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Sample records for chromatin structure related

  1. [Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of neutron scatter techniques to the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin with the long term objective of understanding how the enormous lengths of DNA are folded into chromosomes. Micrococcal nuclease digestion kinetics have defined two subnucleosome particles; the chromatosome with 168 bp DNA, the histone octamer and one H1 and the nucleosome core particle with 146 bp DNA and the histone octamer. As will be discussed, the structure of the 146 bp DNA core particle is known in solution at low resolution from neutron scatter studies and in crystals. Based on this structure, the authors have a working model for the chromatosome and the mode of binding of H1. In order to define the structure of the nucleosome and also the different orders of chromatin structures they need to know the paths of DNA that link nucleosomes and the factors associated with chromosome functions that act on those DNA paths. The major region for this situation is the inherent variabilities in nucleosome DNA sequences, in the histone subtypes and their states of chemical modification and in the precise locations of nucleosomes. Such variabilities obscure the underlying principles that govern the packaging of DNA into the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin. The only way to elucidate these principles is to study the structures of nucleosomes and oligonucleosomes that are fully defined. They have largely achieved these objectives

  2. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin

  3. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin

  4. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  5. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Dept. of Molecular Genetics, V. Babes National Inst., Bd. Timisoara, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [Dept. of Cyclotron, H. Hulubei National Inst., Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  6. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  7. UV-induced structural changes in chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, H.; Zimmer, C.; Vengerov, Yu.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    UV-induced structural alterations of chromatin were studied by means of CD, electron microscopic, and gel electrophoretic measurements. The results indicate that chromatin undergoes serious structural changes after irradiation even at very low fluences. In the low fluence range the structural transitions from the higher ordered chromatin structure to the unfolded state occur without detectable changes in the content of histone H1 and of the core histones. Histone H1 disappears only at fluences above 10 kJ/m 2 . Furthermore, DNA in chromatin is much more sensitive against UV-irradiation and shows a higher degree of strand scission relative to free DNA. While fragmentation in free DNA occurs at fluences above 15 kJ/m 2 , it occurs even at 5.5 kJ/m 2 in the case of chromatin. The biological meaning of the observed UV-induced structural alterations of chromatin is discussed. (author)

  8. Megabase replication domains along the human genome: relation to chromatin structure and genome organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audit, Benjamin; Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Arneodo, Alain; Chen, Chun-Long; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs, marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of (i) the mechanisms that regulate the spatio-temporal replication program, and (ii) the links between origins activation, chromatin structure and transcription. In this chapter, we review the partitioning of the human genome into megabased-size replication domains delineated as N-shaped motifs in the strand compositional asymmetry profiles. They collectively span 28.3% of the genome and are bordered by more than 1,000 putative replication origins. We recapitulate the comparison of this partition of the human genome with high-resolution experimental data that confirms that replication domain borders are likely to be preferential replication initiation zones in the germline. In addition, we highlight the specific distribution of experimental and numerical chromatin marks along replication domains. Domain borders correspond to particular open chromatin regions, possibly encoded in the DNA sequence, and around which replication and transcription are highly coordinated. These regions also present a high evolutionary breakpoint density, suggesting that susceptibility to breakage might be linked to local open chromatin fiber state. Altogether, this chapter presents a compartmentalization of the human genome into replication domains that are landmarks of the human genome organization and are likely to play a key role in genome dynamics during evolution and in pathological situations.

  9. Structured illumination to spatially map chromatin motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Keith; Smelser, Amanda; Moreno, Naike Salvador; Holzwarth, George; Wang, Kevin; Levy, Preston; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre

    2018-05-01

    We describe a simple optical method that creates structured illumination of a photoactivatable probe and apply this method to characterize chromatin motions in nuclei of live cells. A laser beam coupled to a diffractive optical element at the back focal plane of an excitation objective generates an array of near diffraction-limited beamlets with FWHM of 340  ±  30  nm, which simultaneously photoactivate a 7  ×  7 matrix pattern of GFP-labeled histones, with spots 1.70  μm apart. From the movements of the photoactivated spots, we map chromatin diffusion coefficients at multiple microdomains of the cell nucleus. The results show correlated motions of nearest chromatin microdomain neighbors, whereas chromatin movements are uncorrelated at the global scale of the nucleus. The method also reveals a DNA damage-dependent decrease in chromatin diffusion. The diffractive optical element instrumentation can be easily and cheaply implemented on commercial inverted fluorescence microscopes to analyze adherent cell culture models. A protocol to measure chromatin motions in nonadherent human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is also described. We anticipate that the method will contribute to the identification of the mechanisms regulating chromatin mobility, which influences most genomic processes and may underlie the biogenesis of genomic translocations associated with hematologic malignancies. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  10. Chromosome aberration model combining radiation tracks, chromatin structure, DSB repair and chromatin mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, W.; Kundrat, P.

    2015-01-01

    The module that simulates the kinetics and yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations within the biophysical code PARTRAC is described. Radiation track structures simulated by Monte Carlo methods are overlapped with multi-scale models of DNA and chromatin to assess the resulting DNA damage. Spatial mobility of individual DNA ends from double-strand breaks is modelled simultaneously with their processing by the non-homologous end-joining enzymes. To score diverse types of chromosome aberrations, the joined ends are classified regarding their original chromosomal location, orientation and the involvement of centromeres. A comparison with experimental data on dicentrics induced by gamma and alpha particles shows that their relative dose dependence is predicted correctly, although the absolute yields are overestimated. The critical model assumptions on chromatin mobility and on the initial damage recognition and chromatin remodelling steps and their future refinements to solve this issue are discussed. (authors)

  11. Capturing Structural Heterogeneity in Chromatin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekundayo, Babatunde; Richmond, Timothy J; Schalch, Thomas

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin fiber organization is implicated in processes such as transcription, DNA repair and chromosome segregation, but how nucleosomes interact to form higher-order structure remains poorly understood. We solved two crystal structures of tetranucleosomes with approximately 11-bp DNA linker length at 5.8 and 6.7 Å resolution. Minimal intramolecular nucleosome-nucleosome interactions result in a fiber model resembling a flat ribbon that is compatible with a two-start helical architecture, and that exposes histone and DNA surfaces to the environment. The differences in the two structures combined with electron microscopy reveal heterogeneous structural states, and we used site-specific chemical crosslinking to assess the diversity of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions through identification of structure-sensitive crosslink sites that provide a means to characterize fibers in solution. The chromatin fiber architectures observed here provide a basis for understanding heterogeneous chromatin higher-order structures as they occur in a genomic context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  13. Nuclear visions enhanced: chromatin structure, organization and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Meshorer, Eran; Herrmann, Harald; Raška, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The EMBO Workshop on ‘Chromatin Structure, Organization and Dynamics' took place in April 2011 in Prague, Czech Republic. Participants presented data on the generation of models of the genome, working to correlate changes in the organization of chromatin with the functional state of the genome.

  14. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  15. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist

  16. Probing chromatin structure with nuclease sensitivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R I; Khosla, S; Feil, R

    2001-01-01

    To further our understanding of genomic imprinting it will be essential to identify key control elements, and to investigate their regulation by both epigenetic modifications (such as DNA methylation) and trans-acting factors. So far, sequence elements that regulate parental allele-specific gene expression have been identified in a number of imprinted loci, either because of their differential DNA methylation or through functional studies in transgenic mice (1,2). A systematic search for allele-specific chromatin features constitutes an alternative strategy to identify elements that regulate imprinting. The validity of such an in vivo chromatin approach derives from the fact that in several known imprinting control-elements, a specialized organization of chromatin characterized by nuclease hypersensitivity is present on only one of the two parental chromosome (3). For example, the differentially methylated 5 -portion of the human SNRPN gene-a sequence element that controls imprinting in the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes' domain on chromosome 15q11- q13-has strong DNase-I hypersensitive sites on the unmethylated paternal chromosome (4). A differentially methylated region that regulates the imprinting of H19 and that of the neighboring insulin-like growth factor-2 gene on mouse chromosome 7 was also found to have parental chromosome-specific hypersensitive sites (5,6). The precise nature of the allelic nuclease hypersensitivity in these and other imprinted loci remains to be determined in more detail, for example, by applying complementary chromatin methodologies (7,8). However, it is commonly observed that a nuclease hypersensitive site corresponds to a small region where nucleosomes are absent or partially disrupted.

  17. Higher-order structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowary, P.T.; Widom, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a method for partially purifying chromatin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) to a level suitable for studies of its higher-order folding. This has required the use of yeast strains that are free of the ubiquitous yeast killer virus. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction show that the yeast chromatin undergoes a cation-dependent folding into 30-nm filaments that resemble those characteristic of higher-cell chromatin; moreover, the packing of nucleosomes within the yeast 30-nm filaments is similar to that of higher cells. These results imply that yeast has a protein or protein domain that serves the role of the histone H 1 found in higher cells; physical and genetic studies of the yeast activity could help elucidate the structure and function of H 1. Images of the yeast 30-nm filaments can be used to test crossed-linker models for 30-nm filament structure

  18. RNA polymerase III transcription - regulated by chromatin structure and regulator of nuclear chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascali, Chiara; Teichmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription is regulated by modifications of the chromatin. DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation have been linked to Pol III transcriptional activity. In addition to being regulated by modifications of DNA and histones, Pol III genes and its transcription factors have been implicated in the organization of nuclear chromatin in several organisms. In yeast, the ability of the Pol III transcription system to contribute to nuclear organization seems to be dependent on direct interactions of Pol III genes and/or its transcription factors TFIIIC and TFIIIB with the structural maintenance of chromatin (SMC) protein-containing complexes cohesin and condensin. In human cells, Pol III genes and transcription factors have also been shown to colocalize with cohesin and the transcription regulator and genome organizer CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF). Furthermore, chromosomal sites have been identified in yeast and humans that are bound by partial Pol III machineries (extra TFIIIC sites - ETC; chromosome organizing clamps - COC). These ETCs/COC as well as Pol III genes possess the ability to act as boundary elements that restrict spreading of heterochromatin.

  19. Chromatin Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Episomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    EBV latent infection is characterized by a highly restricted pattern of viral gene expression. EBV can establish latent infections in multiple different tissue types with remarkable variation and plasticity in viral transcription and replication. During latency, the viral genome persists as a multi-copy episome, a non-integrated-closed circular DNA with nucleosome structure similar to cellular chromosomes. Chromatin assembly and histone modifications contribute to the regulation of viral gene expression, DNA replication, and episome persistence during latency. This review focuses on how EBV latency is regulated by chromatin and its associated processes.

  20. Chromatin Structure in Cell Differentiation, Aging and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kheradmand Kia (Sima)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractChromatin is the structure that the eukaryotic genome is packaged into, allowing over a metre of DNA to fit into the small volume of the nucleus. It is composed of DNA and proteins, most of which are histones. This DNA-protein complex is the template for a number of essential cell

  1. Relationship between chromatin structure and sensitivity to molecularly targeted auger electron radiation therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terry, S.Y.A.; Vallis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chromatin structure was

  2. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eBeneke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose, the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1, was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor.

  3. Using local chromatin structure to improve CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunru; Zeng, Shiyang; Hu, Ruikun; Wang, Xiangxiu; Huang, Weilai; Liu, Jiangfang; Wang, Luying; Liu, Guifen; Cao, Ying; Zhang, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Although the CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully applied in zebrafish, considerable variations in efficiency have been observed for different gRNAs. The workload and cost of zebrafish mutant screening is largely dependent on the mutation rate of injected embryos; therefore, selecting more effective gRNAs is especially important for zebrafish mutant construction. Besides the sequence features, local chromatin structures may have effects on CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency, which remain largely unexplored. In the only related study in zebrafish, nucleosome organization was not found to have an effect on CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency, which is inconsistent with recent studies in vitro and in mammalian cell lines. To understand the effects of local chromatin structure on CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency in zebrafish, we first determined that CRISPR/Cas9 introduced genome editing mainly before the dome stage. Based on this observation, we reanalyzed our published nucleosome organization profiles and generated chromatin accessibility profiles in the 256-cell and dome stages using ATAC-seq technology. Our study demonstrated that chromatin accessibility showed positive correlation with CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency, but we did not observe a clear correlation between nucleosome organization and CRISPR/Cas9 efficiency. We constructed an online database for zebrafish gRNA selection based on local chromatin structure features that could prove beneficial to zebrafish homozygous mutant construction via CRISPR/Cas9.

  4. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model.

  5. Large-scale Comparative Study of Hi-C-based Chromatin 3D Structure Modeling Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex polymer molecule in eukaryotic cells, primarily consisting of DNA and histones. Many works have shown that the 3D folding of chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA expression. The recently proposed Chro- mosome

  6. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  7. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  8. Structural domains and conformational changes in nuclear chromatin: a quantitative thermodynamic approach by differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, C; Abelmoschi, M L; Gogioso, L; Parodi, S; Barboro, P; Cavazza, B; Patrone, E

    1989-04-18

    A good deal of information on the thermodynamic properties of chromatin was derived in the last few years from optical melting experiments. The structural domains of the polynucleosomal chain, the linker, and the core particle denature as independent units. The differential scanning calorimetry profile of isolated chromatin is made up of three endotherms, at approximately 74, 90, and 107 degrees C, having an almost Gaussian shape. Previous work on this matter, however, was mainly concerned with the dependence of the transition enthalpy on external parameters, such as the ionic strength, or with the melting of nuclei from different sources. In this paper we report the structural assignment of the transitions of rat liver nuclei, observed at 58, 66, 75, 92, and 107 degrees C. They are representative of the quiescent state of the cell. The strategy adopted in this work builds on the method developed for the investigation of complex biological macromolecules. The heat absorption profile of the nucleus was related to the denaturation of isolated nuclear components; electron microscopy and electrophoretic techniques were used for their morphological and molecular characterization. The digestion of chromatin by endogenous nuclease mimics perfectly the decondensation of the higher order structure and represented the source of several misinterpretations. This point was carefully examined in order to define unambiguously the thermal profile of native nuclei. The low-temperature transitions, centered around 58 and 66 degrees C, arise from the melting of scaffolding structures and of the proteins associated with heterogeneous nuclear RNA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Fast neutron irradiation effects on liver chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Radu, L.

    1996-01-01

    The growing interest in neutron therapy requires complex studies on the mechanisms of neutron action on biological systems, especially on chromatin. The chromatin was extracted from a normal tissue-livers of Wistar rats - and from a tumoral tissue - Walker tumour maintained on Wistar rats. Irradiation doses from 5 Gy to 100 Gy by fast neutron intense beams produced via d(13.5 MeV) +Be (thick target) reaction at Bucharest U-120 Classical Cyclotron were used. To study the post-irradiation effects, various methods were employed. So, the variation in the 260 nm absorbency in chromatin thermal transition was pursuit. The chromatin-ethidium bromide complexes fluorescence with λ ex =480 nm and λ em =600 nm was analyzed. To determine chromatin DNA strand breaks a fluorimetric method, with cells' suspensions as starting material was used. This method requires a partial treatment with alkali producing three components: T-estimating the total fluorescence of DNA double helix, P-assigning the untwisting rate and B-the blank, where DNA is completely unfolded The percentsge of DNA double strand,-D-, remaining after this treatment, is: %D=100x(P-B)/(T-B). The intrinsic chromatin fluorescence was determined for tyrosine (λ ex =280 nm, λ em =305 nm), specific for badic chromatin prooteins, and for tryptophane (λ ex =290 nm, λ em =345 nm) specific for acid chromatin proteins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed: The double fluorescent labelling of chromatin was realized with acridine orange for DNA and with dansyl chloride for chromatin proteins. Fluorescence intensity determinations were done with λ ex =505 nm, λ em =530 nm for acridine orange and with λ ex =323 nm, λ em =505 nm for dansyl chloride. A Pye Unicam SP 1800 spectrophotometer and a Aminco SPF 500 spectrofluorimeter were employed. (author)

  10. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  11. Adenovirus chromatin structure at different stages of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniell, E.; Groff, D.E.; Fedor, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    The authors investigated the structure of adenovirus deoxyribonecleic acid (DNA)-protein complexes in nuclei of infected cells by using micrococal nuclease. Parental (infecting) DNA was digested into multimers which had a unit fragment size that was indistinguishable from the size of the nucleosomal repeat of cellular chromatin. This pattern was maintained in parental DNA throughout infection. Similar repeating units were detected in hamster cells that were nonpermissive for human adenovirus and in cells pretreated with n-butyrate. Late in infection, the pattern of digestion of viral DNA was determined by two different experimental approaches. Nuclear DNA was electrophoresed, blotted, and hybridized with labeled viral sequences; in this procedure all virus-specific DNA was detected. This technique revealed a diffuse protected band of viral DNA that was smaller than 160 base pairs, but no discrete multimers. All regions of the genome were represented in the protected DNA. To examine the nuclease protection of newly replicated viral DNA, infected cells were labeled with (/sup 3/)thymidine after blocking of cellular DNA synthesis but not viral DNA synthesis. With this procedure they identified a repeating unit which was distinctly different from the cellular nucleosomal repeat. The authors found broad bands with midpoints at 200, 400, and 600 base pairs, as well as the limit digest material revealed by blotting. High-resolution acrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the viral species comprised a series of closely spaced bands ranging in size from less than 30 to 250 base pairs.

  12. Large-scale Comparative Study of Hi-C-based Chromatin 3D Structure Modeling Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Cheng

    2018-05-17

    Chromatin is a complex polymer molecule in eukaryotic cells, primarily consisting of DNA and histones. Many works have shown that the 3D folding of chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA expression. The recently proposed Chro- mosome Conformation Capture technologies, especially the Hi-C assays, provide us an opportunity to study how the 3D structures of the chromatin are organized. Based on the data from Hi-C experiments, many chromatin 3D structure modeling methods have been proposed. However, there is limited ground truth to validate these methods and no robust chromatin structure alignment algorithms to evaluate the performance of these methods. In our work, we first made a thorough literature review of 25 publicly available population Hi-C-based chromatin 3D structure modeling methods. Furthermore, to evaluate and to compare the performance of these methods, we proposed a novel data simulation method, which combined the population Hi-C data and single-cell Hi-C data without ad hoc parameters. Also, we designed a global and a local alignment algorithms to measure the similarity between the templates and the chromatin struc- tures predicted by different modeling methods. Finally, the results from large-scale comparative tests indicated that our alignment algorithms significantly outperform the algorithms in literature.

  13. Model for the structure of the active nucleolar chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labhart, P.; Ness, P.; Banz, E.; Parish, R.; Koller, T.; Universitaet Zurich, Switzerland)

    1983-01-01

    Transcribed ribosomal genes of Xenopus laevis oocytes and of Dictyostelium discoideum were studied electron microscopically using step gradients at different ionic strengths. Under these conditions the fiber of the active chromatin appears smooth and is indistinguishable from free DNA. The accessibility of the coding region and of a nontranscribed spacer region to restriction enzymes and micrococcal nuclease were investigated. All of the results obtained are consistent with a model in which active nucleolar chromatin is mostly composed of free DNA and the components required for transcription. 50 references, 7 figures

  14. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  15. Structural chromatin organization as a factor determining the rate of chromatin endonucleolysis in irradiated and intact thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Ivannik, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of chromatin endonucleolysis in hypotonized thymocytes incubating in digestive buffers containing different concentrations of potassium, magnesium, calcium, and mercaptoethanol. Inhibition of endonucleolysis by univalent cation during the first 20 min of incubation was followed by intensive chromatin degradation. A decrease in free potassium content retarded chromatin degradation and enhanced the inhibiting effect of the univalent cations. The regularities of changes in the rate of chromatin endonucleolysis in different digestive buffers were similar with both exposed and intact thymocytes

  16. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  17. The effect of higher order chromatin structure on DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.; Warters, R.L.; Higashikubo, R.

    1985-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure are thought to play an important role in various radiobiological end points, i.e., DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival. The authors use here the isoleucine deprivation technique to decondense higher order chromatin structure and asses X-ray induced DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival on cells with decondensed chromatin as compared to controls. This chromatin decondensation manifests itself as a 30 fold decrease in nuclear area occupied by heterochromatin, an increased rate of Micrococcal nuclease digestion, 15% increased ethidium bromide intercalation and an altered binding capacity of Hl histone. These chromatin/nuclear changes do not affect X-ray induced DNA damage as measured by the alkaline elution technique or cell survival but slows DNA damage repair by 2 fold. Therefore, even though the chromatin appears more accessible to DNA damage and repair processes, these particular nuclear changes do not affect the DNA damaging effects of X-rays and in addition, repair is not enhanced by the ''relaxed'' state of chromatin. It is proposed that the altered metabolic state of isoleucine deprived cells provides a less efficient system for the repair of X-ray induced DNA damage

  18. [Automated morphometric evaluation of the chromatin structure of liver cell nuclei after vagotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butusova, N N; Zhukotskiĭ, A V; Sherbo, I V; Gribkov, E N; Dubovaia, T K

    1989-05-01

    The morphometric analysis of the interphase chromatine structure of the hepatic cells nuclei was carried out on the automated TV installation for the quantitative analysis of images "IBAS-2" (by the OPTON firm, the FRG) according to 50 optical and geometric parameters during various periods (1.2 and 4 weeks) after the vagotomy operation. It is determined that upper-molecular organisation of chromatine undergoes the biggest changes one week after operation, and changes of granular component are more informative than changes of the nongranular component (with the difference 15-20%). It was also revealed that chromatine components differ in tinctorial properties, which are evidently dependent on physicochemical characteristics of the chromatine under various functional conditions of the cell. As a result of the correlation analysis the group of morphometric indices of chromatine structure was revealed, which are highly correlated with level of transcription activity of chromatine during various terms after denervation. The correlation quotient of these parameters is 0.85-0.97. The summing up: vagus denervation of the liver causes changes in the morphofunctional organisation of the chromatine.

  19. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  20. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  1. The global relationship between chromatin physical topology, fractal structure, and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Tiwari, A; Ruhoff, P T

    2017-01-01

    in an empty space, but in a highly complex, interrelated, and dense nanoenvironment that profoundly influences chemical interactions. We explored the relationship between the physical nanoenvironment of chromatin and gene transcription in vitro. We analytically show that changes in the fractal dimension, D...... show that the increased heterogeneity of physical structure of chromatin due to increase in fractal dimension correlates with increased heterogeneity of gene networks. These findings indicate that the higher order folding of chromatin topology may act as a molecular-pathway independent code regulating...

  2. Nuclear and chromatin structures and their influence on the radiosensitivity of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleinick, N.L.; Chiu, S.-M.

    1994-01-01

    Among the factors contributing to the distribution of DNA damage within irradiated mammalian cell nuclei are the interactions of DNA with nuclear proteins and the formation of multi-molecular chromatin structures. Studies on the manipulation of chromatin structures of isolated nuclei are summarised. The majority of chromatin within the nucleus of living cells is tightly compacted into nucleosomal superhelices and other higher order structures which have a limited ability to be damaged by radiation. The treatment of isolated nuclei with hypotonic buffers causes a decondensation of these structures and markedly sensitises the DNA to radiation, while retaining the majority of the chromosomal proteins. On the other hand, treatment of nuclei with hypertonic buffers strips the DNA of specific classes of nuclear proteins, destroying chromatin structure, and this procedure also enhances the sensitivity of the DNA to radiation. The various expanded chromatin structures are models for the structure of the minor fraction of DNA which is decondensed in preparation for transcription or replication. The combined results indicate that the majority of nuclear DNA is protected by histones and other nuclear proteins from radiation damage, partially as a result of the limited accessibility of the condensed structures to hydroxyl radical and partially as a result of the scavenging of radicals by the proteins. (Author)

  3. Chromatin structure in the unicellular algae Olisthodiscus luteus, Crypthecodinium cohnii and Peridiniun balticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P J; Burghardt, R C

    1980-01-01

    Isolated nuclei of the unicellular alga Olisthodiscus luteus, the uninucleate dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii and the binucleate dinoflagellate Peridinium balticum were lysed and deposited on grids by the microcentrifugation technique. The ultrastructure of the released chromatin fibers was compared to that of mouse liver nuclei. Chromatin from nuclei of Olisthodiscus luteus and the "eukaryotic" nuclei of Peridinium balticum, appeared as linear arrays of regularly repeating subunits which were identical in size and morphology to mouse nucleosomes. In contrast, the chromatin fibers from Crypthecodinium cohnii nuclei appeared as smoothe threads with a diameter of about 6.5 nm. Nuclear preparations containing mixtures of "dinokaryotic" and "eukaryotic" nuclei of Peridinium balticum also contained smooth fibers which most likely originated from the dinokaryotic nuclei. These and other results demonstrating the presence of nucleosomes in lower eukaryotes suggest that the subunit structure of chromatin arose very early in the evolution of the eukaryotic cell.

  4. Local changes of higher-order chromatin structure during DSB-repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, M; Lukasova, E; Gabrielova, B; Ondrej, V; Kozubek, S

    2008-01-01

    We show that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced in DNA of human cells by γ-radiation arise mainly in active, gene-rich, decondensed chromatin. We demonstrate that DSBs show limited movement in living cells, occasionally resulting in their permanent clustering, which poses a risk of incorrect DNA rejoining. In addition, some DSBs remain unrepaired for several days after irradiation, forming lesions repairable only with difficulty which are hazardous for genome stability. These 'late' DSBs colocalize with heterochromatin markers (dimethylated histone H3 at lysine 9, HP1 and CENP-A proteins), despite the low density of the surrounding chromatin. This indicates that there is epigenetic silencing of loci close to unrepaired DSBs and/or stabilization of damaged decondensed chromatin loops during repair and post-repair reconstitution of chromatin structure

  5. Chromatin structure and epigenetics of tumour cells: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Hájek, R.; Harničarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 51-61 ISSN 1871-529X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : tumour cells * chromatin * radiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Chromatin Structure and Replication Origins: Determinants Of Chromosome Replication And Nuclear Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Owen K.; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA replication program is, in part, determined by the epigenetic landscape that governs local chromosome architecture and directs chromosome duplication. Replication must coordinate with other biochemical processes occurring concomitantly on chromatin, such as transcription and remodeling, to insure accurate duplication of both genetic and epigenetic features and to preserve genomic stability. The importance of genome architecture and chromatin looping in coordinating cellular processes on chromatin is illustrated by two recent sets of discoveries. First, chromatin-associated proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery were shown to affect the timing of DNA replication. These chromatin-associated proteins could be working in concert, or perhaps in competition, with the transcriptional machinery and with chromatin modifiers to determine the spatial and temporal organization of replication initiation events. Second, epigenetic interactions are mediated by DNA sequences that determine chromosomal replication. In this review we summarize recent findings and current models linking spatial and temporal regulation of the replication program with epigenetic signaling. We discuss these issues in the context of the genome’s three-dimensional structure with an emphasis on events occurring during the initiation of DNA replication. PMID:24905010

  7. Structural hierarchy of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei based on small-angle neutron scattering: Fractal nature of the large-scale chromatin organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, D. V.; Filatov, M. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh.; Stellbrink, J.; Pantina, R. A.; Denisov, Yu. Yu.; Toperverg, B. P.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    The chromatin organization in chicken erythrocyte nuclei was studied by small-angle neutron scattering in the scattering-vector range from 1.5 x 10 -1 to 10 -4 A -1 with the use of the contrast-variation technique. This scattering-vector range corresponds to linear dimensions from 4 nm to 6 μm and covers the whole hierarchy of chromatin structures, from the nucleosomal structure to the entire nucleus. The results of the present study allowed the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) both the chromatin-protein structure and the structure of the nucleic acid component in chicken erythrocyte nuclei have mass-fractal properties, (2) the structure of the protein component of chromatin exhibits a fractal behavior on scales extending over two orders of magnitude, from the nucleosomal size to the size of an entire nucleus, and (3) the structure of the nucleic acid component of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei is likewise of a fractal nature and has two levels of organization or two phases with the crossover point at about 300-400 nm

  8. Distributed probing of chromatin structure in vivo reveals pervasive chromatin accessibility for expressed and non-expressed genes during tissue differentiation in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Ky

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue differentiation is accompanied by genome-wide changes in the underlying chromatin structure and dynamics, or epigenome. By controlling when, where, and what regulatory factors have access to the underlying genomic DNA, the epigenome influences the cell's transcriptome and ultimately its function. Existing genomic methods for analyzing cell-type-specific changes in chromatin generally involve two elements: (i a source for purified cells (or nuclei of distinct types, and (ii a specific treatment that partitions or degrades chromatin by activity or structural features. For many cell types of great interest, such assays are limited by our inability to isolate the relevant cell populations in an organism or complex tissue containing an intertwined mixture of other cells. This limitation has confined available knowledge of chromatin dynamics to a narrow range of biological systems (cell types that can be sorted/separated/dissected in large numbers and tissue culture models or to amalgamations of diverse cell types (tissue chunks, whole organisms. Results Transgene-driven expression of DNA/chromatin modifying enzymes provides one opportunity to query chromatin structures in expression-defined cell subsets. In this work we combine in vivo expression of a bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM with high throughput sequencing to sample tissue-specific chromatin accessibility on a genome-wide scale. We have applied the method (DALEC: Direct Asymmetric Ligation End Capture towards mapping a cell-type-specific view of genome accessibility as a function of differentiated state. Taking advantage of C. elegans strains expressing the DAM enzyme in diverse tissues (body wall muscle, gut, and hypodermis, our efforts yield a genome-wide dataset measuring chromatin accessibility at each of 538,000 DAM target sites in the C. elegans (diploid genome. Conclusions Validating the DALEC mapping results, we observe a strong association

  9. Structural Modeling of GR Interactions with the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex and C/EBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muratcioglu, Serena; Presman, Diego M; Pooley, John R

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a steroid-hormone-activated transcription factor that modulates gene expression. Transcriptional regulation by the GR requires dynamic receptor binding to specific target sites located across the genome. This binding remodels the chromatin structure to allow...... interaction with other transcription factors. Thus, chromatin remodeling is an essential component of GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, and understanding the interactions between these molecules at the structural level provides insights into the mechanisms of how GR and chromatin remodeling cooperate...

  10. Chromatin Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory—the two-fluid model—in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model—the Maxwell fluid—for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity. PMID:24806919

  11. Concerted Flexibility of Chromatin Structure, Methylome, and Histone Modifications along with Plant Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial organization of chromosome structure within the interphase nucleus, as well as the patterns of methylome and histone modifications, represent intersecting layers that influence genome accessibility and function. This review is focused on the plastic nature of chromatin structure and epigenetic marks in association to stress situations. The use of chemical compounds (epigenetic drugs or T-DNA-mediated mutagenesis affecting epigenetic regulators (epi-mutants are discussed as being important tools for studying the impact of deregulated epigenetic backgrounds on gene function and phenotype. The inheritability of epigenetic marks and chromatin configurations along successive generations are interpreted as a way for plants to “communicate” past experiences of stress sensing. A mechanistic understanding of chromatin and epigenetics plasticity in plant response to stress, including tissue- and genotype-specific epigenetic patterns, may help to reveal the epigenetics contributions for genome and phenotype regulation.

  12. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Soldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, revealing interplays between neighbouring PTMs and enabling screens for their readers in a comprehensive and quantitative fashion. Here we provide an overview of the recent achievements of state-of-the-art mass spectrometry-based proteomics for the detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of histone post-translational modifications, histone variants, and global interactomes at specific chromatin regions. This synopsis emphasizes how the advances in high resolution MS, from “Bottom Up” to “Top Down” analysis, together with the uptake of quantitative proteomics methods by chromatin biologists, have made MS a well-established method in the epigenetics field, enabling the acquisition of original information, highly complementary to that offered by more conventional, antibody-based, assays.

  13. Gibberellin-induced change in the structure of chromatin in wheat sprouts: decrease in the accessibility of DNA in preparations of soluble chromatin to the action of EcoRII methylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskov, V.A.; Kintsurashvili, L.N.; Smirnova, T.A.; Manamsh'yan, T.A.; Kir'yanov, G.I.; Vanyushin, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    A method has been perfected for producing soluble chromatin from whole wheat sprouts at low ionic strength. The chromatin preparations isolated possess a native structure: they have a nucleosome organization. Under identical conditions the soluble wheat chromatin undergoes more profound degradation by DNase I and staphylococcal nuclease than the chromatin from the rat liver. The DNA contained in the isolated chromatin is capable of accepting CHnumber groups from S-[methyl- 3 H]-adenosylmethionine during incubation with DNA methylase EcoRII; not all the CC A/T GG sequences in DNA are methylated in vivo. Chromatin from gibberellin A 3 -treated wheat sprout DNA accepts 40% fewer CH 3 groups than that from the control sprouts, which is probably due to the greater compactness of the chromatin. In the case of longer incubation, the level of methylation of the chromatin falls, which may be associated with the presence of DNA-demethylating activity

  14. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  15. Chromatin organization and cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumiel, I.; Walicka, M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper briefly describes chromatin organization in mammalian cells and reviews experimental work concerning relations between chromatin structure and accesibility of damaged DNA to repair enzymes. The ''contact effect'', the size of super-coiled DNA domains and ADP-ribosylation of chromatin proteins are discussed in relation to cellular radiosensitivity. 88 refs. (author)

  16. Superresolution imaging reveals structurally distinct periodic patterns of chromatin along pachytene chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, David; Redl, Stefan; Best, Gerrit; Borsos, Máté; Tiwari, Vijay K.; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikuë; Ketting, René F.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo J.

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes associate to form the synaptonemal complex (SC), a structure essential for fertility. Information about the epigenetic features of chromatin within this structure at the level of superresolution microscopy is largely lacking. We combined single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with quantitative analytical methods to describe the epigenetic landscape of meiotic chromosomes at the pachytene stage in mouse oocytes. DNA is found to be nonrandomly distributed along the length of the SC in condensed clusters. Periodic clusters of repressive chromatin [trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine (Lys) 27 (H3K27me3)] are found at 500-nm intervals along the SC, whereas one of the ends of the SC displays a large and dense cluster of centromeric histone mark [trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 (H3K9me3)]. Chromatin associated with active transcription [trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4me3)] is arranged in a radial hair-like loop pattern emerging laterally from the SC. These loops seem to be punctuated with small clusters of H3K4me3 with an average spread larger than their periodicity. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale structure of the pachytene chromosomes is constrained by periodic patterns of chromatin marks, whose function in recombination and higher order genome organization is yet to be elucidated. PMID:26561583

  17. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo-epidermal i......Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo......-epidermal immune complex deposits have similar molecular composition as glomerular deposits, (ii) whether chromatin fragments bind dermo-epidermal structures, and (iii) whether deposits in nephritic glomeruli predispose for accumulation of similar deposits in skin. Paired skin and kidney biopsies from nephritic...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...

  19. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  20. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2008-03-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a higher affinity for double-stranded DNA than for single-stranded DNA, constrains negative DNA supercoils and is associated with genomic DNA in vivo. The solution structure and DNA-binding surface of Cren7 from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus were determined by NMR. The protein adopts an SH3-like fold. It interacts with duplex DNA through a beta-sheet and a long flexible loop, presumably resulting in DNA distortions through intercalation of conserved hydrophobic residues into the DNA structure. These data suggest that the crenarchaeal kingdom in the Archaea shares a common strategy in chromatin organization.

  1. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Rosa-Garrido (Manuel); Chapski, D.J. (Douglas J.); Schmitt, A.D. (Anthony D.); Kimball, T.H. (Todd H.); Karbassi, E. (Elaheh); Monte, E. (Emma); Balderas, E. (Enrique); Pellegrini, M. (Matteo); Shih, T.-T. (Tsai-Ting); Soehalim, E. (Elizabeth); D.A. Liem (David); Ping, P. (Peipei); N.J. Galjart (Niels); Ren, S. (Shuxun); Wang, Y. (Yibin); Ren, B. (Bing); Vondriska, T.M. (Thomas M.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined.METHODS: To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation

  2. High-Resolution Mapping of Chromatin Conformation in Cardiac Myocytes Reveals Structural Remodeling of the Epigenome in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Chapski, Douglas J; Schmitt, Anthony D; Kimball, Todd H; Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Balderas, Enrique; Pellegrini, Matteo; Shih, Tsai-Ting; Soehalim, Elizabeth; Liem, David; Ping, Peipei; Galjart, Niels J; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Ren, Bing; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2017-10-24

    Cardiovascular disease is associated with epigenomic changes in the heart; however, the endogenous structure of cardiac myocyte chromatin has never been determined. To investigate the mechanisms of epigenomic function in the heart, genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (Hi-C) and DNA sequencing were performed in adult cardiac myocytes following development of pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac-specific deletion of CTCF (a ubiquitous chromatin structural protein) were generated to explore the role of this protein in chromatin structure and cardiac phenotype. Transcriptome analyses by RNA-seq were conducted as a functional readout of the epigenomic structural changes. Depletion of CTCF was sufficient to induce heart failure in mice, and human patients with heart failure receiving mechanical unloading via left ventricular assist devices show increased CTCF abundance. Chromatin structural analyses revealed interactions within the cardiac myocyte genome at 5-kb resolution, enabling examination of intra- and interchromosomal events, and providing a resource for future cardiac epigenomic investigations. Pressure overload or CTCF depletion selectively altered boundary strength between topologically associating domains and A/B compartmentalization, measurements of genome accessibility. Heart failure involved decreased stability of chromatin interactions around disease-causing genes. In addition, pressure overload or CTCF depletion remodeled long-range interactions of cardiac enhancers, resulting in a significant decrease in local chromatin interactions around these functional elements. These findings provide a high-resolution chromatin architecture resource for cardiac epigenomic investigations and demonstrate that global structural remodeling of chromatin underpins heart failure. The newly identified principles of endogenous chromatin structure have key implications for epigenetic therapy. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Decrease of H1 histone and changes in chromatin structure and transcription in pea seedlings after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagi, G.; Hidvegi, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    Seeds and seedlings of pea have been irradiated between zero to 300 Gy doses of 60 Co gamma-irradiation and examinations were carried out on the chromatin of shoots of 1-week-old etiolated seedlings. There was only a slight change in the gross composition of chromatin after irradiation (in the mass ratios of DNA:RNA:histone:non-histone proteins). Separation of histones, however, showed that after 300 Gy irradiation the quantity of H1 histones decreased by 33% after seed irradiation and 43% after seedling irradiation. The ratio of H1 subfractions also changed. Enzymes DNAase II and micrococcal nuclease digested the chromatin of the irradiated sample 30% faster than the unirradiated one. Transcription kinetics of chromatin showed a gradual decrease of Ksub(m) value on increasing doses of irradiation. There was, however, no difference in the rate of transcription of DNAs, isolated from the chromatin of the control and irradiated samples. Protease and RNAase activity of whole shoots showed enhancement after irradiation. These data suggest that irradiation of either seeds or seedlings results in loosening of the seedling chromatin structure, while there is no change in basic nucleosomal structure. The specific degradation or dissociation of histone H1, localized in the internucleosomal region may be responsible for these changes in the higher order structure of chromatin. This may explain the easier accessibility of chromatin to DNAase II after irradiation and the more tightly bound RNA polymerase, exhibited in decreasing Ksub(m) values. (Auth.)

  4. Chromatin structure influence the sensitivity of DNA to ionizing radiation induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin acts as a natural hindrance in DNA-damage recognition, repair and recovery. Histone and their variants undergo differential post-translational modification(s) and regulate chromatin structure to facilitate DNA damage response (DDR). During the presentation we will discuss the importance of chromatin organization and histone modification(s) during IR-induced DNA damage response in human liver cells. Our data shows G1-phase specific decrease of H3 serine10 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage is coupled with chromatin compaction in repair phase of DDR. The loss of H3Ser10P during DNA damage shows an inverse correlation with gain of γH2AX from a same mono-nucleosome in a dose-dependent manner. The loss of H3Ser10P is a universal phenomenon as it is independent of origin of cell lines and nature of genotoxic agents in G1 phase cells. The reversible reduction of H3Ser10P is mediated by opposing activities of phosphatase, MKP1 and kinase, MSK1 of the MAP kinase pathway. The present study suggests distinct reversible histone marks are associated with G1-phase of cell cycle and plays a critical role in chromatin organization which may facilitate differential sensitivity against radiation. Thus, the study raises the possibility of combinatorial modulation of H3Ser10P and histone acetylation with specific inhibitors to target the radio-resistant cancer cells in G1-phase and thus may serve as promising targets for cancer therapy. (author)

  5. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-01

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  6. FANCJ couples replication past natural fork barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Rebekka A; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2013-04-01

    Defective DNA repair causes Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare childhood cancer-predisposing syndrome. At least 15 genes are known to be mutated in FA; however, their role in DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we show that the FANCJ helicase promotes DNA replication in trans by counteracting fork stalling on replication barriers, such as G4 quadruplex structures. Accordingly, stabilization of G4 quadruplexes in ΔFANCJ cells restricts fork movements, uncouples leading- and lagging-strand synthesis and generates small single-stranded DNA gaps behind the fork. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that FANCJ suppresses heterochromatin spreading by coupling fork movement through replication barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure. We propose that FANCJ plays an essential role in counteracting chromatin compaction associated with unscheduled replication fork stalling and restart, and suppresses tumorigenesis, at least partially, in this replication-specific manner.

  7. Diazinon alters sperm chromatin structure in mice by phosphorylating nuclear protamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Quintanilla-Vega, B.

    2005-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides, widely used in agriculture and pest control, are associated with male reproductive effects, including sperm chromatin alterations, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. The main toxic action of OP is related to phosphorylation of proteins. Chemical alterations in sperm nuclear proteins (protamines), which pack DNA during the last steps of spermatogenesis, contribute to male reproductive toxicity. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the ability of diazinon (DZN), an OP compound, to alter sperm chromatin by phosphorylating nuclear protamines. Mice were injected with a single dose of DZN (8.12 mg/kg, i.p.), and killed 8 and 15 days after treatment. Quality of sperm from epididymis and vas deferens was evaluated through standard methods and chromatin condensation by flow cytometry (DNA Fragmented Index parameters: DFI and DFI%) and fluorescence microscopy using chromomycin-A 3 (CMA 3 ). Increases in DFI (15%), DFI% (4.5-fold), and CMA 3 (2-fold) were observed only at 8 days post-treatment, indicating an alteration in sperm chromatin condensation and DNA damage during late spermatid differentiation. In addition, an increase of phosphorous content (approximately 50%) in protamines, especially in the phosphoserine content (approximately 73%), was found at 8 days post-treatment. Sperm viability, motility, and morphology showed significant alterations at this time. These data strongly suggest that spermatozoa exposed during the late steps of maturation were the targets of DZN exposure. The correlation observed between the phosphorous content in nuclear protamines with DFI%, DFI, and CMA 3 provides evidence that phosphorylation of nuclear protamines is involved in the OP effects on sperm chromatin

  8. The Correlation of Interphase Chromatin Structure with the Radiation-Induced Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchange Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Purgason, Ashley M.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromosome aberrations induced by radiation and chromatin folding, we reconstructed three dimensional structure of chromosome 3 and measured the physical distances between different regions of the chromosome. Previously, we have investigated the location of breaks involved in inter- and intrachromosomal type exchange events in human chromosome 3, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, we reported that intra-chromosome exchanges occurred preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11 regions, and the breaks involving in inter-chromosome exchanges occurred in two regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions are located on the same arm of the chromosome. In this study, human epithelial cells were fixed at G1 phase and the interphase cells were hybridized using the XCyte3 mBAND kit from MetaSystems. The z-section images of chromosome 3 were captured with a Leica and an LSM 510 Meta laser scanning confocal microscopes. A total of 100 chromosomes were analyzed. The reconstruction of three dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 with six different colored regions was achieved using the Imaris software. The relative distance between different regions was measured as well. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. The data showed that, in majority of the cells, the regions containing 3p21 and 3q11 are colocalized in the center of the chromosome, whereas, the regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome are either physically wrapping outside the chromosome center or with arms sticking out. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation

  9. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10 5 copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G 0 , the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes

  10. Human-Chromatin-Related Protein Interactions Identify a Demethylase Complex Required for Chromosome Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Marcon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division.

  11. Large Scale Chromosome Folding Is Stable against Local Changes in Chromatin Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florescu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the link between small-scale chromatin structure and large-scale chromosome folding during interphase is a prerequisite for understanding transcription. Yet, this link remains poorly investigated. Here, we introduce a simple biophysical model where interphase chromosomes are described in terms of the folding of chromatin sequences composed of alternating blocks of fibers with different thicknesses and flexibilities, and we use it to study the influence of sequence disorder on chromosome behaviors in space and time. By employing extensive computer simulations, we thus demonstrate that chromosomes undergo noticeable conformational changes only on length-scales smaller than 105 basepairs and time-scales shorter than a few seconds, and we suggest there might exist effective upper bounds to the detection of chromosome reorganization in eukaryotes. We prove the relevance of our framework by modeling recent experimental FISH data on murine chromosomes.

  12. Polymer physics predicts the effects of structural variants on chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Simona; Lupiáñez, Darío G; Chiariello, Andrea M; Annunziatella, Carlo; Kraft, Katerina; Schöpflin, Robert; Wittler, Lars; Andrey, Guillaume; Vingron, Martin; Pombo, Ana; Mundlos, Stefan; Nicodemi, Mario

    2018-05-01

    Structural variants (SVs) can result in changes in gene expression due to abnormal chromatin folding and cause disease. However, the prediction of such effects remains a challenge. Here we present a polymer-physics-based approach (PRISMR) to model 3D chromatin folding and to predict enhancer-promoter contacts. PRISMR predicts higher-order chromatin structure from genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) data. Using the EPHA4 locus as a model, the effects of pathogenic SVs are predicted in silico and compared to Hi-C data generated from mouse limb buds and patient-derived fibroblasts. PRISMR deconvolves the folding complexity of the EPHA4 locus and identifies SV-induced ectopic contacts and alterations of 3D genome organization in homozygous or heterozygous states. We show that SVs can reconfigure topologically associating domains, thereby producing extensive rewiring of regulatory interactions and causing disease by gene misexpression. PRISMR can be used to predict interactions in silico, thereby providing a tool for analyzing the disease-causing potential of SVs.

  13. Comparative study of cyanotoxins affecting cytoskeletal and chromatin structures in CHO-K1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gácsi, Mariann; Antal, Otilia; Vasas, Gábor; Máthé, Csaba; Borbély, György; Saker, Martin L; Gyori, János; Farkas, Anna; Vehovszky, Agnes; Bánfalvi, Gáspár

    2009-06-01

    In this study we compared the effects of the two frequently occuring and most dangerous cyanobacterial toxins on the cellular organization of microfilaments, microtubules and on the chromatin structure in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. These compounds are the widely known microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) classified as the highest-priority cyanotoxin. Toxic effects were tested in a concentration and time dependent manner. The hepatotoxic MC-LR did not cause significant cytotoxicity on CHO-K1 cells under 20 microM, but caused apoptotic changes at higher concentrations. Apoptotic shrinkage was associated with the shortening and loss of actin filaments and with a concentration dependent depolymerization of microtubules. No necrosis was observed over the concentration range (1-50 microM MC-LR) tested. Cylindrospermopsin did cause apoptosis at low concentrations (1-2 microM) and over short exposure periods (12h). Necrosis was observed at higher concentrations (5-10 microM) and following longer exposure periods (24 or 48h). Cyanotoxins also affected the chromatin structure. The condensation process was inhibited by MC-LR at a later stage and manifested as broken elongated prechromosomes. CYN inhibited chromatin condensation at the early fibrillary stage leading to blurred fluorescent images of apoptotic bodies and preventing the formation of metaphase chromosomes. Cylindrospermopsin exhibited a more pronounced toxic effect causing cytoskeletal and nuclear changes as well as apoptotic and necrotic alterations.

  14. Characterization of Chromatin Structure-associated Histone Modifications in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Pyo Hong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure and dynamics that are influenced by epigenetic marks, such as histone modification and DNA methylation, play a crucial role in modulating gene transcription. To understand the relationship between histone modifications and regulatory elements in breast cancer cells, we compared our chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq histone modification patterns for histone H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K9/16ac, and H3K27me3 in MCF-7 cells with publicly available formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE-chip signals in human chromosomes 8, 11, and 12, identified by a method called FAIRE. Active regulatory elements defined by FAIRE were highly associated with active histone modifications, like H3K4me3 and H3K9/16ac, especially near transcription start sites. The H3K9/16ac-enriched genes that overlapped with FAIRE signals (FAIRE-H3K9/14ac were moderately correlated with gene expression levels. We also identified functional sequence motifs at H3K4me1-enriched FAIRE sites upstream of putative promoters, suggesting that regulatory elements could be associated with H3K4me1 to be regarded as distal regulatory elements. Our results might provide an insight into epigenetic regulatory mechanisms explaining the association of histone modifications with open chromatin structure in breast cancer cells.

  15. LINE retrotransposon RNA is an essential structural and functional epigenetic component of a core neocentromeric chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderly C Chueh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously identified and characterized the phenomenon of ectopic human centromeres, known as neocentromeres. Human neocentromeres form epigenetically at euchromatic chromosomal sites and are structurally and functionally similar to normal human centromeres. Recent studies have indicated that neocentromere formation provides a major mechanism for centromere repositioning, karyotype evolution, and speciation. Using a marker chromosome mardel(10 containing a neocentromere formed at the normal chromosomal 10q25 region, we have previously mapped a 330-kb CENP-A-binding domain and described an increased prevalence of L1 retrotransposons in the underlying DNA sequences of the CENP-A-binding clusters. Here, we investigated the potential role of the L1 retrotransposons in the regulation of neocentromere activity. Determination of the transcriptional activity of a panel of full-length L1s (FL-L1s across a 6-Mb region spanning the 10q25 neocentromere chromatin identified one of the FL-L1 retrotransposons, designated FL-L1b and residing centrally within the CENP-A-binding clusters, to be transcriptionally active. We demonstrated the direct incorporation of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts into the CENP-A-associated chromatin. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the FL-L1b RNA transcripts led to a reduction in CENP-A binding and an impaired mitotic function of the 10q25 neocentromere. These results indicate that LINE retrotransposon RNA is a previously undescribed essential structural and functional component of the neocentromeric chromatin and that retrotransposable elements may serve as a critical epigenetic determinant in the chromatin remodelling events leading to neocentromere formation.

  16. [Changes in the chromatin structure of hepatocyte nuclei of rats trained to hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domkina, L K; Bresler, V M; Simanovskiĭ, L N

    1976-03-01

    Structure of chromatin in the nuclei of the isolated surviving hepatocytes and in the isolated nuclei of hepatocytes were studied by fluorochroming with acridine orange and by microfluorimetry of fluorescenc connected with the stain chromatin at 530 and 590 nm in intact rats and in the animals trained to hypoxia in a pressure chamber for 60 days. The nuclei of hepatocytes of intact rats were distributed by fluorescence at 530 nm into three classes with the intensity ratio of 1:2:4; as to the nuclei of hepatocytes of the rats trained to hypoxia - they formed a single class corresponding to the second class of control. In intact rats the ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 590 nm to such at 530 nm (alpha coefficient) formed normal distribution; in trained rats - a bimodal distribution with a shift of the maximum in the direction of reduction and increase of alpha in comparison with control. It is supposed that in hypoxia there is a repression of one and depression of other genes in the chromatine of the nuclei of the liver.

  17. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  18. Impact of nuclear organization and chromatin structure on DNA repair and genome stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The non-random organization of the eukaryotic cell nucleus and the folding of genome in chromatin more or less condensed can influence many functions related to DNA metabolism, including genome stability. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious DNA damages for the cells. To preserve genome integrity, eukaryotic cells thus developed DSB repair mechanisms conserved from yeast to human, among which homologous recombination (HR) that uses an intact homologous sequence to repair a broken chromosome. HR can be separated in two sub-pathways: Gene Conversion (GC) transfers genetic information from one molecule to its homologous and Break Induced Replication (BIR) establishes a replication fork than can proceed until the chromosome end. My doctorate work was focused on the contribution of the chromatin context and 3D genome organization on DSB repair. In S. cerevisiae, nuclear organization and heterochromatin spreading at sub-telomeres can be modified through the overexpression of the Sir3 or sir3A2Q mutant proteins. We demonstrated that reducing the physical distance between homologous sequences increased GC rates, reinforcing the notion that homology search is a limiting step for recombination. We also showed that hetero-chromatinization of DSB site fine-tunes DSB resection, limiting the loss of the DSB ends required to perform homology search and complete HR. Finally, we noticed that the presence of heterochromatin at the donor locus decreased both GC and BIR efficiencies, probably by affecting strand invasion. This work highlights new regulatory pathways of DNA repair. (author) [fr

  19. Chromatin structure influences the sensitivity of DNA to gamma-radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1783, č. 12 (2008), s. 2398-2414 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : sensitivity to DNA double- strand breaks induction * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2008

  20. Genome instability in the context of chromatin structure and fragile sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Jugová, Alžbeta; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2010), s. 181-194 ISSN 1045-4403 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : gene amplification * fragile sites * chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.111, year: 2010

  1. Higher-order chromatin structure in DSB induction, repair and misrepair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 704, 1-3 (2010), s. 88-100 ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA double strand breaks * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.741, year: 2010

  2. Relationship Between Chromatin Structure and Sensitivity to Molecularly Targeted Auger Electron Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Samantha Y.A.; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. Methods and Materials: Chromatin structure was altered in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N human breast cancer cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine, or hypertonic treatment. The extent and duration of chromatin structural changes were evaluated using the micrococcal nuclease assay. DNA damage (γH2AX assay) and clonogenic survival were evaluated after exposure to 111 In-DTPA-hEGF, an Auger electron-emitting radiopharmaceutical, or IR. The intracellular distribution of 111 In-DTPA-hEGF after chromatin modification was investigated in cell fractionation experiments. Results: Chromatin remained condensed for up to 20 minutes after NaCl and in a relaxed state 24 hours after SAHA treatment. The number of γH2AX foci per cell was greater in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (0.5 Gy) plus SAHA (1 μM) compared with IR alone (16 ± 0.6 and 14 ± 0.3 vs. 12 ± 0.4 and 11 ± 0.2, respectively). More γH2AX foci were observed in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells exposed to 111 In-DTPA-hEGF (6 MBq/μg) plus SAHA vs. 111 In-DTPA-hEGF alone (11 ± 0.3 and 12 ± 0.7 vs. 9 ± 0.4 and 7 ± 0.3, respectively). 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine enhanced the DNA damage caused by IR and 111 In-DTPA-hEGF. Clonogenic survival was reduced in MDA-MB-468 and 231-H2N cells after IR (6 Gy) plus SAHA (1 μM) vs. IR alone (0.6% ± 0.01 and 0.3% ± 0.2 vs. 5.8% ± 0.2 and 2% ± 0.1, respectively) and after 111 In-DTPA-hEGF plus SAHA compared to 111 In-DTPA-hEGF alone (21% ± 0.4% and 19% ± 4.6 vs. 33% ± 2.3 and 32% ± 3.7). SAHA did not affect 111 In-DTPA-hEGF nuclear localization. Hypertonic treatment resulted in fewer γH2AX foci per cell after IR and 111 In-DTPA-hEGF compared to controls but did not significantly alter clonogenic

  3. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madalena, Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez; Díez, José Luís; Gorab, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs) located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA), allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  4. Chromatin structure of ribosomal RNA genes in dipterans and its relationship to the location of nucleolar organizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Rodriguez Gutierrez Madalena

    Full Text Available Nucleoli, nuclear organelles in which ribosomal RNA is synthesized and processed, emerge from nucleolar organizers (NORs located in distinct chromosomal regions. In polytene nuclei of dipterans, nucleoli of some species can be observed under light microscopy exhibiting distinctive morphology: Drosophila and chironomid species display well-formed nucleoli in contrast to the fragmented and dispersed nucleoli seen in sciarid flies. The available data show no apparent relationship between nucleolar morphology and location of NORs in Diptera. The regulation of rRNA transcription involves controlling both the transcription rate per gene as well as the proportion of rRNA genes adopting a proper chromatin structure for transcription, since active and inactive rRNA gene copies coexist in NORs. Transcription units organized in nucleosomes and those lacking canonical nucleosomes can be analyzed by the method termed psoralen gel retarding assay (PGRA, allowing inferences on the ratio of active to inactive rRNA gene copies. In this work, possible connections between chromosomal location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes were studied in Drosophila melanogaster, and in chironomid and sciarid species. The data suggested a link between location of NORs and proportion of active rRNA genes since the copy number showing nucleosomal organization predominates when NORs are located in the pericentric heterochromatin. The results presented in this work are in agreement with previous data on the chromatin structure of rRNA genes from distantly related eukaryotes, as assessed by the PGRA.

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean; Rayapuram, Naganand; Pflieger, Delphine; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  6. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  7. FoxA1 binding to the MMTV LTR modulates chromatin structure and transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Belikov, Sergey; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Wrange, Oerjan

    2005-01-01

    Novel binding sites for the forkhead transcription factor family member Forkhead box A (FoxA), previously referred to as Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3 (HNF3), were found within the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR). The effect of FoxA1 on MMTV LTR chromatin structure, and expression was evaluated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutagenesis of either of the two main FoxA binding sites showed that the distal site, -232/-221, conferred FoxA1-dependent partial inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) driven MMTV transcription. The proximal FoxA binding segment consisted of two individual FoxA sites at -57/-46 and -45/-34, respectively, that mediated an increased basal MMTV transcription. FoxA1 binding altered the chromatin structure of both the inactive- and the hormone-activated MMTV LTR. Hydroxyl radical foot printing revealed FoxA1-mediated changes in the nucleosome arrangement. Micrococcal nuclease digestion showed the hormone-dependent sub-nucleosome complex, containing ∼120 bp of DNA, to be expanded by FoxA1 binding to the proximal segment into a larger complex containing ∼200 bp. The potential function of the FoxA1-mediated expression of the MMTV provirus for maintenance of expression in different tissues is discussed

  8. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  9. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Stypula-Cyrus

    Full Text Available Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC. However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  10. Changes in chromatin structure during the aging of cell cultures as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagor, M.; Cole, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclei from cultured human cells were examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Their melting profiles revealed four structural transitions at 60, 76, 88, and 105 degrees C (transitions I-IV, respectively). In immortalized (i.e., tumor) cell cultures and in normal cell cultures of low passage number, melting profiles were dominated by the 105 degrees C transition (transition IV), but in vitro aging of normal and Werner syndrome cells was associated with a marked decrease in transition IV followed by an increase in transition III at the expense of transition IV. At intermediate times in the aging process, much DNA melted at a temperature range (95-102 degrees C) intermediate between transitions III and IV, and this is consistent with the notion that aging of cell cultures is accompanied by an increase in single-strand character of the DNA. Calorimetric changes were observed in the melting profile of nuclei from UV-irradiated tumor cells that resembled the age-induced intermediate melting of chromatin. It is suggested that aging is accompanied by an increase in single-stranded character of the DNA in chromatin, which lowers its melting temperature, followed by strand breaks in the DNA that destroy its supercoiling potential

  11. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a high...

  13. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  14. Quantitative analysis of the chromatin of lymphocytes: an assay on comparative structuralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F

    1980-01-01

    With 26 letters we can form all the words we use, and with a few words it is possible to form an infinite number of different meaningful sentences. In our case, the letters will be a few simple neighborhood image transformations and area measurements. The paper shows how, by iterating these transformations, it is possible to obtain a good quantitative description of the nuclear structure of Feulgen-stained lymphocytes (CLL and normal). The fact that we restricted ourselves to a small number of image transformations made it possible to construct an image analysis system (TAS) able to do these transformations very quickly. We will see, successively, how to segment the nucleus itself, the chromatin, and the interchromatinic channels, how openings and closings lead to size and spatial distribution curves, and how skeletons may be used for measuring the lengths of interchromatinic channels.

  15. Spectroscopic study of fast-neutron-irradiated chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Gazdaru, D.; Constantinescu, B.

    2004-01-01

    The effects produced by fast neutrons (0-100 Gy) on chromatin structure were analyzed by (i) [ 1 H]-NMR spectroscopy, (ii) time resolved spectroscopy, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Two types of chromatin were tested: (i) a chromatin from a normal tissue (liver of Wistar rats) and (ii) a chromatin from a tumoral tissue (Guerin limphotrope epithelioma, a rat solid tumor). The fast-neutron action on chromatin determines greater values of the [ 1 H]-NMR transverse relaxation time, indicating a more injured structure. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the relative contribution of the excited state lifetime of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin DNA diminishes with increasing irradiation doses. This reflects the damage that occurs in DNA structure: production of single- and double-strand breaks due to sugar and base modifications. By the FRET method, the distance between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled at chromatin was determined. This distance increases upon fast-neutron action. The radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue chromatin seems higher than that of the normal tissue chromatin, probably because of its higher (loose) euchromatin/(compact) heterochromatin ratio. As the values of the physical parameters analyzed are specific for a determined dose, the establishment of these parameters may constitute a criterion for the microdosimetry of chromatin radiolesions produced by fast neutrons. (author)

  16. Spectroscopic study of fast-neutron-irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [V. Babes National Inst., Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: serbanradu@pcnet.ro; Gazdaru, D. [Bucharest Univ., Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [H. Hulubei National Inst., Dept. of Cyclotron, Bucharest (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The effects produced by fast neutrons (0-100 Gy) on chromatin structure were analyzed by (i) [{sup 1}H]-NMR spectroscopy, (ii) time resolved spectroscopy, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Two types of chromatin were tested: (i) a chromatin from a normal tissue (liver of Wistar rats) and (ii) a chromatin from a tumoral tissue (Guerin limphotrope epithelioma, a rat solid tumor). The fast-neutron action on chromatin determines greater values of the [{sup 1}H]-NMR transverse relaxation time, indicating a more injured structure. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the relative contribution of the excited state lifetime of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin DNA diminishes with increasing irradiation doses. This reflects the damage that occurs in DNA structure: production of single- and double-strand breaks due to sugar and base modifications. By the FRET method, the distance between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled at chromatin was determined. This distance increases upon fast-neutron action. The radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue chromatin seems higher than that of the normal tissue chromatin, probably because of its higher (loose) euchromatin/(compact) heterochromatin ratio. As the values of the physical parameters analyzed are specific for a determined dose, the establishment of these parameters may constitute a criterion for the microdosimetry of chromatin radiolesions produced by fast neutrons. (author)

  17. The influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: a study using nuclear and nucleoid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungman, M.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks, the alkaline unwinding technique was applied to nuclear and nucleoid monolayers. These chromatin substrates were prepared by treating human fibroblasts grown as monolayers with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and varying concentrations of cations. The chromatin structure was modified either by a stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins by extraction in increasing concentrations of monovalent salt, or by the addition or deletion of mono- and divalent cations to condense or decondense the chromatin, respectively. It was found that the stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins from the chromatin dramatically increased the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. The DNA-bound proteins showed a qualitative difference in their ability to protect the DNA where proteins removed by salt concentrations above 1.0 M exerted the greatest protection. Furthermore, the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks was found to be 6 times lower in condensed chromatin than in decondensed chromatin and about 80 times lower than in protein-depleted chromatin. It is concluded that the presence of DNA-bound proteins and the folding of the chromatin into higher-order structures protect the DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks

  18. Chromatin structure influence of DNA damage measurements by four assays: pulsed- and constant-field gel electrophoresis, DNA precipitation and non-denaturing filter elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodek, D.; Olive, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The of elution of DNA during non-denaturing filter elution (NFE) often correlates with cell sensitivity to radiation. The elution rate is influenced by two cellular factors: chromatin structure and the number of DNA-strand breaks (DSBs) produced in an intact cell by ionizing radiation. To determine which of the above factors is relevant to cell radiosensitivity, four assays were used to measure induction of DNA damage in three cell lines varying in radiosensitivity (V79, CHO, and L5178Y-R). Each of the assays, neutral filter elution (NFE), DNA precipitation, constant (CFGE) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have different physical basis for DNA damage measurement and might be differently affected by chromatin structure. Three of the methods used to measure DNA double-strand breaks gave different results: NFE was dependent on cell type and location of DNA relative to the replication fork, gel electrophoresis was independent of cell type but was affected by proximity to the replication fork, and the precipitation assay was independent of both cell type and replication status. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis produced the same results and constant field gel electrophoresis for 3 cell lines examined. Only NFE showed differences in sensitivity which correlated with cell survival following irradiation. The results suggest that three is the same initial amount of DSBs in cells from all three lines and that the sensitivity to radiation is determined by some additional factors, probably chromatin structure. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs

  19. Applications of high-throughput sequencing to chromatin structure and function in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, Ian

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing approaches have enabled direct interrogation of chromatin samples from mammalian cells. We are beginning to develop a genome-wide description of nuclear function during development, but further data collection, refinement, and integration are needed.

  20. Hierarchical role for transcription factors and chromatin structure in genome organization along adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarusi Portuguez, Avital; Schwartz, Michal; Siersbaek, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The three dimensional folding of mammalian genomes is cell type specific and difficult to alter suggesting that it is an important component of gene regulation. However, given the multitude of chromatin-associating factors, the mechanisms driving the colocalization of active chromosomal domains...... by PPARγ and Lpin1, undergoes orchestrated reorganization during adipogenesis. Coupling the dynamics of genome architecture with multiple chromatin datasets indicated that among all the transcription factors (TFs) tested, RXR is central to genome reorganization at the beginning of adipogenesis...

  1. Additive scaling law for structural organization of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashina, E. G.; Velichko, E. V.; Filatov, M. V.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Brulet, A.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) on nuclei of chicken erythrocytes demonstrates the cubic dependence of the scattering intensity Q-3 in the range of momentum transfer Q ∈10-3-10-2nm-1 . Independent spin-echo SANS measurements give the spin-echo function, which is well described by the exponential law in a range of sizes (3 ×102) -(3 ×104) nm. Both experimental dependences reflect the nature of the structural organization of chromatin in the nucleus of a living cell, which corresponds to the correlation function γ (r )=ln(ξ /r ) for r <ξ , where ξ =(3.69 ±0.07 ) ×103 nm, the size of the nucleus. It has the specific scaling property of the logarithmic fractal γ (r /a )=γ (r )+ln(a ), i.e., the scaling down by a gives an additive constant to the correlation function, which distinguishes it from the mass fractal, which is characterized by multiplicative constant.

  2. Chromatin maturation depends on continued DNA-replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaeger, E.J.; Puelm, W.; Knippers, R.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of [ 3 H]thymidine pulse-labeled chromatin in lymphocytes differs from that of non-replicating chromatin by several operational criteria which are related to the higher nuclease sensitivity of replicating chromatin. These structural features of replicating chromatin rapidly disappear when the [ 3 H]thymidine pulse is followed by a chase in the presence of an excess of non-radioactive thymidine. However, when the rate of DNA replication is reduced, as in cycloheximide-treated lymphocytes, chromatin maturation is retarded. No chromatin maturation is observed when nuclei from pulse-labeled lymphocytes are incubated in vitro in the absence of DNA precursors. In contrast, when these nuclei are incubated under conditions known to be optimal for DNA replication, the structure of replicating chromatin is efficiently converted to that of 'mature', non-replicating chromatin. The authors conclude that the properties of nascent DNA and/or the distance from the replication fork are important factors in chromatin maturation. (Auth.)

  3. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  4. Studies on sex-organ development. Changes in chromatin structure during spermatogenesis in maturing rooster testis as demonstrated by the initiation pattern of ribonucleic acid synthesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, C; Teng, C S

    1978-01-01

    To probe the structural change in the genome of the differentiating germ cell of the maturing rooster testis, the chromatin from nuclei at various stages of differentiation were transcribed with prokaryotic RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli or with eukaryotic RNA polymerase II from wheat germ. The transcription was performed under conditions of blockage of RNA chain reinitiation in vitro with rifampicin or rifampicin AF/013. With the E. coli enzyme, the changes in (1) the titration curve for the enzyme-chromatin interaction, (2) the number of initiation sites, (3) the rate of elongation of RNA chains, and (4) the kinetics of the formation of stable initiation complexes revealed the unmasking of DNA in elongated spermatids and the masking of DNA in spermatozoa. In both cases the stability of the DNA duplex in the initiation region for RNA synthesis greatly increased. In contrast with the E. coli enzyme, the wheat-germ RNA polymerase II was relatively inefficient at transcribing chromatin of elongated spermatids. Such behaviour can be predicted if unmasked double-stranded DNA is present in elongated spermatids. PMID:346018

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-07

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for 60 Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with 60 Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage. (paper)

  7. Heterogeneous chromatin target model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Makoto

    1996-01-01

    The higher order structure of the entangled chromatin fibers in a chromosome plays a key role in molecular control mechanism involved in chromosome mutation due to ionizing radiations or chemical mutagens. The condensed superstructure of chromatin is not so rigid and regular as has been postulated in general. We have proposed a rheological explanation for the flexible network system ('chromatin network') that consists of the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters linked with supertwisting DNA in a chromatin fiber ('Supertwisting Particulate Model'). We have proposed a 'Heterosensitive Target Model' for cellular radiosensitivity that is a modification of 'Heterogeneous Target Model'. The heterogeneity of chromatin target is derived from the highly condensed organization of chromatin segments consist of unstable and fragile sites in the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters, namely 'supranucleosomal particles' or 'superbeads'. The models have been principally supported by our electron microscopic experiments employing 'surface - spreading whole - mount technique' since 1967. However, some deformation and artifacts in the chromatin structure are inevitable with these electron microscopic procedures. On the contrary, the 'atomic force microscope (AFM)' can be operated in liquid as well as in the air. A living specimen can be examined without any preparative procedures. Micromanipulation of the isolated chromosome is also possible by the precise positional control of a cantilever on the nanometer scale. The living human chromosomes were submerged in a solution of culture medium and observed by AFM using a liquid immersion cell. The surface - spreading whole - mount technique was applicable for this observation. The particulate chromatin segments of nucleosome clusters were clearly observed within mitotic human chromosomes in a living hydrated condition. These findings support the heterogeneity of chromatin target in a living cell. (J.P.N.)

  8. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschini, Roberta, E-mail: meschini@unitus.it; Morucci, Elisa; Berni, Andrea; Lopez-Martinez, Wilner; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability. • Reduced radiation-induced clastogenicity in Ataxia telangiectasia cell lines. • Histone tails hyperacetylation reduces heterochromatin content favouring DSBs repair. - Abstract: At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post

  9. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.

    2016-01-01

    , and by taking into account the chromatin's fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement...

  10. New Face for Chromatin-Related Mesenchymal Modulator: n-CHD9 Localizes to Nucleoli and Interacts With Ribosomal Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon-Kent, Ronit; Marom, Ronit; John, Sam; Dundr, Miroslav; Schiltz, Louis R; Gutierrez, Jose; Workman, Jerry; Benayahu, Dafna; Hager, Gordon L

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells' differentiation into several lineages is coordinated by a complex of transcription factors and co-regulators which bind to specific gene promoters. The Chromatin-Related Mesenchymal Modulator, CHD9 demonstrated in vitro its ability for remodeling activity to reposition nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner. Epigenetically, CHD9 binds with modified H3-(K9me2/3 and K27me3). Previously, we presented a role for CHD9 with RNA Polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcription of tissue specific genes. Far less is known about CHD9 function in RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) related transcription of the ribosomal locus that also drives specific cell fate. We here describe a new form, the nucleolar CHD9 (n-CHD9) that is dynamically associated with Pol I, fibrillarin, and upstream binding factor (UBF) in the nucleoli, as shown by imaging and molecular approaches. Inhibitors of transcription disorganized the nucleolar compartment of transcription sites where rDNA is actively transcribed. Collectively, these findings link n-CHD9 with RNA pol I transcription in fibrillar centers. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and tilling arrays (ChIP- chip), we find an association of n-CHD9 with Pol I related to rRNA biogenesis. Our new findings support the role for CHD9 in chromatin regulation and association with rDNA genes, in addition to its already known function in transcription control of tissue specific genes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology, Babes National Institute, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: lilianajradu@yahoo.fr; Mihailescu, I. [Department of Lasers, Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Radu, S. [Department of Computer Science, Polytechnics University, Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Department of Biophysics, Bucharest University (Romania)

    2007-09-21

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m{sup 2} was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  12. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy

  13. Assembly of the Arp5 (Actin-related Protein) Subunit Involved in Distinct INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Activities*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wei; Beckwith, Sean L.; Zheng, Tina; Young, Thomas; Dinh, Van T.; Ranjan, Anand; Morrison, Ashby J.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, which repositions and restructures nucleosomes, is essential to all DNA-templated processes. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is an evolutionarily conserved complex involved in diverse cellular processes, including transcription, DNA repair, and replication. The functional diversity of the INO80 complex can, in part, be attributed to specialized activities of distinct subunits that compose the complex. Furthermore, structural analyses have identified biochemically discrete subunit modules that assemble along the Ino80 ATPase scaffold. Of particular interest is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arp5-Ies6 module located proximal to the Ino80 ATPase and the Rvb1-Rvb2 helicase module needed for INO80-mediated in vitro activity. In this study we demonstrate that the previously uncharacterized Ies2 subunit is required for Arp5-Ies6 association with the catalytic components of the INO80 complex. In addition, Arp5-Ies6 module assembly with the INO80 complex is dependent on distinct conserved domains within Arp5, Ies6, and Ino80, including the spacer region within the Ino80 ATPase domain. Arp5-Ies6 interacts with chromatin via assembly with the INO80 complex, as IES2 and INO80 deletion results in loss of Arp5-Ies6 chromatin association. Interestingly, ectopic addition of the wild-type Arp5-Ies6 module stimulates INO80-mediated ATP hydrolysis and nucleosome sliding in vitro. However, the addition of mutant Arp5 lacking unique insertion domains facilitates ATP hydrolysis in the absence of nucleosome sliding. Collectively, these results define the requirements of Arp5-Ies6 assembly, which are needed to couple ATP hydrolysis to productive nucleosome movement. PMID:26306040

  14. [Correcting influence of vitamin E short chain derivatives on lipid peroxidation, liver cell membrane, and chromatin structure when rats are exposed to embichin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, V M; Byshovets', T F; Hubs'kyĭ, Iu I; Levyts'kyĭ, Ie L; Shaiakhmetova, H M; Marchenko, O M; Voloshyna, O S; Saĭfetdinova, H A; Okhrimenko, V O; Donchenko, H V

    2000-01-01

    Embikhin causes activation of LPO processes in endoplasmic reticulum and in nuclear chromatine fractions of rat liver cells. The latter is accompanied by the impairment of repressive and active nuclear chromatine fractions structure. Derivate of vitamin E in these conditions renders correcting action on parameters of lipid peroxidation in the investigated subcellular structures, testifying its positive influence on the cell heredity apparatus state. The normalizing action of tocopherol derivative on cytochromes P450 and b5 levels is shown.

  15. APPLICATION OF THE SPERM CHROMATIN STRUCTURE ASSAY TO THE TEPLICE PROGRAM SEMEN STUDIES: A NEW METHOD FOR EVALUATING SPERM NUCLEAR CHROMATIN DAMAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACTA measure of sperm chromatin integrity was added to the routine semen end points evaluated in the Teplice Program male reproductive health studies. To address the hypothesis that exposure to periods of elevated air pollution may be associated with abnormalities in sp...

  16. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costes, Sylvain V; Chiolo, Irene; Pluth, Janice M.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Jakob, Burkhard

    2009-09-15

    DNA damage sensing proteins have been shown to localize to the sites of DSB within seconds to minutes following ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, resulting in the formation of microscopically visible nuclear domains referred to as radiation-induced foci (RIF). This review characterizes the spatio-temporal properties of RIF at physiological doses, minutes to hours following exposure to ionizing radiation, and it proposes a model describing RIF formation and resolution as a function of radiation quality and nuclear densities. Discussion is limited to RIF formed by three interrelated proteins ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated), 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) and ?H2AX (phosphorylated variant histone H2AX). Early post-IR, we propose that RIF mark chromatin reorganization, leading to a local nuclear scaffold rigid enough to keep broken DNA from diffusing away, but open enough to allow the repair machinery. We review data indicating clear kinetic and physical differences between RIF emerging from dense and uncondensed regions of the nucleus. At later time post-IR, we propose that persistent RIF observed days following exposure to ionizing radiation are nuclear ?scars? marking permanent disruption of the chromatin architecture. When DNA damage is resolved, such chromatin modifications should not necessarily lead to growth arrest and it has been shown that persistent RIF can replicate during mitosis. Thus, heritable persistent RIF spanning over tens of Mbp may affect the transcriptome of a large progeny of cells. This opens the door for a non DNA mutation-based mechanism of radiation-induced phenotypes.

  17. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Inheritance of the DNA sequence and its proper organization into chromatin is fundamental for genome stability and function. Therefore, how specific chromatin structures are restored on newly synthesized DNA and transmitted through cell division remains a central question to understand cell fate...... choices and self-renewal. Propagation of genetic information and chromatin-based information in cycling cells entails genome-wide disruption and restoration of chromatin, coupled with faithful replication of DNA. In this chapter, we describe how cells duplicate the genome while maintaining its proper...... organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  18. Chromatin dynamics in genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote...... access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance...... of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage....

  19. Chromatin structure with respect to histone signature changes during cell differentiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harničarová, Andrea; Bártová, Eva; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2010), s. 31-44 ISSN 0386-7196 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin * gene expression * differentiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.265, year: 2010

  20. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...... landscape may be stably maintained even in the face of dramatic changes in chromatin structure....

  1. Modulating chromatin structure and DNA accessibility by deacetylase inhibition enhances the anti-cancer activity of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igaz, Nóra; Kovács, Dávid; Rázga, Zsolt; Kónya, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered as novel therapeutic agents inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death in various cancer cells. Inhibition of deacetylase activity results in a relaxed chromatin structure thereby rendering the genetic material more vulnerable to DNA targeting agents that could be exploited by combinational cancer therapy. The unique potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in tumor therapy relies on the generation of reactive radicals which trigger oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. The revolutionary application of AgNPs as chemotherapeutical drugs seems very promising, nevertheless the exact molecular mechanisms of AgNP action in combination with other anti-cancer agents have yet to be elucidated in details before clinical administrations. As a step towards this we investigated the combinational effect of HDAC inhibition and AgNP administration in HeLa cervical cancer cells. We identified synergistic inhibition of cancer cell growth and migration upon combinational treatments. Here we report that the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A enhances the DNA targeting capacity and apoptosis inducing efficacy of AgNPs most probably due to its effect on chromatin condensation. These results point to the potential benefits of combinational application of HDAC inhibitors and AgNPs in novel cancer medication protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantitative FLIM-FRET Microscopy to Monitor Nanoscale Chromatin Compaction In Vivo Reveals Structural Roles of Condensin Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Llères

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available How metazoan genomes are structured at the nanoscale in living cells and tissues remains unknown. Here, we adapted a quantitative FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM approach to assay nanoscale chromatin compaction in living organisms. Caenorhabditis elegans was chosen as a model system. By measuring FRET between histone-tagged fluorescent proteins, we visualized distinct chromosomal regions and quantified the different levels of nanoscale compaction in meiotic cells. Using RNAi and repetitive extrachromosomal array approaches, we defined the heterochromatin state and showed that its architecture presents a nanoscale-compacted organization controlled by Heterochromatin Protein-1 (HP1 and SETDB1 H3-lysine-9 methyltransferase homologs in vivo. Next, we functionally explored condensin complexes. We found that condensin I and condensin II are essential for heterochromatin compaction and that condensin I additionally controls lowly compacted regions. Our data show that, in living animals, nanoscale chromatin compaction is controlled not only by histone modifiers and readers but also by condensin complexes.

  3. Expanding the landscape of chromatin modification (CM-related functional domains and genes in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuye Pu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modification (CM plays a key role in regulating transcription, DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, our knowledge of these processes in humans remains very limited. Here we use computational approaches to study proteins and functional domains involved in CM in humans. We analyze the abundance and the pair-wise domain-domain co-occurrences of 25 well-documented CM domains in 5 model organisms: yeast, worm, fly, mouse and human. Results show that domains involved in histone methylation, DNA methylation, and histone variants are remarkably expanded in metazoan, reflecting the increased demand for cell type-specific gene regulation. We find that CM domains tend to co-occur with a limited number of partner domains and are hence not promiscuous. This property is exploited to identify 47 potentially novel CM domains, including 24 DNA-binding domains, whose role in CM has received little attention so far. Lastly, we use a consensus Machine Learning approach to predict 379 novel CM genes (coding for 329 proteins in humans based on domain compositions. Several of these predictions are supported by very recent experimental studies and others are slated for experimental verification. Identification of novel CM genes and domains in humans will aid our understanding of fundamental epigenetic processes that are important for stem cell differentiation and cancer biology. Information on all the candidate CM domains and genes reported here is publicly available.

  4. Electron microscopic study on the initial effect of gamma-irradiation on the chromatin structure of L cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takashi; Nakanishi, Y.H.; Yoshii, Giichi

    1979-01-01

    Mouse L cells are gamma-irradiated at a dose of 1 Mrad, and ultrathin sections of the cells are examined by electron microscopy. The distance between chromatin fibers in diffused chromatin regions in the irradiated nuclei is essentially identical with the nonirradiated control. In contrast, an increase of the distance between the chromatin fibers is observed in the excess of Ca ions in irradiation. (author)

  5. Disconnect between alcohol-induced alterations in chromatin structure and gene transcription in a mouse embryonic stem cell model of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veazey, Kylee J; Wang, Haiqing; Bedi, Yudhishtar S; Skiles, William M; Chang, Richard Cheng-An; Golding, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    Alterations to chromatin structure induced by environmental insults have become an attractive explanation for the persistence of exposure effects into subsequent life stages. However, a growing body of work examining the epigenetic impact that alcohol and other drugs of abuse exert consistently notes a disconnection between induced changes in chromatin structure and patterns of gene transcription. Thus, an important question is whether perturbations in the 'histone code' induced by prenatal exposures to alcohol implicitly subvert gene expression, or whether the hierarchy of cellular signaling networks driving development is such that they retain control over the transcriptional program. To address this question, we examined the impact of ethanol exposure in mouse embryonic stem cells cultured under 2i conditions, where the transcriptional program is rigidly enforced through the use of small molecule inhibitors. We find that ethanol-induced changes in post-translational histone modifications are dose-dependent, unique to the chromatin modification under investigation, and that the extent and direction of the change differ between the period of exposure and the recovery phase. Similar to in vivo models, we find post-translational modifications affecting histone 3 lysine 9 are the most profoundly impacted, with the signature of exposure persisting long after alcohol has been removed. These changes in chromatin structure associate with dose-dependent alterations in the levels of transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Tet1, Tet2, Tet3, and Polycomb complex members Eed and Ezh2. However, in this model, ethanol-induced changes to the chromatin template do not consistently associate with changes in gene transcription, impede the process of differentiation, or affect the acquisition of monoallelic patterns of expression for the imprinted gene Igf2R. These findings question the inferred universal relevance of epigenetic changes induced by drugs of abuse and suggest that changes

  6. Sperm DNA quality evaluated by comet assay and sperm chromatin structure assay in stallions after unilateral orchiectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, R; Varner, D D; Bissett, W; Blanchard, T L; Teague, S R; Love, C C

    2015-09-15

    Unilateral orchiectomy (UO) may interfere with thermoregulation of the remaining testis caused by inflammation surrounding the incision site, thus altering normal spermatogenesis and consequently sperm quality. Two measures of sperm DNA quality (neutral comet assay and the sperm chromatin structure assay [SCSA]) were compared before UO (0 days) and at 14, 30, and 60 days after UO to determine whether sperm DNA changed after a mild testis stress (i.e., UO). The percent DNA in the comet tail was higher at 14 and 60 days compared to 0 days (P comet tail measures (i.e., length, moment, migration) were higher at all time periods after UO compared to 0 days (P comet assay and the SCSA, which was not identified using traditional measures of sperm quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: gamma-rays and protons in action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, L.; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Štefančíková, Lenka; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Lukášová, Emilie; Boreyko, A.; Krasavin, E.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, SI (2014), s. 128-136 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12008 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double-strand breaks * Higher-order chromatin structure and DSB repair * Formation of chromosomal translocations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  8. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  9. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  10. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 orchestrate DNA damage signalling through the ubiquitylation of histone H2A and the recruitment of downstream repair factors. Here, we demonstrate that RNF8, but not RNF168 or the canonical H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2, mediates extensive chromatin decondensation....... Our data show that CHD4, the catalytic subunit of the NuRD complex, interacts with RNF8 and is essential for RNF8-mediated chromatin unfolding. The chromatin remodelling activity of CHD4 promotes efficient ubiquitin conjugation and assembly of RNF168 and BRCA1 at DNA double-strand breaks....... Interestingly, RNF8-mediated recruitment of CHD4 and subsequent chromatin remodelling were independent of the ubiquitin-ligase activity of RNF8, but involved a non-canonical interaction with the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Our study reveals a new mechanism of chromatin remodelling-assisted ubiquitylation...

  11. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-02

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC.

  12. Chromatin in embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshorer, E

    2007-03-01

    Chromatin, the basic regulatory unit of the eukaryotic genetic material, is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. Cellular differentiation involves large changes in gene expression concomitant with alterations in genome organization and chromatin structure. Such changes are particularly evident in self-renewing pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which begin, in terms of cell fate, as a tabula rasa, and through the process of differentiation, acquire distinct identities. Here I describe the changes in chromatin that accompany neuronal differentiation, particularly of embryonic stem cells, and discuss how chromatin serves as the master regulator of cellular destiny.

  13. Radiation response and chromatin dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikura, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Described is a recent progress in studies of chromatin structural alterations induced by DNA damage by radiation. DNA in eukaryotes exists in the chromatin structure and different mechanisms of response to damage and repair of DNA from those in prokaryotes have been recognized. Chromatin is composed from its unit structure of mono-nucleosome, which is formed from DNA and an octamer of core histones of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. When DNA is damaged, histone structural alterations are required for repair factors and checkpoint proteins to access the damaged site. At the actual genome damage, chemical modification of histone to work as a code occurs dependently on the damage where chromatin remodeling factors and histone chaperone participate for structural alteration and remodeling. As well, the exchange of histone variants and fluidization of histones are recently reported. Known chemical modification involves phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitination of H2AX (a variant of H2A), and acetylation and methylation of H3. Each complex of TIP60, NuA4 and INO80 is known to be included in the regulation of chromatin with damaged/repaired DNA for remodeling, but little is known about recruitment of the factors concerned at the damage site. Regulatory mechanisms in above chromatin dynamics with consideration of quality and timing of radiation should be further elucidated for understanding the precise response to DNA damage. (K.T.)

  14. Heterochromatinization associated with cell differentiation as a model to study DNA double strand break induction and repair in the context of higher-order chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Baranová, Elena; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with extensive gene silencing, heterochromatinization and potentially decreasing need for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Differentiation stages of blood cells thus represent an excellent model to study DSB induction, repair and misrepair in the context of changing higher-order chromatin structure. We show that immature granulocytes form γH2AX and 53BP1 foci, contrary to the mature cells; however, these foci colocalize only rarely and DSB repair is inefficient. Moreover, specific chromatin structure of granulocytes probably influences DSB induction. - Highlights: ► DSB repair is absent in mature granulocytes with condensed chromatin. ► Repair proteins and γH2AX appear in immature stages but rarely colocalize. ► γH2AX persist long times in these cells and DSB repair is inefficient. ► Even though, γH2AX foci “move” out of the dense chromatin. ► 53BP1 enters HP1β domains only after their decondensation

  15. Alpha radiation-induced alterations of the proliferation kinetics, chromatin structure and gene expression in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieber, L.

    1983-01-01

    Exponentially growing mammalian cells were exposed to 3.4 MeV alpha particles. The chromatin of cells arrested in G2 by alpha irradiation was severely damaged, though all cells were still capable to condensate their chromatin after fusion with mitotic cells. In addition to the common types of aberrations (breaks, gaps, dicentrics and exchanges) cells were found possessing one or more chromosomes with long stretches of undercondensed chromatin. Repair of these lesions was indicated by site specific unscheduled DNA synthesis and by the observation that condensation of these regions improved during G2 arrest. Furthermore, during G2 arrest the synthesis of two cellular proteins was stimulated. This was studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35 S-methionine labeled cellular proteins. All these findings provided evidence that radiation-induced G2 arrest is caused by chromatin damage, which prevents regular chromosome condensation for mitosis. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Chromatin remodeling, development and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Myunggon; Sohn, Dong H.; Chung, Heekyoung; Seong, Rho H.

    2008-01-01

    Development is a stepwise process in which multi-potent progenitor cells undergo lineage commitment, differentiation, proliferation and maturation to produce mature cells with restricted developmental potentials. This process is directed by spatiotemporally distinct gene expression programs that allow cells to stringently orchestrate intricate transcriptional activation or silencing events. In eukaryotes, chromatin structure contributes to developmental progression as a blueprint for coordinated gene expression by actively participating in the regulation of gene expression. Changes in higher order chromatin structure or covalent modification of its components are considered to be critical events in dictating lineage-specific gene expression during development. Mammalian cells utilize multi-subunit nuclear complexes to alter chromatin structure. Histone-modifying complex catalyzes covalent modifications of histone tails including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex, which disrupts histone-DNA contacts and induces nucleosome mobilization, requires energy from ATP hydrolysis for its catalytic activity. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes during mammalian development. In particular, the roles of these complexes during embryonic and hematopoietic development are reviewed in depth. In addition, pathological conditions such as tumor development that are induced by mutation of several key subunits of the chromatin remodeling complex are discussed, together with possible mechanisms that underlie tumor suppression by the complex

  17. Structural changes in single chromatin fibers induced by tension and torsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, He

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of the right-handed helical structure of DNA, 61 years have passed. The DNA molecule, which encodes genetic information, is also found twisted into coils. This extra twist of the helical structure, called supercoiling, plays important roles in both DNA compaction and gene

  18. Enrichment of HP1a on Drosophila chromosome 4 genes creates an alternate chromatin structure critical for regulation in this heterochromatic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C Riddle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin environments differ greatly within a eukaryotic genome, depending on expression state, chromosomal location, and nuclear position. In genomic regions characterized by high repeat content and high gene density, chromatin structure must silence transposable elements but permit expression of embedded genes. We have investigated one such region, chromosome 4 of Drosophila melanogaster. Using chromatin-immunoprecipitation followed by microarray (ChIP-chip analysis, we examined enrichment patterns of 20 histone modifications and 25 chromosomal proteins in S2 and BG3 cells, as well as the changes in several marks resulting from mutations in key proteins. Active genes on chromosome 4 are distinct from those in euchromatin or pericentric heterochromatin: while there is a depletion of silencing marks at the transcription start sites (TSSs, HP1a and H3K9me3, but not H3K9me2, are enriched strongly over gene bodies. Intriguingly, genes on chromosome 4 are less frequently associated with paused polymerase. However, when the chromatin is altered by depleting HP1a or POF, the RNA pol II enrichment patterns of many chromosome 4 genes shift, showing a significant decrease over gene bodies but not at TSSs, accompanied by lower expression of those genes. Chromosome 4 genes have a low incidence of TRL/GAGA factor binding sites and a low T(m downstream of the TSS, characteristics that could contribute to a low incidence of RNA polymerase pausing. Our data also indicate that EGG and POF jointly regulate H3K9 methylation and promote HP1a binding over gene bodies, while HP1a targeting and H3K9 methylation are maintained at the repeats by an independent mechanism. The HP1a-enriched, POF-associated chromatin structure over the gene bodies may represent one type of adaptation for genes embedded in repetitive DNA.

  19. The Latest Twists in Chromatin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossey, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2018-01-05

    In its most restrictive interpretation, the notion of chromatin remodeling refers to the action of chromatin-remodeling enzymes on nucleosomes with the aim of displacing and removing them from the chromatin fiber (the effective polymer formed by a DNA molecule and proteins). This local modification of the fiber structure can have consequences for the initiation and repression of the transcription process, and when the remodeling process spreads along the fiber, it also results in long-range effects essential for fiber condensation. There are three regulatory levels of relevance that can be distinguished for this process: the intrinsic sequence preference of the histone octamer, which rules the positioning of the nucleosome along the DNA, notably in relation to the genetic information coded in DNA; the recognition or selection of nucleosomal substrates by remodeling complexes; and, finally, the motor action on the nucleosome exerted by the chromatin remodeler. Recent work has been able to provide crucial insights at each of these three levels that add new twists to this exciting and unfinished story, which we highlight in this perspective. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Higher-Order Chromatin Organisation in Cell Nuclei: Structure and Function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozubek, Stanislav; Lukášová, Emilie; Bártová, Eva; Kozubek, Michal; Skalníková, M.; Jirsová, Pavla; Koutná, I.

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2000), s. 1145 ISSN 0739-1102. [Mendel - Brno 2000. DNA Structure and Interactions. Their Biological Roles and Implications in Biomedicine and Biotechnologies. 19.07.2000-23.07.2000, Brno] Institutional research plan: CEZ:A17/98:Z5-004-9-ii Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. The 3D chromatin structure of the mouse β-haemoglobin gene cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); E. de Boer (Ernie); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractHere we show a 3D DNA-FISH method to visualizes the 3D structure of the β-globin locus. Geometric size and shape measurements of the 3D rendered signals (128Kb) show that the volume of the β-globin locus decreases almost two fold upon gene activation. A decrease in length and a

  2. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  3. Important hydrodynamic and spectroscopic techniques in the field of chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olins, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Combining hydrodynamic and spectroscopic techniques in the study of conformational states of ..nu../sub 1/ induced by a variety of perturbants has led us to a general coneption: the two structural domains of ..nu../sub 1/ (i.e., the DNA-rich outer shell and the ..cap alpha..-helix-rich apolar histone core) exhibit differential responsiveness. In general, the ..cap alpha..-helical regions are more resistant, than DNA conformation or ..nu../sub 1/ size and shape, to the perturbing effects of urea, decreased ionic strength and pH, trypsin treatment, or a variety of water-miscible organic solvents. There are a number of reasonable conceptual models to explain this differential responsiveness of the structural domains of ..nu../sub 1/.

  4. Salt and divalent cations affect the flexible nature of the natural beaded chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, J

    1977-01-01

    Cl or 0.6M NaCL, and is compact in 0.01 M NaCl solutions if histone H 1 is present. Even high concentrations of urea did not alter the fundamental beaded structure, consisting of 110A beads of 200 base pair content, each joined by thin DNA bridges of 50 base pairs. The physical bead observed by EM...

  5. Chromatin organization at the nuclear periphery as revealed by image analysis of structured illumination microscopy data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Efenberková, Michaela; Sieger, T.; Maninová, Miloslava; Uhlířová, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 12 (2017), s. 2066-2077 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-08835Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Structured illumination * Image analysis * Chromation * Nucleus * Histone modification * Nuclear pore complexes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.431, year: 2016

  6. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Lakshmi; McDaniel, Ivy E; Engie, Liana; Armstrong, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster CHD1 chromatin remodeling factor modulates global chromosome structure and counteracts HP1a and H3K9me2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Bugga

    Full Text Available CHD1 is a conserved chromatin remodeling factor that localizes to active genes and functions in nucleosome assembly and positioning as well as histone turnover. Mouse CHD1 is required for the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency while human CHD1 may function as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the action of CHD1 on higher order chromatin structure in differentiated cells, we examined the consequences of loss of CHD1 and over-expression of CHD1 on polytene chromosomes from salivary glands of third instar Drosophila melanogaster larvae. We observed that chromosome structure is sensitive to the amount of this remodeler. Loss of CHD1 resulted in alterations of chromosome structure and an increase in the heterochromatin protein HP1a, while over-expression of CHD1 disrupted higher order chromatin structure and caused a decrease in levels of HP1a. Over-expression of an ATPase inactive form of CHD1 did not result in severe chromosomal defects, suggesting that the ATPase activity is required for this in vivo phenotype. Interestingly, changes in CHD1 protein levels did not correlate with changes in the levels of the euchromatin mark H3K4me3 or elongating RNA Polymerase II. Thus, while CHD1 is localized to transcriptionally active regions of the genome, it can function to alter the levels of HP1a, perhaps through changes in methylation of H3K9.

  8. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E. (Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1994-11-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm[sup -3] salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author).

  9. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm -3 salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author)

  10. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  11. Systems Biological Determination of the Epi-Genomic Structure Function Relation: : Nucleosomal Association Changes, Intra/Inter Chromosomal Architecture, Transcriptional Structure Relationship, Simulations of Nucleosomal/Chromatin Fiber/Chromosome Architecture and Dynamics, System Biological/Medical Result Integration via the GLOBE 3D Genome Platform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); P.R. Cook (Peter); K. Rippe (Karsten); Gernot Längst; G. Wedemann (Gero); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDespite our knowledge of the sequence of the human genome, the relation of its three-dimensional dynamic architecture with its function – the storage and expression of genetic information – remains one of the central unresolved issues of our age. It became very clear meanwhile that this

  12. Molecular basis for the redox control of nuclear transport of the structural chromatin protein Hmgb1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, George; Talcott, Katherine E.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Crabb, John W.; Sears, Jonathan E.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress can induce a covalent disulfide bond between protein and peptide thiols that is reversible through enzymatic catalysis. This process provides a post-translational mechanism for control of protein function and may also protect thiol groups from irreversible oxidation. High mobility group protein B1 (Hmgb1), a DNA-binding structural chromosomal protein and transcriptional co-activator was identified as a substrate of glutaredoxin. Hmgb1 contains 3 cysteines, Cys23, 45, and 106. In mild oxidative conditions, Cys23 and Cys45 readily form an intramolecular disulfide bridge, whereas Cys106 remains in the reduced form. The disulfide bond between Cys23 and Cys45 is a target of glutathione-dependent reduction by glutaredoxin. Endogenous Hmgb1 as well as GFP-tagged wild-type Hmgb1 co-localize in the nucleus of CHO cells. While replacement of Hmgb1 Cys23 and/or 45 with serines did not affect the nuclear distribution of the mutant proteins, Cys106-to-Ser and triple cysteine mutations impaired nuclear localization of Hmgb1. Our cysteine targeted mutational analysis suggests that Cys23 and 45 induce conformational changes in response to oxidative stress, whereas Cys106 appears to be critical for the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Hmgb1

  13. Higher order chromatin organization in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Karen L.; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of our increased understanding of how genomes are dysregulated in cancer and a plethora of molecular diagnostic tools, the front line and ‘gold standard’ detection of cancer remains the pathologist’s detection of gross changes in cellular and tissue structure, most strikingly nuclear dis-organization. In fact, for over 140 years it has been noted that nuclear morphology is often disrupted in cancer. Even today, nuclear morphology measures include nuclear size, shape, DNA content (ploidy) and ‘chromatin organization’. Given the importance of nuclear shape to diagnoses of cancer phenotypes, it is surprising and frustrating that we currently lack a detailed understanding to explain these changes and how they might arise and relate to molecular events in the cell. It is an implicit hypothesis that perturbation of chromatin and epigenetic signatures may lead to alterations in nuclear structure (or vice versa) and that these perturbations lie at the heart of cancer genesis. In this review, we attempt to synthesize research leading to our current understanding on how chromatin interactions at the nuclear lamina, epigenetic modulation and gene regulation may intersect in cancer and offer a perspective on critical experiments that would help clarify how nuclear architecture may contribute to the cancerous phenotype. We also discuss the historical understanding of nuclear structure in normal cells and as a diagnostic in cancer. PMID:23266653

  14. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  15. Structural Logical Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schürmann, Carsten; Sarnat, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Tait's method (a.k.a. proof by logical relations) is a powerful proof technique frequently used for showing foundational properties of languages based on typed lambda-calculi. Historically, these proofs have been extremely difficult to formalize in proof assistants with weak meta-logics......, such as Twelf, and yet they are often straightforward in proof assistants with stronger meta-logics. In this paper, we propose structural logical relations as a technique for conducting these proofs in systems with limited meta-logical strength by explicitly representing and reasoning about an auxiliary logic...

  16. Chromatin is wonderful stuff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin molecules have properties that set them aside from all other biomacromolecules in the cell. (i) Chromosomes, which are single chromatin molecules, are the largest macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. (ii) Chromatin molecules carry the cell's genetic and epigenetic information and all

  17. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesne, Annick; Victor, Jean–Marc; Bécavin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. (perspective)

  18. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  19. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases

  20. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    different proteins involved in the synthesis of mRNA from the. DNA template. ... CBP - CREB Binding Protein. CHRAC. Chromatin .... nucleosomal interactions, and thereby change the chromatin structure, as per the ..... methyltransferases in gene regulation is yet to be elucidated. .... Molecular Biology and. Genetics Unit.

  1. Environmental toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation as detected by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA[reg])

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, Donald P.; Wixon, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Studies over the past two decades have clearly shown that reproductive toxicants cause sperm DNA fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation can usually be detected prior to observing alterations of metaphase chromosomes in embryos. Thus, Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA)-detected DNA damage is viewed as the molecular precursor to later gross chromosome damage observed under the light microscope. SCSA measurements of animal or human sperm consist of first obtaining a fresh or flash frozen neat semen sample in LN2 or dry ice. Samples are then sent to a SCSA diagnostic laboratory where the samples are thawed, diluted to ∼1-2 x 106 sperm/ml, treated for 30 s with a pH 1.2 detergent buffer and then stained with acridine orange (AO). The low pH partially denatures DNA at the sites of DNA strand breaks and the AO-ssDNA fluoresces red while the AO-dsDNA fluoresces green. Flow cytometry measurements of 5000 sperm/sample provide statistically robust data on the ratio of red to green sperm, the extent of the DNA fragmentation and the standard deviations of measures. Numerous experiments on rodents treated with reproductive toxicants clearly showed that SCSA measures are highly dose responsive and have a very low CV. Different agents that act on germ cells at various stages of development usually showed sperm DNA fragmentation when that germ cell fraction arrived in the epididymis or ejaculate. Some of these treated samples were capable of successful in vitro fertilization but with frequent embryo failure. A 2-year longitudinal study of men living a valley town with a reported abnormal level of infertility and spontaneous miscarriages and also a seasonal atmospheric smog pollution, showed, for the first time, that SCSA measurements of human sperm DNA fragmentation were detectable and correlated with dosage of air pollution while the classical semen measures were not correlated. Also, young men spraying pesticides without protective gear are at an increased risk for elevated

  2. Map of open and closed chromatin domains in Drosophila genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milon, Beatrice; Sun, Yezhou; Chang, Weizhong; Creasy, Todd; Mahurkar, Anup; Shetty, Amol; Nurminsky, Dmitry; Nurminskaya, Maria

    2014-11-18

    Chromatin compactness has been considered a major determinant of gene activity and has been associated with specific chromatin modifications in studies on a few individual genetic loci. At the same time, genome-wide patterns of open and closed chromatin have been understudied, and are at present largely predicted from chromatin modification and gene expression data. However the universal applicability of such predictions is not self-evident, and requires experimental verification. We developed and implemented a high-throughput analysis for general chromatin sensitivity to DNase I which provides a comprehensive epigenomic assessment in a single assay. Contiguous domains of open and closed chromatin were identified by computational analysis of the data, and correlated to other genome annotations including predicted chromatin "states", individual chromatin modifications, nuclear lamina interactions, and gene expression. While showing that the widely trusted predictions of chromatin structure are correct in the majority of cases, we detected diverse "exceptions" from the conventional rules. We found a profound paucity of chromatin modifications in a major fraction of closed chromatin, and identified a number of loci where chromatin configuration is opposite to that expected from modification and gene expression patterns. Further, we observed that chromatin of large introns tends to be closed even when the genes are expressed, and that a significant proportion of active genes including their promoters are located in closed chromatin. These findings reveal limitations of the existing predictive models, indicate novel mechanisms of epigenetic regulation, and provide important insights into genome organization and function.

  3. [The effect of structure of benzimidazoles on the character of forming intramolecular cross-links in DNA and chromatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil', E M; Zhil'tsova, V M; Biniukov, V I; Zhizhina, G P; Stoliarova, L G; Kuznetsov, Iu P

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of a number of benzimidazole class preparations, being distinguished by a position of aminomethyl substitutes, has been carried out. It has been shown, that the non-substituted preparation BIO-10 does not form UV-cross-links in DNA and chromatine; BIO-40, having one substitute in the position 2, causes the formation of inter-molecular cross-links DNA-DNA. The preparation BIO-50, having 2 aminomethyl groups in the imidazole nucleus positions 2 and 6, forms cross-links DNA-DNA and DNA-protein in chromatine. The generation of radicals by the preparations BIO-10 and BIO-50 has been studied by the EPR-method by use of spin trap. It has been demonstrated, that BIO-10, unlike BIO-50, actively generates superoxide. A supposition has been made, that an UV-formation of superoxide-radical in the presence of BIO-10 might be a reason of DNA-macromolecule destruction.

  4. Interaction of a common painkiller piroxicam and copper-piroxicam with chromatin causes structural alterations accompanied by modulation at the epigenomic/genomic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sathi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Chakraborty, Payal; Das, Chandrima; Sarkar, Munna

    2017-08-01

    NSAIDs are the most common class of painkillers and anti-inflammatory agents. They also show other functions like chemoprevention and chemosuppression for which they act at the protein but not at the genome level since they are mostly anions at physiological pH, which prohibit their approach to the poly-anionic DNA. Complexing the drugs with bioactive metal obliterate their negative charge and allow them to bind to the DNA, thereby, opening the possibility of genome level interaction. To test this hypothesis, we present the interaction of a traditional NSAID, Piroxicam and its copper complex with core histone and chromatin. Spectroscopy, DLS, and SEM studies were applied to see the effect of the interaction on the structure of histone/chromatin. This was coupled with MTT assay, immunoblot analysis, confocal microscopy, micro array analysis and qRT-PCR. The interaction of Piroxicam and its copper complex with histone/chromatin results in structural alterations. Such structural alterations can have different biological manifestations, but to test our hypothesis, we have focused only on the accompanied modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. The complex, showed alteration of key epigenetic signatures implicated in transcription in the global context, although Piroxicam caused no significant changes. We have correlated such alterations caused by the complex with the changes in global gene expression and validated the candidate gene expression alterations. Our results provide the proof of concept that DNA binding ability of the copper complexes of a traditional NSAID, opens up the possibility of modulations at the epigenomic/genomic level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chromatin Dynamics of the mouse β-globin locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); E. de Boer (Ernie); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLately it has become more clear that (subtle) changes in 3D organization of chromatin can either trigger transcription or silence genes or gene clusters. It has also been postulated that due to changes in chromatin structure, a change in chromatin accessibility of transcription factors

  7. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shieh Grace S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1 marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3, which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  8. H2B ubiquitylation is part of chromatin architecture that marks exon-intron structure in budding yeast

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shieh, Grace S.

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background The packaging of DNA into chromatin regulates transcription from initiation through 3\\' end processing. One aspect of transcription in which chromatin plays a poorly understood role is the co-transcriptional splicing of pre-mRNA. Results Here we provide evidence that H2B monoubiquitylation (H2BK123ub1) marks introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genome-wide map of H2BK123ub1 in this organism reveals that this modification is enriched in coding regions and that its levels peak at the transcribed regions of two characteristic subgroups of genes. First, long genes are more likely to have higher levels of H2BK123ub1, correlating with the postulated role of this modification in preventing cryptic transcription initiation in ORFs. Second, genes that are highly transcribed also have high levels of H2BK123ub1, including the ribosomal protein genes, which comprise the majority of intron-containing genes in yeast. H2BK123ub1 is also a feature of introns in the yeast genome, and the disruption of this modification alters the intragenic distribution of H3 trimethylation on lysine 36 (H3K36me3), which functionally correlates with alternative RNA splicing in humans. In addition, the deletion of genes encoding the U2 snRNP subunits, Lea1 or Msl1, in combination with an htb-K123R mutation, leads to synthetic lethality. Conclusion These data suggest that H2BK123ub1 facilitates cross talk between chromatin and pre-mRNA splicing by modulating the distribution of intronic and exonic histone modifications.

  9. Effect of hyperthermia on replicating chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The extent of heat-induced structural alterations in chromatin containing nascent (pulse-labeled) DNA was assayed using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. The basic nucleosome structure in nascent and mature chromatin of S-phase cells appeared unaltered for up to 16 hr after exposure to hyperthermic temperatures as high as 48 0 C for 15 min. However, the rate of nuclease digestion of DNA in both nascent and mature chromatin is inhibited following exposure to hyperthermic temperatures. In unheated cells, pulse-labeled nascent DNA matured into mature chromatin structure with a half-time of 2.5 min. The half-time for the maturation of pulse-labeled DNA from nascent into mature chromatin increased in a linear manner as a function of increasing temperature of exposure with constant heating time at temperatures above 43 0 C. Both the reduced nuclease digestibility of nascent DNA and the increased time for chromatin structural changes could be due to the increased protein mass of chromatin following hyperthermia

  10. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  11. Chromatin damage induced by fast neutrons or UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.; Mihailescu, I

    2002-07-01

    Chromatin samples from livers of Wistar rats were subjected to fast neutron irradiation in doses of 10-100 Gy or to a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, in doses of 0.5-3 MJ.m{sup -2}. The action of the radiation on chromatin was monitored by chromatin intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetimes (of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin) and by analysing fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For the mentioned doses of UV excimer laser radiation, the action on chromatin was more intense than in the case of fast neutrons. The same types of damage are produced by the two radiations: acidic and basic destruction of chromatin protein structure, DNA strand breaking and the increase of the distance between DNA and proteins in chromatin. (author)

  12. Chromatin damage induced by fast neutrons or UV laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.; Mihailescu, I.

    2002-01-01

    Chromatin samples from livers of Wistar rats were subjected to fast neutron irradiation in doses of 10-100 Gy or to a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, in doses of 0.5-3 MJ.m -2 . The action of the radiation on chromatin was monitored by chromatin intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetimes (of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin) and by analysing fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For the mentioned doses of UV excimer laser radiation, the action on chromatin was more intense than in the case of fast neutrons. The same types of damage are produced by the two radiations: acidic and basic destruction of chromatin protein structure, DNA strand breaking and the increase of the distance between DNA and proteins in chromatin. (author)

  13. Epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Somi; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-01-13

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of memory formation and maintenance has been a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Memory formation and maintenance are tightly controlled complex processes. Among the various processes occurring at different levels, gene expression regulation is especially crucial for proper memory processing, as some genes need to be activated while some genes must be suppressed. Epigenetic regulation of the genome involves processes such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These processes edit genomic properties or the interactions between the genome and histone cores. They then induce structural changes in the chromatin and lead to transcriptional changes of different genes. Recent studies have focused on the concept of chromatin remodeling, which consists of 3D structural changes in chromatin in relation to gene regulation, and is an important process in learning and memory. In this review, we will introduce three major epigenetic processes involved in memory regulation: DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation. We will also discuss general mechanisms of long-term memory storage and relate the epigenetic control of learning and memory to chromatin remodeling. Finally, we will discuss how epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to the pathologies of neurological disorders and cause memory-related symptoms.

  14. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...... framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...

  15. Chromatin meets its organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Megan S; Spector, David L

    2013-06-06

    Chromatin organization and gene-gene interactions are critical components of carrying out developmental programs. Phillips-Cremins et al. identify a series of unexpected architectural proteins that work in a combinatorial manner to functionally organize chromatin in a cell-type-specific manner at the submegabase-length scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Extracellular Matrix, Nuclear and Chromatin Structure and GeneExpression in Normal Tissues and Malignant Tumors: A Work inProgress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Virginia A.; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-08-01

    Almost three decades ago, we presented a model where theextracellular matrix (ECM) was postulated to influence gene expressionand tissue-specificity through the action of ECM receptors and thecytoskeleton. This hypothesis implied that ECM molecules could signal tothe nucleus and that the unit of function in higher organisms was not thecell alone, but the cell plus its microenvironment. We now know that ECMinvokes changes in tissue and organ architecture and that tissue, cell,nuclear, and chromatin structure are changed profoundly as a result ofand during malignant progression. Whereas some evidence has beengenerated for a link between ECM-induced alterations in tissuearchitecture and changes in both nuclear and chromatin organization, themanner by which these changes actively induce or repress gene expressionin normal and malignant cells is a topic in need of further attention.Here, we will discuss some key findings that may provide insights intomechanisms through which ECM could influence gene transcription and howtumor cells acquire the ability to overcome these levels ofcontrol.

  17. In the loop: how chromatin topology links genome structure to function in mechanisms underlying learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, L Ashley; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2017-04-01

    Different aspects of learning, memory, and cognition are regulated by epigenetic mechanisms such as covalent DNA modifications and histone post-translational modifications. More recently, the modulation of chromatin architecture and nuclear organization is emerging as a key factor in dynamic transcriptional regulation of the post-mitotic neuron. For instance, neuronal activity induces relocalization of gene loci to 'transcription factories', and specific enhancer-promoter looping contacts allow for precise transcriptional regulation. Moreover, neuronal activity-dependent DNA double-strand break formation in the promoter of immediate early genes appears to overcome topological constraints on transcription. Together, these findings point to a critical role for genome topology in integrating dynamic environmental signals to define precise spatiotemporal gene expression programs supporting cognitive processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Halos and related structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The halo structure originated from nuclear physics but is now encountered more widely. It appears in loosely bound, clustered systems where the spatial extension of the system is significantly larger than that of the binding potentials. A review is given on our current understanding of these stru......The halo structure originated from nuclear physics but is now encountered more widely. It appears in loosely bound, clustered systems where the spatial extension of the system is significantly larger than that of the binding potentials. A review is given on our current understanding...... of these structures, with an emphasis on how the structures evolve as more cluster components are added and on the experimental situation concerning halo states in light nuclei....

  19. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  20. A transient ischemic environment induces reversible compaction of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmes, Ina; Szczurek, Aleksander; Prakash, Kirti; Charapitsa, Iryna; Heiser, Christina; Musheev, Michael; Schock, Florian; Fornalczyk, Karolina; Ma, Dongyu; Birk, Udo; Cremer, Christoph; Reid, George

    2015-11-05

    Cells detect and adapt to hypoxic and nutritional stress through immediate transcriptional, translational and metabolic responses. The environmental effects of ischemia on chromatin nanostructure were investigated using single molecule localization microscopy of DNA binding dyes and of acetylated histones, by the sensitivity of chromatin to digestion with DNAseI, and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of core and linker histones. Short-term oxygen and nutrient deprivation of the cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1 induces a previously undescribed chromatin architecture, consisting of large, chromatin-sparse voids interspersed between DNA-dense hollow helicoid structures 40-700 nm in dimension. The chromatin compaction is reversible, and upon restitution of normoxia and nutrients, chromatin transiently adopts a more open structure than in untreated cells. The compacted state of chromatin reduces transcription, while the open chromatin structure induced upon recovery provokes a transitory increase in transcription. Digestion of chromatin with DNAseI confirms that oxygen and nutrient deprivation induces compaction of chromatin. Chromatin compaction is associated with depletion of ATP and redistribution of the polyamine pool into the nucleus. FRAP demonstrates that core histones are not displaced from compacted chromatin; however, the mobility of linker histone H1 is considerably reduced, to an extent that far exceeds the difference in histone H1 mobility between heterochromatin and euchromatin. These studies exemplify the dynamic capacity of chromatin architecture to physically respond to environmental conditions, directly link cellular energy status to chromatin compaction and provide insight into the effect ischemia has on the nuclear architecture of cells.

  1. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  2. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, S.; Grubert, F.; Zaugg, J. B.; Kundaje, A.; Liu, Y.; Boyle, A. P.; Zhang, Q. C.; Zakharia, F.; Spacek, D. V.; Li, J.; Xie, D.; Olarerin-George, A.; Steinmetz, L. M.; Hogenesch, J. B.; Kellis, M.; Batzoglou, S.; Snyder, M.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  3. A selective HDAC 1/2 inhibitor modulates chromatin and gene expression in brain and alters mouse behavior in two mood-related tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A Schroeder

    Full Text Available Psychiatric diseases, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression, are projected to lead global disease burden within the next decade. Pharmacotherapy, the primary--albeit often ineffective--treatment method, has remained largely unchanged over the past 50 years, highlighting the need for novel target discovery and improved mechanism-based treatments. Here, we examined in wild type mice the impact of chronic, systemic treatment with Compound 60 (Cpd-60, a slow-binding, benzamide-based inhibitor of the class I histone deacetylase (HDAC family members, HDAC1 and HDAC2, in mood-related behavioral assays responsive to clinically effective drugs. Cpd-60 treatment for one week was associated with attenuated locomotor activity following acute amphetamine challenge. Further, treated mice demonstrated decreased immobility in the forced swim test. These changes are consistent with established effects of clinical mood stabilizers and antidepressants, respectively. Whole-genome expression profiling of specific brain regions (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hippocampus from mice treated with Cpd-60 identified gene expression changes, including a small subset of transcripts that significantly overlapped those previously reported in lithium-treated mice. HDAC inhibition in brain was confirmed by increased histone acetylation both globally and, using chromatin immunoprecipitation, at the promoter regions of upregulated transcripts, a finding consistent with in vivo engagement of HDAC targets. In contrast, treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, a non-selective fast-binding, hydroxamic acid HDAC 1/2/3/6 inhibitor, was sufficient to increase histone acetylation in brain, but did not alter mood-related behaviors and had dissimilar transcriptional regulatory effects compared to Cpd-60. These results provide evidence that selective inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 in brain may provide an epigenetic-based target for developing

  4. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  5. Relationship between chromatin complexity and nuclear envelope circularity in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantic, Igor; Basailovic, Milos; Paunovic, Jovana; Pantic, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •We analyzed chromatin structure and nuclear envelope of 200 hippocampal pyramidal neurons. •Fractal and GLCM mathematical parameters were calculated each chromatin structure. •Nuclear shape was quantified by calculating circularity of the nuclear envelope. •Circularity was in significant relationship with chromatin fractal dimension. •Strong correlation was detected between circularity and some GLCM parameters. -- Abstract: In this study we tested the existence and strength of the relationship between circularity of nuclear envelope and mathematical parameters of chromatin structure. Coronal sections of the brain were made in 10 male albino mice. The brain tissue was stained using a modification of Feulgen method for DNA visualization. A total of 200 hippocampal pyramidal neurons (20 per animal) were visualized using DEM 200 High-Speed Color CMOS Chip and Olympus CX21FS1 microscope. Circularity of the nuclear membrane was calculated in ImageJ (NIH, USA) after the nuclear segmentation, based on the freehand selection of the nuclear regions of interest. Circularity was determined from the values of area and perimeter. For each chromatin structure, using fractal and grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithms, we determined the values of fractal dimension, lacunarity, angular second moment, GLCM entropy, inverse difference moment, GLCM correlation, and GLCM contrast. It was found that circularity is in a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with fractal dimension as the main parameter of fractal complexity analysis. Also, circularity was in a very strong relationship (p < 0.001) with certain parameters of grey level co-occurrence matrix such as the angular second moment and GLCM correlation. This is the first study to indicate that nuclear shape is significantly related to mathematical parameters of higher chromatin organization. Also, it seems that circularity of the nuclear envelope is a good predictor of certain features of chromatin

  6. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  7. The Role of Chromatin-Associated Proteins in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Minucci, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    The organization of the chromatin structure is essential for maintaining cell-type-specific gene expression and therefore for cell identity. This structure is highly dynamic and is regulated by a large number of chromatin-associated proteins that are required for normal development...... and differentiation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been found with high frequency in genes coding for chromatin-associated proteins in cancer, and several of these are required for cancer maintenance. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin-associated proteins...

  8. Activation of the alpha-globin gene expression correlates with dramatic upregulation of nearby non-globin genes and changes in local and large-scale chromatin spatial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Galitsyna, Aleksandra A; Flyamer, Ilya M; Golov, Arkadiy K; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Imakaev, Maxim V; Abdennur, Nezar A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-07-11

    In homeotherms, the alpha-globin gene clusters are located within permanently open genome regions enriched in housekeeping genes. Terminal erythroid differentiation results in dramatic upregulation of alpha-globin genes making their expression comparable to the rRNA transcriptional output. Little is known about the influence of the erythroid-specific alpha-globin gene transcription outburst on adjacent, widely expressed genes and large-scale chromatin organization. Here, we have analyzed the total transcription output, the overall chromatin contact profile, and CTCF binding within the 2.7 Mb segment of chicken chromosome 14 harboring the alpha-globin gene cluster in cultured lymphoid cells and cultured erythroid cells before and after induction of terminal erythroid differentiation. We found that, similarly to mammalian genome, the chicken genomes is organized in TADs and compartments. Full activation of the alpha-globin gene transcription in differentiated erythroid cells is correlated with upregulation of several adjacent housekeeping genes and the emergence of abundant intergenic transcription. An extended chromosome region encompassing the alpha-globin cluster becomes significantly decompacted in differentiated erythroid cells, and depleted in CTCF binding and CTCF-anchored chromatin loops, while the sub-TAD harboring alpha-globin gene cluster and the upstream major regulatory element (MRE) becomes highly enriched with chromatin interactions as compared to lymphoid and proliferating erythroid cells. The alpha-globin gene domain and the neighboring loci reside within the A-like chromatin compartment in both lymphoid and erythroid cells and become further segregated from the upstream gene desert upon terminal erythroid differentiation. Our findings demonstrate that the effects of tissue-specific transcription activation are not restricted to the host genomic locus but affect the overall chromatin structure and transcriptional output of the encompassing

  9. Atomic force microscopy on chromosomes, chromatin and DNA: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Wouter; Strappe, Padraig

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the achievements and progress that has been made in the use of atomic force microscopy in DNA related research in the last 25 years. For this review DNA related research is split up in chromosomal-, chromatin- and DNA focused research to achieve a logical flow from large- to smaller structures. The focus of this review is not only on the AFM as imaging tool but also on the AFM as measuring tool using force spectroscopy, as therein lays its greatest advantage and future. The amazing technological and experimental progress that has been made during the last 25 years is too extensive to fully cover in this review but some key developments and experiments have been described to give an overview of the evolution of AFM use from 'imaging tool' to 'measurement tool' on chromosomes, chromatin and DNA. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  11. Cell- and stage-specific chromatin structure across the Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) promoter coincide with CBF1 and C/EBP-beta binding in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Mark N; Fenwick, Emily; Karimi, Mahdad; Abraham, Lawrence J; Ulgiati, Daniela

    2009-08-01

    Stringent developmental transcription requires multiple transcription factor (TF) binding sites, cell-specific expression of signaling molecules, TFs and co-regulators and appropriate chromatin structure. During B-lymphopoiesis, human Complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) is detected on immature and mature B cells but not on B cell precursors and plasma cells. We examined cell- and stage-specific human CR2 gene regulation using cell lines modeling B-lymphopoiesis. Chromatin accessibility assays revealed a region between -409 and -262 with enhanced accessibility in mature B cells and pre-B cells, compared to either non-lymphoid or plasma cell-types, however, accessibility near the transcription start site (TSS) was elevated only in CR2-expressing B cells. A correlation between histone acetylation and CR2 expression was observed, while histone H3K4 dimethylation was enriched near the TSS in both CR2-expressing B cells and non-expressing pre-B cells. Candidate sites within the CR2 promoter were identified which could regulate chromatin, including a matrix attachment region associated with CDP, SATB1/BRIGHT and CEBP-beta sites as well as two CBF1 sites. ChIP assays verified that both CBF1 and C/EBP-beta bind the CR2 promoter in B cells raising the possibility that these factors facilitate or respond to alterations in chromatin structure to control the timing and/or level of CR2 transcription.

  12. Structural consequences of disease-causing mutations in the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain of the chromatin-associated protein ATRX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentaro, Anthony; Yang, Ji-Chun; Chapman, Lynda; Kowalczyk, Monika S; Gibbons, Richard J; Higgs, Douglas R; Neuhaus, David; Rhodes, Daniela

    2007-07-17

    The chromatin-associated protein ATRX was originally identified because mutations in the ATRX gene cause a severe form of syndromal X-linked mental retardation associated with alpha-thalassemia. Half of all of the disease-associated missense mutations cluster in a cysteine-rich region in the N terminus of ATRX. This region was named the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain, based on sequence homology with a family of DNA methyltransferases. Here, we report the solution structure of the ADD domain of ATRX, which consists of an N-terminal GATA-like zinc finger, a plant homeodomain finger, and a long C-terminal alpha-helix that pack together to form a single globular domain. Interestingly, the alpha-helix of the GATA-like finger is exposed and highly basic, suggesting a DNA-binding function for ATRX. The disease-causing mutations fall into two groups: the majority affect buried residues and hence affect the structural integrity of the ADD domain; another group affects a cluster of surface residues, and these are likely to perturb a potential protein interaction site. The effects of individual point mutations on the folding state and stability of the ADD domain correlate well with the levels of mutant ATRX protein in patients, providing insights into the molecular pathophysiology of ATR-X syndrome.

  13. Reprogramming the chromatin landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Tina B; Voss, Ty C; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2013-01-01

    , mechanistic details defining the cellular interactions between ER and GR are poorly understood. We investigated genome-wide binding profiles for ER and GR upon coactivation and characterized the status of the chromatin landscape. We describe a novel mechanism dictating the molecular interplay between ER...... and GR. Upon induction, GR modulates access of ER to specific sites in the genome by reorganization of the chromatin configuration for these elements. Binding to these newly accessible sites occurs either by direct recognition of ER response elements or indirectly through interactions with other factors...

  14. Chromatin dynamics during DSB repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Gabrielová, Barbora; Ondřej, Vladan; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1773, č. 10 (2007), s. 1534-1545 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1065203; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05OC084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin structure * double- strand breaks (DSB) * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.374, year: 2007

  15. Quantitative analysis of nucleolar chromatin distribution in the complex convoluted nucleoli of Didinium nasutum (Ciliophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, Olga G; Karajan, Bella P; Ivlev, Yuri F; Ivanova, Julia L; Skarlato, Sergei O; Popenko, Vladimir I

    2013-01-01

    We have earlier shown that the typical Didinium nasutum nucleolus is a complex convoluted branched domain, comprising a dense fibrillar component located at the periphery of the nucleolus and a granular component located in the central part. Here our main interest was to study quantitatively the spatial distribution of nucleolar chromatin structures in these convoluted nucleoli. There are no "classical" fibrillar centers in D.nasutum nucleoli. The spatial distribution of nucleolar chromatin bodies, which play the role of nucleolar organizers in the macronucleus of D.nasutum, was studied using 3D reconstructions based on serial ultrathin sections. The relative number of nucleolar chromatin bodies was determined in macronuclei of recently fed, starved D.nasutum cells and in resting cysts. This parameter is shown to correlate with the activity of the nucleolus. However, the relative number of nucleolar chromatin bodies in different regions of the same convoluted nucleolus is approximately the same. This finding suggests equal activity in different parts of the nucleolar domain and indicates the existence of some molecular mechanism enabling it to synchronize this activity in D. nasutum nucleoli. Our data show that D. nasutum nucleoli display bipartite structure. All nucleolar chromatin bodies are shown to be located outside of nucleoli, at the periphery of the fibrillar component.

  16. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  17. RevSex duplication-induced and sex-related differences in the SOX9 regulatory region chromatin landscape in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybæk, Helle; de Bruijn, Diederik; den Engelsman-van Dijk, Anke H A; Vanichkina, Darya; Nepal, Chirag; Brendehaug, Atle; Houge, Gunnar

    2014-03-01

    It was recently shown that duplications of the RevSex element, located 0.5 Mb upstream of SOX9, cause XX-disorder of sex development (DSD), and that deletions cause XY-DSD. To explore how a 148 kb RevSex duplication could have turned on gonadal SOX9 expression in the absence of SRY in an XX-male, we examined the chromatin landscape in primary skin fibroblast cultures from the index, his RevSex duplication-carrier father and six controls. The ENCODE project supports the notion that chromatin state maps show overlap between different cell types, i.e., that our study of fibroblasts could be of biological relevance. We examined the SOX9 regulatory region by high-resolution ChIP-on-chip experiments (a kind of "chromatin-CGH") and DNA methylation investigations. The RevSex duplication was associated with chromatin changes predicting better accessibility of the SRY-responsive TESCO enhancer region 14-15 kb upstream of SOX9. Four kb downstream of the TESCO evolutionary conserved region, a peak of the enhancer/promoter-associated H3K4me3 mark was found together with a major dip of the repressive H3K9me3 chromatin mark. Similar differences were also found when three control males were compared with three control females. A marked male/female difference was a more open chromatin signature in males starting ~400 kb upstream of SOX9 and increasing toward the SOX9 promoter. In the RevSex duplication-carrier father, two positions of DNA hypomethylation were also found, one corresponding to the H3K4me3 peak mentioned above. Our results suggest that the RevSex duplication could operate by inducing long-range epigenetic changes. Furthermore, the differences in chromatin state maps between males and females suggest that the Y chromosome or X chromosome dosage may affect chromatin conformation, i.e., that sex-dependent gene regulation may take place by chromatin modification.

  18. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.; Baldwin, J.P.; Carpenter, B.G.; Hjelm, R.P.; Hancock, R.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H 2 O-D 2 O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  19. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. ► DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. ► Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. ► DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and γH2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by linker histones. We suggest that following DSB formation, although there is localised chromatin unfolding to

  20. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iashina, E.G.; Bouwman, W.G.; Duif, C.P.; Filatov, M.V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrmeter length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei

  1. Dissecting relative contributions of cis- and trans-determinants to nucleosome distribution by comparing Tetrahymena macronuclear and micronuclear chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jie; Gao, Shan; Dui, Wen; Yang, Wentao; Chen, Xiao; Taverna, Sean D; Pearlman, Ronald E; Ashlock, Wendy; Miao, Wei; Liu, Yifan

    2016-12-01

    The ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila contains two types of structurally and functionally differentiated nuclei: the transcriptionally active somatic macronucleus (MAC) and the transcriptionally silent germ-line micronucleus (MIC). Here, we demonstrate that MAC features well-positioned nucleosomes downstream of transcription start sites and flanking splice sites. Transcription-associated trans-determinants promote nucleosome positioning in MAC. By contrast, nucleosomes in MIC are dramatically delocalized. Nucleosome occupancy in MAC and MIC are nonetheless highly correlated with each other, as well as with in vitro reconstitution and predictions based upon DNA sequence features, revealing unexpectedly strong contributions from cis-determinants. In particular, well-positioned nucleosomes are often matched with GC content oscillations. As many nucleosomes are coordinately accommodated by both cis- and trans-determinants, we propose that their distribution is shaped by the impact of these nucleosomes on the mutational and transcriptional landscape, and driven by evolutionary selection. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iashina, E G; Grigoriev, S V; Bouwman, W G; Duif, C P; Filatov, M V

    2017-01-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrometer length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei which is well fitted by the exponential function G ( z ) = exp(− z / ξ ), where ξ is the correlation length of a nucleus (in experimental data ξ = 3, 3 μ m). The exponential decay of G ( z ) corresponds to the logarithmic pair correlation function γ ( r ) = ln( ξ / r ). As the sensitivity of the SESANS signal depends on the neutron wavelength, we propose the SESANS setup with the changeable wavelength in the range from 2 to 12 Å. Such option allows one to study in great detail the internal structure of the biological cell in the length scale from 10 −2 μ m to 10 μ m. (paper)

  3. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering study of the structure organization of the chromatin in biological cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashina, E. G.; Bouwman, W. G.; Duif, C. P.; Filatov, M. V.; Grigoriev, S. V.

    2017-06-01

    Spin-echo small-angle scattering (SESANS) technique is a method to measure the structure of materials from nano- to micrmeter length scales. This method could be important for studying the packaging of DNA in the eukaryotic cell. We measured the SESANS function from chicken erythrocyte nuclei which is well fitted by the exponential function G(z) = exp(-z/ξ), where ξ is the correlation length of a nucleus (in experimental data ξ = 3, 3 μm). The exponential decay of G(z) corresponds to the logarithmic pair correlation function γ(r) = ln(ξ/r). As the sensitivity of the SESANS signal depends on the neutron wavelength, we propose the SESANS setup with the changeable wavelength in the range from 2 to 12 Å. Such option allows one to study in great detail the internal structure of the biological cell in the length scale from 10-2 μm to 10 μm.

  4. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by “opening” or “closing” chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but also are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts. PMID:22223048

  5. Modulation of chromatin access during adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Susanne; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    identified; however, it is not until recently that we have begun to understand how these factors act at a genome-wide scale. In a recent publication we have mapped the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and shown that a major reorganization...... of the chromatin landscape occurs within few hours following the addition of the adipogenic cocktail. In addition, we have mapped the genome-wide profiles of several of the early adipogenic transcription factors and shown that they act in a highly cooperative manner to drive this dramatic remodeling process....

  6. Chromatin organisation during Arabidopsis root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorvellec, M.

    2007-01-01

    The genetic information is stored in a highly compact manner in every nucleus. About 150 bp of DNA is packed around a histone octamer constituting a nucleosome. Nucleosomes are linked together by histone H1 and further compaction of this "beads on a string" form higher-order chromatin structures.

  7. Dietary polyphenols and chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Vastolo, Viviana; Ciccarelli, Marco; Albano, Luigi; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Ungaro, Paola

    2017-08-13

    Polyphenols are the most abundant phytochemicals in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages. Recent findings suggest that polyphenols display the ability to reverse adverse epigenetic regulation involved in pathological conditions, such as obesity, metabolic disorder, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and various forms of cancer. Epigenetics, defined as heritable changes to the transcriptome, independent from those occurring in the genome, includes DNA methylation, histone modifications, and posttranscriptional gene regulation by noncoding RNAs. Sinergistically and cooperatively, these processes regulate gene expression by changing chromatin organization and DNA accessibility. Such induced epigenetic changes can be inherited during cell division, resulting in permanent maintenance of the acquired phenotype, but they may also occur throughout an individual life-course and may ultimately influence phenotypic outcomes (health and disease risk). In the last decade, a number of studies have shown that nutrients can affect metabolic traits by altering the structure of chromatin and directly regulate both transcription and translational processes. In this context, dietary polyphenol-targeted epigenetics becomes an attractive approach for disease prevention and intervention. Here, we will review how polyphenols, including flavonoids, curcuminoids, and stilbenes, modulate the establishment and maintenance of key epigenetic marks, thereby influencing gene expression and, hence, disease risk and health.

  8. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  9. [Mechanisms of genoprotective action of a phytoecdysteroid drug(BTK-8L) in chromatin damage by tetrachloromethane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubskiĭ, Iu I; Levitskiĭ, E L; Kholodova, Iu D; Goriushko, A G; Primak, R G; Vistunova, I E; Sachenko, L G

    1993-01-01

    Hepatoprotective action of prophylactic injection of aqueous solution of preparation BTK-8L from plant ecdysteroids to experimental animals with the liver damage by tetrachloromethane was revealed. This effect at least partially was connected with the genoprotective action of the given preparation. As a result, normalization of free radical chromatin lipid peroxidation reaction, modified at the intoxication, as well as partial correction of physical and chemical properties of chromatin protein-lipid complex were those molecular mechanisms of genoprotective action of BTK-8L, which were manifested by the influence of the preparation on such indices which characterized the depth structure of the complex as microviscosity and energy transfer from the protein to the lipid probe. Investigation of the interaction of the preparation with chromatin fractions in vitro and comparison of this interaction with the analogous process in model systems allowed revealing determinative participation of chromatin proteins and lipids in the given process. The preparation interacted more intensively with the active chromatin fraction, which contained a more marked protein-lipid complex, as comparing to the repressed one. Injection of the preparation also normalized such indices as relation between the chromatine fractions and protein/DNA ratio in them. On the contrary, injection of the alcoholic solution of the preparation to experimental animals, aggravated genotoxic tetrachloromethane action.

  10. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  11. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  12. Deoxyribonuclease probing of sea urchin embryo chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The role that the sea urchin, Parechinus angulosus, embryo and sperm histone variants plays in chromatin structure has been investigated. Chromatin structure has been determined at different levels of resolution in sperm and in developing embryos using micrococcal nuclease, pancreatic deoxyribonuclease (DNase I) and restriction endonucleases. Micrococcal nuclease and restriction endonuclease digestions of sea urchin gastrula chromatin have been analysed and it is shown that it is not possible to isolate large polynucleosomal chromatin complexes which are soluble in low ionic strength buffers. The repeat length for sperm is significantly larger than blastula and gastrula repeat lengths whereas blastula and gastrula repeat lengths are not significantly different. Nucleosomal core particles have been isolated from early blastula, gastrula and sperm of sea urchins. After DNase I digestion of 5'-labelled core particles the rate constants of cutting of the DNA at the susceptible sites on these core particles have been determined. The DNase I digestion kinetics of blastula and gastrula core particles are similar whereas sperm core particles are digested at a slower rate, mainly at the sites which are closest to the ends of the core particle DNA

  13. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  14. Chromatin Flavors: Chromatin composition and domain organization in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. van Bemmel (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractChromatin was originally identified by W. Flemming in 1882 as not much more than the stainable substance of the cell nucleus. Flemming named this substance according to the Greek word “chroma”, meaning color. In 1911 chromatin was characterized as proteins, named histones, that

  15. [The biological aspects of chromatin diminution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akif'ev, A P; Grishanin, A K

    1993-01-01

    The chromatine diminution (CD), first discovered by Boveri (1887) in ascarids, represents programmed elimination of a part of genetic material in the nuclei of the somatic cells in cyclops and ascarids, and in the protist macronuclei. The CD can be considered as a macromutation sharply changing chromosomal structure, though minimally effecting the phenotype. The analysis of CD is of significance for discussing mechanisms of origin of chromosomal organization, transformation of genome molecular structure in eucaryote evolution, role of the extra DNA.

  16. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  17. Chromatin- and temperature-dependent modulation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmroth, K; Nygren, J; Stenerlöw, B; Hultborn, R

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the influence of chromatin organization and scavenging capacity in relation to irradiation temperature on the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) in structures derived from human diploid fibroblasts. Agarose plugs with different chromatin structures (intact cells+/-wortmannin, permeabilized cells with condensed chromatin, nucleoids and DNA) were prepared and irradiated with X-rays at 2 or 37 degrees C and lysed using two different lysis protocols (new ice-cold lysis or standard lysis at 37 degrees C). Induction of DSB was determined by constant-field gel electrophoresis. The dose-modifying factor (DMF(temp)) for irradiation at 37 compared with 2 degrees C was 0.92 in intact cells (i.e. more DSB induced at 2 degrees C), but gradually increased to 1.5 in permeabilized cells, 2.2 in nucleoids and 2.6 in naked DNA, suggesting a role of chromatin organization for temperature modulation of DNA damage. In addition, DMF(temp) was influenced by the presence of 0.1 M DMSO or 30 mM glutathione, but not by post-irradiation temperature. The protective effect of low temperature was correlated to the indirect effects of ionizing radiation and was not dependent on post-irradiation temperature. Reasons for a dose modifying factor <1 in intact cells are discussed.

  18. Chromatin-mediated transcriptional regulation by the yeast architectural factors NHP6A and NHP6B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NHP6A and NHP6B proteins are chromatin architectural factors, functionally and structurally related to the mammalian high mobility group (HMG)-1 and -2 proteins, a family of non-sequence-specific DNA binding proteins. nhp6a nhp6b mutants have various morphological...

  19. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  20. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N.; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, and not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins and accumulate DDR signals. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  1. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  2. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppal, Timsy; Jha, Hem C.; Verma, Subhash C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  3. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  4. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  5. The role of proteins and metal ions in the protection of chromatin DNA at fast neutrons action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Preoteasa, V.; Radulescu, I.; Constantinescu, B.

    1997-01-01

    The role of chromatin proteins and of some ions on the fast neutrons actions on chromatin DNA from rat Walker tumors was analysed. The DNA in chromatin is effectively protected against fast neutrons actions by DNA bound proteins and specially by histones, because of the limited accessibility of the condensed chromatin DNA to hydroxyl radicals and of the scavenging of radicals by the chromatin proteins. The ions utilised protect chromatin DNA against the damage produced ed by fast neutrons, through the induction of structural DNA changes with a less accessibility to OH radicals. (authors)

  6. Dissipative structures and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Benjamin R; Chu, Henry S

    2013-11-05

    Dissipative structures include at least one panel and a cell structure disposed adjacent to the at least one panel having interconnected cells. A deformable material, which may comprise at least one hydrogel, is disposed within at least one interconnected cell proximate to the at least one panel. Dissipative structures may also include a cell structure having interconnected cells formed by wall elements. The wall elements may include a mesh formed by overlapping fibers having apertures formed therebetween. The apertures may form passageways between the interconnected cells. Methods of dissipating a force include disposing at least one hydrogel in a cell structure proximate to at least one panel, applying a force to the at least one panel, and forcing at least a portion of the at least one hydrogel through apertures formed in the cell structure.

  7. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response.

  8. Chromatin Regulation of Neuronal Maturation and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, David A; Chan, Urann; Chen, Liang-Fu; West, Anne E

    2018-05-01

    Neurons are dynamic cells that respond and adapt to stimuli throughout their long postmitotic lives. The structural and functional plasticity of neurons requires the regulated transcription of new gene products, and dysregulation of transcription in either the developing or adult brain impairs cognition. We discuss how mechanisms of chromatin regulation help to orchestrate the transcriptional programs that underlie the maturation of developing neurons and the plasticity of adult neurons. We review how chromatin regulation acts locally to modulate the expression of specific genes and more broadly to coordinate gene expression programs during transitions between cellular states. These data highlight the importance of epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms in postmitotic neurons. We suggest areas where emerging methods may advance understanding in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of local chromatin composition by CasID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Anton, Tobias; Rombaut, Pascaline; Herzog, Franz; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2016-09-02

    Chromatin structure and function are determined by a plethora of proteins whose genome-wide distribution is typically assessed by immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Here, we developed a novel tool to investigate the local chromatin environment at specific DNA sequences. We combined the programmable DNA binding of dCas9 with the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA* (CasID) to biotinylate proteins in the direct vicinity of specific loci. Subsequent streptavidin-mediated precipitation and mass spectrometry identified both known and previously unknown chromatin factors associated with repetitive telomeric, major satellite and minor satellite DNA. With super-resolution microscopy, we confirmed the localization of the putative transcription factor ZNF512 at chromocenters. The versatility of CasID facilitates the systematic elucidation of functional protein complexes and locus-specific chromatin composition.

  10. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  11. Phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 11 establishes a novel chromatin mark for transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger, Eric; Yin, Na; Wissmann, Melanie; Kunowska, Natalia; Fischer, Kristin; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Patnaik, Debasis; Higgins, Jonathan M.G.; Potier, Noelle; Scheidtmann, Karl-Heinz; Buettner, Reinhard; Schüle, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications of histones such as methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation regulate chromatin structure and gene expression. Here we show that protein kinase C-related kinase 1 (PRK1) phosphorylates histone H3 at threonine 11 (H3T11) upon ligand-dependent recruitment to androgen receptor (AR) target genes. PRK1 is pivotal to AR function since PRK1 knockdown or inhibition impedes AR-dependent transcription. Blocking PRK1 function abrogates androgen-induced H3T11 phosphor...

  12. Default assembly of early adenovirus chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, David J.

    2007-01-01

    In adenovirus particles, the viral nucleoprotein is organized into a highly compacted core structure. Upon delivery to the nucleus, the viral nucleoprotein is very likely to be remodeled to a form accessible to the transcription and replication machinery. Viral protein VII binds to intra-nuclear viral DNA, as do at least two cellular proteins, SET/TAF-Iβ and pp32, components of a chromatin assembly complex that is implicated in template remodeling. We showed previously that viral DNA-protein complexes released from infecting particles were sensitive to shearing after cross-linking with formaldehyde, presumably after transport of the genome into the nucleus. We report here the application of equilibrium-density gradient centrifugation to the analysis of the fate of these complexes. Most of the incoming protein VII was recovered in a form that was not cross-linked to viral DNA. This release of protein VII, as well as the binding of SET/TAF-Iβ and cellular transcription factors to the viral chromatin, did not require de novo viral gene expression. The distinct density profiles of viral DNA complexes containing protein VII, compared to those containing SET/TAF-Iβ or transcription factors, were consistent with the notion that the assembly of early viral chromatin requires both the association of SET/TAF-1β and the release of protein VII

  13. Hybrid Tourism-Related Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article is rooted in theories presented in the PhD dissertation Tourism and Strategic Planning (Pasgaard 2012) and features a number of much discussed concepts related to the complicated phenomenon of tourism and to the discipline of strategic urban planning. It is beyond the scope of this a...

  14. MRN1 implicates chromatin remodeling complexes and architectural factors in mRNA maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6¿¿ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin....... Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309¿, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing....

  15. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2002-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  17. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...

  18. Hybrid Tourism-Related Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasgaard, Jens Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article is rooted in theories presented in the PhD dissertation Tourism and Strategic Planning (Pasgaard 2012) and features a number of much discussed concepts related to the complicated phenomenon of tourism and to the discipline of strategic urban planning. It is beyond the scope...... of this article to enter a detailed discussion of all mentioned concepts; however, it is important to set the stage by providing a few compressed notes on the overall approach to the phenomenon of tourism. Corresponding to the fluid transition between chores of everyday life and tourism behavior, the tourist...... space is not an unequivocal spatial specification. Rather, tourist space is a temporary condition, which depends on tourism activity and the mode of the observer. It is essential to understand and accept the liquidity of the tourism phenomenon and remember that tourism behavior and tourist space...

  19. Cytoplasmic chromatin triggers inflammation in senescence and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhixun; Ghosh, Kanad; Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Zhu, Jiajun; Sen, Payel; Wangensteen, Kirk J; Simithy, Johayra; Lan, Yemin; Lin, Yanping; Zhou, Zhuo; Capell, Brian C; Xu, Caiyue; Xu, Mingang; Kieckhaefer, Julia E; Jiang, Tianying; Shoshkes-Carmel, Michal; Tanim, K M Ahasan Al; Barber, Glen N; Seykora, John T; Millar, Sarah E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Garcia, Benjamin A; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2017-10-19

    Chromatin is traditionally viewed as a nuclear entity that regulates gene expression and silencing. However, we recently discovered the presence of cytoplasmic chromatin fragments that pinch off from intact nuclei of primary cells during senescence, a form of terminal cell-cycle arrest associated with pro-inflammatory responses. The functional significance of chromatin in the cytoplasm is unclear. Here we show that cytoplasmic chromatin activates the innate immunity cytosolic DNA-sensing cGAS-STING (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase linked to stimulator of interferon genes) pathway, leading both to short-term inflammation to restrain activated oncogenes and to chronic inflammation that associates with tissue destruction and cancer. The cytoplasmic chromatin-cGAS-STING pathway promotes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype in primary human cells and in mice. Mice deficient in STING show impaired immuno-surveillance of oncogenic RAS and reduced tissue inflammation upon ionizing radiation. Furthermore, this pathway is activated in cancer cells, and correlates with pro-inflammatory gene expression in human cancers. Overall, our findings indicate that genomic DNA serves as a reservoir to initiate a pro-inflammatory pathway in the cytoplasm in senescence and cancer. Targeting the cytoplasmic chromatin-mediated pathway may hold promise in treating inflammation-related disorders.

  20. Epigenetic modifications and chromatin loop organization explain the different expression profiles of the Tbrg4, WAP and Ramp3 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montazer-Torbati, Mohammad Bagher; Hue-Beauvais, Cathy; Droineau, Stephanie; Ballester, Maria; Coant, Nicolas; Aujean, Etienne; Petitbarat, Marie; Rijnkels, Monique; Devinoy, Eve

    2008-01-01

    Whey Acidic Protein (WAP) gene expression is specific to the mammary gland and regulated by lactogenic hormones to peak during lactation. It differs markedly from the more constitutive expression of the two flanking genes, Ramp3 and Tbrg4. Our results show that the tight regulation of WAP gene expression parallels variations in the chromatin structure and DNA methylation profile throughout the Ramp3-WAP-Tbrg4 locus. Three Matrix Attachment Regions (MAR) have been predicted in this locus. Two of them are located between regions exhibiting open and closed chromatin structures in the liver. The third, located around the transcription start site of the Tbrg4 gene, interacts with topoisomerase II in HC11 mouse mammary cells, and in these cells anchors the chromatin loop to the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, if lactogenic hormones are present in these cells, the chromatin loop surrounding the WAP gene is more tightly attached to the nuclear structure, as observed after a high salt treatment of the nuclei and the formation of nuclear halos. Taken together, our results point to a combination of several epigenetic events that may explain the differential expression pattern of the WAP locus in relation to tissue and developmental stages

  1. Restoring chromatin after replication: How new and old histone marks come together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zusana; Groth, Anja

    2010-01-01

    In dividing cells genome stability and function rely on faithful transmission of both DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin. In the course of DNA replication chromatin undergoes transient genome-wide disruption followed by restoration on new DNA. This involves tight coordination of DNA...... replication and chromatin assembly processes in time and space. Dynamic recycling and de novo deposition of histones are fundamental for chromatin restoration. Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are thought to have a causal role in establishing distinct chromatin structures. Here we discuss PTMs...... present on new and parental histones and how they influence genome stability and restoration of epigenetically defined domains. Newly deposited histones must change their signature in the process of chromatin restoration, this may occur in a step-wise fashion involving replication-coupled processes...

  2. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human

  3. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  4. Initial high-resolution microscopic mapping of active and inactive regulatory sequences proves non-random 3D arrangements in chromatin domain clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Marion; Schmid, Volker J; Kraus, Felix; Markaki, Yolanda; Hellmann, Ines; Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; John, Sam; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Cremer, Thomas

    2017-08-07

    The association of active transcription regulatory elements (TREs) with DNAse I hypersensitivity (DHS[+]) and an 'open' local chromatin configuration has long been known. However, the 3D topography of TREs within the nuclear landscape of individual cells in relation to their active or inactive status has remained elusive. Here, we explored the 3D nuclear topography of active and inactive TREs in the context of a recently proposed model for a functionally defined nuclear architecture, where an active and an inactive nuclear compartment (ANC-INC) form two spatially co-aligned and functionally interacting networks. Using 3D structured illumination microscopy, we performed 3D FISH with differently labeled DNA probe sets targeting either sites with DHS[+], apparently active TREs, or DHS[-] sites harboring inactive TREs. Using an in-house image analysis tool, DNA targets were quantitatively mapped on chromatin compaction shaped 3D nuclear landscapes. Our analyses present evidence for a radial 3D organization of chromatin domain clusters (CDCs) with layers of increasing chromatin compaction from the periphery to the CDC core. Segments harboring active TREs are significantly enriched at the decondensed periphery of CDCs with loops penetrating into interchromatin compartment channels, constituting the ANC. In contrast, segments lacking active TREs (DHS[-]) are enriched toward the compacted interior of CDCs (INC). Our results add further evidence in support of the ANC-INC network model. The different 3D topographies of DHS[+] and DHS[-] sites suggest positional changes of TREs between the ANC and INC depending on their functional state, which might provide additional protection against an inappropriate activation. Our finding of a structural organization of CDCs based on radially arranged layers of different chromatin compaction levels indicates a complex higher-order chromatin organization beyond a dichotomic classification of chromatin into an 'open,' active and 'closed

  5. Autodigestion of chromatin in some radiosensitive and radioresistant mouse cells. Role of proteolysis and endonucleolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suciu, D.; Bojan, O.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented indicating that mouse thymus, spleen, kidney, lung and heart contain a protease activity with relatively high specificity for histones. It is suggested that degradation of chromatin occurring in irradiated lymphoid tissues is produced by the action of alkaline endonuclease in association with this histone protease. The autodigestion of chromatin was assessed by determining the release of soluble chromatin from cells suspended in sucrose media of low ionic strength. It was found that the protease inhibitors, phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride and especially NaHSO 3 , were also capable of depressing the activity of alkaline endonuclease, the fragmentation of chromatin, and the release of soluble chromatin. The results suggest that the release of histones from irradiated lymphoid tissues cannot be considered as a determinant step in the fragmentation of DNA in chromatin. (author)

  6. Temporal profiling of the chromatin proteome reveals system-wide responses to replication inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Gillespie, Peter J; Stewart, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Although the replication, expression, and maintenance of DNA are well-studied processes, the way that they are coordinated is poorly understood. Here, we report an analysis of the changing association of proteins with chromatin (the chromatin proteome) during progression through interphase...... of the cell cycle. Sperm nuclei were incubated in Xenopus egg extracts, and chromatin-associated proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry at different times. Approximately 75% of the proteins varied in abundance on chromatin by more than 15%, suggesting that the chromatin proteome is highly dynamic....... Proteins were then assigned to one of 12 different clusters on the basis of their pattern of chromatin association. Each cluster contained functional groups of proteins involved in different nuclear processes related to progression through interphase. We also blocked DNA replication by inhibiting either...

  7. Prediction of highly expressed genes in microbes based on chromatin accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that gene expression is dependent on chromatin structure in eukaryotes and it is likely that chromatin can play a role in bacterial gene expression as well. Here, we use a nucleosomal position preference measure of anisotropic DNA flexibility to predict highly expressed...

  8. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics are considered. P, T-breaking, neutron beta decay, neutron radiative capture and neutron polarizability are discussed. Reaction with fast neutrons, methodical aspect low-energy fission are considered too

  9. Histone modifications influence mediator interactions with chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bjornsdottir, Gudrun; Liu, Zhongle; Quan, Amy; Costanzo, Michael; Dávila López, Marcela; Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski; Ronne, Hans; Boone, Charles; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Myers, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The Mediator complex transmits activation signals from DNA bound transcription factors to the core transcription machinery. Genome wide localization studies have demonstrated that Mediator occupancy not only correlates with high levels of transcription, but that the complex also is present at transcriptionally silenced locations. We provide evidence that Mediator localization is guided by an interaction with histone tails, and that this interaction is regulated by their post-translational modifications. A quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map revealed links between Mediator components and factors affecting chromatin structure, especially histone deacetylases. Peptide binding assays demonstrated that pure wild-type Mediator forms stable complexes with the tails of Histone H3 and H4. These binding assays also showed Mediator—histone H4 peptide interactions are specifically inhibited by acetylation of the histone H4 lysine 16, a residue critical in transcriptional silencing. Finally, these findings were validated by tiling array analysis that revealed a broad correlation between Mediator and nucleosome occupancy in vivo, but a negative correlation between Mediator and nucleosomes acetylated at histone H4 lysine 16. Our studies show that chromatin structure and the acetylation state of histones are intimately connected to Mediator localization. PMID:21742760

  10. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2003-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on

  11. Retention of the Native Epigenome in Purified Mammalian Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas H Ehrensberger

    Full Text Available A protocol is presented for the isolation of native mammalian chromatin as fibers of 25-250 nucleosomes under conditions that preserve the natural epigenetic signature. The material is composed almost exclusively of histones and DNA and conforms to the structure expected by electron microscopy. All sequences probed for were retained, indicating that the material is representative of the majority of the genome. DNA methylation marks and histone marks resembled the patterns observed in vivo. Importantly, nucleosome positions also remained largely unchanged, except on CpG islands, where nucleosomes were found to be unstable. The technical challenges of reconstituting biochemical reactions with native mammalian chromatin are discussed.

  12. Chromatin remodelling: the industrial revolution of DNA around histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anjanabha; Wittmeyer, Jacqueline; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin remodellers are specialized multi-protein machines that enable access to nucleosomal DNA by altering the structure, composition and positioning of nucleosomes. All remodellers have a catalytic ATPase subunit that is similar to known DNA-translocating motor proteins, suggesting DNA translocation as a unifying aspect of their mechanism. Here, we explore the diversity and specialization of chromatin remodellers, discuss how nucleosome modifications regulate remodeller activity and consider a model for the exposure of nucleosomal DNA that involves the use of directional DNA translocation to pump 'DNA waves' around the nucleosome.

  13. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  14. Nucleolar chromatin organization at different activities of soybean root meristematic cell nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2013-06-01

    Nucleolar chromatin, including nucleolus-associated chromatin as well as active and inactive condensed ribosomal DNA (rDNA) chromatin, derives mostly from secondary constrictions known as nucleolus organizer regions containing rDNA genes on nucleolus-forming chromosomes. This chromatin may occupy different nucleolar positions being in various condensation states which may imply different rDNA transcriptional competence. Sections of nucleoli originating from root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings grown at 25 °C (the control), then subjected to chilling stress (10 °C), and next transferred again to 25 °C (the recovery) were used to measure profile areas occupied by nucleolar condensed chromatin disclosed with sodium hydroxide methylation-acetylation plus uranyl acetate technique. The biggest total area of condensed chromatin was found in the nucleoli of chilled plants, while the smallest was found in those of recovered plants in relation to the amounts of chromatin in the control nucleoli. The condensed nucleolar chromatin, in the form of different-sized and different-shaped clumps, was mainly located in fibrillar centers. One can suppose that changes of condensed rDNA chromatin amounts might be a mechanism controlling the number of transcriptionally active rDNA genes as the nucleoli of plants grown under these experimental conditions show different transcriptional activity and morphology.

  15. Trichostatin A induced histone acetylation causes decondensation of interphase chromatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); M. Frank-Stöhr (Monika); M. Stöhr (Michael); C.P. Bacher (Christian); K. Rippe (Karsten)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of trichostatin A (TSA)-induced histone acetylation on the interphase chromatin structure was visualized in vivo with a HeLa cell line stably expressing histone H2A, which was fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. The globally increased histone acetylation caused a

  16. Do chromatin changes around a nascent double strand DNA break spread spherically into linearly non-adjacent chromatin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Velibor

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, a lot has been done in elucidating the sequence of events that occur at the nascent double strand DNA break. Nevertheless, the overall structure formed by the DNA damage response (DDR) factors around the break site, the repair focus, remains poorly understood. Although most of the data presented so far only address events that occur in chromatin in cis around the break, there are strong indications that in mammalian systems it may also occur in trans, analogous to the recent findings showing this if budding yeast. There have been attempts to address the issue but the final proof is still missing due to lack of a proper experimental system. If found to be true, the spatial distribution of DDR factors would have a major impact on the neighboring chromatin both in cis and in trans, significantly affecting local chromatin function; gene transcription and potentially other functions.

  17. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  18. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Jenna; Ekwall, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  19. Chromatin Regulation and the Histone Code in HIV Latency
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anne-Marie W; Margolis, David M

    2017-06-01

    The formation of a latent reservoir of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection hidden from immune clearance remains a significant obstacle to approaches to eradicate HIV infection. Towards an understanding of the mechanisms of HIV persistence, there is a growing body of work implicating epigenetic regulation of chromatin in establishment and maintenance of this latent reservoir. Here we discuss recent advances in the field of chromatin regulation, specifically in our understanding of the histone code, and how these discoveries relate to our current knowledge of the chromatin mechanisms linked to HIV transcriptional repression and the reversal of latency. We also examine mechanisms unexplored in the context of HIV latency and briefly discuss current therapies aimed at the induction of proviral expression within latently infected cells. We aim to emphasize that a greater understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms which govern HIV latency could lead to new therapeutic targets for latency reversal and clearance cure strategies.

  20. Radiation-induced cell death by chromatin loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, I.R.; Warenius, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    A model is proposed which relates reproductive death of cells caused by radiation to loss of chromatin at cell division. This loss of chromatin can occur through chromosomal deletions or through the formation of asymmetrical chromosomal exchanges. It is proposed that smaller doses of radiation produce fewer chromatin breaks, which are more likely to be accurately repaired, compared with larger doses. Consequently, smaller doses of radiation are less efficient in causing cell death, leading to a shoulder on the cell survival curve. Experimental evidence supports this model, and the fit between the derived formula and experimental cell survival curves is good. The derived formula approximates to the linear-quadratic equation at low doses of radiation. (author)

  1. INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Coordinates Metabolic Homeostasis with Cell Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme J. Gowans

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive survival requires the coordination of nutrient availability with expenditure of cellular resources. For example, in nutrient-limited environments, 50% of all S. cerevisiae genes synchronize and exhibit periodic bursts of expression in coordination with respiration and cell division in the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC. Despite the importance of metabolic and proliferative synchrony, the majority of YMC regulators are currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex is required to coordinate respiration and cell division with periodic gene expression. Specifically, INO80 mutants have severe defects in oxygen consumption and promiscuous cell division that is no longer coupled with metabolic status. In mutant cells, chromatin accessibility of periodic genes, including TORC1-responsive genes, is relatively static, concomitant with severely attenuated gene expression. Collectively, these results reveal that the INO80 complex mediates metabolic signaling to chromatin to restrict proliferation to metabolically optimal states.

  2. Crystal structure of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) dimerization domain reveals functional organization of ING family of chromatin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culurgioni, Simone; Muñoz, Inés G; Moreno, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Villate, Maider; Palmero, Ignacio; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-03-30

    The protein ING4 binds to histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 (H3K4me3) through its C-terminal plant homeodomain, thus recruiting the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex to target promoters. The structure of the plant homeodomain finger bound to an H3K4me3 peptide has been described, as well as the disorder and flexibility in the ING4 central region. We report the crystal structure of the ING4 N-terminal domain, which shows an antiparallel coiled-coil homodimer with each protomer folded into a helix-loop-helix structure. This arrangement suggests that ING4 can bind simultaneously two histone tails on the same or different nucleosomes. Dimerization has a direct impact on ING4 tumor suppressor activity because monomeric mutants lose the ability to induce apoptosis after genotoxic stress. Homology modeling based on the ING4 structure suggests that other ING dimers may also exist.

  3. Induction of stable protein-deoxyribonucleic acid adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strniste, G.F.; Rall, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv)-light-mediated formation of protein-DNA adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin was investigated in an attempt to compare chromatin alterations induced in vitro with those observed in vivo. Three independent methods of analysis indicated stable protein-DNA associations: a membrane filter assay which retained DNA on the filter in the presence of high salt-detergent; a Sepharose 4B column assay in which protein eluted coincident with DNA; and a CsCl density gradient equilibrium assay which showed both protein and DNA banding at densities other than their respective native densities. Treatment of the irradiated chromatin with DNase provided further evidence that protein--DNA and not protein-protein adducts were being observed in the column assay. There is a fluence-dependent response of protein-DNA adduct formation when the chromatin is irradiated at low ionic strength and is linear for protein over the range studied. When the chromatin is exposed to differing conditions of pH, ionic strength, or divalent metal ion concentration, the quantity of adduct formed upon uv irradiation varies. Susceptibility to adduct formation can be partially explained in terms of the condensation state of the chromatin and other factors such as rearrangement, denaturation, and dissociation of the chromatin components. Besides providing information on the biological significance of these types of uv-induced lesions, this technique may be useful as a probe of chromatin structure

  4. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells

  5. Fast neutron biological effects on normal and tumor chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Bugoi, Roxana; Paunica, Tatiana; Radu, Liliana

    1997-01-01

    the relative absorbencies (E/E 0 ) obtained for the thermal transitions of chromatin samples versus fast neutron dose, lower values at higher neutron dose, were observed, indicating a damaged chromatin DNA. The treatment with gyrostan accelerates the damage process, but adding thyroxine and D3 vitamin the negative effect is partially recovered. Some conclusions on the role of gyrostan and of thyroxine and D3 vitamin are presented. To study the influence of metal ions on DNA strand breakage induced by fast neutrons, chromatin irradiations with 100, 200 and 300 Gy were performed separately and in presence of CsCl, CuCl 2 and AlCl 3 in a 5 x 10 -2 M concentration. Fluorescence lifetime values for chromatin-ethidium bromide complexes were determined using a Fluorimeter Edinburgh Anal. Instr. FL-900 CD. Greater values denote a damaged chromatin DNA. The presence of metal cations strongly decreases the time of life values, acting as a trap for the water radiolysis products. Our results suggest a combination of fast neutron irradiation with anticancer drug gyrostan for tumor destruction enhancement and the use of metal ions with hormonal thyroxine and D3 vitamin for a normal cells better protection during neutron therapy.(authors)

  6. Effect of benzimidazol-derivatives on the DNA-protein binding formation after UV-radiation of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mil', E.M.; Binyukov, V.I.; Zhil'tsova, V.M.; Stolyarova, L.G.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.

    1991-01-01

    Effect of benzimidazol-derivatives on the DNA-protein binding formation was studied after UV-radiation of chromatin. These derivatives were shown to protect chromatin from UV-induced DNA-protein binding formation. Structural analog contained two aminomethyl residuals sensibilized additional binding formation in chromatin. Results suggested, that benzimidazol interacted with DNA, while aminomethyl groups interacted with protein and sensibilized binding of DNA, whilt aminomethyl groups interacted with protein and sensibilized binding of DNA with histone H1

  7. Direction dependent structures in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herberthson, M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis deals with, within the theory of general relativity, asymptotic properties of certain types of space-times. Using conformal transformations, it is possible to describe asymptotic properties of a physical space-time in terms of the local behaviour of the new, rescaled space-time. One then uses so called direction dependent structures. We present two such structures and applications to them. One structure is used in the study of spacelike (or spatial) infinity. We discuss the asymptotic conditions on the gravitational and the electromagnetic field, especially the conditions put on directions corresponding to future and past null infinity. It is shown that these fields have desired physical properties. The other structure is used in connection with timelike infinity. Using this structure, we suggest a new definition of timelike infinity. This definition differs significantly from earlier definitions, and leads to the concept of asymptotically stationary space-times. We also suggest a definition of asymptotic flatness at future null infinity, and a definition of a black hole which is, in a sense, local. Both of these definitions fit nicely into the structure. (24 refs.)

  8. The architects of crenarchaeal chromatin : A biophysical characterization of chromatin proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Rosalie Paula Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of chromatin organization and compaction in Archaea is currently limited. The genome of several megabasepairs long is folded by a set of small chromatin proteins to fit into the micron-sized cell. A first step in understanding archaeal chromatin organization is to study the action of

  9. Toxic effects of lead and nickel nitrate on rat liver chromatin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani Iii, Azra; Fani, Nesa; Abdossamadi, Sayeh; Shahmir, Nosrat

    2011-01-01

    The biological activity of heavy metals is related to their physicochemical interaction with biological receptors. In the present study, the effect of low concentrations of nickel nitrate and lead nitrate (lead nitrate to chromatin compared to nickel nitrate. Also, the binding affinity of lead nitrate to histone proteins free in solution was higher than nickel. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that lead reacts with chromatin components even at very low concentrations and induce chromatin aggregation through histone-DNA cross-links. Whereas, nickel nitrate is less effective on chromatin at low concentrations, suggesting higher toxicity of lead nitrate on chromatin compared to nickel. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Regular character of chromatin degradation in lymphoid tissues after treatment with biological alkylating agents in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyasova, J.; Skalka, M.; Cejkova, M.

    1979-01-01

    The chromatin changes are reevaluated occurring in lymphoid tissues of mice treated with alkylating agents of the nitrogen-mustard type in relation to recent evidence on the nucleosomal organization of chromatin and to our new data on the regular character of chromatin degradation in lymphoid tissues of irradiated mice. DNA was isolated from nuclei at various intervals (1 to 18 h) after treatment of mice and subjected to gel electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Thymus chromatin from treated mice has been shown to degrade in a regular fashion and to yield discrete DNA fragments, resembling those that originate in lymphoid tissues of irradiated mice or in thymus nuclei digested with micrococcal nuclease in vitro. With increasing interval after treatment higher amounts of smaller DNA fragments appear. Chromatin in spleen cells responds to treatment in a similar way, whilst no degradation in vivo takes place in liver chromatin. Chromatin of LS/BL lymphosarcoma cells in mice treated with alkylating agents or with irradiation suffers from a similar regular degradation. The results stress the significance of the action of liberated or activated endogenous nuclease(s) in the development of chromatin damage in lymphoid cells after treatment with alkylating agents. (author)

  11. Structural relations between nested harmonic sums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the structural relations between nested harmonic sums emerging in the description of physical single scale quantities up to the 3-loop level in renormalizable gauge field theories. These are weight w=6 harmonic sums. We identify universal basic functions which allow to describe a large class of physical quantities and derive their complex analysis. For the 3-loop QCD Wilson coefficients 35 basic functions are required, whereas a subset of 15 describes the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. (orig.)

  12. Structural relations between nested harmonic sums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemlein, J.

    2008-07-15

    We describe the structural relations between nested harmonic sums emerging in the description of physical single scale quantities up to the 3-loop level in renormalizable gauge field theories. These are weight w=6 harmonic sums. We identify universal basic functions which allow to describe a large class of physical quantities and derive their complex analysis. For the 3-loop QCD Wilson coefficients 35 basic functions are required, whereas a subset of 15 describes the 3-loop anomalous dimensions. (orig.)

  13. Chromatin-bound RNA and the neurobiology of psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushir, J S; Akbarian, S

    2014-04-04

    A large, and still rapidly expanding literature on epigenetic regulation in the nervous system has provided fundamental insights into the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in the context of neuronal plasticity in health and disease. Remarkably, however, very little is known about the potential role of chromatin-bound RNAs, including many long non-coding transcripts and various types of small RNAs. Here, we provide an overview on RNA-mediated regulation of chromatin structure and function, with focus on histone lysine methylation and psychiatric disease. Examples of recently discovered chromatin-bound long non-coding RNAs important for neuronal health and function include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense transcript (Bdnf-AS) which regulates expression of the corresponding sense transcript, and LOC389023 which is associated with human-specific histone methylation signatures at the chromosome 2q14.1 neurodevelopmental risk locus by regulating expression of DPP10, an auxillary subunit for voltage-gated K(+) channels. We predict that the exploration of chromatin-bound RNA will significantly advance our current knowledge base in neuroepigenetics and biological psychiatry. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  15. A microscopic analysis of Arabidopsis chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is stored as DNA in the nuclei of their cells. Nuclear DNA is associated with several proteins, which together form chromatin. The most abundant chromatin proteins arehistones,they arrange the initial packaging step of the DNA. DNA

  16. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máthé, Csaba; M-Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs) are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization. PMID:24084787

  17. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Vasas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs, a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN, an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization.

  18. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor 'hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam

    2011-01-01

    hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides...... and chromatin remodelling and is required for their establishment. Furthermore, a subset of early remodelled C/EBP-binding sites persists throughout differentiation and is later occupied by PPARγ, indicating that early C/EBP family members, in addition to their well-established role in activation of PPARγ...

  19. Synthesis of Structures Related to Antifreeze Glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    Fyrner, Timmy

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis of structures related to antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are presented. Synthetic routes to a protected carbohydrate derivative, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-β-galactopyranosyl-(1→3)-2-deoxy-2-azido-4,6-di-O-benzyl-β-D-thio-1-galactopyranoside, and a tBu-Ala-Thr-Ala-Fmoc tripeptide, are described. These compounds are meant to be used in the assembly of AFGPs and analogues thereof. A Gal-GlcN disaccharide was synthesized via glycosylation between the donor, bromo-2-O-benzo...

  20. Circular chromatin complexes in human lymphocytes high-resolution autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becak, M.L.; Fukuda-Pizzocaro, K.; Santos, R. de C.S. dos; Brunner, O.

    1985-01-01

    Transcriptionally active chromatin fibers were observed in chromosomes presenting the loops/scaffold configuration. The active fibers showed altered nucleosomes and presented multiforked aspects which led to the formation of ring complexes. The ribonucleoprotein transcripts (RNP) appeared as networks of 0.1 μm or multiples tandemly disposed along the fiber. It is suggested that the ring complexes belong to the human genome. The possibility that these circular structures come from a prokaryote is also considered. (author) [pt

  1. Introducing enteral feeding induces intestinal subclinical inflammation and respective chromatin changes in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Rhea; Krych, Lukasz; Rybicki, Verena

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze how enteral food introduction affects intestinal gene regulation and chromatin structure in preterm pigs. MATERIALS & METHODS: Preterm pigs were fed parenteral nutrition plus/minus slowly increasing volumes of enteral nutrition. Intestinal gene-expression and chromatin structure......; no significant differences for colostrum) with corresponding decondensed chromatin configurations. On histology this correlated with mild mucosal lesions, particularly in formula-fed pigs. In CaCo-2 cells, histone hyperacetylation led to a marked increase in TLR4 mRNA and increased IL8 expression upon...... stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (median: 7.0; interquartile range: 5.63-8.85) compared with naive cells (median 4.2; interquartile range: 2.45-6.33; p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Enteral feeding, particular with formula, induces subclinical inflammation in the premature intestine and more open chromatin...

  2. Role of chromatin structure in telomere maintenance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunická, Zuzana; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Dvořáčková, Martina; Štros, Michal; Fajkus, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, 5C (2008), s. 193 ISSN 0250-7005. [Eighth International Conference of Anticancer Research. 17.10.2008-22.10.2008, Kos] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1530 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : telomeres * epigenetics * heterochromatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Specific distribution of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae linker histone homolog HHO1p in the chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Freidkin, Ilya; Katcoff, Don J.

    2001-01-01

    In virtually all eukaryotic organisms, linker DNA between nucleosomes is associated with a histone termed linker histone or histone H1. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, HHO1 encodes a putative linker histone with very significant homology to histone H1. The encoded protein is expressed in the nucleus, but has not been shown to affect global chromatin structure, nor has its deletion shown any detectable phenotype. In vitro chromatin assembly experiments with recombinant HHO1p have shown that it is...

  4. Aging of nuclear safety related concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerny, R.; Vydra, V.; Toman, J.; Vodak, F.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of aging processes in nuclear-safety-related concrete structures (NSRCS) is presented. The major environmental stressor and aging factors affecting the performance of NSRCS are summarized, as are drying and plastic shrinkage, expansion of water during the freeze-thaw cycle, water passing through cracks dissolving or leaching the soluble calcium hydroxide, attack of acid rain and ground water, chemical reactions between particular aggregates and the alkaline solution within cement paste, reaction of calcium hydroxide in cement paste hydration products with atmospheric carbon dioxide, and physical radiation effects of neutrons and gamma radiation. The current methods for aging management in NSRCS are analyzed and evaluated. A new treatment is presented for the monitoring, evaluation and prediction of aging processes, consisting in a combination of theoretical methods, laboratory experiments, in-situ measurements and numerical simulations. 24 refs

  5. Accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations in tissue-specific stem cells: the driving force of aging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schuler

    Full Text Available Accumulation of DNA damage leading to stem cell exhaustion has been proposed to be a principal mechanism of aging. Using 53BP1-foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs in mouse epidermis were analyzed for age-related DNA damage response (DDR. We observed increasing amounts of 53BP1-foci during the natural aging process independent of telomere shortening and after protracted low-dose radiation, suggesting substantial accumulation of DSBs in HFSCs. Electron microscopy combined with immunogold-labeling showed multiple small 53BP1 clusters diffusely distributed throughout the highly compacted heterochromatin of aged HFSCs, but single large 53BP1 clusters in irradiated HFSCs. These remaining 53BP1 clusters did not colocalize with core components of non-homologous end-joining, but with heterochromatic histone modifications. Based on these results we hypothesize that these lesions were not persistently unrepaired DSBs, but may reflect chromatin rearrangements caused by the repair or misrepair of DSBs. Flow cytometry showed increased activation of repair proteins and damage-induced chromatin modifications, triggering apoptosis and cellular senescence in irradiated, but not in aged HFSCs. These results suggest that accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations, whose structural dimensions reflect the complexity of the initial genotoxic insult, may lead to different DDR events, ultimately determining the biological outcome of HFSCs. Collectively, our findings support the hypothesis that aging might be largely the remit of structural changes to chromatin potentially leading to epigenetically induced transcriptional deregulation.

  6. [Biochemical characterization of fractionated rat liver chromatin in experimental D-hypovitaminosis and after administration of steroidal drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitskiĭ, E L; Kholodova, Iu D; Gubskiĭ, Iu I; Primak, R G; Chabannyĭ, V N; Kindruk, N L; Mozzhukhina, T G; Lenchevskaia, L K; Mironova, V N; Saad, L M

    1993-01-01

    Marked changes in the structural and functional characteristics of liver nuclear chromatin fractions are observed under experimental D-hypovitaminosis, which differ in the degree of transcriptional activity. DNA-polymerase activity and activity of the fraction, enriched with RNA-polymerase I, increases in the active fraction. Free radical LPO reactions are modified in the chromatin fraction with low activity and to the less degree in the active one. Disturbances of chromatine structural properties are caused with the change in the protein and lipid components of chromatin. Administration of ecdysterone preparations (separately and together with vitamin D3) has a partial corrective effect on structural and functional organization of nuclear chromatine. At the action of ecdysterone normalization of LPO reactions modified by pathological changes is observed in the chromatin fraction with low activity and to the less degree in the active one. This kind of influence corrects to the less degree chromatin functional activity and quantitative and qualitative modifications of its protein component. Simultaneous influence of ecdysterone and vitamin D3 leads to the partial normalization of the biochemical indices studied (except for those which characterize LPO reactions) mainly in the active chromatin fraction.

  7. Chromatin Heterogeneity and Distribution of Regulatory Elements in the Late-Replicating Intercalary Heterochromatin Domains of Drosophila melanogaster Chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara A Khoroshko

    Full Text Available Late-replicating domains (intercalary heterochromatin in the Drosophila genome display a number of features suggesting their organization is quite unique. Typically, they are quite large and encompass clusters of functionally unrelated tissue-specific genes. They correspond to the topologically associating domains and conserved microsynteny blocks. Our study aims at exploring further details of molecular organization of intercalary heterochromatin and has uncovered surprising heterogeneity of chromatin composition in these regions. Using the 4HMM model developed in our group earlier, intercalary heterochromatin regions were found to host chromatin fragments with a particular epigenetic profile. Aquamarine chromatin fragments (spanning 0.67% of late-replicating regions are characterized as a class of sequences that appear heterogeneous in terms of their decompactization. These fragments are enriched with enhancer sequences and binding sites for insulator proteins. They likely mark the chromatin state that is related to the binding of cis-regulatory proteins. Malachite chromatin fragments (11% of late-replicating regions appear to function as universal transitional regions between two contrasting chromatin states. Namely, they invariably delimit intercalary heterochromatin regions from the adjacent active chromatin of interbands. Malachite fragments also flank aquamarine fragments embedded in the repressed chromatin of late-replicating regions. Significant enrichment of insulator proteins CP190, SU(HW, and MOD2.2 was observed in malachite chromatin. Neither aquamarine nor malachite chromatin types appear to correlate with the positions of highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNE that are typically replete in intercalary heterochromatin. Malachite chromatin found on the flanks of intercalary heterochromatin regions tends to replicate earlier than the malachite chromatin embedded in intercalary heterochromatin. In other words, there exists a

  8. Models of chromatin spatial organisation in the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario

    2014-03-01

    In the cell nucleus chromosomes have a complex architecture serving vital functional purposes. Recent experiments have started unveiling the interaction map of DNA sites genome-wide, revealing different levels of organisation at different scales. The principles, though, which orchestrate such a complex 3D structure remain still mysterious. I will overview the scenario emerging from some classical polymer physics models of the general aspect of chromatin spatial organisation. The available experimental data, which can be rationalised in a single framework, support a picture where chromatin is a complex mixture of differently folded regions, self-organised across spatial scales according to basic physical mechanisms. I will also discuss applications to specific DNA loci, e.g. the HoxB locus, where models informed with biological details, and tested against targeted experiments, can help identifying the determinants of folding.

  9. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  10. Macrogenomic engineering via modulation of the scaling of chromatin packing density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Bauer, Greta M; Wu, Wenli; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Kendra, Alexis; Gladstein, Scott; Chandler, John E; VanDerway, David; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Ugolkov, Andrey; Billadeau, Daniel D; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Mazar, Andrew P; Roy, Hemant K; Szleifer, Igal; Shahabi, Shohreh; Backman, Vadim

    2017-11-01

    Many human diseases result from the dysregulation of the complex interactions between tens to thousands of genes. However, approaches for the transcriptional modulation of many genes simultaneously in a predictive manner are lacking. Here, through the combination of simulations, systems modelling and in vitro experiments, we provide a physical regulatory framework based on chromatin packing-density heterogeneity for modulating the genomic information space. Because transcriptional interactions are essentially chemical reactions, they depend largely on the local physical nanoenvironment. We show that the regulation of the chromatin nanoenvironment allows for the predictable modulation of global patterns in gene expression. In particular, we show that the rational modulation of chromatin density fluctuations can lead to a decrease in global transcriptional activity and intercellular transcriptional heterogeneity in cancer cells during chemotherapeutic responses to achieve near-complete cancer cell killing in vitro. Our findings represent a 'macrogenomic engineering' approach to modulating the physical structure of chromatin for whole-scale transcriptional modulation.

  11. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  12. Dancing on damaged chromatin. Functions of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in cellular responses to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kenta; Ohara, Maki; Seki, Ryota; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In order to preserve and protect genetic information, eukaryotic cells have developed a signaling or communications network to help the cell respond to DNA damage, and ATM and NBS1 are key players in this network. ATM is a protein kinase which is activated immediately after a DNA double strand break (DSB) is formed, and the resulting signal cascade generated in response to cellular DSBs is regulated by post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In addition, to ensure the efficient functioning of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, the highly ordered structure of eukaryotic chromatin must be appropriately altered to permit access of repair-related factors to DNA. These alterations are termed chromatin remodeling, and are executed by a specific remodeling complex in conjunction with histone modifications. Current advances in the molecular analysis of DNA damage responses have shown that the auto-phosphorylation of ATM and the interaction between ATM and NBS1 are key steps for ATM activation, and that the association of ATM and NBS1 is involved in chromatin remodeling. Identification of novel factors which function in ubiquitination (RNF8, Ubc13, Rap80, etc.) has also enabled us to understand more details of the early stages in DNA repair pathways which respond to DSBs. In this review, the focus is on the role of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in DSB response pathways, and their role in DSB repair and in the regulation of chromatin remodeling. (author)

  13. Monitoring of chromatin integrity changes in the population of motile bovine sperm capacitated in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Rečková

    2007-01-01

    capacitated (P6H+ and incubated (P6H– spermatozoa.The results of our study suggest the following outcomes. Separation of motile spermatozoa by Percoll gradient increased the proportion of spermatozoa with undamaged chromatin structure. Sperm incubation induced gentle damage of chromatin integrity which was potentiated by heparin in capacitated spermatozoa. The proportion of spermatozoa with undamaged chromatin structure remained relatively high in the course of capacitation, therefore we can assume it to be high enough for a potential oocyte fertilization.

  14. The impact of chromatin modification on the development of chronic complications in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Wegner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease. Over 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. Chronic complications (retinopathy, nephropathy or neuropathy are the major dangerous outcome of this disease. Recent studies indicate a significant role of epigenetic regulation in the development of chronic complications in patients with diabetes. Hyperglycemia could cause abnormal regulation of the activity of enzymes participating in the post-translational histone modifications (PTHMs and initiation of changes in patterns of DNA methylation. It leads to modification of chromatin structure. These epigenetic abnormalities result in changes in the expression of genes involved in development of chronic inflammation, such as NF-KAPPAB (nuclear factor kappaB gene, TNFα (tumor necrosis factor a gene, IL6 (interleukin 6 gene or MCP1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 gene. It enhances endothelial cell dysfunction, which plays an important role in development of chronic, diabetic complications. In addition, caused by hyperglycemia epigenetic modifications changes in structure of chromatin explains “metabolic memory”, a phenomenon of presence of pathological pathways related to the prolonged hyperglycemia in the past, despite maintaining good metabolic control later on.

  15. Involvement of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in chromatin integrity and survival of P19 pluripotent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, Julie; Laurent, Audrey; Nicol, Barbara; Guerrier, Daniel; Pellerin, Isabelle; Deschamps, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    Toti- or pluripotent cells proliferation and/or differentiation have been shown to be strongly related to nuclear chromatin organization and structure over the last past years. We have recently identified ZFPIP/Zfp462 as a zinc finger nuclear factor necessary for correct cell division during early embryonic developmental steps of vertebrates. We thus questioned whether this factor was playing a general role during cell division or if it was somehow involved in embryonic cell fate or differentiation. To achieve this goal, we performed a knock-down experiment in the pluripotent P19 and differentiated 3T3 cell lines, both expressing endogenous ZFPIP/Zfp462. Using specific shRNA directed against ZFPIP/Zfp462 transcripts, we demonstrated that depletion of this protein induced cell death in P19 but had no effect in 3T3 cells. In addition, in the absence of the protein, the P19 cells exhibited a complete destructuration of pericentromeric domains associated with a redistribution of the HP1α proteins and an increase in DNA satellites transcribed RNAs level. These data suggested an instrumental role of ZFPIP/Zfp462 in maintaining the chromatin structure of pluripotent cells.

  16. High-resolution whole-genome sequencing reveals that specific chromatin domains from most human chromosomes associate with nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Gierlinski, Marek; Schofield, Pietá; Martin, David; Barton, Geoffey J; Ariyurek, Yavuz; den Dunnen, Johan T; Lamond, Angus I

    2010-11-01

    The nuclear space is mostly occupied by chromosome territories and nuclear bodies. Although this organization of chromosomes affects gene function, relatively little is known about the role of nuclear bodies in the organization of chromosomal regions. The nucleolus is the best-studied subnuclear structure and forms around the rRNA repeat gene clusters on the acrocentric chromosomes. In addition to rDNA, other chromatin sequences also surround the nucleolar surface and may even loop into the nucleolus. These additional nucleolar-associated domains (NADs) have not been well characterized. We present here a whole-genome, high-resolution analysis of chromatin endogenously associated with nucleoli. We have used a combination of three complementary approaches, namely fluorescence comparative genome hybridization, high-throughput deep DNA sequencing and photoactivation combined with time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The data show that specific sequences from most human chromosomes, in addition to the rDNA repeat units, associate with nucleoli in a reproducible and heritable manner. NADs have in common a high density of AT-rich sequence elements, low gene density and a statistically significant enrichment in transcriptionally repressed genes. Unexpectedly, both the direct DNA sequencing and fluorescence photoactivation data show that certain chromatin loci can specifically associate with either the nucleolus, or the nuclear envelope.

  17. Effect of Seminal Vesicles and Dithiotritol (Dtt on Stability of Sperm Chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Nasr-Esfahani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Different studies have shown that there is no relation between sperm chromatin stability and fertilization rate in both IVF and ICSI patients. However, the relation between SDS tests, as a detergent, along with DTT as reducer of disulphide bridges has not been studied so far in ICSI patients. Since different concentrations of DTT can induce different degrees of sperm chromatin decondensation, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of DTT on sperm chromatin decondensation in IVF and ICSI cases. Methods: During this study, 85 patients were divided into two groups according to their treatment procedure (IVF or ICSI.Semen samples of each patient was evaluated for sperm chromatin tests including SDS, SDS+EDTA & SDS+DTT for assessment of free thiole groups level (-SH, amount of non covalent bond between Zn and thioles(-SH Zn SH- and levels of disulfide bond (-S-S- in sperm chromatin, respectively. In this study, seminal fructose concentration, corrected seminal fructose level and true corrected fructose level as indicators of seminal vesicle function on sperm chromatin stability were assessed. Results: No correlation was observed between any of the above tests and rate of fertilization, both in IVF and ICSI cases. However, in IVF patients, a significant correlation was observed between SDS, SDS+DTT test and seminal fructose level, while in ICSI patients, only a significant correlation was observed between SDS+DTT and corrected or true fructose concentration. Conclusion: Since no correlation was observed between sperm chromatin test and fertilization rate, it is suggested that the chromatin status of these samples are adequate for fertilization to take place and extent of disulphide bridges has no effect on fertilization rate. However, the amount of disulphide bound present in sperms of ICSI and IVF patients are different, and this difference is related to seminal vesicle performance in these patients.

  18. The alteration of chromatin domains during damage repair induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.; Olson, K.M.; Olson, G.B.

    1995-01-01

    Several groups previously have reported the ability of chromatin structure to influence the production of damage induced by ionizing radiation. The authors' interest has been to determine whether chromatin structural alterations exist after ionizing radiation during a repair interval. The earlier work investigated this question using biochemical techniques. The crosslinking of nuclear structural proteins to DNA after ionizing radiation was observed. In addition, they found that the chromatin structure in vitro as measured by sucrose density gradient sedimentation, was altered after ionizing radiation. These observations added to earlier studies in which digital imaging techniques showed an alteration in feulgen-positive DNA after irradiation prompted the present study. The object of this study was to detect whether the higher order structure of DNA into chromatin domains within interphase human cells was altered in interphase cells in response to a radiation induced damage. The present study takes advantage of the advances in the detection of chromatin domains in situ using DNA specific dyes and digital image processing of established human T and B cell lines

  19. The use of ultraviolet light in the fractionation of chromatin containing unsubstituted and bromodeoxyuridine-substituted DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taichman, L.B.

    1979-01-01

    Two procedures are described for the fractionation of chromatin containing unsubstituted (LL) DNA and DNA unifilarly substituted with bromodeoxyuridine (HL). The two procedures rely upon the sensitivity of bromodeoxyuridine-containing DNA to UV light to induce either strand breakage or protein crosslinking. When a mixture of LL and HL chromatin is irradiated with UV light, the HL DNA fragments into molecules of smaller molecular weight than the LL DNA and crosslinks more chromosomal protein than the LL DNA. LL and HL chromatin can be fractionated on the basis of size by centrifuging through a neutral sucrose gradient. The HL DNA-protein adducts that are generated by the UV light have a unique buoyant density and may be isolated by isopycnic centrifugation in Cs 2 S0 4 . The ability to fractionate LL and HL chromatin permits certain studies on the structure of replicating chromatin. (author)

  20. ChromaSig: a probabilistic approach to finding common chromatin signatures in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Hon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods to identify functional genomic elements using genetic information have been very successful in determining gene structure and in identifying a handful of cis-regulatory elements. But the vast majority of regulatory elements have yet to be discovered, and it has become increasingly apparent that their discovery will not come from using genetic information alone. Recently, high-throughput technologies have enabled the creation of information-rich epigenetic maps, most notably for histone modifications. However, tools that search for functional elements using this epigenetic information have been lacking. Here, we describe an unsupervised learning method called ChromaSig to find, in an unbiased fashion, commonly occurring chromatin signatures in both tiling microarray and sequencing data. Applying this algorithm to nine chromatin marks across a 1% sampling of the human genome in HeLa cells, we recover eight clusters of distinct chromatin signatures, five of which correspond to known patterns associated with transcriptional promoters and enhancers. Interestingly, we observe that the distinct chromatin signatures found at enhancers mark distinct functional classes of enhancers in terms of transcription factor and coactivator binding. In addition, we identify three clusters of novel chromatin signatures that contain evolutionarily conserved sequences and potential cis-regulatory elements. Applying ChromaSig to a panel of 21 chromatin marks mapped genomewide by ChIP-Seq reveals 16 classes of genomic elements marked by distinct chromatin signatures. Interestingly, four classes containing enrichment for repressive histone modifications appear to be locally heterochromatic sites and are enriched in quickly evolving regions of the genome. The utility of this approach in uncovering novel, functionally significant genomic elements will aid future efforts of genome annotation via chromatin modifications.

  1. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  2. ATM and KAT5 safeguard replicating chromatin against formaldehyde damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Wong, Victor C.; DeLoughery, Zachary; Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Many carcinogens damage both DNA and protein constituents of chromatin, and it is unclear how cells respond to this compound injury. We examined activation of the main DNA damage-responsive kinase ATM and formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) by formaldehyde (FA) that forms histone adducts and replication-blocking DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC). We found that low FA doses caused a strong and rapid activation of ATM signaling in human cells, which was ATR-independent and restricted to S-phase. High FA doses inactivated ATM via its covalent dimerization and formation of larger crosslinks. FA-induced ATM signaling showed higher CHK2 phosphorylation but much lower phospho-KAP1 relative to DSB inducers. Replication blockage by DPC did not produce damaged forks or detectable amounts of DSB during the main wave of ATM activation, which did not require MRE11. Chromatin-monitoring KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase was responsible for acetylation and activation of ATM by FA. KAT5 and ATM were equally important for triggering of intra-S-phase checkpoint and ATM signaling promoted recovery of normal human cells after low-dose FA. Our results revealed a major role of the KAT5-ATM axis in protection of replicating chromatin against damage by the endogenous carcinogen FA. PMID:26420831

  3. Autism genes keep turning up chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalle, Janine M

    2013-06-19

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic disorders collectively characterized by impaired social interactions and language as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. Of the hundreds of genes implicated in ASD, those encoding proteins acting at neuronal synapses have been most characterized by candidate gene studies. However, recent unbiased genome-wide analyses have turned up a multitude of novel candidate genes encoding nuclear factors implicated in chromatin remodeling, histone demethylation, histone variants, and the recognition of DNA methylation. Furthermore, the chromatin landscape of the human genome has been shown to influence the location of de novo mutations observed in ASD as well as the landscape of DNA methylation underlying neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes. Understanding the interactions of nuclear chromatin proteins and DNA with signal transduction pathways and environmental influences in the developing brain will be critical to understanding the relevance of these ASD candidate genes and continued uncovering of the "roots" of autism etiology.

  4. The histone chaperone TAF-I/SET/INHAT is required for transcription in vitro of chromatin templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Matthew J; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Freedman, Leonard P; Fisher, Robert P

    2005-01-01

    To uncover factors required for transcription by RNA polymerase II on chromatin, we fractionated a mammalian cell nuclear extract. We identified the histone chaperone TAF-I (also known as INHAT [inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase]), which was previously proposed to repress transcription, as a potent activator of chromatin transcription responsive to the vitamin D3 receptor or to Gal4-VP16. TAF-I associates with chromatin in vitro and can substitute for the related protein NAP-1 in assembling chromatin onto cloned DNA templates in cooperation with the remodeling enzyme ATP-dependent chromatin assembly factor (ACF). The chromatin assembly and transcriptional activation functions are distinct, however, and can be dissociated temporally. Efficient transcription of chromatin assembled with TAF-I still requires the presence of TAF-I during the polymerization reaction. Conversely, TAF-I cannot stimulate transcript elongation when added after the other factors necessary for assembly of a preinitiation complex on naked DNA. Thus, TAF-I is required to facilitate transcription at a step after chromatin assembly but before transcript elongation.

  5. A high-resolution map of the three-dimensional chromatin interactome in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fulai; Li, Yan; Dixon, Jesse R; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Ye, Zhen; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Schmitt, Anthony D; Espinoza, Celso A; Ren, Bing

    2013-11-14

    A large number of cis-regulatory sequences have been annotated in the human genome, but defining their target genes remains a challenge. One strategy is to identify the long-range looping interactions at these elements with the use of chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based techniques. However, previous studies lack either the resolution or coverage to permit a whole-genome, unbiased view of chromatin interactions. Here we report a comprehensive chromatin interaction map generated in human fibroblasts using a genome-wide 3C analysis method (Hi-C). We determined over one million long-range chromatin interactions at 5-10-kb resolution, and uncovered general principles of chromatin organization at different types of genomic features. We also characterized the dynamics of promoter-enhancer contacts after TNF-α signalling in these cells. Unexpectedly, we found that TNF-α-responsive enhancers are already in contact with their target promoters before signalling. Such pre-existing chromatin looping, which also exists in other cell types with different extracellular signalling, is a strong predictor of gene induction. Our observations suggest that the three-dimensional chromatin landscape, once established in a particular cell type, is relatively stable and could influence the selection or activation of target genes by a ubiquitous transcription activator in a cell-specific manner.

  6. Condensins Exert Force on Chromatin-Nuclear Envelope Tethers to Mediate Nucleoplasmic Reticulum Formation in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozler, Julianna; Nguyen, Huy Q.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Bosco, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Although the nuclear envelope is known primarily for its role as a boundary between the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotes, it plays a vital and dynamic role in many cellular processes. Studies of nuclear structure have revealed tissue-specific changes in nuclear envelope architecture, suggesting that its three-dimensional structure contributes to its functionality. Despite the importance of the nuclear envelope, the factors that regulate and maintain nuclear envelope shape remain largely unexplored. The nuclear envelope makes extensive and dynamic interactions with the underlying chromatin. Given this inexorable link between chromatin and the nuclear envelope, it is possible that local and global chromatin organization reciprocally impact nuclear envelope form and function. In this study, we use Drosophila salivary glands to show that the three-dimensional structure of the nuclear envelope can be altered with condensin II-mediated chromatin condensation. Both naturally occurring and engineered chromatin-envelope interactions are sufficient to allow chromatin compaction forces to drive distortions of the nuclear envelope. Weakening of the nuclear lamina further enhanced envelope remodeling, suggesting that envelope structure is capable of counterbalancing chromatin compaction forces. Our experiments reveal that the nucleoplasmic reticulum is born of the nuclear envelope and remains dynamic in that they can be reabsorbed into the nuclear envelope. We propose a model where inner nuclear envelope-chromatin tethers allow interphase chromosome movements to change nuclear envelope morphology. Therefore, interphase chromatin compaction may be a normal mechanism that reorganizes nuclear architecture, while under pathological conditions, such as laminopathies, compaction forces may contribute to defects in nuclear morphology. PMID:25552604

  7. Condensins exert force on chromatin-nuclear envelope tethers to mediate nucleoplasmic reticulum formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozler, Julianna; Nguyen, Huy Q; Rogers, Gregory C; Bosco, Giovanni

    2014-12-30

    Although the nuclear envelope is known primarily for its role as a boundary between the nucleus and cytoplasm in eukaryotes, it plays a vital and dynamic role in many cellular processes. Studies of nuclear structure have revealed tissue-specific changes in nuclear envelope architecture, suggesting that its three-dimensional structure contributes to its functionality. Despite the importance of the nuclear envelope, the factors that regulate and maintain nuclear envelope shape remain largely unexplored. The nuclear envelope makes extensive and dynamic interactions with the underlying chromatin. Given this inexorable link between chromatin and the nuclear envelope, it is possible that local and global chromatin organization reciprocally impact nuclear envelope form and function. In this study, we use Drosophila salivary glands to show that the three-dimensional structure of the nuclear envelope can be altered with condensin II-mediated chromatin condensation. Both naturally occurring and engineered chromatin-envelope interactions are sufficient to allow chromatin compaction forces to drive distortions of the nuclear envelope. Weakening of the nuclear lamina further enhanced envelope remodeling, suggesting that envelope structure is capable of counterbalancing chromatin compaction forces. Our experiments reveal that the nucleoplasmic reticulum is born of the nuclear envelope and remains dynamic in that they can be reabsorbed into the nuclear envelope. We propose a model where inner nuclear envelope-chromatin tethers allow interphase chromosome movements to change nuclear envelope morphology. Therefore, interphase chromatin compaction may be a normal mechanism that reorganizes nuclear architecture, while under pathological conditions, such as laminopathies, compaction forces may contribute to defects in nuclear morphology. Copyright © 2015 Bozler et al.

  8. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use nascent chromatin capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during...... replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3,995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors...... such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment...

  9. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...... is a frequent event in disease, and the first epigenetic-based therapies for cancer treatment have been approved. A generation of new classes of potent and specific inhibitors for several chromatin-associated proteins have shown promise in preclinical trials. Although the biology of epigenetic regulation...

  10. Discovering hierarchical structure in normal relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    2014-01-01

    -parametric generative model for hierarchical clustering of similarity based on multifurcating Gibbs fragmentation trees. This allows us to infer and display the posterior distribution of hierarchical structures that comply with the data. We demonstrate the utility of our method on synthetic data and data of functional...

  11. Polyethylene glycols (PEG) and related structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenande, Emily; Kroigaard, Mogens; Mosbech, Holger

    2015-01-01

    We describe hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols (PEGs), with cross-reactivity to a structural analog, polysorbate 80, in a 69-year-old patient with perioperative anaphylaxis and subsequent, severe anaphylactic reactions to unrelated medical products. PEGs and PEG analogs are prevalent in the...

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Linker Histone—Hho1p Maintains Chromatin Loop Organization during Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Uzunova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intricate, dynamic, and absolutely unavoidable ageing affects cells and organisms through their entire lifetime. Driven by diverse mechanisms all leading to compromised cellular functions and finally to death, this process is a challenge for researchers. The molecular mechanisms, the general rules that it follows, and the complex interplay at a molecular and cellular level are yet little understood. Here, we present our results showing a connection between the linker histones, the higher-order chromatin structures, and the process of chronological lifespan of yeast cells. By deleting the gene for the linker histone in Saccharomyces cerevisiae we have created a model for studying the role of chromatin structures mainly at its most elusive and so far barely understood higher-order levels of compaction in the processes of yeast chronological lifespan. The mutant cells demonstrated controversial features showing slower growth than the wild type combined with better survival during the whole process. The analysis of the global chromatin organization during different time points demonstrated certain loss of the upper levels of chromatin compaction in the cells without linker histone. The results underlay the importance of this histone for the maintenance of the chromatin loop structures during ageing.

  13. Keeping it quiet: chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Paul M

    2013-12-01

    The human gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establish long-term latent infections associated with diverse human cancers. Viral oncogenesis depends on the ability of the latent viral genome to persist in host nuclei as episomes that express a restricted yet dynamic pattern of viral genes. Multiple epigenetic events control viral episome generation and maintenance. This Review highlights some of the recent findings on the role of chromatin assembly, histone and DNA modifications, and higher-order chromosome structures that enable gammaherpesviruses to establish stable latent infections that mediate viral pathogenesis.

  14. Discovering Multidimensional Structure in Relational Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael Rune; Holmgren, Thomas; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) systems based on multidimensional databases are essential elements of decision support. However, most existing data is stored in “ordinary” relational OLTP databases, i.e., data has to be (re-) modeled as multidimensional cubes before the advantages of OLAP to...... algorithms for discovering multidimensional schemas from relational databases. The algorithms take a wide range of available metadata into account in the discovery process, including functional and inclusion dependencies, and key and cardinality information....... tools are available. In this paper we present an approach for the automatic construction of multidimensional OLAP database schemas from existing relational OLTP databases, enabling easy OLAP design and analysis for most existing data sources. This is achieved through a set of practical and effective...

  15. The intern structure of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierseaux, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The author presents the forgotten fact that in 1905 there were 2 restricted theories of relativity: that of Einstein and that of Poincare. These 2 theories were independently formulated, they are very close to each other but are fundamentally different when we consider their basic principles. Poincare's theory is based on a classical representation of the purely undulatory aspect of light, whereas Einstein stipulates for the quantum aspect of light. Poincare's theory implies the existence of the ether and asserts the primacy of continuity over discontinuity. The author has based his work on a thorough study of the scientific articles in which Poincare and Einstein explained their ideas. The comparison of these 2 theories sheds light on the evolution of concepts on which the whole modern physics is based. An extended bibliography of works published on special relativity or on related topics is given. (A.C.)

  16. Classical and Nonclassical Estrogen Receptor Action on Chromatin Templates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordeen, Steven

    2000-01-01

    .... Using newly-developed approaches, I investigated mechanisms of estrogen/estrogen receptor action on chromatin templates in vitro in order to better understand the role of chromatin in steroid-regulated gene expression...

  17. Classical and Nonclassical Estrogen Receptor Action on Chromatin Templaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordeen, Steve

    2001-01-01

    .... Using newly-developed approaches, I investigated mechanisms of estrogen/estrogen receptor action on chromatin templates in vitro in order to better understand the role of chromatin in steroid-regulated gene expression...

  18. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...

  19. Local Nucleosome Dynamics Facilitate Chromatin Accessibility in Living Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saera Hihara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome information, which is three-dimensionally organized within cells as chromatin, is searched and read by various proteins for diverse cell functions. Although how the protein factors find their targets remains unclear, the dynamic and flexible nature of chromatin is likely crucial. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single-nucleosome imaging, and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate local chromatin dynamics in living mammalian cells. We show that similar to interphase chromatin, dense mitotic chromosomes also have considerable chromatin accessibility. For both interphase and mitotic chromatin, we observed local fluctuation of individual nucleosomes (∼50 nm movement/30 ms, which is caused by confined Brownian motion. Inhibition of these local dynamics by crosslinking impaired accessibility in the dense chromatin regions. Our findings show that local nucleosome dynamics drive chromatin accessibility. We propose that this local nucleosome fluctuation is the basis for scanning genome information.

  20. Probabilistic Relational Structures and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domotor, Zoltan

    The principal objects of the investigation reported were, first, to study qualitative probability relations on Boolean algebras, and secondly, to describe applications in the theories of probability logic, information, automata, and probabilistic measurement. The main contribution of this work is stated in 10 definitions and 20 theorems. The basic…

  1. Chromatin conformation capture strategies in molecular diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vree, Pauline J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis I have explored the clinical potential of the 4C-technology and worked on development of a novel chromatin conformation capture based technology, called TLA. In chapter 2 I describe how the 4C-technology can be applied as a targeted strategy to identify putative fusion-genes or

  2. EBV Latency Types Adopt Alternative Chromatin Conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempera, Italo; Klichinsky, Michael; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp) or type III (Cp) gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer. PMID:21829357

  3. EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Tempera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp or type III (Cp gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer.

  4. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively...

  5. Evaluation of chromatin integrity of motile bovine spermatozoa capacitated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckova, Z; Machatkova, M; Rybar, R; Horakova, J; Hulinska, P; Machal, L

    2008-08-01

    The efficiency of in vitro embryo production is highly variable amongst individual sires in cattle. To eliminate that this variability is not caused by sperm chromatin damage caused by separation or capacitacion, chromatin integrity was evaluated. Seventeen of AI bulls with good NRRs but variable embryo production efficiency were used. For each bull, motile spermatozoa were separated on a Percoll gradient, resuspended in IVF-TALP medium and capacitated with or incubated without heparin for 6 h. Samples before and after separation and after 3-h and 6-h capacitacion or incubation were evaluated by the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA) and the proportion of sperm with intact chromatin structure was calculated. Based on changes in the non-DFI-sperm proportion, the sires were categorized as DNA-unstable (DNA-us), DNA-stable (DNA-s) and DNA-most stable (DNA-ms) bulls (n=3, n=5 and n=9, respectively). In DNA-us bulls, separation produced a significant increase of the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion (p Capacitacion produced a significant decrease in the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion in H+ sperm (p capacitacion, the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion remained almost unchanged. In DNA-ms bulls, neither separation nor capacitacion had any effect on the mean non-DFI-sperm proportion. It can be concluded that, although separation and capacitacion may produce some changes in sperm chromatin integrity, these are not associated with different in vitro fertility of the bulls involved.

  6. Structure soil structure interaction effects: Seismic analysis of safety related collocated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Process, Purification and Stack Buildings are collocated safety related concrete shear wall structures with plan dimensions in excess of 100 feet. An important aspect of their seismic analysis was the determination of structure soil structure interaction (SSSI) effects, if any. The SSSI analysis of the Process Building, with one other building at a time, was performed with the SASSI computer code for up to 50 frequencies. Each combined model had about 1500 interaction nodes. Results of the SSSI analysis were compared with those from soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the individual buildings, done with ABAQUS and SASSI codes, for three parameters: peak accelerations, seismic forces and the in-structure floor response spectra (FRS). The results may be of wider interest due to the model size and the potential applicability to other deep soil layered sites. Results obtained from the ABAQUS analysis were consistently higher, as expected, than those from the SSI and SSSI analyses using the SASSI. The SSSI effect between the Process and Purification Buildings was not significant. The Process and Stack Building results demonstrated that under certain conditions a massive structure can have an observable effect on the seismic response of a smaller and less stiff structure

  7. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2013-01-01

    Although the general relevance of chromatin modifications for genotoxic stress signaling, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, and DNA repair is well established, how these modifications reach initial thresholds in order to trigger robust responses remains largely unexplored. Here, we identify...... the chromatin-associated scaffold attachment factor SAFB1 as a component of the DNA damage response and show that SAFB1 cooperates with histone acetylation to allow for efficient γH2AX spreading and genotoxic stress signaling. SAFB1 undergoes a highly dynamic exchange at damaged chromatin in a poly......(ADP-ribose)-polymerase 1- and poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent manner and is required for unperturbed cell-cycle checkpoint activation and guarding cells against replicative stress. Altogether, our data reveal that transient recruitment of an architectural chromatin component is required in order to overcome physiological...

  8. Borel equivalence relations structure and classification

    CERN Document Server

    Kanovei, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, the theory of Borel equivalence relations and related topics have been very active areas of research in set theory and have important interactions with other fields of mathematics, like ergodic theory and topological dynamics, group theory, combinatorics, functional analysis, and model theory. The book presents, for the first time in mathematical literature, all major aspects of this theory and its applications. This book should be of interest to a wide spectrum of mathematicians working in set theory as well as the other areas mentioned. It provides a systematic exposition of results that so far have been only available in journals or are even unpublished. The book presents unified and in some cases significantly streamlined proofs of several difficult results, especially dichotomy theorems. It has rather minimal overlap with other books published in this subject.

  9. Generalized Disjunctions in (Infinitary) Structural Consequence Relations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2012), s. 442-443 ISSN 1079-8986. [Logic Colloquium 2011. 11.07.2011-16.07.2011, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Abstract Algebraic Logic * Generalized disjunction * Proof by cases properties * Consequence relations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.math.ucla.edu/~asl/bsl/1803- toc .htm

  10. Fullerenes, nanotubes, onions and related carbon structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, C N.R.; Seshadri, Ram; Govindaraj, A; Sen, Rahul [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, CSIR Centre of Excellence in Chemistry and Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    1995-12-01

    Fullerenes, containing five- and six-membered carbon rings, of which C{sub 6}0 and C{sub 7}0 are the prominent members, exhibit phase transitions associated with orientational ordering. When C{sub 6}0 is suitably doped with electrons, it shows novel superconducting and magnetic properties. We review these and other properties of fullerenes in bulk or in film form along with the preparative and structural aspects. Carbon nanotubes and onions (hyperfullerenes) are the other forms of carbon whose material properties have aroused considerable interest. Besides discussing these new forms of carbon, we briefly introduce other possible forms, such as those involving five-, six- and seven-membered rings and hybrids between diamond and graphite

  11. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  12. Intelligent structures and design of energy related facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, Haruyuki

    1994-01-01

    Possibility of applying intelligent structural concepts to civil design of energy plants is discussed. Intelligent structures, which are now common in aerospace engineering field, are also referred to as adaptive structures or smart structures depending on cases. Among various existing concepts, reconfigurable structures, precise shape control, structural monitoring using smart materials of optical fiber sensors, and relation with recent innovative communication technologies are focused from civil engineering point of view. Application of such new technologies will help to enhance design of energy related plants, which include multiplex functions which need to be very reliable and safe. (author)

  13. A comparison of the effect of lead nitrate on rat liver chromatin, DNA and histone proteins in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Abdosamadi, Sayeh; Fani, Nesa; Mohammadian, Shayesteh

    2009-06-01

    Although lead is widely recognized as a toxic substance in the environment and directly damage DNA, no studies are available on lead interaction with chromatin and histone proteins. In this work, we have examined the effect of lead nitrate on EDTA-soluble chromatin (SE chromatin), DNA and histones in solution using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and gel electrophoresis techniques. The results demonstrate that lead nitrate binds with higher affinity to chromatin than to DNA and produces an insoluble complex as monitored at 400 nm. Binding of lead to DNA decreases its Tm, increases its fluorescence intensity and exhibits hypochromicity at 210 nm which reveal that both DNA bases and the backbone participate in the lead-DNA interaction. Lead also binds strongly to histone proteins in the absence of DNA. The results suggest that although lead destabilizes DNA structure, in the chromatin, the binding of lead introduces some sort of compaction and aggregation, and the histone proteins play a key role in this aspect. This chromatin condensation, upon lead exposure, in turn may decrease fidelity of DNA, and inhibits DNA and RNA synthesis, the process that introduces lead toxicity at the chromatin level.

  14. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Öberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, ΔN-hH1.4, were compared. ► Both histones bind to chromatin, however, ΔN-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. ► Interaction of ΔN-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. ► N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain (ΔN-hH1.4). The ΔN-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that ΔN-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  15. Relaxed selection against accidental binding of transcription factors with conserved chromatin contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, G A

    2010-10-15

    The spurious (or nonfunctional) binding of transcription factors (TF) to the wrong locations on DNA presents a formidable challenge to genomes given the relatively low ceiling for sequence complexity within the short lengths of most binding motifs. The high potential for the occurrence of random motifs and subsequent nonfunctional binding of many transcription factors should theoretically lead to natural selection against the occurrence of spurious motif throughout the genome. However, because of the active role that chromatin can influence over eukaryotic gene regulation, it may also be expected that many supposed spurious binding sites could escape purifying selection if (A) they simply occur in regions of high nucleosome occupancy or (B) their surrounding chromatin was dynamically involved in their identity and function. We compared nucleosome occupancy and the presence/absence of functionally conserved chromatin context to the strength of selection against spurious binding of various TF binding motifs in Saccharomyces yeast. While we find no direct relationship with nucleosome occupancy, we find strong evidence that transcription factors spatially associated with evolutionarily conserved chromatin states are under relaxed selection against accidental binding. Transcription factors (with/without) a conserved chromatin context were found to occur on average, (87.7%/49.3%) of their expected frequencies. Functional binding motifs with conserved chromatin contexts were also significantly shorter in length and more often clustered. These results indicate a role of chromatin context dependency in relaxing selection against spurious binding in nearly half of all TF binding motifs throughout the yeast genome. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Not just gene expression: 3D implications of chromatin modifications during sexual plant reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Liu, Chang; Chen, Changbin

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications are epigenetic changes on a DNA molecule that alter the three-dimensional (3D) structure locally as well as globally, impacting chromatin looping and packaging on a larger scale. Epigenetic marks thus inform higher-order chromosome organization and placement in the nucleus. Conventional epigenetic marks are joined by chromatin modifiers like cohesins, condensins and membrane-anchoring complexes to support particularly 3D chromosome organization. The most popular consequences of epigenetic modifications are gene expression changes, but chromatin modifications have implications beyond this, particularly in actively dividing cells and during sexual reproduction. In this opinion paper, we will focus on epigenetic mechanisms and chromatin modifications during meiosis as part of plant sexual reproduction where 3D management of chromosomes and re-organization of chromatin are defining features and prime tasks in reproductive cells, not limited to modulating gene expression. Meiotic chromosome organization, pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes as well as distribution of meiotic double-strand breaks and resulting crossovers are presumably highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Special mobile small RNAs have been described in anthers, where these so-called phasiRNAs seem to direct DNA methylation in meiotic cells. Intriguingly, many of the mentioned developmental processes make use of epigenetic changes and small RNAs in a manner other than gene expression changes. Widening our approaches and opening our mind to thinking three-dimensionally regarding epigenetics in plant development holds high promise for new discoveries and could give us a boost for further knowledge.

  17. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  18. Acetylation-Dependent Chromatin Reorganization by BRDT, a Testis-Specific Bromodomain-Containing Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivot-Pajot, Christophe; Caron, Cécile; Govin, Jérôme; Vion, Alexandre; Rousseaux, Sophie; Khochbin, Saadi

    2003-01-01

    The association between histone acetylation and replacement observed during spermatogenesis prompted us to consider the testis as a source for potential factors capable of remodelling acetylated chromatin. A systematic search of data banks for open reading frames encoding testis-specific bromodomain-containing proteins focused our attention on BRDT, a testis-specific protein of unknown function containing two bromodomains. BRDT specifically binds hyperacetylated histone H4 tail depending on the integrity of both bromodomains. Moreover, in somatic cells, the ectopic expression of BRDT triggered a dramatic reorganization of the chromatin only after induction of histone hyperacetylation by trichostatin A (TSA). We then defined critical domains of BRDT involved in its activity. Both bromodomains of BRDT, as well as flanking regions, were found indispensable for its histone acetylation-dependent remodelling activity. Interestingly, we also observed that recombinant BRDT was capable of inducing reorganization of the chromatin of isolated nuclei in vitro only when the nuclei were from TSA-treated cells. This assay also allowed us to show that the action of BRDT was ATP independent, suggesting a structural role for the protein in the remodelling of acetylated chromatin. This is the first demonstration of a large-scale reorganization of acetylated chromatin induced by a specific factor. PMID:12861021

  19. Effect of ultraviolet irradiation on chromatin and its components from Yoshida ascites tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Patil, M.S.; Pradhan, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of U.V. irradiation on Yoshida ascites tumour chromatin and its non-DNA components. The extractability of total histones was increased from 6% to 17% with an increase in U.V. incident radiation dose from 500J/m 2 to 2000J/m 2 . The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis pattern of chromosomal proteins was examined after irradiation of the chromatin, and the effect of U.V. irradiation of chromatin on histones was also investigated. The results indicated that cross-linking of DNA with chromosomal proteins is an important category of U.V. radiation-induced lesions discerned in U.V. irradiated chromatin. Histones and several non-histone proteins seemed to undergo U.V. radiation-induced cross-linking with DNA, which was taken as indicative of their close association with DNA in the chromatin structure. It is suggested that the cross-link formation between DNA and non-histone proteins may be due to sequence-specific association of non-histone proteins with DNA. (U.K.)

  20. Modulation of Higher Order Chromatin Conformation in Mammalian Cell Nuclei Can Be Mediated by Polyamines and Divalent Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwat Visvanathan

    Full Text Available The organisation of the large volume of mammalian genomic DNA within cell nuclei requires mechanisms to regulate chromatin compaction involving the reversible formation of higher order structures. The compaction state of chromatin varies between interphase and mitosis and is also subject to rapid and reversible change upon ATP depletion/repletion. In this study we have investigated mechanisms that may be involved in promoting the hyper-condensation of chromatin when ATP levels are depleted by treating cells with sodium azide and 2-deoxyglucose. Chromatin conformation was analysed in both live and permeabilised HeLa cells using FLIM-FRET, high resolution fluorescence microscopy and by electron spectroscopic imaging microscopy. We show that chromatin compaction following ATP depletion is not caused by loss of transcription activity and that it can occur at a similar level in both interphase and mitotic cells. Analysis of both live and permeabilised HeLa cells shows that chromatin conformation within nuclei is strongly influenced by the levels of divalent cations, including calcium and magnesium. While ATP depletion results in an increase in the level of unbound calcium, chromatin condensation still occurs even in the presence of a calcium chelator. Chromatin compaction is shown to be strongly affected by small changes in the levels of polyamines, including spermine and spermidine. The data are consistent with a model in which the increased intracellular pool of polyamines and divalent cations, resulting from depletion of ATP, bind to DNA and contribute to the large scale hyper-compaction of chromatin by a charge neutralisation mechanism.

  1. Undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 regulates ESC chromatin organization and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooistra, Susanne M; van den Boom, Vincent; Thummer, Rajkumar P

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports showed that embryonic stem (ES) cells contain hyperdynamic and globally transcribed chromatin-properties that are important for ES cell pluripotency and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate a role for undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1 (UTF1) in regulating ES...... cell chromatin structure. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis, we identified >1,700 UTF1 target genes that significantly overlap with previously identified Nanog, Oct4, Klf-4, c-Myc, and Rex1 targets. Gene expression profiling showed that UTF1 knock down results in increased expression...... of a large set of genes, including a significant number of UTF1 targets. UTF1 knock down (KD) ES cells are, irrespective of the increased expression of several self-renewal genes, Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) dependent. However, UTF1 KD ES cells are perturbed in their differentiation in response...

  2. New insights into chromatin folding and dynamics from multi-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Wilma

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes-the familiar assemblies of roughly 150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins-found on chromatin fibers. We have developed a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs with 3-25 evenly spaced nucleosomes. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition, spacing, and numbers on long-range communication between regulatory proteins bound to the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We have extracted effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the mesoscale simulations and introduced the potentials in a larger scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable influence of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility. Small changes in the length of the DNA fragments linking successive nucleosomes introduce marked changes in the local interactions of the nucleosomes and in the spatial configurations of the fiber as a whole. The changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of longer chromatin constructs with 100-10,000 nucleosomes. We are investigating the extent to which the `local' interactions of regularly spaced nucleosomes contribute to the corresponding interactions in chains with mixed spacings as a step toward the treatment of fibers with nucleosomes positioned at the sites mapped at base-pair resolution on genomic sequences. Support of the work by USPHS R01 GM 34809 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  4. Critical electrolyte concentration of silk gland chromatin of the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis, induced using agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S A; Fermino, F; Moreira, B M T; Araujo, K F; Falco, J R P; Ruvolo-Takasusuki, M C C

    2014-09-29

    The sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis is widely known as the main pest of sugarcane crop, causing increased damage to the entire fields. Measures to control this pest involve the use of chemicals and biological control with Cotesia flavipes wasps. In this study, we evaluated the insecticides fipronil (Frontline; 0.0025%), malathion (Malatol Bio Carb; 0.4%), cipermetrina (Galgotrin; 10%), and neem oil (Natuneem; 100%) and the herbicide nicosulfuron (Sanson 40 SC; 100%) in the posterior region silk glands of 3rd- and 5th-instar D. saccharalis by studying the variation in the critical electrolyte concentration (CEC). Observations of 3rd-instar larvae indicated that malathion, cipermetrina, and neem oil induced increased chromatin condensation that may consequently disable genes. Tests with fipronil showed no alteration in chromatin condensation. With the use of nicosulfuron, there was chromatin and probable gene decompaction. In the 5th-instar larvae, the larval CEC values indicated that malathion and neem oil induced increased chromatin condensation. The CEC values for 5th-instar larvae using cipermetrina, fipronil, and nicosulfuron indicated chromatin unpacking. These observations led us to conclude that the quantity of the pesticide does not affect the mortality of these pests, can change the conformation of complexes of DNA, RNA, and protein from the posterior region of silk gland cells of D. saccharalis, activating or repressing the expression of genes related to the defense mechanism of the insect and contributing to the selection and survival of resistant individuals.

  5. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jé gu, Teddy; Domenichini, Sé verine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Auré lie; Kim, SoonKap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Sté phanie; Mouille, Gré gory; Bourge, Mickaë l; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cé cile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  6. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  7. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teif, Vladimir B; Rippe, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibria measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical-mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quantitative models for the regulation of gene expression.

  8. Phenomenological structure functions and Gribov-Lipatov relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, D.K.; Misra, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the Giribov-Lipatov relation using the phenomenological forms of the structure function F 2 ep is made. The analysis indicate breakdown of the relation at PETRA energies. Plausible reasons of the breakdown of Gribov-Lipatov relation are discussed together with its phenomenological form. 33 refs., 6 figures. (author)

  9. Chromatin Modifying Agents in the In Vitro Production of Bovine Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morato Monteiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The low efficiency observed in cloning by nuclear transfer is related to an aberrant gene expression following errors in epigenetic reprogramming. Recent studies have focused on further understanding of the modifications that take place in the chromatin of embryos during the preimplantation period, through the use of chromatin modifying agents. The goal of these studies is to identify the factors involved in nuclear reprogramming and to adjust in vitro manipulations in order to better mimic in vivo conditions. Therefore, proper knowledge of epigenetic reprogramming is necessary to prevent possible epigenetic errors and to improve efficiency and the use of in vitro fertilization and cloning technologies in cattle and other species.

  10. Gametophyte differentiation and imprinting control in plants: Crosstalk between RBR and chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Amal J; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2009-01-01

    The Retinoblastoma (pRb) pathway has been implicated as a convergent regulatory unit in the control of cell cycle and disease. We have shown that a crosstalk between RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED (RBR), the Arabidopsis homologue of pRb, and the genes encoding proteins of the chromatin complexes involved in DNA or histone methylation, controls gametophytic and post-fertilization differentiation events and a subset of imprinting effects. We describe here a plausible model that incorporates several components of the plant Retinoblastoma pathway, thus offering a novel paradigm that merges the traditional cell cycle and the chromatin components in the control of cell differentiation and imprinting.

  11. Phase relations, crystal structures and physical properties of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Hiroaki; Fujino, Takeo; Tateno, Jun

    1975-07-01

    Phase relations, crystal structures and physical properties of the compounds for nuclear fuels are presented, including melting point, thermal expansion, diffusion and magnetic and electric properties. Emphasis is on oxides, carbides and nitrides of thorium, uranium and plutonium. (auth.)

  12. Ion diffusion related to structure in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1996-08-01

    A model first developed by Zwanzig to derive transport coefficients in cold dense fluids directly from the Green-Kubo time correlation formulae allows one to relate macroscopic diffusion coefficients to the local fluid structure. Applications to various ionic diffusion processes in molten salts are reviewed. Consequences of partial structural quenching are also discussed. (author). 28 refs, 3 tabs

  13. The interplay of structural and relational governance in innovation alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbade, P.J.P.; Omta, S.W.F.; Fortuin, F.T.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to extend the discussion in the governance literature about whether structural and relational governance mechanisms complement or substitute each other in innovation alliances. Where structural governance mechanisms refer to the division of tasks within the alliance and to

  14. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectra of chromatin and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonova, N.Y.; Kiseleva, M.N.; Petrov, M.Y.; Tsyganenko, N.M.; Bubyakina, V.V.; Chikhirzhina, G.I.

    1984-01-01

    The electron absorption spectra of thin films of chromatin and chromatin components in the ultraviolet region (140-280 nm) were investigated. The absorption coefficients μ(lambda) of chromatin, nucleosomes with and without histone H1, total histones (TH), and DNA were compared. The spectra of nucleosomes differ from the sum-spectrum of DNA plus TH. The chromatin and nucleosome spectra are not similar in the spectral region of 190-160 nm. The lack of additivity of absorption coefficients at different wavelengths may be explained by different conformational changes of DNA, TH in nucleosomes and chromatin during the process of drying aqueous solutions for the preparation of thin films. The μ(lambda) values are useful for an estimate of the DNA and TH absorption in chromatin and nucleosomes in discussing UV and VUV irradiation damages. (Auth.)

  16. Incorporating double copies of a chromatin insulator into lentiviral vectors results in less viral integrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Jakobsson, Johan; Rosenqvist, Nina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lentiviral vectors hold great promise as gene transfer vectors in gene therapeutic settings. However, problems related to the risk of insertional mutagenesis, transgene silencing and positional effects have stalled the use of such vectors in the clinic. Chromatin insulators are boundary...

  17. Vibrational energy relaxation: proposed pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.; Greinert, R.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for the a component of exchange-type chromosome aberrations, of chromosome fragmentation and of reproductive cell death is one of the unsolved issues of radiation biology. Under review is whether vibrational energy relaxation in the constitutive biopolymers of chromatin, induced by inelastic energy deposition events and mediated via highly excited vibrational states, may provide a pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation, thereby producing the severe DNA lesion able to interact chemically with other, non-damaged chromatin. (author)

  18. Is there a relationship between the chromatin status and DNA fragmentation of boar spermatozoa following freezing-thawing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2007-07-15

    In this study a radioisotope method, which is based on the quantitative measurements of tritiated-labeled actinomycin D ((3)H-AMD) incorporation into the sperm nuclei ((3)H-AMD incorporation assay), was used to assess the chromatin status of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa. This study also tested the hypothesis that frozen-thawed spermatozoa with altered chromatin were susceptible to DNA fragmentation measured with the neutral comet assay (NCA). Boar semen was diluted in lactose-hen egg yolk-glycerol extender (L-HEY) or lactose ostrich egg yolk lipoprotein fractions-glycerol extender (L-LPFo), packaged into aluminum tubes or plastic straws and frozen in a controlled programmable freezer. In Experiment 1, the chromatin status and DNA fragmentation were measured in fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa from the same ejaculates. There was a significant increase in sperm chromatin destabilization and DNA fragmentation in frozen-thawed semen as compared with fresh semen. The proportions of spermatozoa labeled with (3)H-AMD were concurrent with elevated levels of sperm DNA fragmentation in K-3 extender, without cryoprotective substances, compared with L-HEY or L-LPFo extender. Regression analysis revealed that the results of the (3)H-AMD incorporation assay and NCA for frozen-thawed spermatozoa were correlated. Boars differed significantly in terms of post-thaw sperm DNA damage. In Experiment 2, the susceptibility of sperm chromatin to decondensation was assessed using a low concentration of heparin. Treatment of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with heparin revealed enhanced (3)H-AMD binding, suggesting nuclear chromatin decondensation. The deterioration in post-thaw sperm viability, such as motility, mitochondrial function and plasma membrane integrity, was concurrent with increased chromatin instability and DNA fragmentation. This is the first report to show that freezing-thawing procedure facilitated destabilization in the chromatin structure of boar spermatozoa, resulting in

  19. The Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Activates a Stemness Gene-Expression Program Essential for the Maintenance of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowen Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are tightly regulated partly through configuration of chromatin structure by chromatin remodelers. Using knockout mice, we here demonstrate that bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF, a component of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for maintaining the population size of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, including long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Bptf-deficient HSCs are defective in reconstituted hematopoiesis, and hematopoietic-specific knockout of Bptf caused profound defects including bone marrow failure and anemia. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that BPTF loss caused downregulation of HSC-specific gene-expression programs, which contain several master transcription factors (Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, and Lmo2 required for HSC maintenance and self-renewal. Furthermore, we show that BPTF potentiates the chromatin accessibility of key HSC “stemness” genes. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the chromatin remodeler BPTF and NURF for activation of “stemness” gene-expression programs and proper function of adult HSCs. : Wang and colleagues show that a chromatin remodeler, BPTF, sustains appropriate functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. BPTF loss causes bone marrow failure and anemia. The authors further define a BPTF-dependent gene-expression program in HSPCs, which contains key HSC stemness factors. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the BPTF-associated chromatin remodelers for HSC functionality and adult hematopoiesis. Keywords: Bptf, hematopoietic stem cells, chromatin remodeler, Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, DNA accessibility, NURF, AP1 complex

  20. Chromatin organization regulated by EZH2-mediated H3K27me3 is required for OPN-induced migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Luo, Qing; Sun, Jinghui; Ju, Yang; Morita, Yasuyuki; Song, Guanbin

    2018-03-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a chemokine-like extracellular matrix-associated protein involved in the migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). An increasing number of studies have found that chromatin organization may affect cellular migration. However, whether OPN regulates chromatin organization is not understood, nor are the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the link between chromatin organization and BMSC migration and demonstrated that OPN-mediated BMSC migration leads to elevated levels of heterochromatin marker histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) through the methyltransferase EZH2. The expression of EZH2 reorganizes the chromatin structure of BMSCs. Pharmacological inhibition or depletion of EZH2 blocks BMSC migration. Moreover, using an atomic force microscope (AFM), we found that chromatin decondensation alters the mechanical properties of the nucleus. In addition, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signals represses OPN-promoted chromatin condensation and cell migration. Thus, our results identify a mechanism by which ERK1/2 signalling drives specific chromatin modifications in BMSCs, which alters chromatin organization and thereby enables OPN-mediated BMSC migration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Repression of germline RNAi pathways in somatic cells by retinoblastoma pathway chromatin complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Wu

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma (Rb tumor suppressor acts with a number of chromatin cofactors in a wide range of species to suppress cell proliferation. The Caenorhabditis elegans retinoblastoma gene and many of these cofactors, called synMuv B genes, were identified in genetic screens for cell lineage defects caused by growth factor misexpression. Mutations in many synMuv B genes, including lin-35/Rb, also cause somatic misexpression of the germline RNA processing P granules and enhanced RNAi. We show here that multiple small RNA components, including a set of germline-specific Argonaute genes, are misexpressed in the soma of many synMuv B mutant animals, revealing one node for enhanced RNAi. Distinct classes of synMuv B mutants differ in the subcellular architecture of their misexpressed P granules, their profile of misexpressed small RNA and P granule genes, as well as their enhancement of RNAi and the related silencing of transgenes. These differences define three classes of synMuv B genes, representing three chromatin complexes: a LIN-35/Rb-containing DRM core complex, a SUMO-recruited Mec complex, and a synMuv B heterochromatin complex, suggesting that intersecting chromatin pathways regulate the repression of small RNA and P granule genes in the soma and the potency of RNAi. Consistent with this, the DRM complex and the synMuv B heterochromatin complex were genetically additive and displayed distinct antagonistic interactions with the MES-4 histone methyltransferase and the MRG-1 chromodomain protein, two germline chromatin regulators required for the synMuv phenotype and the somatic misexpression of P granule components. Thus intersecting synMuv B chromatin pathways conspire with synMuv B suppressor chromatin factors to regulate the expression of small RNA pathway genes, which enables heightened RNAi response. Regulation of small RNA pathway genes by human retinoblastoma may also underlie its role as a tumor suppressor gene.

  2. Genetics, chromatin diminution, and sex chromosome evolution in the parasitic nematode genus Strongyloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemetschke, Linda; Eberhardt, Alexander G; Hertzberg, Hubertus; Streit, Adrian

    2010-10-12

    When chromatin diminution occurs during a cell division a portion of the chromatin is eliminated, resulting in daughter cells with a smaller amount of genetic material. In the parasitic roundworms Ascaris and Parascaris, chromatin diminution creates a genetic difference between the soma and the germline. However, the function of chromatin diminution remains a mystery, because the vast majority of the eliminated DNA is noncoding. Within the parasitic roundworm genus Strongyloides, S. stercoralis (in man) and S. ratti (in rat) employ XX/XO sex determination, but the situation in S. papillosus (in sheep) is different but controversial. We demonstrate genetically that S. papillosus employs sex-specific chromatin diminution to eliminate an internal portion of one of the two homologs of one chromosome pair in males. Contrary to ascarids, the eliminated DNA in S. papillosus contains a large number of genes. We demonstrate that the region undergoing diminution is homologous to the X chromosome of the closely related S. ratti. The flanking regions, which are not diminished, are homologous to the S. ratti autosome number I. Furthermore, we found that the diminished chromosome is not incorporated into sperm, resulting in a male-specific transmission ratio distortion. Our data indicate that on the evolutionary path to S. papillosus, the X chromosome fused with an autosome. Chromatin diminution serves to functionally restore an XX/XO sex-determining system. A consequence of the fusion and the process that copes with it is a transmission ratio distortion in males for certain loci. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. From the chromatin interaction network to the organization of the human genome into replication N/U-domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulos, Rasha E; Julienne, Hanna; Baker, Antoine; Jensen, Pablo; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin; Chen, Chun-Long; D'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; Hyrien, Olivier; Goldar, Arach

    2014-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the mammalian nucleus is now being unraveled thanks to the recent development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) technologies. Here we report the results of a combined multiscale analysis of genome-wide mean replication timing and chromatin conformation data that reveal some intimate relationships between chromatin folding and human DNA replication. We previously described megabase replication N/U-domains as mammalian multiorigin replication units, and showed that their borders are ‘master’ replication initiation zones that likely initiate cascades of origin firing responsible for the stereotypic replication of these domains. Here, we demonstrate that replication N/U-domains correspond to the structural domains of self-interacting chromatin, and that their borders act as insulating regions both in high-throughput 3C (Hi-C) data and high-resolution 3C (4C) experiments. Further analyses of Hi-C data using a graph-theoretical approach reveal that N/U-domain borders are long-distance, interconnected hubs of the chromatin interaction network. Overall, these results and the observation that a well-defined ordering of chromatin states exists from N/U-domain borders to centers suggest that ‘master’ replication initiation zones are at the heart of a high-order, epigenetically controlled 3D organization of the human genome. (paper)

  4. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Shiomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  5. Global assemblages and structural models of International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    -category of assemblages – those constructed as malleable and governable which I call ‘governance-objects’ – is central to structure in international relations. The chapter begins with standard definitions of what structures are – patterns of interaction between elements – and briefly covers the range of models currently...... used to simplify different structures. Next the chapter points to the blindness of most structural theories of IR to the role of assemblages in general and governance-objects in particular. Thirdly, the idea that a polity is constituted precisely by the assemblage of a governance...

  6. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom

    2011-01-01

    to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response...... element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3...... histone mark reflect this insulator-dependent chromatin conformation, suggesting that Polycomb action at a distance can be organized by local chromatin topology....

  7. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  8. Neuron-specific chromatin remodeling: a missing link in epigenetic mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, memory, and intellectual disability disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A

    2014-05-01

    Long-term memory formation requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression. Until recently nucleosome remodeling, one of the major epigenetic mechanisms for controlling gene expression, had been largely unexplored in the field of neuroscience. Nucleosome remodeling is carried out by chromatin remodeling complexes (CRCs) that interact with DNA and histones to physically alter chromatin structure and ultimately regulate gene expression. Human exome sequencing and gene wide association studies have linked mutations in CRC subunits to intellectual disability disorders, autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. However, how mutations in CRC subunits were related to human cognitive disorders was unknown. There appears to be both developmental and adult specific roles for the neuron specific CRC nBAF (neuronal Brg1/hBrm Associated Factor). nBAF regulates gene expression required for dendritic arborization during development, and in the adult, contributes to long-term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity, and long-term memory. We propose that the nBAF complex is a novel epigenetic mechanism for regulating transcription required for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory processes and that impaired nBAF function may result in human cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CTCF and CohesinSA-1 Mark Active Promoters and Boundaries of Repressive Chromatin Domains in Primary Human Erythroid Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A Steiner

    Full Text Available CTCF and cohesinSA-1 are regulatory proteins involved in a number of critical cellular processes including transcription, maintenance of chromatin domain architecture, and insulator function. To assess changes in the CTCF and cohesinSA-1 interactomes during erythropoiesis, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing and mRNA transcriptome analyses via RNA-seq were performed in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC and primary human erythroid cells from single donors.Sites of CTCF and cohesinSA-1 co-occupancy were enriched in gene promoters in HSPC and erythroid cells compared to single CTCF or cohesin sites. Cell type-specific CTCF sites in erythroid cells were linked to highly expressed genes, with the opposite pattern observed in HSPCs. Chromatin domains were identified by ChIP-seq with antibodies against trimethylated lysine 27 histone H3, a modification associated with repressive chromatin. Repressive chromatin domains increased in both number and size during hematopoiesis, with many more repressive domains in erythroid cells than HSPCs. CTCF and cohesinSA-1 marked the boundaries of these repressive chromatin domains in a cell-type specific manner.These genome wide data, changes in sites of protein occupancy, chromatin architecture, and related gene expression, support the hypothesis that CTCF and cohesinSA-1 have multiple roles in the regulation of gene expression during erythropoiesis including transcriptional regulation at gene promoters and maintenance of chromatin architecture. These data from primary human erythroid cells provide a resource for studies of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis.

  10. Structure-rheology relations in sodium caseinate containing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ruis, H.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The general aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate structure-rheologyrelations for dairy related products, focusing on model systems containing sodium caseinate. The acid inducedgelationof sodium caseinate, of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions, and the effect of shear on the structure formation was characterized. Special attention was given to the sol-gel transition point, which was defined by a frequency independent loss tangent. It was shown that the sol-gel transit...

  11. Sleep duration is associated with sperm chromatin integrity among young men in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Chen, Qing; Zou, Peng; Liu, Taixiu; Mo, Min; Yang, Huan; Zhou, Niya; Sun, Lei; Chen, Hongqiang; Ling, Xi; Peng, Kaige; Ao, Lin; Yang, Huifang; Cao, Jia; Cui, Zhihong

    2017-10-09

    This study explores whether sleep duration is associated with sperm chromatin integrity. To do so, we conducted a three-phase panel study of 796 male volunteers from colleges in Chongqing (China) from 2013 to 2015. Sleep duration was measured using a modified Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Sperm DNA integrity was examined via Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay and Comet assay. Setting 7-7.5 h day -1 of sleep duration as a reference, either longer or shorter sleep duration was associated negatively with high DNA stainability (HDS) (P = 0.009), which reflected the immaturity of sperm chromatin. The volunteers with > 9.0 h day -1 sleep and those with ≤ 6.5 h day -1 sleep had 40.7 and 30.3% lower HDS than did volunteers with 7-7.5 h day -1 sleep. No association was found between sleep duration and DNA fragmentation index or Comet assay parameters. This study suggests that sleep duration is associated with sperm chromatin integrity. Further studies are required to validate these findings and investigate the mechanism underlying this association. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.; Jé gu, Teddy; Latrasse, David; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Christ, Auré lie; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martí n D.

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Put your 3D glasses on: plant chromatin is on show

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez Granados, Natalia Yaneth; Ramirez Prado, Juan Sebastian; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Latrasse, David; Raynaud, Cé cile; Crespi, Martin; Ariel, Federico; Benhamed, Moussa

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the eukaryotic nucleus and its chromosomal conformation have emerged as important features in the complex network of mechanisms behind gene activity and genome connectivity dynamics, which can be evidenced in the regionalized chromosomal spatial distribution and the clustering of diverse genomic regions with similar expression patterns. The development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) techniques has permitted the elucidation of commonalities between the eukaryotic phyla, as well as important differences among them. The growing number of studies in the field performed in plants has shed light on the structural and regulatory features of these organisms. For instance, it has been proposed that plant chromatin can be arranged into different conformations such as Rabl, Rosette-like, and Bouquet, and that both short- and long-range chromatin interactions occur in Arabidopsis. In this review, we compile the current knowledge about chromosome architecture characteristics in plants, as well as the molecular events and elements (including long non-coding RNAs, histone and DNA modifications, chromatin remodeling complexes, and transcription factors) shaping the genome three-dimensional conformation. Furthermore, we discuss the developmental outputs of genome topology-mediated gene expression regulation. It is becoming increasingly clear that new tools and techniques with higher resolution need to be developed and implemented in Arabidopsis and other model plants in order to better understand chromosome architecture dynamics, from an integrative perspective with other fields of plant biology such as development, stress biology, and finally agriculture. © 2016 The Author 2016.

  14. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Majumder, Parijat [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Chakraborty, Payal [Bionivid Technology Pvt Ltd, Kasturi Nagar, Bangalore 560043 (India); Jana, Kuladip [Division of Molecular Medicine, Centre for Translational Animal Research, Bose Institute, P-1/12 C.I.T. Scheme VIIM, Kolkata 700054, West Bengal (India); Das, Chandrima, E-mail: chandrima.das@saha.ac.in [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India); Dasgupta, Dipak, E-mail: dipak.dasgupta@saha.ac.in [Biophysics & Structural Genomics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Block-AF, Sector-1, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-10

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression.

  15. Recognition of chromatin by the plant alkaloid, ellipticine as a dual binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Majumder, Parijat; Chakraborty, Payal; Jana, Kuladip; Das, Chandrima; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of core histone components of chromatin along with chromosomal DNA by a class of small molecule modulators is worth examining to evaluate their intracellular mode of action. A plant alkaloid ellipticine (ELP) which is a putative anticancer agent has so far been reported to function via DNA intercalation, association with topoisomerase II and binding to telomere region. However, its effect upon the potential intracellular target, chromatin is hitherto unreported. Here we have characterized the biomolecular recognition between ELP and different hierarchical levels of chromatin. The significant result is that in addition to DNA, it binds to core histone(s) and can be categorized as a ‘dual binder’. As a sequel to binding with histone(s) and core octamer, it alters post-translational histone acetylation marks. We have further demonstrated that it has the potential to modulate gene expression thereby regulating several key biological processes such as nuclear organization, transcription, translation and histone modifications. - Highlights: • Ellipticine acts a dual binder binding to both DNA and core histone(s). • It induces structural perturbations in chromatin, chromatosome and histone octamer. • It alters histones acetylation and affects global gene expression

  16. Put your 3D glasses on: plant chromatin is on show

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez Granados, Natalia Yaneth

    2016-04-30

    The three-dimensional organization of the eukaryotic nucleus and its chromosomal conformation have emerged as important features in the complex network of mechanisms behind gene activity and genome connectivity dynamics, which can be evidenced in the regionalized chromosomal spatial distribution and the clustering of diverse genomic regions with similar expression patterns. The development of chromatin conformation capture (3C) techniques has permitted the elucidation of commonalities between the eukaryotic phyla, as well as important differences among them. The growing number of studies in the field performed in plants has shed light on the structural and regulatory features of these organisms. For instance, it has been proposed that plant chromatin can be arranged into different conformations such as Rabl, Rosette-like, and Bouquet, and that both short- and long-range chromatin interactions occur in Arabidopsis. In this review, we compile the current knowledge about chromosome architecture characteristics in plants, as well as the molecular events and elements (including long non-coding RNAs, histone and DNA modifications, chromatin remodeling complexes, and transcription factors) shaping the genome three-dimensional conformation. Furthermore, we discuss the developmental outputs of genome topology-mediated gene expression regulation. It is becoming increasingly clear that new tools and techniques with higher resolution need to be developed and implemented in Arabidopsis and other model plants in order to better understand chromosome architecture dynamics, from an integrative perspective with other fields of plant biology such as development, stress biology, and finally agriculture. © 2016 The Author 2016.

  17. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Compact complex surfaces with geometric structures related to split quaternions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidov, Johann; Grantcharov, Gueo; Mushkarov, Oleg; Yotov, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    We study the problem of existence of geometric structures on compact complex surfaces that are related to split quaternions. These structures, called para-hypercomplex, para-hyperhermitian and para-hyperkähler, are analogs of the hypercomplex, hyperhermitian and hyperkähler structures in the definite case. We show that a compact 4-manifold carries a para-hyperkähler structure iff it has a metric of split signature together with two parallel, null, orthogonal, pointwise linearly independent vector fields. Every compact complex surface admitting a para-hyperhermitian structure has vanishing first Chern class and we show that, unlike the definite case, many of these surfaces carry infinite-dimensional families of such structures. We provide also compact examples of complex surfaces with para-hyperhermitian structures which are not locally conformally para-hyperkähler. Finally, we discuss the problem of non-existence of para-hyperhermitian structures on Inoue surfaces of type S 0 and provide a list of compact complex surfaces which could carry para-hypercomplex structures.

  19. A Method to Study the Epigenetic Chromatin States of Rare Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells; MiniChIP–Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishaupt Holger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic chromatin structure is a fundamental property of gene transcriptional regulation, and has emerged as a critical modulator of physiological processes during cellular differentiation and development. Analysis of chromatin structure using molecular biology and biochemical assays in rare somatic stem and progenitor cells is key for understanding these processes but poses a great challenge because of their reliance on millions of cells. Through the development of a miniaturized genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation method (miniChIP–chip, we have documented the genome-wide chromatin states of low abundant populations that comprise hematopoietic stem cells and immediate progeny residing in murine bone marrow. In this report, we describe the miniChIP methodology that can be used for increasing an understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Application of this method will reveal the contribution of dynamic chromatin structure in regulating the function of other somatic stem cell populations, and how this process becomes perturbed in pathological conditions. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  20. Composition-structure-property relation of oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Christian

    also increases such properties. Yet, these rules are not strictly followed even for the simplest binary oxide glasses, such as alkali silicates, borates and phosphates. In this thesis it is argued that the missing link between composition and properties is the glass structure. Structural models...... are proposed based on topological selection rules and experimentally verified. The relation between structure and properties is evaluated using topological constraint theory, which in its essence is a theory that quantifies the two intuitions of the glass scientist. The end result is a quantitative model...

  1. The mathematical structure of the approximate linear response relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we study the mathematical structures of the linear response relation based on Plefka's expansion and the cluster variation method in terms of the perturbation expansion, and we show how this linear response relation approximates the correlation functions of the specified system. Moreover, by comparing the perturbation expansions of the correlation functions estimated by the linear response relation based on these approximation methods with exact perturbative forms of the correlation functions, we are able to explain why the approximate techniques using the linear response relation work well

  2. Transcriptional and chromatin regulation during fasting – The genomic era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L.

    2015-01-01

    An elaborate metabolic response to fasting is orchestrated by the liver and is heavily reliant upon transcriptional regulation. In response to hormones (glucagon, glucocorticoids) many transcription factors (TFs) are activated and regulate various genes involved in metabolic pathways aimed at restoring homeostasis: gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and amino acid shuttling. We summarize the recent discoveries regarding fasting-related TFs with an emphasis on genome-wide binding patterns. Collectively, the summarized findings reveal a large degree of co-operation between TFs during fasting which occurs at motif-rich DNA sites bound by a combination of TFs. These new findings implicate transcriptional and chromatin regulation as major determinants of the response to fasting and unravels the complex, multi-TF nature of this response. PMID:26520657

  3. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor α target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. • FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. • Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ERα target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ERα target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ERα target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ERα-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators.

  4. Chromatin relaxation-mediated induction of p19INK4d increases the ability of cells to repair damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogara, María F; Sirkin, Pablo F; Carcagno, Abel L; Marazita, Mariela C; Sonzogni, Silvina V; Ceruti, Julieta M; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity is of main importance to the survival and health of organisms which are continuously exposed to genotoxic stress. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating survival pathways consisting of cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms. However, the signal that triggers the DNA damage response is not necessarily a direct detection of the primary DNA lesion. In fact, chromatin defects may serve as initiating signals to activate those mechanisms. If the modulation of chromatin structure could initiate a checkpoint response in a direct manner, this supposes the existence of specific chromatin sensors. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors, plays a crucial role in regulating genomic stability and cell viability by enhancing DNA repair. Its expression is induced in cells injured by one of several genotoxic treatments like cis-platin, UV light or neocarzinostatin. Nevertheless, when exogenous DNA damaged molecules are introduced into the cell, this induction is not observed. Here, we show that p19INK4d is enhanced after chromatin relaxation even in the absence of DNA damage. This induction was shown to depend upon ATM/ATR, Chk1/Chk2 and E2F activity, as is the case of p19INK4d induction by endogenous DNA damage. Interestingly, p19INK4d improves DNA repair when the genotoxic damage is caused in a relaxed-chromatin context. These results suggest that changes in chromatin structure, and not DNA damage itself, is the actual trigger of p19INK4d induction. We propose that, in addition to its role as a cell cycle inhibitor, p19INK4d could participate in a signaling network directed to detecting and eventually responding to chromatin anomalies.

  5. Chromatin relaxation-mediated induction of p19INK4d increases the ability of cells to repair damaged DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F Ogara

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genomic integrity is of main importance to the survival and health of organisms which are continuously exposed to genotoxic stress. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating survival pathways consisting of cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms. However, the signal that triggers the DNA damage response is not necessarily a direct detection of the primary DNA lesion. In fact, chromatin defects may serve as initiating signals to activate those mechanisms. If the modulation of chromatin structure could initiate a checkpoint response in a direct manner, this supposes the existence of specific chromatin sensors. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 cell cycle inhibitors, plays a crucial role in regulating genomic stability and cell viability by enhancing DNA repair. Its expression is induced in cells injured by one of several genotoxic treatments like cis-platin, UV light or neocarzinostatin. Nevertheless, when exogenous DNA damaged molecules are introduced into the cell, this induction is not observed. Here, we show that p19INK4d is enhanced after chromatin relaxation even in the absence of DNA damage. This induction was shown to depend upon ATM/ATR, Chk1/Chk2 and E2F activity, as is the case of p19INK4d induction by endogenous DNA damage. Interestingly, p19INK4d improves DNA repair when the genotoxic damage is caused in a relaxed-chromatin context. These results suggest that changes in chromatin structure, and not DNA damage itself, is the actual trigger of p19INK4d induction. We propose that, in addition to its role as a cell cycle inhibitor, p19INK4d could participate in a signaling network directed to detecting and eventually responding to chromatin anomalies.

  6. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor α target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwang Won

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. • FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. • Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ERα target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ERα target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ERα target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ERα-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators

  7. The structure of relation algebras generated by relativizations

    CERN Document Server

    Givant, Steven R

    1994-01-01

    The foundation for an algebraic theory of binary relations was laid by De Morgan, Peirce, and Schröder during the second half of the nineteenth century. Modern development of the subject as a theory of abstract algebras, called "relation algebras", was undertaken by Tarski and his students. This book aims to analyze the structure of relation algebras that are generated by relativized subalgebras. As examples of their potential for applications, the main results are used to establish representation theorems for classes of relation algebras and to prove existence and uniqueness theorems for simple closures (i.e., for minimal simple algebras containing a given family of relation algebras as relativized subalgebras). This book is well written and accessible to those who are not specialists in this area. In particular, it contains two introductory chapters on the arithmetic and the algebraic theory of relation algebras. This book is suitable for use in graduate courses on algebras of binary relations or algebraic...

  8. Homoeologous chromatin exchange in a radiation-induced gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, J.; Knott, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the ionizing-radiation-induced translocations between alien and wheat chromosomes show no deleterious effects and are transmitted normally through the pollen. Translocations of this type will be called ''compensating''. In one such compensating translocation, designated T4, it was found that chromatin in the long arm of wheat chromosome 7D was replaced with homoeologous chromatin of the Agropyron chromosome

  9. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using Drosophila tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Vuong; Gan, Qiang; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics remains a rapidly developing field that studies how the chromatin state contributes to differential gene expression in distinct cell types at different developmental stages. Epigenetic regulation contributes to a broad spectrum of biological processes, including cellular differentiation during embryonic development and homeostasis in adulthood. A critical strategy in epigenetic studies is to examine how various histone modifications and chromatin factors regulate gene expression. ...

  10. Homoeologous chromatin exchange in a radiation-induced gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J; Knott, D R [Department of Crop Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

    1977-03-01

    Some of the ionizing-radiation-induced translocations between alien and wheat chromosomes show no deleterious effects and are transmitted normally through the pollen. Translocations of this type will be called ''compensating''. In one such compensating translocation, designated T4, it was found that chromatin in the long arm of wheat chromosome 7D was replaced with homologous chromatin of the Agropyron chromosome.

  11. Integrity of Safety-Related Fast Reactor Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.T.; Tomkins, B.

    1981-01-01

    The LMFBR contains several structural items whose integrity must be safeguarded during the life of the plant. These items include the main core support structures (strongback, diagrid) and the primary tank to which these structures are attached. In order to demonstrate an acceptable level of structural integrity, the chosen design philosophy must be supported by both analytical and experimental evidence. This paper describes the current approaches in the UK to these requirements. Section 2 describes the materials mechanical properties tests performed to date on both fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth in Type 316 austenitic stainless steel plate and weldments. This data illustrates the problems in identifying the relevant materials fracture parameters for use in assessments. Section 3 shows the test programmes in hand to extend the materials programmes to tests on structural features (mainly welded wide plate tests) which incorporate the complexity of weldments in a structural context. This includes experimental evidence on the effects of local weld residual stresses on structural failure. Various routes are open for the integrity assessment of FR structures. These are discussed in Section 4 but in effect they reduce to a fracture mechanics approach using some technique to cope with elastic-plastic fracture. The main problems at present relate to our ability in analysis to cope with residual stresses and the post-initiation region of the fracture resistance curve. Also, there is the problem of initial defect sizing by current NDE techniques. Current conservative analytical assessments give acceptable defect sizes of order a few millimetres in irradiated weldments. Finally, Section 5 discusses the options open in design to cope with safety related structures under normal and abnormal loading conditions. It is clear that several options exist in design to satisfy the demand for high integrity

  12. Relativity, symmetry and the structure of quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Klink, William H; Schweiger, Wolfgang

    Quantum theory is one of the most successful of all physical theories. Our everyday world is dominated by devices that function because of knowledge of the quantum world. Yet many, physicists and non-physicists alike, find the theory which explains the behavior of the quantum world baffling and strange. This book is the first in a series of three that argues that relativity and symmetry determine the structure of quantum theory. That is to say, the structure of quantum theory is what it is because of relativity and symmetry. There are different types of relativity, each leading to a particular type of quantum theory. This book deals specifically with what we call Newton relativity, the form of relativity built into Newtonian mechanics, and the quantum theory to which it gives rise, which we call Galilean (often misleadingly called non-relativistic) quantum theory. Key Features: • Meaning and significance of the term of relativity; discussion of the principle of relativity. • Relation of symmetry to relati...

  13. The chromatin accessibility signature of human immune aging stems from CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Duygu; Márquez, Eladio J; Chung, Cheng-Han; Marches, Radu; Rossi, Robert J; Uyar, Asli; Wu, Te-Chia; George, Joshy; Stitzel, Michael L; Palucka, A Karolina; Kuchel, George A; Banchereau, Jacques

    2017-10-02

    Aging is linked to deficiencies in immune responses and increased systemic inflammation. To unravel the regulatory programs behind these changes, we applied systems immunology approaches and profiled chromatin accessibility and the transcriptome in PBMCs and purified monocytes, B cells, and T cells. Analysis of samples from 77 young and elderly donors revealed a novel and robust aging signature in PBMCs, with simultaneous systematic chromatin closing at promoters and enhancers associated with T cell signaling and a potentially stochastic chromatin opening mostly found at quiescent and repressed sites. Combined analyses of chromatin accessibility and the transcriptome uncovered immune molecules activated/inactivated with aging and identified the silencing of the IL7R gene and the IL-7 signaling pathway genes as potential biomarkers. This signature is borne by memory CD8 + T cells, which exhibited an aging-related loss in binding of NF-κB and STAT factors. Thus, our study provides a unique and comprehensive approach to identifying candidate biomarkers and provides mechanistic insights into aging-associated immunodeficiency. © 2017 Ucar et al.

  14. The relation between forest structure and soil burn severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain; Russell T. Graham; David S. Pilliod

    2006-01-01

    A study funded through National Fire Plan evaluates the relation between pre-wildfire forest structure and post-wildfire soil burn severity across three forest types: dry, moist, and cold forests. Over 73 wildfires were sampled in Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Colorado, and Utah, which burned between 2000 and 2003. Because of the study’s breadth, the results are applicable...

  15. Comparing Structural Brain Connectivity by the Infinite Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Herlau, Tue; Dyrby, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The growing focus in neuroimaging on analyzing brain connectivity calls for powerful and reliable statistical modeling tools. We examine the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) as a tool to identify and compare structure in brain connectivity graphs by contrasting its performance on graphs from...

  16. Structure-rheology relations in sodium caseinate containing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruis, H.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The general aim of the work described in this thesis was to investigate structure-rheologyrelations for dairy related products, focusing on model systems containing sodium caseinate. The acid inducedgelationof sodium caseinate, of sodium caseinate stabilized emulsions, and the effect of shear on the

  17. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  18. Sequence-specific targeting of dosage compensation in Drosophila favors an active chromatin context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artyom A Alekseyenko

    Full Text Available The Drosophila MSL complex mediates dosage compensation by increasing transcription of the single X chromosome in males approximately two-fold. This is accomplished through recognition of the X chromosome and subsequent acetylation of histone H4K16 on X-linked genes. Initial binding to the X is thought to occur at "entry sites" that contain a consensus sequence motif ("MSL recognition element" or MRE. However, this motif is only ∼2 fold enriched on X, and only a fraction of the motifs on X are initially targeted. Here we ask whether chromatin context could distinguish between utilized and non-utilized copies of the motif, by comparing their relative enrichment for histone modifications and chromosomal proteins mapped in the modENCODE project. Through a comparative analysis of the chromatin features in male S2 cells (which contain MSL complex and female Kc cells (which lack the complex, we find that the presence of active chromatin modifications, together with an elevated local GC content in the surrounding sequences, has strong predictive value for functional MSL entry sites, independent of MSL binding. We tested these sites for function in Kc cells by RNAi knockdown of Sxl, resulting in induction of MSL complex. We show that ectopic MSL expression in Kc cells leads to H4K16 acetylation around these sites and a relative increase in X chromosome transcription. Collectively, our results support a model in which a pre-existing active chromatin environment, coincident with H3K36me3, contributes to MSL entry site selection. The consequences of MSL targeting of the male X chromosome include increase in nucleosome lability, enrichment for H4K16 acetylation and JIL-1 kinase, and depletion of linker histone H1 on active X-linked genes. Our analysis can serve as a model for identifying chromatin and local sequence features that may contribute to selection of functional protein binding sites in the genome.

  19. Nanoscale changes in chromatin organization represent the initial steps of tumorigenesis: a transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Backman, Vadim; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Subramanian, Hariharan; White, Craig; Dela Cruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K; Goldberg, Michael J; Bianchi, Laura K; Roy, Hemant K

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear alterations are a well-known manifestation of cancer. However, little is known about the early, microscopically-undetectable stages of malignant transformation. Based on the phenomenon of field cancerization, the tissue in the field of a tumor can be used to identify and study the initiating events of carcinogenesis. Morphological changes in nuclear organization have been implicated in the field of colorectal cancer (CRC), and we hypothesize that characterization of chromatin alterations in the early stages of CRC will provide insight into cancer progression, as well as serve as a biomarker for early detection, risk stratification and prevention. For this study we used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of nuclei harboring pre-neoplastic CRC alterations in two models: a carcinogen-treated animal model of early CRC, and microscopically normal-appearing tissue in the field of human CRC. We quantify the chromatin arrangement using approaches with two levels of complexity: 1) binary, where chromatin is separated into areas of dense heterochromatin and loose euchromatin, and 2) grey-scale, where the statistics of continuous mass-density distribution within the nucleus is quantified by its spatial correlation function. We established an increase in heterochromatin content and clump size, as well as a loss of its characteristic peripheral positioning in microscopically normal pre-neoplastic cell nuclei. Additionally, the analysis of chromatin density showed that its spatial distribution is altered from a fractal to a stretched exponential. We characterize quantitatively and qualitatively the nanoscale structural alterations preceding cancer development, which may allow for the establishment of promising new biomarkers for cancer risk stratification and diagnosis. The findings of this study confirm that ultrastructural changes of chromatin in field carcinogenesis represent early neoplastic events leading to the development of well

  20. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G; Onuchic, José N

    2017-11-14

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  1. Lagrangian space consistency relation for large scale structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, Bart; Hui, Lam; Xiao, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Consistency relations, which relate the squeezed limit of an (N+1)-point correlation function to an N-point function, are non-perturbative symmetry statements that hold even if the associated high momentum modes are deep in the nonlinear regime and astrophysically complex. Recently, Kehagias and Riotto and Peloso and Pietroni discovered a consistency relation applicable to large scale structure. We show that this can be recast into a simple physical statement in Lagrangian space: that the squeezed correlation function (suitably normalized) vanishes. This holds regardless of whether the correlation observables are at the same time or not, and regardless of whether multiple-streaming is present. The simplicity of this statement suggests that an analytic understanding of large scale structure in the nonlinear regime may be particularly promising in Lagrangian space

  2. Comparative transmission genetics of introgressed chromatin in Gossypium (cotton) polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghmare, Vijay N; Rong, Junkang; Rogers, Carl J; Bowers, John E; Chee, Peng W; Gannaway, John R; Katageri, Ishwarappa; Paterson, Andrew H

    2016-04-01

    Introgression is widely acknowledged as a potential source of valuable genetic variation, and growing effort is being invested in analysis of interspecific crosses conferring transgressive variation. Experimental backcross populations provide an opportunity to study transmission genetics following interspecific hybridization, identifying opportunities and constraints to introgressive crop improvement. The evolutionary consequences of introgression have been addressed at the theoretical level, however, issues related to levels and patterns of introgression among (plant) species remain inadequately explored, including such factors as polyploidization, subgenome interaction inhabiting a common nucleus, and the genomic distribution and linkage relationships of introgressant alleles. We analyze introgression into the polyploid Gossypium hirsutum (upland cotton) from its sister G. tomentosum and compare the level and pattern with that of G. barbadense representing a different clade tracing to the same polyploidization. Across the genome, recurrent backcrossing to Gossypium hirsutum yielded only one-third of the expected average frequency of the G. tomentosum allele, although one unusual region showed preferential introgression. Although a similar rate of introgression is found in the two subgenomes of polyploid (AtDt) G. hirsutum, a preponderance of multilocus interactions were largely within the Dt subgenome. Skewed G. tomentosum chromatin transmission is polymorphic among two elite G. hirsutum genotypes, which suggests that genetic background may profoundly affect introgression of particular chromosomal regions. Only limited correspondence is found between G. hirsutum chromosomal regions that are intolerant to introgression from the two species, G. barbadense and G. tomentosum, concentrated near possible inversion polymorphisms. Complex transmission of introgressed chromatin highlights the challenges to utilization of exotic germplasm in crop improvement. © 2016

  3. Alternative epigenetic chromatin states of polycomb target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri B Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb (PcG regulation has been thought to produce stable long-term gene silencing. Genomic analyses in Drosophila and mammals, however, have shown that it targets many genes, which can switch state during development. Genetic evidence indicates that critical for the active state of PcG target genes are the histone methyltransferases Trithorax (TRX and ASH1. Here we analyze the repertoire of alternative states in which PcG target genes are found in different Drosophila cell lines and the role of PcG proteins TRX and ASH1 in controlling these states. Using extensive genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, RNAi knockdowns, and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that, in addition to the known repressed state, PcG targets can reside in a transcriptionally active state characterized by formation of an extended domain enriched in ASH1, the N-terminal, but not C-terminal moiety of TRX and H3K27ac. ASH1/TRX N-ter domains and transcription are not incompatible with repressive marks, sometimes resulting in a "balanced" state modulated by both repressors and activators. Often however, loss of PcG repression results instead in a "void" state, lacking transcription, H3K27ac, or binding of TRX or ASH1. We conclude that PcG repression is dynamic, not static, and that the propensity of a target gene to switch states depends on relative levels of PcG, TRX, and activators. N-ter TRX plays a remarkable role that antagonizes PcG repression and preempts H3K27 methylation by acetylation. This role is distinct from that usually attributed to TRX/MLL proteins at the promoter. These results have important implications for Polycomb gene regulation, the "bivalent" chromatin state of embryonic stem cells, and gene expression in development.

  4. Dislocations and related defects in niobium oxide structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J S; Hutchinson, J L; Lincoln, F J [Oxford Univ. (UK). Inorganic Chemistry Lab.

    1977-01-07

    Lattice images of the niobium oxides, structures based on the linkage of octahedral groups in continuous networks, occasionally contain features recognizable as dislocations. Since lattice imaging enables the microstructure to be resolved in greater detail, at the level of local structural organization, it is possible to determine the configuration, and also to infer the chemical composition, of dislocated areas. By treating the niobium oxide 'block' structures as superstructures of the ReO/sub 3/ (DO/sub 9/) type, the topology of dislocations can be expressed by relations between the insertion (or deletion) of one or more half-planes of cations, or of oxygen atoms only, changes in the number of crystallographic shear plane interfaces between blocks or columns, changes in (idealized) dimensions and any requisite distortion in the third dimension. Mapping the structure around a dislocation, from the lattice image, is directly equivalent to plotting the Burgers' circuit. In this way, the precise nature of a dislocating perturbation and its implications for the local chemical composition of the crystal can be directly identified. The method is exemplified by analysis of dislocations and of related extended defects of several types, associated with twinning phenomena, semicoherent intergrowth between different ReO/sub 3/-type superstructures and arrays building up a low angle boundary. The essential features of the analysis are not restricted to structures of the niobium oxide type, but can be extended to other types of polyhedron networks.

  5. Reliability of containment and safety-related structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nessim, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    A research program on Reliability of Containment and Safety-related Structures has been developed and is described in this document. This program is designed to support AECB's regulatory activities aimed at ensuring the safety of these structures. These activities include evaluating submissions by operators and requesting special assessments when necessary. The results of the proposed research will also be useful in revising and enhancing the CSA design standards for containment and safety-related structures. The process of developing the research program started with an information collection and review phase. The sources of information included C-FER's previous work in the area, various recent research publications, regulatory documents and relevant design standards, and a detailed discussion with AECB staff. The second step was to outline the process of reliability evaluation, and identify the required models and parameters. Comparison between the required and available information was used to identify gaps in the state-of-the-art, and the research program was designed to fill these gaps. The program is organized in four major topics, namely: development of an approach for reliability analysis; compilation and development of the required analysis tools; application to specific problems related to design, assessment, maintenance and testing of structures; and testing and validation. It is suggested that the program should be supported by an on-going process of communication and consultation between AECB staff and industry experts. This will lend credibility to the results and facilitate their future application. (author). 1 fig

  6. Graphite structure and its relation to mechanical engineering design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.; Kelly, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    The inhomogeneous nature of polycrystalline graphite requires property measurements to be made over dimensions large enough to average the local variations in the structure. This is particularly true for mechanical integrity, and experimental data are presented which illustrate the importance of the real aggregate structure of graphite and the difficulties of interpreting strength data from different tests. The classical statistical treatments do not hold generally, and the problem of defining a failure criterion for graphite is discussed. It is suggested that the stress conditions in graphite components might be classified in terms of the dimensions and stress gradients related to the characteristic flaw size of the material as determined experimentally. (author)

  7. UbSRD: The Ubiquitin Structural Relational Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph S; Jacobs, Tim M; Houlihan, Kevin; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-02-22

    The structurally defined ubiquitin-like homology fold (UBL) can engage in several unique protein-protein interactions and many of these complexes have been characterized with high-resolution techniques. Using Rosetta's structural classification tools, we have created the Ubiquitin Structural Relational Database (UbSRD), an SQL database of features for all 509 UBL-containing structures in the PDB, allowing users to browse these structures by protein-protein interaction and providing a platform for quantitative analysis of structural features. We used UbSRD to define the recognition features of ubiquitin (UBQ) and SUMO observed in the PDB and the orientation of the UBQ tail while interacting with certain types of proteins. While some of the interaction surfaces on UBQ and SUMO overlap, each molecule has distinct features that aid in molecular discrimination. Additionally, we find that the UBQ tail is malleable and can adopt a variety of conformations upon binding. UbSRD is accessible as an online resource at rosettadesign.med.unc.edu/ubsrd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neutron activation analysis of antimony in chromatin and nucleoids of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, H.A.; Topaloglou, A.; Altmann, H.

    1988-02-01

    Antimony seems to be cancerogenic in men. In the present investigations we tried to find out if Sb +++ are also bound to the cell nucleus. HeLa cells were incubated with SbCl 3 and after a 18 h incubation time cells were lysed and crude chromatin isolated. In this preparation Sb was determined by neutron activation analysis. From the same cell culture nucleoids were prepared by ultracentrifugation and also Sb detected in these structures. 12 refs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. Organisation de la chromatine et signalisation par les oestrogènes

    OpenAIRE

    Quintin , Justine

    2013-01-01

    A given cell has to be able to adapt its fate and homeostasis in response to endogenous and exogenous signals. This adaptation occurs through finely tuned regulations of genes' expressions leading to the variation of their transcriptomes. Multiple parameters have to be integrated in order to provide such mechanisms of regulation. First, the primary sequence of the genome and its organization into chromatin are major regulatory components that harbor genetic, structural and epigenetic informat...

  10. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Máthé, Csaba; Mikóné Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studi...

  11. Rapid and reversible epigenome editing by endogenous chromatin regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Simon M G; Kirkland, Jacob G; Chory, Emma J; Husmann, Dylan; Calarco, Joseph P; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2017-09-15

    Understanding the causal link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation remains a central question in chromatin biology. To edit the epigenome we developed the FIRE-Cas9 system for rapid and reversible recruitment of endogenous chromatin regulators to specific genomic loci. We enhanced the dCas9-MS2 anchor for genome targeting with Fkbp/Frb dimerizing fusion proteins to allow chemical-induced proximity of a desired chromatin regulator. We find that mSWI/SNF (BAF) complex recruitment is sufficient to oppose Polycomb within minutes, leading to activation of bivalent gene transcription in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, Hp1/Suv39h1 heterochromatin complex recruitment to active promoters deposits H3K9me3 domains, resulting in gene silencing that can be reversed upon washout of the chemical dimerizer. This inducible recruitment strategy provides precise kinetic information to model epigenetic memory and plasticity. It is broadly applicable to mechanistic studies of chromatin in mammalian cells and is particularly suited to the analysis of endogenous multi-subunit chromatin regulator complexes.Understanding the link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation requires the development of new tools to directly manipulate chromatin. Here the authors demonstrate a Cas9-based system to recruit chromatin remodelers to loci of interest, allowing rapid, reversible manipulation of epigenetic states.

  12. Chromatin decondensed by acetylation shows an elevated radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nackerdien, Z.; Michie, J.; Boehm, L.

    1989-01-01

    V-79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts exposed to 5 mM n-sodium butyrate were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays and cell survival was determined by the cell colony assay. In a separate set of experiments the acetylated chromatin obtained from these cells was irradiated and the change of molecular weight of the DNA was evaluated by alkaline sucrose density centrifugation. At a survival level of 10(-2) to 10(-4) cells exposed to butyrate were found to be 1.3-1.4 times more radiosensitive than control cells. Exposure of isolated chromatin to 100 Gy of 60Co gamma irradiation generated 0.9 +/- 0.03 single-strand breaks (ssb) per 10 Gy per 10(8) Da and 2.0 +/- 0.3 ssb/10 Gy/10(8) Da for control and acetylated chromatin, respectively. The elevated radiation sensitivity of chromatin relaxed by acetylation is in good agreement with previous results on chromatin expanded by histone H1 depletion. Packing and accessibility of DNA in chromatin appear to be major factors which influence the radiation sensitivity. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of chromatin in various packing states is discussed in light of the variation of radiation sensitivity of whole cells in the cell cycle which incorporates repair

  13. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  14. The Gd14Ag51 structure type and its relation to some complex amalgam structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambornino, Frank; Sappl, Jonathan; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The Gd 14 Ag 51 structure type has been revisited on the basis of single crystal diffraction data. • Symmetry analysis from electron density and TEM shows the space group P6/m to be true. • Gd 14 Ag 51 shows good metallic behaviour. • Structure relations to alkali, alkaline-earth and rare-earth metal amalgams can be established. • Complexity values for the RE 14 Ag 51 structure family were calculated. - Abstract: A plethora of binary and ternary intermetallic compounds has been assigned to the Gd 14 Ag 51 structure type, crystallising in the hexagonal system (space group P6/m, a = 1264.30(18) pm, c = 933.58(11) pm for Gd 14 Ag 51 ). Starting in the late 1960s, much work has been invested in the structural elucidation of these crystal structures. However, reliable single crystal data are scarce, and most structure type assignments have been performed merely on the basis of powder data. We have redetermined four representatives of the binary RE 14 Ag 51 structure type (RE = Y, Ce, Gd, Tb) with modern high-precision single crystal X-ray methods. The assignment of the Gd 14 Ag 51 structure type to space group P6/m was additionally verified by careful analysis of high resolution transmission electron micrographs. We emphasise the close relation of the Gd 14 Ag 51 structure type to the structures of some recently described amalgams of similar composition focussing on disorder phenomena and structural complexity. Furthermore, we provide detailed information on synthesis as well as electrical and magnetic properties for Gd 14 Ag 51 , the parent compound of this structure family

  15. Processing of DNA double strand breaks by alternative non-homologous end-joining in hyperacetylated chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manova, Vasilissa; Singh, Satyendra K; Iliakis, George

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian cells employ at least two subpathways of non-homologous end-joining for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks: The canonical DNA-PK-dependent form of non-homologous end-joining (D-NHEJ) and an alternative, slowly operating, error-prone backup pathway (B-NHEJ). In contrast to D-NHEJ, which operates with similar efficiency throughout the cell cycle, B-NHEJ operates more efficiently in G2-phase. Notably, B-NHEJ also shows strong and as of yet unexplained dependency on growth activity and is markedly compromised in serum-deprived cells, or in cells that enter the plateau-phase of growth. The molecular mechanisms underpinning this response remain unknown. Since chromatin structure or changes in chromatin structure are prime candidate-B-NHEJ-modulators, we study here the role of chromatin hyperacetylation, either by HDAC2 knockdown or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor TSA, on the repair by B-NHEJ of IR-induced DSBs. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC2 fails to provoke histone hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs and has no detectable effect on B-NHEJ function. Treatment with TSA that inhibits multiple HDACs causes efficient, reversible chromatin hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs, as well as in human HCT116 Lig4-/- cells and the human glioma cell line M059K. The IR yield of DSBs in TSA-treated cells remains similar to that of untreated cells despite the expected chromatin relaxation. In addition, chromatin hyperacetylation leaves unchanged repair of DSBs by B-NHEJ in irradiated exponentially growing, or plateau-phase cells. Notably, under the experimental conditions employed here, chromatin hyperacetylation fails to detectably modulate B-NHEJ in M059K cells as well. In summary, the results show that chromatin acetylation or deacetylation does not affect the kinetics of alternative NHEJ in all types of cells examined both in exponentially growing and serum deprived cultures. We conclude that parameters beyond chromatin acetylation determine B

  16. Analysis of DNA replication associated chromatin decondensation: in vivo assay for understanding chromatin remodeling mechanisms of selected proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysov, Sergiy; Bryant, Victoria L; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Of critical importance to many of the events underlying transcriptional control of gene expression are modifications to core and linker histones that regulate the accessibility of trans-acting factors to the DNA substrate within the context of chromatin. Likewise, control over the initiation of DNA replication, as well as the ability of the replication machinery to proceed during elongation through the multiple levels of chromatin condensation that are likely to be encountered, is known to involve the creation of chromatin accessibility. In the latter case, chromatin access will likely need to be a transient event so as to prevent total genomic unraveling of the chromatin that would be deleterious to cells. While there are many molecular and biochemical approaches in use to study histone changes and their relationship to transcription and chromatin accessibility, few techniques exist that allow a molecular dissection of the events underlying DNA replication control as it pertains to chromatin changes and accessibility. Here, we outline a novel experimental strategy for addressing the ability of specific proteins to induce large-scale chromatin unfolding (decondensation) in vivo upon site-specific targeting to an engineered locus. Our laboratory has used this powerful system in novel ways to directly address the ability of DNA replication proteins to create chromatin accessibility, and have incorporated modifications to the basic approach that allow for a molecular genetic analysis of the mechanisms and associated factors involved in causing chromatin decondensation by a protein of interest. Alternative approaches involving co-expression of other proteins (competitors or stimulators), concurrent drug treatments, and analysis of co-localizing histone modifications are also addressed, all of which are illustrative of the utility of this experimental system for extending basic findings to physiologically relevant mechanisms. Although used by our group to analyze

  17. Relation between rheological and structural properties of suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcal, M; Sebor, G; Volsicky, Z

    1982-01-01

    The paper discusses results of investigations into separation processes for coal and kaolin suspensions. Effects of potassium chlorides and methanol additives on electrostatic potential of solid particles and on sedimentation rate are analyzed. Investigation results are shown in 5 diagrams. The relation between rheological and structural properties of coal and clay suspensions is investigated. Investigations show that the non-Newtonian behavior of suspensions cannot be attributed exclusively to the electrostatic and mechanical action of the solid phase particles. It is also caused by structure of the liquid phase, particularly on the surface of the solid particles, which depends mostly on hydrogen bonds. The internal structure of the liquid phase influences differential viscosity much more than the electrical surface properties of the solid phase. Bonds between the molecules of water and methanol are much stronger than bonds between water molecules alone. (9 refs.)

  18. Water relations, thallus structure and photosynthesis in Negev Desert lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, R. J. Jr; Friedmann, E. I.

    1990-01-01

    The role of lichen thallus structure in water relations and photosynthesis was studied in Ramalina maciformis (Del.) Bory and Teloschistes lacunosus (Rupr.) Sav. Water-vapour adsorption and photosynthesis are dependent upon thallus integrity and are significantly lower in crushed thalli. Cultured phycobiont (Trebouxia sp.) cells are capable of photosynthesis over the same relative humidity range (> 80% RH) as are intact lichens. Thus, water-vapour adsorption by the thallus and physiological adaptation of the phycobiont contribute to the ability of these lichens to photosynthesize in an arid environment. Despite differences in their anatomical structure and water-uptake characteristics, their CO2 incorporation is similar. The two lichens use liquid water differently and they occupy different niches.

  19. Nonlocal thermoelectric symmetry relations in ferromagnet-superconductor proximity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machon, Peter; Belzig, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Eschrig, Matthias [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Department of Physics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham Hill, EGHAM, TW20 0EX (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The symmetries of thermal and electric transport coefficients in quantum coherent structures are related to fundamental thermodynamic principles by the Onsager reciprocity. We generalize Onsager's symmetry relation to nonlocal thermoelectric currents in a three terminal ferromagnet-superconductor heterostructure including spin-dependent crossed Andreev reflection and direct electron transfer processes. We proof this general symmetry by applying spin-dependent boundary conditions for quasi-classical Green's functions in both the clean and the dirty limit. We predict an anomalously large local thermopower and a nonlocal Seebeck effect, which can be explained by the spin-dependent spectral properties.

  20. Chemical and physical structures of proteinoids and related polyamino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Hajime; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Nomoto, Shinya

    Studies of polyamino acid formation pathways in the prebiotic condition are important for the study of the origins of life. Several pathways of prebiotic polyamino acid formation have been reported. Heating of monoammonium malate [1] and heating of amino acids in molten urea [2] are important pathways of the prebiotic peptide formation. The former case, globular structure called proteinoid microsphere is formed in aqueous conditions. The later case, polyamino acids are formed from unrestricted amino acid species. Heating of aqueous aspargine is also interesting pathway for the prebiotic polyamino acid formation, because polyamino acid formation proceeds in aqueous condition [3]. In this study, we analyzed the chemical structure of the proteinoids and related polyamino acids formed in the above three pathways using with mass spectrometer. In addition, their physical structures are analyzed by the electron and optical microscopes, in order to determine the self-organization abilities. We discuss the relation between the chemical and the physical structures for the origins of life. References [1] Harada, K., J. Org. Chem., 24, 1662 (1959), Fox, S. W., Harada, K., and Kendrick, J., Science, 129, 1221 (1959). [2] Terasaki, M., Nomoto, S., Mita, H., and Shimoyama, A., Chem. Lett., 480 (2002), Mita, H., Nomoto, S., Terasaki, M., Shimoyama, A., and Yamamoto, Y., Int. J. Astrobiol., 4, 145 (2005). [3] Kovacs, K and Nagy, H., Nature, 190, 531 (1961), Munegumi, T., Tanikawa, N., Mita, H. and Harada, K., Viva Origino, 22, 109 (1994).

  1. Chromatin regulation at the frontier of synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Albert J.; Joung, J. Keith; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Collins, James J.

    2016-01-01

    As synthetic biology approaches are extended to diverse applications throughout medicine, biotechnology and basic biological research, there is an increasing need to engineer yeast, plant and mammalian cells. Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by the diverse biochemical and biophysical states of chromatin, which brings distinct challenges, as well as opportunities, over applications in bacteria. Recent synthetic approaches, including `epigenome editing', have allowed the direct and functional dissection of many aspects of physiological chromatin regulation. These studies lay the foundation for biomedical and biotechnological engineering applications that could take advantage of the unique combinatorial and spatiotemporal layers of chromatin regulation to create synthetic systems of unprecedented sophistication. PMID:25668787

  2. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty

    2015-01-01

    dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO......-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4....

  3. DNA packing in chromatine, a manifestation of the Bonnet transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Z; Lidin, S

    1988-08-01

    The packing of DNA is described using the formalism of differential geometry. Winding of the DNA double helix around the histone 2-5 octamer forming a nucleosome and the condensation of the so-formed bead-on-a-string chromatine aided by histone 1 is interpreted as two consecutive isometric, i.e. Bonnet, transformations. The DNA double helix can be approximated to a helicoid which can be transformed isometrically to a catenoid, an approximation of the nucleosome. Owing to the organization of the histone octamer the extended chromatine takes a helicoidal shape allowing a second Bonnet transformation to consummate the condensation into a chromatine fibre.

  4. Mechanism of chromatin degradation in thymocytes of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotova, R.N.; Umanskij, S.R.; Tokarskaya, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    A biphase change in poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity of the thymocyte chromatin was observed after 10 Gy irradiation of rats: during the first minutes the incorporation of 14 C-NAD increased by 40% then started decreasing to make 110, 60 and 35% after 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively. Irradiation of rat thymus chromatin in vitro sharply decreased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. The possible role of changes in the poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis in the activation of nuclear Ca/Mg-dependent endonuclease and in the postirradiation degradation of the thymocyte chromatin is discussed

  5. X-ray microanalysis of chromatin-bound period 4 metals in Glenodinium foliaceum: A binucleate dinoflagellate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigee, D.C.; Kearns, L.P.

    1981-01-01

    Each vegetative cell of the dinoflagellate Glenodinium foliaceum possesses two distinct types of nucleus, both of which have high levels of chromatinbound Period 4 (Periodic Table) metal elements. The typical dinoflagellate (dinocaryotic) nucleus has chromatin which differs from the atypical (supernumerary) nucleus in its high degree of condensation and in the related high levels of P, Ca, and Transition metals Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn. The complete absence of detectable Fe and Ni in the supernumerary chromatin represents a major difference which may relate to differences in phyllogenetic origin of the two nuclei. The two types of chromatin show close similarities a the molecular level, including the possession of 40 atoms of Period 4 elements per 100 atoms of P-of which approximately half are Ca atoms, and half Transition metals. In both cases, the levels of Ca and Zn show a high correlation with the level of P, suggesting a direct association of these particular metal atoms with nucleic acid phosphate groups. The close similarity in metal binding at the molecular level suggests that the association of Period 4 elements with the two types of chromatin is unrelated to any differences in chromatin proteins-such as the presence or absence of histones. (author)

  6. Combgap Promotes Ovarian Niche Development and Chromatin Association of EcR-Binding Regions in BR-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitrik, Anna; Popliker, Malka; Gancz, Dana; Mukamel, Zohar; Lifshitz, Aviezer; Schwartzman, Omer; Tanay, Amos; Gilboa, Lilach

    2016-11-01

    The development of niches for tissue-specific stem cells is an important aspect of stem cell biology. Determination of niche size and niche numbers during organogenesis involves precise control of gene expression. How this is achieved in the context of a complex chromatin landscape is largely unknown. Here we show that the nuclear protein Combgap (Cg) supports correct ovarian niche formation in Drosophila by controlling ecdysone-Receptor (EcR)- mediated transcription and long-range chromatin contacts in the broad locus (BR-C). Both cg and BR-C promote ovarian growth and the development of niches for germ line stem cells. BR-C levels were lower when Combgap was either reduced or over-expressed, indicating an intricate regulation of the BR-C locus by Combgap. Polytene chromosome stains showed that Cg co-localizes with EcR, the major regulator of BR-C, at the BR-C locus and that EcR binding to chromatin was sensitive to changes in Cg levels. Proximity ligation assay indicated that the two proteins could reside in the same complex. Finally, chromatin conformation analysis revealed that EcR-bound regions within BR-C, which span ~30 KBs, contacted each other. Significantly, these contacts were stabilized in an ecdysone- and Combgap-dependent manner. Together, these results highlight Combgap as a novel regulator of chromatin structure that promotes transcription of ecdysone target genes and ovarian niche formation.

  7. The Chromatin Remodeler BPTF Activates a Stemness Gene-Expression Program Essential for the Maintenance of Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bowen; Cai, Ling; Butler, Jason M; Chen, Dongliang; Lu, Xiongdong; Allison, David F; Lu, Rui; Rafii, Shahin; Parker, Joel S; Zheng, Deyou; Wang, Gang Greg

    2018-03-13

    Self-renewal and differentiation of adult stem cells are tightly regulated partly through configuration of chromatin structure by chromatin remodelers. Using knockout mice, we here demonstrate that bromodomain PHD finger transcription factor (BPTF), a component of the nucleosome remodeling factor (NURF) chromatin-remodeling complex, is essential for maintaining the population size of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), including long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Bptf-deficient HSCs are defective in reconstituted hematopoiesis, and hematopoietic-specific knockout of Bptf caused profound defects including bone marrow failure and anemia. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that BPTF loss caused downregulation of HSC-specific gene-expression programs, which contain several master transcription factors (Meis1, Pbx1, Mn1, and Lmo2) required for HSC maintenance and self-renewal. Furthermore, we show that BPTF potentiates the chromatin accessibility of key HSC "stemness" genes. These results demonstrate an essential requirement of the chromatin remodeler BPTF and NURF for activation of "stemness" gene-expression programs and proper function of adult HSCs. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abstract numeric relations and the visual structure of algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, David; Brookes, David; Smout, Ryan

    2014-09-01

    Formal algebras are among the most powerful and general mechanisms for expressing quantitative relational statements; yet, even university engineering students, who are relatively proficient with algebraic manipulation, struggle with and often fail to correctly deploy basic aspects of algebraic notation (Clement, 1982). In the cognitive tradition, it has often been assumed that skilled users of these formalisms treat situations in terms of semantic properties encoded in an abstract syntax that governs the use of notation without particular regard to the details of the physical structure of the equation itself (Anderson, 2005; Hegarty, Mayer, & Monk, 1995). We explore how the notational structure of verbal descriptions or algebraic equations (e.g., the spatial proximity of certain words or the visual alignment of numbers and symbols in an equation) plays a role in the process of interpreting or constructing symbolic equations. We propose in particular that construction processes involve an alignment of notational structures across representation systems, biasing reasoners toward the selection of formal notations that maintain the visuospatial structure of source representations. For example, in the statement "There are 5 elephants for every 3 rhinoceroses," the spatial proximity of 5 and elephants and 3 and rhinoceroses will bias reasoners to write the incorrect expression 5E = 3R, because that expression maintains the spatial relationships encoded in the source representation. In 3 experiments, participants constructed equations with given structure, based on story problems with a variety of phrasings. We demonstrate how the notational alignment approach accounts naturally for a variety of previously reported phenomena in equation construction and successfully predicts error patterns that are not accounted for by prior explanations, such as the left to right transcription heuristic.

  9. Elucidation of Operon Structures across Closely Related Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components. PMID:24959722

  10. The Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Shifts Nucleosomal DNA Bidirectionally as a Monomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Yupeng; Levendosky, Robert F.; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D.; Myong, Sua

    2017-10-01

    Chromatin remodelers catalyze dynamic packaging of the genome by carrying out nucleosome assembly/disassembly, histone exchange, and nucleosome repositioning. Remodeling results in evenly spaced nucleosomes, which requires probing both sides of the nucleosome, yet the way remodelers organize sliding activity to achieve this task is not understood. Here, we show that the monomeric Chd1 remodeler shifts DNA back and forth by dynamically alternating between different segments of the nucleosome. During sliding, Chd1 generates unstable remodeling intermediates that spontaneously relax to a pre-remodeled position. We demonstrate that nucleosome sliding is tightly controlled by two regulatory domains: the DNA-binding domain, which interferes with sliding when its range is limited by a truncated linking segment, and the chromodomains, which play a key role in substrate discrimination. We propose that active interplay of the ATPase motor with the regulatory domains may promote dynamic nucleosome structures uniquely suited for histone exchange and chromatin reorganization during transcription.

  11. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Ko, E-mail: etoko@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Sonoda, Yoshiyuki [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Jin, Yuji [School of Basic Medicine, Jilin Medical College, Jilin 132013 (China); Abe, Shin-ichi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  12. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  13. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  14. histone H3 predominantly mark the pericentromeric chromatin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANTOSH KUMAR SHARMA

    pericentromeric chromatin during mitosis in monokinetic plants. J. Genet. .... bigger), cytological preparations (easy to difficult) as well as their habitat ... Poaceae. Monocot. Land. 14. Triticum aestivum. Common wheat. Poaceae. Monocot. Land.

  15. Aberrant Chromatin Modification as a Mechanism of Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hongwu

    2004-01-01

    .... However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that aberrant chromatin modification plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression...

  16. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites

  17. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophorou, Maria A; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune...... and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel...... PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic...

  18. histone H3 predominantly mark the pericentromeric chromatin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANTOSH KUMAR SHARMA

    packaging of eukaryotic DNA in nucleoprotein complex known as .... The plant material used in the present study has ... materials (root tips/flower buds) were fixed in PHEMES ..... fications that mark active chromatin, while there are no data.

  19. Multiclassifier combinatorial proteomics of organelle shadows at the example of mitochondria in chromatin data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustatscher, Georg; Grabowski, Piotr; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-02-01

    Subcellular localization is an important aspect of protein function, but the protein composition of many intracellular compartments is poorly characterized. For example, many nuclear bodies are challenging to isolate biochemically and thus remain inaccessible to proteomics. Here, we explore covariation in proteomics data as an alternative route to subcellular proteomes. Rather than targeting a structure of interest biochemically, we target it by machine learning. This becomes possible by taking data obtained for one organelle and searching it for traces of another organelle. As an extreme example and proof-of-concept we predict mitochondrial proteins based on their covariation in published interphase chromatin data. We detect about ⅓ of the known mitochondrial proteins in our chromatin data, presumably most as contaminants. However, these proteins are not present at random. We show covariation of mitochondrial proteins in chromatin proteomics data. We then exploit this covariation by multiclassifier combinatorial proteomics to define a list of mitochondrial proteins. This list agrees well with different databases on mitochondrial composition. This benchmark test raises the possibility that, in principle, covariation proteomics may also be applicable to structures for which no biochemical isolation procedures are available. © 2015 The Authors. Proteomics Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Dual mechanism of chromatin remodeling in the common shrew sex trivalent (XY 1Y 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Matveevsky

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we focus on the XY1Y2 condition in male common shrew Sorex araneus Linnaeus, 1758, applying electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry for a comprehensive analysis of structure, synapsis and behaviour of the sex trivalent in pachytene spermatocytes. The pachytene sex trivalent consists of three distinct parts: short and long synaptic SC fragments (between the X and Y1 and between the X and Y2, respectively and a long asynaptic region of the X in-between. Chromatin inactivation was revealed in the XY1 synaptic region, the asynaptic region of the X and a very small asynaptic part of the Y2. This inactive part of the sex trivalent, that we named the ‘head’, forms a typical sex body and is located at the periphery of the meiotic nucleus at mid pachytene. The second part or ‘tail’, a long region of synapsis between the X and Y2 chromosomes, is directed from the periphery into the nucleus. Based on the distribution patterns of four proteins involved in chromatin inactivation, we propose a model of meiotic silencing in shrew sex chromosomes. Thus, we conclude that pachytene sex chromosomes are structurally and functionally two different chromatin domains with specific nuclear topology: the peripheral inactivated ‘true’ sex chromosome regions (part of the X and the Y1 and more centrally located transcriptionally active autosomal segments (part of the X and the Y2.

  1. Sedimentation Velocity Analysis of Large Oligomeric Chromatin Complexes Using Interference Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Ryan A; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity experiments measure the transport of molecules in solution under centrifugal force. Here, we describe a method for monitoring the sedimentation of very large biological molecular assemblies using the interference optical systems of the analytical ultracentrifuge. The mass, partial-specific volume, and shape of macromolecules in solution affect their sedimentation rates as reflected in the sedimentation coefficient. The sedimentation coefficient is obtained by measuring the solute concentration as a function of radial distance during centrifugation. Monitoring the concentration can be accomplished using interference optics, absorbance optics, or the fluorescence detection system, each with inherent advantages. The interference optical system captures data much faster than these other optical systems, allowing for sedimentation velocity analysis of extremely large macromolecular complexes that sediment rapidly at very low rotor speeds. Supramolecular oligomeric complexes produced by self-association of 12-mer chromatin fibers are used to illustrate the advantages of the interference optics. Using interference optics, we show that chromatin fibers self-associate at physiological divalent salt concentrations to form structures that sediment between 10,000 and 350,000S. The method for characterizing chromatin oligomers described in this chapter will be generally useful for characterization of any biological structures that are too large to be studied by the absorbance optical system. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytogenetic abnormality in man, wider implications of theories of sex chromatin origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILES, C P

    1962-01-01

    Female nuclei may be identified by means of sex chromatin. In general the number of sex chromatin bodies is one less than the number of X chromosomes. An exception to this rule is a case of sex chromatin-positive XO Turner's syndrome. This case suggests the possibility of sex chromatin-positive XY males, and it may be evidence for chromosomal differentiation.

  3. Composition-Structure-Property Relations of Compressed Borosilicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Mouritz N.; Bechgaard, Tobias K.; Fuglsang, Søren D.; Pedersen, Rune H.; Tjell, Anders Ø.; Østergaard, Martin B.; Youngman, Randall E.; Mauro, John C.; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Bockowski, Michal; Smedskjaer, Morten M.

    2014-08-01

    Hot isostatic compression is an interesting method for modifying the structure and properties of bulk inorganic glasses. However, the structural and topological origins of the pressure-induced changes in macroscopic properties are not yet well understood. In this study, we report on the pressure and composition dependences of density and micromechanical properties (hardness, crack resistance, and brittleness) of five soda-lime borosilicate glasses with constant modifier content, covering the extremes from Na-Ca borate to Na-Ca silicate end members. Compression experiments are performed at pressures ≤1.0 GPa at the glass transition temperature in order to allow processing of large samples with relevance for industrial applications. In line with previous reports, we find an increasing fraction of tetrahedral boron, density, and hardness but a decreasing crack resistance and brittleness upon isostatic compression. Interestingly, a strong linear correlation between plastic (irreversible) compressibility and initial trigonal boron content is demonstrated, as the trigonal boron units are the ones most disposed for structural and topological rearrangements upon network compaction. A linear correlation is also found between plastic compressibility and the relative change in hardness with pressure, which could indicate that the overall network densification is responsible for the increase in hardness. Finally, we find that the micromechanical properties exhibit significantly different composition dependences before and after pressurization. The findings have important implications for tailoring microscopic and macroscopic structures of glassy materials and thus their properties through the hot isostatic compression method.

  4. Quantifying the contribution of chromatin dynamics to stochastic gene expression reveals long, locus-dependent periods between transcriptional bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñuelas, José; Kaneko, Gaël; Coulon, Antoine; Vallin, Elodie; Morin, Valérie; Mejia-Pous, Camila; Kupiec, Jean-Jacques; Beslon, Guillaume; Gandrillon, Olivier

    2013-02-25

    A number of studies have established that stochasticity in gene expression may play an important role in many biological phenomena. This therefore calls for further investigations to identify the molecular mechanisms at stake, in order to understand and manipulate cell-to-cell variability. In this work, we explored the role played by chromatin dynamics in the regulation of stochastic gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this purpose, we generated isogenic chicken-cell populations expressing a fluorescent reporter integrated in one copy per clone. Although the clones differed only in the genetic locus at which the reporter was inserted, they showed markedly different fluorescence distributions, revealing different levels of stochastic gene expression. Use of chromatin-modifying agents showed that direct manipulation of chromatin dynamics had a marked effect on the extent of stochastic gene expression. To better understand the molecular mechanism involved in these phenomena, we fitted these data to a two-state model describing the opening/closing process of the chromatin. We found that the differences between clones seemed to be due mainly to the duration of the closed state, and that the agents we used mainly seem to act on the opening probability. In this study, we report biological experiments combined with computational modeling, highlighting the importance of chromatin dynamics in stochastic gene expression. This work sheds a new light on the mechanisms of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells, and argues in favor of relatively slow dynamics with long (hours to days) periods of quiet state.

  5. Mechanism of chromatin degradation in thymocytes of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonova, L.V.; Nelipovich, P.A.; Umanskij, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Chromatin digestion in isolated thymocyte nuclei with DNAase I, micrococcal nuclease and nuclease from Serratia marcescens was studied. It was shown that 3 h after irradiation (10 Gy), the kinetics of accumulation of acid soluble and salt soluble products of DNA degradation, caused by exogenous nucleases, remains unchanged. The administration of cycloheximide does not influence the sensitivity of chromatin to DNAase I and somewhat increases the rate of salt soluble products formation upon the nuclease from S, marcescens treatment

  6. Transcription instability in high-risk neuroblastoma is associated with a global perturbation of chromatin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, Carlo; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2017-11-01

    Chromosome instability has a pivotal role among the hallmarks of cancer, but its transcriptional counterpart is rarely considered a relevant factor in cell destabilization. To examine transcription instability (TIN), we first devised a metric we named TIN index and used it to evaluate TIN on a dataset containing more than 500 neuroblastoma samples. We found that metastatic tumors from high-risk (HR) patients are characterized by significantly different TIN index values compared to low/intermediate-risk patients. Our results indicate that the TIN index is a good predictor of neuroblastoma patient's outcome, and a related TIN index gene signature (TIN-signature) is also able to predict the neuroblastoma patient's outcome with high confidence. Interestingly, we find that TIN-signature genes have a strong positional association with superenhancers in neuroblastoma tumors. Finally, we show that TIN is linked to chromatin structural domains and interferes with their integrity in HR neuroblastoma patients. This novel approach to gene expression analysis broadens the perspective of genome instability investigations to include functional aspects. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. ISINN-2. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings contain the materials presented at the Second International Seminar on Neutron-Nucleus Interactions (ISINN-2) dealing with the problems of neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics. The Seminar took place in Dubna on April 26-28, 1994. Over 120 scientists from Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Holland, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Ukraine, US and about 10 Russian research institutes took part in the Seminar. The main problems discussed are the following: P-odd and P-even angular correlation and T-reversal invariance in neutron reactions, nuclear structure investigations by neutron capture, the mechanism of neutron reactions, nuclear fission processes, as well as neutron data for nuclear astrophysics

  8. Structure-function relations in physiology education: Where's the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E; Gardner, Stephanie M

    2017-06-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such as structure-function relations, selectively neglect mechanisms by not mentioning this term explicitly. We explored how students characterized mechanisms and functions to shed light on how students make sense of these terms. Students characterized mechanisms as 1 ) processes that occur at levels of organization lower than that of functions; and 2 ) as detailed events with many steps involved. We also found that students produced more variability in how they characterized functions compared with mechanisms: students characterized functions in relation to multiple levels of organization and multiple definitions. We interpret these results as evidence that students see mechanisms as holding a more narrow definition than used in the biological sciences, and that students struggle to coordinate and distinguish mechanisms from functions due to cognitive processes germane to learning in many domains. We offer the instructional suggestion that we scaffold student learning by affording students opportunities to relate and also distinguish between these terms so central to understanding physiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  10. [Structure analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of the structure and properties of identified pathogenic proteins are important for elucidating the molecular basis of diseases and in drug discovery research. Vibrational spectroscopy has advantages over other techniques in terms of sensitivity of detection of structural changes. Spectral analysis, however, is complicated because the spectrum involves a substantial amount of information. This article includes examples of structural analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy in combination with additional techniques that facilitate data acquisition and analysis. Residue-specific conformation analysis of an amyloid fibril was conducted using IR absorption spectroscopy in combination with (13)C-isotope labeling, linear dichroism measurement, and analysis of amide I band features. We reveal a pH-dependent property of the interacting segment of an amyloidogenic protein, β2-microglobulin, which causes dialysis-related amyloidosis. We also reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH-dependent sugar-binding activity of human galectin-1, which is involved in cell adhesion, using spectroscopic techniques including UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. The decreased activity at acidic pH was attributed to a conformational change in the sugar-binding pocket caused by protonation of His52 (pKa 6.3) and the cation-π interaction between Trp68 and the protonated His44 (pKa 5.7). In addition, we show that the peak positions of the Raman bands of the C4=C5 stretching mode at approximately 1600 cm(-1) and the Nπ-C2-Nτ bending mode at approximately 1405 cm(-1) serve as markers of the His side-chain structure. The Raman signal was enhanced 12 fold using a vertical flow apparatus.

  11. Cross-cultural structures of concentric and diametric dualism in Lévi-Strauss' structural anthropology: structures of relation underlying the self and ego relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Paul

    2003-02-01

    The parallels between Jung's and Lévi-Strauss' concentric cross-cultural structures of the unconscious are highlighted. Lévi-Strauss' basic contrasts between concentric and diametric dualisms are developed into psychologically relevant differences regarding symmetry, connection and separation, and interaction between foreground and background structures respectively. These contrasts between concentric and diametric structures are applied as a common structural framework for understanding Jungian conceptions of the self, the ego and their relations, Freudian views of compensation and repetition in obsessional neurosis, and Winnicott's conception of a child's transitional object. Developing the contrasts between concentric and diametric structures reveals a compensatory relation between both structures. This supports an argument that concentric structures express the self and diametric structures express the ego in their mutual compensatory interrelation. Contrasting concentric with diametric structures challenges traditional Western logic, including Fordham's view that it is contradictory to treat the self as both centre and totality. It also develops an understanding of Jung's transcendent function which seeks to go beyond the ego-shadow opposition.

  12. Fragmentation of chromatin with 125I radioactive disintegrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.N.; Nobis, P.; Dewey, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The DNA in Chinese hamster cells was labeled first for 3 h with [ 3 H]TdR and then for 3 h with [ 125 I]UdR. Chromatin was extracted, frozen, and stored at -30 0 C until 1.0 x 10 17 and 1.25 x 10 17 disintegrations/g of labeled DNA occurred for 125 I and 3 H, respectively. Velocity sedimentation of chromatin (DNA with associated chromosomal proteins) in neutral sucrose gradients indicated that the localized energy from the 125 I disintegrations, which gave about 1 double-strand break/disintegration plus an additional 1.3 single strand breaks, selectively fragmented the [ 125 I] chromatin into pieces smaller than the [ 3 H] chromatin. In other words, 125 I disintegrations caused much more localized damage in the chromatin labeled with 125 I than in the chromatin labeled with 3 H, and fragments induced in DNA by 125 I disintegrations were not held together by the associated chromosomal proteins. Use of this 125 I technique for studying chromosomal proteins associated with different regions in the cellular DNA is discussed. For these studies, the number of disintegrations required for fragmenting DNA molecules of different sizes is illustrated

  13. Epigenetic regulation of open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    The recent progress in pluripotent stem cell research has opened new avenues of disease modeling, drug screening, and transplantation of patient-specific tissues that had been unimaginable until a decade ago. The central mechanism underlying pluripotency is epigenetic gene regulation; the majority of cell signaling pathways, both extracellular and cytoplasmic, eventually alter the epigenetic status of their target genes during the process of activating or suppressing the genes to acquire or maintain pluripotency. It has long been thought that the chromatin of pluripotent stem cells is globally open to enable the timely activation of essentially all genes in the genome during differentiation into multiple lineages. The current article reviews descriptive observations and the epigenetic machinery relevant to what is supposed to be globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells. This includes microscopic appearance, permissive gene transcription, chromatin remodeling complexes, histone modifications, DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, dynamic movement of chromatin proteins, nucleosome accessibility and positioning, and long-range chromosomal interactions. Detailed analyses of each element, however, have revealed that the globally open chromatin hypothesis is not necessarily supported by some of the critical experimental evidence, such as genome-wide nucleosome accessibility and nucleosome positioning. Further understanding of the epigenetic gene regulation is expected to determine the true nature of the so-called globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem. PMID:24695097

  14. Four signature motifs define the first class of structurally related large coiled-coil proteins in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Iris

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and yeast proteins containing long coiled-coil domains are involved in attaching other proteins to the large, solid-state components of the cell. One subgroup of long coiled-coil proteins are the nuclear lamins, which are involved in attaching chromatin to the nuclear envelope and have recently been implicated in inherited human diseases. In contrast to other eukaryotes, long coiled-coil proteins have been barely investigated in plants. Results We have searched the completed Arabidopsis genome and have identified a family of structurally related long coiled-coil proteins. Filament-like plant proteins (FPP were identified by sequence similarity to a tomato cDNA that encodes a coiled-coil protein which interacts with the nuclear envelope-associated protein, MAF1. The FPP family is defined by four novel unique sequence motifs and by two clusters of long coiled-coil domains separated by a non-coiled-coil linker. All family members are expressed in a variety of Arabidopsis tissues. A homolog sharing the structural features was identified in the monocot rice, indicating conservation among angiosperms. Conclusion Except for myosins, this is the first characterization of a family of long coiled-coil proteins in plants. The tomato homolog of the FPP family binds in a yeast two-hybrid assay to a nuclear envelope-associated protein. This might suggest that FPP family members function in nuclear envelope biology. Because the full Arabidopsis genome does not appear to contain genes for lamins, it is of interest to investigate other long coiled-coil proteins, which might functionally replace lamins in the plant kingdom.

  15. Examining Similarity Structure: Multidimensional Scaling and Related Approaches in Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Shinkareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers similarity analyses, a subset of multivariate pattern analysis techniques that are based on similarity spaces defined by multivariate patterns. These techniques offer several advantages and complement other methods for brain data analyses, as they allow for comparison of representational structure across individuals, brain regions, and data acquisition methods. Particular attention is paid to multidimensional scaling and related approaches that yield spatial representations or provide methods for characterizing individual differences. We highlight unique contributions of these methods by reviewing recent applications to functional magnetic resonance imaging data and emphasize areas of caution in applying and interpreting similarity analysis methods.

  16. Universal Scaling Relations in Scale-Free Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guszejnov, Dávid; Hopkins, Philip F.; Grudić, Michael Y.

    2018-04-01

    A large number of astronomical phenomena exhibit remarkably similar scaling relations. The most well-known of these is the mass distribution dN/dM∝M-2 which (to first order) describes stars, protostellar cores, clumps, giant molecular clouds, star clusters and even dark matter halos. In this paper we propose that this ubiquity is not a coincidence and that it is the generic result of scale-free structure formation where the different scales are uncorrelated. We show that all such systems produce a mass function proportional to M-2 and a column density distribution with a power law tail of dA/d lnΣ∝Σ-1. In the case where structure formation is controlled by gravity the two-point correlation becomes ξ2D∝R-1. Furthermore, structures formed by such processes (e.g. young star clusters, DM halos) tend to a ρ∝R-3 density profile. We compare these predictions with observations, analytical fragmentation cascade models, semi-analytical models of gravito-turbulent fragmentation and detailed "full physics" hydrodynamical simulations. We find that these power-laws are good first order descriptions in all cases.

  17. Two independent modes of chromatin organization revealed by cohesin removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Wibke; Abdennur, Nezar; Goloborodko, Anton; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Loe-Mie, Yann; Fonseca, Nuno A; Huber, Wolfgang; H Haering, Christian; Mirny, Leonid; Spitz, Francois

    2017-11-02

    Imaging and chromosome conformation capture studies have revealed several layers of chromosome organization, including segregation into megabase-sized active and inactive compartments, and partitioning into sub-megabase domains (TADs). It remains unclear, however, how these layers of organization form, interact with one another and influence genome function. Here we show that deletion of the cohesin-loading factor Nipbl in mouse liver leads to a marked reorganization of chromosomal folding. TADs and associated Hi-C peaks vanish globally, even in the absence of transcriptional changes. By contrast, compartmental segregation is preserved and even reinforced. Strikingly, the disappearance of TADs unmasks a finer compartment structure that accurately reflects the underlying epigenetic landscape. These observations demonstrate that the three-dimensional organization of the genome results from the interplay of two independent mechanisms: cohesin-independent segregation of the genome into fine-scale compartments, defined by chromatin state; and cohesin-dependent formation of TADs, possibly by loop extrusion, which helps to guide distant enhancers to their target genes.

  18. Lagged and instantaneous dynamical influences related to brain structural connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eAlonso Montes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary neuroimaging methods can shed light on the basis of human neural and cognitive specializations, with important implications for neuroscience and medicine. Indeed, different MRI acquisitions provide different brain networks at the macroscale; whilst diffusion-weighted MRI (dMRI provides a structural connectivity (SC coincident with the bundles of parallel fibers between brain areas, functional MRI (fMRI accounts for the variations in the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent T2* signal, providing functional connectivity (FC. Understanding the precise relation between FC and SC, that is, between brain dynamics and structure, is still a challenge for neuroscience.To investigate this problem, we acquired data at rest and built the corresponding SC (with matrix elements corresponding to the fiber number between brain areas to be compared with FC connectivity matrices obtained by three different methods: directed dependencies by an exploratory version of structural equation modeling (eSEM, linear correlations (C and partial correlations (PC. We also considered the possibility of using lagged correlations in time series; in particular, we compared a lagged version of eSEM and Granger causality (GC. Our results were two-fold: firstly, eSEM performance in correlating with SC was comparable to those obtained from C and PC, but eSEM (not C, nor PC provides information about directionality of the functional interactions. Second, interactions on a time scale much smaller than the sampling time, captured by instantaneous connectivity methods, are much more related to SC than slow directed influences captured by the lagged analysis. Indeed the performance in correlating with SC was much worse for GC and for the lagged version of eSEM. We expect these results to supply further insights to the interplay between SC and functional patterns, an important issue in the study of brain physiology and function.

  19. The Guadalquivir Diapiric Ridge: Deep Tectonics and Related Gas Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Puga, M. C.; Somoza, L.; Pinheiro, L. M.; Magalhães, V.; Vázquez, J. T.; Díaz-del-Río, V.; Ivanov, M.

    Cooperation between the Spanish TASYO project during the cruises Tasyo/2000, Anastasya/99, Anastasya/00 and Anastasya/01 and the UNESCO-IOC Trainning Trough Research Programme during the TTR9, TTR10 and TTR-11 cruises have per- mitted to identify numerous structures related to hydrocarbon seepages in the Gulf of Cadiz, located between the Africa and Eurasia plate. The interpretation of multibeam bathymetry and a large database of reflection seismic profiles shows two important morphotectonics structures: the Cadiz Diapiric Ridge (CDR) and the Guadalquivir Di- apiric Ridge (GDR). The CDR is a diapiric elongate structure located between 400 and 700m water depth, with a N-S direction. The GDR is an elongated ridge, situated west- ward of this structure and located along the shelf and slope between 300-1100m depth. This highly deformed ridge, formed by several diapirs oriented in NE-SW direction, has been mapped using industrial multifold seismic, core logs, gravity cores, dredge samples and photographs, obtained during the ANASTASYA 01/09 cruise. This data has shown that it is composed of early-middle Miocene blue marls (Maldonado et al, 1999), mud breccias and calcarenites. In fact, this diapiric structure is associated with a complex tectono-sedimentary history related to along slope gravity gliding and tec- tonic compression westward the fronts of the deformed wedges of the SOlistostromic & cedil;allochtonous unitsT (Somoza et al., 1999). According to the observed and sampled structures along the GDR, this ridge can be divided in three areas: (a) The NE area is characterized by the existence of a series of wide single sub-circular mud volcanoes (Anastasya, Tarsis and Pipoca), surrounded by a ring shaped seafloor depression. Mud breccia has been collected from these mud volcanoes (ANAS00-TG5,TG6,TG7,TG8 and ANAS01-TG2); (b) a central sector with long rounded-like crater structures, of unknown origin, from which calcarenites were collected (ANAS01-DA13); and (c) a SW

  20. Self-assemblage and post-radiation recovery of cell supramolecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodzinskij, D.M.; Kolomiets, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    The role of the molecular equation and self-assemblage in post-radiation chromatin recovery of meristematic cells of pea rootlets is shown. Found are the two repair types at the chromatin level by fractionating of the radiation dose. The first type comprises transient processes including DNA repair, the second type comprises processes including biosynthesis of the chromatin components and proteins, in the first place. The role of protein biosynthesis in the process of recovery of the chromatin supramolecular structure is shown. The improved radiostability of chromatin self-assemblage is characteristic for the level of its subunits. The supramolecular chromatin structure of the other levels has less radiostability

  1. Chromatin Remodeling Proteins in Epilepsy: Lessons From CHD2-Associated Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Marie J. Lamar

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD family of proteins are ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers that contribute to the reorganization of chromatin structure and deposition of histone variants necessary to regulate gene expression. CHD proteins play an important role in neurodevelopment, as pathogenic variants in CHD1, CHD2, CHD4, CHD7 and CHD8 have been associated with a range of neurological phenotypes, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD, intellectual disability (ID and epilepsy. Pathogenic variants in CHD2 are associated with developmental epileptic encephalopathy (DEE in humans, however little is known about how these variants contribute to this disorder. Of the nine CHD family members, CHD2 is the only one that leads to a brain-restricted phenotype when disrupted in humans. This suggests that despite being expressed ubiquitously, CHD2 has a unique role in human brain development and function. In this review, we will discuss the phenotypic spectrum of patients with pathogenic variants in CHD2, current animal models of CHD2 deficiency, and the role of CHD2 in proliferation, neurogenesis, neuronal differentiation, chromatin remodeling and DNA-repair. We also consider how CHD2 depletion can affect each of these biological mechanisms and how these defects may underpin neurodevelopmental disorders including epilepsy.

  2. Modify the Histone to Win the Battle: Chromatin Dynamics in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Ramirez Prado, Juan Sebastian

    2018-03-19

    Relying on an immune system comes with a high energetic cost for plants. Defense responses in these organisms are therefore highly regulated and fine-tuned, permitting them to respond pertinently to the attack of a microbial pathogen. In recent years, the importance of the physical modification of chromatin, a highly organized structure composed of genomic DNA and its interacting proteins, has become evident in the research field of plant-pathogen interactions. Several processes, including DNA methylation, changes in histone density and variants, and various histone modifications, have been described as regulators of various developmental and defense responses. Herein, we review the state of the art in the epigenomic aspects of plant immunity, focusing on chromatin modifications, chromatin modifiers, and their physiological consequences. In addition, we explore the exciting field of understanding how plant pathogens have adapted to manipulate the plant epigenomic regulation in order to weaken their immune system and thrive in their host, as well as how histone modifications in eukaryotic pathogens are involved in the regulation of their virulence.

  3. Modify the Histone to Win the Battle: Chromatin Dynamics in Plant–Pathogen Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Ramirez Prado, Juan Sebastian; Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Hirt, Heribert; Raynaud, Cé cile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2018-01-01

    Relying on an immune system comes with a high energetic cost for plants. Defense responses in these organisms are therefore highly regulated and fine-tuned, permitting them to respond pertinently to the attack of a microbial pathogen. In recent years, the importance of the physical modification of chromatin, a highly organized structure composed of genomic DNA and its interacting proteins, has become evident in the research field of plant-pathogen interactions. Several processes, including DNA methylation, changes in histone density and variants, and various histone modifications, have been described as regulators of various developmental and defense responses. Herein, we review the state of the art in the epigenomic aspects of plant immunity, focusing on chromatin modifications, chromatin modifiers, and their physiological consequences. In addition, we explore the exciting field of understanding how plant pathogens have adapted to manipulate the plant epigenomic regulation in order to weaken their immune system and thrive in their host, as well as how histone modifications in eukaryotic pathogens are involved in the regulation of their virulence.

  4. Replicating centromeric chromatin: Spatial and temporal control of CENP-A assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechemia-Arbely, Yael; Fachinetti, Daniele; Cleveland, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is the fundamental unit for insuring chromosome inheritance. This complex region has a distinct type of chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by a structurally different homologue identified in humans as CENP-A. In metazoans, specific DNA sequences are neither required nor sufficient for centromere identity. Rather, an epigenetic mark comprised of CENP-A containing chromatin is thought to be the major determinant of centromere identity. In this view, CENP-A deposition and chromatin assembly are fundamental processes for the maintenance of centromeric identity across mitotic and meiotic divisions. Several lines of evidence support CENP-A deposition in metazoans occurring at only one time in the cell cycle. Such cell cycle-dependent loading of CENP-A is found in divergent species from human to fission yeast, albeit with differences in the cell cycle point at which CENP-A is assembled. Cell cycle dependent CENP-A deposition requires multiple assembly factors for its deposition and maintenance. This review discusses the regulation of new CENP-A deposition and its relevance to centromere identity and inheritance.

  5. Comparative Serum Challenges Show Divergent Patterns of Gene Expression and Open Chromatin in Human and Chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzollo, Jason; Nielsen, William J; Shibata, Yoichiro; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Wray, Gregory A; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2018-03-01

    Humans experience higher rates of age-associated diseases than our closest living evolutionary relatives, chimpanzees. Environmental factors can explain many of these increases in disease risk, but species-specific genetic changes can also play a role. Alleles that confer increased disease susceptibility later in life can persist in a population in the absence of selective pressure if those changes confer positive adaptation early in life. One age-associated disease that disproportionately affects humans compared with chimpanzees is epithelial cancer. Here, we explored genetic differences between humans and chimpanzees in a well-defined experimental assay that mimics gene expression changes that happen during cancer progression: A fibroblast serum challenge. We used this assay with fibroblasts isolated from humans and chimpanzees to explore species-specific differences in gene expression and chromatin state with RNA-Seq and DNase-Seq. Our data reveal that human fibroblasts increase expression of genes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways; in contrast, chimpanzee gene expression changes are not concentrated around particular functional categories. Chromatin accessibility dramatically increases in human fibroblasts, yet decreases in chimpanzee cells during the serum response. Many regions of opening and closing chromatin are in close proximity to genes encoding transcription factors or genes involved in wound healing processes, further supporting the link between changes in activity of regulatory elements and changes in gene expression. Together, these expression and open chromatin data show that humans and chimpanzees have dramatically different responses to the same physiological stressor, and how a core physiological process can evolve quickly over relatively short evolutionary time scales.

  6. Chromatin accessibility data sets show bias due to sequence specificity of the DNase I enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Koohy

    Full Text Available DNase I is an enzyme which cuts duplex DNA at a rate that depends strongly upon its chromatin environment. In combination with high-throughput sequencing (HTS technology, it can be used to infer genome-wide landscapes of open chromatin regions. Using this technology, systematic identification of hundreds of thousands of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS per cell type has been possible, and this in turn has helped to precisely delineate genomic regulatory compartments. However, to date there has been relatively little investigation into possible biases affecting this data.We report a significant degree of sequence preference spanning sites cut by DNase I in a number of published data sets. The two major protocols in current use each show a different pattern, but for a given protocol the pattern of sequence specificity seems to be quite consistent. The patterns are substantially different from biases seen in other types of HTS data sets, and in some cases the most constrained position lies outside the sequenced fragment, implying that this constraint must relate to the digestion process rather than events occurring during library preparation or sequencing.DNase I is a sequence-specific enzyme, with a specificity that may depend on experimental conditions. This sequence specificity is not taken into account by existing pipelines for identifying open chromatin regions. Care must be taken when interpreting DNase I results, especially when looking at the precise locations of the reads. Future studies may be able to improve the sensitivity and precision of chromatin state measurement by compensating for sequence bias.

  7. Dysregulation of chromatin remodelling complexes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibshirani, Michael; Zhao, Beibei; Gentil, Benoit J; Minotti, Sandra; Marques, Christine; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rouaux, Caroline; Robertson, Janice; Durham, Heather D

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with paralysis resulting from dysfunction and loss of motor neurons. A common neuropathological finding is attrition of motor neuron dendrites, which make central connections vital to motor control. The chromatin remodelling complex, neuronal Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1)-associated factor complex (nBAF), is critical for neuronal differentiation, dendritic extension and synaptic function. We have identified loss of the crucial nBAF subunits Brg1, Brg1-associated factor 53b and calcium responsive transactivator in cultured motor neurons expressing FUS or TAR-DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) mutants linked to familial ALS. When plasmids encoding wild-type or mutant human FUS or TDP-43 were expressed in motor neurons of dissociated spinal cord cultures prepared from E13 mice, mutant proteins in particular accumulated in the cytoplasm. Immunolabelling of nBAF subunits was reduced in proportion to loss of nuclear FUS or TDP-43 and depletion of Brg1 was associated with nuclear retention of Brg1 mRNA. Dendritic attrition (loss of intermediate and terminal dendritic branches) occurred in motor neurons expressing mutant, but not wild-type, FUS or TDP-43. This attrition was delayed by ectopic over-expression of Brg1 and was reproduced by inhibiting Brg1 activity either through genetic manipulation or treatment with the chemical inhibitor, (E)-1-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-3-((1R, 4R)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2, 5-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one, demonstrating the importance of Brg1 to maintenance of dendritic architecture. Loss of nBAF subunits was also documented in spinal motor neurons in autopsy tissue from familial amyotrophic sclerosis (chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 with G4C2 nucleotide expansion) and from sporadic cases with no identified mutation, pointing to dysfunction of nBAF chromatin remodelling in multiple forms of ALS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  8. Pharmacologic Targeting of Chromatin Modulators As Therapeutics of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rui; Wang, Gang Greg

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a common hematological cancer of myeloid lineage cells, generally exhibits poor prognosis in the clinic and demands new treatment options. Recently, direct sequencing of samples from human AMLs and pre-leukemic diseases has unveiled their mutational landscapes and significantly advanced the molecular understanding of AML pathogenesis. The newly identified recurrent mutations frequently "hit" genes encoding epigenetic modulators, a wide range of chromatin-modifying enzymes and regulatory factors involved in gene expression regulation, supporting aberration of chromatin structure and epigenetic modification as a main oncogenic mechanism and cancer-initiating event. Increasing body of evidence demonstrates that chromatin modification aberrations underlying the formation of blood cancer can be reversed by pharmacological targeting of the responsible epigenetic modulators, thus providing new mechanism-based treatment strategies. Here, we summarize recent advances in development of small-molecule inhibitors specific to chromatin factors and their potential applications in the treatment of genetically defined AMLs. These compounds selectively inhibit various subclasses of "epigenetic writers" (such as histone methyltransferases MLL/KMT2A, G9A/KMT1C, EZH2/KMT6A, DOT1L/KMT4, and PRMT1), "epigenetic readers" (such as BRD4 and plant homeodomain finger proteins), and "epigenetic erasers" (such as histone demethylases LSD1/KDM1A and JMJD2C/KDM4C). We also discuss about the molecular mechanisms underpinning therapeutic effect of these epigenetic compounds in AML and favor their potential usage for combinational therapy and treatment of pre-leukemia diseases.

  9. Pharmacologic Targeting of Chromatin Modulators As Therapeutics of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML, a common hematological cancer of myeloid lineage cells, generally exhibits poor prognosis in the clinic and demands new treatment options. Recently, direct sequencing of samples from human AMLs and pre-leukemic diseases has unveiled their mutational landscapes and significantly advanced the molecular understanding of AML pathogenesis. The newly identified recurrent mutations frequently “hit” genes encoding epigenetic modulators, a wide range of chromatin-modifying enzymes and regulatory factors involved in gene expression regulation, supporting aberration of chromatin structure and epigenetic modification as a main oncogenic mechanism and cancer-initiating event. Increasing body of evidence demonstrates that chromatin modification aberrations underlying the formation of blood cancer can be reversed by pharmacological targeting of the responsible epigenetic modulators, thus providing new mechanism-based treatment strategies. Here, we summarize recent advances in development of small-molecule inhibitors specific to chromatin factors and their potential applications in the treatment of genetically defined AMLs. These compounds selectively inhibit various subclasses of “epigenetic writers” (such as histone methyltransferases MLL/KMT2A, G9A/KMT1C, EZH2/KMT6A, DOT1L/KMT4, and PRMT1, “epigenetic readers” (such as BRD4 and plant homeodomain finger proteins, and “epigenetic erasers” (such as histone demethylases LSD1/KDM1A and JMJD2C/KDM4C. We also discuss about the molecular mechanisms underpinning therapeutic effect of these epigenetic compounds in AML and favor their potential usage for combinational therapy and treatment of pre-leukemia diseases.

  10. Relation of a unified quantum field theory of spinors to the structure of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Based on a unified quantum field theory of spinors assumed to describe all matter fields and their interactions we construct the space-time structure of general relativity according to a general connection within the corresponding spinor space. The tetrad field and the corresponding metric field are composed from a space-time dependent basis of spinors within the internal space of the fundamental matter field. Similar to twistor theory the Minkowski signature of the space-time metric is related to this spinor nature of elementary matter, if we assume the spinor space to be endowed with a symplectic structure. The equivalence principle and the property of background independence arise from the fact that all elementary fields are composed from the fundamental spinor field. This means that the structure of space-time according to general relativity seems to be a consequence of a fundamental theory of matter fields and not a presupposition as in the usual setting of relativistic quantum field theories.

  11. Maize histone H2B-mCherry: a new fluorescent chromatin marker for somatic and meiotic chromosome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Elizabeth S; Clemente, Thomas E; Bass, Hank W

    2012-06-01

    Cytological studies of fluorescent proteins are rapidly yielding insights into chromatin structure and dynamics. Here we describe the production and cytological characterization of new transgenic maize lines expressing a fluorescent histone fusion protein, H2B-mCherry. The transgene is expressed under the control of the maize ubiquitin1 promoter, including its first exon and intron. Polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping and root-tip microscopy showed that most of the lines carrying the transgene also expressed it, producing bright uniform staining of nuclei. Further, plants showing expression in root tips at the seedling stage also showed expression during meiosis, late in the life cycle. Detailed high-resolution three-dimensional imaging of cells and nuclei from various somatic and meiotic cell types showed that H2B-mCherry produced remarkably clear images of chromatin and chromosome fiber morphology, as seen in somatic, male meiotic prophase, and early microgametophyte cells. H2B-mCherry also yielded distinct nucleolus staining and was shown to be compatible with fluorescence in situ hybridization. We found several instances where H2B-mCherry was superior to DAPI as a generalized chromatin stain. Our study establishes these histone H2B-mCherry lines as new biological reagents for visualizing chromatin structure, chromosome morphology, and nuclear dynamics in fixed and living cells in a model plant genetic system.

  12. Assessment of Chromatin Maturity in Human Spermatozoa: Useful Aniline Blue Assay for Routine Diagnosis of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifa Sellami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, sperm chromatin undergoes structural changes and results in a high condensation. This nuclear compaction would be useful as a predictor of sperm fertilization capacity and pregnancy outcome. We purpose to evaluate firstly the relationship among chromatin maturity assessed by aniline blue staining (AB and the semen parameters in infertile men. Secondly, we analyzed whether the sperm gradient density centrifugation is effective to select mature spermatozoa. Fifty-one ejaculates were investigated by semen analysis and stained for chromatin condensation with AB to distinguish between unstained mature sperm and stained immature sperm. AB was applied also on 12 ejaculates which proceeded by density gradient centrifugation to compare the rates of immature sperm before and after selection. Neat semen were divided into two groups: G1 (: immature sperm <20% and G2 (: immature sperm ≥20%. No significant differences were detected in sperm concentration, motility, and normal morphology between G1 and G2. However, the rates of some morphology abnormalities were higher in G2: head abnormalities ( and microcephalic sperm (. We founded significant correlation between sperm immaturity and acrosome abnormalities (; . Sperm selection has significantly reduced the rates of immature sperm. A better understanding of chromatin structure and its impact on the sperm potential is needed to explore male infertility.

  13. Structure-charge mobility relation for hexabenzocoronene derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, James [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, Mainz 55128 (Germany); Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Marcon, Valentina; Kremer, Kurt [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, Mainz 55128 (Germany); Nelson, Jenny [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Andrienko, Denis

    2008-05-15

    Charge mobilities of several derivatives of discotic liquid crystals have been determined by combining three methods into one scheme: (i) quantum chemical methods for the calculation of molecular electronic structures and reorganization energies (ii) molecular dynamics for simulation of the relative positions and orientations of molecules in a columnar mesophase, and (iii) kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and Master Equation approach to simulate charge transport. Applying this scheme to differently substituted hexabenzocoronene derivatives we reproduce the trends and magnitudes of mobilities as measured by pulse-radiolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (PR-TRMC) and connect mobility directly to the microscopic morphology of the columns. Our study also shows that it is possible to understand and reproduce experimental charge transport parameters, and, in some cases, accurately predict them. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. ISINN-3. Neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure, related topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings contain the materials presented at the Third International Seminar on Neutron-Nucleus Interactions (ISINN-3) dealing with the problems of neutron spectroscopy, nuclear structure and related topics. The Seminar took place in Dubna on April 26-28, 1995. Over 100 scientists from Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Slovakia, Ukraine, USA and from more than 10 Russian research institutes took part in the Seminar. The Seminar is dedicated to the memory of the founder of the Neutron Physics Laboratory of JINR, the famous soviet scientist Professor Fedor L. Shapiro, whose 80th anniversary is being observed. The main problems discussed are the following: fundamental interactions and symmetries in neutron-induced reactions, fundamental properties of the neutron, properties of excited nuclei after neutron capture and some other ones. Special emphasis is laid upon γ decay and neutron induced nuclear fission as well as upon the methodical aspects of new experiments

  15. Entropy, related thermodynamic properties, and structure of methylisocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Phil S.; Kilpatrick, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermodynamic properties of methylisocyanate have been determined by isothermal calorimetry from 15 to 298.15 K. ► The third law entropy has been compared with the entropy calculated by statistical thermodynamics. ► The comparisons are consistent with selected proposed molecular structures and vibrational frequencies. -- Abstract: The entropy and related thermodynamic properties of methylisocyanate, CH 3 NCO, have been determined by isothermal calorimetry. The entropy in the ideal gas state at 298.15 K and 1 atmosphere is S m o = 284.3 ± 0.6 J/K · mol. Other thermodynamic properties determined include: the heat capacity from 15 to 300 K, the temperature of fusion (T fus = 178.461 ± 0.024 K), the enthalpy of fusion (ΔH fus = 7455.2 ± 14.0 J/mol), the enthalpy of vaporization at 298.15 K (ΔH vap = 28768 ± 54 J/mol), and the vapor pressure from fusion to 300 K. Using statistical thermodynamics, the entropy in this same state has been calculated for various assumed structures for methylisocyante which have been proposed based on several spectroscopic and ab initio results. Comparisons between the experimental and calculated entropy have led to the following conclusions concerning historical differences among problematic structural properties: (1) The CNC/CNO angles can have the paired values of 140/180° or 135/173° respectively. It is not possible to distinguish between the two by this thermodynamic analysis. (2) The methyl group functions as a free rotor or near free rotor against the NCO rigid frame. The barrier to internal rotation is less than 2100 J/mol. (3) The CNC vibrational bending frequency is consistent with the more recently observed assignments at 165 and 172 cm −1 with some degree of anharmonicity or with a pure harmonic at about 158 cm −1

  16. Thermodynamic behavior of glassy state of structurally related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-08-01

    Thermodynamic properties of amorphous pharmaceutical forms are responsible for enhanced solubility as well as poor physical stability. The present study was designed to investigate the differences in thermodynamic parameters arising out of disparate molecular structures and associations for four structurally related pharmaceutical compounds--celecoxib, valdecoxib, rofecoxib, and etoricoxib. Conventional and modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry were employed to study glass forming ability and thermodynamic behavior of the glassy state of model compounds. Glass transition temperature of four glassy compounds was in a close range of 327.6-331.8 K, however, other thermodynamic parameters varied considerably. Kauzmann temperature, strength parameter and fragility parameter showed rofecoxib glass to be most fragile of the four compounds. Glass forming ability of the compounds fared similar in the critical cooling rate experiments, suggesting that different factors were determining the glass forming ability and subsequent behavior of the compounds in glassy state. A comprehensive understanding of such thermodynamic facets of amorphous form would help in rationalizing the approaches towards development of stable glassy pharmaceuticals.

  17. Indirect radiation effects related to the environmental structure of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, D.

    1976-01-01

    It is supposed, that in biological systems there are direct as well as indirect radiation effects. Their contributions to lethal effects depend mainly on two different kinds of structures within irradiated systems: the microscopic energy deposition patterns of radiation and the environmental structures of targets. The approach to determine these contributions of the lethal action of ionizing radiation in yeast cells was, to use chemical compounds, which specifically change the radical spectrum of water radiolysis. The efficiency of such chemical compounds in scavenging specifically water radicals was tested in aqueous solutions of thymine molecules, in which indirect radiation effects occur exclusively. The main result is, that the OH'-radical is by far the most effective radical to destroy thymine molecules. The relative contributions of direct and indirect radiation effects to lethal actions of ionizing radiation was investigated in yeast cells. The radical spectrum of water radiolysis was changed by bubbling the cell suspensions with different gases. The main result is, that there are no lethal radiation effects du to the action of water radicals

  18. Growth-related magnetic and physical structures in CMR films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M.E.; Brown, G.W.; Hundley, M.F. [and others

    1997-09-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) have proven to be powerful tools for revealing property-sensitive structures in magnetic materials. With the renewed interest in perovskite films as materials for read-heads in high density magnetic data storage, the same challenges faced by high temperature superconductor (HTS) film fabrication are repeated for these materials. To begin addressing these challenges, we used vapor phase epitaxy to fabricate La (Sr, Ca,) based manganate films on single crystal perovskite substrates under different conditions and characterized them with scanning probe microscopies, x-ray diffraction, and temperature-dependent magnetization and resistivity measurements (M(T) and {rho}(T)). The as-grown films were polygranular with grain sizes increasing with increasing temperature (T). The post-deposition annealed films consisted of coalesced layers with improved transport properties. The room temperature magnetic structure of the Sr-based films appeared to be related to defects and/or strain.

  19. Evaluation of human sperm chromatin status after selection using a modified Diff-Quik stain indicates embryo quality and pregnancy outcomes following in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, R S; Silva, A F; Lourenço, B; Almeida-Santos, T; Sousa, A P; Ramalho-Santos, J

    2013-11-01

    Sperm chromatin/DNA damage can be measured by a variety of assays. However, it has been reported that these tests may lose prognostic value in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) cycles when assessed in post-prepared samples, possibly due to the normalizing effect promoted by sperm preparation procedures. We have recently implemented a modified version of the Diff-Quik staining assay that allows for the evaluation of human sperm chromatin status in native samples, together with standard sperm morphology assessment. However, the value of this parameter in terms of predicting in vitro fertilization (IVF) and Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes after sperm selection is unknown. In this study, data from 138 couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) or Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatments showed that sperm chromatin integrity was significantly improved after density gradient centrifugation and swim up (p embryo development rates (p > 0.05). However, sperm samples presenting lower percentages of damaged chromatin were associated with better quality (Grade I) embryos in both ART procedures (p selection may occur; but not in ICSI, where sperm selection is operator dependent. This quick and low-cost assay is suggested as an alternative method to detect sperm chromatin status in minimal clinical settings, when no other well-established and robust assays (e.g. Sperm chromatin structure assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUDP nick-end labelling) are available. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  20. Circadian expression profiles of chromatin remodeling factor genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Gil; Lee, Kyounghee; Jang, Kiyoung; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a biological time keeper mechanism that regulates biological rhythms to a period of approximately 24 h. The circadian clock enables organisms to anticipate environmental cycles and coordinates internal cellular physiology with external environmental cues. In plants, correct matching of the clock with the environment confers fitness advantages to plant survival and reproduction. Therefore, circadian clock components are regulated at multiple layers to fine-tune the circadian oscillation. Epigenetic regulation provides an additional layer of circadian control. However, little is known about which chromatin remodeling factors are responsible for circadian control. In this work, we analyzed circadian expression of 109 chromatin remodeling factor genes and identified 17 genes that display circadian oscillation. In addition, we also found that a candidate interacts with a core clock component, supporting that clock activity is regulated in part by chromatin modification. As an initial attempt to elucidate the relationship between chromatin modification and circadian oscillation, we identified novel regulatory candidates that provide a platform for future investigations of chromatin regulation of the circadian clock.

  1. Association of sperm apoptosis and DNA ploidy with sperm chromatin quality in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Reda Z; Sharma, Rakesh K; Said, Tamer M; Erenpreiss, Juris; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-04-01

    To examine the relationship among sperm apoptosis, sperm chromatin status, and DNA ploidy in different sperm fractions. Prospective study. Reproductive research center in a tertiary care hospital. Sperm prepared by density gradient were evaluated for sperm count, motility, apoptosis, and sperm chromatin assessment. Sperm count, sperm motility, toluidine blue (TB) results, DNA fragmentation index (%DFI), high DNA stainability, DNA cytometry, and early and late apoptosis. Sperm motility was related to late apoptotic and subhaploid apoptotic sperm (r = -0.56 and -0.53, respectively). The sperm %DFI showed significant correlation with late apoptotic and subhaploid sperm (r = 0.62 and 0.68). TB-stained sperm were significantly correlated with late apoptotic sperm (r = 0.51). Significantly higher proportions of haploid sperm and light blue TB-stained sperm were seen in mature compared with immature fractions. Even in semen samples with low %DFI, semen processing results in a lower incidence of nuclear immaturity and subhaploidy, but the incidence of late apoptotic sperm remains unchanged. Therefore, simultaneous evaluation of apoptosis and sperm chromatin status is important for processing sperm in assisted reproductive procedures.

  2. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-01-01

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress–displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements. (paper)

  3. Universal binding energy relation for cleaved and structurally relaxed surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangarajan, Aarti; Datta, Aditi; Gandi, Appala Naidu; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, U V

    2014-02-05

    The universal binding energy relation (UBER), derived earlier to describe the cohesion between two rigid atomic planes, does not accurately capture the cohesive properties when the cleaved surfaces are allowed to relax. We suggest a modified functional form of UBER that is analytical and at the same time accurately models the properties of surfaces relaxed during cleavage. We demonstrate the generality as well as the validity of this modified UBER through first-principles density functional theory calculations of cleavage in a number of crystal systems. Our results show that the total energies of all the relaxed surfaces lie on a single (universal) energy surface, that is given by the proposed functional form which contains an additional length-scale associated with structural relaxation. This functional form could be used in modelling the cohesive zones in crack growth simulation studies. We find that the cohesive law (stress-displacement relation) differs significantly in the case where cracked surfaces are allowed to relax, with lower peak stresses occurring at higher displacements.

  4. Clinical Application of Sperm Chromatin Structure Assessment in Andrology Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Smit (Marij)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractInfertility, defined as the inability to conceive spontaneously within one year, is a common medical problem. Traditionally, fertility investigations initially focus on the evaluation of ovulation and tubal patency in females, and on assessment of sperm quantity and quality in males. In

  5. The Relative Importance of Spatial Versus Temporal Structure in the Perception of Biological Motion: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Masahiro; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how the spatiotemporal structure of animations of biological motion (BM) affects brain activity. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during the perception of BM under four conditions: normal spatial and temporal structure; scrambled spatial and normal temporal structure; normal spatial and scrambled temporal structure; and…

  6. Structure of some relative relation modules of finite p-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamin, M.

    1990-06-01

    Let G be a finite p-group generated by (g i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d), G i the cyclic subgroup generated by g i , E the free product of the G i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d, and S the kernel of the natural epimorphism of E onto G. The largest elementary abelian p-quotient S-circumflex = S/S'S p , regarded as an IF p G-module via conjugation in E, is called a relative relation module of G. If d is the minimum number of generaters for G, the author has proved that S-circumflex is nonprojective and indecomposable. The aim of this paper is to give an alternative proof for the indecomposability of S-circumflex; the proof here is more informative as it deals with Loewy structure and generating sets of S-circumflex and other associated modules. (author). 9 refs

  7. Matroidal Structure of Generalized Rough Sets Based on Tolerance Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2014-01-01

    of the generalized rough set based on the tolerance relation. The matroid can also induce a new relation. We investigate the connection between the original tolerance relation and the induced relation.

  8. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination) and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed. PMID:26388882

  9. A Method to Identify Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin Domains (NADs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Picart-Picolo, Ariadna; Pontvianne, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    The nuclear context needs to be taken into consideration to better understand the mechanisms shaping the epigenome and its organization, and therefore its impact on gene expression. For example, in Arabidopsis, heterochromatin is preferentially localized at the nuclear and the nucleolar periphery. Although chromatin domains associating with the nuclear periphery remain to be identified in plant cells, Nucleolus Associated chromatin Domains (NADs) can be identified thanks to a protocol allowing the isolation of pure nucleoli. We describe here the protocol enabling the identification of NADs in Arabidopsis. Providing the transfer of a nucleolus marker as described here in other crop species, this protocol is broadly applicable.

  10. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  11. Single-cell Hi-C bridges microscopy and genome-wide sequencing approaches to study 3D chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikue; Razin, Sergey V

    2017-10-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of the single-cell biochemical toolbox including chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based methods that provide novel insights into chromatin spatial organization in individual cells. The observations made with these techniques revealed that topologically associating domains emerge from cell population averages and do not exist as static structures in individual cells. Stochastic nature of the genome folding is likely to be biologically relevant and may reflect the ability of chromatin fibers to adopt a number of alternative configurations, some of which could be transiently stabilized and serve regulatory purposes. Single-cell Hi-C approaches provide an opportunity to analyze chromatin folding in rare cell types such as stem cells, tumor progenitors, oocytes, and totipotent cells, contributing to a deeper understanding of basic mechanisms in development and disease. Here, we review key findings of single-cell Hi-C and discuss possible biological reasons and consequences of the inferred dynamic chromatin spatial organization. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Optical properties of humic substances and CDOM: relation to structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Erin S; Guerriero, Nicolas; Thiallet, Anthony; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Blough, Neil V

    2009-04-01

    The spectral dependencies of absorption and fluorescence emission (emission maxima (lamdamax), quantum yields (phi), and mean lifetimes (taum)) were acquired for a commercial lignin, Suwannee River humic (SRHA) and fulvic (SRFA) acids, and a series solid phase extracts (C18) from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB extracts). These parameters were compared with the relative average size and total lignin phenol content (TLP). TLP was strongly correlated with absorption at 280 and 355 nm for the MAB extracts, SRHA, and SRFA. The spectral dependence of lamdamax, phi), and taum was very similar for all samples, suggesting a common photophysical and thus structural basis. A strong decrease of phi and taum with increasing average size indicates that intramolecular interactions must be important. When combined with previous work, the results lead us to conclude that the optical properties commonly associated with terrestrial humic substances and chromophoric dissolved organic matter arise primarily from an ensemble of partially oxidized lignins derived from vascular plant sources. Theyfurther provide additional support for an electronic interaction model in which intramolecular energy transfer, excited-state electron transfer, as well as charge transfer likely play important roles in producing the observed optical and photochemical properties of these materials.

  13. Electronic structure of magnesium diboride and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduani, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, UFSC, Florianopolis, CEP 88040-900, SC (Brazil)

    2003-11-01

    The electronic structure of AlB{sub 2}-type diborides and related compounds has been investigated in first-principles calculations with the molecular cluster discrete variational method. For MgB{sub 2} was studied the effect of the lattice relaxation on the total density of states at the Fermi energy (N({epsilon}{sub F})). The results indicated that a contraction of about 2% in the lattice spacings a and c can lead to a slight increase of N({epsilon}{sub F}) for boron. In the MB{sub 2} diborides, M=Al, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta, the largest contributions to N({epsilon}{sub F}) is observed for Cr, Mo and Nb. TiB{sub 2} possess the highest chemical stability in the series. The electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} also is calculated for the diborides. The method is employed to obtain the partial B2p contribution to the total DOS at the Fermi level with the introduction of a monolayer of solute atoms as a substitution for Mg atoms of Na, Al, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta in layered superstructures.. /M/B{sub 2}/Mg/B{sub 2}/.. A stronger covalent bonding between boron atoms is identified in these cases. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Electronic structure of magnesium diboride and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paduani, C.

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of AlB 2 -type diborides and related compounds has been investigated in first-principles calculations with the molecular cluster discrete variational method. For MgB 2 was studied the effect of the lattice relaxation on the total density of states at the Fermi energy (N(ε F )). The results indicated that a contraction of about 2% in the lattice spacings a and c can lead to a slight increase of N(ε F ) for boron. In the MB 2 diborides, M=Al, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta, the largest contributions to N(ε F ) is observed for Cr, Mo and Nb. TiB 2 possess the highest chemical stability in the series. The electronic specific heat coefficient γ also is calculated for the diborides. The method is employed to obtain the partial B2p contribution to the total DOS at the Fermi level with the introduction of a monolayer of solute atoms as a substitution for Mg atoms of Na, Al, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta in layered superstructures.. /M/B 2 /Mg/B 2 /.. A stronger covalent bonding between boron atoms is identified in these cases. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Conformation of chromatin oligomers. A new argument for a change with the hexanucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, C; Bezot, P; Hesse-Bezot, C; Roux, B; Bernengo, J C

    1981-11-01

    Quasielastic laser light scattering measurements have been made on chromatin oligomers to obtain information on the transition in their electrooptical properties, previously observed for the hexameric structures [Marion, C. and Roux, B. (1978) Nucleic Acids Res. 5, 4431-4449]. Translational diffusion coefficients were determined for mononucleosomes to octanucleosomes containing histone H1 over a range of ionic strength. At high ionic strength, oligomers show a linear dependence of the logarithm of diffusion coefficient upon the logarithm of number of nucleosomes. At low ionic strength a change occurs between hexamer and heptamer. Our results agree well with the recent sedimentation data of Osipova et al. [Eur. J. Biochem. (1980) 113, 183-188] and of Butler and Thomas [J. Mol. Biol. (1980) 140, 505-529] showing a change in stability with hexamer. Various models for the arrangements of nucleosomes in the superstructure of chromatin are discussed. All calculations clearly indicate a conformational change with the hexanucleosome and the results suggest that, at low ionic strength, the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure of 28-nm diameter and 22-nm pitch. These results are also consistent with a discontinuity every sixth nucleosome, corresponding to a turn of the helix. This discontinuity may explain the recent electric dichroism data of Lee et al. [Biochemistry (1981) 20, 1438-1445]. The hexanucleosome structure which we have previously suggested, with the faces of nucleosomes arranged radially to the helical axis has been recently confirmed by Mc Ghee et al. [Cell (1980) 22, 87-96]. With an increase of ionic strength, the helix becomes more regular and compact with a slightly reduced outer diameter and a decreased pitch, the dimensions resembling those proposed for solenoid models.

  16. Relations between constructive peculiarities and structural behavior in Venice buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doglioni, F.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we are synthetically describing some constructive peculiarities of Venice civil buildings, analyzing the relation with the features of their structural decay and behavior in the long run. We suppose Venetian buildings, especially those parts which are conceived to suit the lagoon environment, to have undergone an evolution made of some adjustments, which were based on the observation of damages in previous buildings. That is we suppose ancient builders to rely on their awareness of the behavior of structures yet to come, and to be able to forecast it in part. This process brought some building contrivances to perfection, as exclusive and enduring features of Venice, overcoming changes in style and architectural layout, till they grew into essential elements of a whole and adaptable “device”. This writing is meant for a concise interpretation of this device, which is the result of some research works carried out at Venice IUAV University.

    En este texto, se describen sintéticamente algunas peculiaridades de la edificación residencial de Venecia, analizando su relación con el abanico de problemas estructurales que caracterizan el comportamiento estructural del edificio a lo largo del tiempo. Se aventura la hipótesis que las construcciones venecianas y, en particular, algunos de sus detalles, concebidos específicamente para la laguna donde se enclava, han sido objeto de una adaptación evolutiva a través de la observación de los problemas estructurales de los edificios precedentes. Los alarifes venecianos aprendieron a tener en cuenta el comportamiento estructural posterior del edificio, que previeron en cierta medida. Este proceso ha llevado a perfeccionar algunos detalles constructivos exclusivos de Venecia que han perdurado en el tiempo, que han resistido impertérritos a mutaciones de estilo y de configuración arquitectónica, hasta constituir elementos esenciales de un aparato indivisible y adaptable cuya interpretaci

  17. In Vivo Chromatin Targets of the Transcription Factor Yin Yang 2 in Trophoblast Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Macías-Redondo, Sofía; Climent, María; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Muniesa, Pedro; Schoorlemmer, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Yin Yang 2 (YY2) is a zinc finger protein closely related to the well-characterized Yin Yang 1 (YY1). YY1 is a DNA-binding transcription factor, with defined functions in multiple developmental processes, such as implantation, cell differentiation, X inactivation, imprinting and organogenesis. Yy2 has been treated as a largely immaterial duplication of Yy1, as they share high homology in the Zinc Finger-region and similar if not identical in vitro binding sites. In contrast to these similarities, gene expression alterations in HeLa cells with attenuated levels of either Yy1 or Yy2 were to some extent gene-specific. Moreover, the chromatin binding sites for YY2, except for its association with transposable retroviral elements (RE) and Endogenous Retroviral Elements (ERVs), remain to be identified. As a first step towards defining potential Yy2 functions matching or complementary to Yy1, we considered in vivo DNA binding sites of YY2 in trophoblast stem (TS) cells. Results We report the presence of YY2 protein in mouse-derived embryonic stem (ES) and TS cell lines. Following up on our previous report on ERV binding by YY2 in TS cells, we investigated the tissue-specificity of REX1 and YY2 binding and confirm binding to RE/ERV targets in both ES cells and TS cells. Because of the higher levels of expression, we chose TS cells to understand the role of Yy2 in gene and chromatin regulation. We used in vivo YY2 association as a measure to identify potential target genes. Sequencing of chromatin obtained in chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays carried out with αYY2 serum allowed us to identify a limited number of chromatin targets for YY2. Some putative binding sites were validated in regular ChIP assays and gene expression of genes nearby was altered in the absence of Yy2. Conclusions YY2 binding to ERVs is not confined to TS cells. In vivo binding sites share the presence of a consensus binding motif. Selected sites were uniquely bound by YY2 as

  18. Compositions comprising enhanced graphene oxide structures and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Priyank Vijaya; Bardhan, Neelkanth M.; Belcher, Angela; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2016-12-27

    Embodiments described herein generally relate to compositions comprising a graphene oxide species. In some embodiments, the compositions advantageously have relatively high oxygen content, even after annealing.

  19. Testing Whether Defective Chromatin Assembly in S-Phase Contributes to Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Peter

    2003-01-01

    .... We used a dominant negative mutant of (chromatin assembly factor-I) CAF1, a complex that assembles newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, to inhibit S-phase chromatin assembly and found that this induced S-phase arrest...

  20. Testing Whether Defective Chromatin Assembly in S-Phase Contributes to Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Peter

    2004-01-01

    .... We used a dominant negative mutant of (chromatin assembly factor-I) CAF1, a complex that assembles newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, to inhibit S-phase chromatin assembly and found that this induced S-phase arrest...