WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromatophores

  1. Colour gamuts in polychromatic dielectric elastomer artificial chromatophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Conn, Andrew; Cerruto, Antonio; Winters, Amy; Roke, Calum

    2014-03-01

    Chromatophores are the colour changing organelles in the skins of animals including fish and cephalopods. The ability of cephalopods in particular to rapidly change their colouration in response to environmental changes, for example to camouflage against a new background, and in social situations, for example to attract a mate or repel a rival, is extremely attractive for engineering, medical, active clothing and biomimetic robotic applications. The rapid response of these chromatophores is possible by the direct coupling of fast acting muscle and pigmented saccules. In artificial chromatophores we are able to mimic this structure using electroactive polymer artificial muscles. In contrast to prior research which has demonstrated monochromatic artificial chromatophores, here we consider a novel multi-colour, multi-layer, artificial chromatophore structure inspired by the complex dermal chromatophore unit in nature and which exploits dielectric elastomer artificial muscles as the electroactive actuation mechanism. We investigate the optical properties of this chromatophore unit and explore the range of colours and effects that a single unit and a matrix of chromatophores can produce. The colour gamut of the multi-colour chromatophore is analysed and shows its suitability for practical display and camouflage applications. It is demonstrated how, by varying actuator strain and chromatophore base colour, the gamut can be shifted through colour space, thereby tuning the artificial chromatophore to a specific environment or application.

  2. The structure–function relationships of a natural nanoscale photonic device in cuttlefish chromatophores

    OpenAIRE

    Deravi, Leila F.; Magyar, Andrew P.; Sheehy, Sean P.; Bell, George R. R.; Mäthger, Lydia M.; Senft, Stephen L.; Trevor J Wardill; Lane, William S.; Kuzirian, Alan M.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-01-01

    Cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, possess neurally controlled, pigmented chromatophore organs that allow rapid changes in skin patterning and coloration in response to visual cues. This process of adaptive coloration is enabled by the 500% change in chromatophore surface area during actuation. We report two adaptations that help to explain how colour intensity is maintained in a fully expanded chromatophore when the pigment granules are distributed maximally: (i) pigment layers as thin as three ...

  3. Melanocortin systems on pigment dispersion in fish chromatophores

    OpenAIRE

    AkiyoshiTakahashi; YumikoSaito

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is responsible for pigment dispersion in the chromatophores of fish and other tetrapods such as amphibians and reptiles. Recently, we discovered that alpha-MSH did not always stimulate pigment dispersion because this hormonal peptide exerted no effects on the melanophores of flounders. We assumed that the reduction of alpha-MSH activity was related to the co-expression of different alpha-MSH receptor subtypes—termed melanocortin receptors (MC...

  4. The structure-function relationships of a natural nanoscale photonic device in cuttlefish chromatophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deravi, Leila F; Magyar, Andrew P; Sheehy, Sean P; Bell, George R R; Mäthger, Lydia M; Senft, Stephen L; Wardill, Trevor J; Lane, William S; Kuzirian, Alan M; Hanlon, Roger T; Hu, Evelyn L; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-04-01

    Cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, possess neurally controlled, pigmented chromatophore organs that allow rapid changes in skin patterning and coloration in response to visual cues. This process of adaptive coloration is enabled by the 500% change in chromatophore surface area during actuation. We report two adaptations that help to explain how colour intensity is maintained in a fully expanded chromatophore when the pigment granules are distributed maximally: (i) pigment layers as thin as three granules that maintain optical effectiveness and (ii) the presence of high-refractive-index proteins-reflectin and crystallin-in granules. The latter discovery, combined with our finding that isolated chromatophore pigment granules fluoresce between 650 and 720 nm, refutes the prevailing hypothesis that cephalopod chromatophores are exclusively pigmentary organs composed solely of ommochromes. Perturbations to granular architecture alter optical properties, illustrating a role for nanostructure in the agile, optical responses of chromatophores. Our results suggest that cephalopod chromatophore pigment granules are more complex than homogeneous clusters of chromogenic pigments. They are luminescent protein nanostructures that facilitate the rapid and sophisticated changes exhibited in dermal pigmentation. PMID:24478280

  5. Eye-independent, light-activated chromatophore expansion (LACE) and expression of phototransduction genes in the skin of Octopus bimaculoides

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, M. Desmond; Oakley, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    Cephalopods are renowned for changing the color and pattern of their skin for both camouflage and communication. Yet, we do not fully understand how cephalopods control the pigmented chromatophore organs in their skin and change their body pattern. Although these changes primarily rely on eyesight, we found that light causes chromatophores to expand in excised pieces of Octopus bimaculoides skin. We call this behavior light-activated chromatophore expansion (or LACE). To uncover how octopus s...

  6. A Fluorescent Chromatophore Changes the Level of Fluorescence in a Reef Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Wucherer, Matthias F; Michiels, Nico K.

    2012-01-01

    Body coloration plays a major role in fish ecology and is predominantly generated using two principles: a) absorbance combined with reflection of the incoming light in pigment colors and b) scatter, refraction, diffraction and interference in structural colors. Poikilotherms, and especially fishes possess several cell types, so-called chromatophores, which employ either of these principles. Together, they generate the dynamic, multi-color patterns used in communication and camouflage. Several...

  7. 6-Ketocholestanol is a recoupler for mitochondria, chromatophores and cytochrome oxidase proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, A A; Bloch, D A; Chernyak, B V; Dedukhova, V I; Mansurova, S E; Severina, I I; Simonyan, R A; Vygodina, T V; Skulachev, V P

    1997-01-16

    The effect of 6-ketocholestanol (kCh) on various natural and reconstituted membrane systems has been studied. 6-ketocholestanol (5 alpha-Cholestan-3 beta-ol-6-one), a compound increasing the membrane dipole potential, completely prevents or reverses the uncoupling action of low concentrations of the most potent artificial protonophore SF6847. This effect can be shown in the rat liver and heart muscle mitochondria, in the intact lymphocytes, in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores, and in proteoliposomes with the heart muscle or Rh. sphaeroides cytochrome oxidase. The recoupling effect of kCh disappears within a few minutes after the kCh addition and cannot be observed at all at high SF6847 concentrations. Almost complete recoupling is also shown with FCCP, CCCP, CCP and platanetin. With 2,4-dinitrophenol, fatty acids and gramicidin, kCh is ineffective. With TTFB, PCP, dicoumarol, and zearalenone, low kCh concentrations are ineffective, whereas its high concentrations recouple but partially. The kCh recoupling is more pronounced in mitochondria, lymphocytes and proteoliposomes than in chromatophores. On the other hand, mitochondria, lymphocytes and proteoliposomes are much more sensitive to SF6847 than chromatophores. A measurable lowering of the electric resistance of a planar bilayer phospholipid membrane (BLM) are shown to occur at SF6847 concentrations which are even higher than in chromatophores. In BLMs, kCh not only fails to reverse the effect of SF6847, but even enhances the conductivity increase caused by this uncoupler. It is assumed that action of low concentrations of the SF6847-like uncouplers on coupling membranes involves cytochrome oxidase and perhaps some other membrane protein(s) as well. This involvement is inhibited by the asymmetric increase in the membrane dipole potential, caused by incorporation of kCh to the outer leaflet of the membrane. PMID:9030261

  8. Immobilization of fish chromatophores for use as a micro-biosensor for biological toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojović Ljiljana V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromatophores isolated from the Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens represent a class of living cells that provide a vivid color response to microbial pathogens and environmental toxins. The selection of the most appropriate microcarrier and the development of the optimal technique for the chromatophore immobilization in order to enable directed transport of the sensor cells throughout microchannels of the biosensor, as well to preserve the cell survival and its functionality was studied. Microcarriers derived from glass, polystyrene and gelatin (collagen were tested as substrates for chromatophore attachement. Gelatin microcarriers were found to be the most suitable, due to high attachment efficiency (95% of attached cells, preservation of the cell viability and enhanced cell sensitivity. The optimum conditions for fish cell immobilization on collagen microcarriers were determined based on the cell-to-microcarrier bead ratio and the pH of the solution. The rate of cell attachment to the gelatin microcarrier followed first-order kinetics. Pretreatment of the gelatin beads with fibronectin, known as a cell attachment-promoting agent, resulted in a 10% higher attachment rate constant (k.

  9. A fluorescent chromatophore changes the level of fluorescence in a reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wucherer, Matthias F; Michiels, Nico K

    2012-01-01

    Body coloration plays a major role in fish ecology and is predominantly generated using two principles: a) absorbance combined with reflection of the incoming light in pigment colors and b) scatter, refraction, diffraction and interference in structural colors. Poikilotherms, and especially fishes possess several cell types, so-called chromatophores, which employ either of these principles. Together, they generate the dynamic, multi-color patterns used in communication and camouflage. Several chromatophore types possess motile organelles, which enable rapid changes in coloration. Recently, we described red fluorescence in a number of marine fish and argued that it may be used for private communication in an environment devoid of red. Here, we describe the discovery of a chromatophore in fishes that regulates the distribution of fluorescent pigments in parts of the skin. These cells have a dendritic shape and contain motile fluorescent particles. We show experimentally that the fluorescent particles can be aggregated or dispersed through hormonal and nervous control. This is the first description of a stable and natural cytoskeleton-related fluorescence control mechanism in vertebrate cells. Its nervous control supports suggestions that fluorescence could act as a context-dependent signal in some marine fish species and encourages further research in this field. The fluorescent substance is stable under different chemical conditions and shows no discernible bleaching under strong, constant illumination. PMID:22701587

  10. A fluorescent chromatophore changes the level of fluorescence in a reef fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias F Wucherer

    Full Text Available Body coloration plays a major role in fish ecology and is predominantly generated using two principles: a absorbance combined with reflection of the incoming light in pigment colors and b scatter, refraction, diffraction and interference in structural colors. Poikilotherms, and especially fishes possess several cell types, so-called chromatophores, which employ either of these principles. Together, they generate the dynamic, multi-color patterns used in communication and camouflage. Several chromatophore types possess motile organelles, which enable rapid changes in coloration. Recently, we described red fluorescence in a number of marine fish and argued that it may be used for private communication in an environment devoid of red. Here, we describe the discovery of a chromatophore in fishes that regulates the distribution of fluorescent pigments in parts of the skin. These cells have a dendritic shape and contain motile fluorescent particles. We show experimentally that the fluorescent particles can be aggregated or dispersed through hormonal and nervous control. This is the first description of a stable and natural cytoskeleton-related fluorescence control mechanism in vertebrate cells. Its nervous control supports suggestions that fluorescence could act as a context-dependent signal in some marine fish species and encourages further research in this field. The fluorescent substance is stable under different chemical conditions and shows no discernible bleaching under strong, constant illumination.

  11. Paulinella longichromatophora sp. nov., a New Marine Photosynthetic Testate Amoeba Containing a Chromatophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunju; Park, Myung Gil

    2016-02-01

    The freshwater testate filose amoeba Paulinella chromatophora is the sole species in the genus to have plastids, usually termed "chromatophores", of a Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus-like cyanobacterial origin. Here, we report a new marine phototrophic species, Paulinella longichromatophora sp. nov., using light and electron microscopy and molecular data. This new species contains two blue-green U-shaped chromatophores reaching up to 40μm in total length. Further, the new Paulinella species is characterized by having five oral scales surrounding the pseudostomal aperture. All trees generated using three nuclear rDNA datasets (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, and the concatenated 18S + 28S rDNA) demonstrated that three photosynthetic Paulinella species (two freshwater species, P. chromatophora and Paulinella strain FK01, and one marine species, P. longichromatophora) congruently formed a monophyletic group with strong support (≥90% of ML and ≥0.90 of PP), but their relationship to each other within the clade remained unresolved in all trees. P. longichromatophora, nevertheless, clustered consistently together with Paulinella strain FK01 with very low support, but the clade received strong support in plastid phylogenies. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from plastid-encoded 16S rDNA and a concatenated dataset of plastid 16S+23S rDNA demonstrated that chromatophores of all photosynthetic Paulinella species were monophyletic. The monophyletic group fell within a cyanobacteria clade having a close relationship to an α-cyanobacterial clade containing Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus species with very robust support (100% of ML and 1.0 of PP). Additionally, phylogenetic analyses of nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid 16S rDNA suggested divergent evolution within the photosynthetic Paulinella population after a single acquisition of the chromatophore. After the single acquisition of the chromatophore, ancestral photosynthetic Paulinella appears to have diverged into at least two distinct

  12. Identification of chromatophore membrane protein complexes formed under different nitrogen availability conditions in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selao, Tiago Toscano; Branca, Rui; Chae, Pil Seok;

    2011-01-01

    The chromatophore membrane of the photosynthetic diazotroph Rhodospirillum rubrum is of vital importance for a number of central processes, including nitrogen fixation. Using a novel amphiphile, we have identified protein complexes present under different nitrogen availability conditions by the use...... expressed proteins, such as subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex and other TCA cycle enzymes that are usually found in the cytosol, thus hinting at a possible association to the membrane in response to nitrogen deficiency. We propose a redox sensing mechanism that can influence the membrane...

  13. Synchronous changes in coral chromatophore tissue density and skeletal banding as an adaptive response to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisana, R. N.; Miller, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    Corals are a key reservoir of biodiversity in coastal, shallow water tropical marine environments, and density banding in their aragonite skeletons is used as a sensitive record of paleoclimate. Therefore, the cellular response of corals to environmental change and its expression in skeletal structure is of significant importance. Chromatophores, pigment-bearing cells within the ectoderm of hermatypic corals, serve to both enhance the photosynthetic activity of zooxanthellae symbionts, as well as protect the coral animal from harmful UV radiation. Yet connections have not previously been drawn between chromatophore tissue density and the development of skeletal density bands. A histological analysis of the coral Montastrea faveolata has therefore been conducted across a bathymetric gradient of 1-20 m on the southern Caribbean island of Curaçao. A combination of field and laboratory photography, serial block face imaging (SBFI), two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), and 3D image analysis has been applied to test whether M. faveolata adapts to increasing water depth and decreasing photosynthetically active radiation by shifting toward a more heterotrophic lifestyle (decreasing zooxanthellae tissue density, increasing mucocyte tissue density, and decreasing chromatophores density). This study is among the first to collect and evaluate histological data in the spatial context of an entire unprocessed coral polyp. TPLSM was used to optically thin section unprocessed tissue biopsies with quantitative image analysis to yield a nanometer-scale three-dimensional map of the quantity and distribution of the symbionts (zooxanthellae) and a host fluorescent pigments (chromatophores), which is thought to have photoprotective properties, within the context of an entire coral polyp. Preliminary results have offered new insight regarding the three-dimensional distribution and abundance of chromatophores and have identified: (1) M. faveolata tissue collected from 8M SWD do

  14. The first see-through frog created by breeding: description, inheritance patterns, and dermal chromatophore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Masayuki; Islam, Mohammed Mafizul; Igawa, Takeshi; Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furukawa, Yukari; Sano, Naomi; Fujii, Tamotsu; Yoshizaki, Norio

    2016-01-01

    We have succeeded in creating see-through frogs from natural color mutants of the Japanese brown frog Rana japonica, which usually possesses an ochre or brown back; this coloration enables the organs, blood vessels, and eggs to be observed through the skin without performing dissection. We crossed two kinds of recessive color mutant (black-eyed and gray-eyed) frogs through artificial insemination, and F2 offspring produced frogs whose skin is translucent throughout the life cycle. Three kinds of dermal chromatophores-xanthophores, iridophores, and melanophores-are observed in a layered arrangement in the skin of wild-type frogs, but few chromatophores were present in the skin of the see-through frogs. The translucent skin enables observation of organ growth and cancer formation and progression in the animal, which can be monitored over its entire life without the need for dissection. See-through frogs thus provide a useful animal model for environmental, medical, and biological research. PMID:27080918

  15. Possible involvement of cone opsins in distinct photoresponses of intrinsically photosensitive dermal chromatophores in tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Chi Chen

    Full Text Available Dermal specialized pigment cells (chromatophores are thought to be one type of extraretinal photoreceptors responsible for a wide variety of sensory tasks, including adjusting body coloration. Unlike the well-studied image-forming function in retinal photoreceptors, direct evidence characterizing the mechanism of chromatophore photoresponses is less understood, particularly at the molecular and cellular levels. In the present study, cone opsin expression was detected in tilapia caudal fin where photosensitive chromatophores exist. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed co-existence of different cone opsins within melanophores and erythrophores. By stimulating cells with six wavelengths ranging from 380 to 580 nm, we found melanophores and erythrophores showed distinct photoresponses. After exposed to light, regardless of wavelength presentation, melanophores dispersed and maintained cell shape in an expansion stage by shuttling pigment granules. Conversely, erythrophores aggregated or dispersed pigment granules when exposed to short- or middle/long-wavelength light, respectively. These results suggest that diverse molecular mechanisms and light-detecting strategies may be employed by different types of tilapia chromatophores, which are instrumental in pigment pattern formation.

  16. Energy transfer properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores during adaptation to low light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, B; Lunceford, C; Lin, S; Woronowicz, K; Niederman, R A; Woodbury, N W

    2014-08-28

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to explore the pathway and kinetics of energy transfer in photosynthetic membrane vesicles (chromatophores) isolated from Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides cells harvested 2, 4, 6 or 24 hours after a transition from growth in high to low level illumination. As previously observed, this light intensity transition initiates the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus and an increase in the number of light harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes relative to light harvesting 1 (LH1) and reaction center (RC) complexes. It has generally been thought that the increase in LH2 complexes served the purpose of increasing the overall energy transmission to the RC. However, fluorescence lifetime measurements and analysis in terms of energy transfer within LH2 and between LH2 and LH1 indicate that, during the remodeling time period measured, only a portion of the additional LH2 generated are well connected to LH1 and the reaction center. The majority of the additional LH2 fluorescence decays with a lifetime comparable to that of free, unconnected LH2 complexes. The presence of large LH2-only domains has been observed by atomic force microscopy in Rba. sphaeroides chromatophores (Bahatyrova et al., Nature, 2004, 430, 1058), providing structural support for the existence of pools of partially connected LH2 complexes. These LH2-only domains represent the light-responsive antenna complement formed after a switch in growth conditions from high to low illumination, while the remaining LH2 complexes occupy membrane regions containing mixtures of LH2 and LH1-RC core complexes. The current study utilized a multi-parameter approach to explore the fluorescence spectroscopic properties related to the remodeling process, shedding light on the structure-function relationship of the photosynthetic assembles. Possible reasons for the accumulation of these largely disconnected LH2-only pools are discussed. PMID:25008288

  17. Contributions of Phenoxazone-Based Pigments to the Structure and Function of Nanostructured Granules in Squid Chromatophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas L; DiBona, Christopher W; Dinneen, Sean R; Jones Labadie, Stephanie F; Chu, Feixia; Deravi, Leila F

    2016-04-19

    Understanding the structure-function relationships of pigment-based nanostructures can provide insight into the molecular mechanisms behind biological signaling, camouflage, or communication experienced in many species. In squid Doryteuthis pealeii, combinations of phenoxazone-based pigments are identified as the source of visible color within the nanostructured granules that populate dermal chromatophore organs. In the absence of the pigments, granules experience a reduction in diameter with the loss of visible color, suggesting important structural and functional features. Energy gaps are estimated from electronic absorption spectra, revealing highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies that are dependent upon the varying carboxylated states of the pigment. These results implicate a hierarchical mechanism for the bulk coloration in cephalopods originating from the molecular components confined within in the nanostructured granules of chromatophore organs. PMID:27049640

  18. Functional interfacing of Rhodospirillum rubrum chromatophores to a conducting support for capture and conversion of solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, John W; Woronowicz, Kamil; Lamptey, Joana L; Awong, John; Baird, James; Moshar, Amir; Vittadello, Michele; Falkowski, Paul G; Niederman, Robert A

    2013-09-26

    Owing to the considerable current interest in replacing fossil fuels with solar radiation as a clean, renewable, and secure energy source, light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems offers a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. In particular, intracytoplasmic membrane vesicles (chromatophores) from the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum provide a fully functional and robust photosynthetic apparatus, ideal for biophysical investigations of energy transduction and incorporation into biohybrid photoelectrochemical devices. These vesicular organelles, which arise by invagination of the cytoplasmic membrane, are the sites of the photochemical reaction centers and the light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex. The LH1 protein is responsible for collecting visible and near-IR radiant energy and funneling these excitations to the reaction center for conversion into a transmembrane charge separation. Here, we have investigated the morphology, fluorescence kinetics and photocurrent generation of chromatophores from Rsp. rubrum deposited directly onto gold surfaces in the absence of chemical surface modifications. Atomic force microscopy showed a significant coverage of the gold electrode surface by Rsp. rubrum chromatophores. By in situ fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements, a high retention of the quantum yield of photochemistry was demonstrated in the photoactive films. Chronoamperometric measurements showed that the assembled bioelectrodes were capable of generating sustained photocurrent under white light illumination at 220 mW/cm(2) with a maximum current of 1.5 μA/cm(2), which slowly declines in about 1 week. This study demonstrates the possibility of photoelectrochemical control of robust chromatophore preparations from Rsp. rubrum that paves the way for future incorporation into functional solar cells. PMID:23789750

  19. oca2 Regulation of chromatophore differentiation and number is cell type specific in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirl, Alisha J; Linbo, Tor H; Cobb, Marea J; Cooper, Cynthia D

    2014-03-01

    We characterized a zebrafish mutant that displays defects in melanin synthesis and in the differentiation of melanophores and iridophores of the skin and retinal pigment epithelium. Positional cloning and candidate gene sequencing link this mutation to a 410-kb region on chromosome 6, containing the oculocutaneous albinism 2 (oca2) gene. Quantification of oca2 mutant melanophores shows a reduction in the number of differentiated melanophores compared with wildtype siblings. Consistent with the analysis of mouse Oca2-deficient melanocytes, zebrafish mutant melanophores have immature melanosomes which are partially rescued following treatment with vacuolar-type ATPase inhibitor/cytoplasmic pH modifier, bafilomycin A1. Melanophore-specific gene expression is detected at the correct time and in anticipated locations. While oca2 zebrafish display unpigmented gaps on the head region of mutants 3 days post-fertilization, melanoblast quantification indicates that oca2 mutants have the correct number of melanoblasts, suggesting a differentiation defect explains the reduced melanophore number. Unlike melanophores, which are reduced in number in oca2 mutants, differentiated iridophores are present at significantly higher numbers. These data suggest distinct mechanisms for oca2 in establishing differentiated chromatophore number in developing zebrafish. PMID:24330346

  20. Direct and simultaneous measurements of light-driven pH gradient and ATP synthesis by 31P-NMR for the chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides G1C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The correlation between ATP synthesis and light-driven pH gradient across the chromatophore membranes of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides G1C was investigated employing 31P-NMR. The internal and external pH were determined by measuring the chemical shift of inorganic phosphate inside and outside the chromatophores, respectively. When the chromatophore suspension was illuminated in the presence of ADP outside the chromatophores, generation of the pH gradient and ATP synthesis could be detected simultaneously. The authors recorded the NMR spectra changing with illumination time, initial external pH and light intensity. The apparent rate of ATP synthesis was determined from the intensities of the signals ascribed to ADP and ATP. The rate of ATP synthesis during the first 30 min illumination was compared with ΔpH generated. The ATP synthesis started at ΔpH ∼ 0.5 and increased its rate with the increase of ΔpH. The rate was almost saturated at above ΔpH ∼ 1.5 or external pH ∼ 7.2. Therefore it can be said that under continuous illumination, the photophosphorylation system of this chromatophore works most efficiently in the physiological pH range. The apparent rate of ATP synthesis was found to decrease at higher external pH and for the illuminations longer than 30 min. This was attributed to ATP hydrolysis which was more efficient at a higher pH. (Auth.)

  1. 月光鱼色素细胞分布及特征的显微观察%Observation of the Distribution and Microstructure of Chromatophores in Xiphophorus maculatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑曙明; 吴青; 李小兵; 魏夕铭; 张铁岩

    2014-01-01

    The chromatophores of the skin ,the scale ,the dorsal fin ,the caudal fin ,the ventral fin ,the pectoral fin and the anal fin in Xiphophorus maculatus was observed by the microscope .Four kinds of pig‐ment cells ,namely melanophore ,xanthophore ,erythrophore and iridophore ,were detected on the surface of the skin and the scale ,and melanophore ,xanthophore and erythrophore on the fins .The melanophores were relatively big in size and black in color ,with round pigment granules in them .They were of two types :dendritic and non‐dendritic .The xanthophores ,with round yellow pigment granules ,were yellow or orange .The cells were mostly oval in shape ,but some were of irregular shape .Some yellow pigment particles were found to cluster in diffuse distribution .The erythrophores ,with round red pigment gran‐ules ,were orange‐red or dark‐red in color and mostly oval in shape .Some cells and red pigment particles clustered into cestiform or in diffuse distribution .Some cells were yellow or orange at the center ,with dense red pigment particles distributed around it ,thus forming composite pigment cells .The iridophores , with short rod‐like light‐blue pigment granules ,were very small in size ,oval in shape and blue‐gray in col‐or .A large number of the pigment particles were dispersed on the skin and the scale .%在显微镜下对月光鱼皮肤、鳞片、背鳍、尾鳍、腹鳍、胸鳍和臀鳍上的色素细胞进行了详细观察。结果表明,皮肤和鳞片上有黑色素细胞、黄色素细胞、红色素细胞和虹彩细胞4种色素细胞,各鳍有除虹彩细胞外的其余3种色素细胞。黑色素细胞较大,黑色,产生圆形黑色素颗粒,细胞有树突状分支和无分支2种类型;黄色素细胞为黄色或桔黄色,产生圆形黄色素颗粒,细胞多为卵圆形、有的呈不规则形,也有黄色素颗粒聚集成弥散状;红色素细胞为橙红色或深红色,产生圆形红色素颗粒,

  2. The first see-through frog created by breeding: description, inheritance patterns, and dermal chromatophore structure

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Sumida; Mohammed Mafizul Islam; Takeshi Igawa; Atsushi Kurabayashi; Yukari Furukawa; Naomi Sano; Tamotsu Fujii; Norio Yoshizaki

    2016-01-01

    We have succeeded in creating see-through frogs from natural color mutants of the Japanese brown frog Rana japonica, which usually possesses an ochre or brown back; this coloration enables the organs, blood vessels, and eggs to be observed through the skin without performing dissection. We crossed two kinds of recessive color mutant (black-eyed and gray-eyed) frogs through artificial insemination, and F2 offspring produced frogs whose skin is translucent throughout the life cycle. Three kinds...

  3. RNase P RNA from the Recently Evolved Plastid of Paulinella and from Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Bernal-Bayard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The RNase P RNA catalytic subunit (RPR encoded in some plastids has been found to be functionally defective. The amoeba Paulinella chromatophora contains an organelle (chromatophore that is derived from the recent endosymbiotic acquisition of a cyanobacterium, and therefore represents a model of the early steps in the acquisition of plastids. In contrast with plastid RPRs the chromatophore RPR retains functionality similar to the cyanobacterial enzyme. The chromatophore RPR sequence deviates from consensus at some positions but those changes allow optimal activity compared with mutated chromatophore RPR with the consensus sequence. We have analyzed additional RPR sequences identifiable in plastids and have found that it is present in all red algae and in several prasinophyte green algae. We have assayed in vitro a subset of the plastid RPRs not previously analyzed and confirm that these organelle RPRs lack RNase P activity in vitro.

  4. Fish scales as indicators of wastewater toxicity from an international water channel Tung Dhab drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajbir; Dua, Anish

    2012-05-01

    The effect of wastewater exposure on scales and chromatophores of freshwater fish Channa punctatus was studied using wastewater dilutions (60-100%) from an international water channel Tung Dhab drain at an interval of 15 and 30 days. The exposed fish showed significant alterations such as uprooted and damaged lepidonts and dispersal of chromatophores. These observations strongly suggest that fish scales can be successfully employed as indicators of wastewater pollution. PMID:21701892

  5. Comparison of pigment cell ultrastructure and organisation in the dermis of marble trout and brown trout, and first description of erythrophore ultrastructure in salmonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurdjevič, Ida; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sušnik Bajec, Simona

    2015-11-01

    Skin pigmentation in animals is an important trait with many functions. The present study focused on two closely related salmonid species, marble trout (Salmo marmoratus) and brown trout (S. trutta), which display an uncommon labyrinthine (marble-like) and spot skin pattern, respectively. To determine the role of chromatophore type in the different formation of skin pigment patterns in the two species, the distribution and ultrastructure of chromatophores was examined with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The presence of three types of chromatophores in trout skin was confirmed: melanophores; xanthophores; and iridophores. In addition, using correlative microscopy, erythrophore ultrastructure in salmonids was described for the first time. Two types of erythrophores are distinguished, both located exclusively in the skin of brown trout: type 1 in black spot skin sections similar to xanthophores; and type 2 with a unique ultrastructure, located only in red spot skin sections. Morphologically, the difference between the light and dark pigmentation of trout skin depends primarily on the position and density of melanophores, in the dark region covering other chromatophores, and in the light region with the iridophores and xanthophores usually exposed. With larger amounts of melanophores, absence of xanthophores and presence of erythrophores type 1 and type L iridophores in the black spot compared with the light regions and the presence of erythrophores type 2 in the red spot, a higher level of pigment cell organisation in the skin of brown trout compared with that of marble trout was demonstrated. Even though the skin regions with chromatophores were well defined, not all the chromatophores were in direct contact, either homophilically or heterophilically, with each other. In addition to short-range interactions, an important role of the cellular environment and long-range interactions between chromatophores in promoting adult pigment pattern

  6. Protein translocons in photosynthetic organelles of Paulinella chromatophora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Gagat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rhizarian amoeba Paulinella chromatophora harbors two photosynthetic cyanobacterial endosymbionts (chromatophores, acquired independently of primary plastids of glaucophytes, red algae and green plants. These endosymbionts have lost many essential genes, and transferred substantial number of genes to the host nuclear genome via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT, including those involved in photosynthesis. This indicates that, similar to primary plastids, Paulinella endosymbionts must have evolved a transport system to import their EGT-derived proteins. This system involves vesicular trafficking to the outer chromatophore membrane and presumably a simplified Tic-like complex at the inner chromatophore membrane. Since both sequenced Paulinella strains have been shown to undergo differential plastid gene losses, they do not have to possess the same set of Toc and Tic homologs. We searched the genome of Paulinella FK01 strain for potential Toc and Tic homologs, and compared the results with the data obtained for Paulinella CCAC 0185 strain, and 72 cyanobacteria, eight Archaeplastida as well as some other bacteria. Our studies revealed that chromatophore genomes from both Paulinella strains encode the same set of translocons that could potentially create a simplified but fully-functional Tic-like complex at the inner chromatophore membranes. The common maintenance of the same set of translocon proteins in two Paulinella strains suggests a similar import mechanism and/or supports the proposed model of protein import. Moreover, we have discovered a new putative Tic component, Tic62, a redox sensor protein not identified in previous comparative studies of Paulinella translocons.

  7. Fluorescence biosensor based on CdTe quantum dots for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the fabrication of fluorescence biosensors based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus. The core biosensor was composed of (i) the highly luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs, (ii) chromatophores extracted from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, and (iii) the antibody of β-subunit. This core part was linked to the peripheral part of the biosensor via a biotin–streptavidin–biotin bridge and finally connected to the H5N1 antibody to make it ready for detecting H5N1 avian influenza virus. Detailed studies of each constituent were performed showing the image of QDs-labeled chromatophores under optical microscope, proper photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe/CdS QDs, chromatophores and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses. (paper)

  8. Fluorescence biosensor based on CdTe quantum dots for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa Nguyen, Thi; Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Hien Vu, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Quyen Dong, Van; Khang Dinh, Duy; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-09-01

    This report highlights the fabrication of fluorescence biosensors based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) for specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus. The core biosensor was composed of (i) the highly luminescent CdTe/CdS QDs, (ii) chromatophores extracted from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, and (iii) the antibody of β-subunit. This core part was linked to the peripheral part of the biosensor via a biotin–streptavidin–biotin bridge and finally connected to the H5N1 antibody to make it ready for detecting H5N1 avian influenza virus. Detailed studies of each constituent were performed showing the image of QDs-labeled chromatophores under optical microscope, proper photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe/CdS QDs, chromatophores and the H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

  9. Dissociation of Circadian and Circatidal Timekeeping in the Marine Crustacean Eurydice pulchra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, L.; Hastings, M. H.; Green, E. W.; Tauber, E.; Sládek, Martin; Webster, S. G.; Kyriacou, C. P.; Wilcockson, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 19 (2013), s. 1863-1873. ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : tidal rhythms * circadian rhythms * circatidal oscillator * Eurydice pulchra * casein kinase 1 * clock genes, chromatophore Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.916, year: 2013

  10. Advances in comparative and environmental physiology. Vol. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpigny, J.L.; Coyette, J.; Davail, S.; Feller, G.; Fonze, E.; Foulkes, E.C.; Frere, J.M.; Fujii, R.; Genicot, S.; Gerday, C.; Joris, B.; Lamotte-Brasseur, J.; Maina, J.N.; Narinx, E.; Nguyen-Disteche, M.; Oshima, N.; Viarengo, A.; Zekhnini, Z.

    1994-12-31

    The present volume contains six reviews on : 1. Motile Activities of Fish Chromatophores; 2. Epithelial Transport of Heavy Metals; 3. Heavy Metal Cytotoxicity in Marine Organisms; 4. Comparative Pulmonary Morphology and Morphometry; 5. Molecular Adaptations in Resistance to Penicillins; 6. Molecular Adaptations of Enzymes from Thermophilic and Psychrophilic Organisms. (orig.). 56 figs.

  11. Connectivity of the intracytoplasmic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: a functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verméglio, André; Lavergne, Jérôme; Rappaport, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is mostly present in intracytoplasmic membrane invaginations. It has long been debated whether these invaginations remain in topological continuity with the cytoplasmic membrane, or form isolated chromatophore vesicles. This issue is revisited here by functional approaches. The ionophore gramicidin was used as a probe of the relative size of the electro-osmotic units in isolated chromatophores, spheroplasts, or intact cells. The decay of the membrane potential was monitored from the electrochromic shift of carotenoids. The half-time of the decay induced by a single channel in intact cells was about 6 ms, thus three orders of magnitude slower than in isolated chromatophores. In spheroplasts obtained by lysis of the cell wall, the single channel decay was still slower (~23 ms) and the sensitivity toward the gramicidin concentration was enhanced 1,000-fold with respect to isolated chromatophores. These results indicate that the area of the functional membrane in cells or spheroplasts is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of isolated chromatophores. Intracytoplasmic vesicles, if present, could contribute to at most 10% of the photosynthetic apparatus in intact cells of Rba. sphaeroides. Similar conclusions were obtained from the effect of a ∆pH-induced diffusion potential in intact cells. This caused a large electrochromic response of carotenoids, of similar amplitude as the light-induced change, indicating that most of the system is sensitive to a pH change of the external medium. A single internal membrane and periplasmic space may offer significant advantages concerning renewal of the photosynthetic apparatus and reallocation of the components shared with other bioenergetic pathways. PMID:25512104

  12. Differential sensitivity of membrane-associated pyrophosphatases to inhibition by diphosphonates and fluoride delineates two classes of enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykov, A A; Dubnova, E B; Bakuleva, N P; Evtushenko, O A; Zhen, R G; Rea, P A

    1993-07-26

    1,1-Diphosphonate analogs of pyrophosphate, containing an amino or a hydroxyl group on the bridge carbon atom, are potent inhibitors of the H(+)-translocating pyrophosphatases of chromatophores prepared from the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum and vacuolar membrane vesicles prepared from the plant Vigna radiata. The inhibition constant for aminomethylenediphosphonate, which binds competitively with respect to substrate, is below 2 microM. Rat liver mitochondrial pyrophosphatase is two orders of magnitude less sensitive to this compound but extremely sensitive to imidodiphosphate. By contrast, fluoride is highly effective only against the mitochondrial pyrophosphatase. It is concluded that the mitochondrial pyrophosphatase and the H(+)-pyrophosphatases of chromatophores and vacuolar membranes belong to two different classes of enzyme. PMID:8392953

  13. Recollections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, A W

    1993-02-01

    About 1939, Sam Ruben and Martin Kamen introduced me to the emergent application of artificial radio-isotopes in the study of photosynthesis. While my own experiments on CO2 fixation by isolated chloroplasts turned out to be negative, their laboratory provided me with an informative and exciting experience. Also, there were many stimulating contacts with Cornelis van Niel, Robert Emerson, Don DeVault and many other outstanding scientists. Efforts on my part to obtain a better understanding of intermediary metabolism, eventually led me to Fritz Lipmann's laboratory. There I was encouraged to study the metabolic activities of cell-free preparations of photosynthetic purple bacteria. Investigations of oxidative phosphorylation by isolated bacterial chromatophores in the dark raised questions about the possible effects of light on the phosphorylation activities of such preparations. Surprisingly, high rates of phosphorylation were observed in the light in the absence of molecular oxygen ('light-induced phosphorylation'). In this process, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) could be converted quantitatively into adenosine triphosphate (ATP). It was postulated that this process was 'cyclic' in nature, as only catalytic concentrations of added electron donors were required. Later, at Minnesota, it could be shown that similar chromatophore preparations, in the presence of suitable electron donors, could reduce nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to NADH in the light. It was then demonstrated that the chromatophores of Rhodospirilum rubrum, as well as the smaller membrane components derived from them, must contain the active metabolic components for these photosynthetic reactions.These observations, and studies on the kinetics of the formation and decay of light-induced free radicals, appeared to demonstrate the usefulness of bacterial chromatophores and of their membrane fragments in the study of partial reactions of bacterial photosynthesis

  14. A highly distributed Bragg stack with unique geometry provides effective camouflage for Loliginid squid eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Holt, Amanda L.; Alison M. Sweeney; Johnsen, Sönke; Morse, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Cephalopods possess a sophisticated array of mechanisms to achieve camouflage in dynamic underwater environments. While active mechanisms such as chromatophore patterning and body posturing are well known, passive mechanisms such as manipulating light with highly evolved reflectors may also play an important role. To explore the contribution of passive mechanisms to cephalopod camouflage, we investigated the optical and biochemical properties of the silver layer covering the eye of the Califo...

  15. Mechanisms and behavioural functions of structural coloration in cephalopods

    OpenAIRE

    Mäthger, Lydia M.; Denton, Eric J.; Marshall, N. Justin; Hanlon, Roger T.

    2008-01-01

    Octopus, squid and cuttlefish are renowned for rapid adaptive coloration that is used for a wide range of communication and camouflage. Structural coloration plays a key role in augmenting the skin patterning that is produced largely by neurally controlled pigmented chromatophore organs. While most iridescence and white scattering is produced by passive reflectance or diffusion, some iridophores in squid are actively controlled via a unique cholinergic, non-synaptic neural system. We review t...

  16. Physiological response of the Caribbean Coral O. annularis to Pollution Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E. L.; Sivaguru, M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    Orbicella annularis is an abundant ecological cornerstone framework-building Scleractinian coral throughout the Caribbean Sea. The O. annularis holobiont (biotic and abiotic components of the coral) is negatively impacted by increased exposure to anthropogenic pollution. This is consistently evidenced by altered tissue cellular composition, and skeletal structure. The O. annularis' holobiont is weakened by increased exposure to sewage and ship bilge pollution. Pollution exposure is characterized by decreased skeletal growth, as well as decreased zooxanthellae and chromatophore tissue cell densities. Healthy colonies studied at five sites on the leeward coast of Curacao, along a systematically decreasing pollution concentration, were sampled from the back-reef depositional facies of a protected fringing reef tract. A unidirectional oceanographic current flows to the NW past the city of Willemstad, a large point source of human sewage and ship bilge. This setting creates an ideal natural laboratory for in situ experimentation that quantitatively tracks the impact to coral physiology along a gradient from unimpacted to polluted seawater. Our lab has established laser scanning microscopy for three-dimensional (3D) quantification of zooxanthellae, and chromatophore cellular tissue density. X-ray computed tomography (BioCT) was used for analysis of skeletal density. Zooxanthellae density decreased as pollution concentration increased. Chromatophore density showed no significant relationship with pollution concentration but varied dramatically within each site. This suggests zooxanthellae density is highly impacted by environmental stress while variation in chromatophore density is driven by genetic variation. These results will be used to create a new model for environmental impacts on coral physiology and skeletal growth.

  17. Eviota piperata, a new gobiid species from Palau (Teleostei: Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David W; Winterbottom, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A new species of dwarfgoby, Eviota piperata is described from Palau. It belongs to the cephalic sensory-pore system Group II (lacking only the IT pore); has a dorsal/anal-fin formula of 8/8; has some pectoral-fin rays branched; no dark spot over the ural centrum; the male genital papilla is not fimbriate; and the cheek and body are heavily peppered with chromatophores. PMID:24869823

  18. Functional characterisation of the chromatically antagonistic photosensitive mechanism of erythrophores in the tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shyh-Chi; Xiao, Chengfeng; Troje, Nikolaus F; Robertson, R Meldrum; Hawryshyn, Craig W

    2015-03-01

    Non-visual photoreceptors with diverse photopigments allow organisms to adapt to changing light conditions. Whereas visual photoreceptors are involved in image formation, non-visual photoreceptors mainly undertake various non-image-forming tasks. They form specialised photosensory systems that measure the quality and quantity of light and enable appropriate behavioural and physiological responses. Chromatophores are dermal non-visual photoreceptors directly exposed to light and they not only receive ambient photic input but also respond to it. These specialised photosensitive pigment cells enable animals to adjust body coloration to fit environments, and play an important role in mate choice, camouflage and ultraviolet (UV) protection. However, the signalling pathway underlying chromatophore photoresponses and the physiological importance of chromatophore colour change remain under-investigated. Here, we characterised the intrinsic photosensitive system of red chromatophores (erythrophores) in tilapia. Like some non-visual photoreceptors, tilapia erythrophores showed wavelength-dependent photoresponses in two spectral regions: aggregations of inner pigment granules under UV and short-wavelengths and dispersions under middle- and long-wavelengths. The action spectra curve suggested that two primary photopigments exert opposite effects on these light-driven processes: SWS1 (short-wavelength sensitive 1) for aggregations and RH2b (rhodopsin-like) for dispersions. Both western blot and immunohistochemistry showed SWS1 expression in integumentary tissues and erythrophores. The membrane potential of erythrophores depolarised under UV illumination, suggesting that changes in membrane potential are required for photoresponses. These results suggest that SWS1 and RH2b play key roles in mediating intrinsic erythrophore photoresponses in different spectral ranges and this chromatically dependent antagonistic photosensitive mechanism may provide an advantage to detect subtle

  19. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakayama Takuro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles. The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis - the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy - and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  20. The influence of chromatic background on the photosensitivity of tilapia erythrophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Chi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates and invertebrates use extraretinal photoreceptors to detect light and perform diverse non-image-forming functions. Compared to well-studied visual systems, the effect of ambient light conditions on photosensory systems of extraretinal photoreceptors is poorly understood. Chromatophores are photosensitive dermal pigment cells that play an important role in the formation of body color patterns to fit the surrounding environment. Here, we used tilapia erythrophores to investigate the relationship between environmental light and chromatophore photoresponses. All erythrophores from three spectral conditions aggregated their pigment granules in UV/short wavelengths and dispersed in middle/long wavelengths. Unlike retinal visual systems, environmental light did not change the usage of the primary opsins responsible for aggregation and dispersion. In addition, short wavelength-rich and red-shifted background conditions led to an inhibitory effect on erythrophore photoresponses. We suggest that, as extraretinal photoreceptors for non-image-forming functions, chromatophores directly adjust their photoresponse sensitivity via changes in opsin expression levels rather than opsin types when environmental light changes.

  1. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Dietary-Induced Pseudo-Albinism during Post-Embryonic Development of Solea senegalensis (Kaup, 1858)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darias, Maria J.; Andree, Karl B.; Boglino, Anaïs; Rotllant, Josep; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel; Estévez, Alicia; Gisbert, Enric

    2013-01-01

    The appearance of the pseudo-albino phenotype was investigated in developing Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup 1858) larvae at morphological and molecular levels. In order to induce the development of pseudo-albinos, Senegalese sole larvae were fed Artemia enriched with high levels of arachidonic acid (ARA). The development of their skin pigmentation was compared to that of a control group fed Artemia enriched with a reference commercial product. The relative amount of skin melanophores, xanthophores and iridophores revealed that larval pigmentation developed similarly in both groups. However, results from different relative proportions, allocation patterns, shapes and sizes of skin chromatophores revealed changes in the pigmentation pattern between ARA and control groups from 33 days post hatching onwards. The new populations of chromatophores that should appear at post-metamorphosis were not formed in the ARA group. Further, spatial patterns of distribution between the already present larval xanthophores and melanophores were suggestive of short-range interaction that seemed to be implicated in the degradation of these chromatophores, leading to the appearance of the pseudo-albino phenotype. The expression profile of several key pigmentation-related genes revealed that melanophore development was promoted in pseudo-albinos without a sufficient degree of terminal differentiation, thus preventing melanogenesis. Present results suggest the potential roles of asip1 and slc24a5 genes on the down-regulation of trp1 expression, leading to defects in melanin production. Moreover, gene expression data supports the involvement of pax3, mitf and asip1 genes in the developmental disruption of the new post-metamorphic populations of melanophores, xanthophores and iridophores. PMID:23874785

  2. Morphological and molecular characterization of dietary-induced pseudo-albinism during post-embryonic development of Solea senegalensis (Kaup, 1858.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J Darias

    Full Text Available The appearance of the pseudo-albino phenotype was investigated in developing Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup 1858 larvae at morphological and molecular levels. In order to induce the development of pseudo-albinos, Senegalese sole larvae were fed Artemia enriched with high levels of arachidonic acid (ARA. The development of their skin pigmentation was compared to that of a control group fed Artemia enriched with a reference commercial product. The relative amount of skin melanophores, xanthophores and iridophores revealed that larval pigmentation developed similarly in both groups. However, results from different relative proportions, allocation patterns, shapes and sizes of skin chromatophores revealed changes in the pigmentation pattern between ARA and control groups from 33 days post hatching onwards. The new populations of chromatophores that should appear at post-metamorphosis were not formed in the ARA group. Further, spatial patterns of distribution between the already present larval xanthophores and melanophores were suggestive of short-range interaction that seemed to be implicated in the degradation of these chromatophores, leading to the appearance of the pseudo-albino phenotype. The expression profile of several key pigmentation-related genes revealed that melanophore development was promoted in pseudo-albinos without a sufficient degree of terminal differentiation, thus preventing melanogenesis. Present results suggest the potential roles of asip1 and slc24a5 genes on the down-regulation of trp1 expression, leading to defects in melanin production. Moreover, gene expression data supports the involvement of pax3, mitf and asip1 genes in the developmental disruption of the new post-metamorphic populations of melanophores, xanthophores and iridophores.

  3. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L Caldwell

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  4. F F1-ATPase as biosensor to detect single virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F F1-ATPase within chromatophore was constructed as a biosensor (immuno-rotary biosensor) for the purpose of capturing single virus. Capture of virus was based on antibody-antigen reaction. The detection of virus based on proton flux change driven by ATP-synthesis of F F1-ATPase, which was indicated by F1300, was directly observed by a fluorescence microscope. The results demonstrate that the biosensor loading of virus particles has remarkable signal-to-noise ratio (3.8:1) compared to its control at single molecular level, and will be convenient, quick, and even super-sensitive for detecting virus particles

  5. CdTe quantum dots for an application in the life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the results of the preparation of semiconductor CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in the aqueous phase. The small size of a few nm and a very high luminescence quantum yield exceeding 60% of these materials make them promisingly applicable to bio-medicine labeling. Their strong, two-photon excitation luminescence is also a good characteristic for biolabeling without interference with the cell fluorescence. The primary results for the pH-sensitive CdTe QDs are presented in that fluorescence of CdTe QDs was used as a proton sensor to detect proton flux driven by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in chromatophores. In other words, these QDs could work as pH-sensitive detectors. Therefore, the system of CdTe QDs on chromatophores prepared from the cells of Rhodospirillum rubrum and the antibodies against the beta-subunit of F0F1–ATPase could be a sensitive detector for the avian influenza virus subtype A/H5N1

  6. An ethogram for Benthic Octopods (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Jennifer A; Alupay, Jean S

    2016-05-01

    The present paper constructs a general ethogram for the actions of the flexible body as well as the skin displays of octopuses in the family Octopodidae. The actions of 6 sets of structures (mantle-funnel, arms, sucker-stalk, skin-web, head, and mouth) combine to produce behavioral units that involve positioning of parts leading to postures such as the flamboyant, movements of parts of the animal with relation to itself including head bob and grooming, and movements of the whole animal by both jetting in the water and crawling along the substrate. Muscular actions result in 4 key changes in skin display: (a) chromatophore expansion, (b) chromatophore contraction resulting in appearance of reflective colors such as iridophores and leucophores, (c) erection of papillae on the skin, and (d) overall postures of arms and mantle controlled by actions of the octopus muscular hydrostat. They produce appearances, including excellent camouflage, moving passing cloud and iridescent blue rings, with only a few known species-specific male visual sexual displays. Commonalities across the family suggest that, despite having flexible muscular hydrostat movement systems producing several behavioral units, simplicity of production may underlie the complexity of movement and appearance. This systematic framework allows researchers to take the next step in modeling how such diversity can be a combination of just a few variables. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27078075

  7. Morphological Characters and Transcriptome Profiles Associated with Black Skin and Red Skin in Crimson Snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ping Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, morphology observation and illumina sequencing were performed on two different coloration skins of crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythropterus, the black zone and the red zone. Three types of chromatophores, melanophores, iridophores and xanthophores, were organized in the skins. The main differences between the two colorations were in the amount and distribution of the three chromatophores. After comparing the two transcriptomes, 9200 unigenes with significantly different expressions (ratio change ≥ 2 and q-value ≤ 0.05 were found, of which 5972 were up-regulated in black skin and 3228 were up-regulated in red skin. Through the function annotation, Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis of the differentially transcribed genes, we excavated a number of uncharacterized candidate pigment genes as well as found the conserved genes affecting pigmentation in crimson snapper. The patterns of expression of 14 pigment genes were confirmed by the Quantitative real-time PCR analysis between the two color skins. Overall, this study shows a global survey of the morphological characters and transcriptome analysis of the different coloration skins in crimson snapper, and provides valuable cellular and genetic information to uncover the mechanism of the formation of pigment patterns in snappers.

  8. Toxic exposure to ethylene dibromide and mercuric chloride: effects on laboratory-reared octopuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P M; Hanlon, R T; Forsythe, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic exposure to either ethylene dibromide (EDB) or mercuric chloride (MC) were studied in laboratory-reared Octopus joubini, O. maya and O. bimaculoides. The advantages of using octopuses were that the responses were immediate, highly visible and sensitive. All species demonstrated signs of toxicity to acute and chronic exposure to EDB and to MC. A dosage-sensitive relationship for the loss and subsequent recovery of locomotor response and of chromatophore expansion was found for each species after acute exposure. For each species the LC50 for chronic exposure occurred within 12 hr at 100 mg/l for EDB and within 3 hr at 1,000 mg/l for MC. This study demonstrated the potential usefulness of laboratory-reared octopuses in evaluating the toxicity of marine environmental pollutants. PMID:3072470

  9. Development of Betta splendens embryos and larvae reveals variation in pigmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Alexis N; Lyvers, Benjamin H; Ferrill, Rachel N; Johnson, Rachel L; Dumaine, Anne Marie; Sly, Belinda J

    2016-06-01

    Vertebrate pigmentation provides an ideal system for studying the intersections between evolution, genetics, and developmental biology. Teleost fish, with their accessible developmental stages and intense and diverse colours produced by chromatophores, are an ideal group for study. We set out to test whether Betta splendens is a good model organism for studying the evolution and development of diverse pigmentation. Our results demonstrate that B. splendens can be bred to produce large numbers of offspring with easily visualized pigment cells. Depending on the colour of the parents, there was variation in larval pigmentation patterns both within and between breeding events. In juveniles the developing adult pigmentation patterns showed even greater variation. These results suggest that B. splendens has great potential as a model organism for pigmentation studies. PMID:27172056

  10. Computational Methodologies for Real-Space Structural Refinement of Large Macromolecular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Boon Chong; Hadden, Jodi A; Bernardi, Rafael C; Singharoy, Abhishek; McGreevy, Ryan; Rudack, Till; Cassidy, C Keith; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    The rise of the computer as a powerful tool for model building and refinement has revolutionized the field of structure determination for large biomolecular systems. Despite the wide availability of robust experimental methods capable of resolving structural details across a range of spatiotemporal resolutions, computational hybrid methods have the unique ability to integrate the diverse data from multimodal techniques such as X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy into consistent, fully atomistic structures. Here, commonly employed strategies for computational real-space structural refinement are reviewed, and their specific applications are illustrated for several large macromolecular complexes: ribosome, virus capsids, chemosensory array, and photosynthetic chromatophore. The increasingly important role of computational methods in large-scale structural refinement, along with current and future challenges, is discussed. PMID:27145875

  11. X-ray structure, thermodynamics, elastic properties and MD simulations of cardiolipin/dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine mixed membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boscia, Alexander L.; Treece, Bradley W.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Braun, Anthony R.; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; Klösgen, Beate Maria; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipins (CLs) are important biologically for their unique role in biomembranes that couple phosphorylation and electron transport like bacterial plasma membranes, chromatophores, chloroplasts and mitochondria. CLs are often tightly coupled to proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. The...... first step in understanding the interaction of CL with proteins is to obtain the pure CL structure, and the structure of mixtures of CL with other lipids. In this work we use a variety of techniques to characterize the fluid phase structure, material properties and thermodynamics of mixtures of...... dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with tetramyristoylcardiolipin (TMCL), both with 14-carbon chains, at several mole percentages. X-ray diffuse scattering was used to determine structure, including bilayer thickness and area/lipid, the bending modulus, KC, and SXray, a measure of chain orientational order. Our results...

  12. Fish scales as biosensors for catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwing, H; Karlsson, J O; Grundström, N; Gustafsson, A L; von Schenck, H; Sundgren, H; Odman, S; Andersson, R G; Lundström, I

    1990-01-01

    Certain fish scales contain specialized cells (chromatophores) with pigment granulas, which can be dispersed or aggregated in the cells. The degree of aggregation is determined by a transmitter substance, noradrenaline, released by the sympathetic nerve endings in the skin. Isolated scales from, for example, cuckoo wrasse (Labrus ossifagus) retain a large sensitivity to externally applied noradrenaline (or more generally catecholamines) for several weeks. The degree of aggregation in isolated scales can be measured objectively by simple photometric techniques. We demonstrate in this paper how fish scales can be used to monitor catecholamine levels in human blood plasma. A discussion of other potential biosensor applications of this intact biological receptor-effector system is also given. PMID:2271145

  13. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kasuno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine, and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn. The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I0, and constant current over time (Ic. Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm−3. The I0 decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I0 or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed.

  14. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I0), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm−3). The I0 decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I0 or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  15. Effect of 10-T magnetic fields on structural colors in guanine crystals of fish scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaka, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Kudo, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the magnetically modulated structural colors in the chromatophore of goldfish scales under static magnetic fields up to 10 T. A fiber optic system for spectroscopy measurements and a CCD microscope were set in the horizontal bore of a 10-T superconducting magnet. One leaf of a fish scale was set in a glass chamber, exposed to visible light from its side direction, and then static magnetic fields were applied perpendicular to the surface of the scale. In addition, an optical fiber for spectroscopy was directed perpendicular to the surface. During the magnetic field sweep-up, the aggregate of guanine thin plates partially showed a rapid light quenching under 0.26 to 2 T; however, most of the thin plates continued to scatter the side-light and showed changing iridescence, which was displayed individually by each guanine plate. For example, an aggregate in the chromatophore exhibited a dynamic change in structural color from white-green to dark blue when the magnetic fields changed from 2 to 10 T. The spectrum profile, which was obtained by the fiber optic system, confirmed the image color changes under magnetic field exposure. Also, a linearly polarized light transmission was measured on fish scales by utilizing an optical polarizer and analyzer. The transmitted polarized light intensities increased in the range of 500-550 nm compared to the intensity at 700 nm during the magnetic field sweep-up. These results indicate that the multi-lamella structure of nano-mirror plates in guanine hexagonal micro-plates exhibit diamagnetically modulated structure changes, and its light interference is affected by strong magnetic fields.

  16. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I₀), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm(-3)). The I₀ decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I₀ or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  17. Structural and Functional Proteomic Analysis of a Developing Energy Transducing Membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niederman, Robert A

    2012-06-04

    While much is known about the light reactions of photosynthesis in purple bacteria, comparatively little information is available on how the requisite integral membrane proteins are assembled, their patterns of cellular localization are established or their apoproteins cooperate with numerous assembly factors in their insertion into the growing intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM). This problem was approached through a detailed structural and functional proteomic analysis of ICM assembly process in the well-characterized purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Proteomic approaches have focused upon identification of membrane proteins temporally expressed during ICM development and spatially localized in both membrane growth initiation sites and in mature ICM vesicles. Protocols were established for ICM induction under reduced aeration and ICM remodeling in cells adapting to low intensity illumination, which permitted isolation, in sucrose density gradients, of ICM growth initiation sites as an upper pigmented band (UPB) and mature ICM vesicles as the main (chromatophore) band. Non-denaturing clear native gel electrophoresis (CNE) of these isolated membrane fractions gave rise to pigmented bands containing the peripheral light-harvesting 2 (LH2) antenna and the reaction center-light-harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) core complex, together with a full array of other ICM proteins, which were subjected to proteomic analysis. Proteomic analysis of the gel bands from chromatophores revealed developmental changes including increasing levels of the LH2 complex as ICM development proceeded, as well as a large array of other associated proteins including high spectral counts for the F1FO– ATP synthase subunits, given the inability to detect this coupling factor, as well as the more abundant cytochrome bc1 complex by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Significant levels of general membrane assembly factors were encountered, as well as high counts for RSP6124, a protein of unknown

  18. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and cellular localization of an LFRFamide gene in the cuttlefish Sepiella japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zi-Hao; Sun, Lian-Lian; Chi, Chang-Feng; Liu, Hui-Hui; Zhou, Li-Qing; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Wu, Chang-Wen

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes in metazoans, such as feeding, reproduction, and heart activities. In this study, an LFRFamide gene was identified from the cuttlefish Sepiella japonica (designated as SjLFRFamide). The full-length sequence of SjLFRFamide cDNA has 841bp, and the open reading frame contains 567bp encoding 188 amino acids, which shared high similarity with precursor SOFaRP2 from Sepia officinalis. The deduced SjLFRFamdie precursor protein contains a signal peptide and four different FLPs (FMRFamide-like peptides): one pentapeptide (TIFRFamide), two hexapeptides (NSLFRFamide and GNLFRFamide) and one heptapeptide (PHTPFRFamide). Multiple sequence alignment showed that SjLFRFamide contains rather conserved mature peptides, which all ended in FRF. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that SjLFRFamide belongs to the LFRFamide subfamily. The tissue distribution analysis through quantitative real-time PCR method showed that SjLFRFamide mRNA is significantly expressed in the brain, and slight trace are detected in female nidamental gland and accessory nidamental gland. In situ hybridization assay of the brain indicated that SjLFRFamide is transcribed in several different functional lobes, suggesting SjLFRFamide might associate with multiple physiological regulations, such as feeding, chromatophore regulation and reproduction. This is the first study describing LFRFamide in S. japonica, which might have great importance for cuttlefish artificial breeding. PMID:26494614

  19. Ex-vivo cytotoxic, antibacterial and DPPH free radical scavenging assay with ethanolic leaf extract of Glycosmis pentaphylla to justify its traditional use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prawej Ansari1,2

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Glycosmis pentaphylla belongs to the family Rutaceae. It is a shrub and locally common in the treatment of hepatic impairment. We have designed this study to provide a scientific basis with the traditional use of leaf of G. pentaphylla in the treatment of hepatitis.Methods: The well-established DPPH free radical scavenging activity was tested for antioxidant property evaluation. On the other hand, disk diffusion and brine shrimp method was respecti-velyused to determine antibacterial and cytotoxic activity. Results and Discussion: In the evaluation of antioxidant property IC50 found 204.91+/- 2.223 and micro;g/ml, in cytotoxicity testing, it is found that the plant part shows 30.49 +/- 1.976 and micro;g/ml of LC50. The ethanolic extract of G. pentaphylla leaves also have efficiency in bacterial growth inhibition; this extract is effective against for both gram, negative and positive. The zone of inhibition at 500 and micro;g/ml dose in E. coli and C. albican culture was 18 mm and 15 mm, respectively. In thin layer chromatography analysis, we found presence of couple of non-polar and polar component, presence of three non-chromatophoric component are also evident.Conclusion: Appropriate isolation and identification of mechanism is suggested in further study. [Biomed Res Ther 2015; 2(7.000: 324-332

  20. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species. PMID:25609785

  1. Mass spectrometric survey of peptides in cephalopods with an emphasis on the FMRFamide-related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweedler, J V; Li, L; Floyd, P; Gilly, W

    2000-12-01

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) survey of the major peptides in the stellar, fin and pallial nerves and the posterior chromatophore lobe of the cephalopods Sepia officinalis, Loligo opalescens and Dosidicus gigas has been performed. Although a large number of putative peptides are distinct among the three species, several molecular masses are conserved. In addition to peptides, characterization of the lipid content of the nerves is reported, and these lipid peaks account for many of the lower molecular masses observed. One conserved set of peaks corresponds to the FMRFamide-related peptides (FRPs). The Loligo opalescens FMRFa gene has been sequenced. It encodes a 331 amino acid residue prohormone that is processed into 14 FRPs, which are both predicted by the nucleotide sequence and confirmed by MALDI MS. The FRPs predicted by this gene (FMRFa, FLRFa/FIRFa and ALSGDAFLRFa) are observed in all three species, indicating that members of this peptide family are highly conserved across cephalopods. PMID:11060217

  2. An Unexpected Diversity of Photoreceptor Classes in the Longfin Squid, Doryteuthis pealeii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra C N Kingston

    Full Text Available Cephalopods are famous for their ability to change color and pattern rapidly for signaling and camouflage. They have keen eyes and remarkable vision, made possible by photoreceptors in their retinas. External to the eyes, photoreceptors also exist in parolfactory vesicles and some light organs, where they function using a rhodopsin protein that is identical to that expressed in the retina. Furthermore, dermal chromatophore organs contain rhodopsin and other components of phototransduction (including retinochrome, a photoisomerase first found in the retina, suggesting that they are photoreceptive. In this study, we used a modified whole-mount immunohistochemical technique to explore rhodopsin and retinochrome expression in a number of tissues and organs in the longfin squid, Doryteuthis pealeii. We found that fin central muscles, hair cells (epithelial primary sensory neurons, arm axial ganglia, and sucker peduncle nerves all express rhodopsin and retinochrome proteins. Our findings indicate that these animals possess an unexpected diversity of extraocular photoreceptors and suggest that extraocular photoreception using visual opsins and visual phototransduction machinery is far more widespread throughout cephalopod tissues than previously recognized.

  3. Behavioral analysis of cuttlefish traveling waves and its implications for neural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, Andres; Gutnick, Tamar; Kuba, Michael J; Laurent, Gilles

    2014-08-01

    Traveling waves (from action potential propagation to swimming body motions or intestinal peristalsis) are ubiquitous phenomena in biological systems and yet are diverse in form, function, and mechanism. An interesting such phenomenon occurs in cephalopod skin, in the form of moving pigmentation patterns called "passing clouds". These dynamic pigmentation patterns result from the coordinated activation of large chromatophore arrays. Here, we introduce a new model system for the study of passing clouds, Metasepia tullbergi, in which wave displays are very frequent and thus amenable to laboratory investigations. The mantle of Metasepia contains four main regions of wave travel, each supporting a different propagation direction. The four regions are not always active simultaneously, but those that are show synchronized activity and maintain a constant wavelength and a period-independent duty cycle, despite a large range of possible periods (from 1.5 s to 10 s). The wave patterns can be superposed on a variety of other ongoing textural and chromatic patterns of the skin. Finally, a traveling wave can even disappear transiently and reappear in a different position ("blink"), revealing ongoing but invisible propagation. Our findings provide useful clues about classes of likely mechanisms for the generation and propagation of these traveling waves. They rule out wave propagation mechanisms based on delayed excitation from a pacemaker but are consistent with two other alternatives, such as coupled arrays of central pattern generators and dynamic attractors on a network with circular topology. PMID:25042589

  4. Light-Induced Infrared Difference Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Light Harvesting Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mezzetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs. The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the pigments and the other constituents of the biological system (proteins, membranes, etc. evolve during a given photoreaction. Different static and time-resolved approaches have been used. Compared to the application of IR-DS to photosynthetic Reaction Centers (RCs, however, IR-DS applied to LHCs is still in an almost pioneering age: very often sophisticated techniques (step-scan FTIR, ultrafast IR or data analysis strategies (global analysis, target analysis, multivariate curve resolution are needed. In addition, band assignment is usually more complicated than in RCs. The results obtained on the studied systems (chromatophores and RC-LHC supercomplexes from purple bacteria; Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins from dinoflagellates; isolated LHCII from plants; thylakoids; Orange Carotenoid Protein from cyanobacteria are summarized. A description of the different IR-DS techniques used is also provided, and the most stimulating perspectives are also described. Especially if used synergically with other biophysical techniques, light-induced IR-DS represents an important tool in the investigation of photophysical/photochemical reactions in LHCs and LHC-containing systems.

  5. Visible Thrombolysis Acceleration of a Nanomachine Powered by Light-Driving F0F1-ATPase Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoxia; Liu, Lifeng; Jiang, Weijian; Yue, Jiachang

    2015-05-01

    We report on thrombolysis acceleration of a nanomachine powered by light-driving δ-subunit-free F0F1-ATPase motor. It is composed of a mechanical device, locating device, energy storage device, and propeller. The rotory δ-subunit-free F0F1-ATPase motor acts as a mechanical device, which was obtained by reconstructing an original chromatophore extracted from Rhodospirillum rubrum. We found that the bioactivity of the F0F1-ATPase motor improved greatly after reconstruction. The zeta potential of the nanomachine is about -23.4 mV. Cytotoxicity induced by the nanomachine was measured using cell counting kit (CCK)-8 assay. The A549 cells incubated with different fractional concentrations of the nanomachine within 48 h did not show obvious cytotoxicity. The locating device helps the nanomachine bind to the thrombi. Energy was easily stored by exposing the nanomachine to 600-nm-wavelength irradiation, which promoted activity of the motor. The rotation of the long propeller accelerated thrombolysis of a blood clot in vitro in the presence of urokinase (UK). This result was based on visual inspection and confirmed by a series of tests.

  6. Elastic scattering spectroscopy in vivo: optical biopsies of cancers of the breast and GI tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, David C. O.; Briggs, Gavin M.; Saunders, Christobel; Lakhani, Sunil; Ripley, Paul M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Bown, Stephen G.

    2000-04-01

    Elastic scattering or diffuse reflectance spectroscopy offers the possibility of distinguishing between normal and neoplastic tissue with a relatively simple optical measurement. The measurement of the reflection of light has previously been shown to be sensitive to the size and distribution of both intra and inter-cellular structures as well as absorption from chromatophores which are present in the tissue. By coupling a white light source and spectrometer to optic fibers it is possible to construct probes which can be inserted precutaneously or intra- operatively into breast tissue or which can pass down the channel of an endoscope and take in-vivo spectra of diseased and normal tissue in the Gastro-Intestinal tract. Spectra are reported from a large number of patients with a variety of benign, metaplastic, dysplastic and cancerous conditions. Some differences that have been observed in these spectra are discussed and the merits and disadvantages of 'optical biopsy' as an in-vivo diagnostic tool are examined. It is shown that to a relatively high degree of sensitivity and specificity it is possible to distinguish cancerous from normal tissue in a number of cases. The methods of distinguishing spectra and some possible modalities for their improvement are discussed.

  7. Photoconductive properties of annealed ZnO/PMMA dispersion composites. Netsushorishita ZnO/PMMA bunsan fukugotai no hikaridodensei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Y.; Yosomiya, R. (Chiba Inst. of Technology, Chiba (Japan))

    1992-05-15

    In order to enhance the photoconductive properties of dispersion composite materials, chromatophoric sensitigation and chemical sensitigation, etc. are done. In this report, the heat treatment effect on the photoconductive properties of the dispersion composites which were made by dispersing ZnO into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and its photoconductive mechanism were studied. In other words, the photoconductive properties, the temperature dependecy of the dark current, the dark current-voltage properties and the photointensity dependency of the photocurrent of the annealed ZnO/PMMA dispersion composites were measured. As a result, the relative sensitivity of the ZnO/PMMA dispersion composites which were heat-treated at 160 {degree} C for 5 hours was increased considerably. The cause of this increase of photoconductivity was considered to be the formation of a carrier trap in the interface polymer due to the formation of special interfacial solidification tissue of PMMA on the surface of ZnO and the increase of interaction between PMMA and its interface with ZnO, and the increase of the carrier transportation. Furthermore, from the damping characteristics of the photo current, it was considered that desorption of oxygen from the surface, etc. contributed to the photoelectric current. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The influence of hypoxia on the thermal sensitivity of skin colouration in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Velasco, Jesus Barraza; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2008-09-01

    One physiological mechanism used by reptiles to remain within thermal optima is their ability to reversibly alter skin colour, imparting changes in overall reflectance, and influencing the rate of heat gain from incident radiation. The ability to lighten or darken their skin is caused by the movement of pigment within the dermal chromatophore cells. Additionally, lizards, as ectotherms, significantly lower their preferred body temperatures when experiencing stressors such as hypoxia. This decrease in preferred temperature has been proposed to be the result of a downward adjustment of the thermal set-point, the temperature around which the body temperature is typically defended. We tested the hypothesis that lightening of the skin in lizards would be modified by hypoxia in a manner consistent with the known reduction in preferred temperatures. Skin colouration values of the dorsal skin of bearded dragons were analysed at three different levels of oxygen (20.8, 9.9 and 4.9 kPa) and at temperatures spanning the preferred temperature range (30, 32, 34, 36, 38 and 40 C). Hypoxic lizards lightened their skin at lower ambient temperatures more than normoxic ones, and in an oxygen-dependent fashion. The orchestrated adjustment of skin reflectance suggests that this physiological trait is being regulated at a new and lower set-point. Evidence from this study demonstrates that skin colouration plays a role in body temperature regulation and that the reduction in temperature set-point so prevalent in hypoxia is also manifested in this physiological trait. PMID:18491114

  9. A new species of Homonota (Reptilia: Squamata: Gekkota: Phyllodactylidae) endemic to the hills of Paraje Tres Cerros, Corrientes Province, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajade, Rodrigo; Etchepare, Eduardo Gabriel; Falcione, Camila; Barrasso, Diego Andrés; Alvarez, Blanca Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    The genus Homonota comprises nine South American species of terrestrial and nocturnal lizards. Homonota lizards lack the femoral pores typical of other South American Phyllodactylidae, and their infradigital lamellas are not expanded. We here describe a new species, Homonota taragui sp. nov., exclusively found on a small group of three hills up to 179 meters above sea level in central eastern Corrientes Province, Argentina. The new species differs from other Homonota species by a combination of characters, including: a well-marked dorsal, reticulate, dark pattern contrasting with a lighter colored background; small, star-shaped chromatophores on the abdomen; the post-orbital region of the head covered by granular scales; the dorsal and anterior regions of the thighs covered by keeled scales interspersed with cycloid scales; and the internasal scale in contact with rostral scales. The conservation status of Homonota taragui sp. nov. may be vulnerable, due to its localized endemism with populations on three small hills surrounded by intense agricultural and livestock activity. Two endemic plant species are known from these hills, and this new lizard represents the first endemic animal species. PMID:26240903

  10. A highly distributed Bragg stack with unique geometry provides effective camouflage for Loliginid squid eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Amanda L; Sweeney, Alison M; Johnsen, Sönke; Morse, Daniel E

    2011-10-01

    Cephalopods possess a sophisticated array of mechanisms to achieve camouflage in dynamic underwater environments. While active mechanisms such as chromatophore patterning and body posturing are well known, passive mechanisms such as manipulating light with highly evolved reflectors may also play an important role. To explore the contribution of passive mechanisms to cephalopod camouflage, we investigated the optical and biochemical properties of the silver layer covering the eye of the California fishery squid, Loligo opalescens. We discovered a novel nested-spindle geometry whose correlated structure effectively emulates a randomly distributed Bragg reflector (DBR), with a range of spatial frequencies resulting in broadband visible reflectance, making it a nearly ideal passive camouflage material for the depth at which these animals live. We used the transfer-matrix method of optical modelling to investigate specular reflection from the spindle structures, demonstrating that a DBR with widely distributed thickness variations of high refractive index elements is sufficient to yield broadband reflectance over visible wavelengths, and that unlike DBRs with one or a few spatial frequencies, this broadband reflectance occurs from a wide range of viewing angles. The spindle shape of the cells may facilitate self-assembly of a random DBR to achieve smooth spatial distributions in refractive indices. This design lends itself to technological imitation to achieve a DBR with wide range of smoothly varying layer thicknesses in a facile, inexpensive manner. PMID:21325315

  11. Patterns of diatom treatment in two coexisting species of filter-feeding freshwater gastropods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnikova T.Ya.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To assess trophic partitioning among sympatric gastropod species in ancient lakes, we quantified diatoms in the guts of two coexistent Baikal gastropod species and tested for differences in species, size, and fracturing of large and small diatoms by taenioglossan radulae. In May 2010, the diatom Synedra acus dominated the littoral phytoplankton and gut contents of Baicalia turriformis and Teratobaikalia ciliata (Baicaliidae, both inhabiting the rocky Baikal littoral. In laboratory experiments, both ctenidial filter-feeding gastropods were fed with two diets of cultivated Synedra acus of different cell sizes: >150 μm and <100 μm. Field and laboratory studies revealed intact diatom cells (often with green chromatophores and fragmented frustules of diatoms <60 μm in the guts of both species. The two baicaliids varied in the number of ingested microalgae. In addition, they exhibited significantly different efficiencies for breaking large diatoms; B. turriformis broke large diatoms into more fragments than T. ciliata. The differences in the utilization of large and small diatoms by gastropods are discussed in terms of the relationships among coexisting species. Small diatom survival is considered from the view of interactions between producers and their consumers in the freshwater food web.

  12. A Novel Biosensor to Detect MicroRNAs Rapidly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Ying Liao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available δ-free F0F1-ATPase within chromatophore was constructed as a novel biosensor to detect miRNA targets. Specific miRNA probes were linked to each rotary β subunits of F0F1-ATPase. Detection of miRNAs was based on the proton flux change induced by light-driven rotation of δ-free F0F1-ATPase. The hybridization reaction was indicated by changes in the fluorescent intensity of pH-sensitive CdTe quantum dots. Our results showed that the assay was attomole sensitivities (1.2×10−18 mol to target miRNAs and capable of distinguishing among miRNA family members. Moreover, the method could be used to monitor real-time hybridization without any complicated fabrication before hybridization. Thus, the rotary biosensor is not only sensitive and specific to detect miRNA target but also easy to perform. The δ-free F0F1-ATPase-based rotary biosensor may be a promising tool for the basic research and clinical application of miRNAs.

  13. Aminomethylenediphosphonate: A Potent Type-Specific Inhibitor of Both Plant and Phototrophic Bacterial H+-Pyrophosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, R. G.; Baykov, A. A.; Bakuleva, N. P.; Rea, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The suitability of different pyrophosphate (PPi) analogs as inhibitors of the vacuolar H+-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase (V-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) of tonoplast vesicles isolated from etiolated hypocotyls of Vigna radiata was investigated. Five 1,1-diphosphonates and imidodiphosphate were tested for their effects on substrate hydrolysis by the V-PPase at a substrate concentration corresponding to the Km of the enzyme. The order of inhibitory potency (apparent inhibition constants, Kiapp values, [mu]M, in parentheses) of the compounds examined was aminomethylenediphosphonate (1.8) > hydroxymethylenediphosphonate (5.7) [almost equal to] ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate (6.5) > imidodiphosphate (12) > methylenediphosphonate (68) > dichloromethylenediphosphonate (>500). The specificity of three of these compounds, aminomethylenediphosphonate, imidodiphosphate, and methylenediphosphonate, was determined by comparing their effects on the V-PPase and vacuolar H+-ATPase from Vigna, plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Beta vulgaris, H+-PPi synthase of chromatophores prepared from Rhodospirillum rubrum, soluble PPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa, and nonspecific monophosphoesterase from Vigna at a PPi concentration equivalent to 10 times the Km of the V-PPase. Although all three PPi analogs inhibited the plant V-PPase and bacterial H+-PPi synthase with qualitatively similar kinetics, whether substrate hydrolysis or PPi-dependent H+-translocation was measured, neither the vacuolar H+-ATPase nor plasma membrane H+-ATPase nor any of the non-V-PPase-related PPi hydrolases were markedly inhibited under these conditions. It is concluded that 1, 1-diphosphonates, in general, and aminomethylenediphosphonate, in particular, are potent type-specific inhibitors of the V-PPase and its putative bacterial homolog, the H+-PPi synthase of Rhodospirillum. PMID:12232069

  14. Export or recombination of charges in reaction centers in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asztalos, Emese; Maróti, Péter

    2009-12-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of forward and reverse electron transfer around the reaction center of purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were studied in vivo by flash-excited delayed fluorescence, prompt fluorescence (induction) and kinetic difference absorption. By protection of the photomultiplier from intense bacteriochlorophyll prompt fluorescence evoked by laser excitation, the time resolution of the fluorometer was reduced typically 10 micros. Two precursor states of the delayed fluorescence were identified: P(+)Q(A)(-) and cyt c(2)(3+)Q(A)(-) whose enthalpy levels were 340 meV and 1020 meV below A, respectively. The free energy of the P(+)Q(A)(-) state relative to A* was -870 meV in whole cells. Similar values were obtained earlier for isolated reaction center and chromatophore. The free energies of cyt c(2)(3+)Q(A)(-) and P(+)Q(A)(-) states showed no or very weak (-6 meV/pH unit) pH-dependence, respectively, supporting the concept of pH-independent redox midpoint potential of Q(A)/Q(A)(-) in intact cells. In accordance with the multiphasic kinetics of delayed fluorescence, the kinetics of re-opening of the closed reaction center is also complex (it extends up to 1 s) as a consequence of acceptor and donor-side reactions. The control of charge export from the reaction center by light regime, redox agents and inhibitors is investigated. The complex kinetics may arise from the distribution of quinones in different redox states on the acceptor side (Q(B) binding site and pool) and from organization of electron transfer components in supercomplexes. PMID:19555655

  15. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. June through August1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1963-10-02

    This report covers the following titles: (1) The Effects of 8-Methyl Lipoic Acid on the Evolution of Oxygen and Reduction of Carbon Dioxide during Photosynthesis; (2) Further {sup 14}C and {sup 15}N Tracer Studies of Amino Acid Synthesis during Photosynthesis by Chlorella Pyrenoidosa; (3) Two-Dimensional High Voltage, Low-Temperature Paper Electrophoresis of {sup 14}C-Labeled Products of Photosynthesis with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}; (4) A Search for Enzymic and Nonenzymic Reactions Between Thiamine Derivatives and Sugar Phosphates; (5) The Cytochrome Content of Purified Spinach Chloroplast Lamellae; (6) The Osmium Tetroxide Fixation of Chloroplast Lamellae; (7) Kinetics of Exoenzymes and Applications to the Determination of the Sequence of Nucleic Acids; (8) Brain Biochemistry and Behavior in Rats; (9) Experiments on Classical Conditioning and Light Habituation in Planarians; (10) Operant Conditioning in Planarians; (11) Manganese Porphyrin Complexes; (12) EPR Studies of Some Complex Organic Solutions; (13) Transient Response of Light-induced Photosynthetic Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Signals: Rhodospirillum rubrum Chromatophores; (14) Studies of the Tautomerism of Amides; (15) Structure and Mechanism of Hydrolysis of the Product of Reaction of PZ05 and Ethyl Ether; (16) A Study of the Irradiation Products of Several Nitrones; (17) Biosynthesis of the Opium Alkaloids; (18) Synthesis of methyl-{beta}-D-thiogalactoside-{sup 35}S; (19) Effect of Acridine Orange and Visible Light on Thymine Dimer Formation and Disruption; (20) Some Aspects of the Radiation Chemistry of DNA; (21) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; and (22) Studies on the Inhibition of the Photoreduction of FMN.

  16. Field and Experimental Evidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as the Causative Agent of Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease of Cultured Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in Northwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Lozano-Olvera, Rodolfo; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel; Morales-Covarrubias, Maria Soledad

    2014-01-01

    Moribund shrimp affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) from farms in northwestern Mexico were sampled for bacteriological and histological analysis. Bacterial isolates were molecularly identified as Vibrio parahaemolyticus by the presence of the tlh gene. The tdh-negative, trh-negative, and tlh-positive V. parahaemolyticus strains were further characterized by repetitive extragenic palindromic element-PCR (rep-PCR), and primers AP1, AP2, AP3, and AP and an ems2 IQ2000 detection kit (GeneReach, Taiwan) were used in the diagnostic tests for AHPND. The V. parahaemolyticus strains were used in immersion challenges with shrimp, and farmed and challenged shrimp presented the same clinical and pathological symptoms: lethargy, empty gut, pale and aqueous hepatopancreas, and expanded chromatophores. Using histological analysis and bacterial density count, three stages of AHNPD (initial, acute, and terminal) were identified in the affected shrimp. The pathognomonic lesions indicating severe desquamation of tubular epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas were observed in both challenged and pond-infected shrimp. The results showed that different V. parahaemolyticus strains have different virulences; some of the less virulent strains do not induce 100% mortality, and mortality rates also rise more slowly than they do for the more virulent strains. The virulence of V. parahaemolyticus strains was dose dependent, where the threshold infective density was 104 CFU ml−1; below that density, no mortality was observed. The AP3 primer set had the best sensitivity and specificity. Field and experimental results showed that the V. parahaemolyticus strain that causes AHPND acts as a primary pathogen for shrimp in Mexico compared with the V. parahaemolyticus strains reported to date. PMID:25548045

  17. [Morphology of gametes in sea urchins from Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, A L; Vinnikova, V V

    2010-01-01

    The fine structure of the gametes in six sea urchin species of the Sea of Japan was studied. The spermatozoons in Strongylocentrotus nudus, S. intermedius, Echinocardium cordatum, Scaphechinus mirabilis, Sc. grizeus and Echinarachnius parma are species-specific. The conical head and symmetrically disposed ring-shape mitochondrion are common to regular sea urchin sperm cells. S. nudus is characterized by the bulb-shaped head of the zoosperm; S. intermedius, by a bullet-shaped one. The zoosperm spearhead and small amount of postacrosome material are common to irregular sea urchins; the sperm width: length ratio varies for different species, with the highest for Sc. mirabilis. The zoosperm of Sc. griseus is characterized by two lipid drops in the cell center. Asymmetrical mitochondrion disposal is usual for E. parma. Actin filaments are found in the postacrosome material in the zoosperm of cordiform sea urchins. The differences in the fine structure of zoosperm in eurybiont species Ech. cordatum inhabiting the Sea of Japan and coastal areas of the Northeast Atlantic may bear record to the complex existence of species Ech. cordatum. The fine structure of zoosperm is unique for each of the studied families, Strongylocentrotidae, Scutellidae, and Loveniidae. The eggs of all the species are characterized by vitelline and tremelloid membranes. The vitelline membrane is formed by cytoplasm protrusions; the area between them is filled with fubrillary material. The tremelloid membrane is formed by fubrillary material associated with apical parts of microvilli of the vitelline membrane. The irregular sea urchins Sc. griseus, Sc. mirabilis and E. parma are characterized by chromatophores situated in the tremelloid membrane, with the highest abundance in Sc. mirabilis. PMID:20184121

  18. Transient Ectopic Overexpression of Agouti-Signalling Protein 1 (Asip1) Induces Pigment Anomalies in Flatfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Rosa; Rotllant, Josep; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel

    2012-01-01

    While flatfish in the wild exhibit a pronounced countershading of the dorso-ventral pigment pattern, malpigmentation is commonly observed in reared animals. In fish, the dorso-ventral pigment polarity is achieved because a melanization inhibition factor (MIF) inhibits melanoblast differentiation and encourages iridophore proliferation in the ventrum. A previous work of our group suggested that asip1 is the uncharacterized MIF concerned. In order to further support this hypothesis, we have characterized asip1 mRNAs in both turbot and sole and used deduced peptide alignments to analyze the evolutionary history of the agouti-family of peptides. The putative asip precursors have the characteristics of a secreted protein, displaying a putative hydrophobic signal. Processing of the potential signal peptide produces mature proteins that include an N-terminal region, a basic central domain with a high proportion of lysine residues as well as a proline-rich region that immediately precedes the C-terminal poly-cysteine domain. The expression of asip1 mRNA in the ventral area was significantly higher than in the dorsal region. Similarly, the expression of asip1 within the unpigmented patches in the dorsal skin of pseudoalbino fish was higher than in the pigmented dorsal regions but similar to those levels observed in the ventral skin. In addition, the injection/electroporation of asip1 capped mRNA in both species induced long term dorsal skin paling, suggesting the inhibition of the melanogenic pathways. The data suggest that fish asip1 is involved in the dorsal-ventral pigment patterning in adult fish, where it induces the regulatory asymmetry involved in precursor differentiation into mature chromatophore. Adult dorsal pseudoalbinism seems to be the consequence of the expression of normal developmental pathways in an inaccurate position that results in unbalanced asip1 production levels. This, in turn, generates a ventral-like differentiation environment in dorsal regions

  19. Histological and ultrastructural investigation of the female reproductive system of Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951 (Crustacea: Branchiura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anirban; Saha, Samar Kumar

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand branchiuran reproductive biology, it is imperative to know the sites of oogenesis and oocyte maturation, locate the accessory reproductive glands, and identify the fertilization site with the present knowledge of the sperm transfer mechanism of the genus Argulus. With these objectives, we attempted to describe the female reproductive system of Argulus bengalensis using serial histological sections through the ovaries and associated ducts in the transverse, longitudinal, and sagittal planes. The reproductive organs include a median ovary, one pair of ovarian lumina, a median oviduct, and a pair of collateral accessory glands. A duct from each of the collateral accessory glands leads into the proximal part of the median oviduct, which opens to the exterior through a genital opening at the distal end. The glandular secretion presumably contributes to the jelly coat of the egg. The ovary is bound with a tunica propria which extends further diametrically inside the ovary forming the paired lumina. The lumina are confluent into the median oviduct. Two distinct areas, the germarium and differentiating zones, are clearly distinguishable within the ovary. The tunica propria itself houses the oogonia within a matrix, serving as the germarium. Transmission electron micrograph reveals that the matrix is made of collagen. The collagen matrix confers elasticity to the tunica propria to accommodate the postvitellogenic oocytes within the ovarian lumen. The differentiating zone is situated in between the germarium: dorsally it is covered with a chromatophore layer. The ovary is ensheathed by a circum ovarian striated muscle. The presence of spermatophores in the ovarian lumen indicates the fertilization site. J. Morphol. 277:707-716, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991011

  20. CdTe and CdSe quantum dots: synthesis, characterizations and applications in agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieu Thuy Ung, Thi; Tran, Thi Kim Chi; Nga Pham, Thu; Nghia Nguyen, Duc; Khang Dinh, Duy; Liem Nguyen, Quang

    2012-12-01

    This paper highlights the results of the whole work including the synthesis of highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs), characterizations and testing applications of them in different kinds of sensors. Concretely, it presents: (i) the successful synthesis of colloidal CdTe and CdSe QDs, their core/shell structures with single- and/or double-shell made by CdS, ZnS or ZnSe/ZnS; (ii) morphology, structural and optical characterizations of the synthesized QDs; and (iii) testing examples of QDs as the fluorescence labels for agricultural-bio-medical objects (for tracing residual pesticide in agricultural products, residual clenbuterol in meat/milk and for detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus in breeding farms). Overall, the results show that the synthesized QDs have very good crystallinity, spherical shape and strongly emit at the desired wavelengths between ∼500 and 700 nm with the luminescence quantum yield (LQY) of 30–85%. These synthesized QDs were used in fabrication of the three testing fluorescence QD-based sensors for the detection of residual pesticides, clenbuterol and H5N1 avian influenza virus. The specific detection of parathion methyl (PM) pesticide at a content as low as 0.05 ppm has been realized with the biosensors made from CdTe/CdS and CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS QDs and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensors using CdTe/CdS QDs conjugated with 2-amino-8-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid were fabricated that enable detection of diazotized clenbuterol at a content as low as 10 pg ml‑1. For detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus, fluorescence biosensors using CdTe/CdS QDs bound on the surface of chromatophores extracted and purified from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum were prepared and characterized. The specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus in the range of 3–50 ng μl‑1 with a detection limit of 3 ng μL‑1 has been performed based on the antibody-antigen recognition.

  1. A single origin of the photosynthetic organelle in different Paulinella lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishida Ken-ichiro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaining the ability to photosynthesize was a key event in eukaryotic evolution because algae and plants form the base of the food chain on our planet. The eukaryotic machines of photosynthesis are plastids (e.g., chloroplast in plants that evolved from cyanobacteria through primary endosymbiosis. Our knowledge of plastid evolution, however, remains limited because the primary endosymbiosis occurred more than a billion years ago. In this context, the thecate "green amoeba" Paulinella chromatophora is remarkable because it very recently (i.e., minimum age of ≈ 60 million years ago acquired a photosynthetic organelle (termed a "chromatophore"; i.e., plastid via an independent primary endosymbiosis involving a Prochlorococcus or Synechococcus-like cyanobacterium. All data regarding P. chromatophora stem from a single isolate from Germany (strain M0880/a. Here we brought into culture a novel photosynthetic Paulinella strain (FK01 and generated molecular sequence data from these cells and from four different cell samples, all isolated from freshwater habitats in Japan. Our study had two aims. The first was to compare and contrast cell ultrastructure of the M0880/a and FK01 strains using scanning electron microscopy. The second was to assess the phylogenetic diversity of photosynthetic Paulinella to test the hypothesis they share a vertically inherited plastid that originated in their common ancestor. Results Comparative morphological analyses show that Paulinella FK01 cells are smaller than M0880/a and differ with respect to the number of scales per column. There are more distinctive, multiple fine pores on the external surface of FK01 than in M0880/a. Molecular phylogenetic analyses using multiple gene markers demonstrate these strains are genetically distinct and likely comprise separate species. The well-supported monophyly of the Paulinella chromatophora strains analyzed here using plastid-encoded 16S rRNA suggests strongly

  2. CdTe and CdSe quantum dots: synthesis, characterizations and applications in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper highlights the results of the whole work including the synthesis of highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs), characterizations and testing applications of them in different kinds of sensors. Concretely, it presents: (i) the successful synthesis of colloidal CdTe and CdSe QDs, their core/shell structures with single- and/or double-shell made by CdS, ZnS or ZnSe/ZnS; (ii) morphology, structural and optical characterizations of the synthesized QDs; and (iii) testing examples of QDs as the fluorescence labels for agricultural-bio-medical objects (for tracing residual pesticide in agricultural products, residual clenbuterol in meat/milk and for detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus in breeding farms). Overall, the results show that the synthesized QDs have very good crystallinity, spherical shape and strongly emit at the desired wavelengths between ∼500 and 700 nm with the luminescence quantum yield (LQY) of 30–85%. These synthesized QDs were used in fabrication of the three testing fluorescence QD-based sensors for the detection of residual pesticides, clenbuterol and H5N1 avian influenza virus. The specific detection of parathion methyl (PM) pesticide at a content as low as 0.05 ppm has been realized with the biosensors made from CdTe/CdS and CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS QDs and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based nanosensors using CdTe/CdS QDs conjugated with 2-amino-8-naphthol-6-sulfonic acid were fabricated that enable detection of diazotized clenbuterol at a content as low as 10 pg ml−1. For detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus, fluorescence biosensors using CdTe/CdS QDs bound on the surface of chromatophores extracted and purified from bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum were prepared and characterized. The specific detection of H5N1 avian influenza virus in the range of 3–50 ng μl−1 with a detection limit of 3 ng μL−1 has been performed based on the antibody-antigen recognition. (review)

  3. Effects of environmental and artificial UV-B radiation on freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersi embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazari, Evelise Maria [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Morfologicas, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21949-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genetica, Campus Universitario, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Ammar, Dib [Universidade do Oeste de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Biologia, Campus Universitario, 89600-000 Joacaba, SC (Brazil); Bem, Andreza Fabro de; Latini, Alexandra [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Bioquimica, Campus Universitario, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Mueller, Yara Maria Rauh [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genetica, Campus Universitario, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Allodi, Silvana, E-mail: sallodi@histo.ufrj.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Morfologicas, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21949-902 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-06-01

    The recent decrease of the stratospheric ozone has resulted in an increase of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the Earth's surface. In freshwater ecosystems with transparent water, UV-B rays easily penetrate and potentially cause harmful effects to organisms. In this study, embryos of the prawn Macrobrachium olfersi were used to evaluate the impact of UV-B rays in freshwater environments. We observed three groups of embryos: the first was to assess whether UV-B radiation produced morphological defects and/or biochemical impairments in the laboratory. The second was to check whether embryos with the same impairments as those observed in the laboratory were found in their environment, under natural solar radiation. The third group was the non-irradiated control. The embryos irradiated with 310 mW cm{sup -2} UV-B for 30 min showed morphological alterations similar to those observed in embryos from the environmental control group. The most important effects of the UV-B radiation observed in M. olfersi embryos were morphological (1.2% of the total number of embryos from the environment and 2.8% of the total number of irradiated embryos), pigmentation changes in the eyes (78.0% of the total number of embryos from the environment and 98.9% of the total number of irradiated embryos), and disruption of the chromatophores (46.9% of the total number of embryos from the environment and 95.5% of the total number of irradiated embryos). We also observed an increase in egg volume, which was accompanied by a significant increase in water content in UV-B irradiated groups when compared with aquaria control embryos. In addition, a significant decrease in the mitotic index in eggs exposed to UV-B radiation was detected (0.17 for the embryos from the aquaria control, 0.10 for the embryos of the environmental control, and 0.04 for the irradiated groups). The low levels of NPSH and high levels of TBARS indicated that UV-B rays directly compromised the antioxidant function of

  4. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. December 1961, January and February 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various,

    1962-04-03

    Progress is reported in investigations on the polymerization of formaldehyde, ultraviolet irradiation of aqueous HC/sup 14/N, radiation chemistry of nucleic acid constituents, oxidation of free sugars and aldonic acid derivatives by Acetobacter suboxydans, preparation and isolation of C/sup 14/O/ sub 2/~ enzyme, metabolism of C/sup 14/-ribulose diphosphate by Nitrobacter agilis, C/sup 14/O/sub 2/ metabolism of Hordeum valgare seedlings during the development of the photosynthetic apparatus, location and chemical characterization of RNA in the chloroplasts of Spinacea oleracea, inhibition of dark bleaching by stroma extracts and by inert gases, ESR studies on chromatophores from Rhodospirillium rubrum and on quantasomes from spinach chloroplasts, and phthalocyanine manganese and etioporphyrin manganese complexes. (J.R.D.) It has been known for a hundred years that formaldehyde polymerizes to carbohydrate substances in alkaline media. Although the reaction has long attracted much attention, only recently has a detailed qualitative analysis of the products been carried out by chromatographic methods. We have started to re-examine this reaction by combining chromatography with radioactive tracer techniques in the hope of refining the quantitative aspects of the analysis. Our particular interest has been to develop methods for determining the relative proportions of ribose and ribulose in the mixtures of sugars formed in basic media, as well as under other polymerizing conditions. The finding of large amounts of these sugars might help to explain the occurrence of ribose as the only basic sugar in the fundamental replicating molecules--the nucleic acids. Formaldehyde is thought to have been present in the primitive reducing atmosphere which existed before life first appeared. The ribonucleic acids must have appeared in the constitution of reproducing systems at a very early stage in the development of living organisms. In this study, the polymerizations of formaldehyde

  5. Three new species of Hyphessobrycon (Characiformes: Characidae from the upper rio Araguaia basin in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio C. T. Lima

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Hyphessobrycon (Characiformes: Characidae are described from the upper rio Araguaia basin. Hyphessobrycon langeanii n. sp. is distinguished from all congeners by the presence of a well-defined, round humeral spot, a reticulate color pattern, a broad, horizontally-elongate caudal-peduncle blotch, and a relatively wide, faint midlateral dark stripe. Hyphessobrycon eilyos n. sp. is distinguished from all congeners by the absence of humeral and caudal spots; by the presence of numerous dark chromatophores on the lateral surface of the body, intensely concentrated on the ventral region from the pelvic-fin origin to the end of the caudal-fin base, dorsal, adipose, and caudal fins with carmine red pigmentation in life; and the presence of 7-11 maxillary teeth. Hyphessobrycon weitzmanorum n. sp. is distinguished from all congeners by the combination of the possession of two humeral spots and a general dark color pattern. These three new species, along with Creagrutus molinus (Characidae, Apareiodon tigrinus (Parodontidae, Aspidoras velites (Callichthyidae, an undescribed member of the Hypoptopomatinae (Loricariidae, Cnesterodon septentrionalis (Poeciliidae, and Simpsonichthys cholopteryx (Rivulidae, all of which are apparently endemic of the upper rio Araguaia, indicate that this area is a previously unrecognized area of endemism.Três novas espécies do gênero Hyphessobrycon (Characiformes: Characidae são descritas para a bacia do alto rio Araguaia. Hyphessobrycon langeanii n.sp. se distingue de seus congêneres pela presença de uma mancha umeral redonda e bem definida, de um padrão reticulado de colorido, de uma mancha no pedúnculo caudal horizontalmente alongada e de uma faixa longitudinal larga e difusa. Hyphessobrycon eilyos n.sp. se distingue de seus congêneres pela ausência de manchas umeral e caudal, pela presença de numerosos cromatóforos escuros nas laterais do corpo, mais concentrado na porção ventral da origem

  6. Molecular Breeding for Flower Colors Modification on Ornamental Plants Based on the Mechanism of Anthocyanins Biosynthesis and Coloration%基于花青素苷合成和呈色机理的观赏植物花色改良分子育种

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴思兰; 洪艳

    2016-01-01

    Flower color, one of the most important quality traits for ornamental plants, is of great adaptive significance during the natural evolution process of plants. Moreover, flower color is also an important content for epigenetic researches. Anthocyanins, the most important pigments for flower coloration, designate the flower colors of approximately 80% plant families in angiosperm. Up to date, more than 600 anthocyanins have been isolated and identified from the natural world, which are mainly derived from six anthocyanidins. The biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanins has been well studied, which starts from the flavonoid metabolic pathway. Different branch pathways result in the diversity of anthocyanins, mainly due to the differences of substituent groups that are located on the basic skeleton of various anthocyanidins. During the biosynthetic process of anthocyanins, the competition forces of enzymes which are located on the branch nodes and the substrate specificity of some key enzymes result in the genus and species specificity of anthocyanins and the corresponding flower color phenotypes. Anthocyanins are transferred to vacuole and are packaged as chromatophore after being biosynthesized. The accumulation and conserve abilities on the chromatophore of vacuole affect the coloration of anthocyanins to a large extent. Therefore, many intracellular factors, such as the pH value of vacuole, the content of co-pigments and the complexation of metal ion, jointly affect the final coloration of anthocyanins in the petals. At present, some structural and regulatory genes that are related to the anthocyanins biosynthesis and coloration have been isolated, whose functions also have been well revealed. Based on these genes, some transgenic flowers have been successfully bred out. However, the mechanisms of gene regulating expression, including the regulation mechanisms on the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and the differences of DNA sequences and the DNA

  7. 三聚氰胺对藻类的毒性效应及其机理研究%Toxic mechanism study of melamine on phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玉宁; 梁辉朝; 许俊峰; 裴国凤

    2011-01-01

    dismutase and catalase in them, along with the toxic effect on algae of melamine. The results of our tests and measurements show that melamine has an apparently inhibiting effect on the growth of these algae. Moreover, the higher the concentration of melamine is, and the longer the time that algae cultured, the lower the chla content and the greater the toxic effect. At the same time, melamine proves to be able to induce fast-growth in these algae even at lower dosages. When the concentration of melamine was over 1 500 mg/L, its chla content would be reduced with the treating time. For example, at the concentration of less than 750 mg/L, chla content tended to increase gradually, though the increasing rate was lower than that of the controls.However, the malonic dialdehyde' s content of the three algae was found to rise with the melamine concentration increased, whereas the superoxide dismutase and catalase were detected to rise during the entire testing period. It has no apparent changes in the protein content.These physiological changes indicate the toxic mechanism of melamine on the algae might be that the decrease of the protected enzyme active in algae cells made the lipid peroxidation of cell biomembrane increased, whereas the structure and function of the chromatophore were affected. Perhaps, the decrease of ehla content in algae cells may influence the photosynthesis process.

  8. A systematic revision of Tatia (Siluriformes: Auchenipteridae: Centromochlinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Maria Sarmento-Soares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The auchenipterid catfish genus Tatia is revised. Twelve species are recognized including three described as new. Tatia is diagnosed by the hyomandibula elongated anterodorsally, the anal-fin base of adult males reduced in length, and the caudal peduncle laterally compressed and deep with a middorsal keel. Tatia aulopygia occurs in the Madeira river drainage and is distinguished by the reduced cranial fontanel in adults and male modified anal fin with middle rays reduced in length. Tatia boemia, known from the upper Uruguay river drainage, is distinguished by its unique color pattern with dark chromatophores on the sides of body. Tatia brunnea from river basins in Suriname and French Guiana and the Negro river drainage, Amazon basin, is recognized by its wide head and mouth and by the male modified anal fin with sharply pointed tip. Tatia dunni, from the upper Amazon basin, is recognized by its narrow head, long postcleithral process in some specimens, and body coloration with irregular blotches or stripes. Tatia galaxias, endemic to the Orinoco river basin, is distinguished by its large eye and short snout. Tatia gyrina, distributed in the upper and central Amazon basin and in northern Suriname, has a uniquely reduced mesethmoid, slightly protruding lower jaw, second nuchal plate with slightly concave lateral borders, third nuchal plate reduced, small prevomer, low number of ribs, low number of vertebrae and sexual dimorphism regarding intumescent male genital papilla. Tatia intermedia, recorded from central and lower Amazon basin, Tocantins river, and coastal drainages in Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and eastern Pará State, Brazil, is distinguished by the short postcleithral process, small eye and long snout. Tatia neivai, from the upper Paraná river , Paraguay river and upper Paraíba do Sul river basin, is distinguished by its unique vertebral count and caudal-fin coloration consisting of transverse dark bars. Tatia strigata, from