic filtered cathodic arc deposition system at various negative bias voltages, from 50 to 450 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggested the co-existence of chromium and chromium carbide phases, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the presence of the nc-Cr/a-CrC structure. The friction coefficient measured with the ball-on disk technique and the nanowear results showed a strong correlation between the macro and nano-tribological properties of the samples. These novel nanocomposite films show promising properties as solid lubricant and wear resistant coatings with relatively high hardness, low friction coefficient and ultra low nanowear.

  14. COST EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AIR EMISSIONS FROM FUNCTIONAL CHROMIUM ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper will summrize thie pollution prevention (p2) method to control stack emissions from hard chromium plating operations performed by the USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) over the last four years. During literature research and user surveys, it...

  15. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-01-01

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  16. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  17. Dephosphorization of melts with chromium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of the results of laboratory and pilot plant research into the dephosphorization of high-chromium melts reported in the literature, mostly Japanese. The use of high-alloy chromium and chromium-nickel steels in nuclear power engineering showed the negative impact of phosphorus on stress corrosion at high temperatures and on the development of cracks under overlays during welding. For a number of years attention is therefore being devoted to the attainment of a low phosphorus content in these steels. Current dephosphorization methods may be divided into oxidation and reduction methods. Oxidation dephosphorization may be carried out using synthetic mixtures: in the use of CaO-FeCl 2 , BaO-BaCl 2 -Cr 2 O 3 , Li 2 CO 3 -CaO-CaF 2 -FeO and Na 2 CO 3 /K 2 CO 3 -NaCl/KCl/KF/CaCl 2 /FeCl 2 a high initial C content, low content of Cr and Si and a low temperature of the melt are advantageous for dephosphorization. Experiments have also been made with dephosphorization in a bottom-blown oxygen converter and in an AOD converter. The most frequently used substances for reduction dephosphorization are calcium and calcium carbide; the best C content ranges between 0.5 and 1.8%, a high Cr content and a high bath temperature are also advantageous. The use of the reduction procedure is greatly limited by the generation of highly toxic phosphine. Another tested method - electroslag remelting is not suitable for commercial application for its economic exactingness. (A.K.)

  18. Ultracold chromium: a dipolar quantum gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfau, T.; Stuhler, J.; Griesmaier, A.; Fattori, M.; Koch, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our recent achievement of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a gas of chromium atoms. Peculiar electronic and magnetic properties of chromium require the implementation of novel cooling strategies. We observe up to ∼ 10 5 condensed 52 Cr atoms after forced evaporation within a crossed optical dipole trap. Due to its large magnetic moment (6μ B ), the dipole-dipole interaction strength in chromium is comparable with the one of the van der Waals interaction. We prove the anisotropic nature of the dipolar interaction by releasing the condensate from a cigar shaped trap and observe, in time of flight measurements, the change of the aspect-ratio for different in-trap orientations of the atomic dipoles. We also report on the recent observation of 14 Feshbach resonances in elastic collisions between polarized ultra-cold 52 Cr atoms. This is the first Ballistic expansion of a dipolar quantum gas: The anisotropic interaction leads to a different expansion dynamics for the case of the magnetic dipoles aligned with the symmetry axis of the cigar shaped trap as compared with the dipoles oriented perpendicular to the axis of the cigar. The straight lines correspond to the theoretical expectation according to mean field theory without free parameters. observation of collisional Feshbach resonances in an atomic species with more than one valence electron. Moreover, such resonances constitute an important tool towards the realization of a purely dipolar interacting gas because they can be used to change strength and sign of the van der Waals interaction. (author)

  19. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the ... time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited .... Lead (II) and nickel (II) adsorption kinetics .... heavy metal by Talaromyces helicus: a trained fungus for copper and.

  20. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents. In the present work the chromium remediation ability of Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in consortia and in their immobilized forms was studied and their efficiencies were compared.

  1. The commensurate spin excitation in chromium: A polarised neutron investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Stirling, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A polarised neutron experiment with neutron energy analysis has been performed with a single-Q sample of chromium in a large magnetic field. The 4-meV ''commensurate'' mode is found to involve spin fluctuations parallel to the ordered chromium moments. 8 refs., 3 figs

  2. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five-year... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  3. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  4. Biosorption of chromium by mangrove-derived Aplanochytrium sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbial dried biomass of Thraustochytrids is used as bioadsorbent for the removal of the chromium in aqueous solution. In this investigation, three species of Thraustochydrids namely Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium sp. and Schizochytrium sp. were tested for the efficiency of chromium accumulation by culturing ...

  5. Optimization of chromium biosorption in aqueous solution by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of a chromium biosorption process was performed by varying three independent variables pH (0.5 to 3.5), initial chromium ion concentration (10 to 30 mg/L), and Yarrowia lipolytica dosage (2 to 4 g/L) using a Doehlert experimental design (DD) involving response surface methodology (RSM). For the maximum ...

  6. Serum chromium concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly refined diet that contains too few micronutrients has been recognized as the dominant factor in the rising incidence of diabetes and other insulin related conditions. Among the missing micronutrients, chromium has the greatest impact on insulin response. The objective of this study was to determine serum chromium ...

  7. Increased chromium uptake in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from burned patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Illner, H.; Dineen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Following thermal injury neutrophil function is severely impaired and thought to be hypometabolic; however, the host is considered to be hypermetabolic. To further investigate the metabolism and the function of neutrophils following thermal injury, neutrophil migration and chromium uptake were studied using radio-labelled neutrophils. Random and directed migration were found to be significantly reduced compared to control values. Neutrophil lysozyme content was also reduced in these burn cells while serum lysozyme from the same patients was significantly elevated over control values. These data suggest lysozyme is released by the neutrophil into the circulatory system. The influx of chromium in cells from burned patients was much greater than the influx in normal cells used in studies for chemotaxis. Influx of chromium over time and over varying concentrations of chromium was linear in cells from burned patients and normals. Cells from burned patients, however, took up more chromium than normals. Influx velocity of chromium was also determined and found to be greater in burn cells than normal cells. Since it has been shown that chromium influx is an energy-dependent reaction it is suggested that cellular energy stores are being depleted by the influx of chromium. Whether this is a response to an intracellular deficit or uncoupling of metabolic pathways is not known at this time

  8. The removal of chromium from wastewaters by activated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, A.; Chegrouche, S.; Ait Ghezala, H.; Douar, L.

    1994-12-01

    The adsorption of chromium onto activated bentonite has been investigated. Adsorption isotherms were analysed to obtain the Langmuir and freundlich constants. The operating parameters (i.e pH, contact time, solid/liquid ratio, temperatureand initial chromium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption have been studied

  9. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  10. Advances In Hexavalent Chromium Removal At Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshem, D.O.; Riddelle, J.

    2012-01-01

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  11. New Evidence against Chromium as an Essential Trace Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, John B

    2017-12-01

    Nearly 60 y ago, chromium, as the trivalent ion, was proposed to be an essential element, but the results of new studies indicate that chromium currently can only be considered pharmacologically active and not an essential element. Regardless, articles still continue to appear in the literature claiming chromium is an essential element. Chromium has been marketed as an agent to reduce body mass and develop muscle; however, such marketing claims are no longer allowed in the United States because these claims, similar to claims of essential status, are not supported by experiments. Trivalent chromium has also been proposed as a therapeutic agent to increase insulin sensitivity and affect lipid metabolism. Although effective in certain rodent models, beneficial effects in humans have not been unequivocally established. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the beneficial effects but have not been definitively shown to occur in animals. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Effects of UV light and chromium ions on wood flavonoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnárné Hamvas, L.; Németh, K.; Stipta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The individual and simultaneous effect of UV light and chromium ions was investigated by spectrophotometric methods on inert surfaces impregnated with quercetin or robinetin. The UV-VIS spectra of the silica gel plates impregnated with these flavonoids were modified characteristically after irradiating ultraviolet light. Even a half an hour of irradiation has caused irreversible changes in the molecule structure. A certain chemical - presumably complexation - was concluded from the change of spectral bands assigned to flavonoids when impregnated with chromic ions. Hexavalent chromium caused more complex changes in the absorption spectra. The differences in the spectra could indicate either the oxidation and decomposition of flavonoids, or some kind of coordination process and the reduction of hexavalent chromium. The simultaneous application of UV light and chromium ions caused more pronounced effects. The complexation process between chromium(III) and flavonoid was completed

  13. Review of occupational epidemiology of chromium chemicals and respiratory cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R B

    1988-06-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have investigated the association between cancer risk and employment in chromium producing and using industries. Strong and consistent associations have been found between employment in the primary chemical producing industry and the risk for respiratory cancer. Workers employed in chromate pigment production and possibly spray painters of chromate pigment paints appear to be at excess risk of respiratory cancer. Chrome platers may also be at excess risk, although the evidence is limited. A few studies indicate that chromium alloy welding may also be an exposure source of concern. Some studies of ferrochromium alloy workers have shown an excess risk for respiratory cancer, although the risk may in part be due to concomitant exposures. The evidence indicates that the hexavalent form of chromium is the primary agent of chromium carcinogenesis. Solubility and other characteristics of chromium compounds may also play a role in determining risk.

  14. CHROMIUM BIOACCUMULATION FROM COMPOSTS AND VERMICOMPOSTS BASED ON TANNERY SLUDGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof GONDEK

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Storage of waste substances is not indifferent to ecological equilibrium in the environment therefore should not be the ultimate way to limit waste arduousness. Therefore, the conducted investigations aimed to determine the effect of tannery composts and vermicomposts loaded with chromium on this element bioaccumulation in earthworm bodies and biomass of selected plants. Chromium in composts and vermicomposts based on tannery sludges occurred in small quantities and easily soluble compounds. Chromium concentrations in redworm biomass points to this metal accumulation in Eisenia fetida body tissues. This element content in redworm biomass was signifi cantly positively correlated with its content in composts. Chromium content in plants was diversifi ed and on treatments was generally smaller than on mineral treatment or farmyard manure. Chromium absorbed by plants was stored mainly in the root systems, and over the norm content of this element found in vermicomposts did not cause its excessive accumulation in plant biomass.

  15. New ternary tantalum borides containing boron dumbbells: Experimental and theoretical studies of Ta2OsB2 and TaRuB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbarki, Mohammed; Touzani, Rachid St.; Rehorn, Christian W.G.; Gladisch, Fabian C.; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2016-01-01

    The new ternary transition metal-rich borides Ta 2 OsB 2 and TaRuB have been successfully synthesized by arc-melting the elements in a water-cooled crucible under an argon atmosphere. The crystal structures of both compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and their metal compositions were confirmed by EDX analysis. It was found that Ta 2 OsB 2 and TaRuB crystallize in the tetragonal Nb 2 OsB 2 (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) and the orthorhombic NbRuB (space group Pmma, no. 51) structure types with lattice parameters a=5.878(2) Å, c=6.857(2) Å and a=10.806(2) Å, b=3.196(1) Å, c=6.312(2) Å, respectively. Furthermore, crystallographic, electronic and bonding characteristics have been studied by density functional theory (DFT). Electronic structure relaxation has confirmed the crystallographic parameters while COHP bonding analysis indicates that B 2 -dummbells are the strongest bonds in both compounds. Moreover, the formation of osmium dumbbells in Ta 2 OsB 2 through a Peierls distortion along the c-axis, is found to be the origin of superstructure formation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that the two phases are Pauli paramagnets, thus confirming the theoretical DOS prediction of metallic character. Also hints of superconductivity are found in the two phases, however lack of single phase samples has prevented confirmation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic stability of the two modifications of AMB (A=Nb, Ta; M =Ru, Os) are studied using DFT, as new possible phases containing either B 4 - or B 2 -units are predicted, the former being the most thermodynamically stable modification. - Graphical abstract: The two new ternary tantalum borides, Ta 2 OsB 2 and TaRuB, have been discovered. Their crystal structures contain boron dumbbells, which are the strongest bonds. Peirls distortion is found responsible for Os 2 -dumbbells formation in Ta 2 OsB 2 . Ta 2 OsB 2 and TaRuB are Pauli paramagnet and potential superconductors. - Highlights:

  16. Phosphate solubilization and chromium (VI) remediation potential of Klebsiella sp. strain CPSB4 isolated from the chromium contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin; Usmani, Zeba; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an effort was made to identify an efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial strain from chromium contaminated agricultural soils. Based on the formation of a solubilized halo around the colonies on Pikovskaya's agar amended with chromium (VI), 10 strains were initially screened out. Out of 10, strain CPSB4, which showed significantly high solubilization zone at different chromium concentrations, was selected for further study. The strain CPSB4 showed significant plant growth promotion traits with chromium (VI) stress under in-vitro conditions in broth. The plant growth promotion activities of the strain decreased regularly, but were not completely lost with the increase in concentration of chromium up to 200 mg L -1 . On subjected to FT-IR analysis, the presence of the functional group, indicating the organic acid aiding in phosphate solubilization was identified. At an optimal temperature of 30  ° C and pH 7.0, the strain showed around 93% chromium (VI) reduction under in-vitro conditions in broth study. In soil condition, the maximum chromium (VI) reduction obtained was 95% under in-vitro conditions. The strain CPSB4 was identified as Klebsiella sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This study shows that the diverse role of the bacterial strain CPSB4 would be useful in the chromium contaminated soil as a good bioremediation and plant growth promoting agent as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of chromium in treated crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, by electrothermal ASS: study of chromium accumulation in different tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, F.; Diaz, J.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.

    1986-06-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of chromium in muscle, hepatopancreas, antennal glands, and gills of Procambarus clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following Cr(VI)-exposure. Determinations of chromium were made by using Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and the standard additions method.

  18. Chromium removal from tanning industries effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, M.A.; Ahmad, S.

    1997-01-01

    Air and water are the basic needs of human being and other living entities on the earth. Tanning industry uses water and some chemicals and so creates environmental problems, depending basically on two principal sources, hide and water. The processes of tanning are based on chromium sulphate and vegetable treatment of hide. According to the national environmental quality standards (NEQS) the effluent or disposed water should contain phenol less than 0.5 ppm, Cr, sulphates, chloride and other salts content. About 30-40 liters of water are used to process one Kg of raw hide into finished goods. Total installed capacity of hides and skins chrome tanning is 53.5 million square meter, earning a large amount of foreign exchange for our country. In the present work, seven tanning industries effluents from the suburbs of Multan city have been collected and analysed. The pH of the liquors have been found to vary from 2.72 to 4.4 and the constituent Cr have been found to be from zero to 8000 ppm from vegetable to chrome tanning industrial effluents studied. The stages involved in tanning and treatment of the effluent water waste including chemical treatment of Cr has been described with a special reference to supported liquid membranes process for removal of chromium ions. (author)

  19. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. High-strength chromium--molybdenum rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Y.E.; Sawhill, J.M. Jr.; Cias, W.W.; Eldis, G.T.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with the aim of developing an as-rolled rail of over 100 ksi (689 N/mm 2 ) yield strength. A series of compositions providing both pearlitic and bainitic microstructures was evaluated. A fine pearlitic structure was developed in a 0.73 percent C -- 0.83 percent Mn -- 0.16 percent Si -- 0.75 percent Cr -- 0.21 percent Mo steel by simulating the mill cooling rate of 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Two 100-ton commercial heats were made of this approximate composition and processed into 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Samples tested in the laboratory ranged from 109 to 125 ksi (750 to 860 N/mm 2 ) in yield strength. The chromium-molybdenum rails also exhibited excellent fracture toughness and fatigue properties. Sections of the rail were joined by both flash-butt welding and thermite welding. The hardness peaks produced in the flash-butt welds could be reduced by applying either a postweld current or an induction heating cycle. The high-strength chromium-molybdenum rails have been in service for over eight months in curved sections of an ore railway that carries over 55 million gross long tons per year. 7 tables, 18 figs

  1. Agroindustrial Waste for Lead and Chromium Biosorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana P. Boeykens

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to re-evaluate the residues generated in industrial processes for the production of new raw material, reducing the volume of waste. In this regard, the biosorption is a low-cost alternative method for treating effluents compared to conventional methods. The main objectives of this research were: the evaluation of the biosorbent capacity of six waste materials for the extraction of chromium(VI and lead(II ions from aqueous solutions and, the determination of the adsorption and kinetic parameters for the more efficient system. The materials evaluated were: peanut shell (Arachis hypagaea, sugarcane bagasse (Saccharum officinarum, avocado peel (Persea americana, pecan nutshell (Carya illinoinensis, wheat bran (Triticum aestivum and banana peel (Mussa paradisiaca. The highest percentage of lead removal was obtained with wheat bran (89%. For chromium, the percentage was generally much lower compared with lead for all tested biosorbents, the banana peel being the most efficient with a 10% removal. The models that better describe the adsorption processes were: Langmuir and Freundlich. The pseudo-second order kinetic model allowed obtaining the parameters for both systems. The equilibrium time, in both systems, was reached after 60 minutes. The study of Fourier Transformed Infrared spectra and the results of desorption experiments allowed to hypothesize on the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of these metals.

  2. 76 FR 71926 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium Policy to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... 0750-AH39 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Applicability of Hexavalent Chromium... the use of materials containing hexavalent chromium. DATES: Comment Date: Comments on the proposed... human health and environmental risks related to the use of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium is a...

  3. 40 CFR 424.70 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic chromium subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrolytic chromium subcategory. 424.70 Section 424.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Electrolytic Chromium Subcategory § 424.70 Applicability; description of the electrolytic chromium subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from the manufacture of chromium...

  4. Electrochemical modification of chromium surfaces using 4-nitro- and4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinge, Mogens; Cecatto, Marcel; Kingshott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer......Chromium surfaces can be electrografted with organic surface films using 4-nitro- or 4-fluorobenzenediazonium salts, despite the fact that the surfaces are covered with a protective chromium oxide layer...

  5. 77 FR 6627 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... aluminum to provide resistance to corrosion. The chromium anodizing process is used to coat aircraft parts... Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel Pickling-HCl Process Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel Pickling-HCl Process Facilities...

  6. The coloring problem in the solid-state metal boride carbide ScB{sub 2}C{sub 2}. A theoretical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassoued, Souheila [Universite de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, UMR 6226 CNRS (France). Inst. des Sciences Chimiques; Universite Kasdi Merbah-Ouargla (Algeria). Faculte des Mathematiques et des Sciences de la Matiere; Boucher, Benoit [Universite de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, UMR 6226 CNRS (France). Inst. des Sciences Chimiques; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik Fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Boutarfaia, Ahmed [Universite Kasdi Merbah-Ouargla (Algeria). Faculte des Mathematiques et des Sciences de la Matiere; Gautier, Regis; Halet, Jean-Francois [Universite de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie, UMR 6226 CNRS (France). Inst. des Sciences Chimiques

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of the layered ternary metal boride carbide ScB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, the structure of which consists of B/C layers made of fused five- and seven-membered rings alternating with scandium sheets, are analyzed. In particular, the respective positions of the B and C atoms (the so-called coloring problem) are tackled using density functional theory, quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and electron localizability indicator calculations. Results reveal that (i) the most stable coloring minimizes the number of B-B and C-C contacts and maximizes the number of boron atoms in the heptagons, (ii) the compound is metallic in character, and (iii) rather important covalent bonding occurs between the metallic sheets and the boron-carbon network.

  7. Workshop on effects of chromium coating on Nb3Sn superconductor strand: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Chromium coating on superconductor strand -- an overview; technology of chromium plating; comparison of wires plated by different platers; search for chromium in copper; strand manufactures' presentations; chromium plating at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; a first look at a chromium plating process development project tailored for T.P.X. and I.T.E.R. strand; and influence of chromium diffusion and related phenomena on the reference ratios of bare and chromium plated Nb 3 Sn strand

  8. Chromium fate in constructed wetlands treating tannery wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotro, Gabriela; Palazolo, Paul; Larsen, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Nine experimental wetlands were built to determine chromium partitioning inside systems treating tannery wastewaters. Results showed 5-day biochemical oxygen demand and chromium removals of 95 to 99% and 90 to 99%, respectively. The majority of chromium was found in association with media (96 to 98%), followed by effluents (2.9 to 3.9%), and the least was found in plant parts (0.1%). Chemical speciation modeling of solutions and scanning electron microscope analysis suggest two potential chromium removal mechanisms--sorption/coprecipitation with iron hydroxides or oxyhydroxides and biomass sorption. The release of the majority of chromium in the iron- and organic-bound phases during sequential extractions supports the proposed dominant removal mechanisms. The use of a mixture of peat and gravel resulted in lower removal efficiencies and stronger partitioning in organic phases during sequential extractions. Chromium was efficiently removed by wetlands, retained through chemical and biological processes. Future research will focus on further exploring removal mechanisms and proposing management strategies for the chromium-containing wetland media.

  9. Lipid peroxidation in workers exposed to hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y L; Chen, C Y; Sheu, J Y; Chuang, I C; Pan, J H; Lin, T H

    1999-02-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to hexavalent chromium induces lipid peroxidation in human. This study involved 25 chrome-plating factory workers and a reference group of 28 control subjects. The whole-blood and urinary chromium concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Malondialdehyde (MDA), the product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the activities of protective enzymes were measured by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. In the chrome-plating workers, the mean concentrations of chromium in blood and urine were 5.98 microg/L and 5.25 microg/g creatinine, respectively; the mean concentrations of MDA in blood and urine were 1.7 micromol/L and 2.24 micromol/g creatinine. The concentrations of both chromium and MDA in blood and urine were significantly higher in the chromium-exposed workers. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT) were not markedly different between control and exposed workers. Data suggest that MDA may be used as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure. Antioxidant enzymic activities are not a suitable marker for chromium exposure.

  10. Bioavailability of a potato chromium complex to the laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    Research objectives were to study the effect of food source, preparation method and chemical form on bioavailability of chromium. Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined and tubers labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate. A labeled chromium complexes was isolated from preparations of raw, baked or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Availability of the potato chromium complex to the rat was examined in three feeding studies. Animals were dosed with radioactive extrinsically or intrinsically labeled potato extract or with chromate. A labeled chromium complex was isolated from gastrointestinal contents of rats and chromatographed. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg Cr/g tissue respectively. True and apparent absorption from extrinsically labeled feedings were 33.4 +/- 4.7 and 29.8 +/- 11.2% respectively, and no differences existed between absorption from raw and cooked potatoes. Absorption from the extrinsic labeled potatoes differed significantly from absorption of inorganic chromatium. Apparent absorption of raw (11.1 +/- 7.9%) and cooked (-0.7 +/- 2.8%) intrinsically labeled feedings differed significantly. Absorption of inorganic chromium was 17.8% (true) and 11.5% (apparent). Examination of the chromium complex isolated from gastrointestinal tract contents showed enlargement of the complex in the stomach after consumption

  11. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Kinetics of chromium (VI) reduction by ferrous iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I.; Wang, R.

    1998-09-01

    Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions

  13. Mode of occurrence of chromium in four US coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Crowley, S.; Palmer, C.A.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The mode of occurrence of chromium in three US bituminous coals and one US subbituminous has been examined using both X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a selective leaching protocol supplemented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron microprobe measurements. A synthesis of results from both methods indicates that chromium occurs principally in two forms in the bituminous coals: the major occurrence of chromium is associated with the macerals and is not readily leached by any reagent, whereas a second, lesser occurrence, which is leachable in hydrofluoric acid (HF), is associated with the clay mineral, illite. The former occurrence is believed to be a small particle oxyhydroxide phase (CrO(OH)). One coal also contained a small fraction (<5%) of the chromium in the form of a chromian magnetite, and the leaching protocol indicated the possibility of a similar small fraction of chromium in sulfide form in all three coals. There was little agreement between the two techniques on the mode of occurrence of chromium in the subbituminous coal; however, only a limited number of subbituminous coals have been analyzed by either technique. The chromium in all four coals was trivalent as no evidence was found for the Cr6+ oxidation state in any coal.

  14. Substoichiometric determination of chromium by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, K.; Shigematsu, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1977-01-01

    A method of radioactivation analysis has been developed for the determination of chromium. It is based on the substoichiometric extraction of chromium diethyldithiocarbamate into methyl-isobutyl-ketone from acetate buffer solution in the presence of EDTA and potassium cyanide. A solution of NaDDC was prepared by dissolving an appropriate amount of GR grade salt in bidistelled water. The concentration of NaDDC was determined by substoichiometric isotope dilution method using 64 Cu or sup(114m)In tracer of known specific activity. The extraction of chromium is not influenced by the presence of EDTA or potassium cyanide while the extraction of chromium is inhibited in tartrate or citrate solution. All metal ions examined are extracted by NaDDC together with chromium and become to interfere for the substoichiometric extraction of chromium. This can be avoided, however, by the addition of EDTA except for copper and silver. The method has been applied for the determination of chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate and NBS glasses as standard reference materials. (T.G.)

  15. Chromium-induced membrane damage: protective role of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S K; Nayak, P; Roy, S

    2001-07-01

    Importance of chromium as environmental toxicant is largely due to impact on the body to produce cellular toxicity. The impact of chromium and their supplementation with ascorbic acid was studied on plasma membrane of liver and kidney in male Wistar rats (80-100 g body weight). It has been observed that the intoxication with chromium (i.p.) at the dose of 0.8 mg/100 g body weight per day for a period of 28 days causes significant increase in the level of cholesterol and decrease in the level of phospholipid of both liver and kidney. The alkaline phosphatase, total ATPase and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activities were significantly decreased in both liver and kidney after chromium treatment, except total ATPase activity of kidney. It is suggested that chromium exposure at the present dose and duration induce for the alterations of structure and function of both liver and kidney plasma membrane. Ascorbic acid (i.p. at the dose of 0.5 mg/100 g body weight per day for period of 28 days) supplementation can reduce these structural changes in the plasma membrane of liver and kidney. But the functional changes can not be completely replenished by the ascorbic acid supplementation in response to chromium exposure. So it is also suggested that ascorbic acid (nutritional antioxidant) is useful free radical scavenger to restrain the chromium-induced membrane damage.

  16. Sorption of chromium(VI) and chromium(III) on aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that influence the sorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) on aluminium hydroxide were investigated. The sorption of chromates decreases as the pH of the suspension increases. The mechanism of CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption was interpreted in terms of reactions between chromates and -OH and/or Hsub(2)O groups at the hydroxide/liquid interface. It was shown that chromates are more tightly sorbed on aluminium hydroxide compared to other anions, e.g. chlorides. On the other hand, specifically absorbed anions, such as molybdates, compete strongly with chromates for the sorption sites. The sorption of chromium(III) increases with the pH of the suspension. Also, the sorption of chromium(III) is suppressed in the presence of citrate ions. The best conditions for the fixation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by aluminium hydroxide are presented. (author)

  17. Plasma Spraying and Characterization of Chromium Carbide-Nickel Chromium Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Prantnerová, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 281-290, č. článku PCCC-2016-09-16-339. ISSN 2008-2134 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Chromium carbide * Slurry abrasion * Dry rubber wheel test * Friction * Microhardness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://www.pccc.icrc.ac.ir/?xid=0113010121000001804&id=976

  18. A REVIEW OF BIOSORPTION OF CHROMIUM IONS BY MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Zinicovscaia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The main source of chromium pollution including the Republic o Moldova is industry. It is a great need to develop new eco-friendly methods of chromium removal. Biosorption of heavy metals is a most promising technology involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and natural waters. This article is an extended abstract of a communication presented at the Conference Ecological Chemistry 2012

  19. Synthesis and characterization of chromium doped boehmite nanofibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jing; Frost, Ray L.; Yuan Yong

    2009-01-01

    Thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis has been used to study synthesised chromium doped boehmite. The dehydroxylation temperature increases significantly from 0 to 5% doping, after which the dehydroxylation temperature shows a small steady increase up to the 20% doping level. The temperature of dehydroxylation increases with time of hydrothermal treatment. Chromium doped boehmite nanofibres were also characterised by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Hydrothermal treatment of doped boehmite with chromium resulted in the formation of nanofibres over a wide dopant range. Nanofibres up to 500 nm in length and between 4 and 6 nm in width were produced

  20. Chromium removal from tannery wastewater by using of flying ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil P, E.; Saldarriaga M, C.

    1998-01-01

    A simple and economic method to chromium removal from tannery wastewater by means of flying ash is presented. The chromium removal operation is a discontinuous process that involve the mass of flying ash, time of contact and temperature or ph as variables, their which are optimized through Box-Wilson type experimental design. The results were successful: From an initial fluid whit chromium concentration of 1850m ppm, final concentrations of 0.008 ppm and 0.5 ppm of Cr+3 and Cr+6 respectively were achieved. These post-treatment concentrations are into the approved range definite by Government's Laws to this waste type

  1. Separation of valence forms of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation with iron(III) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The sorption of 9.62·10 -5 M of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) with iron hydroxide in 1 M potassium nitrate and potassium chloride was investigated in relation to the pH of the medium. Experimental data on the sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) with iron(III) hydroxide made it possible to determine the region of practically complete concentration of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) (pH = 3-6.5). The results from spectrophotometric investigations, calculated data on the distribution of the hydroxocationic forms of chromium(III) and the anions of chromium(IV), and their sorption by iron-(III) hydroxide made it possible to characterize the sorbability of the cationic and anionic forms of chromium in various degrees of oxidation. On this basis a method was developed for the separation of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) by coprecipitation on iron(III) hydroxide and their separation from the iron(III) hydroxide support

  2. Ductility of high chromium stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Kazantsev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to optimize the hot working conditions for high chromium stainless steels the experiments were carried in the temperature range of 800-1300 deg C using hot torsion tests and cylindrical specimens of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels 08Kh13, 12Kh13, 20Kh13, 30Kh13 and 40Kh13. Testing results showed that steel plasticity varies in a wide range depending on carbon content. Steels of lesser carbon concentration (08Kh13 and 12Kh13) exhibit a sharp increase in plasticity with a temperature rise, especially in the interval of 1200-1250 deg C. Steels 20Kh13 and 30Kh13 display insignificant plasticity increasing, whereas plastic properties of steel 40Kh13 increase noticeably in the range of 1000-1300 deg C. It is shown that optimal hot working conditions for specific steel must be selected with account of steel phase composition at high temperatures

  3. Chromium concentrations in ruminant feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, J W; Lloyd, K E; Krafka, K

    2017-05-01

    Chromium (Cr), in the form of Cr propionate, has been permitted for supplementation to cattle diets in the United States at levels up to 0.50 mg of Cr/kg of DM since 2009. Little is known regarding Cr concentrations naturally present in practical feed ingredients. The present study was conducted to determine Cr concentrations in feed ingredients commonly fed to ruminants. Feed ingredients were collected from dairy farms, feed mills, grain bins, and university research farms. Mean Cr concentrations in whole cereal grains ranged from 0.025 mg/kg of DM for oats to 0.041 mg/kg of DM for wheat. Grinding whole samples of corn, soybeans, and wheat through a stainless steel Wiley mill screen greatly increased analyzed Cr concentrations. Harvested forages had greater Cr concentrations than concentrates, and alfalfa hay or haylage had greater Cr concentrations than grass hay or corn silage. Chromium in alfalfa hay or haylage (n = 13) averaged 0.522 mg/kg of DM, with a range of 0.199 to 0.889 mg/kg of DM. Corn silage (n = 21) averaged 0.220 mg of Cr/kg of DM with a range of 0.105 to 0.441 mg of Cr/kg of DM. By-product feeds ranged from 0.040 mg of Cr/kg of DM for cottonseed hulls to 1.222 mg of Cr/kg of DM for beet pulp. Of the feed ingredients analyzed, feed grade phosphate sources had the greatest Cr concentration (135.0 mg/kg). Most ruminant feedstuffs and feed ingredients had less than 0.50 mg of Cr/kg of DM. Much of the analyzed total Cr in feed ingredients appears to be due to Cr contamination from soil or metal contact during harvesting, processing, or both. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An investigation of the bioaccumulation of chromium and uranium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KONANANI

    2013-11-13

    Nov 13, 2013 ... dactylon, an indigenous grass. The grass and soil sample were collected at New Union Gold Mine and ... chromium (Cr3+), an essential element to living organisms ... of radioactive and heavy metals in mine tailings that origi-.

  5. Problems in the determination of chromium in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behne, D.; Braetter, P.; Gessner, H.; Hube, G.; Mertz, W.; Roesick, U.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of sample preparation on the analysis of chromium in biological matter have been investigated using brewer's yeast as a test material. The apparent chromium content of the yeast as determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry was significantly higher after destruction of the organic matter with HNO 3 in a closed pressure vessel than after wet-ashing in open vessels and after direct introduction of the sample into the graphite furnace. The results obtained by neutron activation analysis without any sample preparation, which corresponded to the atomic absorption values after digestion in the pressure vessel, showed that considerable errors arise in the other methods of sample treatment. Chromium analysis of dried and ashed yeast suggest that losses of volatile chromium compounds may occur during heating. (orig.) [de

  6. Synthesis and spectral properties of Chromium(III) complex of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISSCH) with chromium(III) chloride. The complex was characterized by molar conductance, magnetic moment, infrared, far-infrared and electronic spectra and elemental analysis. The ligand exists in keto tantomeric form and it coordinates through ...

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium (Peer Review Plan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hexavalent chromium that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Chromium in Alleviating Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yinan; Clark, Suzanne; Ren, Jun; Sreejayan, Nair

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular anomalies and is a major health problem approaching global epidemic proportions. Insulin resistance, a prediabetic condition, precedes the onset of frank type 2 diabetes and offers potential avenues for early intervention to treat the disease. Although lifestyle modifications and exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, compliance has proved to be difficult, warranting pharmacological interventions. However, most of the currently available drugs that improve insulin sensitivity have adverse effects. Therefore, attractive strategies to alleviate insulin resistance include dietary supplements. One such supplement is chromium, which has been shown reduce insulin resistance in some, but not all, studies. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms of chromium in alleviating insulin resistance remain elusive. This review examines emerging reports on the effect of chromium, as well as molecular and cellular mechanisms by which chromium may provide beneficial effects in alleviating insulin resistance. PMID:22423897

  9. Structure and magnetic properties of chromium doped cobalt molybdenum nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskos, Niko; Żołnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander; Adamski, Paweł; Moszyński, Dariusz

    2016-09-01

    Four nanocomposites containing mixed phases of Co3Mo3N and Co2Mo3N doped with chromium have been prepared. A linear fit is found for relation between Co2Mo3N and chromium concentrations. The magnetization in ZFC and FC modes at different temperatures (2-300 K) and in applied magnetic fields (up to 70 kOe) have been investigated. It has been detected that many magnetic characteristics of the studied four nanocomposites correlate not with the chromium concentration but with nanocrystallite sizes. The obtained results were interpreted in terms of magnetic core-shell model of a nanoparticle involving paramagnetic core with two magnetic sublattices and a ferromagnetic shell related to chromium doping.

  10. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  11. Chromium, Nickel and Zinc Induced Histopathological Alterations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    fish, Labeo rohita to chlorides of chromium, nickel and zinc for 30 days. However ... toxicants such as salts of heavy metals, acids, organic matter ... nutritional supply becomes excessive. ... action), petrochemicals, and fertilizers and in steam.

  12. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbard, W.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates

  13. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  14. Measurement of the hyperfine magnetic field on rhodium in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretto, P.; Teisseron, G.; Berthier, J.

    1978-01-01

    Hyperfine magnetic field of rhodium in a chromium matrix is studied. Anisotropy of rhodium 100 is + 0.17. Time dependence of angular correlation is given with a sample containing 145 ppm of rhodium despite the short life [fr

  15. Chromium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    In most models two nicotinate ligands are ... However, both biological extracts and synthetic GTF models have ..... chromium (III)-β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phos- ... and free fatty acids levels in diabetic rats; J. Inorg. Biochem.

  16. Composite Coatings of Chromium and Nanodiamond Particles on Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidikova N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrome plating is used to improve the properties of metal surfaces like hardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance in machine building. To further improve these properties, an electrodeposited chromium coating on steel, modified with nanodiamond particles is proposed. The nanodiamond particles (average size 4 nm measured by TEM are produced by detonation synthesis (NDDS. The composite coating (Cr+NDDS has an increased thickness, about two times greater microhardness and finer micro-structure compared to that of unmodified chromium coating obtained under the same galvanization conditions. In the microstructure of specimen obtained from chrome electrolyte with concentration of NDDS 25 g/l or more, “minisections” with chromium shell were found. They were identified by metallographic microscope and X-ray analyser on etched section of chromium plated sample. The object of further research is the dependence of the presence of NDDS in the composite coating from the nanodiamond particles concentration in the chroming electrolyte.

  17. Carcinogenicity of chromium and chemoprevention: a brief update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Yafei Wang,1,* Hong Su,1,* Yuanliang Gu,1 Xin Song,1 Jinshun Zhao1,2 1Department of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, People’s Republic of China; 2Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chromium has two main valence states: hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI] and trivalent chromium (Cr[III]. Cr(VI, a well-established human carcinogen, can enter cells by way of a sulfate/phosphate anion-transport system, and then be reduced to lower-valence intermediates consisting of pentavalent chromium (Cr[V], tetravalent chromium (Cr[IV] or Cr(III via cellular reductants. These intermediates may directly or indirectly result in DNA damage or DNA–protein cross-links. Although Cr(III complexes cannot pass easily through cell membranes, they have the ability to accumulate around cells to induce cell-surface morphological alteration and result in cell-membrane lipid injuries via disruption of cellular functions and integrity, and finally to cause DNA damage. In recent years, more research, including in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiological studies, has been conducted to evaluate the genotoxicity/carcinogenicity induced by Cr(VI and/or Cr(III compounds. At the same time, various therapeutic agents, especially antioxidants, have been explored through in vitro and in vivo studies for preventing chromium-induced genotoxicity/carcinogenesis. This review aims to provide a brief update on the carcinogenicity of Cr(VI and Cr(III and chemoprevention with different antioxidants. Keywords: hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI, trivalent chromium, Cr(III, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, chemoprevention, antioxidant 

  18. RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    RDT&E Progress and Plans for Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) Bruce Sartwell Weapons Systems and Platforms Program Manager E2S2 Conference May 12, 2011...2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RDT&E Progress and Plansfor Hexavalent Chromium (Cr6+) 5a...Development of Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocols Alternatives to Hex Chrome and Cadmium Plating Alternatives to Hex Chrome Pretreatments

  19. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel sau...

  20. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  1. Chromium metal organic frameworks and synthesis of metal organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong-Cai; Liu, Tian-Fu; Lian, Xizhen; Zou, Lanfang; Feng, Dawei

    2018-04-24

    The present invention relates to monocrystalline metal organic frameworks comprising chromium ions and carboxylate ligands and the use of the same, for example their use for storing a gas. The invention also relates to methods for preparing metal organic frameworks comprising chromium, titanium or iron ions and carboxylate ligands. The methods of the invention allow such metal organic frameworks to be prepared in monocrystalline or polycrystalline forms.

  2. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2009-07-02

    {sm_bullet} Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage {sm_bullet} Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to <48 parts per billion (ppb) in aquifer (drinking water standard) - Large plumes with isolated areas of high chromium concentrations (> 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  3. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be...

  4. Stabilization of carbon dioxide and chromium slag via carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingxing; Yu, Binbin; Xu, Wei; Fan, Zheng; Wu, Zucheng; Zhang, Huimin

    2017-08-01

    As the main greenhouse gas, CO 2 is considered as a threat in the context of global warming. Many available technologies to reduce CO 2 emission was about CO 2 separation from coal combustion and geological sequestration. However, how to deal with the cost-effective storage of CO 2 has become a new challenge. Moreover, chromium pollution, the treatment of which requires huge energy consumption, has attracted people's widespread attention. This study is aimed to develop the sequestration of CO 2 via chromium slag. A dynamic leaching experiment of chromium slag was designed to testify the ability of CO 2 adsorption onto chromium slag and to release Cr(VI) for stabilization. The results showed that the accumulative amounts of Cr(VI) were ca. 2.6 mg/g released from the chromium slag after 24 h of leaching. In addition, ca. 89 mg/g CO 2 was adsorbed by using pure CO 2 in the experiment at 12 h. Calcite is the only carbonate species in the post-carbonated slag analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The approach provides the feasibility of the utilization of chromium slag and sequestration of the carbon dioxide at the same time at ordinary temperatures and pressures.

  5. Cytokine detection for the diagnosis of chromium allergy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luis Eduardo Agner Machado; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patch testing remains the gold standard method for the identification of the etiologic agent of allergic contact dermatitis. However, it is a subjective, time-consuming exam whose technique demands special care and which presents some contraindications, which hamper its use. In a recent study, we showed that the proliferation assay can suitably replace patch testing for the diagnosis of chromium allergy, which had been previously demonstrated only for nickel allergy. In this study, we try to refine the method by reducing the incubation period of cultures for lymphocyte proliferation assays in response to chromium. OBJECTIVE Develop an alternative or complementary diagnostic test for chromium allergic contact dermatitis. METHODS We compared the production of 9 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17 and RANTES) between 18 chromium-allergic patients and 19 controls. RESULTS Chromium increased the production of IFN-y, IL-5, IL-2 and IL-13 in allergic patients, but only IL-2 and especially IL-13 helped discriminate allergic patients from controls. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy found with IL-13 were about 80%. CONCLUSIONS IL-13 and IL-2 detection may be used to diagnose chromium allergy in 2-day cultures. However, in general, the 6-day cultures seem to be superior for this purpose. PMID:24173176

  6. [Hexavalent chromium pollution and exposure level in electroplating workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-hui; Zhang, Xuan; Yang, Zhang-ping; Jiang, Cai-xia; Ren, Xiao-bin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-min

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the pollution of hexavalent chromium in the electroplating workplace and screen the biomarkers of chromium exposure. Field occupational health investigation was conducted in 25 electroplating workplaces. 157 electroplating workers and 93 healthy unexposed controls were recruited. The epidemiological information was collected with face to face interview. Chromium in erythrocytes was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The median of short-term exposure concentration of chromium in the air at electroplating workplace was 0.06 mg/m(3) (median) and ranging from 0.01 (detect limit) to 0.53 mg/m(3)). The median concentration of Cr (VI) in erythrocytes in electroplating workers was 4.41 (2.50 ∼ 5.29) µg/L, which was significantly higher than that in control subjects [1.54 (0.61 ∼ 2.98) µg/L, P electroplating workers and control subjects, except for the subjects of age less than 30 years old (P = 0.11). There was hexavalent chromium pollution in electroplating workplace. Occupational hazards prevention measures should be taken to control the chromium pollution hazards.

  7. Removal of Chromium and Lead from Industrial Wastewater Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hilal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research an attempt is made on the ability of aerobic treatment of synthetic solutions containing lead and chromium using effective microorganisms within the reactor. To achieve the desired objectives of the research, synthetic aqueous solutions of lead and chromium was used in the concentration of chromium and lead ions of 5, 10,50 and 100 mg / l .The work was done at constant pH equal to 4.5 and temperature of 30 ± 1 º C. Effective microorganisms solutions was added to the reactor at Vol.% of 1/50 ,1/100 ,1/500 and 1/1000, with retention time was 24 hours to measure the heavy metals concentration the atomic absorption device was used. The experimental results showed that each 1mg / l of lead and chromium ions need 24 mg of effective microorganisms to achieve removal of 92.0% and 82.60% for lead and chromium respectively. Increasing the concentration of effective microorganisms increases the surface of adsorption and thus increasing the removal efficiency. It is found that the microorganisms activity occur in the first five hours of processing and about 94% of adsorption capacity of biomass will take place. It is also found the selectivity of microorganisms to lead ions is higher than for chromium ions.

  8. A Study on the Effect of the Boron Potential on the Mechanical Properties of the Borided Layers Obtained by Boron Diffusion at the Surface of AISI 316L Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hernández-Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the boron potential on the thickness and the mechanical properties of borided layers was evaluated. The boron potential was established by means of the available atoms of boron contained in a control volume inside a cylinder. The cylinders were manufactured from AISI 316L steel, and the boriding treatment was performed using the powder pack technique at a temperature of 1273 K over an exposure time of 6 h. Four different internal diameters of the cylinders were evaluated (3.17, 4.76, 6.35, and 7.93 mm. The mechanical properties were evaluated using the Berkovich instrumented indentation technique. The results showed a clear influence of the boron potential on the mechanical properties of the layers. The hardness of the layers was stablished in the range of 16.22 to 21.16 GPa. Young’s modulus values were stablished in the range of 255.96 to 341.37 GPa. Also the fracture toughness and brittleness of the layers reflected the influence of the boron potential supplied during the boriding process. Finally, the influence of the boron potential on the constant of parabolic growth (K was also established as a function of the inner diameter of the cylinders.

  9. Experimental skin deposition of chromium on the hands following handling of samples of leather and metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chromium is an important skin sensitizer. Exposure to it has been regulated in cement, and recently in leather. Studies on the deposition of chromium ions on the skin as a result of handling different chromium-containing materials are sparse, but could improve the risk assessment...... of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis caused by chromium. Objectives: To determine whether the handling of chromium-containing samples of leather and metal results in the deposition of chromium onto the skin. Methods: Five healthy volunteers participated. For 30 min, they handled samples...... of leather and metal known to contain and release chromium. Skin deposition of chromium was assessed with the acid wipe sampling technique. Results: Acid wipe sampling of the participants' fingers showed chromium deposition on the skin in all participants who had been exposed to leather (range 0.01–0.20 µg...

  10. Activation of bentonite to remove the chromium from waste water produced by panning industry, and studying the chromium recovery efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.; Wahba, H.; AL-Masri, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    The fast development of tanning industry led to an increase in environmental problems resulting from discharging its wastes to the surrounding environment. Thus solving this problem became one of the most important aims that the researchers work on. The chromium content of the industrial water wastes of the tanning industry considered as the main pollutant for the environment. The Aleppo Bentonite is used in early research to remove the chromium from the industrial waste water.The current research aims to find a method to activate the Aleppo Bentonite in order to increase the effective removal of chromium from the industrial waste water which is produced by tanning industry, as well as to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery.This study used the Aleppo Bentonite, whose origin is Tal Ajar-Aleppo to study the activation aspects using Sulfuric Acid, Hydrochloric Acid and Nitric Acid, in addition to study the recovery aspects using the same acids and hydrogen peroxide and to specify the optimal conditions for chromium recovery through applying some experiments based on three main factors: concentration, settling time and temperature.It was observed from the applied experiments that it is possible to recover chromium from Bentonite efficiently up to (80% - 90%) by treating the Bentonite with hydrogen peroxide(33% concentration) at room temperature, or by treating it with hydrogen peroxide(8.25% concentration) at 75 o C, while the settling time factor proved that full recovery of chromium is obtained during the first hour, and increasing the time factor does not affect the efficiency of chromium recovery. (author)

  11. New ternary tantalum borides containing boron dumbbells: Experimental and theoretical studies of Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} and TaRuB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarki, Mohammed; Touzani, Rachid St.; Rehorn, Christian W.G.; Gladisch, Fabian C. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Fokwa, Boniface P.T., E-mail: bfokwa@ucr.edu [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of California Riverside (UCR), Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    The new ternary transition metal-rich borides Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} and TaRuB have been successfully synthesized by arc-melting the elements in a water-cooled crucible under an argon atmosphere. The crystal structures of both compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and their metal compositions were confirmed by EDX analysis. It was found that Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} and TaRuB crystallize in the tetragonal Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) and the orthorhombic NbRuB (space group Pmma, no. 51) structure types with lattice parameters a=5.878(2) Å, c=6.857(2) Å and a=10.806(2) Å, b=3.196(1) Å, c=6.312(2) Å, respectively. Furthermore, crystallographic, electronic and bonding characteristics have been studied by density functional theory (DFT). Electronic structure relaxation has confirmed the crystallographic parameters while COHP bonding analysis indicates that B{sub 2}-dummbells are the strongest bonds in both compounds. Moreover, the formation of osmium dumbbells in Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} through a Peierls distortion along the c-axis, is found to be the origin of superstructure formation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that the two phases are Pauli paramagnets, thus confirming the theoretical DOS prediction of metallic character. Also hints of superconductivity are found in the two phases, however lack of single phase samples has prevented confirmation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic stability of the two modifications of AMB (A=Nb, Ta; M =Ru, Os) are studied using DFT, as new possible phases containing either B{sub 4}- or B{sub 2}-units are predicted, the former being the most thermodynamically stable modification. - Graphical abstract: The two new ternary tantalum borides, Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} and TaRuB, have been discovered. Their crystal structures contain boron dumbbells, which are the strongest bonds. Peirls distortion is found responsible for Os{sub 2}-dumbbells formation in Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2}. Ta{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} and

  12. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... exposures. To evaluate the use of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a spot test reagent for the identification of chromium(VI) release. A colorimetric chromium(VI) spot test based on DPC was prepared and used on different items from small market surveys. The DPC spot test was able to identify chromium(VI) release...

  13. A Rare Terminal Dinitrogen Complex of Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, Michael T.; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2011-10-12

    The reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia from N2 and H2 is currently carried out by the Haber-Bosch process, an energy intensive process that requires high pressures and high temperatures and accounts for the production of millions of tons of ammonia per year. The development of a catalytic, energy-efficient process for N2 reduction is of great interest and remains a formidable challenge. In this communication, we are reporting the preparation, characterization and computational electronic structure analysis of a rare 'Chatt-type' ((P-P)2M(N2)2, P-P = diphosphine ligand) complex of chromium, cis-[Cr(N2)2(PPh2NBn2)2] and its reactivity with CO. This complex is supported by the diphosphine ligand PPh2NBn2, containing non-coordinating pendant amine bases, to serve as proton relays. Future studies for this complex are aimed at answering fundamental questions regarding the role of proton relays in the second coordination sphere in their ability to facilitate proton movement from an external acid to metal-bound dinitrogen ligands in the challenging multi-proton/electron reduction of N2 to ammonia.

  14. Low energy spin excitations in chromium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Azuah, R.T.; Stirling, W.G.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments with full polarization analysis have been performed with a single crystal of chromium to study the low-energy spin fluctuations in the transverse spin density wave (TSDW) state. A number of remarkable results have been found. Inelastic scattering observed close to the TSDW satellite positions at (1 ± δ,0,0) does not behave as expected for magnon scattering. In particular, the scattering corresponds to almost equally strong magnetization fluctuations both parallel and perpendicular to the ordered moments of the TSDW phase. As the Neel temperature is approached from below, scattering at the commensurate wavevector (1,0,0) increases in intensity as a result of critical scattering at silent satellites (1,0, ± δ) being included within the spectrometer resolution function. This effect, first observed by Sternlieb et al, does not account for all of the inelastic scattering around the (1,0,0) position, however, Rather, there are further collective excitations, apparently emanating from the TSDW satellites, which correspond to magnetic fluctuations parallel to the ordered TSDW moments. These branches have a group velocity that is close to that of (1,0,0) longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons, but assigning their origin to magneto-elastic scattering raises other unanswered questions

  15. Structure and magnetic properties of the 3d transition-metal mono-borides TM–B (TM=Mn, Fe, Co) under pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourourou, Y.; Beldi, L.; Bentria, B.; Gueddouh, A.; Bouhafs, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, spin-polarization and pressure effects on the structural and electronic properties of the 3d transition-metal mono-borides TM–B (TM=Mn, Fe, Co) have been studied by using both local spin-density approximation (LSDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) within the framework of density-functional theory (DFT). At equilibrium, spin-polarization calculations show that MnB and FeB compounds carry magnetic moment. The non-spin-polarization results show that the non-magnetic state is unstable for MnB and FeB compounds, but a stable non-magnetic phase for CoB compound, which is discussed in the framework of the well-known Stoner criterion. The calculated lattice parameters, bulk moduli, their first-pressure derivatives and magnetic moments agree well with experimental and other theoretical results. Significant differences in volume and in bulk modulus were found between the magnetic and non-magnetic case reached 4%, 22%, respectively. The effect of pressure on the crystal structure reflects in a compression of the unit cell volume with a decreasing in the magnetic moment. The density of states of MnB and FeB ferromagnetic compounds are significantly modified under high pressures. The exchange energy decreases with increasing pressure, at approximately V/V 0 =0.6, the exchange energy becomes absent in ferromagnetic compounds causes mirror in upper and lowers half panels. Finally, we notice that spin-polarization and pressure play a crucially important role in determining the electronic and structural properties of 3d transition-metal mono-borides. - Highlights: • Spin polarization and pressure effects on TM–B (TM=Mn, Fe, Co) have been investigated. • The non-spin-polarization results show that the non-magnetic state is stable for CoB. • The magnetic states of MnB and FeB are found more stable than their nonmagnetic states. • We report significant differences between the magnetic and non-magnetic cases. • The density of states of MnB and

  16. Electronic, structural and magnetic studies of niobium borides of group 8 transition metals, Nb2MB2 (M=Fe, Ru, Os) from first principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzani, Rachid St.; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The Nb 2 FeB 2 phase (U 3 Si 2 -type, space group P4/mbm, no. 127) is known for almost 50 years, but until now its magnetic properties have not been investigated. While the synthesis of Nb 2 OsB 2 (space group P4/mnc, no. 128, a twofold superstructure of U 3 Si 2 -type) with distorted Nb-layers and Os 2 -dumbbells was recently achieved, “Nb 2 RuB 2 ” is still not synthesized and its crystal structure is yet to be revealed. Our first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations have confirmed not only the experimental structures of Nb 2 FeB 2 and Nb 2 OsB 2 , but also predict “Nb 2 RuB 2 ” to crystalize with the Nb 2 OsB 2 structure type. According to chemical bonding analysis, the homoatomic B–B interactions are optimized and very strong, but relatively strong heteroatomic M–B, B–Nb and M–Nb bonds (M=Fe, Ru, Os) are also found. These interactions, which together build a three-dimensional network, are mainly responsible for the structural stability of these ternary borides. The density-of-states at the Fermi level predicts metallic behavior, as expected, from metal-rich borides. Analysis of possible magnetic structures concluded preferred antiferromagnetic ordering for Nb 2 FeB 2 , originating from ferromagnetic interactions within iron chains and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between them. -- Graphical abstract: Nb 2 FeB 2 (U 3 Si 2 structure type, space group P4/mbm, no. 127) is predicted to order antiferromagnetically, due to the presence of iron chains which show ferromagnetic interactions in the chains and antiferromagnetic interactions between them. “Nb 2 RuB 2 ” is predicted to crystallize with the recently discovered Nb 2 OsB 2 twofold superstructure (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) of U 3 Si 2 structure type. The building of ruthenium dumbbells instead of chains along [001] is found to be responsible for the stabilization of this superstructure. Highlights: • Nb 2 FeB 2 is predicted to order antiferromagnetically.

  17. [Biological significance of chromium III for the human organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Anna; Pilch, Wanda; Tota, Łukasz; Nowak, Gabriel

    2018-03-09

    Currently, chromium is probably the most controversial transition metal. In recent publications it is clearly stated that it is not an essential micronutrient and should be considered to have a pharmacological effect. Conflicting scientific reports along with a huge amount of dietary supplements, as well as dietary and sports nutrients available on the market have prompted the authors to investigate the available information on the range of possible application, efficacy and safety of products containing salts or chelates of chromium III. The authors reviewed articles in electronic databases for the years 1959-2016, and selected works describing the biochemical, physiological and toxic properties of chromium salts and chelates and the range of possible applications in medicine, dietetics and sport. A critical analysis of reports dealing with the effect of chromium on the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, body composition, lean body mass and sports performance was carried out. The authors indicated papers analyzing the mechanism of action of chromium in the cognitive and affective disorders. Much attention has been paid to the safety use of chromium III supplements. There are still some unsolved issues. In the field of toxicology, a limited number of reports about environmental exposure to trivalent chromium in the workplace draws our attention. In the field of biochemical research, there is still a need to clarify the mechanism of psychiatric and endocrinological activity, especially in conjunction with the immune system. Med Pr 2018;69(2):211-223. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  18. Roasting and leaching behaviors of vanadium and chromium in calcification roasting-acid leaching of high-chromium vanadium slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Mi; Gao, Hui-yang; Liu, Jia-yi; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2018-05-01

    Calcification roasting-acid leaching of high-chromium vanadium slag (HCVS) was conducted to elucidate the roasting and leaching behaviors of vanadium and chromium. The effects of the purity of CaO, molar ratio between CaO and V2O5 ( n(CaO)/ n(V2O5)), roasting temperature, holding time, and the heating rate used in the oxidation-calcification processes were investigated. The roasting process and mechanism were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The results show that most of vanadium reacted with CaO to generate calcium vanadates and transferred into the leaching liquid, whereas almost all of the chromium remained in the leaching residue in the form of (Fe0.6Cr0.4)2O3. Variation trends of the vanadium and chromium leaching ratios were always opposite because of the competitive reactions of oxidation and calcification between vanadium and chromium with CaO. Moreover, CaO was more likely to combine with vanadium, as further confirmed by thermodynamic analysis. When the HCVS with CaO added in an n(CaO)/ n(V2O5) ratio of 0.5 was roasted in an air atmosphere at a heating rate of 10°C/min from room temperature to 950°C and maintained at this temperature for 60 min, the leaching ratios of vanadium and chromium reached 91.14% and 0.49%, respectively; thus, efficient extraction of vanadium from HCVS was achieved and the leaching residue could be used as a new raw material for the extraction of chromium. Furthermore, the oxidation and calcification reactions of the spinel phases occurred at 592 and 630°C for n(CaO)/ n(V2O5) ratios of 0.5 and 5, respectively.

  19. Establishment of a reference value for chromium in the blood for biological monitoring among occupational chromium workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ji; Yu, Shan-Fa; Wang, Zhi-Liang; Jia, Guang

    2016-10-01

    The concentration of chromium in the blood (CrB) has been confirmed as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure, but its biological exposure indices (BEIs) are still unclear, so we collected data from the years 2006 and 2008 (Shandong Province, China) to analyze the relationship between the concentration of chromium in the air (CrA) of the workplaces and CrB to establish a reference value of CrB for biological monitoring of occupational workers. The levels of the indicators for nasal injury, kidney (β2 microglobulin (β2-MG)), and genetic damages (8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and micronucleus (MN)) were measured in all subjects of the year 2011 (Henan Province, China) to verify the protective effect in this reference value of CrB. Compared with the control groups, the concentrations of CrA and CrB in chromium exposed groups were significantly higher (P value of CrB was recommended to 20 μg/L. The levels of nasal injury, β2-MG, 8-OhdG, and MN were not significantly different between the low chromium exposed group (CrB ≤ 20 μg/L) and the control group, while the levels of β2-MG, 8-OHdG, and MN were statistically different in the high chromium exposed group than that in the control group. This research proved that only in occupational workers, CrB could be used as a biomarker to show chromium exposure in the environment. The recommended reference value of CrB was 20 μg/L. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Use of thermogravimetry and thermodynamic calculations for specifying chromium diffusion occurring in alloys containing chromium carbides during high temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthod, Patrice; Conrath, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    The chromium diffusion is of great importance for the high temperature oxidation behaviour of the chromium-rich carbides-strengthened superalloys. These ones contain high chromium quantities for allowing them well resisting hot corrosion by constituting and maintaining a continuous external scale of chromia. Knowing how chromium can diffuse in such alloys is thus very useful for predicting the sustainability of their chromia-forming behaviour. Since Cr diffusion occurs through the external part of the alloy already affected by the previous steps of oxidation (decarburized subsurface) it is more judicious to specify this diffusion during the oxidation process itself. This was successfully carried out in this work in the case of a model chromia-forming nickel-based alloy containing chromium carbides, Ni(bal.)–25Cr–0.5C (in wt.%). This was done by specifying, using real-time thermogravimetry, the mass gain kinetic due to oxidation, and by combining it with the post-mortem determination of the Cr concentration profiles in subsurface. The values of D Cr thus obtained for 1000, 1050 and 1100 °C in the alloy subsurface are consistent with the values obtained in earlier works for similar alloy's chemical compositions. - Highlights: • A Ni25Cr0.50C alloy was oxidized at high temperature in a thermo-balance. • The mass gain files were analysed to specify the Cr 2 O 3 volatilization constant K v . • Concentration profiles were acquired to specify the chromium gradient. • The diffusion coefficient of chromium through the subsurface was deduced. • The obtained diffusion coefficient is consistent with values previously obtained.

  1. Microscopic analysis of the chromium content in the chromium-induced malignant and premalignant bronchial lesions of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yuji; Kondo, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Sumiyo; Uchihara, Hiroshi; Fujino, Haruhiko; Sawada, Naruhiko; Miyoshi, Takanori; Sakiyama, Shoji; Izumi, Keisuke; Monden, Yasumasa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Our previous studies demonstrated that the frequency of gene instability in lung cancer of chromate workers was very high, but the frequencies of the p53 and ras gene mutations were low. To clarify the carcinogenesis of chromate in the lung, we established a chromate-induced cancer model in the rat proximal airway and examined the relationship between chromium accumulations and the chromium-induced cancer and premalignant bronchial lesions of the rat. Methods: Fifteen male, bred, 12-week-old Jcl-Wister rats were used. A pellet of strontium chromate were inserted into the bronchus of the rats. The rats were sacrificed 9 months after the pellet was inserted. We pathologically examined the region of the bronchi to which the pellet was attached. We quantified the amount of chromium accumulation in the bronchial lesions using a microscopic X-ray fluorescence analyzer. Results: Of the 15 rats, 1 rat had a lesion of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 7 rats had carcinoma in situ (CIS) or dysplasia, 8 rats had squamous metaplasia, and 5 rats had goblet cell hyperplasia. The amounts of chromium accumulation in normal epithelium (n=24), goblet cell hyperplasia (n=14), squamous metaplasia (n=8), and dysplasia plus CIS plus SCC (n=9) were 500±1354, 713±1062, 941±1328, and 3511±4473 (mean±SD) counts/s/mA, respectively. The amount of chromium accumulation was significantly increased according to the progression of malignant change of the bronchial epithelium (Spearman's correlation coefficient by ranks, rs=0.454, P<0.01). Conclusions: The amount of chromium accumulation was significantly increased according to the progression of malignant change of the bronchial epithelium. Examining the genetic alterations of histologic changes in this model was helpful in elucidating the process of carcinogenesis of chromium in the lung

  2. [Occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, M; Gatto, M P; Gordiani, A; Paci, E; Proietto, A

    2007-01-01

    Hygienists are interested in hexavalent chromium due to its genotoxic and carcinogenic effect on humans. The use of products containing hexavalent chromium is decreasing in many industrial fields because of the substitution with less-toxic compounds. In the aeronautical industry, however, the chromate are added to primer paint as a corrosion inhibitor of aircrafts surfaces: so hexavalent chromium compounds are available in many primers with a composition ranging from 10% to 13%. The application of these primers by using electrostatic guns potentially exposes painting and coating workers at high concentrations of aerosols containing Cr(VI). The aim of the present study is the evaluation of professional exposure to hexavalent chromium during aircraft painting, by adopting both environmental personal sampling and biological monitoring. To valuate workers exposure levels the personal measurements results have been compared with the exposure limit values (TLV-TWA) and the urinary chromium contents with the biological exposure indices (IBE). Moreover the strategy of coupling environmental sampling with biological monitoring seems to be a useful instrument to measure the validity of the individual protection devices.

  3. Anthropogenic Chromium Emissions in China from 1990 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongguang; Zhou, Tan; Li, Qian; Lu, Lu; Lin, Chunye

    2014-01-01

    An inventory of chromium emission into the atmosphere and water from anthropogenic activities in China was compiled for 1990 through to 2009. We estimate that the total emission of chromium to the atmosphere is about 1.92×105t. Coal and oil combustion were the two leading sources of chromium emission to the atmosphere in China, while the contribution of them showed opposite annual growth trend. In total, nearly 1.34×104t of chromium was discharged to water, mainly from six industrial categories in 20 years. Among them, the metal fabrication industry and the leather tanning sector were the dominant sources of chromium emissions, accounting for approximately 68.0% and 20.0% of the total emissions and representing increases of15.6% and 10.3% annually, respectively. The spatial trends of Cr emissions show significant variation based on emissions from 2005 to 2009. The emission to the atmosphere was heaviest in Hebei, Shandong, Guangdong, Zhejiang and Shanxi, whose annual emissions reached more than 1000t for the high level of coal and oil consumption. In terms of emission to water, the largest contributors were Guangdong, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang, where most of the leather production and metal manufacturing occur and these four regions accounted for nearly 47.4% of the total emission to water. PMID:24505309

  4. Structure and magnetic properties of chromium doped cobalt molybdenum nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guskos, Niko; Żołnierkiewicz, Grzegorz; Typek, Janusz; Guskos, Aleksander [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Piastów 48, 70-311 Szczecin (Poland); Adamski, Paweł; Moszyński, Dariusz [Institute of Inorganic Chemical Technology and Environment Engineering, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Pułaskiego 10, 70-322 Szczecin (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Four nanocomposites containing mixed phases of Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 3}N and Co{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N doped with chromium have been prepared. A linear fit is found for relation between Co{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N and chromium concentrations. The magnetization in ZFC and FC modes at different temperatures (2–300 K) and in applied magnetic fields (up to 70 kOe) have been investigated. It has been detected that many magnetic characteristics of the studied four nanocomposites correlate not with the chromium concentration but with nanocrystallite sizes. The obtained results were interpreted in terms of magnetic core-shell model of a nanoparticle involving paramagnetic core with two magnetic sublattices and a ferromagnetic shell related to chromium doping. - Highlights: • A new chromium doped mixed Co-Mn-N nanocomposites were synthesized. • Surface ferromagnetism was detected in a wide temperature range. • Core-shell model was applied to explain nanocomposites magnetism.

  5. Review article. Adverse hematological effects of hexavalent chromium: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Rina Rani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Workers of tanneries, welding industries, factories manufacturing chromate containing paints are exposed to hexavalent chromium that increas¬es the risk of developing serious adverse health effects. This review elucidates the mode of action of hexavalent chromium on blood and its adverse effects. Both leukocyte and erythrocyte counts of blood sharply decreased in Swiss mice after two weeks of intraperitoneal treatment with Cr (VI, with the erythrocytes transforming into echinocytes. The hexavalent chromium in the blood is readily reduced to trivalent form and the reductive capacity of erythrocytes is much greater than that of plasma. Excess Cr (VI, not reduced in plasma, may enter erythrocytes and lymphocytes and in rodents it induces microcytic anemia. The toxic effects of chromium (VI include mitochondrial injury and DNA damage of blood cells that leads to carcinogenicity. Excess Cr (VI increases cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ATP depletion thereby inducing eryptosis. Se, vitamin C, and quercetin are assumed to have some protective effect against hexavalent chromium induced hematological disorders.

  6. Void swelling in fast reactor irradiated high purity binary iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.A.; Stow, D.A.

    The void swelling characteristics of a series of high purity binary iron-chromium alloys containing 0 - 615 0 C. The void swelling behaviour can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of point defect trapping and precipitation processes involving chromium atoms

  7. Technology Demonstration of the Zero Emissions Chromium Electroplating System; Appendix I: CHPPM Report on Air Sampling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hay, K. J; Maloney, Stephen W; Cannon, John J; Phelps, Max R; Modrell, Jason

    2008-01-01

    This volume is an Appendix to the main report, Volume 1, which documents the demonstration of a technology developed by PRD, Inc, for control of chromium emissions during hard chromium electroplating...

  8. Bioaccumulation of chromium and nickel in the tissues of Barb us ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-04-25

    Apr 25, 1996 ... S, marequensis suggested no serious chromium or nickel pollution in the study area. "To \\~hom . ... The toxicity of chromium and nickel to fish, as individual elements, is ..... its fitness for human consumption). One should also ...

  9. Chromium-nanodiamond coatings obtained by magnetron sputtering and their tribological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamanov, M. V.; Khrushchov, M. M.; Marchenko, E. A.; Shevchenko, N. V.; Levin, I. S.; Petrzhik, M. I.; Miroshnichenko, V. I.; Relianu, M. D.

    2017-07-01

    Peculiarities of structure, chemical and phase composition, micromechanical and tribological properties of chromium-based coatings obtained by magnetron-sputtering of composite and/or compacted chromium-nanodiamond targets have been investigated.

  10. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  11. Study of Transport and Micro-structural properties of Magnesium Di-Boride Strand under react and bend mode and bend and react mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Ananya; Kumar Das, Subrat; Bano, Anees; Pradhan, Subrata

    2017-01-01

    I-V characterization of commercial multi-filamentary Magnesium Di-Boride (MgB 2 ) wire of diameter 0.83 mm were studied in Cryocooler at self-field I-V characterization system under both react and bend mode and bend and react mode for a range of temperature 6 K - 25 K. This study is of practical technical relevance where the heat treatment of the superconducting wire makes the wire less flexible for winding in magnet and in other applications. In the present work the bending diameter was varied from 40 mm to 20 mm and for each case critical current (I c ) of the strand is measured for above range of temperature. A customized sample holder is fabricated and thermally anchored with the 2 nd cold stage of Cryocooler. It is observed from the measurement that the strand is more susceptible to degradation for react and bend cases. The transport measurement of the strand was accompanied by SEM analyses of bend samples. Also the tensile strength of the raw strands and the heat treated strands were carried out at room temperature in Universal Testing Machine (UTM) to have an estimate about the limiting winding tension value during magnet fabrication. (paper)

  12. Fractionation of chromium(III) compounds in biological matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoechel, A.; Weseloh, G. [Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Many details of the metabolism and biological significance of trivalent inorganic cations have remained obscure up to now, not least because of the lack of appropriate tools for species analysis of these cations in biological matrices. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, the distribution of chromium species in brewer`s yeast, previously incubated with radiolabelled {sup 51}Cr chloride was investigated. Contradictory to the findings of most other researchers in this area, two low-molecular weight, anionic chromium species were detected in cytosolic yeast extracts. In conclusion, reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography may reveal new details of intracellular metabolism of chromium(III) and, possibly, other trivalent cations. (orig.) With 1 fig., 16 refs.

  13. Electron magnetic resonance investigation of chromium diffusion in yttria powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biasi, R.S. de, E-mail: rsbiasi@ime.eb.b [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Pr. General Tiburcio, 80, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grillo, M.L.N., E-mail: mluciag@uerj.b [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The electron magnetic resonance (EMR) technique was used to investigate the diffusion of chromium in yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powders. The EMR absorption intensity was measured for several annealing times and three different temperatures of isothermal annealing: 1273, 1323 and 1373 K. The activation temperature for diffusion, calculated from the experimental data using a theoretical model based on the Fick equation, was found to be E{sub A}=342+-5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This value is larger than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in rutile (TiO{sub 2}), periclase (MgO) and cobalt monoxide (CoO) and smaller than the activation energy for the diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl (BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}).

  14. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  15. Chromium Resistant Bacteria: Impact on Plant Growth in Soil Microcosm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayel Hanane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Three chromium resistant bacterial strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens PF28, Enterobacter amnigenus EA31 and Enterococcus gallinarum S34 isolated from tannery waste contaminated soil were used in this study. All strains could resist a high concentration of K2Cr2O7 that is up to 300 mg/L. The effect of these strains on clover plants (Trifolium campestre in the presence of two chromium salts CrCl3 and K2Cr2O7 was studied in soil microcosm. Application of chromium salts adversely affected seed germination, root and shoot length. Bacterial inoculation improved the growth parameters under chromate stress when compared with non inoculated respective controls. There was observed more than 50% reduction of Cr(VI in inoculated soil microcosms, as compared to the uninoculated soil under the same conditions. The results obtained in this study are significant for the bioremediation of chromate pollution.

  16. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  17. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  18. Use of Cork Waste as Biosorbent for Hexavalent Chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfaksi, Z.; Azzouz, N.; Abdelwahab, A.

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption by cork powder is considered as a new method for heavy metal removal from industrial waste waters such as chromium tanning factories. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency extent of this method using a cork powder as biosorbent for hexavalent chromium Cr(VI). The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis permits to distinguish the type of functional groups likely to participate in metal binding. A linear form of BET isotherms for all the three used temperatures (25, 35 and 45 0 C) and a pseudo-second-order Lagergren equation of adsorption kinetics are obtained. Other experimental results highlight the meaningful influence of parameters such as contact time, pH and concentrations of the solution, on chromium adsorption rate that reach a 97% value under definite conditions particularly a pH of 2-3 values. (author)

  19. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  20. Efficient Separation and Extraction of Vanadium and Chromium in High Chromium Vanadium Slag by Selective Two-Stage Roasting-Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Yingzhe; Liu, Jiayi; Xue, Xiangxin

    2018-06-01

    Vanadium and chromium are important rare metals, leading to a focus on high chromium vanadium slag (HCVS) as a potential raw material to extract vanadium and chromium in China. In this work, a novel method based on selective two-stage roasting-leaching was proposed to separate and extract vanadium and chromium efficiently in HCVS. XRD, FT-IR, and SEM were utilized to analyze the phase evolutions and microstructure during the whole process. Calcification roasting, which can calcify vanadium selectively using thermodynamics, was carried out in the first roasting stage to transfer vanadium into acid-soluble vanadate and leave chromium in the leaching residue as (Fe0.6Cr0.4)2O3 after H2SO4 leaching. When HCVS and CaO were mixed in the molar ratio CaO/V2O3 (n(CaO)/n(V2O3)) of 0.5 to 1.25, around 90 pct vanadium and less than 1 pct chromium were extracted in the first leaching liquid, thus achieving the separation of vanadium and chromium. In the second roasting stage, sodium salt, which combines with chromium easily, was added to the first leaching residue to extract chromium and 95.16 pct chromium was extracted under the optimal conditions. The total vanadium and chromium leaching rates were above 95 pct, achieving the efficient separation and extraction of vanadium and chromium. The established method provides a new technique to separate vanadium and chromium during roasting rather than in the liquid form, which is useful for the comprehensive application of HCVS.

  1. Efficient Separation and Extraction of Vanadium and Chromium in High Chromium Vanadium Slag by Selective Two-Stage Roasting-Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Xu, Yingzhe; Liu, Jiayi; Xue, Xiangxin

    2018-04-01

    Vanadium and chromium are important rare metals, leading to a focus on high chromium vanadium slag (HCVS) as a potential raw material to extract vanadium and chromium in China. In this work, a novel method based on selective two-stage roasting-leaching was proposed to separate and extract vanadium and chromium efficiently in HCVS. XRD, FT-IR, and SEM were utilized to analyze the phase evolutions and microstructure during the whole process. Calcification roasting, which can calcify vanadium selectively using thermodynamics, was carried out in the first roasting stage to transfer vanadium into acid-soluble vanadate and leave chromium in the leaching residue as (Fe0.6Cr0.4)2O3 after H2SO4 leaching. When HCVS and CaO were mixed in the molar ratio CaO/V2O3 (n(CaO)/n(V2O3)) of 0.5 to 1.25, around 90 pct vanadium and less than 1 pct chromium were extracted in the first leaching liquid, thus achieving the separation of vanadium and chromium. In the second roasting stage, sodium salt, which combines with chromium easily, was added to the first leaching residue to extract chromium and 95.16 pct chromium was extracted under the optimal conditions. The total vanadium and chromium leaching rates were above 95 pct, achieving the efficient separation and extraction of vanadium and chromium. The established method provides a new technique to separate vanadium and chromium during roasting rather than in the liquid form, which is useful for the comprehensive application of HCVS.

  2. Photocatalysis with chromium-doped TiO2: Bulk and surface doping

    KAUST Repository

    Ould-Chikh, Samy; Proux, Olivier; Afanasiev, Pavel V.; Khrouz, Lhoussain; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Harb, Moussab; Geantet, Christophe; Basset, Jean-Marie; Puzenat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The photocatalytic properties of TiO2 modified by chromium are usually found to depend strongly on the preparation method. To clarify this problem, two series of chromium-doped titania with a chromium content of up to 1.56 wt % have been prepared

  3. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  4. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  5. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ...-AG35 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS... Regulation Supplement (DFARS) to address requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in... of items containing hexavalent chromium under DoD contracts unless an exception applies. DATES...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2097 - Azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Azo chromium complex dyestuff... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2097 Azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation... substance identified generically as an azo chromium complex dyestuff preparation (PMN P-95-240) is subject...

  7. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  8. 40 CFR 721.981 - Substituted naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. 721.981 Section 721.981 Protection of Environment...-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex. (a) Chemical substance and significant new... naphtholoazo-substituted naphthalenyl-substituted azonaphthol chromium complex (PMN P-93-1631) is subject to...

  9. Improvement on simultaneous determination of chromium species in aqueous solution by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Liao, Y.P.; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was chromatography and chemiluminescence detection. Two Dionex ion-exchange guard columns in series, CG5 and AG7, were used to separate chromium(III) from chromium(VI). Chromium(VI) was reduced by potassium......, the stabilities of reductant and luminol solutions were studied. The linear range of the calibration curve for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) was 1-400 mu g l(-1). The detection limit was 0.12 mu g l(-1) for chromium(III) and 0.09 mu g l(-1) for chromium(VI), respectively. The precision at the 20 mu g l(-1) level...... was 1.4% for chromium(III) and 2.5% for chromium(VI), respectively. The accuracy of the chromium(III) determination was determined by analysis of the NIST standard reference material 1643c, Trace elements in water with the result 19.1 +/- 1.0 mu g Cr(III) l(-1) (certified value 19.0 +/- 0.6 mu g Cr...

  10. Ferrate treatment for removing chromium from high-level radioactive tank waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, P; Rutherford, L A; Gonzalez-Martin, A; Kim, J; Rapko, B M; Lumetta, G J

    2001-01-01

    A method has been developed for removing chromium from alkaline high-level radioactive tank waste. Removing chromium from these wastes is critical in reducing the volume of waste requiring expensive immobilization and deep geologic disposition. The method developed is based on the oxidation of insoluble chromium(III) compounds to soluble chromate using ferrate. This method could be generally applicable to removing chromium from chromium-contaminated solids, when coupled with a subsequent reduction of the separated chromate back to chromium(III). The tests conducted with a simulated Hanford tank sludge indicate that the chromium removal with ferrate is more efficient at 5 M NaOH than at 3 M NaOH. Chromium removal increases with increasing Fe(VI)/Cr(II) molar ratio, but the chromium removal tends to level out for Fe(VI)/ Cr(III) greaterthan 10. Increasingtemperature leadsto better chromium removal, but higher temperatures also led to more rapid ferrate decomposition. Tests with radioactive Hanford tank waste generally confirmed the simulant results. In all cases examined, ferrate enhanced the chromium removal, with a typical removal of around 60-70% of the total chromium present in the washed sludge solids. The ferrate leachate solutions did not contain significant concentrations of transuranic elements, so these solutions could be disposed as low-activity waste.

  11. Method for electrodeposition of nickel--chromium alloys and coating of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromatt, R.W.; Lundquist, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    High-quality electrodeposits of nickel-chromium binary alloys in which the percentage of chromium is controlled can be obtained by the addition of a complexing agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic disodium salt to the plating solution. The nickel-chromium alloys were found to provide an excellent hydrogen barrier for the protection of uranium fuel elements. (U.S.)

  12. 21 CFR 73.3110a - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.3110a Section... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3110a Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide (Pigment Blue 36) (CAS Reg. No...

  13. THE ESTROGENS / CHROMIUM INTERACTION IN THE NITRIC OXIDE GENERATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Ewa; Piwowar, Agnieszka; Musiala, Tomasz; Dlugosz, Anna

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of estrogens with environmental toxins in free radicals generation: reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) which participates in cancerogenesis is not yet recognized. Chromium(VI) is widely present in environment. One of its toxicity pathway is free radicals generation. Estrogens have the ability to scavenge free radicals, but may also act as prooxidants. Both chromium(VI) and estrogens are classified by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as carcinogens, so synergistic effect seems very dangerous. The interaction of chromium and estrogens in ROS generation are partly described but there are no reports on estrogen/chromium interaction on nitric oxide (NO) generation. The aim of the study was to examine the interaction of chromium(VI) and 17-p-estradiol (E2) on NO level in human blood as well as the role of E2 metabolites: 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2) and 16a-hydroxyestrone (16α-OHE1) in these processes. The NO level was estimated with the diagnostic kit (Nitric Oxide Colorimetric Detection Kit from Arbor Assays) in human blood in vitm. The results showed that Cr(VI) in used concentration (0.5; 1.0 and 5.0 gg/mL) decreases significantly NO level in blood, acting antagonistically to E2 and 4-OHE2. Estrogens (E2, 4-OHE2 and 16α-OHEI) do not protect against inhibiting effect of Cr(VI) on nitric oxide generation in blood because after combined exposure the decreased production of NO in blood was noted. In conclusion, presented results provide the information about the character of estrogen/Cr(VI) interaction in NO level in human blood. It is important knowledge for cardio protected effect e.g., hormone replacement therapy in environmental or occupational exposure to Cr(VI), chromium supplementation, also important for cancer risk evaluation.

  14. Adsorption of Chromium from Aqueous Solution Using Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Riahi Samani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New group of polymers have been synthesized that are conductive of electricity so they are called conducting polymers. One of the most conducting polymers is "polyaniline". In the present study, polyaniline was synthesized by oxidizing aniline monomer under strongly acidic conditions using potassium iodate as an initiator of oxidative polymerization. Synthesized polyaniline as a powder used as an adsorbent to remove chromium from aqueous solution. Experiments were conducted in batch mode with variables such as amount of polyaniline, chromium solution pH and adsorbtion isotherms. Due to presence of Cr (III in solution after using polyaniline, removal mechanism is the combination of surface adsorption and reduction. It seems that polyaniline reduces the Cr(VI to Cr(III and adsorbs the Cr(III and a part of remaining  Cr(VI. It is well known that nitrogen atom in compounds of amine derivative makes co-ordinate bond with positive charge of metals due to the presence of electron in sp3 orbital of nitrogen. The majority of total chromium removal  occurred at 30minute for polyaniline  and the optimum  time for  hexavalent chromium  removal was about 5 min. Polyaniline has the maximum total cheomiume removal at pH, 3-9. The maximum hexavalent chromium removal occurred at acidic pH for polyanilines. The equilibrium adsorption data for polyaniline fitted both Freundlich’s and Langmuir’s isotherms. This research shows that polyaniline can be used as an adsorbent  for removal chromium from aqueous solution.

  15. Hexavalent chromium reduction by a hypocrea tawa fungal strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Guillen-Jimenez, F. M.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial transformation of the highly toxic, water-soluble and mobile hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], to the less toxic, insoluble and immobile trivalent chromium [Cr(III)], is an economically feasible alternative for the treatment of wastewaters contaminated with Cr(VI). The main purpose of this work was to isolate, identify and characterize a microbial strain water by batch enrichment culture techniques, and further identified as Hypocrea tawa by its D1/D2 domain sequence of the 26S rRNA gene with 99,44% similarity. (Author)

  16. Fractionation behavior of chromium isotopes during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenviro......Interest in chromium (Cr) isotope incorporation into carbonates arises from the observation that Cr isotopic composition of carbonates could be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track...

  17. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  18. A review of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. Precipitate strengthening is highly effective at 0.4-0.8 Tsub(m) in these metals, with HfC being most effective in tungsten and molybdenum, and Ta(B,C) most effective in chromium. Low-temperature ductility can be improved by alloying to promote rhenium ductilizing or solution softening. The low-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys appear related to electronic interactions rather than to the usual metallurgical considerations. (Auth.)

  19. Possibility of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaynakov, S.A.; Likov, E.P.; Bortun, A.I.; Belyukov, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    Present work is devoted to possibilities of sorption purification of chromium comprising waste waters of galvanic production by inorganic ion exchangers. Thus, the comparative study of sorption of chromium ions on anion exchanger A B-17 and on inorganic ion exchangers on the basis of hydrated titanium and zirconium dioxides in static and dynamic conditions is conducted. The influence of chromium ions concentration, solutions acidity (ph=1÷12) and presence of base electrolyte on sorption is studied. The state of chromium ions sorbed by inorganic ion exchangers is studied by means of infrared spectroscopy and spectroscopy. It is defined that inorganic sorbents could be used for chromium extraction from different solutions.

  20. Comportamiento parabólico del crecimiento de capas boradas en los aceros Y8A y X12M // Parabolic behavior of boriding layers growth in Y8A and X12M steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Figueroa Hernández

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Se determina la influencia que tienen los principales parámetros tecnológicos del borado en el crecimiento de las capas y secorrobora el cumplimiento de la ley parabólica para predecir este comportamiento en los aceros Y8A y X12M.El proceso de borado se aplica en una mezcla de carburo de silicio y bórax (70 y 30 % a la temperatura de 850, 900 y 950 oCdurante un tiempo de 2, 4 y 6 horas. Como variable dependiente se seleccionó la profundidad del recubrimiento, a partir de lacual se obtuvieron los coeficientes del crecimiento parabólico y la energía de activación en función de la temperatura, el tiempodel proceso y el tipo de acero.La caracterización metalográfica reveló la presencia de la fase Fe2BPalabras claves: Borado, recubrimiento superf icial , t ecnología de recubrimiento.__________________________________________________________________________AbstractIt was determined the influence of the main technological parameters of the boriding process, and a mathematical model thatallows to predict this conduct on the steels Y8A and X12M steels was obtained.The boriding process is applied in a mixture of silicon carbide and borax (70 and 30% at 850, 900 and 950 oC temperatureduring a period of time 2, 4 and 6 hours. As an independent variable the depth of the coat was selected.It was obtained the parabolic growth coefficients, and the activation energy according to temperature, time and the chemicalcomposition of steel.Metallografic analysis reveals the presence of Fe2B phase.Key words: Boriding process, superf icial coat , coat technology.

  1. 21 CFR 176.160 - Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N-heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonyl glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N... § 176.160 Chromium (Cr III) complex of N-ethyl-N-heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonyl glycine. The chromium... by weight of the chromium (Cr III) complex of heptadecylfluoro-octane sulfonic acid may be safely...

  2. The chromium accumulation and its physiological effects in juvenile rockfish, Sebastes schlegelii, exposed to different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile rockfish (mean length 13.7±1.7 cm, and mean weight 55.6±4.8 g) were exposed for 4 weeks with the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 240 mg/kg. The profile of chromium in the tissues of rockfish is dependent on the exposure periods and chromium concentration. After 4 weeks, the order of chromium accumulation in tissues was liver>kidney>spleen>intestine>gill>muscle. The dietary chromium exposure decreased the growth rate and hepatosomatic index of rockfish. The major hematological findings were significant decrease in the red blood cell (RBC) count, hematocrit (Ht) value, and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration exposed to ≥120 mg/kg chromium concentrations. The dietary chromium exposure (≥120 mg/kg) led to notable increase in glucose, cholesterol, glutamic oxalate transaminase (GOT), and glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT) in plasma, whereas there was no considerable change in calcium, magnesium, total protein, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The results indicated that the dietary chromium exposure to rockfish can induce significant chromium accumulation in the specific tissues, inhibition of growth, and hematological alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An investigation of the bioaccumulation of chromium and uranium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mine waste, including tailings is generally outlined as one of the largest environmental concern which faces defunct mines in South Africa and New Union Gold Mine is no exception. These tailing contain heavy metal such as chromium (Cr) and uranium (U) which poses enormous threat to the environment even at small ...

  4. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Ziqiang; Chen Weixing; Zheng Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion behavior of porous Cr 3 C 2 in various SCW conditions was investigated. ► Cr 3 C 2 is stable in SCW at temperature below 420–430 °C. ► Cracks and disintegration were observed at elevated testing temperatures. ► Degradation of Cr 3 C 2 is related to the intermediate product CrOOH. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25–30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  5. Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical emission from laser-produced chromium and magnesium plasma under the effect of two sequential laser pulses ... Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India; Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory, Mississippi State University, 205 Research Boulevard, Starkville, ...

  6. Effect Of Chromium- Picolinat On Biochemical And Histopathological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium III tris (picolinate) [Cr(pic)3]is a popular nutritional supplement; however its safety has been questioned, especially with regard to its ability to act as a clastogen. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the biochemical and morphological changes in the liver following oral administration of Cr-picolinate and ...

  7. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphite chitosan binary (GCB) composite was prepared for hexavalent chromium adsorption from studied water. GCB was characterized by TGA, FTIR, SEM and X-ray diffraction techniques.Wide porous sorptive surface of 3.89 m 2 g − 1 and absorptive functionalities of GCB was due to 20% (w/w) graphite support on ...

  8. Studies on Chromium-free Conversion coatings on Aluminum | Oki ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of a chromium-free conversion coating on aluminum has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Auger Electron (AES) and Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) techniques. Within the limits of the resolution of the TEM, the coating is uniformly clear and featureless. It is composed ...

  9. Chromium-induced accumulation of peroxide content, stimulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium (Cr)-induced oxidative damage and changes in contents of chlorophyll, protein, peroxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) and activities of enzymatic antioxidants were investigated in 4-day-old green gram (Vigna radiata L. cv. Wilczek) seedlings. Cr increased the contents of peroxide and MDA but decreased the ...

  10. Local field corrections in the lattice dynamics of chromium | Ndukwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work extends the inclusion of local field corrections in the calculation of the phonon dispersion curves to the transition metal, chromium (Cr3+) using the formalism of lattice dynamics based on the transition metal model potential approach in the adiabatic and hatmonic approximations. The results obtained here have a ...

  11. Removal of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solutions using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hexavalent chromium exists in aquatic media as water soluble complex anions and persist. These are concentrated in industrial waste water especially from the tannery industries and release of effluents from industries adversely affects the environment. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions is carried ...

  12. Extended followup of a cohort of chromium production workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Peter St. John; Wang, Jing; Grace O'Leary, Keri

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study evaluates the mortality of 2,354 workers first employed at a Baltimore chromate production plant between 1950 and 1974. Methods The National Death Index (NDI Plus) was used to determine vital status and cause of death. Cumulative chromium (VI) exposure and nasal and skin irritation were evaluated as risk factors for lung cancer mortality. Results There are 91,186 person‐years of observation and 217 lung cancer deaths. Cumulative chromium (VI) exposure, nasal irritation, nasal perforation, nasal ulceration, and other forms of irritation (e.g., skin irritation) were associated with lung cancer mortality. Conclusion Cumulative chromium (VI) exposure was a risk factor for lung cancer death. Cancer deaths, other than lung cancer, were not significantly elevated. Irritation may be a possible mechanism for chromium (VI)‐induced lung cancer. Am. J. Ind. Med. 58:905–913, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26041683

  13. Chromium toxicity to nitrifying bacteria: implications to wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium, a heavy metal that enters wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) through industrial discharges, can be toxic to microorganisms carrying out important processes within biological wastewater treatment systems. The effect of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on ammonia dependent specific ox...

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  15. Spin-wave and critical neutron scattering from chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Axe, J.D.; Shirane, G.

    1971-01-01

    Chromium and its dilute alloys are unique examples of magnetism caused by itinerant electrons. The magnetic excitations have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering using a high-resolution triple-axis spectrometer. Spin-wave peaks in q scans at constant energy transfer ℏω could, in general...

  16. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coatings Projects for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    laboratory qualification of a total hexavalent chrome free coating systems for use on magnesium transmission housings. This project will leverage... hexavalent chrome free coating system by utilizing a hexavalent chrome free topcoat, primer, and pretreatment for magnesium parts used on Army...of the hexavalent chrome free conversion coatings. Hexavalent Chromium Free Coating System for Magnesium Housings on Aviation Systems Desert

  17. Differents remediation methodos for lead, chromium and cadmium contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trelles, G; Pochintesta, L; Ehrlich, S.

    2008-01-01

    The usage of phosphates in the remediation of plots contaminated with heavy metals appears to be a good strategy to lessen the danger of these metals. This study analyses the effect of the mobilization of: Lead, chromium and cadmium by utilizing diverse forms of phosphates in contaminated soils of three different origins with ph modification and without it

  18. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-20

    May 20, 2014 ... Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the ... and sediment were collected and trace element concentrations were measured with an ICP-MS. ..... Clay minerals are known to have high sorption affinities ..... sediment/water quality interaction with particular reference to the.

  19. Effects of high concentration of chromium stress on physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We studied the effects of high concentration of chromium (Cr) stress on physiological and biochemical characters and accumulation of Cr in Pingyang Tezao tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O. Kutze 'Pingyangtezao'] through a pot experiment. The results show that the indicators of photosynthesis were all suppressed with ...

  20. Effects of chromium picolinate supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladê Rosinski Rocha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chromium picolinate in Type 2 diabetic patients are investigated.  Seventeen Type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and chromium picolinate whereas the control group received fiber-rich hypocaloric diet and placebo. The chromium picolinate was offered twice a day at the dose of 100 μg. Anthropometric data such as blood pressure, fasting glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c were measured and these parameters were evaluated again after 90 days. No difference was reported in rates of body weight, waist, hip, body mass index, blood pressure and fasting glycemia (Control vs. Experimental groups after treatment. However, a decrease (p = 0.0405 of HbA1c occurred in the experimental group when the pre- and post-treatment rates were compared. HbA1c data showed that chromium picolinate improved the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes.

  1. Mössbauer and magnetization studies of nanosize chromium ferrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanosize chromium ferrite (CrF) powder samples were synthesized by citrate precursor route in the size range of 6 to 35 nm. The structural and magnetic behaviour of these samples were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Synthesized ...

  2. Chromium and molybdenum diffusion in tungsten single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotsman, S.M.; Koloskov, V.M.; Osetrov, S.V.; Polikarpova, I.P.; Tatarinova, G.N.; Timofeev, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of measuring temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients of homovalent impurities of chromium and molybdenum in tungsten single crystals. It is concluded that the difference of activation energies of selfdiffusion and impurity diffusion in the system 'tungsten-homovalent impurity' is conditioned by interaction of screened potentials of impurity and vacancy with Lazarus-Le Claire model

  3. Deposition of heated whey proteins on a chromium oxide surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Th.; Verheul, M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kruif, de C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Whey protein solutions were given different heat treatments after which their deposition on a chromium oxide surface (the outer layer of stainless steel) was measured by reflectometry. The deposition was studied under controlled flow conditions by using a stagnation point flow configuration. The

  4. Speciation of Chromium and Vanadium in Medicinal Plants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    lamps of vanadium and chromium operating at 318.4 nm and. 357.9 nm have .... Table 1 Results for the determination of Cr and V in soil (n = 6). [Cr(VI)]. Total [Cr] .... hydrogen storage: Attributes for near-term, early market PEM fuel cells, Curr.

  5. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... removed in multiple batch extractions from the leach liquor and titanium losses were minimal (< 1%). The chromium content of extracted solutions was reduced to less than 1 ppm and thermal hydrolysis of these solutions yielded white titanium(IV) oxide pigments that are suitable for use in the coatings pigment industry.

  6. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100μCi of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium

  7. Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Study of effect of chromium on titanium dioxide phase transformation by A Bellifa (pp 669–677). Figure S1. Structural ... 4 × 1⋅9486; 2 × 1⋅9799. Octahedral packing. 2 × 2 shared edges. 8 free edges. 3 shared edges. 4 corners. 5 free edges. 2 parallel shared edges. 2 corners. 10 free edges. O. O. Coordination scheme.

  8. Evaluation of some trace elements (zinc, chromium, cadmium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Throughout the world, tuberculosis (TB) infection is on the increase and it has remained one of the most important causes of death among adults in developing countries. This study evaluated the serum concentrations of some trace elements -Zinc (Zn), Manganese (Mn), Chromium (Cr) and Cadmium (Cd), in 100 blood ...

  9. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium by graphite–chitosan binary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hexavalent chromium; graphite–chitosan composite; adsorption kinetics. 1. Introduction ... [2], while Cr(III) is less toxicity and relatively innocuous. Cr(VI) generates in ..... Human Environments (New York: Wiley Inter-Science) p 3. [4] U.S. EPA ...

  10. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES FOR CHROMIUM IN THE 100 AREAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    (sm b ullet) Primary Objective: Protect the Columbia River - Focus is control and treatment of contamination at or near the shoreline, which is influenced by bank storage (sm b ullet) Secondary Objective: Reduce hexavalent chromium to 40,000 ppb), - Unknown source location(s); probably originating in reactor operation areas

  11. Effects of chromium supplementation on growth, nutrient digestibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of chromium picolinate (CrPic) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and protein and lipid quality of five anatomical parts in growing pigs. The 30-day study was conducted on eight castrated Topigs growing male pigs, with an initial bodyweight of 17.16 ± 0.62 kg.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed Ultrafine Chromium Oxide Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Jiang Xianliang; Yu Yueguang; Zeng Keli; Ren Xianjing; Li Zhenduo

    2007-01-01

    Ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were prepared by plasma spraying with ultrafine feedstock. Processing parameters of plasma spraying were optimized. Optical microscope (OM) was used to observe the microstructure of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology and particle size of ultrafine powder feedstock as well as to examine the microstructure of the chromium oxide coating. In addition, hardness and bonding strength of the ultrafine chromium oxide coatings were measured. The results showed that the optimized plasma spraying parameters were suitable for ultrafine chromium oxide coating and the properties and microstructure of the optimized ultrafine chromium oxide coating were superior compared to conventional chromium oxide wear resistant coatings

  13. Contribution of photoelectron spectrometry and infrared spectrometry to the study of various oxidised forms of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feve, L.

    1985-03-01

    Securate knowledge of internal surface of primary coolant circuits of PWR is required for an estimation of dissolution of used materials and for estimation of decontamination efficiency. The binding energies of various electron levels of chromium were determined by photoelectron spectrometry (ESCA), both for the metal and for certain compounds. Because of the intensities of the signals obtained the 2 p 3/2 level alone can be used for analytical purposes. Owing to a possible interference between this level due to hexavalent chromium and a satellite peak caused by trivalent chromium the method is not able to show up small amounts of chromium VI in chromium III. Simultaneous detection of the hexavalent and trivalent forms was achieved by infrared spectrometry. The problem of revealing traces of chromium VI in surface layers of trivalent chromium oxide has thus been solved [fr

  14. Residual effects of chromium gettering on the outgassing behavior of a stainless steel vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Blanchard, W.R.; Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    Laboratory experiments that compared chromium and titanium gettering showed that with chromium, unlike titanium, there is no appreciable diffusion of hydrogen isotopes into the film. It was concluded from these experiments that chromium gettering on tokamaks is more desirable than titanium gettering, since chromium should provide higher hydrogen recycling, minimize tritium inventories, and avoid hydrogen embrittlement. Large-scale sublimation sources, consisting of hollow elongated chromium spheres with internal resistance heaters, were developed for use on tokamaks. These sources have been used to getter both the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). In both bases, significant effects on plasma performance were observed, including lower Z/sub eff/ and radiated power losses and an increase in the density limit. In TFTR these effects were observed for a period of weeks after a single chromium deposition. This paper reports the results of laboratory experiments made to examine the gettering characteristics of chromium films under conditions simulating those in TFTR

  15. Work Environment Factors and Their Influence on Urinary Chromium Levels in Informal Electroplating Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyaningsih, Yuliani; Husodo, Adi Heru; Astuti, Indwiani

    2018-02-01

    One of the informal sector which absorbs labor was electroplating business. This sector uses chromium as coating material because it was strong, corrosion resistant and strong. Nonetheless hexavalent chromium is highly toxic if inhaled, swallowed and contact with skin. Poor hygiene, the lack of work environment factors and sanitation conditions can increase the levels of chromium in the body. This aimed of this study was to analyze the association between work environment factors and levels of urinary chromium in informal electroplating worker. A Purposive study was conducted in Tegal Central Java. The research subjects were 66 male workers. Chi Square analysis was used to establish an association between work environment factors and level of urinary chromium. There is a relationship between heat stress and wind direction to the chromium levels in urine (p 0.05). This explains that work environment factors can increase chromium levels in the urine of informal electroplating workers.

  16. Work Environment Factors and Their Influence on Urinary Chromium Levels in Informal Electroplating Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setyaningsih Yuliani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the informal sector which absorbs labor was electroplating business. This sector uses chromium as coating material because it was strong, corrosion resistant and strong. Nonetheless hexavalent chromium is highly toxic if inhaled, swallowed and contact with skin. Poor hygiene, the lack of work environment factors and sanitation conditions can increase the levels of chromium in the body. This aimed of this study was to analyze the association between work environment factors and levels of urinary chromium in informal electroplating worker. A Purposive study was conducted in Tegal Central Java. The research subjects were 66 male workers. Chi Square analysis was used to establish an association between work environment factors and level of urinary chromium. There is a relationship between heat stress and wind direction to the chromium levels in urine (p 0.05. This explains that work environment factors can increase chromium levels in the urine of informal electroplating workers.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of new metal-rich borides with boron fragments; Synthese und Charakterisierung von neuartigen metallreichen Boriden mit Borfragmenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbarki, Mohammed

    2016-03-30

    The present dissertation deals with the synthesis and characterization of new metal-rich borides of the Ce{sub 7}Ni{sub 5±x}Ge{sub 3±x}In{sub 6{sup -}}, Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2{sup -}} and NbRuB-type.The samples are synthesized by a solid state reaction route from elements using an electric arc furnace. The structural characterization of the compounds was carried out by using X-ray diffraction methods on powder samples and single crystals. The chemical composition of single-crystals was verified by EDX analyses. Moreover, the magnetic properties of suitable samples were investigated by SQUID magnetometry.The crystal structure of compounds with the nominal composition NbFe{sub 1-x}Ir{sub 6+x}B{sub 8} is successfully solved from single crystal X-ray data. The most prominent feature in this structure are one-dimensional chains along the c-axis formed by the magnetically active element iron on a site of mixed occupation with Iridium (Fe: Ir = 0.77 (2) 0.23 (2)). Thermomagnetic investigations reveal, that ferromagnetic ordering is observed below the Curie temperature (TC) of 350 K. Theoretical investigations suggest that the iron-chains are mainly responsible for the ferromagnetic ordering. In addition, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is calculated using isothermal magnetization measurements at several temperatures. The maximal magnetic entropy change ΔS = 0.032 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1} is observed in the vicinity of T{sub C}. For the phases Nb{sub 6}Mn{sub 0,75(2)}Ir{sub 6,25(2)}B{sub 8} and Nb{sub 6}Co{sub 1,09(2)}Ir{sub 5,91(2)}B{sub 8} a relationship between the measured ferrimagnetic ordering and the crystal structure is found. Tiny superstructure reflections measured by Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SEAD) indicate a different crystal system for those compounds, which allows a ferrimagnetic spin arrangement within this crystal structure.In the second part of the thesis new results about the Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2-} and NbRuB-type borides are presented, which both

  18. Synthesis, characterization and thermoelectric properties of metal borides, boron carbides and carbaborides; Synthese, Charakterisierung und thermoelektrische Eigenschaften ausgewaehlter Metallboride, Borcarbide und Carbaboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guersoy, Murat

    2015-07-06

    This work reports on the solid state synthesis and structural and thermoelectrical characterization of hexaborides (CaB{sub 6}, SrB{sub 6}, BaB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}), diboride dicarbides (CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), a carbaboride (NaB{sub 5}C) and composites of boron carbide. The characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction methods and Rietveld refinements based on structure models from literature. Most of the compounds were densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. As high-temperature thermoelectric properties the Seebeck coefficients, electrical conductivities, thermal diffusivities and heat capacities were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. ZT values as high as 0.5 at 1273 K were obtained for n-type conducting EuB{sub 6}. High-temperature X-ray diffraction also confirmed its thermal stability. The solid solutions Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}B{sub 6}, Ca{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} and Sr{sub x}Ba{sub 1-x}B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1) are also n-type but did not show better ZT values for the ternary compounds compared to the binaries, but for CaB{sub 6} the values of the figure of merit (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were significantly increased (ca. 50 %) compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process. Sodium carbaboride, NaB{sub 5}C, was found to be the first p-type thermoelectric material that crystallizes with the hexaboride-structure type. Seebeck coefficients of ca. 80 μV . K{sup -1} were obtained. Cerium diboride dicarbide, CeB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, and lanthanum diboride dicarbide, LaB{sub 2}C{sub 2}, are metallic. Both compounds were used as model compounds to develop compacting strategies for such layered borides. Densities obtained at 50 MPa were determined to be higher than 90 %. A new synthesis route using single source precursors that contain boron and carbon was developed to open the access to new metal-doped boron carbides. It was possible to obtain boron carbide, but metal-doping could not be

  19. New ternary tantalum borides containing boron dumbbells: Experimental and theoretical studies of Ta2OsB2 and TaRuB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarki, Mohammed; Touzani, Rachid St.; Rehorn, Christian W. G.; Gladisch, Fabian C.; Fokwa, Boniface P. T.

    2016-10-01

    The new ternary transition metal-rich borides Ta2OsB2 and TaRuB have been successfully synthesized by arc-melting the elements in a water-cooled crucible under an argon atmosphere. The crystal structures of both compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and their metal compositions were confirmed by EDX analysis. It was found that Ta2OsB2 and TaRuB crystallize in the tetragonal Nb2OsB2 (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) and the orthorhombic NbRuB (space group Pmma, no. 51) structure types with lattice parameters a=5.878(2) Å, c=6.857(2) Å and a=10.806(2) Å, b=3.196(1) Å, c=6.312(2) Å, respectively. Furthermore, crystallographic, electronic and bonding characteristics have been studied by density functional theory (DFT). Electronic structure relaxation has confirmed the crystallographic parameters while COHP bonding analysis indicates that B2-dummbells are the strongest bonds in both compounds. Moreover, the formation of osmium dumbbells in Ta2OsB2 through a Peierls distortion along the c-axis, is found to be the origin of superstructure formation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that the two phases are Pauli paramagnets, thus confirming the theoretical DOS prediction of metallic character. Also hints of superconductivity are found in the two phases, however lack of single phase samples has prevented confirmation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic stability of the two modifications of AMB (A=Nb, Ta; M =Ru, Os) are studied using DFT, as new possible phases containing either B4- or B2-units are predicted, the former being the most thermodynamically stable modification.

  20. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, M A; Mir, Mohsin; Murtaza, Shazad; Bhatti, Zafar I

    2003-05-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr(3+)) and hexavalent (Cr(6+)) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr(3+) is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases. In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100% efficiency in reducing Cr(6+) to Cr(3+), and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents. Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr(3+) to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100% was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100% efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confined that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  1. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Sandra S. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Liou, Louis [Department of Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine, 670 Albany St., Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Adam, Rosalyn M. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wise, John Pierce Sr., E-mail: john.wise@louisville.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, Science Building, 96 Falmouth Street, Portland, ME 04103 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. - Highlights: • Hexavalent chromium is genotoxic to human urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium induces aneuploidy in human urothelial cells. • hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells model the effects seen in primary urothelial cells. • Hexavalent chromium has a strong likelihood of being carcinogenic for bladder tissue.

  2. The high temperature impact response of tungsten and chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure polycrystalline tungsten and chromium at room and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.05 to 3 mm (tungsten) and from 0.1 to 2 mm (chromium). The use of fused silica windows in all but one experiment with chromium and in several high temperature experiments with tungsten led to the need for performing shock and optic characterization of these windows over the 300-1200 K temperature interval. Experiments with tungsten and chromium samples showed that annealing of the metals transforms the initial ramping elastic wave into a jump-like wave, substantially increasing the Hugoniot elastic limits of the metals. With increased annealing time, the spall strength of the two metals slightly increases. Both at room and at high temperatures, the elastic precursor in the two metals decays in two distinct regimes. At propagation distances smaller than ˜1 mm (tungsten) or ˜0.5 mm (chromium), decay is fast, with the dislocation motion and multiplication being controlled by phonon viscous drag. At greater distances, the rate of decay becomes much lower, with control of the plastic deformation being passed to the thermally activated generation and motion of dislocation double-kinks. The stress at which this transition takes place virtually coincides with the Peierls stress τP of the active glide system. Analysis of the annealing effects in both presently and previously studied BCC metals (i.e., Ta, V, Nb, Mo, W, and Cr) and of the dependencies of their normalized Peierls stresses τP(θ) /τP(0 ) on the normalized temperature θ=T /Tm allows one to conclude that the non-planar, split into several glide planes, structure of the dislocation core in these metals is mainly responsible for their plastic deformation features.

  3. The Effectiveness of Mendong Plant (Fimbrystilis Globulosa) as a Phytoremediator of Soil Contaminated with Chromium of Industrial Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Ferina, Pungky; Rosariastuti, Retno; Supriyadi, S

    2017-01-01

    The textile industry produces sideline output in the form of dangerous waste. The textile industrial waste containing heavy metal, one of which is Chromium (Cr).  Chromium is very dangerous metal for environment, especially chromium hexavalent that has properties of soluble, carcinogenic, and toxic. The pollution of chromium in soil is a problem that the action to be taken with the technology of bioremediation. Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with chromium using Mendong plant (Fimbrysti...

  4. Raman spectroscopy of supported chromium oxide catalysts : determination of chromium-oxygen bond distances and bond orders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    An empirical correlation is described for relating Raman stretching frequencies of chromium—oxygen (Cr—O) bonds to their bond lengths in chromium oxide reference compounds. An exponential fit of crystallographically determined Cr—O bond lengths to Cr—O Raman symmetric stretching frequencies

  5. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  6. Comparison of Ultrasound-Assisted and Regular Leaching of Vanadium and Chromium from Roasted High Chromium Vanadium Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Gao, Huiyang; Liu, Yajing; Zheng, Xiaole; Xue, Xiangxin

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasound-assisted leaching (UAL) was used for vanadium and chromium leaching from roasted material obtained by the calcification roasting of high-chromium-vanadium slag. UAL was compared with regular leaching. The effect of the leaching time and temperature, acid concentration, and liquid-solid ratio on the vanadium and chromium leaching behaviors was investigated. The UAL mechanism was determined from particle-size-distribution and microstructure analyses. UAL decreased the reaction time and leaching temperature significantly. Furthermore, 96.67% vanadium and less than 1% chromium were leached at 60°C for 60 min with 20% H2SO4 at a liquid-solid ratio of 8, which was higher than the maximum vanadium leaching rate of 90.89% obtained using regular leaching at 80°C for 120 min. Ultrasonic waves broke and dispersed the solid sample because of ultrasonic cavitation, which increased the contact area of the roasted sample and the leaching medium, the solid-liquid mass transfer, and the vanadium leaching rate.

  7. Biotransformation of hexavalent chromium into extracellular chromium(III) oxide nanoparticles using Schwanniomyces occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Pallavi T; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita S

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate biotransformation of toxic Cr(VI) ions into Cr2O3 nanoparticles by the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis. Reaction mixtures containing S. occidentalis NCIM 3459 and Cr(VI) ions that were initially yellow turned green after 48 h incubation. The coloration was due to the synthesis of chromium (III) oxide nanoparticles (Cr2O3NPs). UV-Visible spectra of the reaction mixtures showed peaks at 445 and 600 nm indicating (4)A2g → (4)T1g and (4)A2g → (4)T2g transitions in Cr2O3, respectively. FTIR profiles suggested the involvement of carboxyl and amide groups in nanoparticle synthesis and stabilization. The Cr2O3NPs ranged between 10 and 60 nm. Their crystalline nature was evident from the selective area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction patterns. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the chemical composition of the nanoparticles. These biogenic nanoparticles could find applications in different fields. S. occidentalis mediated biotransformation of toxic Cr(VI) ions into crystalline extracellular Cr2O3NPs under benign conditions.

  8. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  9. Crossover and valence band Kβ X-rays of chromium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazinic, Stjepko; Mandic, Luka; Kavcic, Matjaz; Bozicevic, Iva

    2011-01-01

    Kβ X-ray spectra of chromium metal and selected chromium oxides were measured twice using medium resolution flat crystal spectrometer and high resolution spectrometer employing Johansson geometry after excitation with 2 MeV proton beams. The positions and intensities of crossover (Kβ'') and valence (Kβ 2,5 ) band X-rays relative to the primary Kβ X-ray components were extracted in a consistent way. The results were compared with the existing data obtained by proton and photon induced ionization mechanisms and theoretical predictions. The obtained results in peak relative positions and intensities were analyzed in order to study dependence on the chromium oxidation states and chromium-oxygen bond lengths in selected chromium oxides. Our results obtained by both spectrometers confirm that the linear trend observed for the valence peak relative energy shift as a function of chromium oxidation number does not depend on the experimental resolution. Experimental results for normalized intensities (i.e. relative intensities divided with the number of chromium-oxygen pairs) of crossover and valence band X-rays obtained by both spectrometers are in very good agreement, and follow exponential relationship with the average Cr-O bond lengths in corresponding chromium oxides. The observed trends in crossover and valence X-rays normalized intensities could be used to measure the average chromium-oxygen bond length in various chromium oxides, with the sum of both crossover and valence X-ray normalized intensities being the most sensitive measure.

  10. Black and green pigments based on chromium-cobalt spinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliziario, Sayonara A., E-mail: sayonaraea@iq.unesp.br [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Andrade, Jeferson M. de [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Lima, Severino J.G. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, CT, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, CT, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soledade, Luiz E.B. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Hammer, P.; Longo, E. [Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Souza, Antonio G.; Santos, Ieda M.G. [Departamento de Quimica, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Campus I, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were prepared by the polymeric precursor method. {yields} Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4} displayed a dark color and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was green. {yields} The colors were related to the different oxidation states of Cr and Co. {yields} Cobalt enrichment result in an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decrease amount of Cr(VI). - Abstract: Chromium and cobalt oxides are widely used in the manufacture of industrial pigments. In this work, the Co(Co{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x})O{sub 4} powders with different chromium concentrations (x = 0, 0.25 and 1) were synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, heat treatment between 600 and 1000 deg. C. These powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, colorimetry, UV-vis absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Even with the addition of chromium, the XRD patterns revealed that all powders crystallize in a single spinel cubic structure. The spinels with higher cobalt amount, Co(CoCr)O{sub 4} and Co(Co{sub 1.75}Cr{sub 0.25})O{sub 4}, displayed a dark color, without the Co{sup 3+} reduction observed in Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} between 900 and 950 deg. C. The spinel with higher chromium amount, CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, was green. The colors were directly related to the occupation of tetrahedral and octahedral sites by the chromophores, as well as to the different oxidation states of chromium and cobalt. The different optical band gap values estimated from UV-vis spectra suggested the existence of intermediary energy levels within the band gap. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed an increasing presence of Co(III) and a decreasing amount of Cr(VI) with cobalt enrichment.

  11. Effect of supplementing finishing pigs with different sources of chromium on performance and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Manha Peres

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the dietary supplementation of different sources of chromium (inorganic: chromium sulfate and chelated: chromium-methionine during the finishing period of pigs to obtain improvements in the animal performance, and carcass and meat quality. The statistical design was randomized blocks, where 44 barrows, with an initial weight 60.49±5.12 kg, were divided into four blocks (heavier, heavy, light and lighter according to initial weight. The experimental diets were isoenergetic and isonutrient, except for the chromium level. The treatments were divided as follows: control (without chromium, control + 200 ppb of inorganic chromium (chromium sulfate, and control + 200 ppb of chelated chromium (chromium-methionine. In the performance measures, the stall was considered the experimental unit and in the blood parameters, carcass and meat evaluations each animal constituted the experimental unit. Animals were slaughtered when they reached the final average weight of 107.23±5.23 kg. Blood samples were collected and tested for blood parameters (cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose as well as carcass quality (hot and cold weights, yield, loin-eye area, muscle depth and backfat thickness and meat quality (initial and final pH, drip loss, color, chemical composition and lipid oxidation parameters. Chromium-methionine supplementation provides a greater daily weight gain only compared with the animals that are not supplemented with chromium, because feed conversion is better as compared with the other treatments. After 24 hours of storage, the meat from pigs supplemented either with chromium-methionine or with chromium sulfate presents lower lipid oxidation than that from non-supplemented animals. However, after three days of storage, only chromim-methionine is effective in reducing lipid oxidation.

  12. Investigation of the surface composition of electrodeposited black chromium by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survilienė, S.; Češūnienė, A.; Jasulaitienė, V.; Jurevičiūtė, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) bath is composed of oxide, hydroxide and metallic chromium. • Metallic phase is absent in black chromium electrodeposited from a Cr(III) + ZnO bath. • The near-surface layer is rich in hydroxides, whereas oxides of both metals predominate in the depth of the coatings. - Abstract: The paper reviews black chromium electrodeposited from a trivalent chromium bath containing ZnO as a second main component. The chemical compositions of the top layers of the black chromium coatings were studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. The surface of black chromium was found to be almost entirely covered with organic substances. To gain information on the state of each element in the deposit bulk, the layer-by-layer etching of the black chromium surface with argon gas was used. Analysis of XPS spectra has shown that the top layers of black chromium without zinc are composed of various Cr(III) components, organic substances and metallic Cr, whereas metallic Cr is almost absent in black chromium containing some amount of Zn(II) compounds. The ratios of metal/oxide phases were found to be 10/27 and 2/28 for black chromium without and with zinc, respectively. It has been determined that owing to the presence of ZnO in the Cr(III) bath, the percentage of metallic chromium is substantially reduced in black chromium which is quite important for good solar selective characteristics of the coating. The results confirm some of earlier observations and provide new information on the composition of the near-surface layers

  13. Electrothermal Vaporization-QQQ-ICP-MS for Determination of Chromium in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke Particulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresquez, Mark R; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nathalie; Gray, Naudia; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Watson, Clifford H; Pappas, R Steven

    2017-05-01

    Chromium is transported in mainstream tobacco smoke at very low concentrations. However, when chromium is deposited too deeply in the lungs for mucociliary clearance, or is in a particle that is too large to pass directly through tissues, it bioaccumulates in the lungs of smokers. It is important to determine the concentrations of chromium that are transported in mainstream smoke. Several reliable studies have resulted in reports of chromium concentrations in smoke particulate that were below limits of detection (LODs) for the instruments and methods employed. In this study, electrothermal vaporization-triple quad-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ETV-QQQ-ICP-MS) was chosen for determination of chromium concentrations in mainstream smoke because of the high sensitivity of ETV combined with QQQ-ICP-MS. The smoke from five reference, quality control, and commercial cigarettes was analyzed using ETV-QQQ-ICP-MS with isotope dilution for quantitative determination of chromium. The method LOD was sufficiently low that chromium concentrations in mainstream smoke could indeed be determined. The chromium concentrations in the smoke particulate were between 0.60 and 1.03 ng/cigarette. The range of chromium concentrations was at or below previously reported LODs. Determination of the oxidation state of the chromium transported in mainstream smoke would also be important, in consideration of the fact that both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) oxidation states cause inhalation toxicity, but chromium(VI) is also a carcinogen. It was possible to separate the oxidation states using ETV-QQQ-ICP-MS. However, determination of individual species at the levels found in mainstream smoke particulate matter was not possible with the present method. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Combination of synchrotron radiation X-ray microprobe and nuclear microprobe for chromium and chromium oxidation states quantitative mapping in single cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, Richard; Deves, Guillaume; Fayard, Barbara; Salome, Murielle; Susini, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium compounds are established carcinogens but their mechanism of cell transformation has not been elucidated yet. In this study, chromium oxidation state distribution maps in cells exposed to soluble (Na 2 CrO 4 ), or insoluble (PbCrO 4 ), Cr(VI) compounds have been obtained by use of the ESRF ID-21 X-ray microscope. In addition, the quantitative maps of element distributions in cells have been determined using the nuclear microprobe of Bordeaux-Gradignan. Nuclear microprobe quantitative analysis revealed interesting features on chromium, and lead, cellular uptake. It is suggested that cells can enhance PbCrO 4 solubility, resulting in chromium, but not lead uptake. The differential carcinogenic potential of soluble and insoluble Cr(VI) compounds is discussed with regard to chromium intracellular quantitative distribution

  15. Study of the Thermodynamics of Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) Binding to Fe3O4 and MnFe2O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Steven; Brogfeld, Nathan; Kim, Jisoo; Parsons, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Removal of chromium(III) or (VI) from aqueous solution was achieved using Fe3O4, and MnFe2O4 nanomaterials. The nanomaterials were synthesized using a precipitation method and characterized using XRD. The size of the nanomaterials was determined to be 22.4 ± 0.9 nm (Fe3O4) and 15.5 ± 0.5 nm (MnFe2O4). The optimal binding pH for chromium(III) and chromium(VI) were pH 6 and pH 3. Isotherm studies were performed, under light and dark conditions, to determine the capacity of the nanomaterials. The capacities for the light studies with MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were determined to be 7.189 and 10.63 mg/g, respectively, for chromium(III). The capacities for the light studies with MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were 3.21 and 3.46 mg/g, respectively, for chromium(VI). Under dark reaction conditions the binding of chromium(III) to the MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanomaterials were 5.74 and 15.9 mg/g, respectively. The binding capacity for the binding of chromium(VI) to MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 under dark reaction conditions were 3.87 and 8.54 mg/g, respectively. The thermodynamics for the reactions showed negative ΔG values, and positive ΔH values. The ΔS values were positive for the binding of chromium(III) and for chromium(VI) binding under dark reaction conditions. The ΔS values for chromium(VI) binding under the light reaction conditions were determined to be negative. PMID:23558081

  16. Determination of carbon in chromium by photon activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedoroff, M; Loos-Neskovic, C; Revel, G [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 94 - Vitry-sur-Seine (France). Centre d' Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique

    1975-01-01

    Carbon is determined in chromium by activation in 35 MeV photons. The sample is dissolved by a fused NaOH-NaNO/sub 3/ bath. Carbon dioxide is then extracted by acid dissolution of the solidified bath. A limit of detection of 0.03 ..mu..g of carbon is achieved. Chromium samples are irradiated in photons emitted from a platinum target submitted to an electron beam of 35 MeV produced by a linear accelerator at C.E.N. Saclay. Two graphite foils of some mg are irradiated at the same time and are used as standards. The radioactivities of absorbers and standards are measured on a NaI detector for the annihilation ..gamma..-ray of the ..beta../sup +/radiation.

  17. Impurity effects on the magnetic ordering in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, R.S.

    1992-05-01

    It is well-known that impurities profoundly alter the magnetic properties of chromium. While vanadium impurities suppress the Neel temperature T N , manganese impurities enhanced T N substantially. As evidenced by neutron scattering experiments, doping with as little as 0.2% vanadium changes the transition from weakly first order to second order. Young and Sokoloff explained that the first-order transition in pure chromium is caused by a charge-density wave which is the second harmonic of the spin-density wave. By examining the subtle balance between the spin-density and charge- density wave terms in the mean-field free energy, we find that the first-order transition is destroyed when the vanadium concentration exceeds about 0.15%, in agreement with experiments

  18. Chromium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodler, Alexandra; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during the Ar...... et al., 2007, Water Air Soil Poll. 179, 381-390. [2] Sánchez-Pastor et al., 2011, Cryst. Growth Des. 11, 3081-3089.......The chromium (Cr) isotopic composition of carbonates can potentially be used as a paleoclimate proxy to elucidate past fluctuations of oxygen contents in atmosphere and hydrosphere. The use of Cr isotopes to track paleoenvironmental changes, for example related to the rise of oxygen during...... the Archaean and Protoerozoic, needs careful assessment of the signal robustness and necessitates a thorough understanding of the Cr cycle in Earth system processes. We conducted experiments testing the incorporation and isotopic fractionation of chromate into the calcite lattice. Our experiments indicate...

  19. A mathematical model for the iron/chromium redox battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedkiw, P. S.; Watts, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the isothermal operation of a single anode-separator-cathode unit cell in a redox-flow battery and has been applied to the NASA iron/chromium system. The model, based on porous electrode theory, incorporates redox kinetics, mass transfer, and ohmic effects as well as the parasitic hydrogen reaction which occurs in the chromium electrode. A numerical parameter study was carried out to predict cell performance to aid in the rational design, scale-up, and operation of the flow battery. The calculations demonstrate: (1) an optimum electrode thickness and electrolyte flow rate exist; (2) the amount of hydrogen evolved and, hence, cycle faradaic efficiency, can be affected by cell geometry, flow rate, and charging procedure; (3) countercurrent flow results in enhanced cell performance over cocurrent flow; and (4) elevated temperature operation enhances cell performance.

  20. Morphologic and crystallographic studies on electrochemically formed chromium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amezawa, Koji [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Goto, Takuya; Tsujimura, Hiroyuki; Hagiwara, Rika; Tomii, Yoichi [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Uchimoto, Yoshiharu [Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ito, Yasuhiko [Department of Environmental Systems Science, Faculty of Engineering, Doshisya University, Kyotanabe-shi, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2007-11-20

    Chromium nitride films were prepared by anodically oxidizing nitride ions at 0.4-1.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li on chromium substrates in molten LiCl-KCl-Li{sub 3}N systems at 723 K. A crystalline Cr{sub 2}N film was successfully prepared at 0.4-1.4 V, and was thicker at more positive electrolytic potential. At 1.5 V, a Cr-N film could be also obtained, but its growth rate was relatively low. The film prepared at 1.5 V consisted of two distinctive layers. The surface layer was amorphous Cr-N containing crystalline CrN particles, and the inner layer was crystalline CrN. It was considered the existence of the amorphous phase suppressed the film growth. (author)

  1. Interaction of propylene with reduced surface of chromium molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalova, N.D.; Belokopytov, Yu.V.

    1978-01-01

    It has been found that reduction of oxidated chromium molybdate sample by propylene at 450 deg C does not change the form of energy surface heterogeneity and also practically does not effect activation desorption energy of C 3 H 6 . It is shown that oxygen of this catalyst volume is movable and is responsible for formation of products of C 3 H 6 partial oxidation (acetic aldehyde and acrolein) in the sample reduction by propylene

  2. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  3. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae | Sukumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of Rhizopus oryzae to reduce Cr6+ was evaluated in batch microcosms. The optimum pH of R. oryzae growth was between 6.0 and 7.0. The maximum chromium reduction efficiency of 91.15% and biomass growth was achieved at a pH of 7, temperature of 37°C, with an initial Cr6+ concentration of 400 ppm and ...

  4. Removal and transformation of hexavalent chromium in sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the efficiency of removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and to ascertain the fate of Cr(VI) in the treatment process. An SBR was operated with the FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE periods in the time ratio of 2:12:2:1.5:6.5 for a cycle ...

  5. Hexavalent Chromium Is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to American Alligator Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, Catherine; Xie, Hong; Guillette, Louis J.; Zhu, Cairong; Wise, John Pierce; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Metals are a common pollutant in the aquatic ecosystem. With global climate change, these levels are anticipated to rise as lower pH levels allow sediment bound metals to be released. The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is an apex predator in the aquatic ecosystem and is considered a keystone species; as such it serves as a suitable monitor for localized pollution. One metal of increasing concern is hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). It is present in the aquatic environment and is ...

  6. Chromium Elimination and Cannon Life Extension for Gun Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    the use of hexavalent chromium (VI) in the production of cannon barrels by developing a cost effective environmentally friendly Explosive Bonding...erosion- resistant chrome cobalt alloy matrix with 15% tungsten. Stellite is used as M60 machine gun barrel liner. Tantalum Cobalt Tungsten...Grounds (YPG) Preliminary proof of principle endurance testing at YPG shows promising results when conducted side by side to a chrome plated

  7. The behaviour of chromium in aquatic and terrestrial food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Chromium has been considered both as potential radioactive and conventional pollutant. Chromium-51 is produced by the activation of 50 Cr, which may be present either as a component of steel alloys used in reactors, or in Na 2 CrO 4 added as an anticorrosion agent to the cooling water. Only small amounts of 51 Cr are normally found in the liquid waste of nuclear power plants before discharge into rivers. In exceptional situations, however, as a result of the direct release of cooling waters, the aquatic environments may receive relatively large quantities of 51 Cr. Part of this 51 Cr is adsorbed e.g. to the sediments, but a fraction remains in solution in the river water. Somme accumulation of the radionuclide is observed in fresh water and marine organisms. Therefore, although 51 Cr has a relatively short physical half life (27.8d), it is of interest to acquire better information on its accumulation by different species of fresh water organisms and plants, as well as on its behaviour in soils, in order to evaluate the relative importance of this nuclide in the radioactive contamination of the aquatic and terrestrial food chains. As a related and sometimes associated pollutant, stable chromium is also taken into consideration. This element occurs fairly frequently as an environmental pollutant in many countries, either because of its abundance in soils derived from serpentine or because of its release to the environment from industrial wastes. The sequence of presentation of the experiment data is based on the consecutive steps of the contamination process: aquatic environment, soils, plant link of the food chain. Special attention is paid, in the different chapters, to the behaviour of various chemical forms of chromium and to their distribution in different fractions: soluble in water, adsorbed, precipitated on particles or complexed with organic material

  8. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in chromium(III) oxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Vazquez, Carlos; Banobre-Lopez, Manuel; Lopez-Quintela, M.A.; Hueso, L.E.; Rivas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The low temperature (4< T(K)<350) magnetic properties of chromium(III) oxide particles have been studied. A clear evidence of the presence of weak ferromagnetism is observed below 250 K. The magnetisation curves as a function of the applied field show coercive fields due to the canted antiferromagnetism of the particles. Around 55 K a maximum is observed in the zero-field-cooled curves; this maximum can be assumed as a blocking temperature, similarly to ultrafine ferromagnetic particles

  9. Chromium Isotope Anomaly Scaling with Past Warming Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmelzwaal, S.; O'Connor, L.; Preston, W.; Parkinson, I. J.; Schmidt, D. N.

    2017-12-01

    The recent expansion of oxygen minimum zones caused by anthropogenic global warming raises questions about the scale of this expansion with different emission scenarios. Ocean deoxygenation will impact marine ecosystems and fisheries demanding an assessment of the possible extent and intensity of deoxygenation. Here, we used past climate warming events to quantify a potential link between warming and the spread of oxygen minimum zones: including Ocean Anoxic Event (OAE) 1a, OAE 2 in the Cretaceous, the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), and Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. We applied the emerging proxy of chromium isotopes in planktic foraminifera to assess redox changes during the PETM, ETM2, and Pleistocene and bulk carbonate for the OAEs. Both δ53Cr and chromium concentrations respond markedly during the PETM indicative of a reduction in dissolved oxygen concentrations caused by changes in ocean ventilation and associated warming [1]. A strong correlation between Δδ53Cr and benthic Δδ18O, a measure of the excursion size in both oxygen and chromium isotopes, suggest temperatures to be one of the main drivers of ocean deoxygenation in the past [1]. Chromium concentrations decrease during ETM2 and OAE1a, and, increase by 4.5 ppm over the Plenus Cold Event during OAE2, which suggests enhanced seafloor ventilation. [1] Remmelzwaal, S.R.C., Dixon, S., Parkinson, I.J., Schmidt, D.N., Monteiro, F.M., Sexton, P., Fehr, M., Peacock, C., Donnadieu, Y., James, R.H., in review. Ocean deoxygenation during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. EPSL.

  10. Isolation of Electrogenic Microorganisms with Potential to Reduce Hexavalent Chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mora Collazos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolation of cultivable microorganisms was made from the biofilm formed on the anode of a microbial fuel cell put into operation for 30 days; isolated microorganisms were evaluated for their ability to produce energy and reduce the hexavalent chromium Cr (VI. Five microorganisms were isolated, which were characterized by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, placing them in four bacterial genera: Exiguobacterium (CrMFC1, Acinetobacter (CrMFC2, Aeromonas (CrMFC3 and CrMFC5 and Serratia (CrMFC4. All isolates showed electrogenic activity and ability to reduce hexavalent chromium; the Acinetobacter CrMFC1 strain showed the best electrochemical performance registering a maximum power density of 18.61 mW/m2; the other strains showed values of maximum power density between 4.6 mW/m2and 7.1 mW/m2. Strains Aeromonas CrMFC5 and Exiguobacterium CrMFC1 showed the best rates of chromium reduction being able to reduce 100 % of the Cr (VI in less than 24 hours, the Aeromonas CrMFC5 strain was the most efficient, reducing 100 % of Cr (VI in 10 hours; the other strains reduced 100% of the contaminant after 28 to 30 hours. The microorganisms isolated in this study are hardly known for their electrogenic capacity and for reducing Cr (VI; however, show promise for their use in combined systems involving energy production system coupled to bioremediation of chromium contaminated water.

  11. Application of Genetic Engineering for Chromium Removal from Industrial Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    N. K. Srivastava; M. K. Jha; I. D. Mall; Davinder Singh

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of the industrial wastewater can be particularly difficult in the presence of toxic compounds. Excessive concentration of Chromium in soluble form is toxic to a wide variety of living organisms. Biological removal of heavy metals using natural and genetically engineered microorganisms has aroused great interest because of its lower impact on the environment. Ralston metallidurans, formerly known as Alcaligenes eutrophus is a LProteobacterium colonizing indus...

  12. Plasma source ion implantation of ammonia into electroplated chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, J.T.; Walter, K.C.; Rej, D.J.; Nastasi, M.; Blanchard, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Ammonia gas (NH 3 ) has been used as a nitrogen source for plasma source ion implantation processing of electroplated chromium. No evidence was found of increased hydrogen concentrations in the bulk material, implying that ammonia can be used without risking hydrogen embrittlement. The retained nitrogen dose of 2.1 x 10 17 N-at/cm 2 is sufficient to increase the surface hardness of electroplated Cr by 24% and decrease the wear rate by a factor of 4

  13. Recovery of Chromium from Waste Taning Liquors by Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood M. Barbooti

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case study of AL-Za’afaraniya tanning factory, 15 km to the south of Baghdad, to spot light on simple chemical treatment of the discharged water to solve the environmental problems associated with its chromium content management. The treatment was extended to the recovery and reuse of chromium. Chromium was precipitated by the addition of magnesium oxide which also aid as a neutralizer for the acidic effluent. The laboratory treatment was carried out to find the optimum conditions. The wastewater samples were taken from the outline area of the tannery. Box-Wilson method was adopted to find useful relationships between the operating variables (temperature, mixing period and magnesium oxide dose and the pH and chromium content of effluent. The experimental data were successfully fitted to second order polynomial mathematical models for the treatment. The most favorable operating conditions for the treatment were: temperature, 30 ºC; mixing period, 50 min and magnesium oxide concentration, 3000 mg/L. On using the optimum conditions a mathematical model simulating the operation for the treatment was obtained as follows:Cr = 6.0848 – 0.001839 X11 – 0.105334 X12 – 0.041038 X13pH = 10.29086 – 0.001223 X11 – 0.140043 X12 – 0.00953 X13Experimentally Cr concentration was decreased to about (0.5 mg/L in wastewater after raising the pH value to (7.35 by adding magnesium oxide.

  14. Chromium speciation in solid matrices and regulation: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unceta, N. [University of the Basque Country, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Seby, F. [Ultra Traces Analyses Aquitaine (UT2A), Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Malherbe, J.; Donard, O.F.X. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement, IPREM, UMR CNRS 5254, Pau (France)

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, the extensive use of chromium in industrial processes has led to the promotion of several directives and recommendations by the European Union, that try to limit and regulate the presence of Cr(VI) in the environment and to protect industrial workers using chromium and end-users of manufactured products. As a consequence, new standard methods and analytical procedures have been published at the EU level for Cr(VI) determination in soil, sludge, sediment, and similar waste materials, workplace atmospheres, cement, packaging materials, industrially produced samples, and corrosion-protection layers on some components of vehicles and electrical and electronic equipment. The objective of this article is to summarize the different directives and recommendations and to critically review the currently existing standard methods and the methods published in the literature for chromium speciation in the above mentioned solid matrices, putting the emphasis on the different extraction procedures which have been developed for each matrix. Particular attention has been paid to Cr(III) and Cr(VI) inter-conversions that can occur during extraction and efforts to minimize these unwanted reactions. Although the use of NaOH-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions with hot plate extraction seems to be the more widespread procedure, species transformation can still occur and several studies suggest that speciated isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) could be a suitable tool for correction of these interconversions. Besides, recent studies have proved the role of Cr(III) in chromium toxicology. As a consequence, the authors suggest an update of standard methods in the near future. (orig.)

  15. Effects of chromium exposure from a cement factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isikli, B.; Demir, T.A.; Uerer, S.M.; Berber A.; Akar, T.; Kalyoncu, C.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the chromium concentrations of soil and plant specimens taken from a rural area exposed to cement factory emissions and also to determine the blood concentrations and sensitivity conditions observed in humans residing in this rural area. The study was carried out in Cukurhisar, a town in Eskisehir-Turkey, between May 2000 an March 2001. Besides the 108 soil (36 for control) and plant specimens, which were taken from eight different directions from the cement factory, blood samples of the individuals residing in this area were taken from 258 subject (258 for control) following a physical examination, and patch tests were als applied. The chromium concentrations of the soil and plant specimens take from different places in different directions of the factory were higher than in the control areas. The physical examination of subjects did not reveal results different from those of the control group except for the diagnosis of contact dermatitis. The analyses of venous blood samples showed that chromium concentrations were found to be within the reference values given for bot groups, but higher in the subjects (P<0.001). According to the results o patch tests, sensitivity to chromium was found to be more frequent for the subject group than the control group (P<0.05). According to these results clinical tools revealed no toxic effects for the subjects, except contact dermatitis. However, sensitivity to patch tests showed that this subject group has been affected compared to the control group and that this effect increased with age

  16. A Novel Nonelectrolytic Process for Chromium and Nickel Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    chromium (CrVI) has been regarded as the “ gold standard” against corrosion in military applications for decades [2]. Its uses range from electronics to...silver or gold . Furthermore, these researchers discovered that for centuries, the metal plating industry was dominated by mercury-based coating...generation of metal and metal alloy particles, including nanoparticles, from a physical mixture of metal nitrate, oxide or hydroxide species and urea. This

  17. Reduction Expansion Synthesis of Chromium and Nickel Metal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Garth V. Hobson Chair, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This thesis represents a...chromium and nickel coatings,” Plating and Surface Finishing, vol. 92, no. 4, pp. 42–48, Apr. 2005. [43] S. I. Sandler, Chemical and Engineering ...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. REDUCTION EXPANSION SYNTHESIS OF

  18. Determination of Chromium(III) Picolinate Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Il; Woo, Dong Jin; Kang, Dae Kyung; Lee, Myung Hee; Woo, Gun Jo; Cha, Ki Won

    2003-01-01

    Cr-(pic) 3 has been widely used as food additives, drugs, and feed additives. Accordingly, its determination method should be established. In the present paper, we have studied the determination method of chromium(III) picolinate accurately using ESI-MS on-lined with HPLC. Chromium(III) picolinate in feed products was determined successfully. Chromium(III) is very well known as an essential mineral. It is suggested as a cofactor in the maintenance of both normal lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by assisting the action of insulin on a cell membrane. According to the National Research Council, the daily recommended intake of chromium(III) is 50-200 μg. Several organic chromium(III) complexes have been reported to have significantly higher absorption and tissue incorporation activity than inorganic salts such as chromium(III) chloride

  19. Adsorption and desorption of hydrolyzed metal ions. 3. Scandium and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.; Matijevic, E.; Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY

    1987-01-01

    Adsorption of scandium(III) and chromium(III) species on a PVC latex was measured using radioactive isotopes; the uptake increased with increasing pH. The data were interpreted by combining aspects of the models of James and Healy and also of Anderson and Bockris. The experimental and calculated results agree quite well for scandium, but not for chromium. The deviation in the latter case is believed to be due to polymerization of the hydrolyzed chromium cations and to the interaction of chromium with the anionic surface groups of the latex. Neither of these interactions occur with scandium. Hydrolyzed scandium species adsorbed on the latex were removed by acidifying the dispersion, while chromium complexes were not, substantiating the proposed difference in the chemical nature of chromium and scandium species at the solid/solution interface. 32 refs.; 8 figs.; 8 tabs

  20. Dietary Chromium Supplementation for Targeted Treatment of Diabetes Patients with Comorbid Depression and Binge Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownley, Kimberly A.; Boettiger, Charlotte A.; Young, Laura; Cefalu, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary chromium supplementation for the treatment of diabetes remains controversial. The prevailing view that chromium supplementation for glucose regulation is unjustified has been based upon prior studies showing mixed, modest-sized effects in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Based on chromium's potential to improve insulin, dopamine, and serotonin function, we hypothesize that chromium has a greater glucoregulatory effect in individuals who have concurrent disturbances in dopamine and serotonin function – that is, complex patients with comorbid diabetes, depression, and binge eating. We propose, as suggested by the collective data to date, the need to go beyond the “one size fits all” approach to chromium supplementation and put forth a series of experiments designed to link physiological and neurobehavioral processes in the chromium response phenotype. PMID:25838140

  1. Preparation of Silica Modified with 2-Mercaptoimidazole and its SorptionProperties of Chromium(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Budiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified silica gel was prepared to remove the heavy metal of chromium(III from water sample. Silica gel was used as supporting material and the 2-mercaptoimidazole was immobilized onto surface silica so that the silica would have selective properties to adsorb the heavy metal chromium(III through the formation of coordination compound between the 2-mercaptoimidazole and chromium(III. The characterization of modified silica gel was carried out by analyzing the Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrum of this material in order to ensure the immobilization of 2-mercaptoimidazole onto the surface. The effect of pH solution, initial concentration of chromium(III, and interaction time were investigated in batch mode to find the adsorption properties of chromium(III onto modified silica. The condition optimum of these parameters was applied to determine the removal percentage of chromium(III in water sample using the modified silica gel

  2. Chronic occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium causes DNA damage in electroplating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu-Hui; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Xu-Chu; Jin, Li-Fen; Yang, Zhang-Ping; Jiang, Cai-Xia; Chen, Qing; Ren, Xiao-Bin; Cao, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2011-04-12

    Occupational exposure to chromium compounds may result in adverse health effects. This study aims to investigate whether low-level hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) exposure can cause DNA damage in electroplating workers. 157 electroplating workers and 93 control subjects with no history of occupational exposure to chromium were recruited in Hangzhou, China. Chromium levels in erythrocytes were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes was evaluated with the alkaline comet assay by three parameters: Olive tail moment, tail length and percent of DNA in the comet tail (tail DNA%). Urinary 8-OHdG levels were measured by ELISA. Chromium concentration in erythrocytes was about two times higher in electroplating workers (median: 4.41 μg/L) than that in control subjects (1.54 μg/L, P electroplating workers. Low-level occupational chromium exposure induced DNA damage.

  3. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) release from leather during 8 months of simulated use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Lidén, Carola

    2016-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) release from Cr-tanned leather articles is a major cause of Cr contact dermatitis. It has been suggested that Cr(VI) release from leather is not necessarily an intrinsic property of the leather, but is strongly dependent on environmental conditions. To test this hypothesis for long-term (8 months) simulated use. The release of total Cr and Cr(VI) from Cr-tanned, unfinished leather was analysed in subsequent phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) immersions for a period of 7.5 months. The effect of combined ultraviolet treatment and alkaline solution (pH 12.1) was tested. Dry storage [20% relative humidity (RH)] was maintained between immersions. Atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and diphenylcarbazide tests were used. Cr(VI) release was dependent on previous dry storage or alkaline treatment, but not on duration or number of previous immersions. Cr(III) release decreased with time. Fifty-two percent of the total Cr released during the last immersion period was Cr(VI). Cr(VI) release exceeded 9 mg/kg in all immersion periods except in the first 10-day immersion (2.6 mg/kg). Cr(VI) release is primarily determined by environmental factors (RH prior to immersion, solution pH, and antioxidant content). The RH should be kept low prior to testing Cr(VI) release from leather. © 2016 The Authors. Contact Dermatitis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. High-carbon chromium steel resistance to small plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajduchenya, V.F.; Madyanov, S.A.; Apaev, B.A.; Kirillov, Yu.V.; Sokolov, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    The phase composition of a steel with 1.08% C and 2.1% Cr, and the variation in the level of microstresses in the matrix as related to the annealing temperature in the range of 400-600 deg C and in the applied compression stress were investigated. To study the phase composition, and chromium content in the α-solution and the carbide phases, magnetic, chemical, and X-ray spectrum analyses were carried out. The change in the level of microstresses was determined roentgenographically. During the stress relaxation test at temperatures of 20-180 deg C, the mechanism of plastic deformation near the yield point was investigated. It is shown that three dislocation mechanisms operate in high-carbon chromium steel under the conditions at hand: overcoming the Pierls-Nabarro barriers by the dislocations, overcoming the stress fields of coherent carbide particles by dislocations, and circumvention of second-phase particles by dislocations. The dependence of the realization of the different plastic deformation mechanisms on the number of carbide particles and the chromium concentration in the matrix was established. The thermally activated nature of the motion of the dislocations under conditions of stress relaxation at an elevated temperature is noted

  5. Supported chromium-molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chianelli, R.R.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the process for preparing a supported hydroprocessing catalyst. The process comprising compositing a quantity of a particulate, porous catalyst support material comprising one or more refactory oxides with one or more catalyst precursor salts and heating the composite at elevated temperature of at least about 200/sup 0/C up to about 600/sup 0/, in the presence of a sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur bearing compound is present in excess of that contained in the catalyst precursor and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The catalyst precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture therof and a cation comprising trivalent chromium or a mixture of trivalent chromium with one or more divalent promoter metals selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Co, Mn, Cu and a mixture thereof wherein the trivalent chromium and divalent promoter metals are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand, L

  6. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-06-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and COD(Cr) of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms.

  7. Study on anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing hexavalent chromium*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-bin; Xiao, Hua-hua; Sun, Shui-yu

    2005-01-01

    A self-made anaerobic bio-filter bed which was inoculated with special sludge showed high efficiency in removing hexavalent chromium. When pump flow was 47 ml/min and CODCr of wastewater was about 140 mg/L, it took 4 h to decrease the Cr6+ concentrations from about 60 mg/L to under 0.5 mg/L, compared with 14 h without carbon source addition. Cr6+ concentrations ranged from 64.66 mg/L to 75.53 mg/L, the system efficiency was excellent. When Cr6+ concentration reached 95.47 mg/L, the treatment time was prolonged to 7.5 h. Compared with the contrast system, the system with trace metals showed clear superiority in that the Cr6+ removal rate increased by 21.26%. Some analyses also showed that hexavalent chromium could probably be bio-reduced to trivalent chromium, and that as a result, the chrome hydroxide sediment was formed on the surface of microorganisms. PMID:15909347

  8. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  9. Structure and growth of oxide on iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M.G.C.; McEnaney, B.; Scott, V.D.

    1974-01-01

    Several oxides form during the initial stages of oxidation of iron-chromium alloys at 400 to 600 0 C in CO 2 -1%CO gas. The nature of the oxidation product depends upon crystallographic orientation and composition of the substrate, and can be explained by considering the maximum solubility of chromium in different oxide phases together with interfacial and strain energy factors. Kinetics of oxidation together with micrographic observations indicate that, as oxidation proceeds spinel oxide M 3 O 4 nucleates at sites on the substrate surface associated with asperities. The spinel nuclei grow laterally and vertically until they coalesce and the scale subsequently thickens according to a parabolic rate law. The duplex structure of scales is interpreted in terms of an outward diffusion of cations together with simultaneous growth of an inner layer in the space created by this outward movement. Scale porosity provides a route for gas-phase transport of oxidant to support the growth of the inner layer. Regularly spaced lamellar voids which may form in the inner layer are believed to be associated with a cyclic vacancy condensation process. Enrichment of the inner layer in chromium is explained by analysis of the possible diffusion path networks in close-packed oxides. Some comments are made concerning possible practical applications of these data. (author)

  10. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  11. Lead and chromium removal from leachate using horsetail (Equisetum hyemale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kurniati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation has been widely used for wastewater treatment technology. Horsetail was investigated for its capacity to remediate lead and chromium in leachate. This plant seemed to be an effective choice for phytoremediation due to its survival in extreme to moderate conditions, the availability of annual or perennial varieties and a deep root system. Conducted in a greenhouse, this research used leachate from final disposal. The leachate was exposed to six treated plants with three multiplications using activated natural zeolite media for one month. The treatments were flow system i.e. batch and continue, and living plants weight that is 0, 153 and 306 g planted in 20 cm diameter and 30 cm deep pots. The leachate pH, temperature, lead, and chromium concentration were observed and also the surrounding temperature and humidity. Results showed that 82.2% of lead can be removed by 153 gram horsetail on batch system as well as 61.2% chromium removal by 153 gram horsetail on continue system. Horsetail seemed to have future to be applied in phytoremediation of artisanal and small scale mining waste.

  12. Study of transport and micro-structural properties of magnesium di-boride strand under react and bend mode and bend and react mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Ananya; Das, Subrat Kumar; Bano, Anees; Pradhan, Subrata

    2015-01-01

    I-V characterization of commercial multi-filamentary Magnesium Di-Boride (MgB 2 ) wire of diameter 0.83 mm were studied in cryocooler based self-field characterization system under both react and bent mode and bent and react mode for a range of temperature 6 K - 25 K. This study is of practical technical relevance where the heat treatment of the superconducting wire makes the sample less flexible for winding in magnet and in other applications. There are limited reported data, available on degradation of MgB 2 wire with bending induced strain in react and wind and wind and react method. In the present work the bending diameter were varied from 80 mm to 20 mm in the interval of 10 mm change of bending diameter and for each case critical current (Ic) of the strand is measured for the above range of temperature. An ETP copper made customized sample holder for mounting the MgB 2 strand was fabricated and is thermally anchored to the cooling stage of the cryocooler. It is seen from the experimental data that in react and bent mode the critical current degrades from 105 A to 87 A corresponding to bending diameter of 80 mm and 20 mm respectively. The corresponding bending strain was analytically estimated and compared with the simulation result. It is also observed that in react and bent mode, the degradation of the transport property of the strand is less as compared to react and bent mode. For bent and react mode in the same sample, the critical current (Ic) was measured to be ∼145 A at 15 K for bending diameter of 20 mm. Apart from studying the bending induced strain on MgB 2 strand, the tensile test of the strand at RT was carried out. The electrical characterizations of the samples were accompanied by the microstructure analyses of the bent strand to examine the bending induced degradation in the grain structure of the strand. All these experimental findings are expected to be used as input to fabricate prototype MgB 2 based magnet. (author)

  13. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  14. Effect of supplementing finishing pigs with different sources of chromium on performance and meat quality

    OpenAIRE

    Peres, Louise Manha; Bridi, Ana Maria; Silva, Caio Abércio da; Andreo, Nayara; Barata, Cátia Chilanti Pinheiro; Dário, Julie Gabriela Nagi

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the dietary supplementation of different sources of chromium (inorganic: chromium sulfate and chelated: chromium-methionine) during the finishing period of pigs to obtain improvements in the animal performance, and carcass and meat quality. The statistical design was randomized blocks, where 44 barrows, with an initial weight 60.49±5.12 kg, were divided into four blocks (heavier, heavy, light and lighter) according to initial weight. The experimental diets were i...

  15. Biosorption of hexavalent chromium in a tannery industry wastewater using fungi species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    The isolated fungi species of different kinds from chromium contaminated soil sites located in Nagalkeni, Chennai were used for reducing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater of Nagalkeni, Chennai. The experiments were conducted to know biosorption potential of isolated fungi species for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater against the different p H, fungi biomass and chromium(VI) concentration (dilution ratio). The results of this study indicated that the order of maximum removal of chromium(VI) by an isolated fungi species at an optimum pH of 3, fungi biomass of 4g and an initial chromium(VI) concentration of 18.125 mg/L (dilution ratio 4) is A. niger > A. flavus > A. fumigatus > A. nidulans > A. heteromorphus > A. foetidus > A. viridinutans. This study found that the maximum removal of chromium(VI) was achieved by Aspergillus niger (96.3 %) than other fungi species at chromium(VI) concentration of 18.125 mg/L in a tannery industry wastewater. The chromium removal from tannery industry wastewater was validated by checking chromium removal in an aqueous solution and by checking the removal efficiency of other parameters in a tannery industry wastewater using same isolated A. niger. Biosorption model was proposed to simulate the experimental condition for removing chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater by all isolated fungi species. The R2 and x2 values of the proposed model predicted that the proposed biosorption model is very much useful for predicting the trend of reduction potential of chromium(VI) in a tannery industry wastewater by all isolated fungi species. This study suggested that one could select the type of fungi species, ion concentration level, selection of treatment period, quantity of biomass to be used, and p H level of the medium, to achieve the highest reduction of any toxic metals from any contaminated water, wastewater and soil environment.

  16. Detergents and bleaches are sources of chromium contact dermatitis in Israel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingber, A; Gammelgaard, Bente; David, M

    1998-01-01

    Total chromium levels were determined in 38 detergents and 12 bleaches on the market in Israel (45 locally produced, 5 imported). The samples were analyzed by Zeeman-corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium levels were higher than 5 ppm in 28 (56%) of the 50 products...... ppm, it is concluded that these consumer products may be the cause of the high incidence of chromium sensitivity in Israel....

  17. Evaluation of a method for the determination of chromium in urine by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.; Sardinas, O.; Castaneda, I.; Sanchez, R.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the determination of chromium in urine by atomic absorption spectrometry, using electrothermic atomization with pyrolytic graphite tubes, is proposed. The determinations are performed by standard addition. The method is applicable to biologic monitoring of populations with different degrees of exposition. It is also used in the analysis of chromium in sediments. Results of chromium in urine of a population group non-exposed to the metal are presented. 11 refs

  18. USE OF TWO DIGESTION METHODS IN THE EVALUATION OF CHROMIUM CONTENT IN CATTLE'S MEAT SUPPLEMENTED WITH CHROMIUM CHELATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. T. de Andrade

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze the chromium content in beef using two digestion methods. There were used samples from 24 18-month-old male cattle, and twelve of them were supplemented and twelve were not supplemented with chromium chelate. These samples were evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy, previously submitted to digestion method using nitric acid (65% with hydrogen peroxide (35% and to digestion method, using solution of nitric perchloric acid in the proportion 3:1. Immediately after the slaughter, the carcasses were sent to sanitary maturation. After 24 hours, samples between 12th and 13th rib in the muscle Longissimus Thoracis were taken. For evaluation, it was used completely randomized design (Die and analysis of variance (ANOVA at 5% of significance level. The results didn't evidenced any significant difference (p>0,05 between the (cromo content, regardless the supplementation. The same happened with the digestion methods used.

  19. Characterization of the Organic Component of Low-Molecular-Weight Chromium-Binding Substance and Its Binding of Chromium123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Watson, Heather M.; Gao, Junjie; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Cassady, Carolyn J.; Vincent, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential element over 50 y ago and was shown to have therapeutic potential in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes; however, its mechanism of action at a molecular level is unknown. One chromium-binding biomolecule, low-molecular weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr or chromodulin), has been found to be biologically active in in vitro assays and proposed as a potential candidate for the in vivo biologically active form of chromium. Characterization of the organic component of LMWCr has proven difficult. Treating bovine LMWCr with trifluoroacetic acid followed by purification on a graphite powder micro-column generates a heptapeptide fragment of LMWCr. The peptide sequence of the fragment was analyzed by MS and tandem MS (MS/MS and MS/MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation and post-source decay. Two candidate sequences, pEEEEGDD and pEEEGEDD (where pE is pyroglutamate), were identified from the MS/MS experiments; additional tandem MS suggests the sequence is pEEEEGDD. The N-terminal glutamate residues explain the inability to sequence LMWCr by the Edman method. Langmuir isotherms and Hill plots were used to analyze the binding constants of chromic ions to synthetic peptides similar in composition to apoLMWCr. The sequence pEEEEGDD was found to bind 4 chromic ions per peptide with nearly identical cooperativity and binding constants to those of apoLMWCr. This work should lead to further studies elucidating or eliminating a potential role for LMWCr in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and other conditions resulting from improper carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:21593351

  20. Erosion Modeling of the High Contraction Chromium Plated Crusader Gun System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, S

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-chemical- mechanical erosion modeling predictions are given for the high contraction chromium plated Crusader gun system based on extensive cannon firing, inspection, characterization, and experimental data...