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Sample records for chromatin structure related

  1. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  2. Chromatin structure in relation to telomere length maintenance in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajkus, Jiří; Mozgová, I.; Procházková Schrumpfová, P.; Majerová, E.; Fojtová, M.

    Zürich, 2009. s. 1. [European Workshop on Plant Chromatin. 03.09.2009-04.09.2009, Zürich] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/08/H054; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1530; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : telomere * HMGB1 protein * DNA methylation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Chromatin structure and DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation examines the structure and structural transitions of chromatin in relation to DNA damage. The ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro was examined following DNA photodamage introduced by two different agents. (1) 254-nm UV radiation and (2) trimethylpsoralen (plus near-UV radiation). Both agents are highly specific for DNA and form adducts predicted to cause different degrees of distortion in the DNA helix. The salt-induced structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers were monitored by both analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Our results show that even in the presence of extremely large, nonphysiological amounts of photodamage by either agent the ability of chromatin to fold into higher ordered structures is not affected. The compact, 30 nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA damage without any measurable changes in the overall size or degree of compaction of this structure. The distribution of pyrimidine dimers was mapped at the single nucleotide level in nucleosome core DNA from UV-irradiated mononucleosomes, chromatin fibers, and human cells in culture using the 3' → 5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase

  4. Coming to terms with chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Faitelson, Liron; Hassan-Zadeh, Vahideh; Baghestani, Zahra; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2016-03-01

    Chromatin, once thought to serve only as a means to package DNA, is now recognized as a major regulator of gene activity. As a result of the wide range of methods used to describe the numerous levels of chromatin organization, the terminology that has emerged to describe these organizational states is often imprecise and sometimes misleading. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of chromatin architecture and propose terms to describe the various biochemical and structural states of chromatin. PMID:26223534

  5. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin's dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber's structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:27345617

  6. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  7. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  8. Role of histone modifications in defining chromatin structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Kathy A; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nuclei are not uniformly organized, but rather contain distinct chromatin elements, with each state having a defined biochemical structure and biological function. These are recognizable by their distinct architectures and molecular components, which can change in response to cellular stimuli or metabolic requirements. Chromatin elements are characterized by the fundamental histone and DNA components, as well as other associated non-histone proteins and factors. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins in particular often correlate with a specific chromatin structure and function. Patterns of histone modifications are implicated as having a role in directing the level of chromatin compaction, as well as playing roles in multiple functional pathways directing the readout of distinct regions of the genome. We review the properties of various chromatin elements and the apparent links of histone modifications with chromatin organization and functional output. PMID:18225984

  9. Nuclear visions enhanced: chromatin structure, organization and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Meshorer, Eran; Herrmann, Harald; Raška, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The EMBO Workshop on ‘Chromatin Structure, Organization and Dynamics' took place in April 2011 in Prague, Czech Republic. Participants presented data on the generation of models of the genome, working to correlate changes in the organization of chromatin with the functional state of the genome.

  10. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    but also to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as these receptors share many similarities regarding interaction with, and remodeling of, chromatin. Both receptors can bind nucleosomal DNA and have accordingly been described as pioneering factors. However recent genomic approaches (ChIP-seq and DHS...

  11. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  12. Chromatin structure modulates DNA repair by photolyase in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, B.; Livingstone-Zatchej, M; Thoma, F

    1997-01-01

    Yeast and many other organisms use nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase in the presence of light (photoreactivation) to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), a major class of DNA lesions generated by UV light. To study the role of photoreactivation at the chromatin level in vivo, we used yeast strains which contained minichromosomes (YRpTRURAP, YRpCS1) with well-characterized chromatin structures. The strains were either proficient (RAD1) or deficient (rad1 delta) in NER. In...

  13. Age-related reduction of chromatin fractal dimension in toluidine blue - stained hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor; Petrovic, Danica; Paunovic, Jovana; Vucevic, Danijela; Radosavljevic, Tatjana; Pantic, Senka

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we proposed a hypothesis that chromatin of mouse hepatocytes exhibits age-related reduction of fractal dimension. This hypothesis was based on previously published works demonstrating that complexity of biological systems such as tissues, decreases during the process of physiological aging. Liver tissue was obtained from 24 male mice divided into 3 age groups: 10-days-old (young, juvenile), 210-days-old (adult) and 390-days-old. The tissue was stained using a modification of toluidine blue (nucleic acid - specific) staining method. A total of 480 chromatin structures (20 for each animal) were analyzed. For each structure, the values of fractal dimension, lacunarity, textural angular second moment and inverse difference moment were calculated using ImageJ software and its plugins. The results indicated the age-related reduction in fractal dimension and increase in lacunarity (p<0.01). Fractal dimension is a potentially good indicator of age associated changes in chromatin structure. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that fractal complexity of hepatocyte chromatin decreases during the process of physiological aging. Fractal analysis as a method could be useful in detection of small age-related changes in chromatin distribution not otherwise visible with naked eye on conventional tissue micrographs. PMID:27412950

  14. Chromatin structure near transcriptionally active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitive domains are the most prominent features of transcriptionally active chromatin. In the case of the β/sup A/-globin gene, it seems likely that two or more protein factors are capable of binding to the DNA so tightly that the nucleosome is prevented from binding. We have shown that nucleosomes, once bound in the assembly process in vitro, cannot be displaced. The interaction of the 5S gene transcription factor TFIIIA with its target DNA also is blocked by histones, and it has been suggested that the activation of the gene must occur during replication, before histones are reassembled on the DNA. We suppose that a similar mechanism may govern the binding of the hypersensitivity factors. It should be noted that nucleosomes are excluded not only from the sites to which the factors bind, but also from the regions between the two domains and at either side. 12 refs., 6 figs

  15. Organization of higher-level chromatin structures (chromomere, chromonema and chromatin block) examined using visible light-induced chromatin photo-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, E V; Prusov, A N; Kireev, I I; Fais, D; Polyakov, V Yu

    2002-01-01

    The method of chromatin photo-stabilization by the action of visible light in the presence of ethidium bromide was used for investigation of higher-level chromatin structures in isolated nuclei. As a model we used rat hepatocyte nuclei isolated in buffers which stabilized or destabilized nuclear matrix. Several higher-level chromatin structures were visualized: 100nm globules-chromomeres, chains of chromomeres-chromonemata, aggregates of chromomeres-blocks of condensed chromatin. All these structures were completely destroyed by 2M NaCl extraction independent of the matrix state, and DNA was extruded from the residual nuclei (nuclear matrices) into a halo. These results show that nuclear matrix proteins do not play the main role in the maintenance of higher-level chromatin structures. Preliminary irradiation led to the reduction of the halo width in the dose-dependent manner. In regions of condensed chromatin of irradiated nucleoids there were discrete complexes consisting of DNA fibers radiating from an electron-dense core and resembling the decondensed chromomeres or the rosette-like structures. As shown by the analysis of proteins bound to irradiated nuclei upon high-salt extraction, irradiation presumably stabilized the non-histone proteins. These results suggest that in interphase nuclei loop domains are folded into discrete higher-level chromatin complexes (chromomeres). These complexes are possibly maintained by putative non-histone proteins, which are extracted with high-salt buffers from non-irradiated nuclei. PMID:12127937

  16. Macronuclear chromatin structure dynamics in Colpoda inflata (Protista, Ciliophora) resting encystment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, L; Chessa, M G; Carrara, S; Tagliafierro, G; Delmonte Corrado, M U

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin structure dynamics of the Colpoda inflata macronucleus have been investigated in relation to its functional condition, concerning chromatin body extrusion regulating activity. Samples of 2- and 25-day-old resting cysts derived from a standard culture, and of 1-year-old resting cysts derived from a senescent culture, were examined by means of histogram analysis performed on acquired optical microscopy images. Three groups of histograms were detected in each sample. Histogram classification, clustering and matching were assessed in order to obtain the mean histogram of each group. Comparative analysis of the mean histogram showed a similarity in the grey level range of 25-day- and 1-year-old cysts, unlike the wider grey level range found in 2-day-old cysts. Moreover, the respective mean histograms of the three cyst samples appeared rather similar in shape. All this implies that macronuclear chromatin structural features of 1-year-old cysts are common to both cyst standard cultures. The evaluation of the acquired images and their respective histograms evidenced a dynamic state of the macronuclear chromatin, appearing differently condensed in relation to the chromatin body extrusion regulating activity of the macronucleus. The coexistence of a chromatin-decondensed macronucleus with a pycnotic extrusion body suggests that chromatin unable to decondense, thus inactive, is extruded. This finding, along with the presence of chromatin structural features common to standard and senescent cyst populations, supports the occurrence of 'rejuvenated' cell lines from 1-year-old encysted senescent cells, a phenomenon which could be a result of accomplished macronuclear renewal. PMID:10439214

  17. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model. PMID:662693

  18. Chromatin structure analysis based on a hierarchic texture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, G; Beil, M; Guski, H

    1995-02-01

    The quantification of chromatin structures is an important part of nuclear grading of malignant and premalignant lesions. In order to achieve high accuracy, computerized image analysis systems have been applied in this process. Chromatin texture analysis of cell nuclei requires a suitable texture model. A hierarchic model seemed to be most compatible for this purpose. It assumes that texture consists of homogeneous regions (textons). Based on this model, two approaches to texture segmentation and feature extraction were investigated using sections of cervical tissue. We examined the reproducibility of the measurement under changing optical conditions. The coefficients of variations of the texture features ranged from 2.1% to 16.9%. The features were tested for their discriminating capability in a pilot study including 30 cases of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma. The overall classification accuracy reached 65%. This study presents an automated technique for texture analysis that is similar to human perception. PMID:7766266

  19. Evaluation of sperm chromatin structure in boar semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszewska Dorota

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to evaluate sperm chromatin structure in the semen of insemination boars. Preparations of semen were stained with acridine orange, aniline blue, and chromomycin A3. Abnormal protamination occurred more frequently in young individuals whose sexual development was not yet complete, but may also be an individual trait. This possibility is important to factor into the decision regarding further exploitation of insemination boars. Thus a precise assessment of abnormalities in the protamination process would seem to be expedient as a tool supplementing morphological and molecular evaluation of semen. Disruptions in nucleoprotein structure can be treated as indicators of the biological value of sperm cells.

  20. Changes in large-scale chromatin structure and function during oogenesis: a journey in company with follicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Alberto M; Franciosi, Federica; Dieci, Cecilia; Lodde, Valentina

    2014-09-01

    The mammalian oocyte nucleus or germinal vesicle (GV) exhibits characteristic chromatin configurations, which are subject to dynamic modifications through oogenesis. Aim of this review is to highlight how changes in chromatin configurations are related to both functional and structural modifications occurring in the oocyte nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. During the long phase of meiotic arrest at the diplotene stage, the chromatin enclosed within the GV is subjected to several levels of regulation. Morphologically, the chromosomes lose their individuality and form a loose chromatin mass. The decondensed configuration of chromatin then undergoes profound rearrangements during the final stages of oocyte growth that are tightly associated with the acquisition of meiotic and developmental competence. Functionally, the discrete stages of chromatin condensation are characterized by different level of transcriptional activity, DNA methylation and covalent histone modifications. Interestingly, the program of chromatin rearrangement is not completely intrinsic to the oocyte, but follicular cells exert their regulatory actions through gap junction mediated communications and intracellular messenger dependent mechanism(s). With this in mind and since oocyte growth mostly relies on the bidirectional interaction with the follicular cells, a connection between cumulus cells gene expression profile and oocyte developmental competence, according to chromatin configuration is proposed. This analysis can help in identifying candidate genes involved in the process of oocyte developmental competence acquisition and in providing non-invasive biomarkers of oocyte health status that can have important implications in treating human infertility as well as managing breeding schemes in domestic mammals. PMID:25028181

  1. The Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA(®)) and other sperm DNA fragmentation tests for evaluation of sperm nuclear DNA integrity as related to fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-five years ago the pioneering paper in Science (240:1131) on the relationship between sperm DNA integrity and pregnancy outcome was featured as the cover issue showing a fluorescence photomicrograph of red and green stained sperm. The flow cytometry data showed a very significant difference in sperm DNA integrity between fertile and subfertile bulls and men. This study utilized heat (100°C, 5min) to denature DNA at sites of DNA strand breaks followed by staining with acridine orange (AO) and measurements of 5000 individual sperm of green double strand (ds) DNA and red single strand (ss) DNA fluorescence. Later, the heat protocol was changed to a low pH protocol to denature the DNA at sites of strand breaks; the heat and acid procedures produced the same results. SCSA data are very advantageously dual parameter with 1024 channels (degrees) of both red and green fluorescence. Hundreds of publications on the use of the SCSA test in animals and humans have validated the SCSA as a highly useful test for determining male breeding soundness. The SCSA test is a rapid, non-biased flow cytometer machine measurement providing robust statistical data with exceptional precision and repeatability. Many genotoxic experiments showed excellent dose response data with very low coefficient of variation that further validated the SCSA as being a highly powerful assay for sperm DNA integrity. Twelve years following the introduction of the SCSA test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) test (1993) for sperm was introduced as the only other flow cytometric assay for sperm DNA fragmentation. However, the TUNEL test can also be done by light microscopy with much less statistical robustness. The COMET (1998) and Sperm Chromatin Dispersion (SCD; HALO) (2003) tests were introduced as light microscope tests that don't require a flow cytometer. Since these tests measure only 50-200 sperm per sample, they suffer from the lack of

  2. Salt and divalent cations affect the flexible nature of the natural beaded chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, J

    1977-01-01

    A natural chromatin containing simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA and histone has been used to examine changes in chromatin structure caused by various physical and chemical treatments. We find that histone H1 depleted chromatin is more compact in solutions of 0.15M NaCl or 2 mM MgCl2 than in 0.01 M Na...... therefore contains more DNA than the 140 base pair "core particle". The natural variation in the bridge length is consistent with the broad bands observed after nuclease digestion of chromatin. Chromatin prepared for EM without fixation containing long 20A to 30A fibers possibly complexed with protein....

  3. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  4. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Soldi; Alessandro Cuomo; Michael Bremang; Tiziana Bonaldi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs) and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, re...

  5. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  6. Unsupervised pattern discovery in human chromatin structure through genomic segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael M; Buske, Orion J; Wang, Jie; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-05-01

    We trained Segway, a dynamic Bayesian network method, simultaneously on chromatin data from multiple experiments, including positions of histone modifications, transcription-factor binding and open chromatin, all derived from a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. In an unsupervised fashion, we identified patterns associated with transcription start sites, gene ends, enhancers, transcriptional regulator CTCF-binding regions and repressed regions. Software and genome browser tracks are at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/segway/. PMID:22426492

  7. Higher order chromatin structure: bridging physics and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy and genomic techniques have provided new insight into spatial chromatin organization inside of the nucleus. In particular, chromosome conformation capture data has highlighted the relevance of polymer physics for high-order chromatin organization. In this context, we review basic polymer states, discuss how an appropriate polymer model can be determined from experimental data, and examine the success and limitations of various polymer models of high-order interph...

  8. Structural Fluctuations of the Chromatin Fiber within Topologically Associating Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiana, Guido; Amitai, Assaf; Pollex, Tim; Piolot, Tristan; Holcman, David; Heard, Edith; Giorgetti, Luca

    2016-03-29

    Experiments based on chromosome conformation capture have shown that mammalian genomes are partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), within which the chromatin fiber preferentially interacts. TADs may provide three-dimensional scaffolds allowing genes to contact their appropriate distal regulatory DNA sequences (e.g., enhancers) and thus to be properly regulated. Understanding the cell-to-cell and temporal variability of the chromatin fiber within TADs, and what determines them, is thus of great importance to better understand transcriptional regulation. We recently described an equilibrium polymer model that can accurately predict cell-to-cell variation of chromosome conformation within single TADs, from chromosome conformation capture-based data. Here we further analyze the conformational and energetic properties of our model. We show that the chromatin fiber within TADs can easily fluctuate between several conformational states, which are hierarchically organized and are not separated by important free energy barriers, and that this is facilitated by the fact that the chromatin fiber within TADs is close to the onset of the coil-globule transition. We further show that in this dynamic state the properties of the chromatin fiber, and its contact probabilities in particular, are determined in a nontrivial manner not only by site-specific interactions between strongly interacting loci along the fiber, but also by nonlocal correlations between pairs of contacts. Finally, we use live-cell experiments to measure the dynamics of the chromatin fiber in mouse embryonic stem cells, in combination with dynamical simulations, and predict that conformational changes within one TAD are likely to occur on timescales that are much shorter than the duration of one cell cycle. This suggests that genes and their regulatory elements may come together and disassociate several times during a cell cycle. These results have important implications for transcriptional

  9. Internal and higher-order structure of chromatin nu bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olins, D E

    1977-01-01

    Based upon current biophysical data (including recent laser-Raman studies) of isolated nu bodies and inner histones, we have proposed that the chromatin subunit consists of a DNA-rich outer domain surrounding a protein core composed of ..cap alpha..-helical-rich histone globular regions, close-packed with dihedral point-group symmetry. Analysis of the effects of urea on isolated nu bodies suggest that these two domains respond differently: the DNA-rich shell exhibits noncooperative destabilization; the protein core undergoes cooperative destabilization. This differential response of the two regions of a nu body to a simple chemical perturbant (i.e., urea) may furnish a model for the conformational differences in nu bodies postulated for active chromatin. Nu bodies are believed to organize into 20-30 nm higher-order fibers in condensed regions of chromatin. However, the integrity of subunits in these thick fibers has recently been seriously challenged. Evidence from our laboratory, presented here, confirms that the 20-30 nm chromatin fibers consists of a close-packing of nu bodies. The chromatin subunits, therefore, retain their integrity within the higher-order fibers.

  10. Organophosphorous pesticide exposure alters sperm chromatin structure in Mexican agricultural workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate alterations in sperm chromatin structure in men occupationally exposed to a mixture of organophosphorus pesticides (OP) because these alterations have been proposed to compromise male fertility and offspring development. Chromatin susceptibility to in situ acid-induced denaturation structure was assessed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Urinary levels of alkylphosphates (DAP) were used to assess exposure. Diethylthiophosphate (DETP) was the most frequent OP metabolite found in urine samples indicating that compounds derived from thiophosphoric acid were mainly used. Chromatin structure was altered in most samples. About 75% of semen samples were classified as having poor fertility potential (>30% of Percentage of DNA Fragmentation Index [DFI%]), whereas individuals without OP occupational exposure showed average DFI% values of 9.9%. Most parameters of conventional semen analysis were within normality except for the presence of immature cells (IGC) in which 82% of the samples were above reference values. There were significant direct associations between urinary DETP concentrations and mean DFI and SD-DFI but marginally (P = 0.079) with DFI%, after adjustment for potential confounders, including IGC. This suggests that OP exposure alters sperm chromatin condensation, which could be reflected in an increased number of cells with greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation. This study showed that human sperm chromatin is a sensitive target to OP exposure and may contribute to adverse reproductive outcomes. Further studies on the relevance of protein phosphorylation as a possible mechanism by which OP alter sperm chromatin are required

  11. Structural plasticity of single chromatin fibers revealed by torsional manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bancaud, Aurelien; Barbi, Maria; Wagner, Gaudeline; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe; Croquette, Vincent; Victor, Jean-Marc; Prunell, Ariel; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are used to study the mechanical response under torsion of single nucleosome arrays reconstituted on tandem repeats of 5S positioning sequences. Regular arrays are extremely resilient and can reversibly accommodate a large amount of supercoiling without much change in length. This behavior is quantitatively described by a molecular model of the chromatin 3-D architecture. In this model, we assume the existence of a dynamic equilibrium between three conformations of the nucleosome, which are determined by the crossing status of the entry/exit DNAs (positive, null or negative). Torsional strain, in displacing that equilibrium, extensively reorganizes the fiber architecture. The model explains a number of long-standing topological questions regarding DNA in chromatin, and may provide the ground to better understand the dynamic binding of most chromatin-associated proteins.

  12. Structure of chromatin, protein transitions, and post-translational histone modifications in several sperm models

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Katryn Lucille

    2008-01-01

    [eng] The study of chromatin structure in several simple sperm models of increasing complexity was performed. Species demonstrating different types of sperm nuclear protein transitions and structural changes in spermatic chromatin during spermiogenesis were selected as models for comparison: "H" (non-histone proteins are removed), "H->P" (protamine displaces histones), and "H->Pp->P" (precursor protamine displaces histones, and subsequently is converted into the mature protamine). This study ...

  13. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  14. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  15. ISWI regulates higher-order chromatin structure and histone H1 assembly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide F V Corona

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Imitation SWI (ISWI and other ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factors play key roles in transcription and other processes by altering the structure and positioning of nucleosomes. Recent studies have also implicated ISWI in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure, but its role in this process remains poorly understood. To clarify the role of ISWI in vivo, we examined defects in chromosome structure and gene expression resulting from the loss of Iswi function in Drosophila. Consistent with a broad role in transcriptional regulation, the expression of a large number of genes is altered in Iswi mutant larvae. The expression of a dominant-negative form of ISWI leads to dramatic alterations in higher-order chromatin structure, including the apparent decondensation of both mitotic and polytene chromosomes. The loss of ISWI function does not cause obvious defects in nucleosome assembly, but results in a significant reduction in the level of histone H1 associated with chromatin in vivo. These findings suggest that ISWI plays a global role in chromatin compaction in vivo by promoting the association of the linker histone H1 with chromatin.

  16. Unsupervised pattern discovery in human chromatin structure through genomic segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Michael M.; Buske, Orion J; Wang, Jie; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-01-01

    We applied a dynamic Bayesian network method that identifies joint patterns from multiple functional genomics experiments to ChIP-seq histone modification and transcription factor data, and DNaseI-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin readouts from the human cell line K562. In an unsupervised fashion, we identified patterns associated with transcription start sites, gene ends, enhancers, CTCF elements, and repressed regions. Software and genome browser tracks are at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/...

  17. Chromatin structure and epigenetics of tumour cells: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Hájek, R.; Harničarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 51-61. ISSN 1871-529X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : tumour cells * chromatin * radiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  18. Structural plasticity of single chromatin fibers revealed by torsional manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bancaud, Aurelien; Silva, Natalia Conde e; Barbi, Maria; Wagner, Gaudeline; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe; Croquette, Vincent; Victor, Jean-Marc; Prunell, Ariel; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are used to study the mechanical response under torsion of single nucleosome arrays reconstituted on tandem repeats of 5S positioning sequences. Regular arrays are extremely resilient and can reversibly accommodate a large amount of supercoiling without much change in length. This behavior is quantitatively described by a molecular model of the chromatin 3-D architecture. In this model, we assume the existence of a dynamic equilibrium between three conformations of the nucle...

  19. Sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA): a tool in diagnosis and treatment of infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mona Bungum; Leif Bungum; Aleksander Giwercman

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of male infertility has mainly been based on the World Health Organization (WHO) manual-based semen parameter's concentration,motility and morphology.It has,however,become apparent that none of these parameters are reliable markers for evaluation of the fertility potential of a couple.A search for better markers has led to an increased focus on sperm chromatin integrity testing in fertility work-up and assisted reproductive techniques.During the last couple of decades,numerous sperm DNA integrity tests have been developed.These are claimed to be characterized by a lower intraindividual variation,less intralaboratory and interlaboratory variation and thus less subjective than the conventional sperm analysis.However,not all the sperm chromatin integrity tests have yet been shown to be of clinical value.So far,the test that has been found to have the most stable clinical threshold values in relation to fertility is the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA),a flow cytometric test that measures the susceptibility of sperm DNA to acid-induced DNA denaturation in situ.Sperm DNA fragmentation as measured by SCSA has shown to be an independent predictor of successful pregnancy in first pregnancy planners as well as in couples undergoing intrauterine insemination,and can be used as a tool in investigation,counseling and treatment of involuntary childlessness.More conflicting data exist regarding the role of sperm DNA fragmentation in relation to fertilization,pre-embryo development and pregnancy outcome in in vitrofertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

  20. Structural hierarchy of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei based on small-angle neutron scattering: Fractal nature of the large-scale chromatin organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromatin organization in chicken erythrocyte nuclei was studied by small-angle neutron scattering in the scattering-vector range from 1.5 x 10-1 to 10-4 A-1 with the use of the contrast-variation technique. This scattering-vector range corresponds to linear dimensions from 4 nm to 6 μm and covers the whole hierarchy of chromatin structures, from the nucleosomal structure to the entire nucleus. The results of the present study allowed the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) both the chromatin-protein structure and the structure of the nucleic acid component in chicken erythrocyte nuclei have mass-fractal properties, (2) the structure of the protein component of chromatin exhibits a fractal behavior on scales extending over two orders of magnitude, from the nucleosomal size to the size of an entire nucleus, and (3) the structure of the nucleic acid component of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei is likewise of a fractal nature and has two levels of organization or two phases with the crossover point at about 300-400 nm

  1. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of sperm chromatin structure and DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenhof, H; Schütze, S; Wolkers, W F; Sieme, H

    2016-05-01

    Sperm chromatin structure and condensation determine accessibility for damage, and hence success of fertilization and development. The aim of this study was to reveal characteristic spectral features coinciding with abnormal sperm chromatin packing (i.e., DNA-protein interactions) and decreased fertility, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Chromatin structure in spermatozoa obtained from different stallions was investigated. Furthermore, spermatozoa were exposed to oxidative stress, or treated with thiol-oxidizing and disulfide-reducing agents, to alter chromatin structure and packing. Spectroscopic studies were corroborated with flow cytometric analyses using the DNA-intercalating fluorescent dye acridine orange. Decreased fertility of individuals correlated with increased abnormal sperm morphology and decreased stability toward induced DNA damage. Treatment with the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol resulted in increased sperm chromatin decondensation and DNA accessibility, similar as found for less mature epididymal spermatozoa. In situ infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed that characteristic bands arising from the DNA backbone (ν1230, ν1086, ν1051 cm(-1) ) changed in response to induced oxidative damage, water removal, and decondensation. This coincided with changes in the amide-I region (intensity at ν1620 vs. ν1640 cm(-1) ) denoting concomitant changes in protein secondary structure. Reduction in protein disulfide bonds resulted in a decreased value of the asymmetric to symmetric phosphate band intensity (ν1230/ν1086 cm(-1) ), suggesting that this band ratio is sensitive for the degree of chromatin condensation. Moreover, when analyzing spermatozoa from different individuals, it was found that the asymmetric/symmetric phosphate band ratio negatively correlated with the percentage of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa. PMID:26916383

  2. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A;

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  3. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  4. Remodeling of chromatin structure in senescent cells and its potential impact on tumor suppression and aging

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an important tumor suppression process, and a possible contributor to tissue aging. Senescence is accompanied extensive changes in chromatin structure. In particular, many senescent cells accumulate specialized domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF), which are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. This article reviews ou...

  5. Hypothesis for the influence of fixatives on the chromatin patterns of interphase nuclei, based on shrinkage and retraction of nuclear and perinuclear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignold, L P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear chromatin patterns are used to distinguish normal and abnormal cells in histopathology and cytopathology. However, many chromatin pattern features are affected by aspects of tissue processing, especially fixation. Major effects of aldehyde and/or ethanol fixation on nuclei in the living state include shrinkage, chromatin aggregation and production of a 'chromatinic rim'. The mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. In the past, possible mechanisms of fixation-induced morphological change have been considered only in terms of the theoretical model of the nucleus, which involves only a random tangle of partly unfolded chromosomes contained within the nuclear membrane. Such a model provides no basis for chromatin to be associated with the nuclear envelope, and hence no obvious clue to a mechanism for the formation of the 'chromatinic rim' in fixed nuclei. In recent years, two new models of nuclear structure have been described. The nuclear membrane-bound, chromosomal-domain model is based on the discoveries of chromatin-nuclear membrane attachments and of the localisation of the chromatin of each chromosome within discrete, exclusive parts of the nucleus (the 'domain' of each partly unfolded chromosome). The nuclear matrix/scaffold model is based on the discovery of relatively insoluble proteins in nuclei, which it suggests forms a 'matrix' and modulates gene expression by affecting transcription of DNA. Here, a hypothesis for fixation-associated chromatin pattern formation based mainly on the first model but partially relying on the second, is presented. The hypothesis offers explanations of the variations of appearance of nuclei according to fixation (especially air-drying versus wet-fixation with formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or ethanol); the appearances of the nuclei of more metabolically active versus less metabolically active cells of the same type; the appearances of nuclei after fixation with osmium tetroxide; and of the marked central

  6. [Cytophotometric analysis of the chromatin structural conformity in interphase nuclei detected in UV light and by gallocyanine staining].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukotskiĭ, A V; Shchegolev, A I; Butusova, N N; Nemirovskiĭ, L E; Kogan, E M

    1985-06-01

    Geometric and optical parameters of chromatin of hepatocyte nuclei have been examined before (UV, lambda = 265 nm) and after gallocyanine staining. Quantitative parameters of the chromatin structure in the same nuclei measured in situ by a scanning microscope-photometer (step size 0.125 micron) before and after staining were equal. Tinctorial properties of chromatin granules (condensed part of the nuclear material) and its diffuse part were different. It is suggested that the difference between granules and the nongranular part of chromatin is not only of optical but also of chemical nature. PMID:2410060

  7. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  8. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeatedDNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C.

    2007-05-05

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  9. Structural Modeling of GR Interactions with the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex and C/EBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muratcioglu, Serena; Presman, Diego M; Pooley, John R;

    2015-01-01

    interaction with other transcription factors. Thus, chromatin remodeling is an essential component of GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, and understanding the interactions between these molecules at the structural level provides insights into the mechanisms of how GR and chromatin remodeling cooperate to...

  10. Decrease of H1 histone and changes in chromatin structure and transcription in pea seedlings after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds and seedlings of pea have been irradiated between zero to 300 Gy doses of 60Co gamma-irradiation and examinations were carried out on the chromatin of shoots of 1-week-old etiolated seedlings. There was only a slight change in the gross composition of chromatin after irradiation (in the mass ratios of DNA:RNA:histone:non-histone proteins). Separation of histones, however, showed that after 300 Gy irradiation the quantity of H1 histones decreased by 33% after seed irradiation and 43% after seedling irradiation. The ratio of H1 subfractions also changed. Enzymes DNAase II and micrococcal nuclease digested the chromatin of the irradiated sample 30% faster than the unirradiated one. Transcription kinetics of chromatin showed a gradual decrease of Ksub(m) value on increasing doses of irradiation. There was, however, no difference in the rate of transcription of DNAs, isolated from the chromatin of the control and irradiated samples. Protease and RNAase activity of whole shoots showed enhancement after irradiation. These data suggest that irradiation of either seeds or seedlings results in loosening of the seedling chromatin structure, while there is no change in basic nucleosomal structure. The specific degradation or dissociation of histone H1, localized in the internucleosomal region may be responsible for these changes in the higher order structure of chromatin. This may explain the easier accessibility of chromatin to DNAase II after irradiation and the more tightly bound RNA polymerase, exhibited in decreasing Ksub(m) values. (Auth.)

  11. Conformational changes in the chromatin structure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations are known to challenge the integrity of the genome by inducing several lesions like double strand breaks, single strand breaks and oxidative base damage in the DNA. Human cells have evolved efficient DNA repair processes in response to DNA damage by which the integrity of genome is maintained. Emerging evidence indicates that various modulations to chromatin structure are centrally important to many aspects of the DNA damage response (DDR). DNA is compacted and packed in the form of chromatin in eukaryotic cells, the basic unit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which consists of ∼ 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped in two left-handed superhelical turns around an octamer of histone proteins. Higher order chromatin packaging acts as a barrier to the detection and repair of DNA damage. Hence, chromatin reorganization is thought to play a crucial role in cellular responses to DNA damage by making damaged sites more accessible to repair as well as transcriptional machinery of the cell. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is a sensitive and non invasive tool to study the dynamics of biomolecules in solution. Changes in the conformation of chromatin on exposure to gamma radiation were measured in the form of average hydrodynamic diameter of chromatin fragments in irradiated and control cells. In the present study we have used Dynamic Light Scattering (PLS) as a tool to analyze radiation induced conformational changes in the structure of native chromatin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at resting stage (G0). Dose response experiments carried out on 10 individuals have shown a significant difference in the average hydrodynamic diameter of chromatin fibers in different dose groups. Our results have also shown significant changes in the chromatin size at low dose groups (25 cGy and 50 cGy) as compared to higher doses. Inter-individual variations in the chromatin dynamics were clearly demonstrated

  12. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli G Castillo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1 associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1 for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1 and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1 influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1 chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 and other core histones.

  13. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Araceli G; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C; Pidoux, Alison L

    2007-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1) associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1) for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1) and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1) influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) and other core histones. PMID:17677001

  14. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  15. Chromatin structure implicated in activation of HIV-1 gene expression by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the effects of different DNA-damaging agents on HIV-1 gene expression. We find that agents that produce bulky DNA lesions, similar to those induced by ultraviolet light (UV), all dramatically increase HIV-1 gene expression, whereas agents that produce primarily base damage and DNA breakage, such as ionizing radiation, have little or no effect. We show that these effects are independent of DNA synthesis per se and do not require DNA nucleotide excision repair. The drug novobiocin effectively prevents the UV activation process, consistent with the idea that a change in DNA chromatin structure may be required. We suggest that a transient decondensation of chromatin structure, an early step in DNA nucleotide excision repair but not in base excision repair, may be the triggering mechanism. The decondensation may allow the transcriptional machinery better access to the HIV-1 promoter region, thereby increasing gene expression

  16. RNAi-mediated gene silencing reveals involvement of Arabidopsis chromatin-related genes in Agrobacterium-mediated root transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Crane, Yan Ma; Gelvin, Stanton B

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of RNAi-mediated gene silencing of 109 Arabidopsis thaliana chromatin-related genes (termed “chromatin genes” hereafter) on Agrobacterium-mediated root transformation. Each of the RNAi lines contains a single- or low-copy-number insertion of a hairpin construction that silences the endogenous copy of the target gene. We used three standard transient and stable transformation assays to screen 340 independent RNAi lines, representing 109 target genes, for the rat (res...

  17. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 105 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G0, the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  18. LINE retrotransposon RNA is an essential structural and functional epigenetic component of a core neocentromeric chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderly C Chueh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified and characterized the phenomenon of ectopic human centromeres, known as neocentromeres. Human neocentromeres form epigenetically at euchromatic chromosomal sites and are structurally and functionally similar to normal human centromeres. Recent studies have indicated that neocentromere formation provides a major mechanism for centromere repositioning, karyotype evolution, and speciation. Using a marker chromosome mardel(10 containing a neocentromere formed at the normal chromosomal 10q25 region, we have previously mapped a 330-kb CENP-A-binding domain and described an increased prevalence of L1 retrotransposons in the underlying DNA sequences of the CENP-A-binding clusters. Here, we investigated the potential role of the L1 retrotransposons in the regulation of neocentromere activity. Determination of the transcriptional activity of a panel of full-length L1s (FL-L1s across a 6-Mb region spanning the 10q25 neocentromere chromatin identified one of the FL-L1 retrotransposons, designated FL-L1b and residing centrally within the CENP-A-binding clusters, to be transcriptionally active. We demonstrated the direct incorporation of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts into the CENP-A-associated chromatin. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts led to a reduction in CENP-A binding and an impaired mitotic function of the 10q25 neocentromere. These results indicate that LINE retrotransposon RNA is a previously undescribed essential structural and functional component of the neocentromeric chromatin and that retrotransposable elements may serve as a critical epigenetic determinant in the chromatin remodelling events leading to neocentromere formation.

  19. Structured nucleosome fingerprints enable high-resolution mapping of chromatin architecture within regulatory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schep, Alicia N; Buenrostro, Jason D; Denny, Sarah K; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors canonically bind nucleosome-free DNA, making the positioning of nucleosomes within regulatory regions crucial to the regulation of gene expression. Using the assay of transposase accessible chromatin (ATAC-seq), we observe a highly structured pattern of DNA fragment lengths and positions around nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and use this distinctive two-dimensional nucleosomal "fingerprint" as the basis for a new nucleosome-positioning algorithm called NucleoATAC. We show that NucleoATAC can identify the rotational and translational positions of nucleosomes with up to base-pair resolution and provide quantitative measures of nucleosome occupancy in S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. We demonstrate the application of NucleoATAC to a number of outstanding problems in chromatin biology, including analysis of sequence features underlying nucleosome positioning, promoter chromatin architecture across species, identification of transient changes in nucleosome occupancy and positioning during a dynamic cellular response, and integrated analysis of nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding. PMID:26314830

  20. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  1. Structural transition in inactive Balbiani ring chromatin of Chironomus during micrococcus nuclease digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Widmer, R. M.; Lezzi, M.; Koller, Th.

    1987-01-01

    We have analysed by micrococcus nuclease digestion the chromatin structure of genes in the Balbiani ring (BR) regions of a Chironomus cell line. Gel electrophoresis of the DNA fragments reveals a repeating structure which consists of two repeat sizes, a long repeat seen in the large fragments and a small repeat seen in the small fragments. The two repeats hardly overlap, except in a narrow transition zone which is at a different fragment size in the BR 2.2 and the BR 2.1 gene. The sizes of th...

  2. Replication domains are self-interacting structural chromatin units of human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Alain

    2011-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the replication program in different cell types. In silico analysis of nucleotide compositional skew has predicted the existence, in the germline, of replication N-domains bordered by putative replication origins and where the skew decreases rather linearly as the signature of a progressive inversion of the average fork polarity. Here, from the demonstration that the average fork polarity can be directly extracted from the derivative of replication timing profiles, we develop a wavelet-based pattern recognition methodology to delineate replication U-domains where the replication timing profile is shaped as a U and its derivative as a N. Replication U-domains are robustly found in seven cell lines as covering a significant portion (40-50%) of the human genome where the replication timing data actually displays some plasticity between cell lines. The early replication initiation zones at U-domains borders are found to be hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, to be associated with transcriptional activity and to present a significant enrichment in insular-binding proteins CTCF, the hallmark of an open chromatin structure. A comparative analysis of genome-wide chromatin interaction (HiC) data shows that replication-U domains correspond to self-interacting structural high order chromatin units of megabase characteristic size. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that the epigenetic compartmentalization of the human genome into autonomous replication U-domains comes along with an extensive remodelling of the threedimensional chromosome architecture during development or in specific diseases. The observed cell specific conservation of the replication timing between the human and mouse genomes strongly suggests that this chromosome organization into

  3. Higher-order chromatin structure in DSB induction, repair and misrepair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 704, 1-3 (2010), s. 88-100. ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA double strand breaks * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.741, year: 2010

  4. Genome instability in the context of chromatin structure and fragile sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Jugová, Alžbeta; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2010), s. 181-194. ISSN 1045-4403 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * fragile sites * chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2010

  5. Relationship Between Chromatin Structure and Sensitivity to Molecularly Targeted Auger Electron Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. Methods and Materials: Chromatin structure was altered in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N human breast cancer cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, or hypertonic treatment. The extent and duration of chromatin structural changes were evaluated using the micrococcal nuclease assay. DNA damage (γH2AX assay) and clonogenic survival were evaluated after exposure to 111In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, or IR. The intracellular distribution of 111In-DTPA-hEGF after chromatin modification was investigated in cell fractionation experiments. Results: Chromatin remained condensed for up to 20 minutes after NaCl and in a relaxed state 24 hours after SAHA treatment. The number of γH2AX foci per cell was greater in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (0.5 Gy) plus SAHA (1 μM) compared with IR alone (16 ± 0.6 and 14 ± 0.3 vs. 12 ± 0.4 and 11 ± 0.2, respectively). More γH2AX foci were observed in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells exposed to 111In-DTPA-hEGF (6 MBq/μg) plus SAHA vs. 111In-DTPA-hEGF alone (11 ± 0.3 and 12 ± 0.7 vs. 9 ± 0.4 and 7 ± 0.3, respectively). 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine enhanced the DNA damage caused by IR and 111In-DTPA-hEGF. Clonogenic survival was reduced in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (6 Gy) plus SAHA (1 μM) vs. IR alone (0.6% ± 0.01 and 0.3% ± 0.2 vs. 5.8% ± 0.2 and 2% ± 0.1, respectively) and after 111In-DTPA-hEGF plus SAHA compared to 111In-DTPA-hEGF alone (21% ± 0.4% and 19% ± 4.6 vs. 33% ± 2.3 and 32% ± 3.7). SAHA did not affect 111In-DTPA-hEGF nuclear localization. Hypertonic treatment resulted in fewer γH2AX foci per cell after IR and 111In-DTPA-hEGF compared to controls but did not significantly alter clonogenic survival

  6. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: γ-rays and protons in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to their physical characteristics, protons and ion beams promise a revolution in cancer radiotherapy. Curing protocols however reflect rather the empirical knowledge than experimental data on DNA repair. This especially holds for the spatio-temporal organization of repair processes in the context of higher-order chromatin structure—the problematics addressed in this work. The consequences for the mechanism of chromosomal translocations are compared for gamma rays and proton beams. - Highlights: ► The majority of DSBs are repaired individually close to the sites of their origin. ► Decondensation of damaged chromatin domains can potentiate clustering of lesions. ► DSB clustering might increase the risk of chromatin translocation. ► Distances of lesions and higher-order chromatin structure influence DSB clustering. ► The conclusions seem to hold both for DSB damage caused by γ-radiation and protons

  7. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  8. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  9. Neuronal accumulation of unrepaired DNA in a novel specific chromatin domain: structural, molecular and transcriptional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Garrido, Jorge; Casafont, Iñigo; Tapia, Olga; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that defective DNA repair in neurons with accumulation of DNA lesions and loss of genome integrity underlies aging and many neurodegenerative disorders. An important challenge is to understand how neurons can tolerate the accumulation of persistent DNA lesions without triggering the apoptotic pathway. Here we study the impact of the accumulation of unrepaired DNA on the chromatin architecture, kinetics of the DNA damage response and transcriptional activity in rat sensory ganglion neurons exposed to 1-to-3 doses of ionizing radiation (IR). In particular, we have characterized the structural, molecular and transcriptional compartmentalization of unrepaired DNA in persistent DNA damaged foci (PDDF). IR induced the formation of numerous transient foci, which repaired DNA within the 24 h post-IR, and a 1-to-3 PDDF. The latter concentrate DNA damage signaling and repair factors, including γH2AX, pATM, WRAP53 and 53BP1. The number and size of PDDF was dependent on the doses of IR administered. The proportion of neurons carrying PDDF decreased over time of post-IR, indicating that a slow DNA repair occurs in some foci. The fine structure of PDDF consisted of a loose network of unfolded 30 nm chromatin fiber intermediates, which may provide a structural scaffold accessible for DNA repair factors. Furthermore, the transcription assay demonstrated that PDDF are transcriptionally silent, although transcription occurred in flanking euchromatin. Therefore, the expression of γH2AX can be used as a reliable marker of gene silencing in DNA damaged neurons. Moreover, PDDF were located in repressive nuclear environments, preferentially in the perinucleolar domain where they were frequently associated with Cajal bodies or heterochromatin clumps forming a structural triad. We propose that the sequestration of unrepaired DNA in discrete PDDF and the transcriptional silencing can be essential to preserve genome stability and prevent the synthesis of

  10. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a high...

  11. Maintenance of genome stability in plants: repairing DNA double strand breaks and chromatin structure stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit eRoy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells are subject to high levels of DNA damage resulting from plant’s obligatory dependence on sunlight and the associated exposure to environmental stresses like solar UV radiation, high soil salinity, drought, chilling injury and other air and soil pollutants including heavy metals and metabolic byproducts from endogenous processes. The irreversible DNA damages, generated by the environmental and genotoxic stresses affect plant growth and development, reproduction and crop productivity. Thus, for maintaining genome stability, plants have developed an extensive array of mechanisms for the detection and repair of DNA damages. This review will focus recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms regulating plant genome stability in the context of repairing of double stand breaks and chromatin structure maintenance.

  12. The influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: a study using nuclear and nucleoid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks, the alkaline unwinding technique was applied to nuclear and nucleoid monolayers. These chromatin substrates were prepared by treating human fibroblasts grown as monolayers with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and varying concentrations of cations. The chromatin structure was modified either by a stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins by extraction in increasing concentrations of monovalent salt, or by the addition or deletion of mono- and divalent cations to condense or decondense the chromatin, respectively. It was found that the stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins from the chromatin dramatically increased the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. The DNA-bound proteins showed a qualitative difference in their ability to protect the DNA where proteins removed by salt concentrations above 1.0 M exerted the greatest protection. Furthermore, the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks was found to be 6 times lower in condensed chromatin than in decondensed chromatin and about 80 times lower than in protein-depleted chromatin. It is concluded that the presence of DNA-bound proteins and the folding of the chromatin into higher-order structures protect the DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks

  13. Chromatin structure influence of DNA damage measurements by four assays: pulsed- and constant-field gel electrophoresis, DNA precipitation and non-denaturing filter elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The of elution of DNA during non-denaturing filter elution (NFE) often correlates with cell sensitivity to radiation. The elution rate is influenced by two cellular factors: chromatin structure and the number of DNA-strand breaks (DSBs) produced in an intact cell by ionizing radiation. To determine which of the above factors is relevant to cell radiosensitivity, four assays were used to measure induction of DNA damage in three cell lines varying in radiosensitivity (V79, CHO, and L5178Y-R). Each of the assays, neutral filter elution (NFE), DNA precipitation, constant (CFGE) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have different physical basis for DNA damage measurement and might be differently affected by chromatin structure. Three of the methods used to measure DNA double-strand breaks gave different results: NFE was dependent on cell type and location of DNA relative to the replication fork, gel electrophoresis was independent of cell type but was affected by proximity to the replication fork, and the precipitation assay was independent of both cell type and replication status. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis produced the same results and constant field gel electrophoresis for 3 cell lines examined. Only NFE showed differences in sensitivity which correlated with cell survival following irradiation. The results suggest that three is the same initial amount of DSBs in cells from all three lines and that the sensitivity to radiation is determined by some additional factors, probably chromatin structure. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs

  14. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  15. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  16. Painting a Clearer Picture of Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Elizabeth H; Misteli, Tom; Shachar, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Elucidating chromatin's 3D shape is critical to understanding its function, but the fine structure of chromatin domains remains poorly resolved. In a recent report in Nature, Boettiger et al. (2016) visualize chromatin in super-resolution, gaining unprecedented insight into chromatin architecture. PMID:26906730

  17. Activation of tachykinin, neurokinin 3 receptors affects chromatin structure and gene expression by means of histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Amit; Sylar, Elise; Flynn, Francis W

    2012-12-01

    The tachykinin, neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) is a g-protein coupled receptor that is broadly distributed in the nervous system and exerts its diverse physiological actions through multiple signaling pathways. Despite the role of the receptor system in a range of biological functions, the effects of NK3R activation on chromatin dynamics and gene expression have received limited attention. The present work determined the effects of senktide, a selective NK3R agonist, on chromatin organization, acetylation, and gene expression, using qRT-PCR, in a hypothalamic cell line (CLU 209) that expresses the NK3R. Senktide (1 nM, 10nM) caused a relaxation of chromatin, an increase in global acetylation of histone H3 and H4, and an increase in the expression of a common set of genes involved in cell signaling, cell growth, and synaptic plasticity. Pretreatment with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor (garcinol and 2-methylene y-butylactone), that inhibits p300, p300/CREB binding protein (CBP) associated factor (PCAF), and GCN 5, prevented the senktide-induced increase in expression of most, but not all, of the genes upregulated in response to 1 nM and 10nM senktide. Treatment with 100 nM had the opposite effect: a reduction in chromatin relaxation and decreased acetylation. The expression of four genes was significantly decreased and the HAT inhibitor had a limited effect in blocking the upregulation of genes in response to 100 nM senktide. Activation of the NK3R appears to recruit multiple pathways, including acetylation, and possibly histone deactylases, histone methylases, or DNA methylases to affect chromatin structure and gene expression. PMID:22985858

  18. Chromatin structure is required to block transcription of the methylated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene transcription (pHSV-106, pML-BPV-TK4) by DNA methylation is an indirect effect, which occurs with a latency period of ∼ 8 hr microinjection of the DNA into TK- rat 2 and mouse LTK- cells. The authors have strong evidence that chromatin formation is critical for the transition of the injected DNA from methylation insensitivity to methylation sensitivity. Chromatin was reconstituted in vitro by using methylated and mock-methylated HSV TK DNA and purified chicken histone octamers. After microinjection, the methylated chromatin was always biologically inactive, as tested by autoradiography of the cells after incubation with [3H]thymidine and by RNA dot blot analysis. However, in transformed cell lines, reactivation of the methylated chromatic occurred after treatment with 5-azacytidine. Furthermore, integration of the TK chromatin into the host genome is not required to block expression of the methylated TK gene. Mouse cells that contained the pML-BPV-TK4 chromatin permanently in an episomal state also did not support TK gene expression as long as the TK DNA remained methylated

  19. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability. • Reduced radiation-induced clastogenicity in Ataxia telangiectasia cell lines. • Histone tails hyperacetylation reduces heterochromatin content favouring DSBs repair. - Abstract: At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post

  20. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschini, Roberta, E-mail: meschini@unitus.it; Morucci, Elisa; Berni, Andrea; Lopez-Martinez, Wilner; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability. • Reduced radiation-induced clastogenicity in Ataxia telangiectasia cell lines. • Histone tails hyperacetylation reduces heterochromatin content favouring DSBs repair. - Abstract: At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post

  1. Site-specific demethylation and normal chromatin structure of the human dihydrofolate reductase gene promoter after transfection into CHO cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, T.; Inokuchi, K; Nienhuis, A W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of in vitro methylation on the function and chromatin structure of the human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) promoter linked to the DHFR coding sequences (minigene) was studied after DNA-mediated gene transfer into DHFR- CHO cells. Methylation of HhaI sites reduced the transforming frequency to about 10% of control, whereas methylation of HpaII sites had a less significant effect. The integrated genes were demethylated at specific sites in the promoter sequence, namely, HpaII sites ...

  2. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  4. Plasticity of Fission Yeast CENP-A Chromatin Driven by Relative Levels of Histone H3 and H4

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Araceli G.; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; William Richardson; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Allshire, Robin C.; Pidoux, Alison L.

    2007-01-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone...

  5. PARP-1 Regulates Chromatin Structure and Transcription Through a KDM5B-Dependent Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnakumar, Raga; Kraus, W. Lee

    2010-01-01

    PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear enzyme that regulates gene expression, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We examined the interplay between PARP-1, histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), and linker histone H1 in the chromatin-dependent control of transcription. We show that PARP-1 is required for a series of molecular outcomes at the promoters of PARP-1 regulated genes, leading to a permissive chromatin environment that allows loading of the RNA Pol II machinery. PARP-1 does ...

  6. Chromatin structure of Asparagales telomeres - old story with a new end?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkorová, Eva; Skleničková, Marie; Lim, K. Y.; Leitch, A. R.; Fajkus, Jiří

    London: Biochemical Society, 2004. s. 17. [EMBO Workshop / Harden Conference /58./ - Telemeres and Genome Stability . 03.04.2004-07.04.2004, Cambridge] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/02/0027; GA ČR GP204/04/P105 Keywords : alternative telomeres in plants * chromatin * nucleosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  7. Effect of Different Thawing Rates on Post-Thaw Viability, Kinematic Parameters and Chromatin Structure of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis Spermatozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Rastegarnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate three thawing rates on the post thaw motility, viability and chromatin structure of buffalo semen frozen in 0.5-ml straws.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study semen was collected with artificial vagina (42˚C from four buffalo bulls.Split pooled ejaculates (n=4 were extended at 37˚C with a Bioxcell® extender. Semen was cooled to 4˚C within 2 hours, equilibrated at 4˚C for 4 hours, then filled in 0.5 ml French straws, and frozen in programmable cell freezer before plunging into liquid nitrogen. Straws were thawed at water bath temperatures of 37, 50 or 70˚C for 30, 15 and 6 seconds, respectively. Semen was incubated at 37˚C for 2 hours and evaluated for post thaw motility, viability, acrosomal and DNA integrity of spermatozoa. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was used for comparisons of means. When the ANOVA test showed statistical differences, the mean of the treatments were compared using Duncan’s multiple range tests.Results: The initial postthaw motility (0 hour averaged 62.7 ± 7.2%, 73.1 ± 9.77%, and 74.9 ± 8.58% for the three thaw rates, respectively. Kinematic parameters such as average path velocity, linearity and beat/cross frequency in the thaw rate of 70˚C for 6 seconds were superior to other rates studied (p0.05. A positive correlation was detected between sperm motility and thawing rate after two hours incubation times. The percentage of viable spermatozoa and spermatozoa with an intact acrosome and plasma membrane integrity were not different between the groups of samples thawed at different temperatures (p>0.05. The percentage of spermatozoa with chromatin dispersion forthe thaw rate of 70˚C for 6 seconds was significantly higher than for the to other rates studied (p< 0.05. In contrast with motility and viability, the DNA integrity of post thaw spermatozoa remained unaffected during 2 hours incubation.Conclusion: The post thaw motility and kinematic

  8. Chromatin-related proteins in pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells are downregulated after removal of leukemia inhibitory factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have generated enormous interest due to their capacity to self-renew and the potential for growing many different cell types in vitro. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), bone morphogenetic proteins, octamer-binding protein 3 or 4, and Nanog are important factors in the maintenance of pluripotency in mouse ES cells. However, the mechanisms by which these factors regulate the pluripotency remain poorly understood. To identify other proteins involved in this process, we did a proteomic analysis of mouse ES cells that were cultured in the presence or absence of LIF. More than 100 proteins were found to be involved specifically in either the differentiation process or the maintenance of undifferentiated state. Among these, chromatin-related proteins were identified as the major proteins in nuclear extracts of undifferentiated cells. Analysis with real-time RT-PCR revealed that enrichment of these proteins in pluripotent ES cells was regulated at the transcriptional levels. These results suggest that specific chromatin-related proteins may be involved in maintaining the unique properties of pluripotent ES cells

  9. Topoisomerase II–DNA complexes trapped by ICRF-193 perturb chromatin structure

    OpenAIRE

    Germe, Thomas; Hyrien, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (topo II) is involved in unlinking replicating DNA and organizing mitotic chromosomes. Topo II is the target of many antitumour drugs. Topo II inhibition results in extensive catenation of newly replicated DNA and may potentially perturb chromatin assembly. Here, we show that the topo II inhibitor ICRF-193 does not prevent the bulk of nucleosome deposition, but perturbs nucleosome spacing in Xenopus egg extracts. This is due to the trapping of topo II-closed clamps on the...

  10. Trypsin-induced changes in cell shape and chromatin structure result in radiosensitization of monolayer Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trypsin is the enzyme commonly used to prepare single cell suspensions from monolayer and spheroid cultures, both to determine survival and to assay DNA damage. Trypsin induces rounding, dissociation and radiosensitization of anchorage-dependent cells. Radiosensitivity and chromatin structure were compared between trypsin-treated (0.05%) round V79 cells from monolayers and spheroids vs. untreated spread monolayer cells in situ. The fluorescent halo technique was used to measure the changes in DNA supercoiling in nucleoids isolated from control and irradiated round and spread cells. Maximal halo diameters, the amount of initial and residual radiation-induced SNA damage and the radiosensitivity were higher in round cells than in spread monolayer V79 cells. The effects on cellular radiosensitivity and maximal halo diameter of other agents which also round and dissociate cells, e.g. 0.25% trypsin, pronase E and a non-enzymatic cell-dissociation solution, were similar to those of 0.05% trypsin. In LY-S cells, which are anchorage-independent, DNA loop size, the initial amount of DNA damage and radiosensitivity were not affected by trypsin. We suggest that the higher radiosensitivity of anchorage-dependent cells under immediate trypsinization and plating conditions, compared to cells with postirradiation in situ repair incubation, is due to correlated changes in cell shape and chromatin structure. (author)

  11. [RNA responsible for conferring a DNase I sensitive structure on albumin gene in assembled chromatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Zhai, Yu; Song, Shu-Xia

    2003-01-01

    Although the set of genes is virtually the same in all tissues,differential gene expression is appeared in cells of different kinds. Differentiation and ageing are associated with regulation of gene expression that is a fundamental mechanism in eukaryotic development and survival. The sensitivity to DNase I of actively transcribed genes seems to be a general phenomenon. The purpose of the study is to test whether RNAs obtained from different organs or cells can enhance susceptibility of albumin gene to DNase I digestion in BALB/c mouse brain chromatin assembled.RNAs extracted from rat liver, lung, kidney, brain, tRNA from yeast and synthesized RNAs (23 nt completed with mouse alb gene) were added to a system of chromatin reconstitution that was achieved by dialysis from high ionic strength solution. Assembled chromatin was digested with DNase I (12.5 microg/mL) at 20 degrees for 1 min, then PCR assay was used to detect the level of albumin gene digested. PCR products (1200 bp) were run on a 6% polyacylamide gel and analyzed by silver stain assay. RNAs from different organs and synthesized RNAs all increased the sensitivity of albumin gene to DNase I attack in mouse assembled chromatin. The effect was more obvious in liver and lung RNAs than in kidney and brain ones. tRNA from yeast did not enhance the sensitivity of albumin gene to DNase I digestion. RNA increased albumin gene sensitivity to DNase I in a dose-dependent manner. We report here for the first time that RNAs can enhance susceptibility of albumin gene to DNase I digestion. The effect is associated with RNA sources or sequences. It is generally agreed that the formation of gene sensitivity to DNase I, by unfolding of a tightly packed chromatin fiber, is the first step in gene activation, then RNAs that recognize complementary DNA sequences may be the specific factors that affect DNA supercoiling and determine the sensitivity of gene to DNase I digestion. Here we describes "RNA Population Gene Activating

  12. Modulating chromatin structure and DNA accessibility by deacetylase inhibition enhances the anti-cancer activity of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaz, Nóra; Kovács, Dávid; Rázga, Zsolt; Kónya, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered as novel therapeutic agents inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Inhibition of deacetylase activity results in a relaxed chromatin structure thereby rendering the genetic material more vulnerable to DNA targeting agents that could be exploited by combinational cancer therapy. The unique potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in tumor therapy relies on the generation of reactive radicals which trigger oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. The revolutionary application of AgNPs as chemotherapeutical drugs seems very promising, nevertheless the exact molecular mechanisms of AgNP action in combination with other anti-cancer agents have yet to be elucidated in details before clinical administrations. As a step towards this we investigated the combinational effect of HDAC inhibition and AgNP administration in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We identified synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth and migration upon combinational treatments. Here we report that the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A enhances the DNA targeting capacity and apoptosis inducing efficacy of AgNPs most probably due to its effect on chromatin condensation. These results point to the potential benefits of combinational application of HDAC inhibitors and AgNPs in novel cancer medication protocols. PMID:27434153

  13. Impact of Chromatin on HIV Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Agosto, Luis M.; Matthew Gagne; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin influences Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration and replication. This review highlights critical host factors that influence chromatin structure and organization and that also impact HIV integration, transcriptional regulation and latency. Furthermore, recent attempts to target chromatin associated factors to reduce the HIV proviral load are discussed.

  14. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  15. Spectroscopic study of laser irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Liliana, E-mail: liliana1radu@gmail.com [V. Babes National Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology (Romania); Mihailescu, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Lasers (Romania); Gazdaru, Doina [Faculty of Physics, Bucharest University, Department of Biophysics (Romania); Preoteasa, V. [V. Babes National Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology (Romania)

    2013-04-15

    The effects of three UV excimer laser radiations, with wavelengths of 193, 248 and 282 nm respectively, on the structure of chromatin (the complex of deoxyribonucleic acid with proteins that exists in eukaryotic cells nuclei) were investigated. The chromatin was extracted from livers of Winstar rats. The spectroscopic methods used are: fluorescence (Foerster) resonance energy transfer (FRET), time resolved fluorescence and steady-state fluorescence. A chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid radiolysis, a chromatin proteins damage and a change of the global chromatin structure on lasers action were indicated by this study. It exists some small differences between the actions of these three laser radiations.

  16. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: gamma-rays and protons in action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, L.; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Štefančíková, Lenka; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Lukášová, Emilie; Boreyko, A.; Krasavin, E.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, SI (2014), s. 128-136. ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12008 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double-strand breaks * Higher-order chromatin structure and DSB repair * Formation of chromosomal translocations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  17. Structural Logical Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Sarnat, Jeffrey

    Tait's method (a.k.a. proof by logical relations) is a powerful proof technique frequently used for showing foundational properties of languages based on typed lambda-calculi. Historically, these proofs have been extremely difficult to formalize in proof assistants with weak meta-logics, such as...... Twelf, and yet they are often straightforward in proof assistants with stronger meta-logics. In this paper, we propose structural logical relations as a technique for conducting these proofs in systems with limited meta-logical strength by explicitly representing and reasoning about an auxiliary logic...

  18. Brain Function and Chromatin Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dulac, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of epigenetic control, including the potential for long-lasting, stable effects on gene expression that outlive an initial transient signal, could be of singular importance for post-mitotic neurons, which are subject to changes with short- to long-lasting influence on their activity and connectivity. Persistent changes in chromatin structure are thought to contribute to mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Recent advances in chromatin biology offer new avenues to investig...

  19. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena;

    2012-01-01

    . Interestingly, RNF8-mediated recruitment of CHD4 and subsequent chromatin remodelling were independent of the ubiquitin-ligase activity of RNF8, but involved a non-canonical interaction with the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Our study reveals a new mechanism of chromatin remodelling-assisted ubiquitylation......The ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 orchestrate DNA damage signalling through the ubiquitylation of histone H2A and the recruitment of downstream repair factors. Here, we demonstrate that RNF8, but not RNF168 or the canonical H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2, mediates extensive chromatin decondensation...

  20. Chromatin remodeling, development and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development is a stepwise process in which multi-potent progenitor cells undergo lineage commitment, differentiation, proliferation and maturation to produce mature cells with restricted developmental potentials. This process is directed by spatiotemporally distinct gene expression programs that allow cells to stringently orchestrate intricate transcriptional activation or silencing events. In eukaryotes, chromatin structure contributes to developmental progression as a blueprint for coordinated gene expression by actively participating in the regulation of gene expression. Changes in higher order chromatin structure or covalent modification of its components are considered to be critical events in dictating lineage-specific gene expression during development. Mammalian cells utilize multi-subunit nuclear complexes to alter chromatin structure. Histone-modifying complex catalyzes covalent modifications of histone tails including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex, which disrupts histone-DNA contacts and induces nucleosome mobilization, requires energy from ATP hydrolysis for its catalytic activity. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes during mammalian development. In particular, the roles of these complexes during embryonic and hematopoietic development are reviewed in depth. In addition, pathological conditions such as tumor development that are induced by mutation of several key subunits of the chromatin remodeling complex are discussed, together with possible mechanisms that underlie tumor suppression by the complex

  1. A Model of Repetitive-DNA-Organized Chromatin Network of Interphase Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During interphase, chromosomes are relatively de-condensed in the nuclear space. Interphase chromosomes are known to occupy nuclear space in a non-random manner (chromosome territory; however, their internal structures are poorly defined. In particular, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that govern the internal organization of interphase chromosomes. The author recently proposed that pairing (or interaction of repetitive DNA-containing chromatin regions is a critical driving force that specifies the higher-order organization of eukaryotic chromosomes. Guided by this theoretical framework and published experimental data on the structure of interphase chromosomes and the spatial distribution of repetitive DNA in interphase nuclei, I postulate here a molecular structure of chromatin organization in interphase chromosomes. According to this model, an interphase chromosome is a chromatin mesh (or lattice that is formed by repeat pairing (RP. The mesh consists of two types of structural components: chromosome nodes and loose chromatin fibers. Chromosome nodes are DNA repeat assemblies (RAs that are formed via RP, while loose fibers include chromatin loops that radiate from the nodes. Different loops crosslink by RPs and form a large integrated chromatin network. I suggest that the organization of the chromatin network of a given interphase chromosome is intrinsically specified by the distribution of repetitive DNA elements on the linear chromatin. The stability of the organization is governed by the collection of RA-formed nodes, and the dynamics of the organization is driven by the assembling and disassembling of the nodes.

  2. Alpha radiation-induced alterations of the proliferation kinetics, chromatin structure and gene expression in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exponentially growing mammalian cells were exposed to 3.4 MeV alpha particles. The chromatin of cells arrested in G2 by alpha irradiation was severely damaged, though all cells were still capable to condensate their chromatin after fusion with mitotic cells. In addition to the common types of aberrations (breaks, gaps, dicentrics and exchanges) cells were found possessing one or more chromosomes with long stretches of undercondensed chromatin. Repair of these lesions was indicated by site specific unscheduled DNA synthesis and by the observation that condensation of these regions improved during G2 arrest. Furthermore, during G2 arrest the synthesis of two cellular proteins was stimulated. This was studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35S-methionine labeled cellular proteins. All these findings provided evidence that radiation-induced G2 arrest is caused by chromatin damage, which prevents regular chromosome condensation for mitosis. (orig./MG)

  3. Activation of tachykinin Neurokinin 3 receptors affects chromatin structure and gene expression by means of histone acetylation

    OpenAIRE

    Thakar, Amit; Sylar, Elise; Flynn, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    The tachykinin, neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) is a g-protein coupled receptor that is broadly distributed in the nervous system and exerts its diverse physiological actions through multiple signaling pathways. Despite the role of the receptor system in a range of biological functions, the effects of NK3R activation on chromatin dynamics and gene expression have received limited attention. The present work determined the effects of senktide, a selective NK3R agonist, on chromatin organization, ...

  4. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  5. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  6. Magnetic tweezers based force spectroscopy studies of the structure and dynamics of nucleosomes and chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kruithof, Maarten Christiaan

    2009-01-01

    Animals and plants are build from a large number of cells. These cells continuously respond to signals from outside and inside the cell by producing various kinds of proteins. The blueprints of these proteins are stored in genes. The genes, in cells with a nucleus, are carried in chromosomes: threadlike structures in the nucleus of a cell that become visible when the cell, upon dividing, condenses these structures. Chromosomes consist of roughly two parts: proteins, that take care of the cond...

  7. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  8. Chromatin remodelers and their roles in chromatin organization

    OpenAIRE

    Strålfors, Annelie

    2012-01-01

    The DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus is organized into a complex DNA-protein structure called chromatin. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer. The nucleosomes form a “beads on a string” structure, which can be folded into higherorder structures that allow an extensive degree of DNA compaction. This compaction is so effective that 2 meters of DNA can fit into the human cell nucleus with a ...

  9. Astrocyte- and hepatocyte-specific expression of genes from the distal serpin subcluster at 14q32.1 associates with tissue-specific chromatin structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalan, Sunita; Kasza, Aneta; Xu, Weili; Kiss, Daniel L.; Wilczynska, Katarzyna M.; Rydel, Russell E.; Kordula, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The distal serpin subcluster contains genes encoding α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT), protein C inhibitor (PCI), kallistatin (KAL), and the KAL-like protein that are expressed in hepatocytes but only the act gene is expressed in astrocytes. We show here that the tissue-specific expression of these genes associates with astrocyte- and hepatocyte-specific chromatin structures. In hepatocytes, we identified twelve DNase I-hypersenitive sites (DHS) that were distributed throughout the entire subcluster...

  10. Characterization of the RNA content of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Rasmussen, Markus; Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Isaksson, Anders; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) constitutes a significant portion of the mammalian transcriptome. Emerging evidence suggests that it regulates gene expression in cis or trans by modulating the chromatin structure. To uncover the functional role of ncRNA in chromatin organization, we deep sequenced chromatin-associated RNAs (CARs) from human fibroblast (HF) cells. This resulted in the identification of 141 intronic regions and 74 intergenic regions harboring CARs. The intronic and intergenic CARs show s...

  11. Genome-wide analysis of interactions between ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jiang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and the covalent modification of histones play central roles in determining chromatin structure and function. Although several specific interactions between these two activities have been elaborated, the global landscape remains to be elucidated. Results In this paper, we have developed a computational method to generate the first genome-wide landscape of interactions between ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and the covalent modification of histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our method succeeds in identifying known interactions and uncovers many previously unknown interactions between these two activities. Analysis of the genome-wide picture revealed that transcription-related modifications tend to interact with more chromatin remodelers. Our results also demonstrate that most chromatin remodeling-modification interactions act via interactions of remodelers with both histone-modifying enzymes and histone residues. We also found that the co-occurrence of both modification and remodeling has significantly different influences on multiple gene features (e.g. nucleosome occupancy compared with the presence of either one. Conclusion We gave the first genome-wide picture of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling-histone modification interactions. We also revealed how these two activities work together to regulate chromatin structure and function. Our results suggest that distinct strategies for regulating chromatin activity are selectively employed by genes with different properties.

  12. Halos and related structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Karsten

    The halo structure originated from nuclear physics but is now encountered more widely. It appears in loosely bound, clustered systems where the spatial extension of the system is significantly larger than that of the binding potentials. A review is given on our current understanding of these...... structures, with an emphasis on how the structures evolve as more cluster components are added and on the experimental situation concerning halo states in light nuclei....

  13. Some peculiarities of liver and testis chromatin structure of channel fish (Ictalurus Punctatus) from ChNPP cooling reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrophoretic spectra of nuclear proteins, as well as of DNA fragments, forming as a result of activation of liver/testis cell nuclear nucleases of channel fishes from ChNPP cooling reservoir, have been investigated. Differences were found between histone H1 and nonhistone fractions of liver/testis chromatin protein tissues. Nuclear nucleases are also tissue-specific and have different activity

  14. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  15. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. (perspective)

  16. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC. Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we observed that the replication foci contain decondensed chromatin as well as 80 and 130 nm globules, those were also found in condensed non-replicating chromatin domains. Using immunogolding, we demonstrated that DNA replication in S-phase PCC occurs in loose chromatin on the periphery of dense chromatin domains. Conclusion. Replication in PCC occurred in the decondensed chromatin neighboring the condensed chromatin without formation of special structures.

  17. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA[reg])

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to ∼1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for elevated

  18. Chromatin domain boundaries: insulators and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Hong WEI; De Pei LIU; Chih Chuan LIANG

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into functionally and structurally distinct domains, representing regulatory units for gene expression and chromosome behavior. DNA sequences that mark the border between adjacent domains are the insulators or boundary elements, which are required in maintenance of the function of different domains. Some insulators need others enable to play insulation activity. Chromatin domains are defined by distinct sets of post-translationally modified histones. Recent studies show that these histone modifications are also involved in establishment of sharp chromatin boundaries in order to prevent the spreading of distinct domains. Additionally, in some loci, the high-order chromatin structures for long-range looping interactions also have boundary activities, suggesting a correlation between insulators and chromatin loop domains. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in the field of chromatin domain boundaries.

  19. Promoter region of interleukin-2 gene undergoes chromatin structure changes and confers inducibility on chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene during activation of T cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenlist, U; Durand, D B; Bressler, P; Holbrook, N J; Norris, C A; Kamoun, M.; Kant, J A; Crabtree, G R

    1986-01-01

    The chromatin structure of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene was probed by DNase I treatment of isolated nuclei. The 5' region of the IL-2 gene contains three regions of hypersensitivity to DNase I. When peripheral blood T cells or Jurkat T cells are stimulated with mitogens, IL-2 message is induced, and the promoter region of the IL-2 gene develops an additional hypersensitive site. This suggests that a DNA sequence close to the transcriptional start site is involved in the transduction of the e...

  20. Colocalization of PML bodies and PML/RARalpha microspeckles with up- and down-regulated loci and changes of chromatin structure in APL leukemia cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Faretta, M.; Dellino, I.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Pellici, G. I.; Kozubek, Michal; Rochi, M.

    Brno : Masarykova univerzita v Brně, 2004 - (Kozubek, S.; Kozubek, M.), s. 8-23 ISBN 80-210-3560-9. [Biophysics of the Genome. Brno (CZ), 12.10.2004-13.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA MZd NC6987; GA AV ČR IAA1065203; GA AV ČR IBS5004010; GA AV ČR IAA5004306; GA ČR GA202/02/0804; GA MŠk ME 565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : acute promyelocytic leukemia * PML bodies * higher order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. Where splicing joins chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous data suggesting that two key steps in gene expression—transcription and splicing influence each other closely. For a long time it was known that chromatin modifications regulate transcription, but only recently it was shown that chromatin and histone modifications play a significant role in pre-mRNA splicing. Here we summarize interactions between splicing machinery and chromatin and discuss their potential functional significance. We focus mainly on histone acetylation and...

  2. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shieh, Grace S.

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3\\' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1) marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3), which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  3. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  4. LncRNA Khps1 Regulates Expression of the Proto-oncogene SPHK1 via Triplex-Mediated Changes in Chromatin Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postepska-Igielska, Anna; Giwojna, Alena; Gasri-Plotnitsky, Lital; Schmitt, Nina; Dold, Annabelle; Ginsberg, Doron; Grummt, Ingrid

    2015-11-19

    Although thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, very little is known about their mode of action. Here we functionally characterize an E2F1-regulated lncRNA named Khps1, which is transcribed in antisense orientation to the proto-oncogene SPHK1. Khps1 activates SPHK1 expression by recruiting the histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP to the SPHK1 promoter, which leads to local changes of the chromatin structure that ensures E2F1 binding and enhances transcription. Mechanistically, this is achieved by direct association of Khps1 with a homopurine stretch upstream of the transcription start site of SPHK1, which forms a DNA-RNA triplex that anchors the lncRNA and associated effector proteins to the gene promoter. The results reveal an lncRNA- and E2F1-driven regulatory loop in which E2F1-dependent induction of antisense RNA leads to changes in chromatin structure, facilitating E2F1-dependent expression of SPHK1 and restriction of E2F1-induced apoptosis. PMID:26590717

  5. ATAC-seq on biobanked specimens defines a unique chromatin accessibility structure in naïve SLE B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharer, Christopher D; Blalock, Emily L; Barwick, Benjamin G; Haines, Robert R; Wei, Chungwen; Sanz, Ignacio; Boss, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Biobanking is a widespread practice for storing biological samples for future studies ranging from genotyping to RNA analysis. However, methods that probe the status of the epigenome are lacking. Here, the framework for applying the Assay for Transposase Accessible Sequencing (ATAC-seq) to biobanked specimens is described and was used to examine the accessibility landscape of naïve B cells from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients undergoing disease flares. An SLE specific chromatin accessibility signature was identified. Changes in accessibility occurred at loci surrounding genes involved in B cell activation and contained motifs for transcription factors that regulate B cell activation and differentiation. These data provide evidence for an altered epigenetic programming in SLE B cells and identify loci and transcription factor networks that potentially impact disease. The ability to determine the chromatin accessibility landscape and identify cis-regulatory elements has broad application to studies using biorepositories and offers significant advantages to improve the molecular information obtained from biobanked samples. PMID:27249108

  6. The Chromatin Fiber: Multiscale Problems and Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Ozer, Gungor; Luque, Antoni; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The structure of chromatin, affected by many factors from DNA linker lengths to posttranslational modifications, is crucial to the regulation of eukaryotic cells. Combined experimental and computational methods have led to new insights into its structural and dynamical features, from interactions due to the flexible core histone tails of the nucleosomes to the physical mechanism driving the formation of chromosomal domains. Here we present a perspective of recent advances in chromatin modelin...

  7. Extracellular Matrix, Nuclear and Chromatin Structure and GeneExpression in Normal Tissues and Malignant Tumors: A Work inProgress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Virginia A.; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-08-01

    Almost three decades ago, we presented a model where theextracellular matrix (ECM) was postulated to influence gene expressionand tissue-specificity through the action of ECM receptors and thecytoskeleton. This hypothesis implied that ECM molecules could signal tothe nucleus and that the unit of function in higher organisms was not thecell alone, but the cell plus its microenvironment. We now know that ECMinvokes changes in tissue and organ architecture and that tissue, cell,nuclear, and chromatin structure are changed profoundly as a result ofand during malignant progression. Whereas some evidence has beengenerated for a link between ECM-induced alterations in tissuearchitecture and changes in both nuclear and chromatin organization, themanner by which these changes actively induce or repress gene expressionin normal and malignant cells is a topic in need of further attention.Here, we will discuss some key findings that may provide insights intomechanisms through which ECM could influence gene transcription and howtumor cells acquire the ability to overcome these levels ofcontrol.

  8. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  9. Pulling chromatin apart: Unstacking or Unwrapping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Jean Marc

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the mechanical properties of chromatin is an essential step towards deciphering the physical rules of gene regulation. In the past ten years, many single molecule experiments have been carried out, and high resolution measurements of the chromatin fiber stiffness are now available. Simulations have been used in order to link those measurements with structural cues, but so far no clear agreement among different groups has been reached. Results We revisit here some of the most precise experimental results obtained with carefully reconstituted fibers. Conclusions We show that the mechanical properties of the chromatin fiber can be quantitatively accounted for by the stiffness of the DNA molecule and the 3D structure of the chromatin fiber.

  10. Tilings and associated relational structures

    CERN Document Server

    Oger, Francis

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, as we did previously in [5], we investigate the relations between the geometric properties of tilings and the algebraic and model-theoretic properties of associated relational structures. Our study is motivated by the existence of aperiodic tilings. In [5], we considered tilings of the euclidean spaces of finite dimension, and isomorphism was defined up to translation. Here, we consider, more generally, tilings of a metric space, and isomorphism is defined modulo an arbitrary group of isometries. The results of Sections 1 and 2 concern, in particular, the characterization of relational structures which can be represented by tilings of some given type, local isomorphism and the extraction preorder. In Section 3, we show that the notions of periodicity and invariance through a translation, defined for tilings of the euclidean spaces of finite dimension, can be generalized, with appropriate hypotheses, to relational structures, and in particular to tilings of non-euclidean spaces. In Sectio...

  11. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  12. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  13. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  14. Chromatin deregulation in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, Anne C; Foster, Benjamin M; Bartke, Till

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of chromatin by epigenetic mechanisms plays a central role in gene expression and is essential for development and maintenance of cell identity and function. Aberrant chromatin regulation is observed in many diseases where it leads to defects in epigenetic gene regulation resulting in pathological gene expression programmes. These defects are caused by inherited or acquired mutations in genes encoding enzymes that deposit or remove DNA and histone modifications and that shape chromatin architecture. Chromatin deregulation often results in neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities, frequently linked to physical and developmental abnormalities, but can also cause neurodegenerative diseases, immunodeficiency, or muscle wasting syndromes. Epigenetic diseases can either be of monogenic origin or manifest themselves as complex multifactorial diseases such as in congenital heart disease, autism spectrum disorders, or cancer in which mutations in chromatin regulators are contributing factors. The environment directly influences the epigenome and can induce changes that cause or predispose to diseases through risk factors such as stress, malnutrition or exposure to harmful chemicals. The plasticity of chromatin regulation makes targeting the enzymatic machinery an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention and an increasing number of small molecule inhibitors against a variety of epigenetic regulators are in clinical use or under development. In this review, we will give an overview of the molecular lesions that underlie epigenetic diseases, and we will discuss the impact of the environment and prospects for epigenetic therapies. PMID:26188466

  15. In vivo binding of retinol to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously shown that exposure of responding cells to vitamin A leads to profound modifications of chromatin structure as revealed by an increased susceptibility to DNase I digestion, modified patterns of histone acetylation, and impaired synthesis of a nonhistone chromosomal protein. The present results show that these effects are most probably due to the direct interaction between retinol and chromatin, and analysis of mononucleosomes and higher oligomers obtained from retinol-treated cells shows that retinol is indeed tightly bound to chromatin. Enzymatic digestions of vitamin A containing nucleosomes with proteinase K, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2 support a model where the final binding of retinol to chromatin is mediated by a lipoprotein: the recognition of the binding sites on DNA being dictated by the proteic component while the hydrophobic retinol is solubilized in the fatty acid moiety

  16. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  17. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  18. Structure-factor probabilities for related structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probability relationships between structure factors from related structures have allowed previously only for either differences in atomic scattering factors (isomorphous replacement case) or differences in atomic positions (coordinate error case). In the coordinate error case, only errors drawn from a single probability distribution have been considered, in spite of the fact that errors vary widely through models of macromolecular structures. It is shown that the probability relationships can be extended to cover more general cases. Either the atomic parameters or the reciprocal-space vectors may be chosen as the random variables to derive probability relationships. However, the relationships turn out to be very similar for either choice. The most intuitive is the expected electron-density formalism, which arises from considering the atomic parameters as random variables. In this case, the centroid of the structure-factor distribution is the Fourier transform of the expected electron-density function, which is obtained by smearing each atom over its possible positions. The centroid estimate has a phase different from, and more accurate than, that obtained from the unweighted atoms. The assumption that there is a sufficient number of independent errors allows the application of the central limit theorem. This gives a one- (centric case) or two-dimensional (non-centric) Gaussian distribution about the centroid estimate. The general probability expression reduces to those derived previously when the appropriate simplifying assumptions are made. The revised theory has implications for calculating more accurate phases and maps, optimizing molecular replacement models, refining structures, estimating coordinate errors and interpreting refined B factors. (orig.)

  19. Minireview: role of kinases and chromatin remodeling in progesterone signaling to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, Guillermo P; Nacht, A Silvina; Zaurín, Roser; Ballaré, Cecilia; Clausell, Jaime; Beato, Miguel

    2010-11-01

    Steroid hormones regulate gene expression by interaction of their receptors with hormone-responsive elements on DNA or with other transcription factors, but they can also activate cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Rapid activation of Erk by progestins via an interaction of the progesterone receptor (PR) with the estrogen receptor is critical for transcriptional activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter and other progesterone target genes. Erk activation leads to the phosphorylation of PR, activation of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1, and the recruitment of a complex of the three activated proteins and of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) to a single nucleosome, resulting in the phosphoacetylation of histone H3 and the displacement of heterochromatin protein 1γ. Hormone-dependent gene expression requires ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. Two switch/sucrose nonfermentable-like complexes, Brahma-related gene 1-associated factor (BAF) and polybromo-BAF are present in breast cancer cells, but only BAF is recruited to the MMTV promoter and cooperates with PCAF during activation of hormone-responsive promoters. PCAF acetylates histone H3 at K14, an epigenetic mark recognized by BAF subunits, thus anchoring the complex to chromatin. BAF catalyzes localized displacement of histones H2A and H2B, facilitating access of nuclear factor 1 and additional PR complexes to the hidden hormone-responsive elements on the MMTV promoter. The linker histone H1 is a structural component of chromatin generally regarded as a general repressor of transcription. However, it contributes to a better regulation of the MMTV promoter by favoring a more homogeneous nucleosome positioning, thus reducing basal transcription and actually enhancing hormone induced transcription. During transcriptional activation, H1 is phosphorylated and displaced from the promoter. The kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 2 is activated after progesterone treatment and could

  20. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  1. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  2. Phosphorylation of histone variant regions in chromatin: unlocking the linker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G R

    2001-01-01

    Histone variants illuminate the behavior of chromatin through their unique structures and patterns of postsynthetic modification. This review examines the literature on heteromorphous histone structures in chromatin, structures that are primary targets for histone kinases and phosphatases in vivo. Special attention is paid to certain well-studied experimental systems: mammalian culture cells, chicken erythrocytes, sea urchin sperm, wheat sprouts, Tetrahymena, and budding yeast. A common theme emerges from these studies. Specialized, highly basic structures in histone variants promote chromatin condensation in a variety of developmental situations. Before, and sometimes after condensed chromatin is formed, the chromatin is rendered soluble by phosphorylation of the heteromorphous regions, preventing their interaction with linker DNA. A simple structural model accounting for histone variation and phosphorylation is presented. PMID:11467741

  3. Inverstigation of chromatin folding patterns by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYi; OUYANGZhenqian; 等

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin folding patterns in air and liquid were studied by atomic force microscopy(AFM),A gentle water-air interface method was adopted to spread chromatin from interphase nucleus of chicken erythrocyte.The chromatin was absorbed on APS-mica surface and studied with AFM,Beads-on a-string were observed and many higher-order structrues such as superbeads with dimensions 40-60nm in diameter and 4-7nm in height were found to string together to make chromation fibers.When sample spreading and absorbing time were shortened.higher-order chromatin fibers with 60-120nm in width were observed in air as well as under water environment.These chromatin structures may reflect chromatin folding patterns in the living cells.

  4. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms.......Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...

  5. Chromatin chemistry goes cellular.

    OpenAIRE

    W. Fischle; D. Schwarzer; Mootz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing post-translational modifications of histone proteins as they occur within chromatin is challenging due to their large number and chemical diversity. A major step forward has now been achieved by using split intein chemistry to engineer functionalized histones within cells.

  6. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  7. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188. ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  8. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H2O-D2O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  9. The epigenetic regulation of cell cycle and chromatin dynamic by sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Redondo, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) The chromatin consists of a hierarchical and dynamical structure that is modulated during the different cell cycle stages in order to maintain genome integrity and preserve the genetic information coded in the DNA. The dynamic structure of the chromatin depends on the coordination of the different chromatin remodeling processes: histone modifications, chromatin remodeling enzymes/complexes, DNA methylation and chr...

  10. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  11. MADS dynamics : gene regulation in flower development by changes in chromatin structure and MADS-domain protein binding

    OpenAIRE

    Pajoro, A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the life cycle, a plant undergoes a series of developmental phase changes. The first phase change is the transition from the initial juvenile vegetative stage into the adult vegetative phase. During the juvenile phase plants produce leaves and axillary buds, whereas during the adult phase the initiation of reproductive structures occurs. The next developmental change is the switch from vegetative to reproductive growth, when the shoot apical meristem acquires the identity of a...

  12. Bacterial chromatin: converging views at different scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Remus T; Tark-Dame, Mariliis

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized and compactly folded into a structure referred to as bacterial chromatin or the nucleoid. An important role in genome folding is attributed to Nucleoid-Associated Proteins, also referred to as bacterial chromatin proteins. Although a lot of molecular insight in the mechanisms of operation of these proteins has been generated in the test tube, knowledge on genome organization in the cellular context is still lagging behind severely. Here, we discuss important advances in the understanding of three-dimensional genome organization due to the application of Chromosome Conformation Capture and super-resolution microscopy techniques. We focus on bacterial chromatin proteins whose proposed role in genome organization is supported by these approaches. Moreover, we discuss recent insights into the interrelationship between genome organization and genome activity/stability in bacteria. PMID:26942688

  13. Dissipative structures and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Benjamin R; Chu, Henry S

    2013-11-05

    Dissipative structures include at least one panel and a cell structure disposed adjacent to the at least one panel having interconnected cells. A deformable material, which may comprise at least one hydrogel, is disposed within at least one interconnected cell proximate to the at least one panel. Dissipative structures may also include a cell structure having interconnected cells formed by wall elements. The wall elements may include a mesh formed by overlapping fibers having apertures formed therebetween. The apertures may form passageways between the interconnected cells. Methods of dissipating a force include disposing at least one hydrogel in a cell structure proximate to at least one panel, applying a force to the at least one panel, and forcing at least a portion of the at least one hydrogel through apertures formed in the cell structure.

  14. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  15. Expression of p21WAF1 is related to acetylation of histone H3 in total chromatin in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xuan Chen; Jing-Yuan Fang; Rong Lu; De-Kai Qiu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between acetylation of histone in total chromatin and p21WAF1 expression regulation in human colorectal carcinoma.METHODS: We analyzed the expression of tumor suppressor gene p21WAF1 mRNA by RT-PCR or realtime PCR in 33 samples of colorectal cancerous tissue,corresponding para-cancerous tissue and normal colorectal mucosa, and also examined the level of acetylated histone H3 in total chromatin using Western blotting.RESULTS: The expression level of p21WAF1 mRNA was significantly lower in colorectal cancerous tissue from 33 patients than in para-cancerous tissue and normal colorectal mucosa (2377.95 ± 865.80 vs 3216.58 ±1149.42 and 3541.61 ± 1433.17 respectively, P <0.01). In addition, when p21WAF1 mRNA expression was undectectable or at very low level (50% less than that in adjacent tissue and normal colorectal mucosa) in all tissues, the level of acetylated histone H3 in colorectal cancerous tissue was significantly lower than that in corresponding para-cancerous tissue and normal colorectal mucosa in five of seven (71.43%) cases. The transcriptional level of p21WAF1 in colorectal carcinoma might not be associated with its biological behaviors.CONCLUSION: The down-regulation of p21WAF1 transcription is involved in the tumorigenesis and development of colorectal carcinoma. The down-expression of p21WAF1 mRNA in colorectal carcinoma might be associated with histone hypoacetylation in chromatin but not with biological behaviors.

  16. Genome maintenance in the context of 4D chromatin condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sonia; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged in the three-dimensional nuclear space by forming loops, domains, and compartments in a hierarchical manner. However, when duplicated genomes prepare for segregation, mitotic cells eliminate topologically associating domains and abandon the compartmentalized structure. Alongside chromatin architecture reorganization during the transition from interphase to mitosis, cells halt most DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. The intrinsically condensed chromatin serves as a sophisticated signaling module subjected to selective relaxation for programmed genomic activities. To understand the elaborate genome-epigenome interplay during cell cycle progression, the steady three-dimensional genome requires a time scale to form a dynamic four-dimensional and a more comprehensive portrait. In this review, we will dissect the functions of critical chromatin architectural components in constructing and maintaining an orderly packaged chromatin environment. We will also highlight the importance of the spatially and temporally conscious orchestration of chromatin remodeling to ensure high-fidelity genetic transmission. PMID:27098512

  17. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  18. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.; Hashimoto, Tatsunori Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  19. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira A Barkal

    Full Text Available Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  20. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  1. Sibling Structure and Intergenerational Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitze, Glenna; Logan, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Examined effects of adult siblings' number, gender, and birth order on their relationships with parents. Analyses showed no evidence for effects of sibling structure through effects on closeness to parents, attitudes about filial responsibilities, or attitudes about gender-typing of responsibilities. Number of siblings had consistent negative…

  2. Hybrid Tourism-Related Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article is rooted in theories presented in the PhD dissertation Tourism and Strategic Planning (Pasgaard 2012) and features a number of much discussed concepts related to the complicated phenomenon of tourism and to the discipline of strategic urban planning. It is beyond the scope of this a...

  3. Epigenetics & chromatin: Interactions and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Henikoff (Steven); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOn 11 to 13 March 2013, BioMed Central will be hosting its inaugural conference, Epigenetics & Chromatin: Interactions and Processes, at Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA. Epigenetics & Chromatin has now launched a special article series based on the general themes of the confer

  4. Preliminary study of sperm chromatin characteristics of the brachyuran crab Maja brachydactyla. Histones and nucleosome-like structures in decapod crustacean sperm nuclei previously described without SNBPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, K; Ausió, J; Chiva, M

    2009-10-01

    An interesting characteristic of decapod crustacean sperm nuclei is that they do not contain highly packaged chromatin. In the present study we re-examine the presence of DNA-interacting proteins in sperm nuclei of the brachyuran Maja brachydactyla. Although previous reports have indicated that, unlike the majority of sperm cells, DNA of decapod sperm is not organized by basic proteins, in this work we show that: (1) histones are present in sperm of M. brachydactyla; (2) histones are associated with sperm DNA; (3) histone H3 appears in lower proportions than the other core histones, while histone H2B appears in higher proportions; and (4) histone H3 in sperm nuclei is acetylated. This work complements a previous study of sperm histones of Cancer pagurus and supports the suggestion that decapod crustacean sperm chromatin deserves further attention. PMID:19324386

  5. Factors affecting chromatin stability of bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, T A A; Rekkas, C A; Lymberopoulos, A G; Sioga, A; Dimitriadis, I; Papanikolaou, Th

    2008-03-01

    The structural stability of transcriptionally inert paternal chromatin is of vital importance for the fertilization process and early embryonic development. Accordingly, a series of eight experiments were conducted during a 7-month period to investigate: (1) effects of bull breed, individuality, successive ejaculations, semen quality characteristics (SQC), semen dilution rates and hypothermic storage of semen in a Tris-egg yolk extender on incidence of sperm nuclear chromatin instability (NCI), and (2) effects of the interaction between variation of NCI within a frozen ejaculate and variation of oocytes quality due to maturation time and/or season on the efficiency of in vitro embryo production (IVEP). Semen samples were collected once a week from six bulls using an AV and only ejaculates (n=220) of >0.30x10(9) sperm/ml and >or=60% motility were used. NCI was measured by: (1) detection of lysine-rich histones in sperm chromatin using aniline blue staining, (2) sperm susceptibility to acid-induced nuclear DNA denaturation in situ using acridine orange test, and (3) sperm susceptibility to nuclear chromatin decondensation (NCD). Bovine oocytes (n=695) were matured in vitro for 18 or 24 h, fertilized after sperm selection through a swim-up procedure and cultured for 72 h. The results showed that the 2nd ejaculates were superior to the 1st ones with respect to chromatin stability. Dilution of semen to 49.67+/-8.56x10(6) sperm/ml (1:19) decreased resistance of sperm to NCD. Cooling of semen had no significant effect on chromatin stability. Cryopreservation of semen augmented sperm vulnerability to DNA denaturation. Improvement of SQC (semen volume, sperm motility, velocity, viability and morphological normalcy) was generally concomitant with increase of sperm resistance to NCI. While Blonde d'Aquitaine bulls had a resistance to NCD higher than Limousine bulls in fresh semen, the former showed a greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation than the latter in cooled semen

  6. Interaction and conformational changes of chromatin with divalent ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Borochov, N; Ausio, J; Eisenberg, H

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of divalent ions with chromatin towards a closer understanding of the role of metal ions in the cell nucleus. The first row transition metal ion chlorides MnCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2 and CuCl2 lead to precipitation of chicken erythrocyte chromatin at a significantly lower concentration than the alkali earth metal chlorides MgCl2, CaCl2 and BaCl2. A similar distinction can be made for the compaction of chromatin to the "30 nm" solenoid higher order structure which ...

  7. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  8. On the topology of chromatin fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Victor, Jean-Marc; Wong, Hua; Lavelle, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The ability of cells to pack, use and duplicate DNA remains one of the most fascinating questions in biology. To understand DNA organization and dynamics, it is important to consider the physical and topological constraints acting on it. In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA is organized by proteins acting as spools on which DNA can be wrapped. These proteins can subsequently interact and form a structure called the chromatin fibre. Using a simple geometric model, we propose a general method fo...

  9. Chromatin regulation in drug addiction and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Renthal, William; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatrie disorders, including drug addiction and depression, increasing evidence indicates that changes in gene expression in neurons, in the context of animal models of addiction and depression, are mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms that alter chromatin structure on specific gene promoters. This review discusses recent findings from behavioral, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches that are being u...

  10. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-02-11

    Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, but not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres accumulate DDR signals and become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  11. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  12. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsy Uppal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  13. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  14. CTCF-Mediated Functional Chromatin Interactome in Pluripotent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoko, Lusy; Xu, Han; Li, Guoliang; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chew, Elaine; Schnapp, Marie; Lee, Charlie Wah Heng; Ye, Chaopeng; Ping, Joanne Lim Hui; Mulawadi, Fabianus; Wong, Eleanor; Sheng, Jianpeng; Zhang, Yubo; Poh, Thompson; Chan, Chee Seng; Kunarso, Galih; Shahab, Atif; Bourque, Guillaume; Cacheux-Rataboul, Valere; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ruan, Yijun; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are viewed as functional organizations that orchestrate spatial and temporal gene regulation. CTCF, the most characterized insulator-binding protein, has been implicated as a key genome organizer. Yet, little is known about CTCF-associated higher order chromatin structures at a global scale. Here, we applied Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End-Tag sequencing to elucidate the CTCF-chromatin interactome in pluripotent cells. From this analysis, 1,480 cis and 336 trans interacting loci were identified with high reproducibility and precision. Associating these chromatin interaction loci with their underlying epigenetic states, promoter activities, enhancer binding and nuclear lamina occupancy, we uncovered five distinct chromatin domains that suggest potential new models of CTCF function in chromatin organization and transcriptional control. Specifically, CTCF interactions demarcate chromatin-nuclear membrane attachments and influence proper gene expression through extensive crosstalk between promoters and regulatory elements. This highly complex nuclear organization offers insights towards the unifying principles governing genome plasticity and function. PMID:21685913

  15. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  16. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  17. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  18. VIPERdb: a relational database for structural virology

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, Craig M.; Borelli, Ian A.; Lander, Gabriel; Natarajan, Padmaja; Siddavanahalli, Vinay; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Johnson, John E.; Brooks, Charles L.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2005-01-01

    VIPERdb () is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive resource specific to the needs of the structural virology community, with an emphasis on the description and comparison of derived data from structural and energetic analyses of capsids. A relational database implementation based on a schema for macromolecular structure makes the data highly accessible to the user, allowing detailed queries at the atomic level. Together with curation practi...

  19. Diversity in the organization of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Centromeric chromatin is distinguished primarily by nucleosomes containing the histone variant cenH3, which organizes the kinetochore that links the chromosome to the spindle apparatus. Whereas budding yeast have simple 'point' centromeres with single cenH3 nucleosomes, and fission yeast have 'regional' centromeres without obvious sequence specificity, the centromeres of most organisms are embedded in highly repetitive 'satellite' DNA. Recent studies have revealed a remarkable diversity in centromere chromatin organization among different lineages, including some that have lost cenH3 altogether. We review recent progress in understanding point, regional and satellite centromeres, as well as less well-studied centromere types, such as holocentromeres. We also discuss the formation of neocentromeres, the role of pericentric heterochromatin, and the structure and composition of the cenH3 nucleosome. PMID:25956076

  20. On the topology of chromatin fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Victor, Jean-Marc; Wong, Hua; Lavelle, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The ability of cells to pack, use and duplicate DNA remains one of the most fascinating questions in biology. To understand DNA organization and dynamics, it is important to consider the physical and topological constraints acting on it. In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA is organized by proteins acting as spools on which DNA can be wrapped. These proteins can subsequently interact and form a structure called the chromatin fibre. Using a simple geometric model, we propose a general method for computing topological properties (twist, writhe and linking number) of the DNA embedded in those fibres. The relevance of the method is reviewed through the analysis of magnetic tweezers single molecule experiments that revealed unexpected properties of the chromatin fibre. Possible biological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:24098838

  1. DNA-Protein interactions in nucleosomes and in Chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosslinking induced by ultraviolet light irradiation at 254 nm has been utilized to investigate the structure of chromatin and isolated nucleosomes. The results presented here imply that the four core histones, as well as histone H1, have reactive groups within a bond length of the DNA bases. In nucleosomes depleted of H1, all of the core histones react similarly with the DNA and form crosslinks. In chromatin, the rate of crosslinking of all histones to DNA is essentially similar. Comparison of mononucleosomes, dinucleosomes and whole chromatin shows that the rate of crosslinking increase significantly with increasing number of connected nucleosomes. These differences in the rate of crosslinking are interpreted in terms of interactions between neighbouring nucleosomes on the chromatin fiber, which are absent in an isolated mononucleosome. (orig.)

  2. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics are considered. P, T-breaking, neutron beta decay, neutron radiative capture and neutron polarizability are discussed. Reaction with fast neutrons, methodical aspect low-energy fission are considered too

  3. Minor groove binder distamycin remodels chromatin but inhibits transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as "chromatin remodeling". In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance.

  4. Condensation of interphase chromatin in nuclei of synchronized chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacsi, Mariann; Nagy, Gabor; Pinter, Gabor; Basnakian, Alexei G; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2005-01-01

    Reversibly permeabilized cells have been used to visualize interphase chromatin structures in the presence and absence of biotinylated nucleotides. By reversing permeabilization, it was possible to confirm the existence of a flexible chromatin folding pattern through a series of transient geometric forms such as supercoiled, circular forms, chromatin bodies, thin and thick fibers, and elongated chromosomes. Our results show that the incorporation of biotin-11-dUTP interferes with chromatin condensation, leading to the accumulation of decondensed chromatin structures. Chromatin condensation without nucleotide incorporation was also studied in cell populations synchronized by centrifugal elutriation. After reversal of permeabilization, nuclei were isolated and chromatin structures were visualized after DAPI staining by fluorescent microscopy. Decondensed veil-like structures were observed in the early S phase (at an average C-value of 2.21), supercoiled chromatin later in the early S (2, 55 C), fibrous structures in the early mid S phase (2, 76 C), ribboned structures in the mid-S phase (2, 98 C), continuous chromatin strings later in the mid-S phase (3,28), elongated prechromosomes in the late S-phase (3, 72 C), precondensed chromosomes at the end and after the S phase (3, 99 C). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that neither interphase nor metaphase chromosomes are separate entities but form a linear array arranged in a semicircle. Linear arrangement was confirmed by computer image analysis. PMID:15684719

  5. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M; Knippers, R; Gruss, C

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...

  6. Direct Measurement of Local Chromatin Fluidity Using Optical Trap Modulation Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roopa, T.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromatin assembly is condensed by histone tail-tail interactions and other nuclear proteins into a highly compact structure. Using an optical trap modulation force spectroscopy, we probe the effect of tail interactions on local chromatin fluidity. Chromatin fibers, purified from mammalian cells, are tethered between a microscope coverslip and a glass micropipette. Mechanical unzipping of tail interactions, using the micropipette, lead to the enhancement of local fluidity. This is measured us...

  7. The Proteomic Investigation of Chromatin Functional Domains Reveals Novel Synergisms among Distinct Heterochromatin Components*

    OpenAIRE

    Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic, well-structured nucleoprotein complex of DNA and proteins that controls virtually all DNA transactions. Chromatin dynamicity is regulated at specific loci by the presence of various associated proteins, histones, post-translational modifications, histone variants, and DNA methylation. Until now the characterization of the proteomic component of chromatin domains has been held back by the challenge of enriching distinguishable, homogeneous regions for subsequent ...

  8. General relativity and cosmic structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Adamek, Julian; Daverio, David; Durrer, Ruth.; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations are a versatile tool providing insight into the complicated process of structure formation in cosmology. This process is mainly governed by gravity, which is the dominant force on large scales. To date, a century after the formulation of general relativity, numerical codes for structure formation still employ Newton's law of gravitation. This approximation relies on the two assumptions that gravitational fields are weak and that they are only sourced by non-relativistic ...

  9. Epigenetic modifications and chromatin loop organization explain the different expression profiles of the Tbrg4, WAP and Ramp3 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whey Acidic Protein (WAP) gene expression is specific to the mammary gland and regulated by lactogenic hormones to peak during lactation. It differs markedly from the more constitutive expression of the two flanking genes, Ramp3 and Tbrg4. Our results show that the tight regulation of WAP gene expression parallels variations in the chromatin structure and DNA methylation profile throughout the Ramp3-WAP-Tbrg4 locus. Three Matrix Attachment Regions (MAR) have been predicted in this locus. Two of them are located between regions exhibiting open and closed chromatin structures in the liver. The third, located around the transcription start site of the Tbrg4 gene, interacts with topoisomerase II in HC11 mouse mammary cells, and in these cells anchors the chromatin loop to the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, if lactogenic hormones are present in these cells, the chromatin loop surrounding the WAP gene is more tightly attached to the nuclear structure, as observed after a high salt treatment of the nuclei and the formation of nuclear halos. Taken together, our results point to a combination of several epigenetic events that may explain the differential expression pattern of the WAP locus in relation to tissue and developmental stages

  10. Algebraic and geometric structures of Special Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Giulini, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    I review, some of the algebraic and geometric structures that underlie the theory of Special Relativity. This includes a discussion of relativity as a symmetry principle, derivations of the Lorentz group, its composition law, its Lie algebra, comparison with the Galilei group, Einstein synchronization, the lattice of causally and chronologically complete regions in Minkowski space, rigid motion (the Noether-Herglotz theorem), and the geometry of rotating reference frames. Representation-theor...

  11. Mapping Relational Structure in Spatial Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattis, Merideth

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether the similarity of relational structures influences the interpretation of spatial representations. Adults were shown diagrams of hand gestures paired with simple statements and asked to judge the meaning of new gestures. In Experiment 1 the gestures were paired with active declarative statements. In Experiment…

  12. General relativity and cosmic structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Adamek, Julian; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations are a versatile tool providing insight into the complicated process of structure formation in cosmology. This process is mainly governed by gravity, which is the dominant force on large scales. To date, a century after the formulation of general relativity, numerical codes for structure formation still employ Newton's law of gravitation. This approximation relies on the two assumptions that gravitational fields are weak and that they are only sourced by non-relativistic matter. While the former appears well justified on cosmological scales, the latter imposes restrictions on the nature of the "dark" components of the Universe (dark matter and dark energy) which are, however, poorly understood. Here we present the first simulations of cosmic structure formation using equations consistently derived from general relativity. We study in detail the small relativistic effects for a standard {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology which cannot be obtained within a purely Newtonian framework. Our particle-mesh N...

  13. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  14. Chromatin state dynamics during blood formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lara-Astiaso, David; Weiner, Assaf; Lorenzo-Vivas, Erika; Zaretsky, Irina; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Mildner, Alexander; Winter, Deborah; Jung, Steffen; Friedman, Nir; Amit, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin modifications are crucial for development, yet little is known about their dynamics during differentiation. Hematopoiesis provides a well-defined model to study chromatin state dynamics, however technical limitations impede profiling of homogeneous differentiation intermediates. We developed a high sensitivity indexing-first chromatin immunoprecipitation approach (iChIP) to profile the dynamics of four chromatin modifications across 16 stages of hematopoietic differentiation. We ide...

  15. Predicting chromatin organization using histone marks

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jialiang; Marco, Eugenio; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of three dimensional chromatin organization is an important yet technically challenging task. To aid experimental effort and to understand the determinants of long-range chromatin interactions, we have developed a computational model integrating Hi-C and histone mark ChIP-seq data to predict two important features of chromatin organization: chromatin interaction hubs and topologically associated domain (TAD) boundaries. Our model accurately and robustly predicts these feat...

  16. Structural relations between nested harmonic sums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the structural relations between nested harmonic sums emerging in the description of physical single scale quantities up to the 3-loop level in renormalizable gauge field theories. These are weight w=6 harmonic sums. We identify universal basic functions which allow to describe a large class of physical quantities and derive their complex analysis. For the 3-loop QCD Wilson coefficients 35 basic functions are required, whereas a subset of 15 describes the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. (orig.)

  17. Long Noncoding RNAs, Chromatin, and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Caley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  18. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain;

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet the...... challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...

  19. Distinct roles for histone chaperones in the deposition of Htz1 in chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongde; Zhu, Min; Mu, Yawen; Liu, Lingjie; Li, Guanghui; Wan, Yakun

    2014-01-01

    Histone variant Htz1 substitution for H2A plays important roles in diverse DNA transactions. Histone chaperones Chz1 and Nap1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) are important for the deposition Htz1 into nucleosomes. In literatures, it was suggested that Chz1 is a Htz1–H2B-specific chaperone, and it is relatively unstructured in solution but it becomes structured in complex with the Htz1–H2B histone dimer. Nap1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) can bind (H3–H4)2 tetramers, H2A–H2B dimers and Htz1–H2B dimers. Nap1 can bind H2A–H2B dimer in the cytoplasm and shuttles the dimer into the nucleus. Moreover, Nap1 functions in nucleosome assembly by competitively interacting with non-nucleosomal histone–DNA. However, the exact roles of these chaperones in assembling Htz1-containing nucleosome remain largely unknown. In this paper, we revealed that Chz1 does not show a physical interaction with chromatin. In contrast, Nap1 binds exactly at the genomic DNA that contains Htz1. Nap1 and Htz1 show a preferential interaction with AG-rich DNA sequences. Deletion of chz1 results in a significantly decreased binding of Htz1 in chromatin, whereas deletion of nap1 dramatically increases the association of Htz1 with chromatin. Furthermore, genome-wide nucleosome-mapping analysis revealed that nucleosome occupancy for Htz1p-bound genes decreases upon deleting htz1 or chz1, suggesting that Htz1 is required for nucleosome structure at the specific genome loci. All together, these results define the distinct roles for histone chaperones Chz1 and Nap1 to regulate Htz1 incorporation into chromatin. PMID:25338502

  20. The Proportion of Chromatin Graded between Closed and Open States Determines the Level of Transcripts Derived from Distinct Promoters in the CYP19 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotomura, Naoe; Harada, Nobuhiro; Ishihara, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The human CYP19 gene encodes aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens. CYP19 mRNA variants are transcribed mainly from three promoters. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the relative amounts of each of the three transcripts and determine the on/off state of the promoters. While some of the promoters were silent, CYP19 mRNA production differed among the other promoters, whose estimated transcription levels were 0.001% to 0.1% of that of the TUBB control gene. To investigate the structural aspects of chromatin that were responsible for this wide range of activity of the CYP19 promoters, we used a fractionation protocol, designated SEVENS, which sequentially separates densely packed nucleosomes from dispersed nucleosomes. The fractional distribution of each inactive promoter showed a similar pattern to that of the repressed reference loci; the inactive regions were distributed toward lower fractions, in which closed chromatin comprising packed nucleosomes was enriched. In contrast, active CYP19 promoters were raised toward upper fractions, including dispersed nucleosomes in open chromatin. Importantly, these active promoters were moderately enriched in the upper fractions as compared to active reference loci, such as the TUBB promoter; the proportion of open chromatin appeared to be positively correlated to the promoter strength. These results, together with ectopic transcription accompanied by an increase in the proportion of open chromatin in cells treated with an H3K27me inhibitor, indicate that CYP19 mRNA could be transcribed from a promoter in which chromatin is shifted toward an open state in the equilibrium between closed and open chromatin. PMID:26020632

  1. The Proportion of Chromatin Graded between Closed and Open States Determines the Level of Transcripts Derived from Distinct Promoters in the CYP19 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoe Kotomura

    Full Text Available The human CYP19 gene encodes aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens. CYP19 mRNA variants are transcribed mainly from three promoters. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the relative amounts of each of the three transcripts and determine the on/off state of the promoters. While some of the promoters were silent, CYP19 mRNA production differed among the other promoters, whose estimated transcription levels were 0.001% to 0.1% of that of the TUBB control gene. To investigate the structural aspects of chromatin that were responsible for this wide range of activity of the CYP19 promoters, we used a fractionation protocol, designated SEVENS, which sequentially separates densely packed nucleosomes from dispersed nucleosomes. The fractional distribution of each inactive promoter showed a similar pattern to that of the repressed reference loci; the inactive regions were distributed toward lower fractions, in which closed chromatin comprising packed nucleosomes was enriched. In contrast, active CYP19 promoters were raised toward upper fractions, including dispersed nucleosomes in open chromatin. Importantly, these active promoters were moderately enriched in the upper fractions as compared to active reference loci, such as the TUBB promoter; the proportion of open chromatin appeared to be positively correlated to the promoter strength. These results, together with ectopic transcription accompanied by an increase in the proportion of open chromatin in cells treated with an H3K27me inhibitor, indicate that CYP19 mRNA could be transcribed from a promoter in which chromatin is shifted toward an open state in the equilibrium between closed and open chromatin.

  2. General relativity and cosmic structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Julian; Daverio, David; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations are a versatile tool for providing insight into the complicated process of structure formation in cosmology. This process is mainly governed by gravity, which is the dominant force on large scales. At present, a century after the formulation of general relativity, numerical codes for structure formation still employ Newton’s law of gravitation. This approximation relies on the two assumptions that gravitational fields are weak and that they originate from non-relativistic matter. Whereas the former seems well justified on cosmological scales, the latter imposes restrictions on the nature of the `dark’ components of the Universe (dark matter and dark energy), which are, however, poorly understood. Here we present the first simulations of cosmic structure formation using equations consistently derived from general relativity. We study in detail the small relativistic effects for a standard lambda cold dark matter cosmology that cannot be obtained within a purely Newtonian framework. Our particle-mesh N-body code computes all six degrees of freedom of the metric and consistently solves the geodesic equation for particles, taking into account the relativistic potentials and the frame-dragging force. This conceptually clean approach is very general and can be applied to various settings where the Newtonian approximation fails or becomes inaccurate, ranging from simulations of models with dynamical dark energy or warm/hot dark matter to core collapse supernova explosions.

  3. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  4. H4K44 Acetylation Facilitates Chromatin Accessibility during Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialei Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination hotspots are associated with histone post-translational modifications and open chromatin. However, it remains unclear how histone modifications and chromatin structure regulate meiotic recombination. Here, we identify acetylation of histone H4 at Lys44 (H4K44ac occurring on the nucleosomal lateral surface. We show that H4K44 is acetylated at pre-meiosis and meiosis and displays genome-wide enrichment at recombination hotspots in meiosis. Acetylation at H4K44 is required for normal meiotic recombination, normal levels of double-strand breaks (DSBs during meiosis, and optimal sporulation. Non-modifiable H4K44R results in increased nucleosomal occupancy around DSB hotspots. Our results indicate that H4K44ac functions to facilitate chromatin accessibility favorable for normal DSB formation and meiotic recombination.

  5. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  6. Canopy Structure in Relation to Rainfall Interception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathizadeh, Omid; Mohsen Hosseini, Seyed; Keim, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Spatial variation of throughfall (TF) is linked to canopy structure. The effects of canopy structure on the spatial redistribution of rainfall in deciduous stands remains poorly documented. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of canopy structure such as stand density on the partitioning of incident rainfall when passing through the canopy of Brant's oak (Quercus branti) forest stands. The study site is the Zagros forests in the western Iranian state of Ilam, protected forests of Dalab region. Twelve TF plots (50 m × 50 m) with 30 gauges randomly placed within each plot were established. Interception loss was computed as the difference between rain and TF. Canopy cover (%) and leaf area index (LAI, m2 m‑2) were estimated from the analysis of hemispherical photographs obtained during the fully leafed period. Relative interception varied from ˜4% at 0.1 LAI and canopy cover of 10% to ˜25% at 1.5 LAI and canopy cover of 65%. Interception represents a significant component of the seasonal water balance of oak forests, particularly in the case of intensive plantings. Keywords: Canopy Structure, Rainfall redistribution, Zagros forests, Quercus branti

  7. On the mechanochemical machinery underlying chromatin remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.

    This dissertation discuss two recent efforts, via a unique combination of structural bioinformatics and density functional theory, to unravel some of the details concerning how molecular machinery within the eukaryotic cell nucleus controls chromatin architecture. The first, a study of the 5-methylation of cytosine in 5'-CG-3' : 5'-CG-3' base-pair steps, reveals that the methyl groups roughen the local elastic energy landscape of the DNA. This enhances the probability of the canonical B-DNA structure transitioning into the undertwisted A-like and overtwisted C-like forms seen in nucleosomes, or looped segments of DNA bound to histones. The second part focuses on the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. The arginine residues are ob- served to apply a tunable mechanical load to the backbone, enabling precision-controlled activation of DNA deformations.

  8. Protein Structure Is Related to RNA Structural Reactivity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yin; Assmann, Sarah M; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-02-27

    We assessed whether in vivo mRNA structural reactivity and the structure of the encoded protein are related. This is the first investigation of such a relationship that utilizes information on RNA structure obtained in living cells. Based on our recent genome-wide Structure-seq analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we report that, as a meta property, regions of individual mRNAs that code for protein domains generally have higher reactivity to DMS (dimethyl sulfate), a chemical that covalently modifies accessible As and Cs, than regions that encode protein domain junctions. This relationship is prominent for proteins annotated for catalytic activity and reversed in proteins annotated for binding and transcription regulatory activity. Upon analyzing intrinsically disordered proteins, we found a similar pattern for disordered regions as compared to ordered regions: regions of individual mRNAs that code for ordered regions have significantly higher DMS reactivity than regions that code for intrinsically disordered regions. Based on these effects, we hypothesize that the decreased DMS reactivity of RNA regions that encode protein domain junctions or intrinsically disordered regions may reflect increased RNA structure that may slow translation, allowing time for the nascent protein domain or ordered region of the protein to fold, thereby reducing protein misfolding. In addition, a drop in DMS reactivity was observed on portions of mRNA sequences that correspond to the C-termini of protein domains, suggesting ribosome protection at these mRNA regions. Structural relationships between mRNAs and their encoded proteins may have evolved to allow efficient and accurate protein folding. PMID:26598238

  9. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  10. Aging of nuclear safety related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of aging processes in nuclear-safety-related concrete structures (NSRCS) is presented. The major environmental stressor and aging factors affecting the performance of NSRCS are summarized, as are drying and plastic shrinkage, expansion of water during the freeze-thaw cycle, water passing through cracks dissolving or leaching the soluble calcium hydroxide, attack of acid rain and ground water, chemical reactions between particular aggregates and the alkaline solution within cement paste, reaction of calcium hydroxide in cement paste hydration products with atmospheric carbon dioxide, and physical radiation effects of neutrons and gamma radiation. The current methods for aging management in NSRCS are analyzed and evaluated. A new treatment is presented for the monitoring, evaluation and prediction of aging processes, consisting in a combination of theoretical methods, laboratory experiments, in-situ measurements and numerical simulations. 24 refs

  11. Prion protein: structural features and related toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Ping Hu; Cheng Zhi Huang

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,or prion diseases,is a group of infectious neurodegenerative disorders.The conformational conversion from cellular form (PrPC) to disease-causing isoform (PrPSc) is considered to be the most important and remarkable event in these diseases,while accumulation of PrPSc is thought to be the main reason for cell death,inflammation and spongiform degeneration observed in infected individuals.Although these rare but unique neurodegenerative disorders have attracted much attention,there are still many questions that remain to be answered.Knowledge of the scrapie agent structures and the toxic species may have significance for understanding the causes of the diseases,and could be helpful for rational design of novel therapeutic and diagnostic methods.In this review,we summarized the available experimental evidence concerning the relationship among the structural features,aggregation status of misfolded PrP and related neurotoxicity in the course of prion diseases development.In particular,most data supports the idea that the smaller oligomeric PrPSc aggregates,rather than the mature amyloid fibers,exhibit the highest toxicity to the host.

  12. Relations Between Permeability and Structure of Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Fucheng; Zhao Youke; Lü Jianxiong

    2003-01-01

    The permeability and the structure of heartwood and sapwood of the solvent-exchange dried and the air-dried green-wood of Chinese-fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.) and masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) were measured inorder to study the relations between the permeability and the structure. The results showed that the permeability of sapwood of boththe air-dried and the solvent-exchange dried wood was higher than that of heartwood, and the permeability of the solvent-exchangeddried heartwood and sapwood was higher than that of the air-dried. A higher permeability of wood was attributed to, on the one hand,a bigger number of flow path per unit area of the wood perpendicular to the flow direction resulted from a bigger number ofunaspirated pits per unit area and a bigger number of effective pit openings per membrane, and on the other hand, a smaller numberof tracheid in series connection per unit length parallel to flow direction resulted from a longer tracheid length and an effectivetracheid length for permeability.

  13. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grøntved Lars

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh. The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied

  14. Induction of stable protein-deoxyribonucleic acid adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (uv)-light-mediated formation of protein-DNA adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin was investigated in an attempt to compare chromatin alterations induced in vitro with those observed in vivo. Three independent methods of analysis indicated stable protein-DNA associations: a membrane filter assay which retained DNA on the filter in the presence of high salt-detergent; a Sepharose 4B column assay in which protein eluted coincident with DNA; and a CsCl density gradient equilibrium assay which showed both protein and DNA banding at densities other than their respective native densities. Treatment of the irradiated chromatin with DNase provided further evidence that protein--DNA and not protein-protein adducts were being observed in the column assay. There is a fluence-dependent response of protein-DNA adduct formation when the chromatin is irradiated at low ionic strength and is linear for protein over the range studied. When the chromatin is exposed to differing conditions of pH, ionic strength, or divalent metal ion concentration, the quantity of adduct formed upon uv irradiation varies. Susceptibility to adduct formation can be partially explained in terms of the condensation state of the chromatin and other factors such as rearrangement, denaturation, and dissociation of the chromatin components. Besides providing information on the biological significance of these types of uv-induced lesions, this technique may be useful as a probe of chromatin structure

  15. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  16. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling facilitates nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in synthetic dinucleosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ura, Kiyoe; Araki, Marito; Saeki, Hideaki; Masutani, Chikahide; Ito, Takashi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromatin dynamics and nucleotide excision repair (NER), we have examined the effect of chromatin structure on the formation of two major classes of UV-induced DNA lesions in reconstituted dinucleosomes. Furthermore, we have developed a model chromatin-NER system consisting of purified human NER factors and dinucleosome substrates that contain pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs) either at the center of the nucleosome or in the linker DNA....

  17. Radiolysis of chromatin extracted from cultured mammalian cells: formation of DNA-protein cross links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin extracted from Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts has been examined for the formation of radiation-induced DNA-protein cross links, using a membrane filter assay. The relative efficiencies of the aqueous radical intermediates, 0H., esub(aq)- and 02-, were investigated. Cross links were found in gamma-irradiated isolated chromatin and in chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation. When isolated chromatin was irradiated under conditions in which the chromosomal proteins were dissociated from the DNA, no cross links were detectable. The most efficient radical for the production of cross links in irradiated, isolated chromatin was found to be the hydroxyl radical, whereas, the superoxide radical was essentially ineffective. For chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation, the greatest effect was seen for cells irradiated in an atmosphere of nitrous oxide, suggesting the hydroxyl radical may be involved in the formation of cross links in intact cells also. The formation of cross links in chromatin irradiated in cells before isolation was considerably less efficient than in irradiated, isolated chromatin. (author)

  18. Novel chromatin texture features for the classification of pap smears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejnordi, Babak E.; Moshavegh, Ramin; Sujathan, K.; Malm, Patrik; Bengtsson, Ewert; Mehnert, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a set of novel structural texture features for quantifying nuclear chromatin patterns in cells on a conventional Pap smear. The features are derived from an initial segmentation of the chromatin into bloblike texture primitives. The results of a comprehensive feature selection experiment, including the set of proposed structural texture features and a range of different cytology features drawn from the literature, show that two of the four top ranking features are structural texture features. They also show that a combination of structural and conventional features yields a classification performance of 0.954±0.019 (AUC±SE) for the discrimination of normal (NILM) and abnormal (LSIL and HSIL) slides. The results of a second classification experiment, using only normal-appearing cells from both normal and abnormal slides, demonstrates that a single structural texture feature measuring chromatin margination yields a classification performance of 0.815±0.019. Overall the results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed structural approach and that it is possible to detect malignancy associated changes (MACs) in Papanicoloau stain.

  19. Sequence-structure relations of biopolymers

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Christopher; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: DNA data is transcribed into single-stranded RNA, which folds into specific molecular structures. In this paper we pose the question to what extent sequence- and structure-information correlate. We view this correlation as structural semantics of sequence data that allows for a different interpretation than conventional sequence alignment. Structural semantics could enable us to identify more general embedded "patterns" in DNA and RNA sequences. Results: We compute the partition function of sequences with respect to a fixed structure and connect this computation to the mutual information of a sequence-structure pair for RNA secondary structures. We present a Boltzmann sampler and obtain the a priori probability of specific sequence patterns. We present a detailed analysis for the three PDB-structures, 2JXV (hairpin), 2N3R (3-branch multi-loop) and 1EHZ (tRNA). We localize specific sequence patterns, contrast the energy spectrum of the Boltzmann sampled sequences versus those sequences that refold ...

  20. The sequencing bias relaxed characteristics of Hi-C derived data and implications for chromatin 3D modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Fu, Liang-Yu; Dong, Peng-Fei; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Li, Jian-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The 3D chromatin structure modeling by chromatin interactions derived from Hi-C experiments is significantly challenged by the intrinsic sequencing biases in these experiments. Conventional modeling methods only focus on the bias among different chromatin regions within the same experiment but neglect the bias arising from different experimental sequencing depth. We now show that the regional interaction bias is tightly coupled with the sequencing depth, and we further identify a chromatin structure parameter as the inherent characteristics of Hi-C derived data for chromatin regions. Then we present an approach for chromatin structure prediction capable of relaxing both kinds of sequencing biases by using this identified parameter. This method is validated by intra and inter cell-line comparisons among various chromatin regions for four human cell-lines (K562, GM12878, IMR90 and H1hESC), which shows that the openness of chromatin region is well correlated with chromatin function. This method has been executed by an automatic pipeline (AutoChrom3D) and thus can be conveniently used. PMID:23965308

  1. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Will, William Ryan; Petrini, Edoardo; Theodorou, Delphine; Harris, Rachael R.; Crawford, Margaret R.; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Krueger, Felix; Correra, Rosa Maria; Vetter, Anna T.; Miller, J. Ross; Kent, Nicholas A.; Varga-Weisz, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Centromeres are essential to chromatin structures, providing a binding platform for the mitotic spindle. Defects in centromere structure or function can lead to chromosome missegregation or chromosome breakage. This, in turn, can cause cancer in metazoans. Centromeres are defined by specialized chromatin that contains the histone H3 variant CENP-A (also called CenH3, or Cse4 in budding yeast), and transcription over centromeres is tightly controlled. Budding yeast centromeres a...

  2. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human genome

  3. Interplay of RNA Pol IV and ROS1 during post-embryonic 5S rDNA chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douet, Julien; Blanchard, Bertrand; Cuvillier, Claudine; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2008-12-01

    We have investigated the chromatin structure of 5S rDNA, a heterochromatic pericentromeric tandemly repeated family, at 2, 3, 4 and 5 days post-germination. Our results revealed a large-scale reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin that occurs during the first days of development. Unexpectedly, there is a decondensation followed by a 're'condensation of 5S rDNA chromatin, to obtain almost mature nuclei 5 d post-germination. The reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin is accompanied by a rapid and active demethylation of 5S rDNA mediated by the ROS1 (repressor of silencing 1) demethylase, whereas the plant-specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is essential to the 5S chromatin 're'condensation. In conclusion, Pol IV and ROS1 collaborate to unlock the 5S rDNA chromatin inherited from the seed, and establish adult features. PMID:18845569

  4. Making the case for chromatin profiling: a new tool to investigate the immune-regulatory landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Deborah R; Jung, Steffen; Amit, Ido

    2015-09-15

    Recent technological advances have enabled researchers to accurately and efficiently assay the chromatin dynamics of scarce cell populations. In this Opinion article, we advocate the application of these technologies to central questions in immunology. Unlike changes to other molecular structures in the cell, chromatin features can reveal the past (developmental history), present (current activity) and future (potential response to challenges) of a given immune cell type; chromatin profiling is therefore an important new tool for studying the immune-regulatory networks of health and disease. PMID:26272294

  5. Commitment in Structurally Enabled and Induced Exchange Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Edward J.; Thye, Shane R.; Yoon, Jeongkoo

    2006-01-01

    Network structures both enable and constrain the development of social relations. This research investigates these features by comparing the development of commitments in structurally enabled and structurally induced exchange relations. We integrate ideas from the theory of relational cohesion and the choice process theory of commitment. In an…

  6. Structure Selection from Streaming Relational Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalkova, Lilyana

    2011-01-01

    Statistical relational learning techniques have been successfully applied in a wide range of relational domains. In most of these applications, the human designers capitalized on their background knowledge by following a trial-and-error trajectory, where relational features are manually defined by a human engineer, parameters are learned for those features on the training data, the resulting model is validated, and the cycle repeats as the engineer adjusts the set of features. This paper seeks to streamline application development in large relational domains by introducing a light-weight approach that efficiently evaluates relational features on pieces of the relational graph that are streamed to it one at a time. We evaluate our approach on two social media tasks and demonstrate that it leads to more accurate models that are learned faster.

  7. Nucleosome conformational flexibility in experiments with single chromatin fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sivolob A. V.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the chromatin nucleosome organization play an ever increasing role in our comprehension of mechanisms of the gene activity regulation. This minireview describes the results on the nucleosome conformational flexibility, which were obtained using magnetic tweezers to apply torsion to oligonucleosome fibers reconstituted on single DNA molecules. Such an approach revealed a new structural form of the nucleosome, the reversome, in which DNA is wrapped in a right-handed superhelix around...

  8. Transcription within Condensed Chromatin: Steric Hindrance Facilitates Elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Bécavin, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Victor, Jean-Marc; Lesne, Annick

    2010-01-01

    During eukaryotic transcription, RNA-polymerase activity generates torsional stress in DNA, having a negative impact on the elongation process. Using our previous studies of chromatin fiber structure and conformational transitions, we suggest that this torsional stress can be alleviated, thanks to a tradeoff between the fiber twist and nucleosome conformational transitions into an activated state named “reversome”. Our model enlightens the origin of polymerase pauses, and leads to the counter...

  9. Comparisons Among Multidimensional Structures Of Interpersonal Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wish, M

    1976-07-01

    Eighty-seven subjects made three kinds of judgments about each of 25 kinds of interpersonal relations (for example, "between supervisor and employee"): (1) direct ratings of similarity between pairs of relations; (2) repeated selections of subsets of relations having some characteristic in common; and (3) ratings of the relations on numerous bipolar scales, "INDSCAL" analyses of data from each of the judgmental tasks indicated that the conceptual space for the interpersonal relations is four-dimensional. The unrotated dimensions were interpreted as "cooperative and friendly vs. competitive and hostile," "equal vs. unequal," "socioemotional and informal vs. task-oriented and formal," and "intense vs. superficial." Different subgroups varied in terms of the weights they implicitly gave to these four dimensions. PMID:26766501

  10. Methodology for rehabilitation of aged nuclear safety related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phenomena of ageing of concrete structures are discussed along with procedure for rehabilitation of aged structures. Different activities of rehabilitation of aged concrete structures like condition survey, testing, data analysis, interpretation of data, appraisal of structural integrity, and assessment of durability including confirmatory studies are presented. Aspects related to safety in rehabilitation of nuclear safety related concrete structures are discussed and approach to implement requirements of safety is presented along with quality assurance programme. (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  11. Projective structure and holonomy in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review presents a study of the situation when two spacetimes admit the same (unparametrized) geodesics, that is, when they are projectively related. The solution is based on the curvature class and the holonomy type of a spacetime and it transpires that all holonomy possibilities can be solved except the most general one and that the consequence of two spacetimes being projectively related leads, in many cases, to their associated Levi-Civita connections being identical. Some results are also given regarding the general case. It is also shown that the holonomy types of projectively related spacetimes are very closely related. The theory is then applied, with Einstein's principle of equivalence in mind, to 'generic' spacetimes. (brief review)

  12. Projective structure and holonomy in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G S [Institute of Mathematics, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Lonie, D P, E-mail: g.hall@abdn.ac.uk, E-mail: dplonie@gmail.com [School of Computing, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen AB25 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-21

    This review presents a study of the situation when two spacetimes admit the same (unparametrized) geodesics, that is, when they are projectively related. The solution is based on the curvature class and the holonomy type of a spacetime and it transpires that all holonomy possibilities can be solved except the most general one and that the consequence of two spacetimes being projectively related leads, in many cases, to their associated Levi-Civita connections being identical. Some results are also given regarding the general case. It is also shown that the holonomy types of projectively related spacetimes are very closely related. The theory is then applied, with Einstein's principle of equivalence in mind, to 'generic' spacetimes. (brief review)

  13. Discovering hierarchical structure in normal relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering is a widely used tool for structuring and visualizing complex data using similarity. Traditionally, hierarchical clustering is based on local heuristics that do not explicitly provide assessment of the statistical saliency of the extracted hierarchy. We propose a non...

  14. Subnational Government Structure and Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson Boex; Jorge Martinez-Vazquez; Andrey Timofeev

    2004-01-01

    Many countries around the world are currently engaged in one way or another in policy debates or reforms of their system of intergovernmental fiscal relations. While the policy dynamics vary greatly from country to country, the focus of such reform efforts can generally be categorized into one of the four main dimensions of intergovernmental fiscal relations, namely the assignment of functional responsibilities (expenditure assignments), the assignment of revenue sources, the provision of int...

  15. Centromeric chromatin and its dynamics in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermontova, Inna; Sandmann, Michael; Mascher, Martin; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2015-07-01

    Centromeres are chromatin structures that are required for proper separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. The centromere is composed of centromeric DNA, often enriched in satellite repeats, and kinetochore complex proteins. To date, over 100 kinetochore components have been identified in various eukaryotes. Kinetochore assembly begins with incorporation of centromeric histone H3 variant CENH3 into centromeric nucleosomes. Protein components of the kinetochore are either present at centromeres throughout the cell cycle or localize to centromeres transiently, prior to attachment of microtubules to each kinetochore in prometaphase of mitotic cells. This is the case for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) proteins in animal cells. The SAC complex ensures equal separation of chromosomes between daughter nuclei by preventing anaphase onset before metaphase is complete, i.e. the sister kinetochores of all chromosomes are attached to spindle fibers from opposite poles. In this review, we focus on the organization of centromeric DNA and the kinetochore assembly in plants. We summarize recent advances regarding loading of CENH3 into the centromere, and the subcellular localization and protein-protein interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in kinetochore assembly and function. We describe the transcriptional activity of corresponding genes based on in silico analysis of their promoters and cell cycle-dependent expression. Additionally, barley homologs of all selected A. thaliana proteins have been identified in silico, and their sequences and domain structures are presented. PMID:25976696

  16. The intern structure of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents the forgotten fact that in 1905 there were 2 restricted theories of relativity: that of Einstein and that of Poincare. These 2 theories were independently formulated, they are very close to each other but are fundamentally different when we consider their basic principles. Poincare's theory is based on a classical representation of the purely undulatory aspect of light, whereas Einstein stipulates for the quantum aspect of light. Poincare's theory implies the existence of the ether and asserts the primacy of continuity over discontinuity. The author has based his work on a thorough study of the scientific articles in which Poincare and Einstein explained their ideas. The comparison of these 2 theories sheds light on the evolution of concepts on which the whole modern physics is based. An extended bibliography of works published on special relativity or on related topics is given. (A.C.)

  17. Discovering Multidimensional Structure in Relational Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael Rune; Holmgren, Thomas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) systems based on multidimensional databases are essential elements of decision support. However, most existing data is stored in “ordinary” relational OLTP databases, i.e., data has to be (re-) modeled as multidimensional cubes before the advantages of OLAP...... tools are available. In this paper we present an approach for the automatic construction of multidimensional OLAP database schemas from existing relational OLTP databases, enabling easy OLAP design and analysis for most existing data sources. This is achieved through a set of practical and effective...... algorithms for discovering multidimensional schemas from relational databases. The algorithms take a wide range of available metadata into account in the discovery process, including functional and inclusion dependencies, and key and cardinality information....

  18. Gene Expression and Chromatin Modifications Associated with Maize Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hainan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENH3, a variant of histone H3. Centromeres in most plant species contain exclusively highly repetitive DNA sequences, which has hindered research on structure and function of centromeric chromatin. Several maize centromeres have been nearly completely sequenced, providing a sequence-based platform for genomic and epigenomic research of plant centromeres. Here we report a high resolution map of CENH3 nucleosomes in the maize genome. Although CENH3 nucleosomes are spaced ∼190 bp on average, CENH3 nucleosomes that occupied CentC, a 156-bp centromeric satellite repeat, showed clear positioning aligning with CentC monomers. Maize centromeres contain alternating CENH3-enriched and CENH3-depleted subdomains, which account for 87% and 13% of the centromeres, respectively. A number of annotated genes were identified in the centromeres, including 11 active genes that were located exclusively in CENH3-depleted subdomains. The euchromatic histone modification marks, including H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9ac, detected in maize centromeres were associated mainly with the active genes. Interestingly, maize centromeres also have lower levels of the heterochromatin histone modification mark H3K27me2 relative to pericentromeric regions. We conclude that neither H3K27me2 nor the three euchromatic histone modifications are likely to serve as functionally important epigenetic marks of centromere identity in maize.

  19. Gene Expression and Chromatin Modifications Associated with Maize Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hainan; Zhu, Xiaobiao; Wang, Kai; Gent, Jonathan I; Zhang, Wenli; Dawe, R Kelly; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENH3, a variant of histone H3. Centromeres in most plant species contain exclusively highly repetitive DNA sequences, which has hindered research on structure and function of centromeric chromatin. Several maize centromeres have been nearly completely sequenced, providing a sequence-based platform for genomic and epigenomic research of plant centromeres. Here we report a high resolution map of CENH3 nucleosomes in the maize genome. Although CENH3 nucleosomes are spaced ∼190 bp on average, CENH3 nucleosomes that occupied CentC, a 156-bp centromeric satellite repeat, showed clear positioning aligning with CentC monomers. Maize centromeres contain alternating CENH3-enriched and CENH3-depleted subdomains, which account for 87% and 13% of the centromeres, respectively. A number of annotated genes were identified in the centromeres, including 11 active genes that were located exclusively in CENH3-depleted subdomains. The euchromatic histone modification marks, including H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9ac, detected in maize centromeres were associated mainly with the active genes. Interestingly, maize centromeres also have lower levels of the heterochromatin histone modification mark H3K27me2 relative to pericentromeric regions. We conclude that neither H3K27me2 nor the three euchromatic histone modifications are likely to serve as functionally important epigenetic marks of centromere identity in maize. PMID:26564952

  20. Effect of saffron on rat sperm chromatin integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mardani; Ahmad Vaez; Shahnaz Razavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, relation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) ROS concentration and semen quality was indicated. Saffron has traditionally been not only considered as a food additive but also as a medicinal herb, which has a good antioxidant properties. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection potency of saffron and vitamin E on sperm chromatin integrity. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats divided equally into saffron (100 mg/kg), vitamin E (10...

  1. Projective structure and holonomy in general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, G. S.; Lonie, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents a study of the situation when two space-times admit the same (unparametrised) geodesics, that is, when they are projectively related. The solution is based on the curvature class and the holonomy type of a space-time and it transpires that all holonomy possibilities can be solved except the most general one and that the consequence of two space-times being projectively related leads, in many cases, to their associated Levi-Civita connections being identical. So...

  2. Correlation among DNA Linker Length, Linker Histone Concentration, and Histone Tails in Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Antoni; Ozer, Gungor; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells condense their genetic material in the nucleus in the form of chromatin, a macromolecular complex made of DNA and multiple proteins. The structure of chromatin is intimately connected to the regulation of all eukaryotic organisms, from amoebas to humans, but its organization remains largely unknown. The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) and the concentration of linker histones (ρLH) are two structural parameters that vary among cell types and cell cycles; the NRL is the number of DNA basepairs wound around each nucleosome core plus the number of basepairs linking successive nucleosomes. Recent studies have found a linear empirical relationship between the variation of these two properties for different cells, but its underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we apply our established mesoscale chromatin model to explore the mechanisms responsible for this relationship, by investigating chromatin fibers as a function of NRL and ρLH combinations. We find that a threshold of linker histone concentration triggers the compaction of chromatin into well-formed 30-nm fibers; this critical value increases linearly with NRL, except for long NRLs, where the fibers remain disorganized. Remarkably, the interaction patterns between core histone tails and chromatin elements are highly sensitive to the NRL and ρLH combination, suggesting a molecular mechanism that could have a key role in regulating the structural state of the fibers in the cell. An estimate of the minimized work and volume associated with storage of chromatin fibers in the nucleus further suggests factors that could spontaneously regulate the NRL as a function of linker histone concentration. Both the tail interaction map and DNA packing considerations support the empirical NRL/ρLH relationship and offer a framework to interpret experiments for different chromatin conditions in the cell. PMID:27276249

  3. Dancing on damaged chromatin. Functions of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in cellular responses to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to preserve and protect genetic information, eukaryotic cells have developed a signaling or communications network to help the cell respond to DNA damage, and ATM and NBS1 are key players in this network. ATM is a protein kinase which is activated immediately after a DNA double strand break (DSB) is formed, and the resulting signal cascade generated in response to cellular DSBs is regulated by post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In addition, to ensure the efficient functioning of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, the highly ordered structure of eukaryotic chromatin must be appropriately altered to permit access of repair-related factors to DNA. These alterations are termed chromatin remodeling, and are executed by a specific remodeling complex in conjunction with histone modifications. Current advances in the molecular analysis of DNA damage responses have shown that the auto-phosphorylation of ATM and the interaction between ATM and NBS1 are key steps for ATM activation, and that the association of ATM and NBS1 is involved in chromatin remodeling. Identification of novel factors which function in ubiquitination (RNF8, Ubc13, Rap80, etc.) has also enabled us to understand more details of the early stages in DNA repair pathways which respond to DSBs. In this review, the focus is on the role of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in DSB response pathways, and their role in DSB repair and in the regulation of chromatin remodeling. (author)

  4. Polyethylene glycols (PEG) and related structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenande, Emily; Kroigaard, Mogens; Mosbech, Holger; Garvey, Lene H

    2015-01-01

    We describe hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols (PEGs), with cross-reactivity to a structural analog, polysorbate 80, in a 69-year-old patient with perioperative anaphylaxis and subsequent, severe anaphylactic reactions to unrelated medical products. PEGs and PEG analogs are prevalent in the...... perioperative setting, contained in a wide range of products seldom suspected of causing hypersensitivity reactions and thus rarely documented in surgical/anesthetic records. We suggest routine testing for PEGs after perioperative anaphylaxis because exposure to these polymers often is significant....... Comprehensive brand name documentation on the anesthetic chart of all product exposures is central to identifying the responsible allergen....

  5. Linker Histones Incorporation Maintains Chromatin Fiber Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Lavelle, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Conde e Silva, Natalia; Le Cam, Eric; Victor, Jean-Marc; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized in supercoiled chromatin fibers, which undergo dynamic changes during such DNA metabolic processes as transcription or replication. Indeed, DNA-translocating enzymes like polymerases produce physical constraints in vivo. We used single-molecule micromanipulation by magnetic tweezers to study the response of chromatin to mechanical constraints in the same range as those encountered in vivo. We had previously shown that under positive torsional const...

  6. Generalized Disjunctions in (Infinitary) Structural Consequence Relations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2012), s. 442-443. ISSN 1079-8986. [Logic Colloquium 2011. 11.07.2011-16.07.2011, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Abstract Algebraic Logic * Generalized disjunction * Proof by cases properties * Consequence relations Subject RIV: BA - General Math ematics http://www. math .ucla.edu/~asl/bsl/1803-toc.htm

  7. Relating transverse structure of various parton distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, D; Teryaev, O V

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of T-even TMDs in a light front quark-diquark model of nucleons with the wave functions constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. The relations amongst TMDs are discussed. The $p_\\perp$ dependence of the TMDs are compared with the $t$-dependence of the GPDs. AdS/QCD wave function provides an explanation behind the approximate $x$ and $p_\\perp$ factorization observed in lattice TMD calculations.

  8. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  9. Structure of Leptin Receptor Related with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toleikis, Zigmantas

    The hormone leptin is central to obesity, but the molecular processes underlying the activation of the leptin receptor are unknown. To further the understanding of the system, an atomic resolution structure of this cytokine type I receptor in the unbound inactive form and in the activated bound...... receptor, while the D5 domain is the central leptin-binding domain, implicated in the first steps of activation. Both domains are characterized by a fibronectin type III fold and both contain a conserved WSXWS motif (X represents an unconserved amino acid residue), a distinct feature of the cytokine...... receptors. This motif is thought to play a major role in correct folding and activation of the receptor. The complex between leptin and the D5CA domain was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the amino acid residues implicated in the binding were determined. To investigate which parts...

  10. Visualization of chromatin folding patterns in chicken erythrocytes by atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANRUOLAN; ZHENGXIALIU; 等

    1997-01-01

    The organization of the higher order structure of chromatin in chicken erythrocytes has been examined with tapping-mode scanning force microscopy under conditions close to their native envirinment.Reproducible highresolution AFM images of chromatin compaction at several levels can be demonstrated.An extended beads-on-astring (width of - 15-20nm,height of - 2-3nm for each individual nucleosome) can be consistently observed.Furthermore,superbeade (width of - 40nm,height of - 7nm) are demonstrated.Visualization of the solenoid conformation at the level of 30nm chromatin fiber is attained either by using AFM or by using electron microscopy.In addition,tightly coiled chromatin fibers (- 50-60nm and - 90-110nm) can be revealed.Our data suggest that the chromatin in the interphase nucleus of chicken erythrocyte represents a high-order conformation and AFM provides useful high-resolution structural information concerning the folding pattern of interphase chromatin fibers.

  11. Effects of thyrotropin on the phosphorylation of histones and nonhistone phosphoproteins in micrococcal nuclease-sensitive and resistant thyroid chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actively transcribed regions of chromatin are more susceptible than bulk chromatin to digestion by nucleases, and useful information about the composition and structure of active chromatin may be obtained by studying the chromatin fragments released from nuclei by limited nuclease digestion. In the present study, we have used micrococcal nuclease to investigate the effects of TSH on protein phosphorylation in nuclease-sensitive fractions of calf thyroid chromatin. Batches of calf thyroid slices were incubated for 2 h with 32Pi, with or without 50 mU/ml TSH. Nuclei were then prepared and the distribution of 32P-labeled histones, high mobility group (HMG) proteins, and other acid-soluble phosphoproteins between micrococcal nuclease-sensitive and resistant fractions of chromatin was examined. TSH increased the amount of 32P incorporated into HMG 14 and the histones H1 and H3. Hormone-dependent increases in the 32P-labeling of H1 and H3 were not selectively associated with micrococcal nuclease-sensitive chromatin. In contrast, [32P] HMG-14 was preferentially solubilized from nuclei by micrococcal nuclease. This lends support to the view that TSH-induced effects on the structure and function of transcriptionally active chromatin may be mediated in part by phosphorylation of HMG 14

  12. Intelligent structures and design of energy related facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibility of applying intelligent structural concepts to civil design of energy plants is discussed. Intelligent structures, which are now common in aerospace engineering field, are also referred to as adaptive structures or smart structures depending on cases. Among various existing concepts, reconfigurable structures, precise shape control, structural monitoring using smart materials of optical fiber sensors, and relation with recent innovative communication technologies are focused from civil engineering point of view. Application of such new technologies will help to enhance design of energy related plants, which include multiplex functions which need to be very reliable and safe. (author)

  13. Holistic Structuralism, Elementarism and Piaget's Theory of 'Relationalism'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Richard F.

    1985-01-01

    Contrasts holism, elementarism and Piaget's rationalism. Suggests Piaget's views are close to those of transactionalism and that the key difference between Gestalt holistic structure and Piagetian operatory structure is whether the composition laws are additive or not. Piaget's version of structuralism (relationalism) is distinctive in being…

  14. Structure soil structure interaction effects: Seismic analysis of safety related collocated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Process, Purification and Stack Buildings are collocated safety related concrete shear wall structures with plan dimensions in excess of 100 feet. An important aspect of their seismic analysis was the determination of structure soil structure interaction (SSSI) effects, if any. The SSSI analysis of the Process Building, with one other building at a time, was performed with the SASSI computer code for up to 50 frequencies. Each combined model had about 1500 interaction nodes. Results of the SSSI analysis were compared with those from soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the individual buildings, done with ABAQUS and SASSI codes, for three parameters: peak accelerations, seismic forces and the in-structure floor response spectra (FRS). The results may be of wider interest due to the model size and the potential applicability to other deep soil layered sites. Results obtained from the ABAQUS analysis were consistently higher, as expected, than those from the SSI and SSSI analyses using the SASSI. The SSSI effect between the Process and Purification Buildings was not significant. The Process and Stack Building results demonstrated that under certain conditions a massive structure can have an observable effect on the seismic response of a smaller and less stiff structure

  15. Structure soil structure interaction effects: Seismic analysis of safety related collocated concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, J.R.

    2000-06-20

    The Process, Purification and Stack Buildings are collocated safety related concrete shear wall structures with plan dimensions in excess of 100 feet. An important aspect of their seismic analysis was the determination of structure soil structure interaction (SSSI) effects, if any. The SSSI analysis of the Process Building, with one other building at a time, was performed with the SASSI computer code for up to 50 frequencies. Each combined model had about 1500 interaction nodes. Results of the SSSI analysis were compared with those from soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the individual buildings, done with ABAQUS and SASSI codes, for three parameters: peak accelerations, seismic forces and the in-structure floor response spectra (FRS). The results may be of wider interest due to the model size and the potential applicability to other deep soil layered sites. Results obtained from the ABAQUS analysis were consistently higher, as expected, than those from the SSI and SSSI analyses using the SASSI. The SSSI effect between the Process and Purification Buildings was not significant. The Process and Stack Building results demonstrated that under certain conditions a massive structure can have an observable effect on the seismic response of a smaller and less stiff structure.

  16. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. → Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. → Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  17. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Okabayashi, Koji [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kohnuma@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  18. Interaction of heavy ions with nuclear chromatin: Spatiotemporal investigations of biological responses in a cellular environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion beams offer the possibility to generate strictly localized DNA lesions within subregions of a cell nucleus. The distribution of the ion-induced damage can be indirectly visualized by immunocytochemical detection of repair-related proteins as radiation-induced foci. The proteins analyzed here were the double-strand break marker γ-H2AX, the excision repair and replication protein PCNA and the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A. A newly developed adjustable sample holder is now used to apply an irradiation geometry characterized by a small angle between the plane of the cellular monolayer and the incoming ion beam. This allows the spatial analysis of protein accumulations along ion trajectories, revealing an unexpected clustering after irradiation with low-energy zinc ions. The patterns of protein aggregation observed show considerable intrinsic variability, but similar patterns of protein clustering were obtained for functionally different proteins irrespective of the type of ion beam applied, confirming previous observations for lower and higher LET beams. Foci sizes within ion tracks were found to be larger for γ-H2AX foci in comparison to CDKN1A foci, in agreement with the known histone H2AX phosphorylation response. The results suggest that not the pattern of dose deposition but the underlying chromatin structure determines the distribution of protein clusters along tracks. Therefore, the requirement of time-lapse studies using live cells is emphasized for future studies on chromatin movement as a potential component of the DNA damage response

  19. Novel RNA-binding properties of the MTG chromatin regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi Nicoletta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myeloid translocation gene (MTG proteins are non-DNA-binding transcriptional regulators capable of interacting with chromatin modifying proteins. As a consequence of leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, two of the MTG proteins, MTG8 and MTG16, are fused to the DNA-binding domain of AML1, a transcriptional activator crucial for hematopoiesis. The AML1-MTG fusion proteins, as the wild type MTGs, display four conserved homology regions (NHR1-4 related to the Drosophila nervy protein. Structural protein analyses led us to test the hypothesis that specific MTG domains may mediate RNA binding. Results By using an RNA-binding assay based on synthetic RNA homopolymers and a panel of MTG deletion mutants, here we show that all the MTG proteins can bind RNA. The RNA-binding properties can be traced to two regions: the Zinc finger domains in the NHR4, which mediate Zinc-dependent RNA binding, and a novel short basic region (SBR upstream of the NHR2, which mediates Zinc-independent RNA binding. The two AML1-MTG fusion proteins, retaining both the Zinc fingers domains and the SBR, also display RNA-binding properties. Conclusion Evidence has been accumulating that RNA plays a role in transcriptional control. Both wild type MTGs and chimeric AML1-MTG proteins display in vitro RNA-binding properties, thus opening new perspectives on the possible involvement of an RNA component in MTG-mediated chromatin regulation.

  20. Chromatin Proteomics Reveals Variable Histone Modifications during the Life Cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Teresa Cristina Leandro; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Lopes, Mariana de Camargo; Martil, Daiana Evelin; Iwai, Leo Kei; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Machado, Fabrício Castro; de Lima-Stein, Mariana L; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique; Elias, Maria Carolina; Janzen, Christian; Schenkman, Sergio; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas

    2016-06-01

    Histones are well-conserved proteins that form the basic structure of chromatin in eukaryotes and undergo several post-translational modifications, which are important for the control of transcription, replication, DNA damage repair, and chromosome condensation. In early branched organisms, histones are less conserved and appear to contain alternative sites for modifications, which could reveal evolutionary unique functions of histone modifications in gene expression and other chromatin-based processes. Here, by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified and quantified histone post-translational modifications in two life cycle stages of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. We detected 44 new modifications, namely: 18 acetylations, seven monomethylations, seven dimethylations, seven trimethylations, and four phosphorylations. We found that replicative (epimastigote stage) contains more histone modifications than nonreplicative and infective parasites (trypomastigote stage). Acetylations of lysines at the C-terminus of histone H2A and methylations of lysine 23 of histone H3 were found to be enriched in trypomastigotes. In contrast, phosphorylation in serine 23 of H2B and methylations of lysine 76 of histone H3 predominates in proliferative states. The presence of one or two methylations in the lysine 76 was found in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis, typical of proliferating parasites. Our findings provide new insights into the role of histone modifications related to the control of gene expression and cell-cycle regulation in an early divergent organism. PMID:27108550

  1. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  2. Linker Histones Incorporation Maintains Chromatin Fiber Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Lavelle, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Conde e Silva, Natalia; Le Cam, Eric; Victor, Jean-Marc; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized in supercoiled chromatin fibers, which undergo dynamic changes during such DNA metabolic processes as transcription or replication. Indeed, DNA-translocating enzymes like polymerases produce physical constraints in vivo. We used single-molecule micromanipulation by magnetic tweezers to study the response of chromatin to mechanical constraints in the same range as those encountered in vivo. We had previously shown that under positive torsional constraints, nucleosomes can undergo a reversible chiral transition toward a state of positive topology. We demonstrate here that chromatin fibers comprising linker histones present a torsional plasticity similar to that of naked nucleosome arrays. Chromatosomes can undergo a reversible chiral transition toward a state of positive torsion (reverse chromatosome) without loss of linker histones. PMID:21641318

  3. Relations between the emission spectra and radio structures of quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present evidence that the emission spectra and radio structures of low-redshift quasars are related statistically. Our sample compriese 34 quasars with z<0.70 and known radio structures. Objects with the broadest and most irregular emission lines are associated with extended radio sources, while those with relatively narrow emission lines with smooth profiles tend to have compact radio structures. There is also a significant tendency for Fe II emission lines to be found preferentially in quasars with compact radio structure

  4. Sperm chromatin structure assay predicts the outcome of intrauterine insemination%精子染色质结构分析预测夫精宫腔内人工授精结局的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓玉; 张燕; 孙雪萍; 崔毓桂; 钱晓乔; 冒韵东; 刘嘉茵

    2011-01-01

    Objective; Speim chromatin structure assay (SCSA) , as a clinically practical technique for the analysis of DNA damage, is rarely reported in China. This study focuses on the correlation of DNA damage with the pregnancy rate of intrauterine insemination (IUI). Methods-. We performed semen analysis for482 couples undergoing IUI, calculated the DNA fragmentation index (DFI) by SCSA, and observed the relationship between DFI and the pregnancy rate of IUI. Results: Clinical pregnancy was achieved in 5 (5.26% ) of the 95 cases with DFI > 25% , and in 59 (15.25% ) of the 387 cases with DFI 25%. Those with sperm DFI >25% had significantly lower rates of biochemical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy than those with DFI s;25% (0R: 0. 37, 95% CI: 0.14 -0.96 and OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.16 -0.97). No significant differences were found in the DFI of 54 cases between the first and the second cycle ( [ 15.05 ±7.98]% vs [17.25 ± 12.18]% , P >0.05). Sperm DFI was significantly negatively correlated with sperm concentration, sperm motility and total progressively motile sperm count (P 25% than in those with DFI ^25%. Sperm DFI obtained from SCSA is partly correlated with sperm concentration and motility, and it is a robust predictor of the IUI outcome. Natl J Androl, 2011, 17 (II) -. 977 -983%目的:分析精子DNA损伤与宫腔内人工授精(intrauterine insemination,IUI)妊娠率的关系.方法:482例行IUI治疗的患者,常规精液分析,并采用精子染色质结构分析法(SCSA)计算DNA碎片指数(DNA fragmentation index,DFI),观察DFI与IUI妊娠率的关系.结果:482例患者中DFI> 25%的患者为95例,5例临床妊娠,妊娠率为5.26%;DFI≤25%的患者为387例,59例临床妊娠,妊娠率为15.25%.DFI> 25%的患者,其生化妊娠率和临床妊娠率只有DFI≤25%的患者的0.37(95% CI:0.14~0.96)和0.38(95% CI:0.16~0.97)倍.54例患者前后2个周期DFI值分别为(15.05±7.98)%与(17.25 +12.18)%,差异无统计学意义(P>0

  5. Evolution of histone 2A for chromatin compaction in eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Macadangdang, Benjamin R; Oberai, Amit; Spektor, Tanya; Campos, Oscar A; Sheng, Fang; Carey, Michael F.; Vogelauer, Maria; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest There are up to three meters of DNA in a human cell. To fit this length into the cell's nucleus in an organized manner, DNA is wrapped around proteins called histones and then tightly packaged to form a structure called chromatin. The interaction between the histones and the DNA is helped by certain amino acids on the surface of the histones fitting snugly into the DNA molecule. Plants and animals have genomes that are significantly larger than those of single-celled organisms. H...

  6. Duality relation between small- and large-x structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using the concept of duality between direct channel resonances and Regge exchanges we relate the small- and large-x behavior of the structure functions. We show that even a single resonance exhibits Bjorken scaling at large Q2

  7. Painting by Numbers: Increasing the Parts List for Chromatin Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiuyi V.; Rando, Oliver J.

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, van Bemmel and colleagues (2013) report the genome-wide mapping of 42 novel chromatin factors, systematically identifying new components of the various chromatin domains present in fly cells. PMID:23438859

  8. Exploring Pattern Structures of Syntactic Trees for Relation Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Leeuwenberg, Artuur; Buzmakov, Aleksey; Toussaint, Yannick; Napoli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we explore the possibility of defining an original pattern structure for managing syntactic trees.More precisely, we are interested in the extraction of relations such as drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in medical texts where sentences are represented as syntactic trees.In this specific pattern structure, called STPS, the similarity operator is based on rooted tree intersection.Moreover, we introduce "Lazy Pattern Structure Classification" (LPSC), which is a symbolic method able t...

  9. Relative Energy Dissipation: Sensitive to Structural Changes of Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祖方遒; 郭丽君; 朱震刚; 凤仪

    2002-01-01

    Energy dissipation techniques, widely used in solid physics previously, are proven to be sensitive also to changes in liquid structure. It has been suggested from relative energy dissipation that changes in liquid structure can occur as a function of temperature in some ordinary binary systems such as Pb-Sn, In-Sn and In-Bi. This finding may be helpful to understand liquid structure changing patterns, therefore enriching the phenomenology of liquid state physics. This is significant for engineering practices.

  10. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, M.L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; Grooth, de B.G.; Greve, J.

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to r

  11. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Gall, Le Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meetin

  12. CTCF Binding Polarity Determines Chromatin Looping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Elzo; Vos, Erica S M; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Verstegen, Marjon J A M; Teunissen, Hans; Splinter, Erik; Wijchers, Patrick J; Krijger, Peter H L; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an architectural protein involved in the three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromatin. In this study, we assayed the 3D genomic contact profiles of a large number of CTCF binding sites with high-resolution 4C-seq. As recently reported, our data also suggest that ch

  13. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control is a ...

  14. Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China, BGI, the largest genomics organization in the world, and Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, published online in Nature Geneticsics that the study on frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of thebladder on August 8th, 2011. Their study provides a valuable genetic basis for future studies on TCC,

  15. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin-modifying proteins mold the genome into areas that are accessible for transcriptional activity and areas that are transcriptionally silent. This epigenetic gene regulation allows for different transcriptional programs to be conducted in different cell types at different timepoints-despi...

  16. Evaluation of chromatin integrity of motile bovine spermatozoa capacitated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckova, Z; Machatkova, M; Rybar, R; Horakova, J; Hulinska, P; Machal, L

    2008-08-01

    The efficiency of in vitro embryo production is highly variable amongst individual sires in cattle. To eliminate that this variability is not caused by sperm chromatin damage caused by separation or capacitacion, chromatin integrity was evaluated. Seventeen of AI bulls with good NRRs but variable embryo production efficiency were used. For each bull, motile spermatozoa were separated on a Percoll gradient, resuspended in IVF-TALP medium and capacitated with or incubated without heparin for 6 h. Samples before and after separation and after 3-h and 6-h capacitacion or incubation were evaluated by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA) and the proportion of sperm with intact chromatin structure was calculated. Based on changes in the non-DFI-sperm proportion, the sires were categorized as DNA-unstable (DNA-us), DNA-stable (DNA-s) and DNA-most stable (DNA-ms) bulls (n=3, n=5 and n=9, respectively). In DNA-us bulls, separation produced a significant increase of the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion (p Capacitacion produced a significant decrease in the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion in H+ sperm (p capacitacion, the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion remained almost unchanged. In DNA-ms bulls, neither separation nor capacitacion had any effect on the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion. It can be concluded that, although separation and capacitacion may produce some changes in sperm chromatin integrity, these are not associated with different in vitro fertility of the bulls involved. PMID:18578952

  17. Structural relations between harmonic sums up to w=6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiply nested finite harmonic sums Sa1...an(N) occur in many single scale higher order calculations in Quantum Field Theory. We discuss their algebraic and structural relations to weight w=6. As an example, we consider the application of these relations to the soft and virtual corrections for Bhabha-scattering to O(α2). (orig.)

  18. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  19. Twisted topological structures related to M-branes II: Twisted Wu and Wu^c structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sati, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    Studying the topological aspects of M-branes in M-theory leads to various structures related to Wu classes. First we interpret Wu classes themselves as twisted classes and then define twisted notions of Wu structures. These generalize many known structures, including Pin^- structures, twisted Spin structures in the sense of Distler-Freed-Moore, Wu-twisted differential cocycles appearing in the work of Belov-Moore, as well as ones introduced by the author, such as twisted Membrane and twisted ...

  20. Sperm Chromatin-Induced Ectopic Polar Body Extrusion in Mouse Eggs after ICSI and Delayed Egg Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Manqi; Li, Rong

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic chromosomes in an oocyte are not only a maternal genome carrier but also provide a positional signal to induce cortical polarization and define asymmetric meiotic division of the oocyte, resulting in polar body extrusion and haploidization of the maternal genome. The meiotic chromosomes play dual function in determination of meiosis: 1) organizing a bipolar spindle formation and 2) inducing cortical polarization and assembly of a distinct cortical cytoskeleton structure in the overlying cortex for polar body extrusion. At fertilization, a sperm brings exogenous paternal chromatin into the egg, which induces ectopic cortical polarization at the sperm entry site and leads to a cone formation, known as fertilization cone. Here we show that the sperm chromatin-induced fertilization cone formation is an abortive polar body extrusion due to lack of spindle induction by the sperm chromatin during fertilization. If experimentally manipulating the fertilization process to allow sperm chromatin to induce both cortical polarization and spindle formation, the fertilization cone can be converted into polar body extrusion. This suggests that sperm chromatin is also able to induce polar body extrusion, like its maternal counterpart. The usually observed cone formation instead of ectopic polar body extrusion induced by sperm chromatin during fertilization is due to special sperm chromatin compaction which restrains it from rapid spindle induction and therefore provides a protective mechanism to prevent a possible paternal genome loss during ectopic polar body extrusion. PMID:19787051

  1. Assessment of chromatin status (SCSA) in epididymal and ejaculated sperm in Iberian red deer, ram and domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Macias, Vanesa; Martinez-Pastor, Felipe; Alvarez, Mercedes; Garde, Jose Julian; Anel, Enrique; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino

    2006-11-01

    Abnormal chromatin condensation is not detected using classical techniques for sperm analysis. SCSA has demonstrated its usefulness in sperm chromatin analysis in several species (human, bull, stallion and boar). In this work, we studied sperm samples from red deer, ram and dog to analyze the differentiation of chromatin structure applying SCSA in epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa. Epididymal samples were obtained from the caput, corpus and cauda by means of cuts, and ejaculated ones were obtained by electroejaculation (deer), artificial vagina (ram) and digital manipulation (dog). SCSA results suggested different critical points in sperm maturation (spermatozoa with loose chromatin to more condensed chromatin) among species: from corpus to cauda in ram and from caput to corpus in deer and dog. Moreover, we also detected differences in ruminants and dog, reflected in the appearance of SCSA plots. Indeed, ram and deer samples rendered two peaks within the sperm main population (sperm with condensed chromatin), whereas only one was detected in dog. Although some differences were observed between cauda and ejaculated samples, SCSA parameters indicated good chromatin condensation, making these samples suitable for germplasm banking. Some species-dependent modifications in the analysis of the results may be necessary to take full advantage of its analytical power. PMID:16790270

  2. CAST-ChIP Maps Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States in the Drosophila Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Schauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP, a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II CAST-ChIP identifies ∼1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  3. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  4. Principle of relative positioning of structures in the human body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Buliang Meng; Ailan Pang; Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    The arrangement of various biological structures should generally ensure the safety of crucial structures and increase their working efficiency; however, other principles governing the relative positions of structures in humans have not been reported. The present study therefore investigated other principles using nerves and their companion vessels in the human body as an example. Nerves and blood vessels usually travel together and in the most direct way towards their targets. Human embryology, histology, and gross anatomy suggest that there are many possible positions for these structures during development. However, for mechanical reasons, tougher or stronger structures should take priority. Nerves are tougher than most other structures, followed by arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. Nerves should therefore follow the most direct route, and be followed by the arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. This general principle should be applicable to all living things.

  5. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  6. Estimating Relative Positions of Outer-Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balian, Harry; Breckenridge, William; Brugarolas, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A computer program estimates the relative position and orientation of two structures from measurements, made by use of electronic cameras and laser range finders on one structure, of distances and angular positions of fiducial objects on the other structure. The program was written specifically for use in determining errors in the alignment of large structures deployed in outer space from a space shuttle. The program is based partly on equations for transformations among the various coordinate systems involved in the measurements and on equations that account for errors in the transformation operators. It computes a least-squares estimate of the relative position and orientation. Sequential least-squares estimates, acquired at a measurement rate of 4 Hz, are averaged by passing them through a fourth-order Butterworth filter. The program is executed in a computer aboard the space shuttle, and its position and orientation estimates are displayed to astronauts on a graphical user interface.

  7. The landscape of accessible chromatin in mammalian preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingyi; Huang, Bo; Chen, He; Yin, Qiangzong; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Yunlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Liu, Bofeng; Wang, Qiujun; Xia, Weikun; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Zheng, Hui; Ming, Jia; Zhang, Wenhao; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Geng; Xu, Feng; Chang, Zai; Na, Jie; Yang, Xuerui; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-30

    In mammals, extensive chromatin reorganization is essential for reprogramming terminally committed gametes to a totipotent state during preimplantation development. However, the global chromatin landscape and its dynamics in this period remain unexplored. Here we report a genome-wide map of accessible chromatin in mouse preimplantation embryos using an improved assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) approach with CRISPR/Cas9-assisted mitochondrial DNA depletion. We show that despite extensive parental asymmetry in DNA methylomes, the chromatin accessibility between the parental genomes is globally comparable after major zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Accessible chromatin in early embryos is widely shaped by transposable elements and overlaps extensively with putative cis-regulatory sequences. Unexpectedly, accessible chromatin is also found near the transcription end sites of active genes. By integrating the maps of cis-regulatory elements and single-cell transcriptomes, we construct the regulatory network of early development, which helps to identify the key modulators for lineage specification. Finally, we find that the activities of cis-regulatory elements and their associated open chromatin diminished before major ZGA. Surprisingly, we observed many loci showing non-canonical, large open chromatin domains over the entire transcribed units in minor ZGA, supporting the presence of an unusually permissive chromatin state. Together, these data reveal a unique spatiotemporal chromatin configuration that accompanies early mammalian development. PMID:27309802

  8. Role of Histone-Modifying Enzymes and Their Complexes in Regulation of Chromatin Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesJarlais, Renee; Tummino, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    In 1964, Alfrey and colleagues proposed that acetylation and methylation of histones may regulate RNA synthesis and described "the possibility that relatively minor modifications of histone structure, taking place on the intact protein molecule, offer a means of switching-on or off RNA synthesis at different loci along the chromosome" [Allfrey, V., Faulkner, R., and Mirsky, A. (1964) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 51, 786]. Fifty years later, this prescient description provides a simple but conceptually accurate model for the biological role of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). The basic unit of chromosomes is the nucleosome, with double-stranded DNA wrapped around a histone protein oligomer. The "tails" of histone proteins are post-translationally modified, which alters the physical properties of nucleosomes in a manner that impacts gene accessibility for transcription and replication. Enzymes that catalyze the addition and removal of histone PTMs, histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs), are present in large protein complexes, with DNA-binding proteins, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, and epigenetic reader proteins that bind to post-translationally modified histone residues [Arrowsmith, C. H., Bountra, C., Fish, P. V., Lee, K., and Schapira, M. (2012) Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 11, 384-400]. The activity of HME complexes is coordinated with that of other chromatin-associated complexes that, together, regulate gene transcription, DNA repair, and DNA replication. In this context, the enzymes that catalyze addition and removal of histone PTMs are an essential component of the highly regulated mechanism for accessing compacted DNA. To fully understand the function of HMEs, the structure of nucleosomes, their natural substrate, will be described. Each major class of HMEs subsequently will be discussed with regard to its biochemistry, enzymatic mechanism, and biological function in the context of a prototypical HME complex. PMID:26745824

  9. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  10. A CADASTRAL SPATIAL DATA STORAGE STRUCTURE BASED ON RELATIONAL DATABASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a cadastral spatial data storage structure based on relational database,the method and the procedure to realize it.The paper consists of three parts.In the first part,some existing problems in some de veloped cadastral management systems are discussed.These problems are the fo llowing four.1) The security of cadastral spatial data is difficult to be assure d.2) It is difficult to varify cadastral data and the integrality of cadastral d ata is diffi cult to be kept.3) To transmit and share cadastral data is difficult.4) The effi ciency of data access is low.In the second part,t he feasibility of using relational database to store spatial data is analyzed an d a new cadastral spatial data storage structure is presented.At the same time, the related table structures and field descriptions are given,and then the merits and demerits of this storage structure are analyzed in detail.In th e last part,through a real example,the detailed methods to make the new storag e structure a reality are given.Moreover,some involving key techniques of the ne w storage structure are discussed.These techniques are:1) the application of database transaction,2) the application of database trigger,3) and the appl ication of secure recovery of database.

  11. Diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in development and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang I. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian SWI/SNF like Brg1/Brm associated factors (BAF) chromatin-remodeling complexes are able to use energy derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to change chromatin structures and regulate nuclear processes such as transcription.BAF complexes contain multiple subunits and the diverse subunit compositions provide functional specificities to BAF complexes.In this review,we summarize the functions of BAF subunits during mammalian development and in progression of various cancers.The mechanisms underlying the functional diversity and specificities of BAF complexes will be discussed.

  12. Compact complex surfaces with geometric structures related to split quaternions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the problem of existence of geometric structures on compact complex surfaces that are related to split quaternions. These structures, called para-hypercomplex, para-hyperhermitian and para-hyperkähler, are analogs of the hypercomplex, hyperhermitian and hyperkähler structures in the definite case. We show that a compact 4-manifold carries a para-hyperkähler structure iff it has a metric of split signature together with two parallel, null, orthogonal, pointwise linearly independent vector fields. Every compact complex surface admitting a para-hyperhermitian structure has vanishing first Chern class and we show that, unlike the definite case, many of these surfaces carry infinite-dimensional families of such structures. We provide also compact examples of complex surfaces with para-hyperhermitian structures which are not locally conformally para-hyperkähler. Finally, we discuss the problem of non-existence of para-hyperhermitian structures on Inoue surfaces of type S0 and provide a list of compact complex surfaces which could carry para-hypercomplex structures.

  13. Identification of alternative topological domains in chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across various r...

  14. Multiscale Identification of Topological Domains in Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Recent chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across va...

  15. Critical electrolyte concentration of silk gland chromatin of the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis, induced using agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S A; Fermino, F; Moreira, B M T; Araujo, K F; Falco, J R P; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C C

    2014-01-01

    The sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis is widely known as the main pest of sugarcane crop, causing increased damage to the entire fields. Measures to control this pest involve the use of chemicals and biological control with Cotesia flavipes wasps. In this study, we evaluated the insecticides fipronil (Frontline; 0.0025%), malathion (Malatol Bio Carb; 0.4%), cipermetrina (Galgotrin; 10%), and neem oil (Natuneem; 100%) and the herbicide nicosulfuron (Sanson 40 SC; 100%) in the posterior region silk glands of 3rd- and 5th-instar D. saccharalis by studying the variation in the critical electrolyte concentration (CEC). Observations of 3rd-instar larvae indicated that malathion, cipermetrina, and neem oil induced increased chromatin condensation that may consequently disable genes. Tests with fipronil showed no alteration in chromatin condensation. With the use of nicosulfuron, there was chromatin and probable gene decompaction. In the 5th-instar larvae, the larval CEC values indicated that malathion and neem oil induced increased chromatin condensation. The CEC values for 5th-instar larvae using cipermetrina, fipronil, and nicosulfuron indicated chromatin unpacking. These observations led us to conclude that the quantity of the pesticide does not affect the mortality of these pests, can change the conformation of complexes of DNA, RNA, and protein from the posterior region of silk gland cells of D. saccharalis, activating or repressing the expression of genes related to the defense mechanism of the insect and contributing to the selection and survival of resistant individuals. PMID:25299111

  16. Tagged Chromosomal Insertion Site System: A Method to Study Lamina-Associated Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Jennifer C; Reddy, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the genome is important for chromatin regulation. This organization is nonrandom and appears to be tightly correlated with or regulated by chromatin state and scaffolding proteins. To understand how specific DNA and chromatin elements contribute to the functional organization of the genome, we developed a new tool-the tagged chromosomal insertion site (TCIS) system-to identify and study minimal DNA sequences that drive nuclear compartmentalization and applied this system to specifically study the role of cis elements in targeting DNA to the nuclear lamina. The TCIS system allows Cre-recombinase-mediated site-directed integration of any DNA fragment into a locus tagged with lacO arrays, thus enabling both functional molecular studies and positional analysis of the altered locus. This system can be used to study the minimal DNA sequences that target the nuclear periphery (or other nuclear compartments), allowing researchers to understand how genome-wide results obtained, for example, by DNA adenine methyltransferase identification, chromosome conformation capture (HiC), or related methods, connect to the actual organization of DNA and chromosomes at the single-cell level. Finally, TCIS allows one to test roles for specific proteins in chromatin reorganization and to determine how changes in nuclear environment affect chromatin state and gene regulation at a single locus. PMID:26778570

  17. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  18. New insights into chromatin folding and dynamics from multi-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Wilma

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of roughly 150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. We have developed a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs with 3-25 evenly spaced nucleosomes. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition, spacing, and numbers on long-range communication between regulatory proteins bound to the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We have extracted effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the mesoscale simulations and introduced the potentials in a larger scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable influence of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility. Small changes in the length of the DNA fragments linking successive nucleosomes introduce marked changes in the local interactions of the nucleosomes and in the spatial configurations of the fiber as a whole. The changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of longer chromatin constructs with 100-10,000 nucleosomes. We are investigating the extent to which the `local' interactions of regularly spaced nucleosomes contribute to the corresponding interactions in chains with mixed spacings as a step toward the treatment of fibers with nucleosomes positioned at the sites mapped at base-pair resolution on genomic sequences. Support of the work by USPHS R01 GM 34809 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  20. Compact complex surfaces with geometric structures related to split quaternions

    CERN Document Server

    Davidov, Johann; Mushkarov, Oleg; Yotov, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    We study the problem of existence of geometric structures on compact complex surfaces that are related to split quaternions. These structures, called para-hypercomplex, para-hyperhermitian and para-hyperk\\"ahler are analogs of the hypercomplex, hyperhermitian and hyperk\\"ahler structures in the definite case. We show that a compact oriented 4-manifold carries a para-hyperk\\"ahler structure iff it has a metric of split signature together with two parallel, orthogonal and null vector fields. Every compact complex surface admiting a para-hyperhermitian structure has vanishing first Chern class and we show that, unlike the definite case, many of these surfaces carry infinite dimensional families of such structures. We provide also compact examples of complex surfaces with para-hyperhermitian structures which are not locally conformally para-hyperk\\"ahler. Finally, we discuss the problem of non-existence of para-hyperhermitian structures on Inoue surfaces of type $S^0$ and provide a list of compact complex surface...

  1. Integrity of Safety-Related Fast Reactor Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LMFBR contains several structural items whose integrity must be safeguarded during the life of the plant. These items include the main core support structures (strongback, diagrid) and the primary tank to which these structures are attached. In order to demonstrate an acceptable level of structural integrity, the chosen design philosophy must be supported by both analytical and experimental evidence. This paper describes the current approaches in the UK to these requirements. Section 2 describes the materials mechanical properties tests performed to date on both fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth in Type 316 austenitic stainless steel plate and weldments. This data illustrates the problems in identifying the relevant materials fracture parameters for use in assessments. Section 3 shows the test programmes in hand to extend the materials programmes to tests on structural features (mainly welded wide plate tests) which incorporate the complexity of weldments in a structural context. This includes experimental evidence on the effects of local weld residual stresses on structural failure. Various routes are open for the integrity assessment of FR structures. These are discussed in Section 4 but in effect they reduce to a fracture mechanics approach using some technique to cope with elastic-plastic fracture. The main problems at present relate to our ability in analysis to cope with residual stresses and the post-initiation region of the fracture resistance curve. Also, there is the problem of initial defect sizing by current NDE techniques. Current conservative analytical assessments give acceptable defect sizes of order a few millimetres in irradiated weldments. Finally, Section 5 discusses the options open in design to cope with safety related structures under normal and abnormal loading conditions. It is clear that several options exist in design to satisfy the demand for high integrity

  2. SF3B1 Association with Chromatin Determines Splicing Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Kfir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Much remains unknown concerning the mechanism by which the splicing machinery pinpoints short exons within intronic sequences and how splicing factors are directed to their pre-mRNA targets. One probable explanation lies in differences in chromatin organization between exons and introns. Proteomic, co-immunoprecipitation, and sedimentation analyses described here indicate that SF3B1, an essential splicing component of the U2 snRNP complex, is strongly associated with nucleosomes. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses reveal that SF3B1 specifically binds nucleosomes located at exonic positions. SF3B1 binding is enriched at nucleosomes positioned over short exons flanked by long introns that are also characterized by differential GC content between exons and introns. Disruption of SF3B1 binding to such nucleosomes affects splicing of these exons similarly to SF3B1 knockdown. Our findings suggest that the association of SF3B1 with nucleosomes is functionally important for splice-site recognition and that SF3B1 conveys splicing-relevant information embedded in chromatin structure.

  3. Calculation of structurally related properties of bulk and surface Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-consistent pseudopotential method is applied to study the bulk and surface structurally related properties of Si. Equilibrium configurations are determined by minimizing the total energy of the system; the calculated bulk properties and the surface relaxation of Si are found to be in good agreement with experiment. The surface energy and the surface reconstruction of Si are briefly discussed

  4. Learning Queries for Relational, Semi-structured, and Graph Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Ciucanu, Radu

    2013-01-01

    International audience Web applications store their data within various database models, such as relational, semi-structured, and graph data models to name a few. We study learning algorithms for queries for the above mentioned models. As a further goal, we aim to apply the results to learning cross-model database mappings, which can also be seen as queries across different schemas.

  5. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibria measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical-mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quantitative models for the regulation of gene expression.

  6. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn2+ complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn2+ similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn2+-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1

  7. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  8. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin;

    2014-01-01

    protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine......Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date......, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  9. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  10. PTEN Interacts with Histone H1 and Controls Chromatin Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hong Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and dynamics are integral to global gene transcription. Histone modification influences chromatin status and gene expression. PTEN plays multiple roles in tumor suppression, development, and metabolism. Here, we report on the interplay of PTEN, histone H1, and chromatin. We show that loss of PTEN leads to dissociation of histone H1 from chromatin and decondensation of chromatin. PTEN deletion also results in elevation of histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16, an epigenetic marker for chromatin activation. We found that PTEN and histone H1 physically interact through their C-terminal domains. Disruption of the PTEN C terminus promotes the chromatin association of MOF acetyltransferase and induces H4K16 acetylation. Hyperacetylation of H4K16 impairs the association of PTEN with histone H1, which constitutes regulatory feedback that may reduce chromatin stability. Our results demonstrate that PTEN controls chromatin condensation, thus influencing gene expression. We propose that PTEN regulates global gene transcription profiling through histones and chromatin remodeling.

  11. Structure of the lepidopteran proboscis in relation to feeding guild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Matthew S; Beard, Charles E; Gerard, Patrick D; Kornev, Konstantin G; Adler, Peter H

    2016-02-01

    Most butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) use modified mouthparts, the proboscis, to acquire fluids. We quantified the proboscis architecture of five butterfly species in three families to test the hypothesis that proboscis structure relates to feeding guild. We used scanning electron microscopy to elucidate the fine structure of the proboscis of both sexes and to quantify dimensions, cuticular patterns, and the shapes and sizes of sensilla and dorsal legulae. Sexual dimorphism was not detected in the proboscis structure of any species. A hierarchical clustering analysis of overall proboscis architecture reflected lepidopteran phylogeny, but did not produce a distinct group of flower visitors or of puddle visitors within the flower visitors. Specific characters of the proboscis, nonetheless, can indicate flower and nonflower visitors, such as the configuration of sensilla styloconica, width of the lower branches of dorsal legulae, presence or absence of dorsal legulae at the extreme apex, and degree of proboscis tapering. We suggest that the overall proboscis architecture of Lepidoptera reflects a universal structural organization that promotes fluid uptake from droplets and films. On top of this fundamental structural organization, we suggest that the diversity of floral structure has selected for structural adaptations that facilitate entry of the proboscis into floral tubes. PMID:26589780

  12. Commutator relations reveal solvable structures in unambiguous state discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a criterion, based on three commutator relations, that allows us to decide whether two self-adjoint matrices with non-overlapping support are simultaneously unitarily similar to quasi-diagonal matrices, i.e., whether they can be simultaneously brought into a diagonal structure with (2 x 2)-dimensional blocks. Application of this criterion to unambiguous state discrimination provides a systematic test whether the given problem is reducible to a solvable structure. As an example, we discuss unambiguous state comparison. (fast track communication)

  13. Prevalence of X-chromatin in Jordanian women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of X-chromatin among Jordanian women at different age groups. Results will be compared with other studies for possible racial and environmental effects on X-chromatin distribution. Blood samples were drawn from all women subjected to this study by finger prick and stained with Wright's stain. X-chromatin positive polymorphonuclear cells were counted and corrected for percentage. Samples were taken during the late 2002 and early 2003 from healthy women attending routine checkup in health centers in Northern Jordan. The number of X-chromatin was highest in the 50 and above years age group. The number of X-chromatin was 14-18% in other age groups. These results were in accordance with other studies. It seems that racial and environmental factors are ineffective on distribution of X-chromatin in Jordanian women. These data could be used as as reference for further studies. (author)

  14. Structured IR illumination for relative depth sensing in virtual interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Bernard; Raulot, Victorien; Grossman, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Depth mapping or depth sensing has become a popular field, applied not only to automotive sensing for collision avoidance (radar) but also to gesture sensing for gaming and virtual interfaces (optical). Popular gesture sensing devices such as the Kinect from Microsoft's Xbox gaming device produce a full absolute depth map, which is in most cases not adapted to the task on hand (relative gesture sensing). We propose in this paper a new gesture sensing technique through structured IR illumination to provide a relative depth mapping rather than an absolute one, and this reducing the requirements on computing power and therefore enabling this technology for wearable computing such as see through display.

  15. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models are......The composition of glass can be varied continuously within their glass-forming regions. This compositional flexibility makes it possible to tailor the properties of a glass for a variety of specific uses. In the industry such tailoring is done on a trial-and-error basis with only the intuition of a...... proposed based on topological selection rules and experimentally verified. The relation between structure and properties is evaluated using topological constraint theory, which in its essence is a theory that quantifies the two intuitions of the glass scientist. The end result is a quantitative model...

  16. Material relation to assess the crashworthiness of ship structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, Sören

    2009-01-01

    A ship collision accident can result in severe environmental damage and loss of life. Therefore the non-linear finite element method with shell elements is used to assess the crashworthiness of ship steel structures through collision simulations. However, a non-linear finite element-based benchmark revealed inconsistencies and inaccuracies in the results of collision analysis using current material relations and failure criteria. To overcome these problems in this thesis, the steel material's...

  17. The optimal industry structure in a vertically related market

    OpenAIRE

    Fiocco, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    We consider a vertically related market characterized by down- stream imperfect competition and by the monopolistic provision of an essential facility-based input, whose price is set by a social-welfare maximizing regulator. Our model shows that the regulatory knowl- edge about the cost for providing the monopolistic input crucially af- fects the design of the optimal industry structure. In particular, we compare ownership separation, which prevents a single company from having the control of...

  18. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Wu

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene.

  19. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Shi, Zhen; Cui, Mingxue; Han, Min; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:22412383

  20. Proteins of the origin recognition complex (ORC and DNA topoisomerases on mammalian chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baack Martina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of DNA replication requires the separation of complementary DNA strands. In this process, the unwinding of circularly closed or long DNA duplices leads to torsional tensions which must be released by topoisomerases. So topoisomerases play an important role in DNA replication. In order to provide more information about topoisomerases in the initiation of mammalian replication, we investigated whether topoisomerases occur close to ORC in the chromatin of cultured human HeLa cells. Results We have used different cell fractionation procedures, namely salt and nuclease treatment of isolated nuclei as well as formaldehyde-mediated cross-linking of chromatin, to investigate the distribution of topoisomerases and proteins of the origin recognition complex (ORC in the chromatin of human HeLa cells. First we obtained no evidence for a physical interaction of either topoisomerase I or topoisomerase II with ORC. Then we found, however, that (Orc1-5 and topo II occurred together on chromatin fragments of 600 and more bp lengths. At last we showed that both topo II and Orc2 protein are enriched near the origin at the human MCM4 gene, and at least some of the topo II at the origin is active in proliferating HeLa cells. So taken together, topoisomerase II, but not topoisomerase I, is located close to ORC on chromatin. Conclusion Topoisomerase II is more highly expressed than ORC proteins in mammalian cells, so only a small fraction of total chromatin-bound topoisomerase II was found in the vicinity of ORC. The precise position of topo II relative to ORC may differ among origins.

  1. Informal Numeracy Skills: The Structure and Relations among Numbering, Relations, and Arithmetic Operations in Preschool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpura, David J.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Validating the structure of informal numeracy skills is critical to understanding the developmental trajectories of mathematics skills at early ages; however, little research has been devoted to construct evaluation of the Numbering, Relations, and Arithmetic Operations domains. This study was designed to address this knowledge gap by examining…

  2. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC). Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron mic...

  3. Combinatorial epigenetic patterns as quantitative predictors of chromatin biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cieślik, Marcin; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method for characterizing the epigenetic states of chromatin on a genomic scale. With the recent availability of large genome-wide data sets, often comprising several epigenetic marks, novel approaches are required to explore functionally relevant interactions between histone modifications. Computational discovery of "chromatin states" defined by such combinatorial interactions enabled desc...

  4. Single-epitope recognition imaging of native chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Hongda; Dalal Yamini; Henikoff Steven; Lindsay Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Direct visualization of chromatin has the potential to provide important insights into epigenetic processes. In particular, atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize single nucleosomes under physiological ionic conditions. However, AFM has mostly been applied to chromatin that has been reconstituted in vitro, and its potential as a tool for the dissection of native nucleosomes has not been explored. Recently we applied AFM to native Drosophila chromatin containing the ce...

  5. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  6. From the chromatin interaction network to the organization of the human genome into replication N/U-domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the mammalian nucleus is now being unraveled thanks to the recent development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) technologies. Here we report the results of a combined multiscale analysis of genome-wide mean replication timing and chromatin conformation data that reveal some intimate relationships between chromatin folding and human DNA replication. We previously described megabase replication N/U-domains as mammalian multiorigin replication units, and showed that their borders are ‘master’ replication initiation zones that likely initiate cascades of origin firing responsible for the stereotypic replication of these domains. Here, we demonstrate that replication N/U-domains correspond to the structural domains of self-interacting chromatin, and that their borders act as insulating regions both in high-throughput 3C (Hi-C) data and high-resolution 3C (4C) experiments. Further analyses of Hi-C data using a graph-theoretical approach reveal that N/U-domain borders are long-distance, interconnected hubs of the chromatin interaction network. Overall, these results and the observation that a well-defined ordering of chromatin states exists from N/U-domain borders to centers suggest that ‘master’ replication initiation zones are at the heart of a high-order, epigenetically controlled 3D organization of the human genome. (paper)

  7. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  8. H3K9 acetylation and radial chromatin positioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strašák, Luděk; Bártová, Eva; Harničarová, Andrea; Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Krejčí, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 1 (2009), s. 91-101. ISSN 0021-9541 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5004306; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GP310/07/P480 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin structure * RIDGE and anti-RIDGE regions * H3K9 acetylation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.586, year: 2009

  9. The Gd14Ag51 structure type and its relation to some complex amalgam structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The Gd14Ag51 structure type has been revisited on the basis of single crystal diffraction data. • Symmetry analysis from electron density and TEM shows the space group P6/m to be true. • Gd14Ag51 shows good metallic behaviour. • Structure relations to alkali, alkaline-earth and rare-earth metal amalgams can be established. • Complexity values for the RE14Ag51 structure family were calculated. - Abstract: A plethora of binary and ternary intermetallic compounds has been assigned to the Gd14Ag51 structure type, crystallising in the hexagonal system (space group P6/m, a = 1264.30(18) pm, c = 933.58(11) pm for Gd14Ag51). Starting in the late 1960s, much work has been invested in the structural elucidation of these crystal structures. However, reliable single crystal data are scarce, and most structure type assignments have been performed merely on the basis of powder data. We have redetermined four representatives of the binary RE14Ag51 structure type (RE = Y, Ce, Gd, Tb) with modern high-precision single crystal X-ray methods. The assignment of the Gd14Ag51 structure type to space group P6/m was additionally verified by careful analysis of high resolution transmission electron micrographs. We emphasise the close relation of the Gd14Ag51 structure type to the structures of some recently described amalgams of similar composition focussing on disorder phenomena and structural complexity. Furthermore, we provide detailed information on synthesis as well as electrical and magnetic properties for Gd14Ag51, the parent compound of this structure family

  10. Structure-Based Alignment and Consensus Secondary Structures for Three HIV-Related RNA Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Lavender

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available HIV and related primate lentiviruses possess single-stranded RNA genomes. Multiple regions of these genomes participate in critical steps in the viral replication cycle, and the functions of many RNA elements are dependent on the formation of defined structures. The structures of these elements are still not fully understood, and additional functional elements likely exist that have not been identified. In this work, we compared three full-length HIV-related viral genomes: HIV-1NL4-3, SIVcpz, and SIVmac (the latter two strains are progenitors for all HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains, respectively. Model-free RNA structure comparisons were performed using whole-genome structure information experimentally derived from nucleotide-resolution SHAPE reactivities. Consensus secondary structures were constructed for strongly correlated regions by taking into account both SHAPE probing structural data and nucleotide covariation information from structure-based alignments. In these consensus models, all known functional RNA elements were recapitulated with high accuracy. In addition, we identified multiple previously unannotated structural elements in the HIV-1 genome likely to function in translation, splicing and other replication cycle processes; these are compelling targets for future functional analyses. The structure-informed alignment strategy developed here will be broadly useful for efficient RNA motif discovery.

  11. Relation of tropical cyclone structure with thundersorm activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, B. M.; Permyakov, M. S.; Potalova, E. Yu.; Cherneva, N. V.; Holzworth, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Synoptic and mesoscale cyclone systems over an ocean and seas are often accompanied by thunderstorm activity, which intensity and spatial distribution are modulated by the dynamic structure of these systems. The paper considers a method connecting the parameters of this thunderstorm activity with weather system structures over oceans and seas with mesoscale formation intensities and forms in these systems determined by driving wind vortex fields of scatterometers and by satellite images in visible and infrared ranges. On the example of separate tropical cyclones (TC) of 2005-2013, the relation of lightning discharge frequency and density in the TC area of influence and spatial distribution of driving wind vortex is shown. The work was supported by the Russian-American Grant RUG1-7084-PA- 13 in the area of fundamental researches of FEB RAS and CRDF.

  12. Deterioration of Safety Related Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Chul; Cho, Myung Sug; Suh, Young Pyue; Jung, Hyung Jin; Pang, Gi Sung [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang Hwa; Kim, Keung Hwan; Park, Heung Seik; You, Young Chan; Kim, Do Gyeum; Jeong, Youn Ju; Lee, Jong Suk [Korea Institute of Construction Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    In general, the Safety Related Concrete Structures(SRCS) in nuclear power plants are progressively deteriorated as the total service life is increased. The deterioration of SRCS becomes major concern in the maintenance of the nuclear power plants since the failure of SRCS can cause safety problems. To ensure safety of SRCS, the maintenance of SRCS should be conducted according to the reliable maintenance techniques. For this reason, this study to evaluate the soundness of the existing SRCS and to develop an advanced maintenance technique which is named Structural Aging Maintenance System(SAMS), especially for the efficient treatment of deteriorated SRCS. SAMS can handle input/output and search/control of the results, detection of deterioration causes by using Deterioration Diagnosis System(DDS), and establishment of the maintenance plan which including repairs and retrofit. (author). 82 refs., 46 figs.

  13. ISINN-2. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain the materials presented at the Second International Seminar on Neutron-Nucleus Interactions (ISINN-2) dealing with the problems of neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics. The Seminar took place in Dubna on April 26-28, 1994. Over 120 scientists from Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Holland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, US and about 10 Russian research institutes took part in the Seminar. The main problems discussed are the following: P-odd and P-even angular correlation and T-reversal invariance in neutron reactions, nuclear structure investigations by neutron capture, the mechanism of neutron reactions, nuclear fission processes, as well as neutron data for nuclear astrophysics

  14. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  15. Nuclear envelope proteins and chromatin arrangement: a pathogenic mechanism for laminopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Maraldi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the nuclear envelope in the modulation of chromatin organization is strongly suggested by the increasing number of human diseases due to mutations of nuclear envelope proteins. A common feature of these diseases, named laminopathies, is the occurrence of major chromatin defects. Laminopathies share in some instances their clinical features, but each of them is characterized by a phenotype that involves one or multiple tissues.We previously reported that cells from laminopathic patients show an altered nuclear profile, and loss or detachment of heterochromatin from the nuclear envelope. Recent evidence indicates that processing of the lamin A precursor is altered in laminopathies featuring pre-mature aging and/or lipodystrophy phenotype. In these cases, pre-lamin A is accumulated in the nucleus and heterochromatin is severely disorganized. Moreover, altered distribution and solubility properties of heterochromatin-associated proteins such as HP1 are observed. These findings indicate that defects of chromatin remodeling are involved in the cascade of epigenetic events leading to the laminopathic phenotypes. Here we report evidence indicating that pre-lamin A is mis-localized in the nuclei of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy fibroblasts, either bearing lamin A/C or emerin mutations. Abnornal pre-lamin A-containing structures are formed following treatment with a farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, a drug that causes accumulation of non-farnesylated pre-lamin A. Pre-lamin A-labeled structures co-localize with heterochromatin clumps. These data indicate that in almost all laminopathies the expression of the mutant lamin A precursor disrupts the organization of heterochromatin domains so that affected cells are unable to maintain the silenced chromatin state capable to allow/preserve terminal differentiation. Our results further show that the absence of emerin expression alters the distribution of pre-lamin A and of heterochromatin

  16. Measurement of local relative displacements in large structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesauro, Angelo; Eder, Martin Alexander; Nielsen, Magda

    2014-01-01

    and capable of measuring 3D local displacements with a high degree of accuracy. In this article, the technique is used to measure local deformations in the vicinity of the adhesive trailing edge joint of a wind turbine rotor blade. The SDMS results correspond well with another independent measurement...... particular. The measurement of small local relative displacements in structures subjected to large global deformations is complex and hardly feasible with conventional measurement methods. Therefore, a Small Displacement Measurement System (SDMS) has been devised. The SDMS is based on stereo photogrammetry...

  17. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression

  19. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Majumder, Parijat [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Chakraborty, Payal [Bionivid Technology Pvt Ltd, Kasturi Nagar, Bangalore 560043 (India); Jana, Kuladip [Division of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Translational Animal Research, Bose Institute, P-1/12 C.I.T. Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700054, West Bengal (India); Das, Chandrima, E-mail: chandrima.das@saha.ac.in [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Dasgupta, Dipak, E-mail: dipak.dasgupta@saha.ac.in [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-10

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression.

  20. Nuclease Footprints in Sperm Project Past and Future Chromatin Regulatory Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham D; Jodar, Meritxell; Pique-Regi, Roger; Krawetz, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear remodeling to a condensed state is a hallmark of spermatogenesis. This is achieved by replacement of histones with protamines. Regions retaining nucleosomes may be of functional significance. To determine their potential roles, sperm from wild type and transgenic mice harboring a single copy insert of the human protamine cluster were subjected to Micrococcal Nuclease-seq. CENTIPEDE, a hierarchical Bayesian model, was used to identify multiple spatial patterns, "footprints", of MNase-seq reads along the sperm genome. Regions predicted by CENTIPEDE analysis to be bound by a regulatory factor in sperm were correlated with genomic landmarks and higher order chromatin structure datasets to identify potential roles for these factors in regulating either prior or post spermatogenic, i.e., early embryonic events. This approach linked robust endogenous protamine transcription and transgene suppression to its chromatin environment within topologically associated domains. Of the candidate enhancer-bound regulatory proteins, Ctcf, was associated with chromatin domain boundaries in testes and embryonic stem cells. The continuity of Ctcf binding through the murine germline may permit rapid reconstitution of chromatin organization following fertilization. This likely reflects its preparation for early zygotic genome activation and comparatively accelerated preimplantation embryonic development program observed in mouse as compared to human and bull. PMID:27184706

  1. Influence of oncogenic transcription factors on chromatin conformation and implications in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang YA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeqing Angela Yang,1 Jung Kim,1 Jindan Yu1,21Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: In recent years, facilitated by rapid technological advances, we are becoming more adept at probing the molecular processes, which take place in the nucleus, that are crucial for the hierarchical regulation and organization of chromatin architecture. With an unprecedented level of resolution, a detailed atlas of chromosomal structures (histone displacement, variants, modifications, chromosome territories, and DNA looping and mechanisms underlying their establishment, provides invaluable insight into physiological as well as pathological phenomena. In this review, we will focus on prostate cancer, a prevalent malignancy in men worldwide, and for which a curative treatment strategy is yet to be attained. We aim to catalog the most frequently observed oncogenic alterations associated with chromatin conformation, while emphasizing the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, which is found in more than one-half of prostate cancer patients and its functions in compromising the chromatin landscape in prostate cancer.Keywords: chromatin conformation, ERG, prostate cancer

  2. A Method to Study the Epigenetic Chromatin States of Rare Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells; MiniChIP–Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishaupt Holger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic chromatin structure is a fundamental property of gene transcriptional regulation, and has emerged as a critical modulator of physiological processes during cellular differentiation and development. Analysis of chromatin structure using molecular biology and biochemical assays in rare somatic stem and progenitor cells is key for understanding these processes but poses a great challenge because of their reliance on millions of cells. Through the development of a miniaturized genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation method (miniChIP–chip, we have documented the genome-wide chromatin states of low abundant populations that comprise hematopoietic stem cells and immediate progeny residing in murine bone marrow. In this report, we describe the miniChIP methodology that can be used for increasing an understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Application of this method will reveal the contribution of dynamic chromatin structure in regulating the function of other somatic stem cell populations, and how this process becomes perturbed in pathological conditions. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  3. Constraining cosmological ultra-large scale structure using numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Braden, Jonathan; Peiris, Hiranya V; Aguirre, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic inflation, a period of accelerated expansion in the early universe, can give rise to large amplitude ultra-large scale inhomogeneities on distance scales comparable to or larger than the observable universe. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy on the largest angular scales is sensitive to such inhomogeneities and can be used to constrain the presence of ultra-large scale structure (ULSS). We numerically evolve nonlinear inhomogeneities present at the beginning of inflation in full General Relativity to assess the CMB quadrupole constraint on the amplitude of the initial fluctuations and the size of the observable universe relative to a length scale characterizing the ULSS. To obtain a statistically significant number of simulations, we adopt a toy model in which inhomogeneities are injected along a preferred direction. We compute the likelihood function for the CMB quadrupole including both ULSS and the standard quantum fluctuations produced during inflation. We compute the posterior given...

  4. Relating reconnection rate, exhaust structure and effective resistivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic reconnection structure consists of a central diffusion region (CDR) and a cone or wedge shaped reconnection exhaust containing accelerated plasma flows and electromagnetic fluctuations. We predict here the relationship among the exhaust half-cone angle (θe), the half width (w) of the CDR, the outflow velocity Vo, and the effective resistivity (ηeff), which includes the effects of all the nonideal terms in the generalized Ohm's law. The effective resistivity is defined as the ratio of reconnection electric field Erec to the current density Jy at the X point and it essentially represents the loss of momentum from the current-carrying plasma particles due to scattering by waves, their inertia or outflux from the CDR. The relation is checked against relevant results previously reported from laboratory experiments, space observations, and simulations, showing excellent agreement. The relation can be used for estimating the ad-hoc effective resistivity often used in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of reconnection

  5. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    formation of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct...

  6. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bandle, Russell; John, Sam;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on la...

  7. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, K Gh M; El-Sokary, A A E; Abdel-Ghaffar, A E; Abou El-Roos, M E A; Ahmed, Y F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (Partificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  8. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Olsen, Jesper V; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-01-01

    identified dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the...

  9. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor α target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. • FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. • Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ERα target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ERα target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ERα target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ERα-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators.

  10. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor α target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. • FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. • Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ERα target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ERα target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ERα target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ERα-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators

  11. Chromatin remodeling by curcumin alters endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Akbarizadeh, Amin Reza; Delju, Fatemeh; Rannug, Agneta

    2016-05-25

    The aim of this study was to gain more information about the mechanisms that regulate expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) target gene CYP1A1. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh7) and human immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT) were treated with different concentrations of the dietary polyphenolic compound curcumin (CUR) alone or in combination with the natural AHR agonist 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). In an earlier study, we described that CUR can activate the AHR indirectly by inhibiting metabolic clearance of FICZ. Here, we measured cell viability, activation of AHR signaling, oxidative stress and histone modifying activities in response to CUR at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 50 μM. We observed apparent non-linear responses on cell viability and activation of AHR signaling. The CYP1A1 expression and the CYP1A1 enzyme activity in the presence of CUR reflected the histone acetylation efficiency observed in nuclear extracts. At the lowest concentration, CUR significantly decreased histone deacetylase activity and increased the FICZ-induced CYP1A1 activity. In contrast, at the highest concentration, CUR increased the formation of reactive oxygen species, significantly inhibited histone acetylation, and temporally decreased FICZ-induced CYP1A1 activity. The results suggest that CUR can both increase and decrease the accessibility of DNA and thereby influence transcriptional responses to the ligand-activated AHR. This suggestion was supported by the fact that chromatin remodeling treatments with trichostatin A, p300, or 5-aza-dC increased CYP1A1 transcription. We conclude that the AHR-dependent transcriptional efficiency is modified by factors that influence the cellular redox status and the chromatin structure. PMID:27041069

  12. Data on the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-09-01

    Here, we use LC-MS/MS and SWATH-MS to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos (DREX). This system allows easy manipulation of distinct aspects of chromatin assembly such as post-translational histone modifications, the levels of histone chaperones and the concentration of distinct DNA binding factors. In total, 480 proteins have been quantified as chromatin enriched factors and their binding kinetics have been monitored in the time course of 15 min, 1 h and 4 h of chromatin assembly. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach, Völker-Albert et al., 2016 "A quantitative proteomic analysis of in vitro assembled chromatin" [1], has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier submission number PRIDE: PXD002537 and PRIDE: PXD003445. PMID:27331114

  13. Chromatin-based epigenetics of adult subventricular zone neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eGonzales-Roybal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In specific regions of the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs generate new neurons throughout life. Emerging evidence indicate that chromatin-based transcriptional regulation is a key epigenetic mechanism for the life-long function of adult NSCs. In the adult mouse brain, NSCs in the subventricular zone (SVZ retain the ability to produce both neurons and glia for the life of the animal. In this review, we discuss the origin and function of SVZ NSCs as they relate to key epigenetic concepts of development and potential underlying mechanism of chromatin-based transcriptional regulation. A central point of discussion is how SVZ NSCs – which possess many characteristics of mature, non-neurogenic astrocytes – maintain a youthful ability to produce both neuronal and glial lineages. In addition to reviewing data regarding the function of chromatin-modifying factors in SVZ neurogenesis, we incorporate our growing understanding that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs serve as an important element to chromatin-based transcriptional regulation, including that of SVZ NSCs. Discoveries regarding the epigenetic mechanisms of adult SVZ NSCs may provide key insights into fundamental principles of adult stem cell biology as well as the more complex and dynamic developmental environment of the embryonic brain.

  14. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  15. The Structure of Relations among Neighbours in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Tołłoczko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Structure of Relations among Neighbours in CroatiaThe article discusses the study carried out by Croatian researchers from the Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar. The research was realized through face-to-face interviews conducted between March and May 2014. It’s goal was to investigate the structure of local social relations by exploring the frequency and density of interactions between neighbours. Obtained data was analysed according to the demographic and socioeconomic background of the responders. The article includes a short introduction into the issue of neighbourhood patterns in Croatia which is described in the context of broader, global changes. After reviewing the research theoretical and methodological assumptions I present and discuss its findings. The summary suggests some problems and inspirations for further exploration in the matter of neighbourhood relations. Struktura relacji międzysąsiedzkich w ChorwacjiArtykuł omawia prace przeprowadzone przez badaczy z Instytutu Ivo Pilar w Zagrzebiu. Wykonano serię wywiadów bezpośrednich w okresie od marca do maja 2014 r. Ich celem było przyjrzenie się strukturze lokalnych relacji społecznych poprzez zbadanie częstotliwości i głębokości interakcji między sąsiadami. Otrzymane dane zostały zanalizowane w świetle demograficznego i socjoekonomicznego profilu badanych. Artykuł zawiera krótkie wprowadzenie w problematykę wzorów sąsiedztwa w Chorwacji w szerszym, globalnym kontekście. Po omówieniu teoretycznych i metodologicznych założeń przedstawiono i przedyskutowano rezultaty badania.

  16. Histone modifications and lamin A regulate chromatin protein dynamics in early embryonic stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Melcer, Shai; Hezroni, Hadas; Rand, Eyal; Nissim-Rafinia, Malka; Skoultchi, Arthur; Stewart, Colin L.; Bustin, Michael; Meshorer, Eran

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are characterized by unique epigenetic features including decondensed chromatin and hyperdynamic association of chromatin proteins with chromatin. Here we investigate the potential mechanisms that regulate chromatin plasticity in embryonic stem cells. Using epigenetic drugs and mutant embryonic stem cells lacking various chromatin proteins, we find that histone acetylation, G9a-mediated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation and lamin A expression, all affect chromatin pr...

  17. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po;

    2014-01-01

    such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC...

  18. The structure of the pelagic food web in relation to water column structure in the Skagerrak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Kaas, H.; Kruse, B.;

    1990-01-01

    a deep mixed layer. Thus a 'microbial loop' type of food web seemed to be evolving in the central, strongly stratified parts of the Skagerrak, while a shorter 'classical' type of food web appeared to dominate along the margin. The relation between food web structure and vertical mixing processes...

  19. Nanoscale changes in chromatin organization represent the initial steps of tumorigenesis: a transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear alterations are a well-known manifestation of cancer. However, little is known about the early, microscopically-undetectable stages of malignant transformation. Based on the phenomenon of field cancerization, the tissue in the field of a tumor can be used to identify and study the initiating events of carcinogenesis. Morphological changes in nuclear organization have been implicated in the field of colorectal cancer (CRC), and we hypothesize that characterization of chromatin alterations in the early stages of CRC will provide insight into cancer progression, as well as serve as a biomarker for early detection, risk stratification and prevention. For this study we used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of nuclei harboring pre-neoplastic CRC alterations in two models: a carcinogen-treated animal model of early CRC, and microscopically normal-appearing tissue in the field of human CRC. We quantify the chromatin arrangement using approaches with two levels of complexity: 1) binary, where chromatin is separated into areas of dense heterochromatin and loose euchromatin, and 2) grey-scale, where the statistics of continuous mass-density distribution within the nucleus is quantified by its spatial correlation function. We established an increase in heterochromatin content and clump size, as well as a loss of its characteristic peripheral positioning in microscopically normal pre-neoplastic cell nuclei. Additionally, the analysis of chromatin density showed that its spatial distribution is altered from a fractal to a stretched exponential. We characterize quantitatively and qualitatively the nanoscale structural alterations preceding cancer development, which may allow for the establishment of promising new biomarkers for cancer risk stratification and diagnosis. The findings of this study confirm that ultrastructural changes of chromatin in field carcinogenesis represent early neoplastic events leading to the development of well

  20. Three-Dimensional, Live-Cell Imaging of Chromatin Dynamics in Plant Nuclei Using Chromatin Tagging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    In plants, chromatin dynamics spatiotemporally change in response to various environmental stimuli. However, little is known about chromatin dynamics in the nuclei of plants. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional, live-cell imaging method that can monitor chromatin dynamics in nuclei via a chromatin tagging system that can visualize specific genomic loci in living plant cells. The chromatin tagging system is based on a bacterial operator/repressor system in which the repressor is fused to fluorescent proteins. A recent refinement of promoters for the system solved the problem of gene silencing and abnormal pairing frequencies between operators. Using this system, we can detect the spatiotemporal dynamics of two homologous loci as two fluorescent signals within a nucleus and monitor the distance between homologous loci. These live-cell imaging methods will provide new insights into genome organization, development processes, and subnuclear responses to environmental stimuli in plants. PMID:27557696

  1. ISINN-3. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain the materials presented at the Third International Seminar on Neutron-Nucleus Interactions (ISINN-3) dealing with the problems of neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics. The Seminar took place in Dubna on April 26-28, 1995. Over 100 scientists from Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Slovakia, Ukraine, USA and from more than 10 Russian research institutes took part in the Seminar. The Seminar is dedicated to the memory of the founder of the Neutron Physics Laboratory of JINR, the famous soviet scientist Professor Fedor L. Shapiro, whose 80th anniversary is being observed. The main problems discussed are the following: fundamental interactions and symmetries in neutron-induced reactions, fundamental properties of the neutron, properties of excited nuclei after neutron capture and some other ones. Special emphasis is laid upon γ decay and neutron induced nuclear fission as well as upon the methodical aspects of new experiments

  2. Packing regularities in biological structures relate to their dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Robert L; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The high packing density inside proteins leads to certain geometric regularities and also is one of the most important contributors to the high extent of cooperativity manifested by proteins in their cohesive domain motions. The orientations between neighboring nonbonded residues in proteins substantially follow the similar geometric regularities, regardless of whether the residues are on the surface or buried, a direct result of hydrophobicity forces. These orientations are relatively fixed and correspond closely to small deformations from those of the face-centered cubic lattice, which is the way in which identical spheres pack at the highest density. Packing density also is related to the extent of conservation of residues, and we show this relationship for residue packing densities by averaging over a large sample or residue packings. There are three regimes: (1) over a broad range of packing densities the relationship between sequence entropy and inverse packing density is nearly linear, (2) over a limited range of low packing densities the sequence entropy is nearly constant, and (3) at extremely low packing densities the sequence entropy is highly variable. These packing results provide important justification for the simple elastic network models that have been shown for a large number of proteins to represent protein dynamics so successfully, even when the models are extremely coarse grained. Elastic network models for polymeric chains are simple and could be combined with these protein elastic networks to represent partially denatured parts of proteins. Finally, we show results of applications of the elastic network model to study the functional motions of the ribosome, based on its known structure. These results indicate expected correlations among its components for the step-wise processing steps in protein synthesis, and suggest ways to use these elastic network models to develop more detailed mechanisms, an important possibility because most

  3. Cosmological nonlinear structure formation in full general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, José M.; Alcubierre, Miguel; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Núñez, Darío

    2014-12-01

    We perform numerical evolutions of cosmological scenarios using a standard general relativistic code in spherical symmetry. We concentrate on two different situations: initial matter distributions that are homogeneous and isotropic, and perturbations to those that respect the spherical symmetry. As matter models we consider the case of a pressureless perfect fluid, i.e. dust, and the case of a real massive scalar field oscillating around the minimum of the potential. Both types of matter have been considered as possible dark matter candidates in the cosmology literature, dust being closely related to the standard cold dark matter paradigm. We confirm that in the linear regime the perturbations associated with these types of matter grow in essentially the same way, the main difference being that in the case of a scalar field the dynamics introduce a cutoff in the power spectrum of the density perturbations at scales comparable with the Compton wavelength of the field. We also follow the evolutions well beyond the linear regime showing that both models are able to form structure. In particular we find that, once in the nonlinear regime, perturbations collapse faster in a universe dominated by dust. This is expected to delay the formation of the first structures in the scalar field dark matter scenario with respect to the standard cold dark matter one.

  4. Structure of some relative relation modules of finite p-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Let G be a finite p-group generated by (gi, 1 ≤ i ≤ d), Gi the cyclic subgroup generated by gi, E the free product of the Gi, 1 ≤ i ≤ d, and S the kernel of the natural epimorphism of E onto G. The largest elementary abelian p-quotient S-circumflex = S/S'Sp, regarded as an IFpG-module via conjugation in E, is called a relative relation module of G. If d is the minimum number of generaters for G, the author has proved that S-circumflex is nonprojective and indecomposable. The aim of this paper is to give an alternative proof for the indecomposability of S-circumflex; the proof here is more informative as it deals with Loewy structure and generating sets of S-circumflex and other associated modules. (author). 9 refs

  5. Agency-Structure Relation in Social Sciences: Reflections on Policy Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    D. Daniel Kipo

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses important and highly contested agency and structure issue in philosophy of social science. The agency-structure relation focuses on autonomy and control. It draws more insights from Giddens thinking. Also, the paper discusses agency-structure relation in policy implementation. Discussions start with conceptualizations of agents, agency, structure and power relations between agency-structure. The paper specifically highlights problematics in agency-structure and relates the...

  6. Ubiquitous heterogeneity and asymmetry of the chromatin environment at regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundaje, Anshul; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Libbrecht, Max; Smith, Cheryl L; Raha, Debasish; Winters, Elliott E; Johnson, Steven M; Snyder, Michael; Batzoglou, Serafim; Sidow, Arend

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulation at functional elements (e.g., enhancers, promoters, insulators) is governed by an interplay of nucleosome remodeling, histone modifications, and transcription factor binding. To enhance our understanding of gene regulation, the ENCODE Consortium has generated a wealth of ChIP-seq data on DNA-binding proteins and histone modifications. We additionally generated nucleosome positioning data on two cell lines, K562 and GM12878, by MNase digestion and high-depth sequencing. Here we relate 14 chromatin signals (12 histone marks, DNase, and nucleosome positioning) to the binding sites of 119 DNA-binding proteins across a large number of cell lines. We developed a new method for unsupervised pattern discovery, the Clustered AGgregation Tool (CAGT), which accounts for the inherent heterogeneity in signal magnitude, shape, and implicit strand orientation of chromatin marks. We applied CAGT on a total of 5084 data set pairs to obtain an exhaustive catalog of high-resolution patterns of histone modifications and nucleosome positioning signals around bound transcription factors. Our analyses reveal extensive heterogeneity in how histone modifications are deposited, and how nucleosomes are positioned around binding sites. With the exception of the CTCF/cohesin complex, asymmetry of nucleosome positioning is predominant. Asymmetry of histone modifications is also widespread, for all types of chromatin marks examined, including promoter, enhancer, elongation, and repressive marks. The fine-resolution signal shapes discovered by CAGT unveiled novel correlation patterns between chromatin marks, nucleosome positioning, and sequence content. Meta-analyses of the signal profiles revealed a common vocabulary of chromatin signals shared across multiple cell lines and binding proteins. PMID:22955985

  7. Phosphorylation-Dependent Targeting of Tetrahymena HP1 to Condensed Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale, Katerina; Tackett, Alan J; Neuman, Monica; Bulley, Emily; Chait, Brian T; Wiley, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved proteins related to heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), originally described in Drosophila, are well known for their roles in heterochromatin assembly and gene silencing. Targeting of HP1 proteins to specific chromatin locales is mediated, at least in part, by the HP1 chromodomain, which binds to histone H3 methylated at lysine 9 that marks condensed regions of the genome. Mechanisms that regulate HP1 targeting are emerging from studies with yeast and metazoans and point to roles for posttranslational modifications. Here, we report that modifications of an HP1 homolog (Hhp1) in the ciliate model Tetrahymena thermophila correlated with the physiological state and with nuclear differentiation events involving the restructuring of chromatin. Results support the model in which Hhp1 chromodomain binds lysine 27-methylated histone H3, and we show that colocalization with this histone mark depends on phosphorylation at a single Cdc2/Cdk1 kinase site in the "hinge region" adjacent to the chromodomain. These findings help elucidate important functional roles of reversible posttranslational modifications of proteins in the HP1 family, in this case, regulating the targeting of a ciliate HP1 to chromatin regions marked with methylated H3 lysine 27. IMPORTANCE Compacting the genome to various degrees influences processes that use DNA as a template, such as gene transcription and replication. This project was aimed at learning more about the cellular mechanisms that control genome compaction. Posttranslational modifications of proteins involved in genome condensation are emerging as potentially important points of regulation. To help elucidate protein modifications and how they affect the function of condensation proteins, we investigated the phosphorylation of the chromatin protein called Hhp1 in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. This is one of the first functional investigations of these modifications of a nonhistone chromatin

  8. The role of chromatin insulators in nuclear architecture and genome function

    OpenAIRE

    Van Bortle, Kevin; Corces, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are intricately arranged into highly organized yet dynamic structures that underlie patterns of gene expression and cellular identity. The recent adaptation of novel genomic strategies for assaying nuclear architecture has significantly extended and accelerated our ability to query the nature of genome organization and the players involved. In particular, recent explorations of physical arrangements and chromatin landscapes in higher eukaryotes have demonstrated that chroma...

  9. Aberrant chromatin at genes encoding stem cell regulators in human mixed-lineage leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Guenther, Matthew G.; Lawton, Lee N.; Rozovskaia, Tatiana; Frampton, Garrett M.; Levine, Stuart S.; Thomas L Volkert; Croce, Carlo M.; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Canaani, Eli; Young, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins are potent inducers of leukemia, but how these proteins generate aberrant gene expression programs is poorly understood. Here we show that the MLL-AF4 fusion protein occupies developmental regulatory genes important for hematopoietic stem cell identity and self-renewal in human leukemia cells. These MLL-AF4-bound regions have grossly altered chromatin structure, with histone modifications catalyzed by trithorax group proteins and DOT1 extending acr...

  10. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham, Ariel B; Robert Bronstein; Avanish S Reddy; Mirjana Maletic-Savatic; Adan Aguirre; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2(-/-) mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation...

  11. CENP-C facilitates the recruitment of M18BP1 to centromeric chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Dambacher, Silvia; Deng, Wen; Hahn, Matthias; Sadic, Dennis; Fröhlich, Jonathan; Nuber, Alexander; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Schotta, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Centromeres are important structural constituents of chromosomes that ensure proper chromosome segregation during mitosis by providing defined sites for kinetochore attachment. In higher eukaryotes, centromeres have no specific DNA sequence and thus, they are rather determined through epigenetic mechanisms. A fundamental process in centromere establishment is the incorporation of the histone variant CENP-A into centromeric chromatin, which provides a binding platform for the other centromeric...

  12. Hinge Atlas: relating protein sequence to sites of structural flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Julie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relating features of protein sequences to structural hinges is important for identifying domain boundaries, understanding structure-function relationships, and designing flexibility into proteins. Efforts in this field have been hampered by the lack of a proper dataset for studying characteristics of hinges. Results Using the Molecular Motions Database we have created a Hinge Atlas of manually annotated hinges and a statistical formalism for calculating the enrichment of various types of residues in these hinges. Conclusion We found various correlations between hinges and sequence features. Some of these are expected; for instance, we found that hinges tend to occur on the surface and in coils and turns and to be enriched with small and hydrophilic residues. Others are less obvious and intuitive. In particular, we found that hinges tend to coincide with active sites, but unlike the latter they are not at all conserved in evolution. We evaluate the potential for hinge prediction based on sequence. Motions play an important role in catalysis and protein-ligand interactions. Hinge bending motions comprise the largest class of known motions. Therefore it is important to relate the hinge location to sequence features such as residue type, physicochemical class, secondary structure, solvent exposure, evolutionary conservation, and proximity to active sites. To do this, we first generated the Hinge Atlas, a set of protein motions with the hinge locations manually annotated, and then studied the coincidence of these features with the hinge location. We found that all of the features have bearing on the hinge location. Most interestingly, we found that hinges tend to occur at or near active sites and yet unlike the latter are not conserved. Less surprisingly, we found that hinge residues tend to be small, not hydrophobic or aliphatic, and occur in turns and random coils on the surface. A functional sequence based hinge predictor was

  13. Terahertz plasmon dispersion relation in layered semiconductor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietze, Daniel; Darmo, Juraj; Unterrainer, Karl [TU Wien (Austria). Institut fuer Photonik

    2010-07-01

    Surface guided waves, so-called plasmons, have attracted considerable attention in the past years due to their possible use for sub-wavelength confinement and guiding of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic fields. Fundamental insight into the behavior of plasmons can be obtained from their dispersion relation, which links the in-plane wave vector {beta} to the angular frequency {omega}. In general, the underlying equations are transcendental and stability of the numerical methods becomes an issue in the THz spectral range, as the characteristic frequencies are often separated by orders of magnitude. In our contribution, we present a robust method which does not require any prior knowledge about the dispersion relation or the mode structure. It is based on simplex minimization in three dimensions, a Monte-Carlo approach for the initial values and analytical expressions for the transcendental equations. Additionally, we included the possibility of conducting interfaces, which allows modeling of systems including 2DEG layers, such as HEMTS or graphene based devices. Several examples are presented which are of current technological interest.

  14. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress–displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. (paper)

  15. Characteristics of thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) chromatin in the cell-free reconstruction system. The normal-cell extract performed specific dimer excision from native chromatin and DNA isolated from 100 J/m2-irradiated cells. Such an excision in vitro was rapid and required high concentrations of extract. The extracts of XP group A, C and G cells were unable to excise from their own native-chromatin, but capable of excising from chromatin deprived of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl, as were from purified DNA. Thus, group A, C and G cells are most likely to be defective in the specific XP factors facilitating the excising activity under multicomponent regulation at the chromatin level. Further, either of group A, C and G extracts successfully complemented the native chromatin of the alternative groups. Uniquely, the XP group D extract excised dimers from native chromatin in the normal fashion under the condition. These results suggest that XP group A, C, D and G cells examined may not be defective in the dimer specific endonuclease and exonuclease per se. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  17. Effect of different thawing temperatures on the viability, in vitro fertilizing capacity and chromatin condensation of frozen boar semen packaged in 5 ml straws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Izquierdo, A; Oliva, J H; Lleó, B; García-Artiga, C; Corcuera, B D; Pérez-Gutiérrez, J F

    2006-03-01

    The effect of two different thawing temperatures on frozen boar semen viability, in vitro fertilizing capacity and chromatin condensation and stability was studied. Freeze-thaw motility, normal apical ridge (NAR), in vitro fertilizing (IVF) capacity and chromatin condensation and stability were evaluated after thawing at 42 degrees C, 40s and 50 degrees C, 40s. Chromatin condensation degree was determined by flow cytometry, using propidium iodide as fluorochrome intercalating agent, and chromatin stability was evaluated by the same procedure after inducing sperm chromatin decondensation with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The results showed that thawing straws at 42 degrees C, 40s significantly reduced motility compared to straws thawed at 50 degrees C, 40s. NAR, penetration, monospermy and polyspermy were not different between the two groups of samples thawed at different temperatures. Chromatin was significantly more compact when thawing was performed at 50 degrees C, but its stability did not show any difference relative to thawing at 42 degrees C. It is suggested that the interactions involved in chromatin overcondensation had a non-covalent nature. PMID:15975744

  18. Nucleosome Stability at the Yeast PHO5 and PHO8 Promoters Correlates with Differential Cofactor Requirements for Chromatin Opening

    OpenAIRE

    Hertel, Christina Bech; Längst, Gernot; Hörz, Wolfram; Korber, Philipp

    2005-01-01

    The coregulated PHO5 and PHO8 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provide typical examples for the role of chromatin in promoter regulation. It has been a long-standing question why the cofactors Snf2 and Gcn5 are essential for full induction of PHO8 but dispensable for opening of the PHO5 promoter. We show that this discrepancy may result from different stabilities of the two promoter chromatin structures. To test this hypothesis, we used our recently established yeast extract in vitro chromat...

  19. Human Lymphoid Translocation Fragile Zones Are Hypomethylated and Have Accessible Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R.; Tsai, Albert G.; Pardo, Carolina E.; Müschen, Markus; Kladde, Michael P.; Hsieh, Chih-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of hematopoietic malignancies. CG motifs within translocation fragile zones (typically 20 to 600 bp in size) are prone to chromosomal translocation in lymphomas. Here we demonstrate that the CG motifs in human translocation fragile zones are hypomethylated relative to the adjacent DNA. Using a methyltransferase footprinting assay on isolated nuclei (in vitro), we find that the chromatin at these fragile zones is accessible. We also examined in vivo ac...

  20. Heterochromatin and RNAi Are Required to Establish CENP-A Chromatin at Centromeres

    OpenAIRE

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L.; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C.

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to p...

  1. Lamin C and chromatin organization in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. V. Gurudatta; L. S. Shashidhara; Veena K. Parnaik

    2010-04-01

    Drosophila lamin C (LamC) is a developmentally regulated component of the nuclear lamina. The lamC gene is situated in the fifth intron of the essential gene tout velu (ttv). We carried out genetic analysis of lamC during development. Phenotypic analyses of RNAi-mediated downregulation of lamC expression as well as targeted misexpression of lamin C suggest a role for lamC in cell survival. Of particular interest in the context of laminopathies is the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by the overexpression of lamin C. Interestingly, misexpression of lamin C in the central nervous system, where it is not normally expressed, did not affect organization of the nuclear lamina. lamC mutant alleles suppressed position effect variegation normally displayed at near-centromeric and telomeric regions. Further, both downregulation and misexpression of lamin C affected the distribution of heterochromatin protein 1. Our results suggest that Drosophila lamC has a tissue-specific role during development and is required for chromatin organization.

  2. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  3. Does seminal fluid viscosity influence sperm chromatin integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, K; Padwal, V; Balaiah, D

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to investigate whether viscosity alters sperm chromatin integrity. Semen samples were obtained from 269 men attending the infertility clinic. The viscosity was measured quantitatively by needle and syringe method and the viscosity ratio was calculated against distilled water. The chromatin integrity was evaluated by in vitro decondensation test using 1% SDS and 6 mM EDTA. According to the viscosity ratios the samples were divided into 2 groups: I, normal (ratio 9, n = 30) viscosity. Chromatin integrity was significantly lower in the group with higher viscosity. Significant decrease in sperm count and motility were seen in group II as compared to group I. Thus, hyperviscosity of seminal fluid alters the sperm chromatin integrity. PMID:11028927

  4. Nuclear envelope and chromatin, lock and key of genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Sophie; Foiani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    More than as an inert separation between the inside and outside of the nucleus, the nuclear envelope (NE) constitutes an active toll, which controls the import and export of molecules, and also a hub for a diversity of genomic processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, and chromatin dynamics. Proteins localized at the inner surface of the NE (such as lamins, nuclear pore proteins, lamin-associated proteins) interact with chromatin in a dynamic manner, contributing to the establishment of topological domains. In this review, we address the complex interplay between chromatin and NE. We discuss the divergence of this cross talk during evolution and comment both on the current established models and the most recent findings. In particular, we focus our attention on how the NE cooperates with chromatin in protecting the genome integrity. PMID:26008788

  5. Relation of the Serbian cultural club related to the structure of the population of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Saša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serbian Cultural Club is an organization founded in mid-January 1937. The Club pretended to be an non-party entity with the idea of cultural renaissance and broader national homogenization of the Serbian nation in The Kingdom of Yugoslavia, as an answer to the tendency for the political division of the country according to the national basis which was realized by the Cvetković-Maček Agreement from August 26, 1939. On the basis of that Agreement, formation of the Banat of Croatia started the division of the territories and federalization of the country along the ethnic principle. Since the borders between the constitutional nations of Yugoslavia were not clear in the territory and the theoretical pretensions were very conflicting. The Serbian Cultural Club tried to answer the challenge of the newly created situation. Its activity was specially visible in Vojvodina, having in mind the structure of the population, and there was also a numerous, nationally still not completely determined group of the Bunjevci and Šokci population. In an attempt to define their attitude to Vojvodina, intellectuals from The Serbian Cultural Club discussed all 'burning' issues related to the structure of the population, too. This paper would deal with his interesting and controversial topic. .

  6. Transcriptional repression of the yeast CHA1 gene requires the chromatin-remodeling complex RSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    absence of Sth1p/Nps1p (a homolog of Swi2p/Snf2p) or of Swh3p (a homolog of Swi3p), expression of CHA1 in non-induced cells is increased to a level comparable with that of fully induced cells. Furthermore, in non-induced cells depleted for Sth1p/Nps1p or Swh3p, a nucleosome positioned over the TATA box of......In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism in...

  7. CTCF-mediated Chromatin Loop for the Posterior Hoxc Gene Expression in MEF Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyehyun; Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Chang-Pyo; Seo, Seong-Hye; Roh, Tae-Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-06-01

    Modulation of chromatin structure has been proposed as a molecular mechanism underlying the spatiotemporal collinear expression of Hox genes during development. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-mediated chromatin organization is now recognized as a crucial epigenetic mechanism for transcriptional regulation. Thus, we examined whether CTCF-mediated chromosomal conformation is involved in Hoxc gene expression by comparing wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells expressing anterior Hoxc genes with Akt1 null MEFs expressing anterior as well as posterior Hoxc genes. We found that CTCF binding between Hoxc11 and -c12 is important for CTCF-mediated chromosomal loop formation and concomitant posterior Hoxc gene expression. Hypomethylation at this site increased CTCF binding and recapitulated the chromosomal conformation and posterior Hoxc gene expression patterns observed in Akt1 null MEFs. From this work we found that CTCF at the C12|11 does not function as a barrier/boundary, instead let the posterior Hoxc genes switch their interaction from inactive centromeric to active telomeric genomic niche, and concomitant posterior Hoxc gene expression. Although it is not clear whether CTCF affects Hoxc gene expression solely through its looping activity, CTCF-mediated chromatin structural modulation could be an another tier of Hox gene regulation during development. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):436-444, 2016. PMID:27080371

  8. How does the chromatin fiber deal with topological constraints?

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2004-01-01

    In the nuclei of eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged through several levels of compaction in an orderly retrievable way that enables the correct regulation of gene expression. The functional dynamics of this assembly involves the unwinding of the so-called 30 nm chromatin fiber and accordingly imposes strong topological constraints. We present a general method for computing both the twist and the writhe of any winding pattern. An explicit derivation is implemented for the chromatin fiber which ...

  9. Structure-property relationship and transport properties of structurally related silyl carbonate electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten different substituted structurally related linear and cyclic carbonates were synthesized and investigated as electrolyte solvents for lithium-ion cells. Synthesis of the compounds, mainly silyl carbonates, was carried out via catalytic CO2 addition, nucleophilic substitution or hydrosilylation. Besides the ten synthesized compounds a binary mixture of a cyclic and linear silyl carbonate, propylene carbonate (PC), diethyl carbonate (DEC) and a binary mixture thereof were analyzed as a function of molar lithium ((bistrifluoromethyl) sulfonyl) imide LiTFSI ratio in order to develop a structure-property relationship. The extrapolation of the temperature-dependent ionic conductivities using Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) equation revealed a solvent assisted ionic transport mechanism. The strength of interaction between the lithium-ion and the respective carbonates was investigated via 13C and 29Si NMR measurements by the change of the chemical shift upon LiTFSI addition. The results show that the interaction of the lithium ion with the cyclic carbonates is much stronger compared to the linear ones and varies among the different substituents. These findings were in good accordance with ionicities represented by the Walden product. The diffusivities of Li+ and TFSI− were determined via Pulsed Field Gradient STimulated Echo (PGSTE)-NMR. The hydrodynamic radii calculated thereof demonstrate the superior coordination ability of the cyclic carbonates as compared to linear structures. Furthermore, Haven ratios indicate rather different dissociation abilities of different carbonate solvents, depending on the structural fragment of the solvents

  10. Could carnosine or related structures suppress Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, copper and zinc ions, glycating agents and reactive aldehydes, protein cross-linking and proteolytic dysfunction may all contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is a naturally-occurring, pluripotent, homeostatic agent. The olfactory lobe is normally enriched in carnosine and zinc. Loss of olfactory function and oxidative damage to olfactory tissue are early symptoms of AD. Amyloid peptide aggregates in AD brain are enriched in zinc ions. Carnosine can chelate zinc ions. Protein oxidation and glycation are integral components of the AD pathophysiology. Carnosine can suppress amyloid-beta peptide toxicity, inhibit production of oxygen free-radicals, scavenge hydroxyl radicals and reactive aldehydes, and suppresses protein glycation. Glycated protein accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients. Homocarnosine levels in human CSF dramatically decline with age. CSF composition and turnover is controlled by the choroid plexus which possesses a specific transporter for carnosine and homocarnosine. Carnosine reacts with protein carbonyls and suppress the reactivity of glycated proteins. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity is diminished in AD patient brains. Administration of CA activators improves learning in animals. Carnosine is a CA activator. Protein cross-links (gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-amino) are present in neurofibrillary tangles in AD brain. gamma-Glutamyl-carnosine has been isolated from biological tissue. Carnosine stimulates vimentin expression in cultured human fibroblasts. The protease oxidised-protein-hydrolase is co-expressed with vimentin. Carnosine stimulates proteolysis in cultured myocytes and senescent cultured fibroblasts. These observations suggest that carnosine and related structures should be explored for therapeutic potential towards AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17522447

  11. The structure of the pelagic food web in relation to water column structure in the Skagerrak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Kaas, H.; Kruse, B.; Møhlenberg, F.; Tiselius, P.; Ærtebjerg, G.

    a deep mixed layer. Thus a 'microbial loop' type of food web seemed to be evolving in the central, strongly stratified parts of the Skagerrak, while a shorter 'classical' type of food web appeared to dominate along the margin. The relation between food web structure and vertical mixing processes...... by a doming of the pycnocline, with a deep mixed layer along the periphery and a very shallow pycnocline in central parts. Average phytoplankton size increased with the depth of the upper mixed layer, and the central stratified area was characterized by small flagellates while large and chain...

  12. Gray level co-occurrence matrix algorithm as pattern recognition biosensor for oxidopamine-induced changes in lymphocyte chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor; Dimitrijevic, Draga; Nesic, Dejan; Petrovic, Danica

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate that a proapoptotic chemical agent, oxidopamine, induces dose dependent changes in chromatin textural patterns which can be quantified using the Gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) method. Peripheral blood (heparin-pretreated) samples were treated with oxidopamine (6-OHDA, 6-hydroxydopamine) to achieve effective concentrations of 100, 200 and 300µM. The samples were smeared on microscope slides and fixated in methanol. The smears were stained using a modification of Feulgen method for DNA visualization. For each stained smear, a sample of 30 lymphocyte chromatin structures were visualized and analyzed. This way, textural parameters for a total of 120 nuclei micrographs were calculated. For each chromatin structure, five different GLCM features were calculated: angular second moment, GLCM entropy, inverse difference moment, GLCM correlation, and GLCM variance. Oxidopamine induced the rise of the values of GLCM entropy and variance, and the reduction of angular second moment, correlation, and inverse difference moment. The trends for GLCM parameter changes were found to be highly significant (palgorithm might be successfully used in detection and evaluation of discrete early apoptotic structural changes in Feulgen-stained chromatin of peripheral blood lymphocytes that are not detectable using conventional microscopy/cell biology techniques. PMID:27424557

  13. Chromatin and Cell Wall Staining of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeasts grow by tip extension, maintaining a constant width until they reach a critical size threshold and divide. Division by medial fission-which gives these yeast their name-generates a new end that arises from the site of cytokinesis. The old end, which was produced during the previous cell cycle, initiates progression of the new cell cycle, and in G2, the new end is activated in a process termed new-end takeoff (NETO). In this protocol, the fluorescent stains calcofluor and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) are used to give a rapid and informative assessment of morphogenesis and cell-cycle progression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Calcofluor reveals the timing of NETO because it stains the birth scars that are generated at new ends by cytokinesis less efficiently than the rest of the cell wall. Intense calcofluor staining of the septum and measurement of cell length are also widely used to identify dividing cells and to gauge the timing of mitotic commitment. Staining nuclei with DAPI identifies mono- and binucleated cells and complements the calcofluor staining procedure to evaluate the stages of the cell cycle and identify mitotic errors. Equally simple DAPI staining procedures reveal chromatin structure in higher resolution, facilitating more accurate staging of mitotic progression and characterization of mitotic errors. PMID:27250942

  14. HJURP is involved in the expansion of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpelescu, Marinela; Hori, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Misu, Sadahiko; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujiyama, Asao; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    The CENP-A-specific chaperone HJURP mediates CENP-A deposition at centromeres. The N-terminal region of HJURP is responsible for binding to soluble CENP-A. However, it is unclear whether other regions of HJURP have additional functions for centromere formation and maintenance. In this study, we generated chicken DT40 knockout cell lines and gene replacement constructs for HJURP to assess the additional functions of HJURP in vivo. Our analysis revealed that the middle region of HJURP associates with the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1/KNL2 and that the HJURP-M18BP1 association is required for HJURP function. In addition, on the basis of the analysis of artificial centromeres induced by ectopic HJURP localization, we demonstrate that HJURP exhibits a centromere expansion activity that is separable from its CENP-A-binding activity. We also observed centromere expansion surrounding natural centromeres after HJURP overexpression. We propose that this centromere expansion activity reflects the functional properties of HJURP, which uses this activity to contribute to the plastic establishment of a centromeric chromatin structure. PMID:26063729

  15. The Structure of Positive Interpersonal Relations in Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James A.; Leinhardt, Samuel

    The authors sought to test Homans' proposition that small groups inevitably generate a social structure which combines subgroups (cliques) and a ranking system. We present a graph theoretical model of such a structure and prove that a necessary and sufficient condition for its existence is the absence of seven particular triad types. Expected…

  16. Factors related to the capital structures of small new ventures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, R.; Breitenecker, R.; Schwartz, E.J.; Wdowiak, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    In the literature, there exists evidence on the capital structure determinants for small ventures, but empirical research for new ventures is limited. We seek to address this gap by presenting a confirmatory analysis of determinants of capital structure of a sample of small new ventures in Austria.

  17. Electronic structure of palladium and its relation to uv spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    The electronic-energy-band structure of palladium has been calculated by means of the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method covering energies up to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The optical interband transitions producing structure in the dielectric function up to photon energies of 25 eV have...

  18. Structuring Interactivity; Space and Time in Relational Art

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Craig

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the concepts of space, time and interactivity in Relational Art. Relational Art is an interdisciplinary art practice described by the art critic and curator Nicolas Bourriaud in his book Relational Aesthetics (1998/2002). For Bourriaud, Relational Art consists of a location (space) in which viewers endure a physical encounter with the artist and artworks exhibited (time). Bourriaud describes this encounter as `interactivity; ' a term borrowed from digit...

  19. Dysregulation of select ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in high trait anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Alexandra; Amort, Thomas; Singewald, Nicolas; Sartori, Simone B; Lusser, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    Enhanced anxiety is a salient feature of a number of psychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders, trauma-related disorders and depression. Although aberrant expression of various genes has been detected in patients suffering from persistent high anxiety as well as in high anxiety rodent models, the molecular mechanisms responsible for altered transcription regulation have been poorly addressed. Transcription regulation intimately involves the contribution of chromatin modifying processes, such as histone modification and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, yet their role in pathological anxiety is not known. Here, we investigated for the first time if altered levels of several ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) may be linked to high trait anxiety in mice. While we found protein levels of the ChRFs SNF2H, ATRX, CHD1, CHD3 and CHD5 and of HDACs 1-3 and 6 to be similar in most of the tested brain areas of mice with high (HAB) versus normal (NAB) anxiety-related behavior, we observed distinctly altered regulation of SNF2H in the amygdala, and of CHD3 and CHD5 in the ventral hippocampus. In particular, CHD3 and CHD5 exhibited altered expression of protein but not of mRNA in HAB mice. Since both proteins are components of NuRD-like complexes, these results may indicate an impaired equilibrium between different NuRD-like complexes in the ventral hippocampus. Overall, our data provide novel evidence for localized differences of specific ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in mice with high trait anxiety that may ultimately contribute to altered transcriptional programs resulting in the manifestation of pathological anxiety. PMID:27208790

  20. Tagging of MADS domain proteins for chromatin immunoprecipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zuijlen Lisette GC

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most transcription factors fulfill their role in complexes and regulate their target genes upon binding to DNA motifs located in upstream regions or introns. To date, knowledge about transcription factor target genes and their corresponding transcription factor binding sites are still very limited. Two related methods that allow in vivo identification of transcription factor binding sites are chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and chromatin affinity purification (ChAP. For ChAP, the protein of interest is tagged with a peptide or protein, which can be used for affinity purification of the protein-DNA complex and hence, the identification of the target gene. Results Here, we present the results of experiments aiming at the development of a generic tagging approach for the Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins AGAMOUS, SEPALLATA3, and FRUITFULL. For this, Arabidopsis wild type plants were transformed with constructs containing a MADS-box gene fused to either a double Strep-tag® II-FLAG-tag, a triple HA-tag, or an eGFP-tag, all under the control of the constitutive double 35S Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV promoter. Strikingly, in all cases, the number of transformants with loss-of-function phenotypes was much larger than those with an overexpression phenotype. Using endogenous promoters in stead of the 35S CaMV resulted in a dramatic reduction in the frequency of loss-of-function phenotypes. Furthermore, pleiotropic defects occasionally caused by an overexpression strategy can be overcome by using the native promoter of the gene. Finally, a ChAP result is presented using GFP antibody on plants carrying a genomic fragment of a MADS-box gene fused to GFP. Conclusion This study revealed that MADS-box proteins are very sensitive to fusions with small peptide tags and GFP tags. Furthermore, for the expression of chimeric versions of MADS-box genes it is favorable to use the entire genomic region in frame to the tag of choice

  1. Relations of Control: Walkthroughs and the Structuring of Player Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Newman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Videogame walkthroughs provide instructions on various elements of gameplay in relation to specific digital games, and exist as text-based documents and, to a lesser extent, as recorded moving image game footage. We focus here on written-walkthroughs for the purposes of depth, while recognising the specific and significant position that moving image walkthroughs hold (see Ashton, forthcoming. Player-produced walkthroughs, freely and widely distributed online, point to the broader social contexts that inform and structure player agency. In this article, we emphasize three perspectives on these documents. First, walkthroughs can be approached as a means of recording and codifying playing styles, thereby legitimising specific approaches or strategies. Accordingly, we highlight glitch hunting and the Pokémon series to illustrate the diversity of these playing styles and the significance of the walkthrough as a form of ludic archival document. Second, walkthroughs as textual codifications of gameplay potential can encourage new styles of engagement with authors and performers by outlining opportunities for play, and illuminating strategies and techniques previously unknown to the reader. Importantly, as we shall demonstrate, walkthroughs not only investigate and interrogate game texts – exploring their every narrative turn and spatial aspects in minute detail – but also frequently present techniques that take advantage of weaknesses and flaws in the ruleset or code of the game in order to offer new gameplay options. In this respect, as James Newman (2008 suggests, walkthroughs can be understood as a form of reverse-engineering that renegotiates the player-designer relationship and encourages (perhaps even demands deliberately investigative, resistant and deviant strategies of gameplay. These modes of engagement frequently involve playing beyond performative norms and technical limits. The walkthrough, then, is both a document of the game as

  2. ATM alters the otherwise robust chromatin mobility at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Becker

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs which can lead to the formation of chromosome rearrangements through error prone repair. In mammalian cells the positional stability of chromatin contributes to the maintenance of genome integrity. DSBs exhibit only a small, submicron scale diffusive mobility, but a slight increase in the mobility of chromatin domains by the induction of DSBs might influence repair fidelity and the formation of translocations. The radiation-induced local DNA decondensation in the vicinity of DSBs is one factor potentially enhancing the mobility of DSB-containing chromatin domains. Therefore in this study we focus on the influence of different chromatin modifying proteins, known to be activated by the DNA damage response, on the mobility of DSBs. IRIF (ionizing radiation induced foci in U2OS cells stably expressing 53BP1-GFP were used as a surrogate marker of DSBs. Low angle charged particle irradiation, known to trigger a pronounced DNA decondensation, was used for the defined induction of linear tracks of IRIF. Our results show that movement of IRIF is independent of the investigated chromatin modifying proteins like ACF1 or PARP1 and PARG. Also depletion of proteins that tether DNA strands like MRE11 and cohesin did not alter IRIF dynamics significantly. Inhibition of ATM, a key component of DNA damage response signaling, resulted in a pronounced confinement of DSB mobility, which might be attributed to a diminished radiation induced decondensation. This confinement following ATM inhibition was confirmed using X-rays, proving that this effect is not restricted to densely ionizing radiation. In conclusion, repair sites of DSBs exhibit a limited mobility on a small spatial scale that is mainly unaffected by depletion of single remodeling or DNA tethering proteins. However, it relies on functional ATM kinase which is considered to influence the chromatin structure after irradiation.

  3. An Allosteric Interaction Links USP7 to Deubiquitination and Chromatin Targeting of UHRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Min Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The protein stability and chromatin functions of UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains, 1 are regulated in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. We report a structural characterization of the complex between UHRF1 and the deubiquitinase USP7. The first two UBL domains of USP7 bind to the polybasic region (PBR of UHRF1, and this interaction is required for the USP7-mediated deubiquitination of UHRF1. Importantly, we find that the USP7-binding site of the UHRF1 PBR overlaps with the region engaging in an intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal tandem Tudor domain (TTD. We show that the USP7-UHRF1 interaction perturbs the TTD-PBR interaction of UHRF1, thereby shifting the conformation of UHRF1 from a TTD-“occluded” state to a state open for multivalent histone binding. Consistently, introduction of a USP7-interaction-defective mutation to UHRF1 significantly reduces its chromatin association. Together, these results link USP7 interaction to the dynamic deubiquitination and chromatin association of UHRF1.

  4. Replicating centromeric chromatin: Spatial and temporal control of CENP-A assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The centromere is the fundamental unit for insuring chromosome inheritance. This complex region has a distinct type of chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by a structurally different homologue identified in humans as CENP-A. In metazoans, specific DNA sequences are neither required nor sufficient for centromere identity. Rather, an epigenetic mark comprised of CENP-A containing chromatin is thought to be the major determinant of centromere identity. In this view, CENP-A deposition and chromatin assembly are fundamental processes for the maintenance of centromeric identity across mitotic and meiotic divisions. Several lines of evidence support CENP-A deposition in metazoans occurring at only one time in the cell cycle. Such cell cycle-dependent loading of CENP-A is found in divergent species from human to fission yeast, albeit with differences in the cell cycle point at which CENP-A is assembled. Cell cycle dependent CENP-A deposition requires multiple assembly factors for its deposition and maintenance. This review discusses the regulation of new CENP-A deposition and its relevance to centromere identity and inheritance.

  5. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response

  6. Improvements in or relating to the inspection of underwater structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation detector is described, for use in the inspection of underwater structures, which is capable of withstanding high pressures and arduous marine conditions. The ingress of water into the body of the radiation detector tube is prevented by the use of a resilient waterproof compound. Marine structures incorporating such radiation detectors are described, whereby the presence or density of flowing cement grout in the legs of an offshore platform may be determined. (U.K.)

  7. Transthyretin and the transthyretin-related protein: A structural study

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is one of several proteins involved in amyloid disease in humans. Unknown conformational changes of the native state of TTR result in aggregation of TTR molecules into amyloid fibrils, which accumulate in extracellular tissues. This may result in different clinical symptoms, e.g. polyneuropathy or cardiomyopathy, depending on their site of accumulation. Our long-term goal is to identify structural changes associated with amyloid formation. For this work, structural charact...

  8. ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF MOS 2 MONOLAYER AND RELATED STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    ENYASHIN A.N.; Seifert, G.

    2014-01-01

    The present review provides an overview of the transition metal dichalcogenides discovered newly at the level of two dimensions. A special emphasis is given to the electronic structure of semiconducting representatives of this family, which can depend on many factors like thickness, environment, mechanical strain and structural imperfections of the layers. Both calculations and experimental data available to date on example of MoS 2 compound evidence that, semiconducting dichalcogenide layers...

  9. Structural relations in copper oxysalt minerals. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hierarchical structural classification is developed for the copper oxysalt minerals, based on the polymerization of coordination polyhedra of higher bond valences, and focusing specifically on [3]-, [4]-, [5]- and [6]-coordinate polyhedra. The nature of copper oxysalt structures is complicated by the extremely distorted coordinations often occurring around the Cu2+ cation, a result of the well-known Jahn-Teller effect. Although this is widely recognized at the qualitative level, it has led to a very inconsistent assignment of coordination numbers to Cu2+ in minerals. While this seems like a minor point, it has made intercomparison of copper oxysalt structures generally difficult to impossible. Here we re-examine these structures, assigning octahedral coordination to Cu2+ wherever possible; in the majority of structures this can be done. This allows a consistent hierarchical organization scheme to be developed for these structures, and also allows structural comparison with other triangular/tetrahedral/octahedral structures. Cu2+ shows octahedral, square-pyramidal, triangular-bipyramidal, square-planar, trigonal-prismatic and augmented-octahedral ([7]-fold) coordinations in oxysalt minerals. Octahedral coordination is by far the most common. The distribution of octahedral bond lengths is distinctly bimodal, with maxima at 1.97 and 2.44 A and a frequency of 2:1; this is compatible with the usual Jahn-Teller argument concerning bond-length distributions in Cu2+ compounds, the [4+2]-coordination. There are a few instances of regular octahedral coordination, sometimes (but not always) forced by symmetry. (orig.)

  10. Functional clustering in hippocampal cultures: relating network structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we investigate the relationship between gross anatomic structural network properties, neuronal dynamics and the resultant functional structure in dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Specifically, we studied cultures as they developed under two conditions: the first supporting glial cell growth (high glial group), and the second one inhibiting it (low glial group). We then compared structural network properties and the spatio-temporal activity patterns of the neurons. Differences in dynamics between the two groups could be linked to the impact of the glial network on the neuronal network as the cultures developed. We also implemented a recently developed algorithm called the functional clustering algorithm (FCA) to obtain the resulting functional network structure. We show that this new algorithm is useful for capturing changes in functional network structure as the networks evolve over time. The FCA detects changes in functional structure that are consistent with expected dynamical differences due to the impact of the glial network. Cultures in the high glial group show an increase in global synchronization as the cultures age, while those in the low glial group remain locally synchronized. We additionally use the FCA to quantify the amount of synchronization present in the cultures and show that the total level of synchronization in the high glial group is stronger than in the low glial group. These results indicate an interdependence between the glial and neuronal networks present in dissociated cultures

  11. Assessment of Chromatin Maturity in Human Spermatozoa: Useful Aniline Blue Assay for Routine Diagnosis of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifa Sellami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, sperm chromatin undergoes structural changes and results in a high condensation. This nuclear compaction would be useful as a predictor of sperm fertilization capacity and pregnancy outcome. We purpose to evaluate firstly the relationship among chromatin maturity assessed by aniline blue staining (AB and the semen parameters in infertile men. Secondly, we analyzed whether the sperm gradient density centrifugation is effective to select mature spermatozoa. Fifty-one ejaculates were investigated by semen analysis and stained for chromatin condensation with AB to distinguish between unstained mature sperm and stained immature sperm. AB was applied also on 12 ejaculates which proceeded by density gradient centrifugation to compare the rates of immature sperm before and after selection. Neat semen were divided into two groups: G1 (: immature sperm <20% and G2 (: immature sperm ≥20%. No significant differences were detected in sperm concentration, motility, and normal morphology between G1 and G2. However, the rates of some morphology abnormalities were higher in G2: head abnormalities ( and microcephalic sperm (. We founded significant correlation between sperm immaturity and acrosome abnormalities (; . Sperm selection has significantly reduced the rates of immature sperm. A better understanding of chromatin structure and its impact on the sperm potential is needed to explore male infertility.

  12. Energy-complexity relations by structural complexity methods

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ricca

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we shall review some of the most recent developments and results on work on energy-complexity relations and, if time will allow it, we shall provide an analytical proof of eq. (3) below, a fundamental relation between energy and complexity established by numerical experiments.

  13. Crystal structure of a symbiosis-related lectin from octocoral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Akiko; Jimbo, Mitsuru; Sakai, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yukio; Miki, Kunio

    2015-09-01

    D-Galactose-binding lectin from the octocoral, Sinularia lochmodes (SLL-2), distributes densely on the cell surface of microalgae, Symbiodinium sp., an endosymbiotic dinoflagellate of the coral, and is also shown to be a chemical cue that transforms dinoflagellate into a non-motile (coccoid) symbiotic state. SLL-2 binds with high affinity to the Forssman antigen (N-acetylgalactosamine(GalNAc)α1-3GalNAcβ1-3Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glc-ceramide), and the presence of Forssman antigen-like sugar on the surface of Symbiodinium CS-156 cells was previously confirmed. Here we report the crystal structures of SLL-2 and its GalNAc complex as the first crystal structures of a lectin involved in the symbiosis between coral and dinoflagellate. N-Linked sugar chains and a galactose derivative binding site common to H-type lectins were observed in each monomer of the hexameric SLL-2 crystal structure. In addition, unique sugar-binding site-like regions were identified at the top and bottom of the hexameric SLL-2 structure. These structural features suggest a possible binding mode between SLL-2 and Forssman antigen-like pentasaccharide. PMID:26022515

  14. Heterochromatin and RNAi are required to establish CENP-A chromatin at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, Hernan Diego; Pidoux, Alison L; Urano, Takeshi; Allshire, Robin C

    2008-01-01

    Heterochromatin is defined by distinct posttranslational modifications on histones, such as methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), which allows heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1)-related chromodomain proteins to bind. Heterochromatin is frequently found near CENP-A chromatin, which is the key determinant of kinetochore assembly. We have discovered that the RNA interference (RNAi)-directed heterochromatin flanking the central kinetochore domain at fission yeast centromeres is required to promote CENP-A(Cnp1) and kinetochore assembly over the central domain. The H3K9 methyltransferase Clr4 (Suv39); the ribonuclease Dicer, which cleaves heterochromatic double-stranded RNA to small interfering RNA (siRNA); Chp1, a component of the RNAi effector complex (RNA-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing; RITS); and Swi6 (HP1) are required to establish CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin on naïve templates. Once assembled, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is propagated by epigenetic means in the absence of heterochromatin. Thus, another, potentially conserved, role for centromeric RNAi-directed heterochromatin has been identified. PMID:18174443

  15. Chromatin defects in normal and malformed human ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa: a cytochemical ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, S; Cordeschi, G; Gabriele, A; Gianaroli, L; Properzi, G

    1996-03-01

    Cytochemical defects in chromatin were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after the staining by alcoholic phosphotungstic acid (PTA) of normal and malformed ejaculated spermatozoa from 35 male partners of infertile couples, and in six sperm samples retrieved from the caput epididymidis of men affected by obstructive azoospermia. PTA staining was also analysed in normal ejaculates of fertile men after incubation of the washed spermatozoa with dithiothreitol (DTT) to reduce disulfides to thiols, or with DTT followed by iodoacetamide, a blocking agent for thiol groups. PTA stained 63 (27-100)% of malformed heads and 25 (10-100)% of normal sperm heads (median (range) n = 35; P = 0.0001, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). The percentage of normal heads stained by PTA was negatively correlated with the percentage of heads of normal form, with condensed chromatin and a normal acrosome (Spearman r = 0.75; P = 0.0001), and positively correlated with the percentage of malformed heads after conventional TEM analysis (Spearman r 0.60; P = 0.0001). Staining with PTA in normal heads was not correlated with the presence of non-condensed chromatin in otherwise normal sperm heads evaluated by conventional TEM analysis. In spermatozoa recovered from the caput epididymidis, 15% of normal heads were stained with PTA, significantly fewer than in ejaculated sperm samples (P = 0.014). The reduction of disulfides to thiols was associated with PTA staining of all normal heads, and this was prevented by incubation with iodoacetamide. We conclude that PTA staining of the nuclei of human ejaculated spermatozoa may indicate a defect of chromatin condensation, owing to an excess of free thiol groups. The lower percentage of normal epididymal sperm heads that stained with PTA in cases of obstructive azoospermia compared with ejaculated sperm may be related to an overoxidation of thils owing to the ageing of spermatozoa. PMID:8699409

  16. PARP1 Links CHD2-Mediated Chromatin Expansion and H3.3 Deposition to DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; de Krijger, Inge; Wiegant, Wouter W; Shah, Rashmi G; Smeenk, Godelieve; de Groot, Anton J L; Pines, Alex; Vertegaal, Alfred C O; Jacobs, Jacqueline J L; Shah, Girish M; van Attikum, Haico

    2016-02-18

    The response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) requires alterations in chromatin structure to promote the assembly of repair complexes on broken chromosomes. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DSB repair pathway in human cells, but our understanding of how it operates in chromatin is limited. Here, we define a mechanism that plays a crucial role in regulating NHEJ in chromatin. This mechanism is initiated by DNA damage-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), which recruits the chromatin remodeler CHD2 through a poly(ADP-ribose)-binding domain. CHD2 in turn triggers rapid chromatin expansion and the deposition of histone variant H3.3 at sites of DNA damage. Importantly, we find that PARP1, CHD2, and H3.3 regulate the assembly of NHEJ complexes at broken chromosomes to promote efficient DNA repair. Together, these findings reveal a PARP1-dependent process that couples ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling with histone variant deposition at DSBs to facilitate NHEJ and safeguard genomic stability. PMID:26895424

  17. Variable Geometry Aircraft Pylon Structure and Related Operation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Parthiv N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft control structure can be utilized for purposes of drag management, noise control, or aircraft flight maneuvering. The control structure includes a high pressure engine nozzle, such as a bypass nozzle or a core nozzle of a turbofan engine. The nozzle exhausts a high pressure fluid stream, which can be swirled using a deployable swirl vane architecture. The control structure also includes a variable geometry pylon configured to be coupled between the nozzle and the aircraft. The variable geometry pylon has a moveable pylon section that can be deployed into a deflected state to maintain or alter a swirling fluid stream (when the swirl vane architecture is deployed) for drag management purposes, or to assist in the performance of aircraft flight maneuvers.

  18. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  19. Chromatin: a tunable spring at work inside chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haïm, E; Lesne, A; Victor, J M

    2001-11-01

    This paper focuses on mechanical aspects of chromatin biological functioning. Within a basic geometric modeling of the chromatin assembly, we give a complete set of elastic constants (twist and bend persistence lengths, stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling constant) of the so-called 30-nm chromatin fiber, in terms of DNA elastic properties and geometric properties of the fiber assembly. The computation naturally embeds the fiber within a current analytical model known as the "extensible wormlike rope," allowing a straightforward prediction of the force-extension curves. We show that these elastic constants are strongly sensitive to the linker length, up to 1 bp, or equivalently to its twist, and might locally reach very low values, yielding a highly flexible and extensible domain in the fiber. In particular, the twist-stretch coupling constant, reflecting the chirality of the chromatin fiber, exhibits steep variations, and sign changes when the linker length is varied. We argue that this tunable elasticity might be a key feature for chromatin function, for instance, in the initiation and regulation of transcription. PMID:11735982

  20. State Confessional Relations: Problem of the Subject Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A. Dorskaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article various existing definitions of the concept "state and confessional relations" are analyzed, also author's definition is offered. Three levels of the state and confessional relations are revealed: conceptual, legislative and administrative-managerial. In the article it is shown that in Russia a tradition of only two subjects of the state and confessional relations – government bodies and the religious organizations allocation exists. It is revealed that at the present stage many researchers are dissatisfied with such situation. Scientific sources of the problem of the state and church relations within the psychological school of the law, which are addressed to the personality and experiences in the legal sphere are studied and revealed. Special attention is paid to scientific heritage of the M.A. Reysner, who was one of the first to begin study of this problem. In the article the question of the school of three subjects of the state and confessional relations allocation formation, what adds the faithful or faithless personality in addition to two traditional subjects is analyzed. The state and confessional relations are considered in the context of the human rights development. The question of new type of the believer possessing high education level and knowledge formation is considered. In the article it is shown that at the present stage relations of any regulation between the state and religious organizations is based on the basis of international legal standards, domestic legislation and norms of canon law.

  1. Large-Scale Structure Observables in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    We review recent studies that rigorously define several key observables of the large-scale structure of the Universe in a general relativistic context. Specifically, we consider i) redshift perturbation of cosmic clock events; ii) distortion of cosmic rulers, including weak lensing shear and magnification; iii) observed number density of tracers of the large-scale structure. We provide covariant and gauge-invariant expressions of these observables. Our expressions are given for a linearly perturbed flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric including scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations. While we restrict ourselves to linear order in perturbation theory, the approach can be straightforwardly generalized to higher order.

  2. Crystal Structure of Three Compounds Related to Triphenylene and Tetracyanoquinodimethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, T.L.; Krebs, Frederik C; Larsen, M.; Thorup, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structures of a charge-transfer complex of triphenylene with 1,3,5-tris(2,2-dicyanovinyl) benzene (1), a complex of 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexamethoxytriphenylene with 2,5-dichlorotetracyanoquinodimethane (2) and also 2,5-dichlorotetracyanoquinodimethane itself (3) have been determined. Compou......,2-dichlorobenzene solvent molecules. Weak hydrogen bonds are present in the structures of 1 and 2. Based on comparisons of bond lengths the electronic charge-transfer in 2 has been estimated to be about 0.3 e. The synthesis of 1,3,5-tris(2,2-dicyanovinyl) benzene is also reported....

  3. Mapping relational database into OWL Structure with data semantic preservation

    CERN Document Server

    Gherabi, Noreddine; Bahaj, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a solution for migrating an RDB into Web semantic. The solution takes an existing RDB as input, and extracts its metadata representation (MTRDB). Based on the MTRDB, a Canonical Data Model (CDM) is generated. Finally, the structure of the classification scheme in the CDM model is converted into OWL ontology and the recordsets of database are stored in owl document. A prototype has been implemented, which migrates a RDB into OWL structure, for demonstrate the practical applicability of our approach by showing how the results of reasoning of this technique can help improve the Web systems.

  4. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Risplendi, Francesca; Bernardi, Marco; Cicero, Giancarlo; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles mol...

  5. The effects of DNA intercalators on chromatin of chicken red blood cells——differential extraction on nonhistone proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangFan; ZhuJingde

    1990-01-01

    Taking advantage of the effects on DNA secondary structure of two DNA-intercalators,ethidium bromide and chloroquine,we used each of them to treat nuclei from both mature erythrocytes and reticulocytes of chicken,as an alternative approach to study the relationships between DNA secondary structure,nuclear proteins and chromatin structure.We presented results of differential extraction of nuclear proteins from nuclei with DNA-intercalators,as well as preliminary characterization of these proteins.A 45kd protein is the major component in fractions extracted by both intercalators from nuclei from either mature erythrocytes or reticulocytes and seems to be a DNA-binding protein.Furthermore,from current concepts of functional aspects of DNA conformation and structural heterogeneity in chromatin and nuclear proteins,we have discussed both the significance of our results as well as technical aspects of this approach.

  6. About Hierarchical XML Structures, Replacement of Relational Data Structures in Construction and Implementation of ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The projects essential objective is to develop a new ERP system, of homogeneous nature, based on XML structures, as a possible replacement for classic ERP systems. The criteria that guide the objective definition are modularity, portability and Web connectivity. This objective is connected to a series of secondary objectives, considering that the technological approach will be filtered through the economic, social and legislative environment for a validation-by-context study. Statistics and cybernetics are to be used for simulation purposes. The homogeneous approach is meant to provide strong modularity and portability, in relation with the n-tier principles, but the main advantage of the model is its opening to the semantic Web, based on a Small enterprise ontology defined with XML-driven languages. Shockwave solutions will be used for implementing client-oriented hypermedia elements and an XML Gate will be de-fined between black box modules, for a clear separation with obvious advantages. Security and the XMLTP project will be an important issue for XML transfers due to the conflict between the open architecture of the Web, the readability of XML data and the privacy elements which have to be preserved within a business environment. The projects finality is oriented on small business but the semantic Web perspective and the surprising new conflict between hierarchical/network data structures and relational ones will certainly widen its scope. The proposed model is meant to fulfill the IT compatibility requirements of the European environment, defined as a knowledge society. The paper is a brief of the contributions of the team re-search at the project type A applied to CNCSIS "Research on the Role of XML in Building Extensible and Homogeneous ERP Systems".

  7. Overall Dynamic Constitutive Relations of Micro-structured Elastic Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    A method for homogenization of a heterogeneous (finite or periodic) elastic composite is presented. It allows direct, consistent, and accurate evaluation of the averaged overall frequency-dependent dynamic material constitutive relations. It is shown that when the spatial variation of the field variables is restricted by a Bloch-form (Floquet-form) periodicity, then these relations together with the overall conservation and kinematical equations accurately yield the displacement or stress modeshapes and, necessarily, the dispersion relations. It also gives as a matter of course point-wise solution of the elasto-dynamic field equations, to any desired degree of accuracy. The resulting overall dynamic constitutive relations however, are general and need not be restricted by the Bloch-form periodicity. The formulation is based on micro-mechanical modeling of a representative unit cell of the composite proposed by Nemat-Nasser and coworkers; see, e.g., [1] and [2].

  8. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal. PMID:25562581

  9. The Intestinal Tract: Structure, Function, Disorders and Related Medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Dianne M.

    This instructional guide is intended for use within inservice or continuing education programs for people who work in long-term care facilities. This module includes an overview of the normal functions of the small and large intestines and discusses the structures of the intestines, absorption in the intestines, and commonly occurring conditions…

  10. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  11. Organizational Structure and the Consequences for Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Larissa A.

    J. Hage and F. Hull (1981) developed a typology of organizations based on two major dimensions--scale and complexity. The typology delineates four types of organizations: Type 1, "traditional" organizations, typically small-scale structures with low complexity; Type 2, "mechanical" organizations that are large scale, low complexity structures…

  12. A relational structure of voluntary visual-attention abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Skogsberg, KatieAnn; Grabowecky, Marcia; Wilt, Joshua; Revelle, William; Iordanescu, Lucica; Suzuki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have examined attention mechanisms involved in specific behavioral tasks (e.g., search, tracking, distractor inhibition). However, relatively little is known about the relationships among those attention mechanisms. Is there a fundamental attention faculty that makes a person superior or inferior at most types of attention tasks, or do relatively independent processes mediate different attention skills? We focused on individual differences in voluntary visual-attention abilities ...

  13. Representation of spatial relations and structures in object-based knowledge representation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Le Ber, Florence; Napoli, Amedeo

    2000-01-01

    This paper is concerned with representing spatial structures in object-based knowledge representation systems (OKR systems). Spatial structures are defined as sets of objects related with qualitative spatial relations. We focus on topological relations from the RCC-8 theory, their recognition on raster images, and their reification in an OKR system. Spatial structures and relations have been implemented and used in a knowledge-based system for satellite image interpretation

  14. Sliding and peeling of histone during chromatin remodelling

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific stretches of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. We investigate the mechanism of peeling of the histone spool, and its complete detachment, from the dsDNA by a CRE. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean times for histone detachment. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the measurable quantities can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments.

  15. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M; Urban, Jennifer A; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E; Tolstorukov, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  16. The relation between ventilation rates and building structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the concept of building and structure includes so various kinds of factors, the discussion in this paper on the ventilation rates refers mainly to the 'residential buildings' of 'reinforced concrete and timber frame'. Although it was believed, since before the world war II, that the concrete structure was better in air tightness than the timber frame of which ventilation rates were estimated as more than one air change per hour or so, it is getting hard to decide which one is tighter and to estimate the amount of ventilation rate based on just only the construction style. A description was given on the methodology to estimate the ventilation rate of a house using a simple chart. Outline of the values thus obtained is presented for the ventilation rates in Japanese residential buildings. (author)

  17. The network structure of city-firm relations

    CERN Document Server

    Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    How are economic activities linked to geographic locations? To answer this question, we use a data-driven approach that builds on the information about location, ownership and economic activities of the world's 3,000 largest firms and their almost one million subsidiaries. From this information we generate a bipartite network of cities linked to economic activities. Analysing the structure of this network, we find striking similarities with nested networks observed in ecology, where links represent mutualistic interactions between species. This motivates us to apply ecological indicators to identify the unbalanced deployment of economic activities. Such deployment can lead to an over-representation of specific economic sectors in a given city, and poses a significant thread for the city's future especially in times when the over-represented activities face economic uncertainties. If we compare our analysis with external rankings about the quality of life in a city, we find that the nested structure of the cit...

  18. Subcortical representation of speech fine structure relates to reading ability

    OpenAIRE

    Hornickel, Jane; Anderson, Samira; Skoe, Erika; Yi, Han-Gyol; Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Impaired perception of consonants by poor readers is reflected in poor subcortical encoding of speech timing and harmonics. We assessed auditory brainstem representation of higher harmonics within a consonant-vowel formant transition to identify relationships between speech fine structure and reading. Responses were analyzed in three ways: a single stimulus polarity, adding responses to inverted polarities (emphasizing low harmonics), and subtracting responses to inverted polarities (emphasiz...

  19. Using computational models to relate structural and functional brain connectivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Coombes, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2012), s. 2137-2145. ISSN 0953-816X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E08027 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 200728 - BRAIN SYNC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : brain disease * computational modelling * functional connectivity * graph theory * structural connectivity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.753, year: 2012

  20. Localizing age-related individual differences in a hierarchical structure

    OpenAIRE

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Data from 33 separate studies were combined to create an aggregate data set consisting of 16 cognitive variables and 6832 different individuals who ranged between 18 and 95 years of age. Analyses were conducted to determine where in a hierarchical structure of cognitive abilities individual differences associated with age, gender, education, and self-reported health could be localized. The results indicated that each type of individual difference characteristic exhibited a d...

  1. The Hierarchical Structure of Work-Related Maladaptive Personality Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Guenole, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    A brief pathological personality measure, the G-50, was designed to study substantive developments from clinical psychology in occupational settings. Responses to item-pools assessing DSM-5 domain traits were collected from 696 working adults in England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland. Exploratory factor analyses supported a structure comprised of Antagonism, Compulsivity, Detachment, Negative Affect, Disinhibition, and Psychoticism. Gender differences were observed following invariance analyse...

  2. Constraining cosmological ultra-large scale structure using numerical relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Braden, Jonathan; Johnson, Matthew C.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Aguirre, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic inflation, a period of accelerated expansion in the early universe, can give rise to large amplitude ultra-large scale inhomogeneities on distance scales comparable to or larger than the observable universe. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy on the largest angular scales is sensitive to such inhomogeneities and can be used to constrain the presence of ultra-large scale structure (ULSS). We numerically evolve nonlinear inhomogeneities present at the beginning of inflation...

  3. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Bernardi, Marco; Cicero, Giancarlo; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-07-01

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  4. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  5. Single-epitope recognition imaging of native chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct visualization of chromatin has the potential to provide important insights into epigenetic processes. In particular, atomic force microscopy (AFM can visualize single nucleosomes under physiological ionic conditions. However, AFM has mostly been applied to chromatin that has been reconstituted in vitro, and its potential as a tool for the dissection of native nucleosomes has not been explored. Recently we applied AFM to native Drosophila chromatin containing the centromere-specific histone 3 (CenH3, showing that it is greatly enriched in smaller particles. Taken together with biochemical analyses of CenH3 nucleosomes, we propose that centromeric nucleosomes are hemisomes, with one turn of DNA wrapped around a particle consisting of one molecule each of centromere-specific CenH3, H4, H2A and H2B. Results Here we apply a recognition mode of AFM imaging to directly identify CenH3 within histone core particles released from native centromeric chromatin. More than 90% of these particles were found to be tetrameric in height. The specificity of recognition was confirmed by blocking with a CenH3 peptide, and the strength of the interaction was quantified by force measurements. These results imply that the particles imaged by AFM are indeed mature CenH3-containing hemisomes. Conclusion Efficient and highly specific recognition of CenH3 in histone core particles isolated from native centromeric chromatin demonstrates that tetramers are the predominant form of centromeric nucleosomes in mature tetramers. Our findings provide proof of principle that this approach can yield insights into chromatin biology using direct and rapid detection of native nucleosomes in physiological salt concentrations.

  6. Structural and elastic properties of DNA and chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Mergell, Boris

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a chain consisting of two coupled worm-like chains withconstant distance between the strands. The effects due todouble-strandedness of the chain are studied. In a previous analyticalstudy of this system an intrinsic twist-stretch coupling and atendency of kinking is predicted. Even though a local twist structureis observed the predicted features are not recovered. A new model for DNA at the base-pair level is presented. Thebase-pairs are treated as flat rigid ellipsoids and ...

  7. Structural logical relations with case analysis and equality reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ulrik Terp; Filinski, Andrzej

    Formalizing proofs by logical relations in the Twelf proof assistant is known to be notoriously difficult. However, as demonstrated by Schürmann and Sarnat [In Proc. of 23rd Symp. on Logic in Computer Science, 2008] such proofs can be represented and verified in Twelf if done so using a Gentzen-s...

  8. Modulation of chromatin modifying complexes by noncoding RNAs in trans

    OpenAIRE

    Názer, Ezequiel; Lei, Elissa P.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a central role for ncRNA in numerous aspects of chromatin function. For instance, ncRNAs can act as a scaffold for the recruitment of certain chromatin modifying complexes to specific sites within the genome. It is easily imaginable how this can occur in cis, but examples also exist whereby targeting of complexes by ncRNA occurs in trans to the site of transcription. Moreover, association of an ncRNA with a particular locus can trigger localization of the gene to ...

  9. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles of the...... polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  10. Relation between structure and organisation properties of new amphiphilic cyclodextrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a number of years, special attention and efforts have been made to prepare amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) with the objective to use them to obtain supramolecular assemblies as such or in the presence of preformed lipidic structures. The aim of these investigation is in both cases to combine the size specificity of cyclodextrins for guests and the transport properties of phospho-lipidic structures. The final objects could be of importance to transport or target biologically relevant molecules such as drugs using new galenic formulations. In a first step, a new family of amphiphilic CDs was prepared from a pure phospholipids (DMPE) onto cyclodextrins or methylated derivatives through a spacing arm. The afforded compounds (phospholipidyl-cyclodextrins) were fully characterized by high field NMR and high resolution mass spectrometry. The methylated derivatives were shown to self-organize in water with low CMC to form fluctuating micellar fibers retaining the inclusion capacity of the cyclodextrin cavities. The interactions of these compounds with membrane systems were investigated as black films using X-ray reflectivity and by evaluation of their detergent power towards model DMPC liposomes. Their ability to cross over the Blood Brain Barrier was evidenced by a new approach making use of novel immuno-enzymatic assays. In a second step, a new class of amphiphilic cyclodextrins was considered (peptidolipidyl-cyclodextrins). Although they are structurally similar to phospholipidyl-CDs, their preparation overcomes the tedious steps of the later and lead to a considerable versatility in terms of the number of possible molecules to be prepared. Moreover, the stability problems encountered with phospholipids are avoided. Several examples have been prepared, fully characterized and their organization properties investigated by the determination of CMC and by deuterium NMR on a pure and homogeneous mixed peptidolipidyl-CD / DMPC lamellar phase. This novel class of

  11. Structures and related properties of helical, disulfide-stabilized peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, M.D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The three dimensional structure of several peptides were determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry calculations. Each peptide formed a predictable, rigid structure, consisting of an {alpha}-helix, a {open_quotes}scaffold{close_quotes} region which packed along one face of the helix, and two disulfide bridges which covalently connect the helix and scaffold regions. The peptide Apa-M5 was designed to constrain the M5 peptide from MLCK in a helical geometry using the apamin disulfide scaffold. This scaffold constrains the N- terminal end of the helix with two disulfide bridges and a reverse turn. Like the M5 peptide, Apa-M5 was found to bind calmodulin in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent 1:1 stoichiometry. However, the dissociation constant of the (Apa-M5)-calmodulin complex, 107 nM, was 100-fold higher than the dissociation constant of the M5-calmodulin complex. This difference was due to a putative steric overlap between the Apa-M5 scaffold and calmodulin. The peptide Apa-Cro was designed to replace the large structural protein matrix of {lambda} Cro with the apamin disulfide scaffold. However, Apa-Cro did not bind the consensus DNA operator half-site of {lambda} Cro, probably due to a steric overlap between the Apa-Cro disulfide framework and the DNA. The amino acid sequence of the scaffold-disulfide bridge arrangement of the peptide Max was derived from the core sequence of scyllatoxin, which contains an {alpha}-helix constrained at the C-terminal end by two disulfide bridges and a two-stranded {beta}sheet scaffold. Max was shown to fold with >84% yield to form a predictable, stable structure that is similar to scyllatoxin. The folding and stability properties of Max make this scaffold and disulfide bridge arrangement an ideal candidate for the development of hybrid sequence peptides. The dynamics of a fraying C-terminal end of the helix of the peptide Apa-AlaN was determined by analysis of {sup 15}N NMR relaxation properties.

  12. Muscle structural changes in mitochondrial myopathy relate to genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, David B.; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Ørngreen, Mette C.;

    2003-01-01

    typically not been associated with mitochondrial disease. We investigated gross and microscopic muscle morphology in thigh muscles by muscle biopsy and MRI in 16 patients with MM, and compared findings with those obtained in muscular dystrophy patients and healthy subjects. Changes of muscle architecture......It is well known that morphological changes at the cellular level occur in muscle of patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM), but changes in muscle structure with fat infiltration and gross variation of muscle fiber size with giant fibers, normally encountered in the muscular dystrophies, have...

  13. Long-range looping of a locus control region drives tissue-specific chromatin packing within a multigene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Cooke, Nancy E; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    The relationships of higher order chromatin organization to mammalian gene expression remain incompletely defined. The human Growth Hormone (hGH) multigene cluster contains five gene paralogs. These genes are selectively activated in either the pituitary or the placenta by distinct components of a remote locus control region (LCR). Prior studies have revealed that appropriate activation of the placental genes is dependent not only on the actions of the LCR, but also on the multigene composition of the cluster itself. Here, we demonstrate that the hGH LCR 'loops' over a distance of 28 kb in primary placental nuclei to make specific contacts with the promoters of the two GH genes in the cluster. This long-range interaction sequesters the GH genes from the three hCS genes which co-assemble into a tightly packed 'hCS chromatin hub'. Elimination of the long-range looping, via specific deletion of the placental LCR components, triggers a dramatic disruption of the hCS chromatin hub. These data reveal a higher-order structural pathway by which long-range looping from an LCR impacts on local chromatin architecture that is linked to tissue-specific gene regulation within a multigene cluster. PMID:26893355

  14. Object-based Representation and Classification of Spatial Structures and Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Le Ber, Florence; Napoli, Amedeo

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the representation and the classification of spatial relations and structures in an object-based knowledge representation system. In this system, spatial structures are defined as sets of spatial entities connected with topological relations. Relations are represented by objects with their own properties. We propose to define two types of properties: the first ones are concerned with relations as concepts while the second are concerned with relations as links betw...

  15. Horizontal Structure in Public Relations: An Exploratory Study of Departmental Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunig, Larissa Schneider

    An exploratory study of horizontal organizational structure investigated how the tasks in a public relations department are apportioned and why the structure is as it is. J. E. Grunig and T. Hunt's taxonomy of horizontal structures, which served as the framework for the research, suggests that the following structures are typical: by public, by…

  16. Analytical Operations Relate Structural and Functional Connectivity in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggio, Maria Luisa; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state large-scale brain models vary in the amount of biological elements they incorporate and in the way they are being tested. One might expect that the more realistic the model is, the closer it should reproduce real functional data. It has been shown, instead, that when linear correlation across long BOLD fMRI time-series is used as a measure for functional connectivity (FC) to compare simulated and real data, a simple model performs just as well, or even better, than more sophisticated ones. The model in question is a simple linear model, which considers the physiological noise that is pervasively present in our brain while it diffuses across the white-matter connections, that is structural connectivity (SC). We deeply investigate this linear model, providing an analytical solution to straightforwardly compute FC from SC without the need of computationally costly simulations of time-series. We provide a few examples how this analytical solution could be used to perform a fast and detailed parameter exploration or to investigate resting-state non-stationarities. Most importantly, by inverting the analytical solution, we propose a method to retrieve information on the anatomical structure directly from functional data. This simple method can be used to complement or guide DTI/DSI and tractography results, especially for a better assessment of inter-hemispheric connections, or to provide an estimate of SC when only functional data are available. PMID:27536987

  17. Structure related uranium mineralization in the Westmoreland district, Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westmoreland Uranium District straddles the boundary between Queensland and the Northern Territory of Australia some 100 km south of the coastline. Middle Proterozoic conglomerate/sandstones and a basic volcanic sequence of the McArthur River Basin unconformably overly Lower Proterozoic metamorphics and acid volcanics, both intruded by high level granites, which are exposed in an EW trending uplift. Basic dikes, thought to be feeders to the multiple basic extrusions were emplaced mainly along the NE trending structures dissecting the sandstone sequence. Uranium mineralization in the district frequently occurs as vertical or subvertical, discontinuous lenses or sheets adjacent to or within these dike filled structures. The primary minerals are uraninite and protobrannerite. Gold may occur coincidental to uranium. Uraninite is the last replacive mineral phase, following cementation and argillic alteration of the host rocks and the introduction of chlorite/hematite. The primary origin of the uranium remains open due to lack of conclusive evidence for introduction of the uranium into the system either as detrital component or by exhalative volcanogenic activity or by hydrothermal remobilization from deep seated sources. It is postulated that a heat flow event at about 820 Ma generated and maintained convection flow cells within permeable host rocks and that uranium introduced to circulating oxygenated formation waters by any one or more of the above processes was precipitated against physico-chemical barriers such as basic dikes or basaltic flows due to the abundant supply of divalid iron as reductant. (author)

  18. Conformation of chromatin oligomers. A new argument for a change with the hexanucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, C; Bezot, P; Hesse-Bezot, C; Roux, B; Bernengo, J C

    1981-11-01

    Quasielastic laser light scattering measurements have been made on chromatin oligomers to obtain information on the transition in their electrooptical properties, previously observed for the hexameric structures [Marion, C. and Roux, B. (1978) Nucleic Acids Res. 5, 4431-4449]. Translational diffusion coefficients were determined for mononucleosomes to octanucleosomes containing histone H1 over a range of ionic strength. At high ionic strength, oligomers show a linear dependence of the logarithm of diffusion coefficient upon the logarithm of number of nucleosomes. At low ionic strength a change occurs between hexamer and heptamer. Our results agree well with the recent sedimentation data of Osipova et al. [Eur. J. Biochem. (1980) 113, 183-188] and of Butler and Thomas [J. Mol. Biol. (1980) 140, 505-529] showing a change in stability with hexamer. Various models for the arrangements of nucleosomes in the superstructure of chromatin are discussed. All calculations clearly indicate a conformational change with the hexanucleosome and the results suggest that, at low ionic strength, the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure of 28-nm diameter and 22-nm pitch. These results are also consistent with a discontinuity every sixth nucleosome, corresponding to a turn of the helix. This discontinuity may explain the recent electric dichroism data of Lee et al. [Biochemistry (1981) 20, 1438-1445]. The hexanucleosome structure which we have previously suggested, with the faces of nucleosomes arranged radially to the helical axis has been recently confirmed by Mc Ghee et al. [Cell (1980) 22, 87-96]. With an increase of ionic strength, the helix becomes more regular and compact with a slightly reduced outer diameter and a decreased pitch, the dimensions resembling those proposed for solenoid models. PMID:7308214

  19. Relations of Control: Walkthroughs and the Structuring of Player Agency

    OpenAIRE

    James Newman; Daniel Ashton

    2010-01-01

    Videogame walkthroughs provide instructions on various elements of gameplay in relation to specific digital games, and exist as text-based documents and, to a lesser extent, as recorded moving image game footage. We focus here on written-walkthroughs for the purposes of depth, while recognising the specific and significant position that moving image walkthroughs hold (see Ashton, forthcoming). Player-produced walkthroughs, freely and widely distributed online, point to the broader social cont...

  20. Storing an OWL 2 Ontology in a Relational Database Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Gorskis, Henrihs; Borisov, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of storing OWL 2 based ontology information in a classical relational database and reviews some existing methods for ontology databases. In most cases a database is a fitting solution for storing and sharing information among systems, clients or agents. Similarly, in order to make domain ontology information more accessible to systems, in a comparable way, it can be stored and provided in a database form. As of today, there is no consensus on a specific ont...

  1. Packing Regularities in Biological Structures Relate to Their Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jernigan, Robert L.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The high packing density inside proteins leads to certain geometric regularities and also is one of the most important contributors to the high extent of cooperativity manifested by proteins in their cohesive domain motions. The orientations between neighboring non-bonded residues in proteins substantially follow the similar geometric regularities, regardless of whether the residues are on the surface or buried - a direct result of hydrophobicity forces. These orientations are relatively fixe...

  2. The Influence of Surface Building's Relative Position on the Seismic Response of Subway Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fangjie; Zhao Fengxin; Zhang Yushan; You Hongbing

    2011-01-01

    By using the finite element method and viscoelastic artificial boundary, a soil-structure interaction system is established to simulate the influence of surface buildings on the seismic response of subway structures. The conditions of different relative p

  3. The evolutionary history of histone H3 suggests a deep eukaryotic root of chromatin modifying mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postberg Jan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenotype of an organism is an outcome of both its genotype, encoding the primary sequence of proteins, and the developmental orchestration of gene expression. The substrate of gene expression in eukaryotes is the chromatin, whose fundamental units are nucleosomes composed of DNA wrapped around each two of the core histone types H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Key regulatory steps involved in the determination of chromatin conformations are posttranslational modifications (PTM at histone tails as well as the assembly of histone variants into nucleosomal arrays. Although the mechanistic background is fragmentary understood, it appears that the chromatin signature of metazoan cell types is inheritable over generations. Even less understood is the conservation of epigenetic mechanisms among eukaryotes and their origins. Results In the light of recent progress in understanding the tree of eukaryotic life we discovered the origin of histone H3 by phylogenetic analyses of variants from all supergroups, which allowed the reconstruction of ancestral states. We found that H3 variants evolved frequently but independently within related species of almost all eukaryotic supergroups. Interestingly, we found all core histone types encoded in the genome of a basal dinoflagellate and H3 variants in two other species, although is was reported that dinoflagellate chromatin is not organized into nucleosomes. Most probably one or more animal/nuclearid H3.3-like variants gave rise to H3 variants of all opisthokonts (animals, choanozoa, fungi, nuclearids, Amoebozoa. H3.2 and H3.1 as well as H3.1t are derivatives of H3.3, whereas H3.2 evolved already in early branching animals, such as Trichoplax. H3.1 and H3.1t are probably restricted to mammals. We deduced a model for protoH3 of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA confirming a remarkable degree of sequence conservation in comparison to canonical human H3.1. We found evidence that multiple PTMs are

  4. In Vivo Chromatin Targets of the Transcription Factor Yin Yang 2 in Trophoblast Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Macías-Redondo, Sofía; Climent, María; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Muniesa, Pedro; Schoorlemmer, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Yin Yang 2 (YY2) is a zinc finger protein closely related to the well-characterized Yin Yang 1 (YY1). YY1 is a DNA-binding transcription factor, with defined functions in multiple developmental processes, such as implantation, cell differentiation, X inactivation, imprinting and organogenesis. Yy2 has been treated as a largely immaterial duplication of Yy1, as they share high homology in the Zinc Finger-region and similar if not identical in vitro binding sites. In contrast to these similarities, gene expression alterations in HeLa cells with attenuated levels of either Yy1 or Yy2 were to some extent gene-specific. Moreover, the chromatin binding sites for YY2, except for its association with transposable retroviral elements (RE) and Endogenous Retroviral Elements (ERVs), remain to be identified. As a first step towards defining potential Yy2 functions matching or complementary to Yy1, we considered in vivo DNA binding sites of YY2 in trophoblast stem (TS) cells. Results We report the presence of YY2 protein in mouse-derived embryonic stem (ES) and TS cell lines. Following up on our previous report on ERV binding by YY2 in TS cells, we investigated the tissue-specificity of REX1 and YY2 binding and confirm binding to RE/ERV targets in both ES cells and TS cells. Because of the higher levels of expression, we chose TS cells to understand the role of Yy2 in gene and chromatin regulation. We used in vivo YY2 association as a measure to identify potential target genes. Sequencing of chromatin obtained in chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays carried out with αYY2 serum allowed us to identify a limited number of chromatin targets for YY2. Some putative binding sites were validated in regular ChIP assays and gene expression of genes nearby was altered in the absence of Yy2. Conclusions YY2 binding to ERVs is not confined to TS cells. In vivo binding sites share the presence of a consensus binding motif. Selected sites were uniquely bound by YY2 as

  5. Issues related to choosing a guard force structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The establishment of a federal security force has been suggested as an additional step to protect nuclear material. The force would be given the responsibility for guarding nuclear facilities and shipments of nuclear materials. A study to identify the issues that are relevant to choosing between the private guard forces that are presently employed by industry or a guard force under federal authority is summarized. To examine the issues which would be relevant, three possible types of security force structures were selected for comparison: a federal force under central authority, a private guard force employed by or under contract to a facility, and a private arrangement to employ local police officers similar to the arrangement for armed guards at airports. The issues were divided into seven categories: (1) legal considerations, (2) liability, (3) staffing and operations, (4) costs, (5) relationship to off-site forces, (6) management and control, and (7) transportation. (U.S.)

  6. Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang; , Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

    2013-03-12

    The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

  7. Possible relation of water structural relaxation to water anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-03-26

    The anomalous behavior of thermodynamic response functions is an unsolved problem in the physics of water. The mechanism that gives rise to the dramatic indefinite increase at low temperature in the heat capacity, the compressibility, and the coefficient of thermal expansion, is unknown. We explore this problem by analyzing both new and existing experimental data on the power spectrum S(Q, ω) of bulk and confined water at ambient pressure. When decreasing the temperature, we find that the liquid undergoes a structural transformation coinciding with the onset of an extended hydrogen bond network. This network onset seems to give rise to the marked viscoelastic behavior, consistent with the interesting possibility that the sound velocity and response functions of water depend upon both the frequency and wave vector. PMID:23483053

  8. The Role of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies on the Outcome of Assisted Reproductive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Razavi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm DNA is known to contribute one half of the genomic material to the offspring. The integrity of sperm DNA is important in fertilization, embryonic and fetal development, and postnatal child well being. The nature has created multiple barriers that allow only the fittest sperm to reach and fertilize an oocyte. However, assisted reproductive techniques (ART, like IVF and ICSI, may allow sperms with abnormal genomic material to enter the oocyte with minimal effort. This article describes structure of sperm DNA and different mechanism involved in sperm chromatin anomalies and DNA damage. Furthermore, this study elaborates possible sperm selection methods that may improve the outcome of ART.

  9. Bitopological spaces theory, relations with generalized algebraic structures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dvalishvili, Badri

    2005-01-01

    This monograph is the first and an initial introduction to the theory of bitopological spaces and its applications. In particular, different families of subsets of bitopological spaces are introduced and various relations between two topologies are analyzed on one and the same set; the theory of dimension of bitopological spaces and the theory of Baire bitopological spaces are constructed, and various classes of mappings of bitopological spaces are studied. The previously known results as well the results obtained in this monograph are applied in analysis, potential theory, general topology, a

  10. Development of software program named SLMS(Structure Life Management System) for the safety related structure of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The personal-computer software program named SLMS(Structure Life Management System) was developed for the safety related structure of NPP(Nuclear Power Plant). SLMS is constituted of three part, database system containing various inspection data, operation program for input/output of the inspection data, and application program for efficient operation of database system. Using the SLMS, the field engineers can easily acquire the information about the various inspection data, repair and related histories of NPP structures. SLMS will contribute to the efficient maintenance of NPP structures

  11. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, ...

  12. Transcriptional regulation by histone modifications: towards a theory of chromatin re-organization during stem cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin-related mechanisms, as e.g. histone modifications, are known to be involved in regulatory switches within the transcriptome. Only recently, mathematical models of these mechanisms have been established. So far they have not been applied to genome-wide data. We here introduce a mathematical model of transcriptional regulation by histone modifications and apply it to data of trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and 27 (H3K27me3) in mouse pluripotent and lineage-committed cells. The model describes binding of protein complexes to chromatin which are capable of reading and writing histone marks. Molecular interactions of the complexes with DNA and modified histones create a regulatory switch of transcriptional activity. The regulatory states of the switch depend on the activity of histone (de-) methylases, the strength of complex-DNA-binding and the number of nucleosomes capable of cooperatively contributing to complex-binding. Our model explains experimentally measured length distributions of modified chromatin regions. It suggests (i) that high CpG-density facilitates recruitment of the modifying complexes in embryonic stem cells and (ii) that re-organization of extended chromatin regions during lineage specification into neuronal progenitor cells requires targeted de-modification. Our approach represents a basic step towards multi-scale models of transcriptional control during development and lineage specification. (paper)

  13. Extract relation between structures of proton and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Schroedinger wrote that an interaction between microscopic physical objects is controlled by specific resonance laws. According to these laws, the difference between two eigenenergies (eigenfrequencies) in one system should be equal to each other: hv1-hv'1=hv2-hv'2, v1-v'1=v2-v'2. Therefore, the eigenfrequencies are additive. In other words, the resonance condition is formulated in the following way: oscillations participating in an interaction process should be constituents of the same frequency. Thus, we come to the conclusion: in a whole interacting self-consistent wave system the hierarchy of frequencies is established So, the sum of all partial frequencies is an integral of motion. Any interaction in a microscopic hierarchic wave system exhibits the resonance character. Due to the above-said the corresponding partial motions are determinate. As the resonance condition arises from the fundamental energy conservation law, the rhythms and synchronization of the majority of phenomena to be observed are the reflection of the universal property of self-organization of the Universe. The Huygens synchronization principle is substantiated at the microscopic level. We come to the conclusion that the proton stability can be explained by the assumption: channel motions in a proton are exactly synchronous. Therefore proton represent coherent synchronized states The aim this paper is to establish some bridge between structures of proton and nuclei as the further extension our phenomenological analysis. The parameter-free formula for spectra of nuclei has been obtained which establish some bridge between the structures of a proton and nuclei. The energies of nuclear states have been systematically analyzed by using all available experimental data. The interest of our results is not only in their closeness to the experimental data, but also in the derivation of formula from the fundamental law of Nature: the conservation law of energy-momentum. These observations

  14. How Structure Sense for Algebraic Expressions or Equations Is Related to Structure Sense for Abstract Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotna, Jarmila; Hoch, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Many students have difficulties with basic algebraic concepts at high school and at university. In this paper two levels of algebraic structure sense are defined: for high school algebra and for university algebra. We suggest that high school algebra structure sense components are sub-components of some university algebra structure sense…

  15. Structures of General Relativity in Dilaton-Maxwell Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kechkin, Oleg V

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that electro (magneto) static sector of Maxwell's electrodynamics coupled to the dilaton field in a string theory form possesses the symmetry group of the stationary General Relativity in vacuum. Performing the Ernst formalism, we develope a technique for generation of exact solutions in this modified electrodynamics on the base of the normalized Ehlers symmetry transformation. In the electrostatic case, we construct and study a general class of spherically symmetric solutions that describes a point-like sourse of the Coulomb type. It is shown that this source is characterized by asymptotical freedom of the electrostatic interaction at short distances. Also it is established that the total electrostatic energy of this source is finite and inversely proportional to the dilaton-Maxwell coupling constant.

  16. Structures of general relativity in dilaton-Maxwell electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechkin, O. V.; Mosharev, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that electro (magneto) static sector of Maxwell’s electrodynamics coupled to the dilaton field in a string theory form possesses the symmetry group of the stationary General Relativity in vacuum. Performing the Ernst formalism, we develope a technique for generation of exact solutions in this modified electrodynamics on the base of the normalized Ehlers symmetry transformation. In the electrostatic case, we construct and study a general class of spherically symmetric solutions that describes a pointlike source of the Coulomb type. It is demonstrated that this source is characterized by finite and singularity-free interaction at short distances. Also it is established that the total electrostatic energy of this source is finite and inversely proportional to the dilaton-Maxwell coupling constant.

  17. Relations of aqueduct with some structures of mesencephalon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aqueductus mesencephali is the biggest part of the ventricular system and that is why it is the most common place of intraventricular obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid. This study was done in order to study topographic characteristics of aqueduct more thoroughly. Materials and methods. Transversal sections of mesencephalon were made in three levels. The first section was made caudally immediately from the posterior commissure. The second section was made in the middle part of the superior colliculi, and the third section was made in the rostral parts of the caudal sections of the superior colliculi. Distances of the aqueduct from structures of mesencephalon, obtained on the second section, are: 1. The distance of the aqueduct from the superior colliculi - 6.96 mm; 2. The distance of the aqueduct from the red nucleus - 6.02 mm; 3. The distance of the aqueduct from the substantia nigra - 12.29 mm; 4. The distance of the aqueduct from the interpeduncular fossa - 10.22 mm. Conclusion. Knowledge of the anatomy of the aqueductus mesencephali is very important because of interpretation of patogenesis of hidrocefalus as well as of other syndromes that occure in some pathological processes in the system of ventricles.

  18. Analysis of β-globin chromatin micro-environment using a novel 3C variant, 4Cv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Ryan C; Eskiw, Christopher H; Caley, Daniel P; Carter, David R F

    2010-01-01

    Higher order chromatin folding is critical to a number of developmental processes, including the regulation of gene expression. Recently developed biochemical techniques such as RNA TRAP and chromosome conformation capture (3C) have provided us with the tools to probe chromosomal structures. These techniques have been applied to the β-globin locus, revealing a complex pattern of interactions with regions along the chromosome that the gene resides on. However, biochemical and microscopy data on the nature of β-globin interactions with other chromosomes is contradictory. Therefore we developed a novel 4C variant, Complete-genome 3C by vectorette amplification (4Cv), which allows an unbiased and quantitative method to examine chromosomal structure. We have used 4Cv to study the microenvironment of the β-globin locus in mice and show that a significant proportion of the interactions of β-globin are inter-chromosomal. Furthermore, our data show that in the liver, where the gene is active, β-globin is more likely to interact with other chromosomes, compared to the brain where the gene is silent and is more likely to interact with other regions along the same chromosome. Our data suggest that transcriptional activation of the β-globin locus leads to a change in nuclear position relative to the chromosome territory. PMID:20927371

  19. High-resolution in situ hybridization analysis on the chromosomal interval 61C7-61C8 of Drosophila melanogaster reveals interbands as open chromatin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Thomas; Glotov, Alexander; Saumweber, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is organized in contiguous domains that differ in protein binding, histone modifications, transcriptional activity, and in their degree of compaction. Genome-wide comparisons suggest that, overall, the chromatin organization is similar in different cells within an organism. Here, we compare the structure and activity of the 61C7-61C8 interval in polytene and diploid cells of Drosophila. By in situ hybridization on polytene chromosomes combined with high-resolution microscopy, we mapped the boundaries of the 61C7-8 interband and of the 61C7 and C8 band regions, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the 61C7-8 interband is significantly larger than estimated previously. This interband extends over 20 kbp and is in the range of the flanking band domains. It contains several active genes and therefore can be considered as an open chromatin domain. Comparing the 61C7-8 structure of Drosophila S2 cells and polytene salivary gland cells by ChIP for chromatin protein binding and histone modifications, we observe a highly consistent domain structure for the proximal 13 kbp of the domain in both cell types. However, the distal 7 kbp of the open domain differs in protein binding and histone modification between both tissues. The domain contains four protein-coding genes in the proximal part and two noncoding transcripts in the distal part. The differential transcriptional activity of one of the noncoding transcripts correlates with the observed differences in the chromatin structure between both tissues. The significance of our findings for the organization and structure of open chromatin domains will be discussed. PMID:26520107

  20. Interaction of maize chromatin-associated HMG proteins with mononucleosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichota, J.; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    maize HMGA and five different HMGB proteins with mononucleosomes (containing approx. 165 bp of DNA) purified from micrococcal nuclease-digested maize chromatin. The HMGB proteins interacted with the nucleosomes independent of the presence of the linker histone H1, while the binding of HMGA in the...

  1. Linking Morphogen and Chromatin in the Hair Follicle

    OpenAIRE

    Mesa, Kailin R; Greco, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Xiong et al. (2013) identify a critical role for the chromatin remodeler, Brg1, in hair follicle stem cell maintenance and epidermal repair. Brg1 interacts with the Shh9 signaling pathway to create a positive feedback loop that fuels hair follicle growth.

  2. ATP independent and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unraveling the biochemistry of chromatin dynamics during DNA replication, repair, recombination as well as transcription is the current challenge in biology. The nucleosomes containing histone octamer are the crucial elements responsible for winding and unwinding eukaryotic DNA. During DNA centric events, these nucleosomes translocate along the DNA with concomitant covalent modifications of histones. We explored these mechanisms in wheat seedlings after irradiation with survivable dose of 60Co-γ radiations. The histones isolated from irradiated seedlings showed that global acetylation of H3 decreased and H4 increased in dose depend manner till 100 grays. Time course of individual modifications showed that for H3K4 and H3K9 acetylation decreased, whereas H3S10, phosphorylation increased. There were fluctuations in acetylation of H4K5, H4K12 and H4K16, whereas H4K8 showed hyperacetylation. We found ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity as trans-transfer of the nucleosomes from wheat native donor chromatin on a labeled nucleosome positioning sequence and cis-transfer of the mononucleosomes in vitro. However, there was no significant change in this activity in extracts obtained from irradiated wheat seedlings. This is the first report on, demonstration of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity and site specific H3 and H4 modifications in response to exposure to ionizing radiation in case of plants. (author)

  3. Chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, Godelieve

    2012-01-01

    During my PhD project, I studied the role of several chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break (DSB) response. We discovered that both CHD4 and SMARCA5 are required for ubiquitin signaling through the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, which is a central signaling event in the response

  4. Generation of bivalent chromatin domains during cell fate decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gobbi Marco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In self-renewing, pluripotent cells, bivalent chromatin modification is thought to silence (H3K27me3 lineage control genes while 'poising' (H3K4me3 them for subsequent activation during differentiation, implying an important role for epigenetic modification in directing cell fate decisions. However, rather than representing an equivalently balanced epigenetic mark, the patterns and levels of histone modifications at bivalent genes can vary widely and the criteria for identifying this chromatin signature are poorly defined. Results Here, we initially show how chromatin status alters during lineage commitment and differentiation at a single well characterised bivalent locus. In addition we have determined how chromatin modifications at this locus change with gene expression in both ensemble and single cell analyses. We also show, on a global scale, how mRNA expression may be reflected in the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K27me3. Conclusions While truly 'poised' bivalently modified genes may exist, the original hypothesis that all bivalent genes are epigenetically premarked for subsequent expression might be oversimplistic. In fact, from the data presented in the present work, it is equally possible that many genes that appear to be bivalent in pluripotent and multipotent cells may simply be stochastically expressed at low levels in the process of multilineage priming. Although both situations could be considered to be forms of 'poising', the underlying mechanisms and the associated implications are clearly different.

  5. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  6. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. PMID:24522270

  7. Rearrangement of chromatin domains during development in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassetzky, Y; Hair, A; Méchali, M

    2000-06-15

    A dynamic change in the organization of different gene domains transcribed by RNA polymerase I, II, or III occurs during the progression from quiescent [pre-midblastula transition (pre-MBT)] to active (post-MBT) embryos during Xenopus development. In the rDNA, c-myc, and somatic 5S gene domains, a transition from random to specific anchorage to the nuclear matrix occurs when chromatin domains become active. The keratin gene domain was also randomly associated to the nuclear matrix before MBT, whereas a defined attachment site was found in keratinocytes. In agreement with this specification, ligation-mediated (LM)-PCR genomic footprinting carried out on the subpopulation of 5S domains specifically attached to the matrix reveals the hallmarks of determined chromatin after the midblastula transition. In contrast, the same analysis performed on the total 5S gene population does not reveal specific chromatin organization, validating the use of nuclear matrix fractionation to unveil active chromatin domains. These data provide a means for the determination of active chromosomal territories in the embryo and emphasize the role of nuclear architecture in regulated gene expression during development. PMID:10859171

  8. Effect of triiodothyronine on rat liver chromatin protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1) Injection of triiodothyronine to rats stimulates protein kinase activity in liver chromatin nonhistone proteins. A significant increase was found after two daily injections. A 4-fold increase was observed with the purified enzyme after eight daily injections of the hormone. No variations were observed in cytosol protein kinase activity. Electrophoretic pattern, effect of heat denaturation, effect of p-hydroxymercuribenzoate seem to indicate that the enzyme present in treated rats is not identical to the enzyme in control animals, which suggests that thyroid hormone has induced nuclear protein kinase. Diiodothyronine, 3, 3', 5'-triiodothyronine have no effect on protein kinase. 2) Chromatin non-histone proteins isolated from rats injected with triiodothyronine incorporated more 32P when incubated with [γ-32P]ATP than the chromatin proteins from untreated rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the in vitro 32P incorporation. It is suggested that some of the biological activity of thyroid hormone could be mediated through its effect on chromatin non-histone proteins. (orig.)

  9. Control of the Transition to Flowering by Chromatin Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuehui He

    2009-01-01

    The timing of floral transition is critical to reproductive success in angiosperms and is genetically controlled by a network of flowering genes.In Arabidopsis,expression of certain flowering genes is regulated by various chromatin modifications,among which are two central regulators of flowering,namely FLOWERING LOCUS C(FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T(FT).Recent studies have revealed that a number of chromatin-modifying components are involved in activation or repression of FLC expression.Activation of FLC expression is associated with various 'active' chromatin modifications including acetylation of core histone tails,histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) methylation,H2B monoubiquitination,H3 lysine-36 (H3K36) di- and tri-methylation and deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z,whereas various 'repressive' histone modifications are associated with FLC repression,including histone deacetylation,H3K4 demethylation,histone H3 lysine-9(H3Kg) and H3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation,and histone arginine methylation.In addition,recent studies have revealed that Polycomb group gene-mediated transcriptional-silencing mechanism not only represses FLC expression,but also directly represses FT expression.Regulation of FLC expression provides a paradigm for control of the expression of other developmental genes in plants through chromatin mechanisms.

  10. Relations between structural and magnetic properties of actinide oxidic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work ternary oxides of Pr(IV), U(VI), Np(IV) and Np(VI) have been synthesized and investigated by X-ray-, spectroscopic and magnetic methods. In the case of Pr(IV), the paramagnetic ion was diluted with the diamagnetic Ce(IV) to perform EPR studies. In all compounds with metal ions with the f1-electronic configuration, the central ion shows a distorted octahedral coordination. The experimental effective magnetic moments are lower than the theoretical value for a f1-system in an ideal octahedral symmetry. This leads to the conclusion, that the covalent part of the bond between the central ion and oxygen can not be neglected in the investigated compounds. Magnetic ordering phenomena can be correlated definitely with the existence of An-O-An-chains in the lattice at least in one direction. The experimental data support the assumption of a critical An-An-spacing. In compounds with An-An-distances greater than the critical value no magnetic ordering was observed within the investigated temperature range. In NpGeO4 with eightfold coordination of the 5f3-electronic system, the Np-O-Np-chains are not linear. The angle of the O-Np-O-bonds seems to favour orbital overlapping, as the compound orders magnetically with a Np-Np-distance above the critical value. On some Np-compounds, Moessbauer studies were performed in the Institute of Experimental Nuclear Physics of the University of Karlsruhe. The results confirm the suggested structural and magnetic properties. (orig./RB)

  11. [Impact of energy related pollutants on chromosome structure]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of the structure of nucleosome cores using chymotrypsin as a probe of hydrophobic residues showed that only leu-20 of H3 was readily accessible. Primary sites of cleavage of H2a, H2b, and H4 were identified. Chymotrypsin removal of specific histone termini showed that removal of the amino-terminal plus the carboxy-terminal 13 residues of H2a caused little unfolding. Using carbon-13 NMR spectroscopic, about 10% of histone amino acid residues were found to be in termini that are highly mobile. The major mobile segments were amino terminal regions of H3 and H2a, plus a carboxy-terminal region of H2a. The histone variants and developmental changes during embryogenesis of sea urchin were characterized. The early histone gene organization in L. variegatus was characterized, a genomic library was cloned in lambda phage, and several histone gene clones were selected. The nucleosome core length DNA forms crystalline phases at physiological concentrations. Microscopic and NMR spectroscopic methods were used to identify crystalline phases and to establish phase diagrams for transitions between phases as functions of DNA concentration and temperature. The sequence specificities of binding of several polycyclic aromatic chemicals to early H3 and H2a genes were examined. Chemicals studied were the bis-(o-phenanthroline) Cu(I) complex, AAAF, benzopyrene dihydrodiol epoxide, methylene blue, and acridine orange A preliminary map of binding sites of CuOP, AAAF and BPDE in and near the H3 gene showed that several sequence regions were bound preferentially by two or more of these chemicals. CuOP appeared to exhibit the most specificity. 80 refs., 4 figs

  12. Phenotypic plasticity in Drosophila pigmentation caused by temperature sensitivity of a chromatin regulator network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Gibert

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to produce contrasting phenotypes in different environments. Although many examples have been described, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood. In particular, it is not clear how phenotypic plasticity is related to buffering, the maintenance of a constant phenotype against genetic or environmental variation. We investigate here the genetic basis of a particularly well described plastic phenotype: the abdominal pigmentation in female Drosophila melanogaster. Cold temperature induces a dark pigmentation, in particular in posterior segments, while higher temperature has the opposite effect. We show that the homeotic gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B has a major role in the plasticity of pigmentation in the abdomen. Abd-B plays opposite roles on melanin production through the regulation of several pigmentation enzymes. This makes the control of pigmentation very unstable in the posterior abdomen, and we show that the relative spatio-temporal expression of limiting pigmentation enzymes in this region of the body is thermosensitive. Temperature acts on melanin production by modulating a chromatin regulator network, interacting genetically with the transcription factor bric-à-brac (bab, a target of Abd-B and Hsp83, encoding the chaperone Hsp90. Genetic disruption of this chromatin regulator network increases the effect of temperature and the instability of the pigmentation pattern in the posterior abdomen. Colocalizations on polytene chromosomes suggest that BAB and these chromatin regulators cooperate in the regulation of many targets, including several pigmentation enzymes. We show that they are also involved in sex comb development in males and that genetic destabilization of this network is also strongly modulated by temperature for this phenotype. Thus, we propose that phenotypic plasticity of pigmentation is a side effect reflecting a global impact of temperature on epigenetic mechanisms

  13. Structure-property relations in bismuth-based Aurivillius phases

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, D Y S

    2001-01-01

    ferroelectric phase transition in Aurivillius phases. Orientational and translational domains arising from a change in crystal class and a doubling of the unit cell were detected. At the (PE) tetragonal - (PE) orthorhombic phase transition 90 deg ferroelastic domains are formed. Finally, at the (PE) orthorhombic to the (FE) orthorhombic phase transition centro-symmetry is lost, the ferroelastic orientation domain boundaries (ODBs) become ferroelectric and anti phase boundaries (APBs) are coupled with inversion domain boundaries (IDBs). The aim of this work was to relate the onset temperature and amplitude (qualitatively) of rotations of the octahedra to the onset of ferroelectricity in a range of Aurivillius compounds. Several stoichiometries were tested, including MBi sub 2 Nb sub 2 O sub 9 , MBi sub 4 Ti sub 4 O sub 1 sub 5 , M sub 2 Bi sub 4 Ti sub 5 O sub 1 sub 8 and MBi sub 8 Ti sub 7 O sub 2 sub 7 with the substitution of divalent (Ca sup 2 sup + , Sr sup 2 sup + , Pb sup 2 sup + and Ba sup 2 sup +) and...

  14. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  15. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  16. UV-induced pyrimidine dimers and trimethylpsoralen cross-links do not alter chromatin folding in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined the ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro following DNA damage by two different agents: UV irradiation at 254 nm and trimethylpsoralen plus near-UV light. Both agents damage DNA specifically, yet cause different degrees of unwinding (and possibly bending) of the DNA helix. In addition, trimethylpsoralen forms interstrand DNA cross-links. The structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers, induced by NaCl, were monitored by analytical ultracentrifugation, light scattering, and circular dichroism. Our results indicate that when chromatin fibers contain even large, nonphysiological amounts of DNA photodamage by either agent, the salt-induced folding of these fibers into higher ordered structures is unaffected. The compact 30-nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA photodamage (greater than one UV-induced photoproduct or trimethylpsoralen interstrand cross-link per nucleosome) with little or no change in the overall size or compaction of this structure

  17. Numeric Input Relations for Relational Learning with Applications to Community Structure Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jiuchuan; Jaeger, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Most work in the area of statistical relational learning (SRL) is focussed on discrete data, even though a few approaches for hybrid SRL models have been proposed that combine numerical and discrete variables. In this paper we distinguish numerical random variables for which a probability distrib...

  18. Time dependence of X gene reactivation induced by 5-azacytidine: Possible progressive restructuring of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the theoretical mechanism of DNA demethylation by 5-azacytidine, the complete demethylation of one site will require two cell divisions. If re-expression is directly related to demethylation, a maximal re-expression is expected after two cell divisions. In a hamster x human hybrid cell line containing an inactive human X chromosome treated by 5-azacytidine, the authors show that HPRT reactivation frequency is increased more than 10-fold when cells are allowed to divide 14 times before the selection for the HPRT reactivants. They suggest that the delay corresponds to changes in chromatin conformation

  19. Time dependence of X gene reactivation induced by 5-azacytidine: Possible progressive restructuring of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homman, N.; Heuertz, S.; Hors-Cayla, M.C. (INSERM U 12, Paris (France))

    1987-10-01

    According to the theoretical mechanism of DNA demethylation by 5-azacytidine, the complete demethylation of one site will require two cell divisions. If re-expression is directly related to demethylation, a maximal re-expression is expected after two cell divisions. In a hamster {times} human hybrid cell line containing an inactive human X chromosome treated by 5-azacytidine, the authors show that HPRT reactivation frequency is increased more than 10-fold when cells are allowed to divide 14 times before the selection for the HPRT reactivants. They suggest that the delay corresponds to changes in chromatin conformation.

  20. Fission Yeast Scm3 Mediates Stable Assembly of Cnp1 (CENP-A) into Centromeric Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Jessica S.; Hayashi, Takeshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Russell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Mis16 and Mis18 are subunits of a protein complex required for incorporation of the histone H3 variant CenH3 (Cnp1/CENP-A) into centromeric chromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. How the Mis16-Mis18 complex performs this function is unknown. Here we report that the Mis16-Mis18 complex is required for centromere localization of Scm3Sp, a Cnp1-binding protein related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scm3. Scm3Sp is required for centromeric localization of Cnp1, whilst Scm3Sp localizes a...