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Sample records for chromatin breaks iv

  1. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ

  2. Do chromatin changes around a nascent double strand DNA break spread spherically into linearly non-adjacent chromatin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Velibor

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, a lot has been done in elucidating the sequence of events that occur at the nascent double strand DNA break. Nevertheless, the overall structure formed by the DNA damage response (DDR) factors around the break site, the repair focus, remains poorly understood. Although most of the data presented so far only address events that occur in chromatin in cis around the break, there are strong indications that in mammalian systems it may also occur in trans, analogous to the recent findings showing this if budding yeast. There have been attempts to address the issue but the final proof is still missing due to lack of a proper experimental system. If found to be true, the spatial distribution of DDR factors would have a major impact on the neighboring chromatin both in cis and in trans, significantly affecting local chromatin function; gene transcription and potentially other functions.

  3. DNA repair goes hip-hop: SMARCA and CHD chromatin remodellers join the break dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Magdalena B; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-10-05

    Proper signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical to prevent genome instability and diseases such as cancer. The packaging of DNA into chromatin, however, has evolved as a mere obstacle to these DSB responses. Posttranslational modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling help to overcome this barrier by modulating nucleosome structures and allow signalling and repair machineries access to DSBs in chromatin. Here we recap our current knowledge on how ATP-dependent SMARCA- and CHD-type chromatin remodellers alter chromatin structure during the signalling and repair of DSBs and discuss how their dysfunction impacts genome stability and human disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Chromatin mobility is increased at sites of DNA double-strand breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, P. M.; Borovski, T.; Stap, J.; Cijsouw, T.; ten Cate, R.; Medema, J. P.; Kanaar, R.; Franken, N. A. P.; Aten, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can efficiently kill cancer cells, but they can also produce unwanted chromosome rearrangements when DNA ends from different DSBs are erroneously joined. Movement of DSB-containing chromatin domains might facilitate these DSB interactions and promote the formation of

  5. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-01

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  7. Chromatin- and temperature-dependent modulation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmroth, K; Nygren, J; Stenerlöw, B; Hultborn, R

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the influence of chromatin organization and scavenging capacity in relation to irradiation temperature on the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) in structures derived from human diploid fibroblasts. Agarose plugs with different chromatin structures (intact cells+/-wortmannin, permeabilized cells with condensed chromatin, nucleoids and DNA) were prepared and irradiated with X-rays at 2 or 37 degrees C and lysed using two different lysis protocols (new ice-cold lysis or standard lysis at 37 degrees C). Induction of DSB was determined by constant-field gel electrophoresis. The dose-modifying factor (DMF(temp)) for irradiation at 37 compared with 2 degrees C was 0.92 in intact cells (i.e. more DSB induced at 2 degrees C), but gradually increased to 1.5 in permeabilized cells, 2.2 in nucleoids and 2.6 in naked DNA, suggesting a role of chromatin organization for temperature modulation of DNA damage. In addition, DMF(temp) was influenced by the presence of 0.1 M DMSO or 30 mM glutathione, but not by post-irradiation temperature. The protective effect of low temperature was correlated to the indirect effects of ionizing radiation and was not dependent on post-irradiation temperature. Reasons for a dose modifying factor <1 in intact cells are discussed.

  8. Suberoylanilide Hydroxyamic Acid Modification of Chromatin Architecture Affects DNA Break Formation and Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sheetal; Le Hongan; Shih, S.-J.; Ho, Bay; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Chromatin-modifying compounds that inhibit the activity of histone deacetylases have shown potency as radiosensitizers, but the action of these drugs at a molecular level is not clear. Here we investigated the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxyamic acid (SAHA) on DNA breaks and their repair and induction of rearrangements. Methods and Materials: The effect of SAHA on both clonogenic survival and repair was assessed using cell lines SCC-25, MCF7, and TK6. In order to study unique DNA double-strand breaks, anti-CD95 antibody was employed to introduce a DNA double-strand break at a known location within the 11q23 region. The effects of SAHA on DNA cleavage and rearrangements were analyzed by ligation-mediated PCR and inverse PCR, respectively. Results: SAHA acts as radiosensitizer at 1 μM, with dose enhancement factors (DEFs) at 10% survival of: SCC-25 - 1.24 ± 0.05; MCF7 - 1.16 ± 0.09 and TK6 - 1.17 ± 0.05, and it reduced the capacity of SCC-25 cells to repair radiation induced lesions. Additionally, SAHA treatment diffused site-specific fragmentation over at least 1 kbp in TK6 cells. Chromosomal rearrangements produced in TK6 cells exposed to SAHA showed a reduction in microhomology at the breakpoint between 11q23 and partner chromosomes. Conclusions: SAHA shows efficacy as a radiosensitizer at clinically obtainable levels. In its presence, targeted DNA strand breaks occur over an expanded region, indicating increased chromatin access. The rejoining of such breaks is degraded by SAHA when measured as rearrangements at the molecular level and rejoining that contributes to cell survival.

  9. Heavy ion-induced lesions in DNA: A theoretical model for the initial induction of DNA strand breaks and chromatin breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed and used to calculate yields and spatial distributions of DNA strand breaks resulting from the interactions of heavy ions with chromatin in aqueous systems. The three dimensional spatial distribution of ionizing events has been modeled for charged particles as a function of charge and velocity. Chromatin has been modeled as a 30 nm diameter solenoid of nucleosomal DNA. The Monte Carlo methods used by Chatterjee et al. have been applied to DNA in a chromatin conformation. Refinements to their methods include: a combined treatment of primary and low energy (<2 keV) secondary electron interactions, an improved low energy delta ray model, and the combined simulation of direct energy deposition on the DNA and attack by diffusing hydroxyl radicals. Individual particle tracks are treated independently, which is assumed to be applicable to low fluence irradiations in which multiple particle effects are negligible. Single strand break cross section open-quotes hooksclose quotes seen in experiments at very high LET appear to be due to the collapsing radial extent of the track, as predicted in the open-quotes deep sieveclose quotes hypothesis proposed by Tobias et al. Spatial distributions of lesions produced by particles have been found to depend on chromatin structure. In the future, heavy ions may be used as a tool to probe the organization of DNA in chromatin. A Neyman A-binomial variation of the open-quotes cluster modelclose quotes for the distribution of chromatin breaks per irradiated cell has been theoretically tested. The model includes a treatment of the chromatin fragment detection technique's resolution, which places a limitation on the minimum size of fragments which can be detected. The model appears to fit some of the experimental data reasonably well. However, further experimental and theoretical refinements are desirable

  10. JMJD1C demethylates MDC1 to regulate the RNF8 and BRCA1-mediated chromatin response to DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Sugiko; Watanabe, Kenji; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin ubiquitylation flanking DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), mediated by RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases, orchestrates a two-branch pathway, recruiting repair factors 53BP1 or the RAP80-BRCA1 complex. We report that human demethylase JMJD1C regulates the RAP80-BRCA1 branch of this DNA...

  11. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao

    2009-01-01

    -PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor......-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA......, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA...

  12. The influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks: a study using nuclear and nucleoid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungman, M.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the influence of chromatin structure on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks, the alkaline unwinding technique was applied to nuclear and nucleoid monolayers. These chromatin substrates were prepared by treating human fibroblasts grown as monolayers with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 and varying concentrations of cations. The chromatin structure was modified either by a stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins by extraction in increasing concentrations of monovalent salt, or by the addition or deletion of mono- and divalent cations to condense or decondense the chromatin, respectively. It was found that the stepwise removal of DNA-bound proteins from the chromatin dramatically increased the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. The DNA-bound proteins showed a qualitative difference in their ability to protect the DNA where proteins removed by salt concentrations above 1.0 M exerted the greatest protection. Furthermore, the frequency of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks was found to be 6 times lower in condensed chromatin than in decondensed chromatin and about 80 times lower than in protein-depleted chromatin. It is concluded that the presence of DNA-bound proteins and the folding of the chromatin into higher-order structures protect the DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks

  13. Chromatin condensation and differential sensitivity of mammalian and insect cells to DNA strand breaks induced by bleomycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Larraza, Daniel M. [IMBICE, C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)]. E-mail: danielop@imbice.org.ar; Padron, Juan [IMBICE, C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ronci, Natalia E. [IMBICE, C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Vidal Rioja, Lidia A. [IMBICE, C.C. 403, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2006-08-30

    Bleomycin (BLM) induces DNA damage in living cells. In this report we analyzed the role of chromatin compactness in the differential response of mosquito (ATC-15) and mammalian (CHO) cells to DNA strand breaks induced by BLM. We used cells unexposed and exposed to sodium butyrate (NaB), which induces chromatin decondensation. By nucleoid sedimentation assay and digestions of nuclei with DNAse I, untreated mosquito cells (no BLM; no NaB) were shown to have more chromatin condensation than untreated CHO cells. By alkaline unwinding ATC-15 cells treated with NaB showed more BLM-induced DNA strand breaks than NaB-untreated CHO cells. The time-course of BLM-induced DNA damage to nuclear DNA was similar for NaB-untreated mammalian and insect cells, but with mosquito cells showing less DNA strand breaks, both at physiological temperatures and at 4 {sup o}C. However, when DNA repair was inhibited by low temperatures and chromatin was decondensed by NaB treatments, differences in BLM-induced DNA damage between these cells lines were no longer observed. In both cell lines, NaB did not affect BLM action on cell growth and viability. On the other hand, the low sensitivity of ATC-15 cells to BLM was reflected in their better growth efficiency. These cells exhibited a satisfactory growth at BLM doses that produced a permanent arrest of growth in CHO cells. The data suggest that mosquito cells might have linker DNAs shorter than those of mammalian cells, which would result in the observed both greater chromatin condensation and greater resistance to DNA damage induced by BLM as compared to CHO cells.

  14. Chromatin condensation and differential sensitivity of mammalian and insect cells to DNA strand breaks induced by bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Larraza, Daniel M.; Padron, Juan; Ronci, Natalia E.; Vidal Rioja, Lidia A.

    2006-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) induces DNA damage in living cells. In this report we analyzed the role of chromatin compactness in the differential response of mosquito (ATC-15) and mammalian (CHO) cells to DNA strand breaks induced by BLM. We used cells unexposed and exposed to sodium butyrate (NaB), which induces chromatin decondensation. By nucleoid sedimentation assay and digestions of nuclei with DNAse I, untreated mosquito cells (no BLM; no NaB) were shown to have more chromatin condensation than untreated CHO cells. By alkaline unwinding ATC-15 cells treated with NaB showed more BLM-induced DNA strand breaks than NaB-untreated CHO cells. The time-course of BLM-induced DNA damage to nuclear DNA was similar for NaB-untreated mammalian and insect cells, but with mosquito cells showing less DNA strand breaks, both at physiological temperatures and at 4 o C. However, when DNA repair was inhibited by low temperatures and chromatin was decondensed by NaB treatments, differences in BLM-induced DNA damage between these cells lines were no longer observed. In both cell lines, NaB did not affect BLM action on cell growth and viability. On the other hand, the low sensitivity of ATC-15 cells to BLM was reflected in their better growth efficiency. These cells exhibited a satisfactory growth at BLM doses that produced a permanent arrest of growth in CHO cells. The data suggest that mosquito cells might have linker DNAs shorter than those of mammalian cells, which would result in the observed both greater chromatin condensation and greater resistance to DNA damage induced by BLM as compared to CHO cells

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-07

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for 60 Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with 60 Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage. (paper)

  17. Processing of DNA double strand breaks by alternative non-homologous end-joining in hyperacetylated chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manova, Vasilissa; Singh, Satyendra K; Iliakis, George

    2012-08-22

    Mammalian cells employ at least two subpathways of non-homologous end-joining for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks: The canonical DNA-PK-dependent form of non-homologous end-joining (D-NHEJ) and an alternative, slowly operating, error-prone backup pathway (B-NHEJ). In contrast to D-NHEJ, which operates with similar efficiency throughout the cell cycle, B-NHEJ operates more efficiently in G2-phase. Notably, B-NHEJ also shows strong and as of yet unexplained dependency on growth activity and is markedly compromised in serum-deprived cells, or in cells that enter the plateau-phase of growth. The molecular mechanisms underpinning this response remain unknown. Since chromatin structure or changes in chromatin structure are prime candidate-B-NHEJ-modulators, we study here the role of chromatin hyperacetylation, either by HDAC2 knockdown or treatment with the HDAC inhibitor TSA, on the repair by B-NHEJ of IR-induced DSBs. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC2 fails to provoke histone hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs and has no detectable effect on B-NHEJ function. Treatment with TSA that inhibits multiple HDACs causes efficient, reversible chromatin hyperacetylation in Lig4-/- MEFs, as well as in human HCT116 Lig4-/- cells and the human glioma cell line M059K. The IR yield of DSBs in TSA-treated cells remains similar to that of untreated cells despite the expected chromatin relaxation. In addition, chromatin hyperacetylation leaves unchanged repair of DSBs by B-NHEJ in irradiated exponentially growing, or plateau-phase cells. Notably, under the experimental conditions employed here, chromatin hyperacetylation fails to detectably modulate B-NHEJ in M059K cells as well. In summary, the results show that chromatin acetylation or deacetylation does not affect the kinetics of alternative NHEJ in all types of cells examined both in exponentially growing and serum deprived cultures. We conclude that parameters beyond chromatin acetylation determine B

  18. Human RAD18 interacts with ubiquitylated chromatin components and facilitates RAD9 recruitment to DNA double strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Inagaki

    Full Text Available RAD18 is an ubiquitin ligase involved in replicative damage bypass and DNA double-strand break (DSB repair processes. We found that RPA is required for the dynamic pattern of RAD18 localization during the cell cycle, and for accumulation of RAD18 at sites of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage. In addition, RAD18 colocalizes with chromatin-associated conjugated ubiquitin and ubiquitylated H2A throughout the cell cycle and following irradiation. This localization pattern depends on the presence of an intact, ubiquitin-binding Zinc finger domain. Using a biochemical approach, we show that RAD18 directly binds to ubiquitylated H2A and several other unknown ubiquitylated chromatin components. This interaction also depends on the RAD18 Zinc finger, and increases upon the induction of DSBs by γ-irradiation. Intriguingly, RAD18 does not always colocalize with regions that show enhanced H2A ubiquitylation. In human female primary fibroblasts, where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated to equalize X-chromosomal gene expression between male (XY and female (XX cells, this inactive X is enriched for ubiquitylated H2A, but only rarely accumulates RAD18. This indicates that the binding of RAD18 to ubiquitylated H2A is context-dependent. Regarding the functional relevance of RAD18 localization at DSBs, we found that RAD18 is required for recruitment of RAD9, one of the components of the 9-1-1 checkpoint complex, to these sites. Recruitment of RAD9 requires the functions of the RING and Zinc finger domains of RAD18. Together, our data indicate that association of RAD18 with DSBs through ubiquitylated H2A and other ubiquitylated chromatin components allows recruitment of RAD9, which may function directly in DSB repair, independent of downstream activation of the checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2.

  19. Damage to cellular DNA from particulate radiations, the efficacy of its processing and the radiosensitivity of mammalian cells. Emphasis on DNA double strand breaks and chromatin breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    For several years, it has been evident that cellular radiation biology is in a necessary period of consolidation and transition (Lett 1987, 1990; Lett et al. 1986, 1987). Both changes are moving apace, and have been stimulated by studies with heavy charged particles. From the standpoint of radiation chemistry, there is now a consensus of opinion that the DNA hydration shell must be distinguished from bulk water in the cell nucleus and treated as an integral part of DNA (chromatin) (Lett 1987). Concomitantly, sentiment is strengthening for the abandonment of the classical notions of "direct" and "indirect" action (Fielden and O'Neill 1991; O'Neill 1991; O'Neill et al. 1991; Schulte-Frohlinde and Bothe 1991 and references therein). A layer of water molecules outside, or in the outer edge of, the DNA (chromatin) hydration shell influences cellular radiosensitivity in ways not fully understood. Charge and energy transfer processes facilitated by, or involving, DNA hydration must be considered in rigorous theories of radiation action on cells. The induction and processing of double stand breaks (DSBs) in DNA (chromatin) seem to be the predominant determinants of the radiotoxicity of normally radioresistant mammalian cells, the survival curves of which reflect the patterns of damage induced and the damage present after processing ceases, and can be modelled in formal terms by the use of reaction (enzyme) kinetics. Incongruities such as sublethal damage are neither scientifically sound nor relevant to cellular radiation biology (Calkins 1991; Lett 1990; Lett et al. 1987a). Increases in linear energy transfer (LET infinity) up to 100-200 keV micron-1 cause increases in the extents of neighboring chemical and physical damage in DNA denoted by the general term DSB. Those changes are accompanied by decreasing abilities of cells normally radioresistant to sparsely ionizing radiations to process DSBs in DNA and chromatin and to recover from radiation exposure, so they make

  20. Breaking an epigenetic chromatin switch: curious features of hysteresis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomeric silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi H Nagaraj

    Full Text Available In addition to gene network switches, local epigenetic modifications to DNA and histones play an important role in all-or-none cellular decision-making. Here, we study the dynamical design of a well-characterized epigenetic chromatin switch: the yeast SIR system, in order to understand the origin of the stability of epigenetic states. We study hysteresis in this system by perturbing it with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. We find that SIR silencing has many characteristics of a non-linear bistable system, as observed in conventional genetic switches, which are based on activities of a few promoters affecting each other through the abundance of their gene products. Quite remarkably, our experiments in yeast telomeric silencing show a very distinctive pattern when it comes to the transition from bistability to monostability. In particular, the loss of the stable silenced state, upon increasing the inhibitor concentration, does not seem to show the expected saddle node behavior, instead looking like a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. In other words, the 'off' state merges with the 'on' state at a threshold concentration leading to a single state, as opposed to the two states remaining distinct up to the threshold and exhibiting a discontinuous jump from the 'off' to the 'on' state. We argue that this is an inevitable consequence of silenced and active regions coexisting with dynamic domain boundaries. The experimental observations in our study therefore have broad implications for the understanding of chromatin silencing in yeast and beyond.

  1. Data report for ROSA-IV LSTF 10% hot leg break experiment Run SB-HL-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukita, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hideo; Saeki, Hiroyuki

    1991-03-01

    Experimental data for the 10% hot leg break test, Run SB-HL-04, conducted on March 29, 1988 at the ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF), are presented. This test was conducted as part of test series which studied the effect of break orientation on 10% hot leg break transient, and represented a vertical upward break. Other two tests in this test series represented horizontal break and vertical downward break, respectively. The results of these tests were characterized by asymmetric loop responses, flashing in the cold legs as well as upper downcomer, and condensation depressurization in the cold legs following injection of emergency core coolant (ECC) from accumulators. (author)

  2. Differences in heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks in a mouse DNA repair-deficient mutant cell line (SL3-147) before and after chromatin proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masahiro; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Sato, Koki; Minohara, Shinichi; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yatagai, Fumio.

    1995-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks induced by X- or neon beam-irradiation in a DNA double-strand break-repair-deficient mutant cell line (SL3-147) were examined. The increase in the number of DNA double-strand breaks was dose-depend after irradiation with X-rays and neon beams and was enhanced by chromatin-proteolysis treatment before irradiation. These results suggest that the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, is influenced by the chromatin structure. (author)

  3. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D; Panyutin, Igor G

    2016-01-02

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC.

  4. Heterochromatinization associated with cell differentiation as a model to study DNA double strand break induction and repair in the context of higher-order chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Baranová, Elena; Falková, Iva; Ježková, Lucie; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with extensive gene silencing, heterochromatinization and potentially decreasing need for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Differentiation stages of blood cells thus represent an excellent model to study DSB induction, repair and misrepair in the context of changing higher-order chromatin structure. We show that immature granulocytes form γH2AX and 53BP1 foci, contrary to the mature cells; however, these foci colocalize only rarely and DSB repair is inefficient. Moreover, specific chromatin structure of granulocytes probably influences DSB induction. - Highlights: ► DSB repair is absent in mature granulocytes with condensed chromatin. ► Repair proteins and γH2AX appear in immature stages but rarely colocalize. ► γH2AX persist long times in these cells and DSB repair is inefficient. ► Even though, γH2AX foci “move” out of the dense chromatin. ► 53BP1 enters HP1β domains only after their decondensation

  5. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  6. Chromatin dynamics during cell cycle mediate conversion of DNA damage into chromatid breaks and affect formation of chromosomal aberrations: Biological and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I.; Hatzi, Vasiliki I.; Donta-Bakoyianni, Catherine; Pantelias, Gabriel E.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of diverse chromosomal aberrations following irradiation and the variability in radiosensitivity at different cell-cycle stages remain a long standing controversy, probably because most of the studies have focused on elucidating the enzymatic mechanisms involved using simple DNA substrates. Yet, recognition, processing and repair of DNA damage occur within the nucleoprotein complex of chromatin which is dynamic in nature, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding. The present work reviews experimental work designed to investigate the impact of chromatin dynamics and chromosome conformation changes during cell-cycle in the formation of chromosomal aberrations. Using conventional cytogenetics and premature chromosome condensation to visualize interphase chromatin, the data presented support the hypothesis that chromatin dynamic changes during cell-cycle are important determinants in the conversion of sub-microscopic DNA lesions into chromatid breaks. Consequently, the type and yield of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations at a given cell-cycle-stage depends on the combined effect of DNA repair processes and chromatin dynamics, which is cell-cycle-regulated and subject to up- or down-regulation following radiation exposure or genetic alterations. This new hypothesis is used to explain the variability in radiosensitivity observed at various cell-cycle-stages, among mutant cells and cells of different origin, or among different individuals, and to revisit unresolved issues and unanswered questions. In addition, it is used to better understand hypersensitivity of AT cells and to provide an improved predictive G2-assay for evaluating radiosensitivity at individual level. Finally, experimental data at single cell level obtained using hybrid cells suggest that the proposed hypothesis applies only to the irradiated component of the hybrid.

  7. Data report for ROSA-IV LSTF 10% hot leg break experiment Run SB-HL-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukita, Yutaka; Hirata, Kazuo; Gotou, Hiroki

    1990-03-01

    Experimental data for the 10% hot leg break test, Run SB-HL-02, conducted at the ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) on June 30, 1987, are presented. This test assumed total failure of both high pressure injection (HPI) and auxiliary feedwater (AFW) systems. The test results were characterized by asymmetric loop responses, flashing in the cold legs and upper downcomer, as well as condensation depressurization in the cold legs following injection of emergency core coolant (ECC) from accumulators. (author)

  8. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in ...

  9. DNA breaks and repair in interstitial telomere sequences: Influence of chromatin structure; Etude des cassures de l'ADN et des mecanismes de reparation dans les sequences telomeriques interstitielles: Influence de la structure chromatinienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revaud, D.

    2009-06-15

    Interstitial Telomeric Sequences (ITS) are over-involved in spontaneous and radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in chinese hamster cells. We have performed a study to investigate the origin of their instability, spontaneously or after low doses irradiation. Our results demonstrate that ITS have a particular chromatin structure: short nucleotide repeat length, less compaction of the 30 nm chromatin fiber, presence of G-quadruplex structures. These features would modulate breaks production and would favour the recruitment of alternative DNA repair mechanisms, which are prone to produce chromosome aberrations. These pathways could be at the origin of chromosome aberrations in ITS whereas NHEJ and HR Double Strand Break repair pathways are rather required for a correct repair in these regions. (author)

  10. Reprogramming chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrensberger, Andreas Hasso; Svejstrup, Jesper Qualmann

    2012-01-01

    attributed to high kinetic barriers that affect all cells equally and can only be overcome by rare stochastic events. The barriers to reprogramming are likely to involve transformations of chromatin state because (i) inhibitors of chromatin-modifying enzymes can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming...... and (ii) knockdown or knock-out of chromatin-modifying enzymes can lower the efficiency of reprogramming. Here, we review the relationship between chromatin state transformations (chromatin reprogramming) and cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors...

  11. DNA double-strand breaks and Aurora B mislocalization induced by exposure of early mitotic cells to H2O2 appear to increase chromatin bridges and resultant cytokinesis failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min-Guk; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Choi, Hee-Song; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2017-07-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes that is a hallmark of cancer cells, can arise from tetraploid/binucleated cells through a failure of cytokinesis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer. However, the nature and role of ROS in cytokinesis progression and related mechanisms has not been clearly elucidated. Here, using time-lapse analysis of asynchronously growing cells and immunocytochemical analyses of synchronized cells, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) treatment at early mitosis (primarily prometaphase) significantly induced cytokinesis failure. Cytokinesis failure and the resultant formation of binucleated cells containing nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) seemed to be caused by increases in DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and subsequent unresolved chromatin bridges. We further found that H 2 O 2 induced mislocalization of Aurora B during mitosis. All of these effects were attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or overexpression of Catalase. Surprisingly, the PARP inhibitor PJ34 also reduced H 2 O 2 -induced Aurora B mislocalization and binucleated cell formation. Results of parallel experiments with etoposide, a topoisomerase IIα inhibitor that triggers DNA DSBs, suggested that both DNA DSBs and Aurora B mislocalization contribute to chromatin bridge formation. Aurora B mislocalization also appeared to weaken the "abscission checkpoint". Finally, we showed that KRAS-induced binucleated cell formation appeared to be also H 2 O 2 -dependent. In conclusion, we propose that a ROS, mainly H 2 O 2 increases binucleation through unresolved chromatin bridges caused by DNA damage and mislocalization of Aurora B, the latter of which appears to augment the effect of DNA damage on chromatin bridge formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chromatin Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Robijn; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Rabin, Yitzhak; Zidovska, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Following recent observations of large scale correlated motion of chromatin inside the nuclei of live differentiated cells, we present a hydrodynamic theory—the two-fluid model—in which the content of a nucleus is described as a chromatin solution with the nucleoplasm playing the role of the solvent and the chromatin fiber that of a solute. This system is subject to both passive thermal fluctuations and active scalar and vector events that are associated with free energy consumption, such as ATP hydrolysis. Scalar events drive the longitudinal viscoelastic modes (where the chromatin fiber moves relative to the solvent) while vector events generate the transverse modes (where the chromatin fiber moves together with the solvent). Using linear response methods, we derive explicit expressions for the response functions that connect the chromatin density and velocity correlation functions to the corresponding correlation functions of the active sources and the complex viscoelastic moduli of the chromatin solution. We then derive general expressions for the flow spectral density of the chromatin velocity field. We use the theory to analyze experimental results recently obtained by one of the present authors and her co-workers. We find that the time dependence of the experimental data for both native and ATP-depleted chromatin can be well-fitted using a simple model—the Maxwell fluid—for the complex modulus, although there is some discrepancy in terms of the wavevector dependence. Thermal fluctuations of ATP-depleted cells are predominantly longitudinal. ATP-active cells exhibit intense transverse long wavelength velocity fluctuations driven by force dipoles. Fluctuations with wavenumbers larger than a few inverse microns are dominated by concentration fluctuations with the same spectrum as thermal fluctuations but with increased intensity. PMID:24806919

  13. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E. (Saint Andrews Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1994-11-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm[sup -3] salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author).

  14. A component of DNA double-strand break repair is dependent on the spatial orientation of the lesions within the higher-order structures of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.J.; Bryant, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    By the use of a modified neutral filter elution procedure variations in the repair of DNA dsb have been observed between the ionising radiation sensitive mutant xrs-5 and the parent cell line CHO-K1. Conventional neutral filter elution requires harsh lysis conditions to remove higher-order chromatin structures which interfere with elution of DNA containing dsb. By lysing cells with non-ionic detergent in the presence of 2 mol dm -3 salt, histone-depleted structures that retain the higher-order nuclear matrix organization, including chromatin loops, can be produced. Elution from these structures will only occur if two or more dsb lie within a single-looped domain delineated by points of attachment to the nuclear matrix. Repair experiments indicate that in CHO cells repair of dsb in loops containing multiple dsb are repaired with slow kinetics whilst dsb occurring in loops containing single dsb are repaired with fast kinetics. Xrs-5 cells are defective in the repair of multiply damaged loops. This work indicates that the spatial orientation of dsb in the higher-order structures of chromatin are a possible factor in the repair of these lesions. (Author)

  15. Protective role of OH scavengers and DNA/chromatin organization in the induction of DNA breaks: mechanistic models and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballarini, F.; Rossetti, M.; Scannicchio, D.; Jacob, P.; Molinelli, S.; Ottolenghi, A.; Volata, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage can be modulated by various factors, including the environment scavenging capacity (SC) and the DNA organization within the cell nucleus (chromatin compactness, DNA-binding proteins etc.). In this context the induction of ssb and dsb by photons and light ions of different energies impinging on different DNA structures (e.g. linear DNA, SV40 'minichromosomes' and cellular DNA) at different OH-radical SC values was modelled with the Monte Carlo PARTRAC code. Presently PARTRAC can transport electrons, photons, protons and alpha particles in liquid water with an 'event-by-event' approach, and can simulate the DNA content of mammalian cells with an 'atom-by-atom' description, from nucleotide pairs to chromatin fibre loops and chromosome territories. Energy depositions in the sugar-phosphate were considered as potential (direct) ssb. The production, diffusion and reaction of chemical species were explicitly simulated; reactions of OH radicals with the sugar-phosphate were assumed to lead to 'indirect' ssb with probability 65%. Two ssb on opposite strands within 10 bp were considered as a dsb. Yields of ssb and dsb/Gy/Dalton were calculated for different DNA structures as a function of the OH mean life time. By Zyuzikov, N.; Michael, B.D. (Gray Cancer Institute, (GB)); Wu, L. (Ch Zyuzdirect damage yields. In general, also depending on radiation quality, linear DNA was found to be more susceptible to strand breakage than SV40 minichromosomes, which in turn showed higher damage yields with respect to cellular DNA. The very good agreement found with available experimental data provided a validation of the model and allowed us to quantify separately the protective effect of OH scavengers and DNA/chromatin organization. Comparisons with data on nucleoids (DNA unfolded and depleted of histones) suggested that the experimental procedures used to obtain such targets might lower the environment SC, due to the loss of cellular scavenging compounds

  16. Heterochromatinization associated with cell differentiation as a model to study DNA double strand break induction and repair in the context of higher-order chromatin structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Štefančíková, Lenka; Baranová, E.; Falková, Iva; Ježková, L.; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, Jan (2014), s. 177-185 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double strand break (DSB) repair * Immature and terminally differentiated granulocytes * gamma H2AX/53BP1 repair foci Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  17. Epigenetic chromatin modifiers in barley: IV. The study of barley Polycomb group (PcG genes during seed development and in response to external ABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanca Michele A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic phenomena have been associated with the regulation of active and silent chromatin states achieved by modifications of chromatin structure through DNA methylation, and histone post-translational modifications. The latter is accomplished, in part, through the action of PcG (Polycomb group protein complexes which methylate nucleosomal histone tails at specific sites, ultimately leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Different PcG complex variants operating during different developmental stages have been described in plants. In particular, the so-called FIE/MEA/FIS2 complex governs the expression of genes important in embryo and endosperm development in Arabidopsis. In our effort to understand the epigenetic mechanisms regulating seed development in barley (Hordeum vulgare, an agronomically important monocot plant cultivated for its endosperm, we set out to characterize the genes encoding barley PcG proteins. Results Four barley PcG gene homologues, named HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a, and HvSu(z12b were identified and structurally and phylogenetically characterized. The corresponding genes HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a, and HvSu(z12b were mapped onto barley chromosomes 7H, 4H, 2H and 5H, respectively. Expression analysis of the PcG genes revealed significant differences in gene expression among tissues and seed developmental stages and between barley cultivars with varying seed size. Furthermore, HvFIE and HvE(Z gene expression was responsive to the abiotic stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA known to be involved in seed maturation, dormancy and germination. Conclusion This study reports the first characterization of the PcG homologues, HvFIE, HvE(Z, HvSu(z12a and HvSu(z12b in barley. All genes co-localized with known chromosomal regions responsible for malting quality related traits, suggesting that they might be used for developing molecular markers to be applied in marker assisted selection. The Pc

  18. SHH1, a homeodomain protein required for DNA methylation, as well as RDR2, RDM4, and chromatin remodeling factors, associate with RNA polymerase IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Law

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic modification that is critical for gene silencing and the maintenance of genome integrity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the de novo DNA methyltransferase, domains rearranged methyltransferase 2 (DRM2, is targeted to specific genomic loci by 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM. Biogenesis of the targeting siRNAs is thought to be initiated by the activity of the plant-specific RNA polymerase IV (Pol-IV. However, the mechanism through which Pol-IV is targeted to specific genomic loci and whether factors other than the core Pol-IV machinery are required for Pol-IV activity remain unknown. Through the affinity purification of nuclear RNA polymerase D1 (NRPD1, the largest subunit of the Pol-IV polymerase, we found that several previously identified RdDM components co-purify with Pol-IV, namely RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2, CLASSY1 (CLSY1, and RNA-directed DNA methylation 4 (RDM4, suggesting that the upstream siRNA generating portion of the RdDM pathway may be more physically coupled than previously envisioned. A homeodomain protein, SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1 (SHH1, was also found to co-purify with NRPD1; and we demonstrate that SHH1 is required for de novo and maintenance DNA methylation, as well as for the accumulation of siRNAs at specific loci, confirming it is a bonafide component of the RdDM pathway.

  19. Chromatin damage induced by fast neutrons or UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.; Mihailescu, I

    2002-07-01

    Chromatin samples from livers of Wistar rats were subjected to fast neutron irradiation in doses of 10-100 Gy or to a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, in doses of 0.5-3 MJ.m{sup -2}. The action of the radiation on chromatin was monitored by chromatin intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetimes (of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin) and by analysing fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For the mentioned doses of UV excimer laser radiation, the action on chromatin was more intense than in the case of fast neutrons. The same types of damage are produced by the two radiations: acidic and basic destruction of chromatin protein structure, DNA strand breaking and the increase of the distance between DNA and proteins in chromatin. (author)

  20. Chromatin damage induced by fast neutrons or UV laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.; Mihailescu, I.

    2002-01-01

    Chromatin samples from livers of Wistar rats were subjected to fast neutron irradiation in doses of 10-100 Gy or to a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, in doses of 0.5-3 MJ.m -2 . The action of the radiation on chromatin was monitored by chromatin intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetimes (of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin) and by analysing fluorescence resonance energy transfer between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For the mentioned doses of UV excimer laser radiation, the action on chromatin was more intense than in the case of fast neutrons. The same types of damage are produced by the two radiations: acidic and basic destruction of chromatin protein structure, DNA strand breaking and the increase of the distance between DNA and proteins in chromatin. (author)

  1. Radiation-induced XRCC4 association with chromatin DNA analyzed by biochemical fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamdar, R.P.; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    XRCC4, in association with DNA ligase IV, is thought to play a critical role in the ligation of two DNA ends in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. In the present study, we captured radiation-induced chromatin-recruitment of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. A subpopulation of XRCC4 changed into a form that is resistant to the extraction with 0.5% Nonidet P-40-containing buffer after irradiation. This form of XRCC4 was liberated by micrococcal nuclease treatment, indicating that it had been tethered to chromatin DNA. This chromatin-recruitment of XRCC4 could be seen immediately (<0.1 hr) after irradiation and remained up to 4 hr after 20 Gy irradiation. It was seen even after irradiation of small doses, id est (i.e.), 2 Gy, but the residence of XRCC4 on chromatin was very transient after 2 Gy irradiation, returning to near normal level in 0.2-0.5 hr after irradiation. The chromatin-bound XRCC4 represented only -1% of total XRCC4 molecules even after 20 Gy irradiation and the quantitative analysis using purified protein as the reference suggested that only a few XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complexes were recruited to each DNA end. We further show that the chromatin-recruitment of XRCC4 was not attenuated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of DNA-PK, or siRNA-mediated knockdown of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), indicating that this process does not require DNA-PKcs. These results would provide us with useful experimental tools and important insights to understand the DNA repair process through NHEJ pathway. (author)

  2. Mutagenic repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in vaccinia virus genomes requires cellular DNA ligase IV activity in the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteijn, Rutger David; Drexler, Ingo; Smith, Geoffrey L; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2018-04-20

    Poxviruses comprise a group of large dsDNA viruses that include members relevant to human and animal health, such as variola virus, monkeypox virus, cowpox virus and vaccinia virus (VACV). Poxviruses are remarkable for their unique replication cycle, which is restricted to the cytoplasm of infected cells. The independence from the host nucleus requires poxviruses to encode most of the enzymes involved in DNA replication, transcription and processing. Here, we use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering system to induce DNA damage to VACV (strain Western Reserve) genomes. We show that targeting CRISPR/Cas9 to essential viral genes limits virus replication efficiently. Although VACV is a strictly cytoplasmic pathogen, we observed extensive viral genome editing at the target site; this is reminiscent of a non-homologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism. This pathway was not dependent on the viral DNA ligase, but critically involved the cellular DNA ligase IV. Our data show that DNA ligase IV can act outside of the nucleus to allow repair of dsDNA breaks in poxvirus genomes. This pathway might contribute to the introduction of mutations within the genome of poxviruses and may thereby promote the evolution of these viruses.

  3. Changes in chromatin structure during the aging of cell cultures as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagor, M.; Cole, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclei from cultured human cells were examined by differential scanning calorimetry. Their melting profiles revealed four structural transitions at 60, 76, 88, and 105 degrees C (transitions I-IV, respectively). In immortalized (i.e., tumor) cell cultures and in normal cell cultures of low passage number, melting profiles were dominated by the 105 degrees C transition (transition IV), but in vitro aging of normal and Werner syndrome cells was associated with a marked decrease in transition IV followed by an increase in transition III at the expense of transition IV. At intermediate times in the aging process, much DNA melted at a temperature range (95-102 degrees C) intermediate between transitions III and IV, and this is consistent with the notion that aging of cell cultures is accompanied by an increase in single-strand character of the DNA. Calorimetric changes were observed in the melting profile of nuclei from UV-irradiated tumor cells that resembled the age-induced intermediate melting of chromatin. It is suggested that aging is accompanied by an increase in single-stranded character of the DNA in chromatin, which lowers its melting temperature, followed by strand breaks in the DNA that destroy its supercoiling potential

  4. Chromatin is wonderful stuff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin molecules have properties that set them aside from all other biomacromolecules in the cell. (i) Chromosomes, which are single chromatin molecules, are the largest macromolecules in eukaryotic cells. (ii) Chromatin molecules carry the cell's genetic and epigenetic information and all

  5. Chromatin dynamics during DSB repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Gabrielová, Barbora; Ondřej, Vladan; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1773, č. 10 (2007), s. 1534-1545 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1065203; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05OC084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin structure * double- strand breaks (DSB) * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.374, year: 2007

  6. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  7. Spectroscopic study of fast-neutron-irradiated chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Gazdaru, D.; Constantinescu, B.

    2004-01-01

    The effects produced by fast neutrons (0-100 Gy) on chromatin structure were analyzed by (i) [ 1 H]-NMR spectroscopy, (ii) time resolved spectroscopy, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Two types of chromatin were tested: (i) a chromatin from a normal tissue (liver of Wistar rats) and (ii) a chromatin from a tumoral tissue (Guerin limphotrope epithelioma, a rat solid tumor). The fast-neutron action on chromatin determines greater values of the [ 1 H]-NMR transverse relaxation time, indicating a more injured structure. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the relative contribution of the excited state lifetime of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin DNA diminishes with increasing irradiation doses. This reflects the damage that occurs in DNA structure: production of single- and double-strand breaks due to sugar and base modifications. By the FRET method, the distance between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled at chromatin was determined. This distance increases upon fast-neutron action. The radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue chromatin seems higher than that of the normal tissue chromatin, probably because of its higher (loose) euchromatin/(compact) heterochromatin ratio. As the values of the physical parameters analyzed are specific for a determined dose, the establishment of these parameters may constitute a criterion for the microdosimetry of chromatin radiolesions produced by fast neutrons. (author)

  8. Spectroscopic study of fast-neutron-irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [V. Babes National Inst., Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: serbanradu@pcnet.ro; Gazdaru, D. [Bucharest Univ., Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [H. Hulubei National Inst., Dept. of Cyclotron, Bucharest (Romania)

    2004-02-01

    The effects produced by fast neutrons (0-100 Gy) on chromatin structure were analyzed by (i) [{sup 1}H]-NMR spectroscopy, (ii) time resolved spectroscopy, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Two types of chromatin were tested: (i) a chromatin from a normal tissue (liver of Wistar rats) and (ii) a chromatin from a tumoral tissue (Guerin limphotrope epithelioma, a rat solid tumor). The fast-neutron action on chromatin determines greater values of the [{sup 1}H]-NMR transverse relaxation time, indicating a more injured structure. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that the relative contribution of the excited state lifetime of bound ethidium bromide to chromatin DNA diminishes with increasing irradiation doses. This reflects the damage that occurs in DNA structure: production of single- and double-strand breaks due to sugar and base modifications. By the FRET method, the distance between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled at chromatin was determined. This distance increases upon fast-neutron action. The radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue chromatin seems higher than that of the normal tissue chromatin, probably because of its higher (loose) euchromatin/(compact) heterochromatin ratio. As the values of the physical parameters analyzed are specific for a determined dose, the establishment of these parameters may constitute a criterion for the microdosimetry of chromatin radiolesions produced by fast neutrons. (author)

  9. Chromatin meets its organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Megan S; Spector, David L

    2013-06-06

    Chromatin organization and gene-gene interactions are critical components of carrying out developmental programs. Phillips-Cremins et al. identify a series of unexpected architectural proteins that work in a combinatorial manner to functionally organize chromatin in a cell-type-specific manner at the submegabase-length scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heterogeneous chromatin target model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Makoto

    1996-01-01

    The higher order structure of the entangled chromatin fibers in a chromosome plays a key role in molecular control mechanism involved in chromosome mutation due to ionizing radiations or chemical mutagens. The condensed superstructure of chromatin is not so rigid and regular as has been postulated in general. We have proposed a rheological explanation for the flexible network system ('chromatin network') that consists of the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters linked with supertwisting DNA in a chromatin fiber ('Supertwisting Particulate Model'). We have proposed a 'Heterosensitive Target Model' for cellular radiosensitivity that is a modification of 'Heterogeneous Target Model'. The heterogeneity of chromatin target is derived from the highly condensed organization of chromatin segments consist of unstable and fragile sites in the fluctuating assembly of nucleosome clusters, namely 'supranucleosomal particles' or 'superbeads'. The models have been principally supported by our electron microscopic experiments employing 'surface - spreading whole - mount technique' since 1967. However, some deformation and artifacts in the chromatin structure are inevitable with these electron microscopic procedures. On the contrary, the 'atomic force microscope (AFM)' can be operated in liquid as well as in the air. A living specimen can be examined without any preparative procedures. Micromanipulation of the isolated chromosome is also possible by the precise positional control of a cantilever on the nanometer scale. The living human chromosomes were submerged in a solution of culture medium and observed by AFM using a liquid immersion cell. The surface - spreading whole - mount technique was applicable for this observation. The particulate chromatin segments of nucleosome clusters were clearly observed within mitotic human chromosomes in a living hydrated condition. These findings support the heterogeneity of chromatin target in a living cell. (J.P.N.)

  11. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  12. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  13. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. ► DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. ► Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. ► DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and γH2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by linker histones. We suggest that following DSB formation, although there is localised chromatin unfolding to

  14. Chromosome aberration model combining radiation tracks, chromatin structure, DSB repair and chromatin mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, W.; Kundrat, P.

    2015-01-01

    The module that simulates the kinetics and yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations within the biophysical code PARTRAC is described. Radiation track structures simulated by Monte Carlo methods are overlapped with multi-scale models of DNA and chromatin to assess the resulting DNA damage. Spatial mobility of individual DNA ends from double-strand breaks is modelled simultaneously with their processing by the non-homologous end-joining enzymes. To score diverse types of chromosome aberrations, the joined ends are classified regarding their original chromosomal location, orientation and the involvement of centromeres. A comparison with experimental data on dicentrics induced by gamma and alpha particles shows that their relative dose dependence is predicted correctly, although the absolute yields are overestimated. The critical model assumptions on chromatin mobility and on the initial damage recognition and chromatin remodelling steps and their future refinements to solve this issue are discussed. (authors)

  15. Blind-blind prediction by RELAP5/MOD1 for a 0.1% very small cold-leg break experiment at ROSA-IV large-scale test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Kukita, Y.; Kawaji, M.; Osakabe, M.; Schultz, R.R.; Tanaka, M.; Tasaka, K.

    1986-01-01

    The large-scale test facility (LSTF) of the Rig of Safety Assessment No. 4 (ROSA-IV) program is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) pressurized water reactor (PWR) system with an electrically heated core used for integral simulation of small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) and operational transients. The 0.1% very small cold-leg break experiment was conducted as the first integral experiment at the LSTF. The test provided a good opportunity to truly assess the state-of-the-art predictability of the safety analysis code RELAP5/MODI CY18 through a blind-blind prediction of the experiment since there was no prior experience in analyzing the experimental data with the code; furthermore, detailed operational characteristics of LSTF were not yet known. The LOCA transient was mitigated by high-pressure charging pump injection to the primary system and bleed and feed operation of the secondary system. The simulated reactor system was safely placed in hot standby condition by engineered safety features similar to those on a PWR. Natural circulation flow was established to effectively remove the decay heat generated in the core. No cladding surface temperature excursion was observed. The RELAP5 code showed good capability to predict thermal-hydraulic phenomena during the very small break LOCA transient. Although all the information needed for the analysis by the RELAP5 code was obtained solely from the engineering drawings for fabrication and the operational specifications, the code predicted key phenomena satisfactorily

  16. Fragmentation of chromatin with 125I radioactive disintegrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.N.; Nobis, P.; Dewey, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The DNA in Chinese hamster cells was labeled first for 3 h with [ 3 H]TdR and then for 3 h with [ 125 I]UdR. Chromatin was extracted, frozen, and stored at -30 0 C until 1.0 x 10 17 and 1.25 x 10 17 disintegrations/g of labeled DNA occurred for 125 I and 3 H, respectively. Velocity sedimentation of chromatin (DNA with associated chromosomal proteins) in neutral sucrose gradients indicated that the localized energy from the 125 I disintegrations, which gave about 1 double-strand break/disintegration plus an additional 1.3 single strand breaks, selectively fragmented the [ 125 I] chromatin into pieces smaller than the [ 3 H] chromatin. In other words, 125 I disintegrations caused much more localized damage in the chromatin labeled with 125 I than in the chromatin labeled with 3 H, and fragments induced in DNA by 125 I disintegrations were not held together by the associated chromosomal proteins. Use of this 125 I technique for studying chromosomal proteins associated with different regions in the cellular DNA is discussed. For these studies, the number of disintegrations required for fragmenting DNA molecules of different sizes is illustrated

  17. Reprogramming the chromatin landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Tina B; Voss, Ty C; Sung, Myong-Hee

    2013-01-01

    , mechanistic details defining the cellular interactions between ER and GR are poorly understood. We investigated genome-wide binding profiles for ER and GR upon coactivation and characterized the status of the chromatin landscape. We describe a novel mechanism dictating the molecular interplay between ER...... and GR. Upon induction, GR modulates access of ER to specific sites in the genome by reorganization of the chromatin configuration for these elements. Binding to these newly accessible sites occurs either by direct recognition of ER response elements or indirectly through interactions with other factors...

  18. Fast neutron irradiation effects on liver chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Radu, L.

    1996-01-01

    The growing interest in neutron therapy requires complex studies on the mechanisms of neutron action on biological systems, especially on chromatin. The chromatin was extracted from a normal tissue-livers of Wistar rats - and from a tumoral tissue - Walker tumour maintained on Wistar rats. Irradiation doses from 5 Gy to 100 Gy by fast neutron intense beams produced via d(13.5 MeV) +Be (thick target) reaction at Bucharest U-120 Classical Cyclotron were used. To study the post-irradiation effects, various methods were employed. So, the variation in the 260 nm absorbency in chromatin thermal transition was pursuit. The chromatin-ethidium bromide complexes fluorescence with λ ex =480 nm and λ em =600 nm was analyzed. To determine chromatin DNA strand breaks a fluorimetric method, with cells' suspensions as starting material was used. This method requires a partial treatment with alkali producing three components: T-estimating the total fluorescence of DNA double helix, P-assigning the untwisting rate and B-the blank, where DNA is completely unfolded The percentsge of DNA double strand,-D-, remaining after this treatment, is: %D=100x(P-B)/(T-B). The intrinsic chromatin fluorescence was determined for tyrosine (λ ex =280 nm, λ em =305 nm), specific for badic chromatin prooteins, and for tryptophane (λ ex =290 nm, λ em =345 nm) specific for acid chromatin proteins. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed: The double fluorescent labelling of chromatin was realized with acridine orange for DNA and with dansyl chloride for chromatin proteins. Fluorescence intensity determinations were done with λ ex =505 nm, λ em =530 nm for acridine orange and with λ ex =323 nm, λ em =505 nm for dansyl chloride. A Pye Unicam SP 1800 spectrophotometer and a Aminco SPF 500 spectrofluorimeter were employed. (author)

  19. Inverse break-through investigation on uranium isotope separation in the system Fe(III) water-glycerine solution-U(IV) cathionic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murgulescu, Sanda; Calusaru, A.

    1977-01-01

    When a solution containing ferric ions passes on cationic resin in U(IV) form, the substitution of uranium by iron is preceded by oxydation of U(IV) to U(VI). During the contact of U(VI) in solution with U(IV) in resin, an exchange reaction occurs, in which 235 U is slightly concentrated in solution and 238 U in resin phase. Since increase of temperature accelerates the exchange reaction, the apparent thermodynamic values of the exchange reaction were calculated, by taking into account the variation of the apparent equilibrium constant as a function of the reciprocal value of the temperature. The corresponding thermodynamic values in both pure aqueous and water-glycerine solution are: ΔH 0 =6.45 cal.mol -1 and ΔS 0 =21.6x10 -3 cal. 0 K -1 . The use of glycerine containing solutions offers the important advantage to increase the stability versus hydrolysis of the ferric ions even at higher temperature

  20. Proteolysis breaks tolerance toward intact α345(IV) collagen, eliciting novel anti-GBM autoantibodies specific for α345NC1 hexamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaru, Florina; Wang, Xu-Ping; Luo, Wentian; Ge, Linna; Miner, Jeffrey H; Kleinau, Sandra; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Wasiluk, Andrew; Heidet, Laurence; Kitching, A. Richard; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Goodpasture disease is an autoimmune kidney disease mediated by autoAbs against NC1 monomers of α3(IV) collagen that bind to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), usually causing rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. We identified a novel type of human IgG4-restricted anti-GBM autoAbs associated with mild non-progressive glomerulonephritis, which specifically targeted α345NC1 hexamers but not α3NC1 monomers. The mechanisms eliciting these anti-GBM autoAbs were investigated in mouse models recapitulating this phenotype. Wild type and FcγRIIB−/− mice immunized with autologous murine GBM NC1 hexamers produced mouse IgG1-restricted autoAbs specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which bound to the GBM in vivo but did not cause glomerulonephritis. In these mice, intact collagen IV from murine GBM was not immunogenic. However, in Col4a3−/− Alport mice, both intact collagen IV and NC1 hexamers from murine GBM elicited IgG antibodies specific for α3α4α5NC1 hexamers, which were not subclass restricted. As heterologous antigen in COL4A3-humanized mice, murine GBM NC1 hexamers elicited mouse IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b autoAbs specific for α345NC1 hexamers and induced anti-GBM Ab glomerulonephritis. These findings indicate that tolerance toward autologous intact α3α4α5(IV) collagen is established in hosts expressing this antigen, even though autoreactive B cells specific for α345NC1 hexamers are not purged from their repertoire. Proteolysis selectively breaches this tolerance by generating autoimmunogenic α3α4α5NC1 hexamers. This provides a mechanism eliciting autoAbs specific for α345NC1 hexamers, which are restricted to non-inflammatory IgG subclasses and non-nephritogenic. In Alport syndrome, lack of tolerance toward α3α4α5(IV) collagen promotes production of alloantibodies to α345NC1 hexamers, including pro-inflammatory IgG subclasses which mediate post-transplant anti-GBM nephritis. PMID:23303673

  1. Chromatin decondensed by acetylation shows an elevated radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nackerdien, Z.; Michie, J.; Boehm, L.

    1989-01-01

    V-79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts exposed to 5 mM n-sodium butyrate were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays and cell survival was determined by the cell colony assay. In a separate set of experiments the acetylated chromatin obtained from these cells was irradiated and the change of molecular weight of the DNA was evaluated by alkaline sucrose density centrifugation. At a survival level of 10(-2) to 10(-4) cells exposed to butyrate were found to be 1.3-1.4 times more radiosensitive than control cells. Exposure of isolated chromatin to 100 Gy of 60Co gamma irradiation generated 0.9 +/- 0.03 single-strand breaks (ssb) per 10 Gy per 10(8) Da and 2.0 +/- 0.3 ssb/10 Gy/10(8) Da for control and acetylated chromatin, respectively. The elevated radiation sensitivity of chromatin relaxed by acetylation is in good agreement with previous results on chromatin expanded by histone H1 depletion. Packing and accessibility of DNA in chromatin appear to be major factors which influence the radiation sensitivity. The intrinsic radiation sensitivity of chromatin in various packing states is discussed in light of the variation of radiation sensitivity of whole cells in the cell cycle which incorporates repair

  2. The effect of stellar evolution uncertainties on the rest-frame ultraviolet stellar lines of C IV and He II in high-redshift Lyman-break galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, John J.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Young, massive stars dominate the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectra of star-forming galaxies. At high redshifts (z > 2), these rest-frame UV features are shifted into the observed-frame optical and a combination of gravitational lensing, deep spectroscopy and spectral stacking analysis allows the stellar population characteristics of these sources to be investigated. We use our stellar population synthesis code Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) to fit two strong rest-frame UV spectral features in published Lyman-break galaxy spectra, taking into account the effects of binary evolution on the stellar spectrum. In particular, we consider the effects of quasi-homogeneous evolution (arising from the rotational mixing of rapidly rotating stars), metallicity and the relative abundance of carbon and oxygen on the observed strengths of He IIλ1640 Å and C IVλ1548, 1551 Å spectral lines. We find that Lyman-break galaxy spectra at z ˜ 2-3 are best fitted with moderately sub-solar metallicities, and with a depleted carbon-to-oxygen ratio. We also find that the spectra of the lowest metallicity sources are best fitted with model spectra in which the He II emission line is boosted by the inclusion of the effect of massive stars being spun-up during binary mass transfer so these rapidly rotating stars experience quasi-homogeneous evolution.

  3. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  4. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Dept. of Molecular Genetics, V. Babes National Inst., Bd. Timisoara, Bucharest (Romania); Constantinescu, B. [Dept. of Cyclotron, H. Hulubei National Inst., Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Dept. of Biophysics, Physics Faculty, Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  5. Effects of fast neutrons on chromatin: dependence on chromatin structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Constantinescu, B.; Gazdaru, D.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of fast neutrons (10-100 Gy) on chromatin extracted from normal (liver of Wistar rats) and tumor (Walker carcinosarcoma maintained on Wistar rats) tissues were compared. The spectroscopic assays used were (i) chromatin intrinsic fluorescence, (ii) time-resolved fluorescence of chromatin-proflavine complexes, and (iii) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between dansyl chloride and acridine orange coupled to chromatin. For both normal and tumor chromatin, the intensity of intrinsic fluorescence specific for acidic and basic proteins decreased with increasing dose. The relative contributions of the excited-state lifetime of proflavine bound to chromatin were reduced upon fast-neutron irradiation, indicating a decrease in the proportion of chromatin DNA available for ligand binding. The Forster energy transfer efficiencies were also modified by irradiation. These effects were larger for chromatin from tumor tissue. In the range 0-100 Gy, fast neutrons induced alterations in DNA and acidic and basic proteins, as well as in global chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of chromatin extracted from tumor tissue seems to be higher than that of chromatin extracted from normal tissue, probably because of its higher euchromatin (loose)-heterochromatin (compact) ratio. (author)

  6. Radiolysis of chromatin extracted from cultured mammalian cells: production of alkali-labile strand damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, L.K.; Adelstein, S.J.; Stein, G.

    1978-01-01

    Chromatin has been isolated from cultured Chinese-hamster lung fibroblasts as an expanded aqueous gel. The DNA in isolated chromatin has been examined by sedimentation on alkaline sucrose gradients. The average molecular weight of the DNA has been determined to be 50 million. γ -irradiation of isolated chromatin degraded the DNA to lower molecular weight. The yield of single-strand breaks in the DNA was 0.02 single-strand breaks per krad-10 6 dalton, calculated from a dose-range of 1 to 400 krad and covering a DNA molecular weight range of 2 x 10 7 to 1.4 x 10 5 . There was a considerable difference in the efficiency of the formation of single-strand breaks in DNA irradiated as isolated chromatin compared with chromatin irradiated in whole cells before isolation. For isolated chromatin, values of 6 eV per break have been calculated compared with about 80 eV per break for chromatin irradiated in whole cells, which suggest a large contribution from indirect action by aqueous radicals in isolated chromatin. (author)

  7. Evaluation of a sodium-water reaction event caused by steam generator tubes break in the prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang June; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Kang, Seok Hun; Lee, Kwi Lim; Choi, Chi Woong; Lee, Seung Won; Yoo, Jin; Jeong, Jae Ho; Jeong, Tae Kyeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The prototype generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) has been developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This reactor uses sodium as a reactor coolant to transfer the core heat energy to the turbine. Sodium has chemical characteristics that allow it to violently react with materials such as a water or steam. When a sodium–water reaction (SWR) occurs due to leakage or breakage of steam generator tubes, high-pressure waves and corrosive reaction products are produced, which threaten the structural integrity of the components of the intermediate heat-transfer system (IHTS) and the safety of the primary heat-transfer system (PHTS). In the PGSFR, SWR events are included in the design-basis event. This event should be analyzed from the viewpoint of the integrities of the IHTS and fuel rods. To evaluate the integrity of the IHTS based on the consequences of the SWR, the behaviors of the generated high-pressure waves are analyzed at the major positions of a failed IHTS loop using a sodium–water advanced analysis method-II code. The integrity of the fuel rods must be consistently maintained below the safety acceptance criteria to avoid the consequences of the SWR. The integrity of the PHTS is evaluated using the multidimensional analysis of reactor safety-liquid metal reactor code to model the whole plant.

  8. Chromatin modifications and the DNA damage response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Singh, Mayank; Gupta, Arun; Misra, Hari S.; Albuquerque, Kevin; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, cells have evolved highly effective repair mechanisms to deal with the potentially lethal DNA damage produced by exposure to endogenous as well as exogenous agents. Ionizing radiation exposure induces highly lethal DNA damage, especially DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), that is sensed by the cellular machinery and then subsequently repaired by either of two different DSB repair mechanisms: (1) non-homologous end joining, which re-ligates the broken ends of the DNA and (2) homologous recombination, that employs an undamaged identical DNA sequence as a template, to maintain the fidelity of DNA repair. Repair of DSBs must occur within the natural context of the cellular DNA which, along with specific proteins, is organized to form chromatin, the overall structure of which can impede DNA damage site access by repair proteins. The chromatin complex is a dynamic structure and is known to change as required for ongoing cellular processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Similarly, during the process of DNA damage sensing and repair, chromatin needs to undergo several changes in order to facilitate accessibility of the repair machinery. Cells utilize several factors to modify the chromatin in order to locally open up the structure to reveal the underlying DNA sequence but post-translational modification of the histone components is one of the primary mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize chromatin modifications by the respective chromatin modifying factors that occur during the DNA damage response.

  9. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  10. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Inheritance of the DNA sequence and its proper organization into chromatin is fundamental for genome stability and function. Therefore, how specific chromatin structures are restored on newly synthesized DNA and transmitted through cell division remains a central question to understand cell fate...... choices and self-renewal. Propagation of genetic information and chromatin-based information in cycling cells entails genome-wide disruption and restoration of chromatin, coupled with faithful replication of DNA. In this chapter, we describe how cells duplicate the genome while maintaining its proper...... organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  11. Histone Variant Regulates DNA Repair via Chromatin Condensation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activating the appropriate DNA repair pathway is essential for maintaining the stability of the genome after a break in both strands of DNA. How a pathway is selected, however, is not well understood. Since these double strand breaks (DSBs) occur while DNA is packaged as chromatin, changes in its organization are necessary for repair to take place. Numerous alterations have

  12. Chromatin dynamics in genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote...... access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance...... of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage....

  13. Chromatin Flavors: Chromatin composition and domain organization in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. van Bemmel (Joke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractChromatin was originally identified by W. Flemming in 1882 as not much more than the stainable substance of the cell nucleus. Flemming named this substance according to the Greek word “chroma”, meaning color. In 1911 chromatin was characterized as proteins, named histones, that

  14. Breaking Bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Isaac-Cesar; Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    The sight of a broken bat in Major League Baseball can produce anything from a humorous dribbler in the infield to a frightening pointed projectile headed for the stands. Bats usually break at the weakest point, typically in the handle. Breaking happens because the wood gets bent beyond the breaking point due to the wave sent down the bat created…

  15. Radiation-induced cell death by chromatin loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, I.R.; Warenius, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    A model is proposed which relates reproductive death of cells caused by radiation to loss of chromatin at cell division. This loss of chromatin can occur through chromosomal deletions or through the formation of asymmetrical chromosomal exchanges. It is proposed that smaller doses of radiation produce fewer chromatin breaks, which are more likely to be accurately repaired, compared with larger doses. Consequently, smaller doses of radiation are less efficient in causing cell death, leading to a shoulder on the cell survival curve. Experimental evidence supports this model, and the fit between the derived formula and experimental cell survival curves is good. The derived formula approximates to the linear-quadratic equation at low doses of radiation. (author)

  16. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  17. Chromatin Structure and Radiation-Induced Intrachromosome Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala; Zhang, Ye; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    We have recently investigated the location of breaks involved in intrachromosomal type exchange events, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique for human chromosome 3. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, intrachromosome exchanges were found to occur preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions were on the same arm of the chromosome. To explore the relationships between intrachromosome exchanges and chromatin structure, we used probes that hybridize the three regions of 3p21, 3q11 and 3q26, and measured the distance between two of the three regions in interphase cells. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation-induced intrachromosome aberrations depends upon both the location of fragile sites and the folding of chromatins

  18. Change from subcutaneous to intravenous abatacept and back in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as simulation of a vacation: a prospective phase IV, open-label trial (A-BREAK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ruediger B; Gengenbacher, Michael; Richter, Symi; Dudler, Jean; Möller, Burkhard; von Kempis, Johannes

    2016-04-14

    Vacation can present a major problem to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with weekly subcutaneous biologics, including subcutaneous (SC) abatacept. Therefore, the replacement of four SC doses of abatacept by a single dose of intravenous (IV) abatacept may present an acceptable alternative to cover a 4-week interval needed for vacations. In the study presented, we analyzed the efficacy and safety of this intervention followed by a switch back to SC abatacept after 4 weeks. This open-label, prospective, single-arm, 24-week trial recruited patients with established RA in low disease activity (LDA) or in remission on treatment with SC abatacept for at least 3 months to receive a single dose of IV abatacept (baseline) followed by a break of 4 weeks and then continuation of weekly SC abatacept from day 28 on. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD)-inadequate or biologic-inadequate responders (or both) were included. The baseline characteristics of the 49 patients (per protocol) were typical for a cohort of RA patients with established disease (mean disease duration of 8.31 years) in LDA under treatment with synthetic DMARDs and a biologic. Two patients (one flare and one patient decision) dropped out of the study. The proportions of patients with disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS-28) of not more than 3.2 at day 28 were 93.9 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 83.5-97.9) and 93.6 % (95 % CI 82.8-97.8) at the end of the study (day 168). The average DAS-28 values were 1.74 (standard deviation (SD) ± 0.72) at baseline, 2.03 (SD ± 1.03) at day 28, and 1.96 (SD ± 0.92) at the end of the study (day 168). Pre-exposure to IV abatacept and having failed methotrexate or anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) did not influence the average DAS-28 or the proportion of patients maintaining LDA over time. The average health assessment questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI) was stable throughout the study. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in

  19. ATM-dependent pathways of chromatin remodelling and oxidative DNA damage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, N Daniel; Stanley, Fintan K T; Moore, Shaun; Goodarzi, Aaron A

    2017-10-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase with a master regulatory function in the DNA damage response. In this role, ATM commands a complex biochemical network that signals the presence of oxidative DNA damage, including the dangerous DNA double-strand break, and facilitates subsequent repair. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding ATM-dependent chromatin remodelling and epigenomic alterations that are required to maintain genomic integrity in the presence of DNA double-strand breaks and/or oxidative stress. We will focus particularly on the roles of ATM in adjusting nucleosome spacing at sites of unresolved DNA double-strand breaks within complex chromatin environments, and the impact of ATM on preserving the health of cells within the mammalian central nervous system.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. The Seed Repair Response during Germination: Disclosing Correlations between DNA Repair, Antioxidant Response, and Chromatin Remodeling in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pagano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This work provides novel insights into the effects caused by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA during Medicago truncatula seed germination, with emphasis on the seed repair response. Seeds treated with H2O and TSA (10 and 20 μM were collected during imbibition (8 h and at the radicle protrusion phase. Biometric data showed delayed germination and impaired seedling growth in TSA-treated samples. Comet assay, performed on radicles at the protrusion phase and 4-days old M. truncatula seedlings, revealed accumulation of DNA strand breaks upon exposure to TSA. Activation of DNA repair toward TSA-mediated genotoxic damage was evidenced by the up-regulation of MtOGG1(8-OXOGUANINE GLYCOSYLASE/LYASE gene involved in the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, MtLIGIV(LIGASE IV gene, a key determinant of seed quality, required for the rejoining of DNA double strand breaks and TDP(TYROSYL-DNA PHOSPHODIESTERASE genes encoding the multipurpose DNA repair enzymes tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterases. Since radical scavenging can prevent DNA damage, the specific antioxidant activity (SAA was measured by DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and Folin-Ciocalteu reagent assays. Fluctuations of SAA were observed in TSA-treated seeds/seedlings concomitant with the up-regulation of antioxidant genes MtSOD(SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, MtAPX(ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE and MtMT2(TYPE 2 METALLOTHIONEIN. Chromatin remodeling, required to facilitate the access of DNA repair enzymes at the damaged sites, is also part of the multifaceted seed repair response. To address this aspect, still poorly explored in plants, the MtTRRAP(TRANSFORMATION/TRANSACTIVATION DOMAIN-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN gene was analyzed. TRRAP is a transcriptional adaptor, so far characterized only in human cells where it is needed for the recruitment of histone acetyltransferase complexes to chromatin during DNA repair. The MtTRRAP gene and the predicted interacting partners MtHAM2 (HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE OF

  1. Radiation response and chromatin dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikura, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Described is a recent progress in studies of chromatin structural alterations induced by DNA damage by radiation. DNA in eukaryotes exists in the chromatin structure and different mechanisms of response to damage and repair of DNA from those in prokaryotes have been recognized. Chromatin is composed from its unit structure of mono-nucleosome, which is formed from DNA and an octamer of core histones of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. When DNA is damaged, histone structural alterations are required for repair factors and checkpoint proteins to access the damaged site. At the actual genome damage, chemical modification of histone to work as a code occurs dependently on the damage where chromatin remodeling factors and histone chaperone participate for structural alteration and remodeling. As well, the exchange of histone variants and fluidization of histones are recently reported. Known chemical modification involves phosphorylation, acetylation and ubiquitination of H2AX (a variant of H2A), and acetylation and methylation of H3. Each complex of TIP60, NuA4 and INO80 is known to be included in the regulation of chromatin with damaged/repaired DNA for remodeling, but little is known about recruitment of the factors concerned at the damage site. Regulatory mechanisms in above chromatin dynamics with consideration of quality and timing of radiation should be further elucidated for understanding the precise response to DNA damage. (K.T.)

  2. Chromatin remodeling, development and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Myunggon; Sohn, Dong H.; Chung, Heekyoung; Seong, Rho H.

    2008-01-01

    Development is a stepwise process in which multi-potent progenitor cells undergo lineage commitment, differentiation, proliferation and maturation to produce mature cells with restricted developmental potentials. This process is directed by spatiotemporally distinct gene expression programs that allow cells to stringently orchestrate intricate transcriptional activation or silencing events. In eukaryotes, chromatin structure contributes to developmental progression as a blueprint for coordinated gene expression by actively participating in the regulation of gene expression. Changes in higher order chromatin structure or covalent modification of its components are considered to be critical events in dictating lineage-specific gene expression during development. Mammalian cells utilize multi-subunit nuclear complexes to alter chromatin structure. Histone-modifying complex catalyzes covalent modifications of histone tails including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex, which disrupts histone-DNA contacts and induces nucleosome mobilization, requires energy from ATP hydrolysis for its catalytic activity. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes during mammalian development. In particular, the roles of these complexes during embryonic and hematopoietic development are reviewed in depth. In addition, pathological conditions such as tumor development that are induced by mutation of several key subunits of the chromatin remodeling complex are discussed, together with possible mechanisms that underlie tumor suppression by the complex

  3. Early aberrations in chromatin dynamics in embryos produced under In vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Rahul Shahaji; Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, Frantisek

    2012-01-01

    standard to that of embryos produced by IVF, parthenogenetic activation (PA), or SCNT. In contrast to IV embryos, chromatin spatial and temporal dynamics in PA, IVF, and SCNT embryos were altered; starting with aberrant chromatin-nuclear envelope interactions at the two-cell stage, delayed chromatin...... decondensation and nucleolar development at the four-cell stage, and ultimately culminating in failure of proper first lineage segregation at the blastocyst stage, demonstrated by poorly defined inner cell mass. Interestingly, in vitro produced (IVP) embryos also lacked a heterochromatin halo around nucleolar...

  4. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  5. N-Butyrate alters chromatin accessibility to DNA repair enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the complex nature of mammalian chromatin can result in the concealment of DNA damage from repair enzymes and their co-factors. Recently it has been proposed that the acetylation of histone proteins in chromatin may provide a surveillance system whereby damaged regions of DNA become exposed due to changes in chromatin accessibility. This hypothesis has been tested by: (i) using n-butyrate to induce hyperacetylation in human adenocarcinoma (HT29) cells; (ii) monitoring the enzymatic accessibility of chromatin in permeabilised cells; (iii) measuring u.v. repair-associated nicking of DNA in intact cells and (iv) determining the effects of n-butyrate on cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The results indicate that the accessibility of chromatin to Micrococcus luteus u.v. endonuclease is enhanced by greater than 2-fold in n-butyrate-treated cells and that there is a corresponding increase in u.v. repair incision rates in intact cells exposed to the drug. Non-toxic levels of n-butyrate induce a block to G1 phase transit and there is a significant growth delay on removal of the drug. Resistance of HT29 cells to u.v.-radiation and adriamycin is enhanced in n-butyrate-treated cells whereas X-ray sensitivity is increased. Although changes in the responses of cells to DNA damaging agents must be considered in relation to the effects of n-butyrate on growth rate and cell-cycle distribution, the results are not inconsistent with the proposal that increased enzymatic-accessibility/repair is biologically favourable for the resistance of cells to u.v.-radiation damage. Overall the results support the suggested operation of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in human cells

  6. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...... landscape may be stably maintained even in the face of dramatic changes in chromatin structure....

  8. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Smeenk (Godelieve); W.W. Wiegant (Wouter); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen); M.S. Luijsterburg (Martijn); N. Sroczynski (Nicholas); T. Costelloe (Thomas); R. Romeijn (Ron); A. Pastink (Albert); N. Mailand (Niels); W. Vermeulen (Wim); H. van Attikum (Haico)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIonizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising in native chromatin elicit an RNF8/RNF168-dependent ubiquitylation response, which triggers the recruitment of various repair factors. Precisely how this response is regulated in the context of chromatin remains

  9. Local changes of higher-order chromatin structure during DSB-repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, M; Lukasova, E; Gabrielova, B; Ondrej, V; Kozubek, S

    2008-01-01

    We show that double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced in DNA of human cells by γ-radiation arise mainly in active, gene-rich, decondensed chromatin. We demonstrate that DSBs show limited movement in living cells, occasionally resulting in their permanent clustering, which poses a risk of incorrect DNA rejoining. In addition, some DSBs remain unrepaired for several days after irradiation, forming lesions repairable only with difficulty which are hazardous for genome stability. These 'late' DSBs colocalize with heterochromatin markers (dimethylated histone H3 at lysine 9, HP1 and CENP-A proteins), despite the low density of the surrounding chromatin. This indicates that there is epigenetic silencing of loci close to unrepaired DSBs and/or stabilization of damaged decondensed chromatin loops during repair and post-repair reconstitution of chromatin structure

  10. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille

    2018-01-01

    storytelling to enact fruitful breakings of patterns unbecoming. The claim being, that the hamster wheel of Work-life anno 2016 needs reconfiguration and the simple yet fruitful manner by which this is done is through acknowledging the benefits of bodies, spaces and artifacts – and the benefits of actually...... taking a break, discontinuing for a moment in order to continue better, wiser and more at ease. Both within and as part of the daily routines, and – now and then – outside these routines in the majesty of nature with time to explore and redirect the course of life in companionships with fellow man...

  11. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human

  12. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  13. A new non-catalytic role for ubiquitin ligase RNF8 in unfolding higher-order chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Acs, Klara; Ackermann, Leena

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168 orchestrate DNA damage signalling through the ubiquitylation of histone H2A and the recruitment of downstream repair factors. Here, we demonstrate that RNF8, but not RNF168 or the canonical H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF2, mediates extensive chromatin decondensation....... Our data show that CHD4, the catalytic subunit of the NuRD complex, interacts with RNF8 and is essential for RNF8-mediated chromatin unfolding. The chromatin remodelling activity of CHD4 promotes efficient ubiquitin conjugation and assembly of RNF168 and BRCA1 at DNA double-strand breaks....... Interestingly, RNF8-mediated recruitment of CHD4 and subsequent chromatin remodelling were independent of the ubiquitin-ligase activity of RNF8, but involved a non-canonical interaction with the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. Our study reveals a new mechanism of chromatin remodelling-assisted ubiquitylation...

  14. Chromatin in embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshorer, E

    2007-03-01

    Chromatin, the basic regulatory unit of the eukaryotic genetic material, is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling. Cellular differentiation involves large changes in gene expression concomitant with alterations in genome organization and chromatin structure. Such changes are particularly evident in self-renewing pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which begin, in terms of cell fate, as a tabula rasa, and through the process of differentiation, acquire distinct identities. Here I describe the changes in chromatin that accompany neuronal differentiation, particularly of embryonic stem cells, and discuss how chromatin serves as the master regulator of cellular destiny.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes, GAGs accumulate within cells, specifically inside the lysosomes . Lysosomes are compartments in the cell that break down ... that cause molecules to build up inside the lysosomes are called lysosomal storage disorders. In MPS IV, ...

  16. ATM and KAT5 safeguard replicating chromatin against formaldehyde damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Wong, Victor C.; DeLoughery, Zachary; Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Many carcinogens damage both DNA and protein constituents of chromatin, and it is unclear how cells respond to this compound injury. We examined activation of the main DNA damage-responsive kinase ATM and formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) by formaldehyde (FA) that forms histone adducts and replication-blocking DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC). We found that low FA doses caused a strong and rapid activation of ATM signaling in human cells, which was ATR-independent and restricted to S-phase. High FA doses inactivated ATM via its covalent dimerization and formation of larger crosslinks. FA-induced ATM signaling showed higher CHK2 phosphorylation but much lower phospho-KAP1 relative to DSB inducers. Replication blockage by DPC did not produce damaged forks or detectable amounts of DSB during the main wave of ATM activation, which did not require MRE11. Chromatin-monitoring KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase was responsible for acetylation and activation of ATM by FA. KAT5 and ATM were equally important for triggering of intra-S-phase checkpoint and ATM signaling promoted recovery of normal human cells after low-dose FA. Our results revealed a major role of the KAT5-ATM axis in protection of replicating chromatin against damage by the endogenous carcinogen FA. PMID:26420831

  17. Breaking away.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, G M; Sosnow, P L

    1995-05-01

    While life as hospital employees was comfortable, the lure of independence won out for these two emergency department physicians. Breaking away to develop a new company was not easy, but it's paid off for the entrepreneurs of the Capital Region Emergency Medicine, P.C. Developing an emergency medicine business meant learning all aspects of business: billing services, evaluating legal services, raising capital, and becoming employers. The advantage has been an ability to use profits to improve the moral of staff, an increase in salary, and an overall sense of satisfaction.

  18. UV-induced structural changes in chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, H.; Zimmer, C.; Vengerov, Yu.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    UV-induced structural alterations of chromatin were studied by means of CD, electron microscopic, and gel electrophoretic measurements. The results indicate that chromatin undergoes serious structural changes after irradiation even at very low fluences. In the low fluence range the structural transitions from the higher ordered chromatin structure to the unfolded state occur without detectable changes in the content of histone H1 and of the core histones. Histone H1 disappears only at fluences above 10 kJ/m 2 . Furthermore, DNA in chromatin is much more sensitive against UV-irradiation and shows a higher degree of strand scission relative to free DNA. While fragmentation in free DNA occurs at fluences above 15 kJ/m 2 , it occurs even at 5.5 kJ/m 2 in the case of chromatin. The biological meaning of the observed UV-induced structural alterations of chromatin is discussed. (author)

  19. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  20. The architects of crenarchaeal chromatin : A biophysical characterization of chromatin proteins from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Rosalie Paula Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of chromatin organization and compaction in Archaea is currently limited. The genome of several megabasepairs long is folded by a set of small chromatin proteins to fit into the micron-sized cell. A first step in understanding archaeal chromatin organization is to study the action of

  1. Dietary polyphenols and chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Gian Luigi; Vastolo, Viviana; Ciccarelli, Marco; Albano, Luigi; Macchia, Paolo Emidio; Ungaro, Paola

    2017-08-13

    Polyphenols are the most abundant phytochemicals in fruits, vegetables, and plant-derived beverages. Recent findings suggest that polyphenols display the ability to reverse adverse epigenetic regulation involved in pathological conditions, such as obesity, metabolic disorder, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and various forms of cancer. Epigenetics, defined as heritable changes to the transcriptome, independent from those occurring in the genome, includes DNA methylation, histone modifications, and posttranscriptional gene regulation by noncoding RNAs. Sinergistically and cooperatively, these processes regulate gene expression by changing chromatin organization and DNA accessibility. Such induced epigenetic changes can be inherited during cell division, resulting in permanent maintenance of the acquired phenotype, but they may also occur throughout an individual life-course and may ultimately influence phenotypic outcomes (health and disease risk). In the last decade, a number of studies have shown that nutrients can affect metabolic traits by altering the structure of chromatin and directly regulate both transcription and translational processes. In this context, dietary polyphenol-targeted epigenetics becomes an attractive approach for disease prevention and intervention. Here, we will review how polyphenols, including flavonoids, curcuminoids, and stilbenes, modulate the establishment and maintenance of key epigenetic marks, thereby influencing gene expression and, hence, disease risk and health.

  2. The Break

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille; Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    the challenges of the million-dollar question is stemming from the ‘bets on the future’ – or what David Boje coins as ‘antenarratives’, (Boje, 2008) that emerged through various reconfiguring story actions, on two different occasions. The paper thus elaborates on two cases of restorying events; One taking place...... that language and the social has been granted too much power on the dispense of the bodily, physical and biological – or in short, in dispense of the material. The break To be or not to be poses the theoretical notion of dis-/continuity (Barad, 2007, 2010) from the quantum approach to storytelling (Strand 2012...... in their use of the communicative platform of Object theatre from the methodology of Material Storytelling (Strand 2012). The Bets on the Future piece discusses the extend to which the cases of using this kind of technologies may provide fruitful ‘bets on the future’ in regard to the million-dollar question...

  3. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  4. A microscopic analysis of Arabidopsis chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic information of eukaryotic organisms is stored as DNA in the nuclei of their cells. Nuclear DNA is associated with several proteins, which together form chromatin. The most abundant chromatin proteins arehistones,they arrange the initial packaging step of the DNA. DNA

  5. Chromatin dynamics resolved with force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chien, Fan-Tso

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is organized in chromatin fibers composed of nucleosomes as structural units. A nucleosome contains 1.7 turns of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer and is connected to the adjacent nucleosomes with linker DNA. The folding of chromatin fibers effectively increases

  6. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    different proteins involved in the synthesis of mRNA from the. DNA template. ... CBP - CREB Binding Protein. CHRAC. Chromatin .... nucleosomal interactions, and thereby change the chromatin structure, as per the ..... methyltransferases in gene regulation is yet to be elucidated. .... Molecular Biology and. Genetics Unit.

  7. Chromatin Remodelers: From Function to Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Längst

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelers are key players in the regulation of chromatin accessibility and nucleosome positioning on the eukaryotic DNA, thereby essential for all DNA dependent biological processes. Thus, it is not surprising that upon of deregulation of those molecular machines healthy cells can turn into cancerous cells. Even though the remodeling enzymes are very abundant and a multitude of different enzymes and chromatin remodeling complexes exist in the cell, the particular remodeling complex with its specific nucleosome positioning features must be at the right place at the right time in order to ensure the proper regulation of the DNA dependent processes. To achieve this, chromatin remodeling complexes harbor protein domains that specifically read chromatin targeting signals, such as histone modifications, DNA sequence/structure, non-coding RNAs, histone variants or DNA bound interacting proteins. Recent studies reveal the interaction between non-coding RNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes showing importance of RNA in remodeling enzyme targeting, scaffolding and regulation. In this review, we summarize current understanding of chromatin remodeling enzyme targeting to chromatin and their role in cancer development.

  8. Alpha radiation-induced alterations of the proliferation kinetics, chromatin structure and gene expression in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieber, L.

    1983-01-01

    Exponentially growing mammalian cells were exposed to 3.4 MeV alpha particles. The chromatin of cells arrested in G2 by alpha irradiation was severely damaged, though all cells were still capable to condensate their chromatin after fusion with mitotic cells. In addition to the common types of aberrations (breaks, gaps, dicentrics and exchanges) cells were found possessing one or more chromosomes with long stretches of undercondensed chromatin. Repair of these lesions was indicated by site specific unscheduled DNA synthesis and by the observation that condensation of these regions improved during G2 arrest. Furthermore, during G2 arrest the synthesis of two cellular proteins was stimulated. This was studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35 S-methionine labeled cellular proteins. All these findings provided evidence that radiation-induced G2 arrest is caused by chromatin damage, which prevents regular chromosome condensation for mitosis. (orig./MG) [de

  9. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  10. Not just gene expression: 3D implications of chromatin modifications during sexual plant reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Liu, Chang; Chen, Changbin

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications are epigenetic changes on a DNA molecule that alter the three-dimensional (3D) structure locally as well as globally, impacting chromatin looping and packaging on a larger scale. Epigenetic marks thus inform higher-order chromosome organization and placement in the nucleus. Conventional epigenetic marks are joined by chromatin modifiers like cohesins, condensins and membrane-anchoring complexes to support particularly 3D chromosome organization. The most popular consequences of epigenetic modifications are gene expression changes, but chromatin modifications have implications beyond this, particularly in actively dividing cells and during sexual reproduction. In this opinion paper, we will focus on epigenetic mechanisms and chromatin modifications during meiosis as part of plant sexual reproduction where 3D management of chromosomes and re-organization of chromatin are defining features and prime tasks in reproductive cells, not limited to modulating gene expression. Meiotic chromosome organization, pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes as well as distribution of meiotic double-strand breaks and resulting crossovers are presumably highly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Special mobile small RNAs have been described in anthers, where these so-called phasiRNAs seem to direct DNA methylation in meiotic cells. Intriguingly, many of the mentioned developmental processes make use of epigenetic changes and small RNAs in a manner other than gene expression changes. Widening our approaches and opening our mind to thinking three-dimensionally regarding epigenetics in plant development holds high promise for new discoveries and could give us a boost for further knowledge.

  11. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in the DNA-damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lans Hannes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of DNA is continuously challenged by metabolism-derived and environmental genotoxic agents that cause a variety of DNA lesions, including base alterations and breaks. DNA damage interferes with vital processes such as transcription and replication, and if not repaired properly, can ultimately lead to premature aging and cancer. Multiple DNA pathways signaling for DNA repair and DNA damage collectively safeguard the integrity of DNA. Chromatin plays a pivotal role in regulating DNA-associated processes, and is itself subject to regulation by the DNA-damage response. Chromatin influences access to DNA, and often serves as a docking or signaling site for repair and signaling proteins. Its structure can be adapted by post-translational histone modifications and nucleosome remodeling, catalyzed by the activity of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes play important, although poorly characterized, roles in facilitating the effectiveness of the DNA-damage response. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the involvement of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in three major DNA repair pathways: nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination, and non-homologous end-joining. This shows that a surprisingly large number of different remodeling complexes display pleiotropic functions during different stages of the DNA-damage response. Moreover, several complexes seem to have multiple functions, and are implicated in various mechanistically distinct repair pathways.

  12. The sensitivity of active and inactive chromatin to ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand breakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.-M.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    The sensitivity of DNA in actively transcribing and inactive states has been compared with regard to γ-radiation-induced single-strand break (SSB) induction. The results indicate that chromatin organization is important in the determination of the sensitivity of cellular DNA toward γ-radiation: Not only the yield but also the rate of repair of SSB is greater in the actively transcribing genes than in the total nuclear DNA. (author)

  13. Structured illumination to spatially map chromatin motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Keith; Smelser, Amanda; Moreno, Naike Salvador; Holzwarth, George; Wang, Kevin; Levy, Preston; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre

    2018-05-01

    We describe a simple optical method that creates structured illumination of a photoactivatable probe and apply this method to characterize chromatin motions in nuclei of live cells. A laser beam coupled to a diffractive optical element at the back focal plane of an excitation objective generates an array of near diffraction-limited beamlets with FWHM of 340  ±  30  nm, which simultaneously photoactivate a 7  ×  7 matrix pattern of GFP-labeled histones, with spots 1.70  μm apart. From the movements of the photoactivated spots, we map chromatin diffusion coefficients at multiple microdomains of the cell nucleus. The results show correlated motions of nearest chromatin microdomain neighbors, whereas chromatin movements are uncorrelated at the global scale of the nucleus. The method also reveals a DNA damage-dependent decrease in chromatin diffusion. The diffractive optical element instrumentation can be easily and cheaply implemented on commercial inverted fluorescence microscopes to analyze adherent cell culture models. A protocol to measure chromatin motions in nonadherent human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is also described. We anticipate that the method will contribute to the identification of the mechanisms regulating chromatin mobility, which influences most genomic processes and may underlie the biogenesis of genomic translocations associated with hematologic malignancies. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Effect of hyperthermia on replicating chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The extent of heat-induced structural alterations in chromatin containing nascent (pulse-labeled) DNA was assayed using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. The basic nucleosome structure in nascent and mature chromatin of S-phase cells appeared unaltered for up to 16 hr after exposure to hyperthermic temperatures as high as 48 0 C for 15 min. However, the rate of nuclease digestion of DNA in both nascent and mature chromatin is inhibited following exposure to hyperthermic temperatures. In unheated cells, pulse-labeled nascent DNA matured into mature chromatin structure with a half-time of 2.5 min. The half-time for the maturation of pulse-labeled DNA from nascent into mature chromatin increased in a linear manner as a function of increasing temperature of exposure with constant heating time at temperatures above 43 0 C. Both the reduced nuclease digestibility of nascent DNA and the increased time for chromatin structural changes could be due to the increased protein mass of chromatin following hyperthermia

  15. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation links the chromatin remodeler SMARCA5/SNF2H to RNF168-dependent DNA damage signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeenk, G.; Wiegant, W.W.; Luijsterburg, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arising in native chromatin elicit an RNF8/RNF168-dependent ubiquitylation response, which triggers the recruitment of various repair factors. Precisely how this response is regulated in the context of chromatin remains largely...... unexplored. Here, we show that SMARCA5/SNF2H, the catalytic subunit of ISWI chromatin remodeling complexes, is recruited to DSBs in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-dependent manner. Remarkably, PARP activity, although dispensable for the efficient spreading of νH2AX into damaged chromatin......, selectively promotes spreading of SMARCA5, the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF168, ubiquitin conjugates and the ubiquitin-binding factors RAD18 and the RAP80-BRCA1 complex throughout DSB-flanking chromatin. This suggests that PARP regulates the spatial organization of the RNF168-driven ubiquitin response to DNA...

  16. IVS Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  17. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  18. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.; Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, S.; Grubert, F.; Zaugg, J. B.; Kundaje, A.; Liu, Y.; Boyle, A. P.; Zhang, Q. C.; Zakharia, F.; Spacek, D. V.; Li, J.; Xie, D.; Olarerin-George, A.; Steinmetz, L. M.; Hogenesch, J. B.; Kellis, M.; Batzoglou, S.; Snyder, M.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean; Rayapuram, Naganand; Pflieger, Delphine; Hirt, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  20. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  1. Chromatin Pioneers | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taking advantage of their ability to explore provocative ideas, NCI investigators pioneered the study of chromatin to demonstrate its functional importance and lay the groundwork for understanding its role in cancer and other diseases.

  2. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...... framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...

  3. Physics of chiral symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1991-01-01

    This subsection of the 'Modeling QCD' Workshop has included five talks. E. Shuryak spoke on 'Recent Progress in Understanding Chiral Symmetry Breaking'; below it is split into two parts: (i) a mini-review of the field and (ii) a brief presentation of the status of the theory of interacting instantons. The next sections correspond to the following talks: (iii) K. Goeke et al., 'Chiral Restoration and Medium Corrections to Nucleon in the NJL Model'; (iv) M. Takizawa and K. Kubodera, 'Study of Meson Properties and Quark Condensates in the NJL Model with Instanton Effects'; (v) G. Klein and A. G. Williams, 'Dynamical Chiral Symmetry Breaking in Dual QCD'; and (vi) R. D. Ball, 'Skyrmions and Baryons.' (orig.)

  4. Unification of SUSY breaking and GUT breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University,Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Omura, Yuji [Department of Physics, Nagoya University,Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-02-18

    We build explicit supersymmetric unification models where grand unified gauge symmetry breaking and supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking are caused by the same sector. Besides, the SM-charged particles are also predicted by the symmetry breaking sector, and they give the soft SUSY breaking terms through the so-called gauge mediation. We investigate the mass spectrums in an explicit model with SU(5) and additional gauge groups, and discuss its phenomenological aspects. Especially, nonzero A-term and B-term are generated at one-loop level according to the mediation via the vector superfields, so that the electro-weak symmetry breaking and 125 GeV Higgs mass may be achieved by the large B-term and A-term even if the stop mass is around 1 TeV.

  5. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.; Baldwin, J.P.; Carpenter, B.G.; Hjelm, R.P.; Hancock, R.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H 2 O-D 2 O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  6. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  7. Impact of nuclear organization and chromatin structure on DNA repair and genome stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batte, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    The non-random organization of the eukaryotic cell nucleus and the folding of genome in chromatin more or less condensed can influence many functions related to DNA metabolism, including genome stability. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious DNA damages for the cells. To preserve genome integrity, eukaryotic cells thus developed DSB repair mechanisms conserved from yeast to human, among which homologous recombination (HR) that uses an intact homologous sequence to repair a broken chromosome. HR can be separated in two sub-pathways: Gene Conversion (GC) transfers genetic information from one molecule to its homologous and Break Induced Replication (BIR) establishes a replication fork than can proceed until the chromosome end. My doctorate work was focused on the contribution of the chromatin context and 3D genome organization on DSB repair. In S. cerevisiae, nuclear organization and heterochromatin spreading at sub-telomeres can be modified through the overexpression of the Sir3 or sir3A2Q mutant proteins. We demonstrated that reducing the physical distance between homologous sequences increased GC rates, reinforcing the notion that homology search is a limiting step for recombination. We also showed that hetero-chromatinization of DSB site fine-tunes DSB resection, limiting the loss of the DSB ends required to perform homology search and complete HR. Finally, we noticed that the presence of heterochromatin at the donor locus decreased both GC and BIR efficiencies, probably by affecting strand invasion. This work highlights new regulatory pathways of DNA repair. (author) [fr

  8. Map of open and closed chromatin domains in Drosophila genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milon, Beatrice; Sun, Yezhou; Chang, Weizhong; Creasy, Todd; Mahurkar, Anup; Shetty, Amol; Nurminsky, Dmitry; Nurminskaya, Maria

    2014-11-18

    Chromatin compactness has been considered a major determinant of gene activity and has been associated with specific chromatin modifications in studies on a few individual genetic loci. At the same time, genome-wide patterns of open and closed chromatin have been understudied, and are at present largely predicted from chromatin modification and gene expression data. However the universal applicability of such predictions is not self-evident, and requires experimental verification. We developed and implemented a high-throughput analysis for general chromatin sensitivity to DNase I which provides a comprehensive epigenomic assessment in a single assay. Contiguous domains of open and closed chromatin were identified by computational analysis of the data, and correlated to other genome annotations including predicted chromatin "states", individual chromatin modifications, nuclear lamina interactions, and gene expression. While showing that the widely trusted predictions of chromatin structure are correct in the majority of cases, we detected diverse "exceptions" from the conventional rules. We found a profound paucity of chromatin modifications in a major fraction of closed chromatin, and identified a number of loci where chromatin configuration is opposite to that expected from modification and gene expression patterns. Further, we observed that chromatin of large introns tends to be closed even when the genes are expressed, and that a significant proportion of active genes including their promoters are located in closed chromatin. These findings reveal limitations of the existing predictive models, indicate novel mechanisms of epigenetic regulation, and provide important insights into genome organization and function.

  9. Modelling and testing the molecular mechanism of radiation-induced chromatid breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P. E.

    2001-01-01

    Chromatid breaks induced by ionizing radiation in the G2 phase of the cell cycle are considered as markers of individual human radiosensitivity and may indicate the presence of low-penetrance genes regulating susceptibility to breast and other cancers). Together with our own study of Scottish (Tayside) breast cancer patients and a group of normal controls these studies show an overall 10-fold variation in chromatid break frequency (the parameter defining individual chromosomal 'radiosensitivity'). Thus, an understanding of the mechanisms and genes involved in determining these widely different responses should help to clarify the reasons for individual radiosensitivity and may lead us to identify key genes involved in cancer susceptibility. The presence of colour-switches at around 16% of chromatid break points (detected in harlequin-stained chromosomes) indicates that this type of chromatid break is formed by a chromatin rearrangement involving one or more large chromatin domains of the order of 3 - 5 Mbp, possibly representing transcription 'factories'. The signal model of chromatid breaks assumes that all chromatid breaks are the result of chromatin rearrangements, and that the initiating DNA double-strand break (dsb) is itself not involved in the rearrangement but signals its presence (possibly via ATM protein or DNAPK) leading to the initiation of the chromatin rearrangement. Experimental evidence from radiosensitive cell lines (e.g. human AT and hamster irs2) and with the nucleoside analogue araA (9-β-D-arabinofuranosyladenine) demonstrates the lack of correspondence between the rejoining kinetics of dsb and that of disappearance of chromatid breaks, thus supporting the signal model. Coupled with the linear induction of chromatid breaks with dose in both human and rodent cell lines of various types, and the production of chromatid breaks by single dsb in genetically engineered cell lines the classical 'breakage-first' model of chromatid breaks is no longer

  10. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  11. Autism genes keep turning up chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalle, Janine M

    2013-06-19

    Autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex genetic disorders collectively characterized by impaired social interactions and language as well as repetitive and restrictive behaviors. Of the hundreds of genes implicated in ASD, those encoding proteins acting at neuronal synapses have been most characterized by candidate gene studies. However, recent unbiased genome-wide analyses have turned up a multitude of novel candidate genes encoding nuclear factors implicated in chromatin remodeling, histone demethylation, histone variants, and the recognition of DNA methylation. Furthermore, the chromatin landscape of the human genome has been shown to influence the location of de novo mutations observed in ASD as well as the landscape of DNA methylation underlying neurodevelopmental and synaptic processes. Understanding the interactions of nuclear chromatin proteins and DNA with signal transduction pathways and environmental influences in the developing brain will be critical to understanding the relevance of these ASD candidate genes and continued uncovering of the "roots" of autism etiology.

  12. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome function and stability, DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin must be duplicated during cell division. Understanding how entire chromosomes are copied remains a major challenge. Here, we use nascent chromatin capture (NCC) to profile chromatin proteome dynamics during...... replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3,995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors...... such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC enrichment...

  13. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by “opening” or “closing” chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but also are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts. PMID:22223048

  14. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...... is a frequent event in disease, and the first epigenetic-based therapies for cancer treatment have been approved. A generation of new classes of potent and specific inhibitors for several chromatin-associated proteins have shown promise in preclinical trials. Although the biology of epigenetic regulation...

  15. Modulation of chromatin access during adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Susanne; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    identified; however, it is not until recently that we have begun to understand how these factors act at a genome-wide scale. In a recent publication we have mapped the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and shown that a major reorganization...... of the chromatin landscape occurs within few hours following the addition of the adipogenic cocktail. In addition, we have mapped the genome-wide profiles of several of the early adipogenic transcription factors and shown that they act in a highly cooperative manner to drive this dramatic remodeling process....

  16. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  17. Duality after supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadmi, Yael; Cheng, Hsin-Chia

    1998-05-01

    Starting with two supersymmetric dual theories, we imagine adding a chiral perturbation that breaks supersymmetry dynamically. At low energy we then get two theories with soft supersymmetry-breaking terms that are generated dynamically. With a canonical Kaehler potential, some of the scalars of the ''magnetic'' theory typically have negative mass-squared, and the vector-like symmetry is broken. Since for large supersymmetry breaking the ''electric'' theory becomes ordinary QCD, the two theories are then incompatible. For small supersymmetry breaking, if duality still holds, the magnetic theory analysis implies specific patterns of chiral symmetry breaking in supersymmetric QCD with small soft masses

  18. Classical and Nonclassical Estrogen Receptor Action on Chromatin Templates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordeen, Steven

    2000-01-01

    .... Using newly-developed approaches, I investigated mechanisms of estrogen/estrogen receptor action on chromatin templates in vitro in order to better understand the role of chromatin in steroid-regulated gene expression...

  19. Classical and Nonclassical Estrogen Receptor Action on Chromatin Templaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nordeen, Steve

    2001-01-01

    .... Using newly-developed approaches, I investigated mechanisms of estrogen/estrogen receptor action on chromatin templates in vitro in order to better understand the role of chromatin in steroid-regulated gene expression...

  20. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...

  1. Local Nucleosome Dynamics Facilitate Chromatin Accessibility in Living Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saera Hihara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome information, which is three-dimensionally organized within cells as chromatin, is searched and read by various proteins for diverse cell functions. Although how the protein factors find their targets remains unclear, the dynamic and flexible nature of chromatin is likely crucial. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, single-nucleosome imaging, and Monte Carlo computer simulations, we demonstrate local chromatin dynamics in living mammalian cells. We show that similar to interphase chromatin, dense mitotic chromosomes also have considerable chromatin accessibility. For both interphase and mitotic chromatin, we observed local fluctuation of individual nucleosomes (∼50 nm movement/30 ms, which is caused by confined Brownian motion. Inhibition of these local dynamics by crosslinking impaired accessibility in the dense chromatin regions. Our findings show that local nucleosome dynamics drive chromatin accessibility. We propose that this local nucleosome fluctuation is the basis for scanning genome information.

  2. Deoxyribonuclease probing of sea urchin embryo chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The role that the sea urchin, Parechinus angulosus, embryo and sperm histone variants plays in chromatin structure has been investigated. Chromatin structure has been determined at different levels of resolution in sperm and in developing embryos using micrococcal nuclease, pancreatic deoxyribonuclease (DNase I) and restriction endonucleases. Micrococcal nuclease and restriction endonuclease digestions of sea urchin gastrula chromatin have been analysed and it is shown that it is not possible to isolate large polynucleosomal chromatin complexes which are soluble in low ionic strength buffers. The repeat length for sperm is significantly larger than blastula and gastrula repeat lengths whereas blastula and gastrula repeat lengths are not significantly different. Nucleosomal core particles have been isolated from early blastula, gastrula and sperm of sea urchins. After DNase I digestion of 5'-labelled core particles the rate constants of cutting of the DNA at the susceptible sites on these core particles have been determined. The DNase I digestion kinetics of blastula and gastrula core particles are similar whereas sperm core particles are digested at a slower rate, mainly at the sites which are closest to the ends of the core particle DNA

  3. Chromatin conformation capture strategies in molecular diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vree, Pauline J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis I have explored the clinical potential of the 4C-technology and worked on development of a novel chromatin conformation capture based technology, called TLA. In chapter 2 I describe how the 4C-technology can be applied as a targeted strategy to identify putative fusion-genes or

  4. EBV Latency Types Adopt Alternative Chromatin Conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempera, Italo; Klichinsky, Michael; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp) or type III (Cp) gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer. PMID:21829357

  5. EBV latency types adopt alternative chromatin conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Tempera

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV can establish latent infections with distinct gene expression patterns referred to as latency types. These different latency types are epigenetically stable and correspond to different promoter utilization. Here we explore the three-dimensional conformations of the EBV genome in different latency types. We employed Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C assay to investigate chromatin loop formation between the OriP enhancer and the promoters that determine type I (Qp or type III (Cp gene expression. We show that OriP is in close physical proximity to Qp in type I latency, and to Cp in type III latency. The cellular chromatin insulator and boundary factor CTCF was implicated in EBV chromatin loop formation. Combining 3C and ChIP assays we found that CTCF is physically associated with OriP-Qp loop formation in type I and OriP-Cp loop formation in type III latency. Mutations in the CTCF binding site located at Qp disrupt loop formation between Qp and OriP, and lead to the activation of Cp transcription. Mutation of the CTCF binding site at Cp, as well as siRNA depletion of CTCF eliminates both OriP-associated loops, indicating that CTCF plays an integral role in loop formation. These data indicate that epigenetically stable EBV latency types adopt distinct chromatin architectures that depend on CTCF and mediate alternative promoter targeting by the OriP enhancer.

  6. Chromatin organisation during Arabidopsis root development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorvellec, M.

    2007-01-01

    The genetic information is stored in a highly compact manner in every nucleus. About 150 bp of DNA is packed around a histone octamer constituting a nucleosome. Nucleosomes are linked together by histone H1 and further compaction of this "beads on a string" form higher-order chromatin structures.

  7. Keystone Symposia on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Keystone Symposia kicked off the start of 2012 with two joint meetings on Epigenomics and Chromatin Dynamics and a star-studded list of speakers. Held in Keystone, CO, January 17-22, and organized by Steven Jacobsen and Steven Henikoff and by Bradley Cairns and Geneviève Almouzni, respectively...

  8. The Latest Twists in Chromatin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossey, Ralf; Schiessel, Helmut

    2018-01-05

    In its most restrictive interpretation, the notion of chromatin remodeling refers to the action of chromatin-remodeling enzymes on nucleosomes with the aim of displacing and removing them from the chromatin fiber (the effective polymer formed by a DNA molecule and proteins). This local modification of the fiber structure can have consequences for the initiation and repression of the transcription process, and when the remodeling process spreads along the fiber, it also results in long-range effects essential for fiber condensation. There are three regulatory levels of relevance that can be distinguished for this process: the intrinsic sequence preference of the histone octamer, which rules the positioning of the nucleosome along the DNA, notably in relation to the genetic information coded in DNA; the recognition or selection of nucleosomal substrates by remodeling complexes; and, finally, the motor action on the nucleosome exerted by the chromatin remodeler. Recent work has been able to provide crucial insights at each of these three levels that add new twists to this exciting and unfinished story, which we highlight in this perspective. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Chromatin Scaffold Protein SAFB1 Renders Chromatin Permissive for DNA Damage Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Gudjonsson, Thorkell

    2013-01-01

    Although the general relevance of chromatin modifications for genotoxic stress signaling, cell-cycle checkpoint activation, and DNA repair is well established, how these modifications reach initial thresholds in order to trigger robust responses remains largely unexplored. Here, we identify...... the chromatin-associated scaffold attachment factor SAFB1 as a component of the DNA damage response and show that SAFB1 cooperates with histone acetylation to allow for efficient γH2AX spreading and genotoxic stress signaling. SAFB1 undergoes a highly dynamic exchange at damaged chromatin in a poly......(ADP-ribose)-polymerase 1- and poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent manner and is required for unperturbed cell-cycle checkpoint activation and guarding cells against replicative stress. Altogether, our data reveal that transient recruitment of an architectural chromatin component is required in order to overcome physiological...

  10. Meta-analysis of DNA double-strand break response kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kochan, Jakub A.; Desclos, Emilie C. B.; Bosch, Ruben; Meister, Luna; Vriend, Lianne E. M.; Attikum, Haico V.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.

    2017-01-01

    Most proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break response (DSBR) accumulate at the damage sites, where they perform functions related to damage signaling, chromatin remodeling and repair. Over the last two decades, studying the accumulation of many DSBR proteins provided information about their

  11. Chromatin organization and cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szumiel, I.; Walicka, M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper briefly describes chromatin organization in mammalian cells and reviews experimental work concerning relations between chromatin structure and accesibility of damaged DNA to repair enzymes. The ''contact effect'', the size of super-coiled DNA domains and ADP-ribosylation of chromatin proteins are discussed in relation to cellular radiosensitivity. 88 refs. (author)

  12. Chromatin Dynamics of the mouse β-globin locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); E. de Boer (Ernie); T.A. Knoch (Tobias); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); M. Lesnussa (Michael); H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLately it has become more clear that (subtle) changes in 3D organization of chromatin can either trigger transcription or silence genes or gene clusters. It has also been postulated that due to changes in chromatin structure, a change in chromatin accessibility of transcription factors

  13. Structural chromatin organization as a factor determining the rate of chromatin endonucleolysis in irradiated and intact thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Ivannik, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of chromatin endonucleolysis in hypotonized thymocytes incubating in digestive buffers containing different concentrations of potassium, magnesium, calcium, and mercaptoethanol. Inhibition of endonucleolysis by univalent cation during the first 20 min of incubation was followed by intensive chromatin degradation. A decrease in free potassium content retarded chromatin degradation and enhanced the inhibiting effect of the univalent cations. The regularities of changes in the rate of chromatin endonucleolysis in different digestive buffers were similar with both exposed and intact thymocytes

  14. Chromatin structure influences the sensitivity of DNA to gamma-radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 1783, č. 12 (2008), s. 2398-2414 ISSN 0167-4889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P349; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : sensitivity to DNA double- strand breaks induction * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.893, year: 2008

  15. Higher-order chromatin structure in DSB induction, repair and misrepair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 704, 1-3 (2010), s. 88-100 ISSN 1383-5742 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 919; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040802; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA double strand breaks * DSB repair * higher-order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.741, year: 2010

  16. Bubbles and breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes which control the transfer of gases between the atmosphere and oceans or lakes are poorly understood. Clouds of micro-bubbles have been detected below the surface of Loch Ness when the wind is strong enough to cause the waves to break. The rate of transfer of gas into solution from these bubbles is estimated to be significant if repeated on a global scale. We present here further evidence that the bubbles are caused by breaking waves, and discuss the relationship between the mean frequency of wave breaking at a fixed point and the average distance between breaking waves, as might be estimated from an aerial photograph.

  17. PWR cold-leg small break loca with faulty HPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumamaru, H.; Kukita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a 1/48 volumetrically-scaled model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). At the LSTF are performed cold-leg small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests with faulty high pressure injection (HPI) system for break areas from 0.5% to 10% and an intentional primary system depressurization test following a small-break LOCA test. A simple prediction model is proposed for prediction of times of major events. Test data and calculations show that intentional primary system depressurization with use of the pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) is effective for break areas of approximately 0.5% or less, is unnecessary for breaks of 5% or more, and is insufficient for intermediate break areas to maintain adequate core cooling. (author)

  18. Influence of chromatin condensation on the number of direct DSB damages induced by ions studied using a Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, M.; Clairand, I.; Gruel, G.; Barquinero, J.F.; Villagrasa, C.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the influence of the chromatin condensation on the number of direct double-strand break (DSB) damages induced by ions. Two geometries of chromosome territories containing either condensed or de-condensed chromatin were implemented as biological targets in the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation code and proton and alpha irradiation was simulated using the Geant4-DNA processes. A DBSCAN algorithm was used in order to detect energy deposition clusters that could give rise to single-strand breaks or DSBs on the DNA molecule. The results of this study show an increase in the number and complexity of DNA DSBs in condensed chromatin when compared with de-condensed chromatin. This work aims to evaluate the influence of the chromatin condensation in the number and complexity of direct DSB damages induced by proton and alpha irradiation. With the simulations of this study, the increase in the number and complexity of DSB-like clusters induced by ions in the heterochromatin when compared with euchromatin regions of the cell nucleus has been observed and quantified. These results suggest that condensed chromatin can be the location of more severe radiation-induced lesions, more difficult to repair, than de-condensed chromatin. On the other hand, it was also observed that, whatever the chromatin condensation, more possible damages are found after proton irradiation compared with alpha particles of the same LET. Nevertheless, as already remarked, this study concerns only the direct effect of ionising radiation that can be calculated from the results of the physical stage simulated with Geant4-DNA. To include indirect effects induced by radicals around the DNA molecule, the elements needed for simulating the chemical stage are being developed in the frame of the Geant4-DNA project(15, 16) and they are planned to be included in future work. With a complete calculation (direct + indirect damages) it would then be possible to estimate an energy

  19. 'BREAKS' Protocol for Breaking Bad News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Vijayakumar; Bista, Bibek; Koshy, Cheriyan

    2010-05-01

    Information that drastically alters the life world of the patient is termed as bad news. Conveying bad news is a skilled communication, and not at all easy. The amount of truth to be disclosed is subjective. A properly structured and well-orchestrated communication has a positive therapeutic effect. This is a process of negotiation between patient and physician, but physicians often find it difficult due to many reasons. They feel incompetent and are afraid of unleashing a negative reaction from the patient or their relatives. The physician is reminded of his or her own vulnerability to terminal illness, and find themselves powerless over emotional distress. Lack of sufficient training in breaking bad news is a handicap to most physicians and health care workers. Adherence to the principles of client-centered counseling is helpful in attaining this skill. Fundamental insight of the patient is exploited and the bad news is delivered in a structured manner, because the patient is the one who knows what is hurting him most and he is the one who knows how to move forward. Six-step SPIKES protocol is widely used for breaking bad news. In this paper, we put forward another six-step protocol, the BREAKS protocol as a systematic and easy communication strategy for breaking bad news. Development of competence in dealing with difficult situations has positive therapeutic outcome and is a professionally satisfying one.

  20. Chromatin Regulation of Neuronal Maturation and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, David A; Chan, Urann; Chen, Liang-Fu; West, Anne E

    2018-05-01

    Neurons are dynamic cells that respond and adapt to stimuli throughout their long postmitotic lives. The structural and functional plasticity of neurons requires the regulated transcription of new gene products, and dysregulation of transcription in either the developing or adult brain impairs cognition. We discuss how mechanisms of chromatin regulation help to orchestrate the transcriptional programs that underlie the maturation of developing neurons and the plasticity of adult neurons. We review how chromatin regulation acts locally to modulate the expression of specific genes and more broadly to coordinate gene expression programs during transitions between cellular states. These data highlight the importance of epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms in postmitotic neurons. We suggest areas where emerging methods may advance understanding in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A transient ischemic environment induces reversible compaction of chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmes, Ina; Szczurek, Aleksander; Prakash, Kirti; Charapitsa, Iryna; Heiser, Christina; Musheev, Michael; Schock, Florian; Fornalczyk, Karolina; Ma, Dongyu; Birk, Udo; Cremer, Christoph; Reid, George

    2015-11-05

    Cells detect and adapt to hypoxic and nutritional stress through immediate transcriptional, translational and metabolic responses. The environmental effects of ischemia on chromatin nanostructure were investigated using single molecule localization microscopy of DNA binding dyes and of acetylated histones, by the sensitivity of chromatin to digestion with DNAseI, and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of core and linker histones. Short-term oxygen and nutrient deprivation of the cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1 induces a previously undescribed chromatin architecture, consisting of large, chromatin-sparse voids interspersed between DNA-dense hollow helicoid structures 40-700 nm in dimension. The chromatin compaction is reversible, and upon restitution of normoxia and nutrients, chromatin transiently adopts a more open structure than in untreated cells. The compacted state of chromatin reduces transcription, while the open chromatin structure induced upon recovery provokes a transitory increase in transcription. Digestion of chromatin with DNAseI confirms that oxygen and nutrient deprivation induces compaction of chromatin. Chromatin compaction is associated with depletion of ATP and redistribution of the polyamine pool into the nucleus. FRAP demonstrates that core histones are not displaced from compacted chromatin; however, the mobility of linker histone H1 is considerably reduced, to an extent that far exceeds the difference in histone H1 mobility between heterochromatin and euchromatin. These studies exemplify the dynamic capacity of chromatin architecture to physically respond to environmental conditions, directly link cellular energy status to chromatin compaction and provide insight into the effect ischemia has on the nuclear architecture of cells.

  2. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  3. Probing chromatin structure with nuclease sensitivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R I; Khosla, S; Feil, R

    2001-01-01

    To further our understanding of genomic imprinting it will be essential to identify key control elements, and to investigate their regulation by both epigenetic modifications (such as DNA methylation) and trans-acting factors. So far, sequence elements that regulate parental allele-specific gene expression have been identified in a number of imprinted loci, either because of their differential DNA methylation or through functional studies in transgenic mice (1,2). A systematic search for allele-specific chromatin features constitutes an alternative strategy to identify elements that regulate imprinting. The validity of such an in vivo chromatin approach derives from the fact that in several known imprinting control-elements, a specialized organization of chromatin characterized by nuclease hypersensitivity is present on only one of the two parental chromosome (3). For example, the differentially methylated 5 -portion of the human SNRPN gene-a sequence element that controls imprinting in the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes' domain on chromosome 15q11- q13-has strong DNase-I hypersensitive sites on the unmethylated paternal chromosome (4). A differentially methylated region that regulates the imprinting of H19 and that of the neighboring insulin-like growth factor-2 gene on mouse chromosome 7 was also found to have parental chromosome-specific hypersensitive sites (5,6). The precise nature of the allelic nuclease hypersensitivity in these and other imprinted loci remains to be determined in more detail, for example, by applying complementary chromatin methodologies (7,8). However, it is commonly observed that a nuclease hypersensitive site corresponds to a small region where nucleosomes are absent or partially disrupted.

  4. [The biological aspects of chromatin diminution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akif'ev, A P; Grishanin, A K

    1993-01-01

    The chromatine diminution (CD), first discovered by Boveri (1887) in ascarids, represents programmed elimination of a part of genetic material in the nuclei of the somatic cells in cyclops and ascarids, and in the protist macronuclei. The CD can be considered as a macromutation sharply changing chromosomal structure, though minimally effecting the phenotype. The analysis of CD is of significance for discussing mechanisms of origin of chromosomal organization, transformation of genome molecular structure in eucaryote evolution, role of the extra DNA.

  5. Gauge symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, S.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of how gauge symmetries of the weak interactions get broken is discussed. Some reasons why such a heirarchy of gauge symmetry breaking is needed, the reason gauge heirarchies do not seem to arise in theories of a given and related type, and the implications of theories with dynamical symmetry breaking, which can exhibit a gauge hierarchy

  6. Dynamical supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affleck, I.

    1985-03-01

    Supersymmetry, and in particular, dynamical supersymmetry breaking, offers the hope of a natural solution of the gauge hierarchy problem in grand unification. I briefly review recent work on dynamical supersymmetry breaking in four-dimensional Higgs theories and its application to grand unified model building

  7. Default assembly of early adenovirus chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spector, David J.

    2007-01-01

    In adenovirus particles, the viral nucleoprotein is organized into a highly compacted core structure. Upon delivery to the nucleus, the viral nucleoprotein is very likely to be remodeled to a form accessible to the transcription and replication machinery. Viral protein VII binds to intra-nuclear viral DNA, as do at least two cellular proteins, SET/TAF-Iβ and pp32, components of a chromatin assembly complex that is implicated in template remodeling. We showed previously that viral DNA-protein complexes released from infecting particles were sensitive to shearing after cross-linking with formaldehyde, presumably after transport of the genome into the nucleus. We report here the application of equilibrium-density gradient centrifugation to the analysis of the fate of these complexes. Most of the incoming protein VII was recovered in a form that was not cross-linked to viral DNA. This release of protein VII, as well as the binding of SET/TAF-Iβ and cellular transcription factors to the viral chromatin, did not require de novo viral gene expression. The distinct density profiles of viral DNA complexes containing protein VII, compared to those containing SET/TAF-Iβ or transcription factors, were consistent with the notion that the assembly of early viral chromatin requires both the association of SET/TAF-1β and the release of protein VII

  8. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  9. Capturing Structural Heterogeneity in Chromatin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekundayo, Babatunde; Richmond, Timothy J; Schalch, Thomas

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin fiber organization is implicated in processes such as transcription, DNA repair and chromosome segregation, but how nucleosomes interact to form higher-order structure remains poorly understood. We solved two crystal structures of tetranucleosomes with approximately 11-bp DNA linker length at 5.8 and 6.7 Å resolution. Minimal intramolecular nucleosome-nucleosome interactions result in a fiber model resembling a flat ribbon that is compatible with a two-start helical architecture, and that exposes histone and DNA surfaces to the environment. The differences in the two structures combined with electron microscopy reveal heterogeneous structural states, and we used site-specific chemical crosslinking to assess the diversity of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions through identification of structure-sensitive crosslink sites that provide a means to characterize fibers in solution. The chromatin fiber architectures observed here provide a basis for understanding heterogeneous chromatin higher-order structures as they occur in a genomic context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Higher order chromatin organization in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Karen L.; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of our increased understanding of how genomes are dysregulated in cancer and a plethora of molecular diagnostic tools, the front line and ‘gold standard’ detection of cancer remains the pathologist’s detection of gross changes in cellular and tissue structure, most strikingly nuclear dis-organization. In fact, for over 140 years it has been noted that nuclear morphology is often disrupted in cancer. Even today, nuclear morphology measures include nuclear size, shape, DNA content (ploidy) and ‘chromatin organization’. Given the importance of nuclear shape to diagnoses of cancer phenotypes, it is surprising and frustrating that we currently lack a detailed understanding to explain these changes and how they might arise and relate to molecular events in the cell. It is an implicit hypothesis that perturbation of chromatin and epigenetic signatures may lead to alterations in nuclear structure (or vice versa) and that these perturbations lie at the heart of cancer genesis. In this review, we attempt to synthesize research leading to our current understanding on how chromatin interactions at the nuclear lamina, epigenetic modulation and gene regulation may intersect in cancer and offer a perspective on critical experiments that would help clarify how nuclear architecture may contribute to the cancerous phenotype. We also discuss the historical understanding of nuclear structure in normal cells and as a diagnostic in cancer. PMID:23266653

  11. Bcl2-independent chromatin cleavage is a very early event during induction of apoptosis in mouse thymocytes after treatment with either dexamethasone or ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Peter J; Lai, Zhi-Wei; Nevaldine, Barbara; Schiff, Ninel; Fiore, Nancy C; Silverstone, Allen E

    2003-11-01

    We have quantified the emergence of early chromatin breaks during the signal transduction phase of apoptosis in mouse thymocytes after treatment with either ionizing radiation or dexamethasone. Dexamethasone at 1 microM can induce significant levels of DNA breaks (equivalent to the amount induced directly by 7.5 Gy ionizing radiation) within 0.5 h of treatment. The execution phase of apoptosis was not observed until 4-6 h after the same treatment. The presence of the Bcl2 transgene under the control of the p56lck promoter almost completely inhibited apoptosis up to 24 h after treatment, but it had virtually no effect on the early chromatin cleavage occurring in the first 6 h. Ionizing radiation induced chromatin cleavage both directly by damaging DNA and indirectly with kinetics similar to the induction of chromatin cleavage by dexamethasone. The presence of the Bcl2 transgene had no effect on the direct or indirect radiation-induced cleavage in the first 6 h, but after the first 6 h, the Bcl2 gene inhibited further radiation-induced chromatin cleavage. These results suggest that endonucleases are activated within minutes of treatment with either dexamethasone or ionizing radiation as part of the very early signal transduction phase of apoptosis, and prior to the irreversible commitment to cell death.

  12. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jé gu, Teddy; Domenichini, Sé verine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Auré lie; Kim, SoonKap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Sté phanie; Mouille, Gré gory; Bourge, Mickaë l; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cé cile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  13. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  14. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  15. Consistency of Trend Break Point Estimator with Underspecified Break Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the consistency of trend break point estimators when the number of breaks is underspecified. The consistency of break point estimators in a simple location model with level shifts has been well documented by researchers under various settings, including extensions such as allowing a time trend in the model. Despite the consistency of break point estimators of level shifts, there are few papers on the consistency of trend shift break point estimators in the presence of an underspecified break number. The simulation study and asymptotic analysis in this paper show that the trend shift break point estimator does not converge to the true break points when the break number is underspecified. In the case of two trend shifts, the inconsistency problem worsens if the magnitudes of the breaks are similar and the breaks are either both positive or both negative. The limiting distribution for the trend break point estimator is developed and closely approximates the finite sample performance.

  16. Ultrastructural analysis of radiation induced chromosome breaks and rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.L.; Goyanes, V.J.; Campos, A.; Cajigal, D.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese Hamster chromosomes R-banded in vitro were gamma-irradiated and chromatid breaks and rearrangements examined by electron microscopy employing whole-mounting technique. Breaks were preferentially located at the point of transition between G- and R-bands where the chromosome showed an average diameter 71.65 % of the wide condensed R-bands. This result was similar to the average diameter of narrow G-bands. Three chromosomes which were thin sectioned presented their broken terminal end organized as a coil constituted by two 23 nm wide chromatin fibers coiling together. Coils diameter was 43.70 % of the mean chromatid diameter. The border of damage-breakage was analyzed in whole-mounted chromosomes where breaks were photoinduced in BrdU-substituted DNA. Measurements of the angle of the sharp border of damage with respect to the chromatid axis showed a tendency to be more perpendicular as condensation progressed. These results clearly correlate with the several levels of chromatin fiber organization of the metaphase chromosome. (author)

  17. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David; Patrick, Steve M.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: ► Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. ► Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. ► Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. ► Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  18. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption spectra of chromatin and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonova, N.Y.; Kiseleva, M.N.; Petrov, M.Y.; Tsyganenko, N.M.; Bubyakina, V.V.; Chikhirzhina, G.I.

    1984-01-01

    The electron absorption spectra of thin films of chromatin and chromatin components in the ultraviolet region (140-280 nm) were investigated. The absorption coefficients μ(lambda) of chromatin, nucleosomes with and without histone H1, total histones (TH), and DNA were compared. The spectra of nucleosomes differ from the sum-spectrum of DNA plus TH. The chromatin and nucleosome spectra are not similar in the spectral region of 190-160 nm. The lack of additivity of absorption coefficients at different wavelengths may be explained by different conformational changes of DNA, TH in nucleosomes and chromatin during the process of drying aqueous solutions for the preparation of thin films. The μ(lambda) values are useful for an estimate of the DNA and TH absorption in chromatin and nucleosomes in discussing UV and VUV irradiation damages. (Auth.)

  20. Supersymmetry breaking from superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; California Univ., Berkeley

    1990-01-01

    The gauge hierarchy problem is briefly reviewed and a class of effective field theories obtained from superstrings is described. These are characterized by a clasical symmetry, related to the space-time duality of string theory, that is responsible for the suppression of observable supersymmetry breaking effects. At the quantum level, the symmetry is broken by anomalies that provide the seed of observable supersymmetry breaking, and an acceptably large gauge hierarchy may be generated

  1. Supersymmetry breaking from superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1990-05-01

    The gauge hierarchy problem is briefly reviewed and a class of effective field theories obtained from superstrings is described. These are characterized by a classical symmetry, related to the space-time duality of string theory, that is responsible for the suppression of observable supersymmetry breaking effects. At the quantum level, the symmetry is broken by anomalies that provide the seed of observable supersymmetry breaking, and an acceptably large gauge hierarchy may be generated. 26 refs

  2. Vibrational energy relaxation: proposed pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, D.; Greinert, R.

    2002-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for the a component of exchange-type chromosome aberrations, of chromosome fragmentation and of reproductive cell death is one of the unsolved issues of radiation biology. Under review is whether vibrational energy relaxation in the constitutive biopolymers of chromatin, induced by inelastic energy deposition events and mediated via highly excited vibrational states, may provide a pathway of fast local chromatin denaturation, thereby producing the severe DNA lesion able to interact chemically with other, non-damaged chromatin. (author)

  3. Chromatin maturation depends on continued DNA-replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaeger, E.J.; Puelm, W.; Knippers, R.

    1983-01-01

    The structure of [ 3 H]thymidine pulse-labeled chromatin in lymphocytes differs from that of non-replicating chromatin by several operational criteria which are related to the higher nuclease sensitivity of replicating chromatin. These structural features of replicating chromatin rapidly disappear when the [ 3 H]thymidine pulse is followed by a chase in the presence of an excess of non-radioactive thymidine. However, when the rate of DNA replication is reduced, as in cycloheximide-treated lymphocytes, chromatin maturation is retarded. No chromatin maturation is observed when nuclei from pulse-labeled lymphocytes are incubated in vitro in the absence of DNA precursors. In contrast, when these nuclei are incubated under conditions known to be optimal for DNA replication, the structure of replicating chromatin is efficiently converted to that of 'mature', non-replicating chromatin. The authors conclude that the properties of nascent DNA and/or the distance from the replication fork are important factors in chromatin maturation. (Auth.)

  4. The Role of Chromatin-Associated Proteins in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Minucci, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    The organization of the chromatin structure is essential for maintaining cell-type-specific gene expression and therefore for cell identity. This structure is highly dynamic and is regulated by a large number of chromatin-associated proteins that are required for normal development...... and differentiation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been found with high frequency in genes coding for chromatin-associated proteins in cancer, and several of these are required for cancer maintenance. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin-associated proteins...

  5. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom

    2011-01-01

    to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response...... element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3...... histone mark reflect this insulator-dependent chromatin conformation, suggesting that Polycomb action at a distance can be organized by local chromatin topology....

  6. Genes on chromosomes 1 and 4 in the mouse are associated with repair of radiation-induced chromatin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, M; Sanford, K K; Parshad, R; Tarone, R E; Price, F M; Mock, B; Huppi, K

    1988-04-01

    Early-passage skin fibroblasts from different inbred and congenic strains of mice were X-irradiated (1 Gy), and the number of chromatid breaks was determined at 2.0 h after irradiation. The cells from DBA/2N, C3H/HeN, STS/A, C57BL/6N, BALB/cJ, and AKR/N had 25 to 42 chromatid breaks per 100 metaphase cells (efficient repair phenotype). NZB/NJ had greater than 78 and BALB/cAn had 87 to 110 chromatid breaks per 100 cells (inefficient repair phenotype). Differences between BALB/cAn and BALB/c. DBA/2 congenic strains which carry less than 1% of the DBA/2 genome indicate that two genes, one on chromosome 1 linked to bcl-2-Pep-3 and the other on chromosome 4 closely linked to Fv-1, affect the efficiency with which the cells repair radiation-induced chromatin damage.

  7. IV treatment at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other IV treatments you may receive after you leave the hospital include: Treatment for hormone deficiencies Medicines for severe nausea that cancer chemotherapy or pregnancy may cause Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain (this is IV ...

  8. The Correlation of Interphase Chromatin Structure with the Radiation-Induced Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchange Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Purgason, Ashley M.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between chromosome aberrations induced by radiation and chromatin folding, we reconstructed three dimensional structure of chromosome 3 and measured the physical distances between different regions of the chromosome. Previously, we have investigated the location of breaks involved in inter- and intrachromosomal type exchange events in human chromosome 3, using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. In human epithelial cells exposed to both low- and high-LET radiations in vitro, we reported that intra-chromosome exchanges occurred preferentially between a break in the 3p21 and one in the 3q11 regions, and the breaks involving in inter-chromosome exchanges occurred in two regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome. Exchanges were also observed between a break in 3p21 and one in 3q26, but few exchanges were observed between breaks in 3q11 and 3q26, even though the two regions are located on the same arm of the chromosome. In this study, human epithelial cells were fixed at G1 phase and the interphase cells were hybridized using the XCyte3 mBAND kit from MetaSystems. The z-section images of chromosome 3 were captured with a Leica and an LSM 510 Meta laser scanning confocal microscopes. A total of 100 chromosomes were analyzed. The reconstruction of three dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 with six different colored regions was achieved using the Imaris software. The relative distance between different regions was measured as well. We further analyzed fragile sites on the chromosome that have been identified in various types of cancers. The data showed that, in majority of the cells, the regions containing 3p21 and 3q11 are colocalized in the center of the chromosome, whereas, the regions towards the telomeres of the chromosome are either physically wrapping outside the chromosome center or with arms sticking out. Our results demonstrated that the distribution of breaks involved in radiation

  9. Histone modifications influence mediator interactions with chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yongqiang; Bjornsdottir, Gudrun; Liu, Zhongle; Quan, Amy; Costanzo, Michael; Dávila López, Marcela; Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski; Ronne, Hans; Boone, Charles; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Myers, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    The Mediator complex transmits activation signals from DNA bound transcription factors to the core transcription machinery. Genome wide localization studies have demonstrated that Mediator occupancy not only correlates with high levels of transcription, but that the complex also is present at transcriptionally silenced locations. We provide evidence that Mediator localization is guided by an interaction with histone tails, and that this interaction is regulated by their post-translational modifications. A quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map revealed links between Mediator components and factors affecting chromatin structure, especially histone deacetylases. Peptide binding assays demonstrated that pure wild-type Mediator forms stable complexes with the tails of Histone H3 and H4. These binding assays also showed Mediator—histone H4 peptide interactions are specifically inhibited by acetylation of the histone H4 lysine 16, a residue critical in transcriptional silencing. Finally, these findings were validated by tiling array analysis that revealed a broad correlation between Mediator and nucleosome occupancy in vivo, but a negative correlation between Mediator and nucleosomes acetylated at histone H4 lysine 16. Our studies show that chromatin structure and the acetylation state of histones are intimately connected to Mediator localization. PMID:21742760

  10. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  11. Homoeologous chromatin exchange in a radiation-induced gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, J.; Knott, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the ionizing-radiation-induced translocations between alien and wheat chromosomes show no deleterious effects and are transmitted normally through the pollen. Translocations of this type will be called ''compensating''. In one such compensating translocation, designated T4, it was found that chromatin in the long arm of wheat chromosome 7D was replaced with homoeologous chromatin of the Agropyron chromosome

  12. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using Drosophila tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Vuong; Gan, Qiang; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics remains a rapidly developing field that studies how the chromatin state contributes to differential gene expression in distinct cell types at different developmental stages. Epigenetic regulation contributes to a broad spectrum of biological processes, including cellular differentiation during embryonic development and homeostasis in adulthood. A critical strategy in epigenetic studies is to examine how various histone modifications and chromatin factors regulate gene expression. ...

  13. Homoeologous chromatin exchange in a radiation-induced gene transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J; Knott, D R [Department of Crop Science, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

    1977-03-01

    Some of the ionizing-radiation-induced translocations between alien and wheat chromosomes show no deleterious effects and are transmitted normally through the pollen. Translocations of this type will be called ''compensating''. In one such compensating translocation, designated T4, it was found that chromatin in the long arm of wheat chromosome 7D was replaced with homologous chromatin of the Agropyron chromosome.

  14. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  15. Nuclear visions enhanced: chromatin structure, organization and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Meshorer, Eran; Herrmann, Harald; Raška, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The EMBO Workshop on ‘Chromatin Structure, Organization and Dynamics' took place in April 2011 in Prague, Czech Republic. Participants presented data on the generation of models of the genome, working to correlate changes in the organization of chromatin with the functional state of the genome.

  16. Vitamin C attenuates negative effects of vitrification on sperm parameters, chromatin quality, apoptosis and acrosome reaction in neat and prepared normozoospermic samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmat Mangoli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of vitamin C on sperm parameters, sperm chromatin quality and apoptosis resulted of vitrification in neat semen and prepared spermatozoa of normozoospermic samples. Material and methods: Forty semen samples from normozoospermic men were included in this prospective study. Each sample was divided into five groups. Group I: control or fresh semen, group II: semen prepared by swim-up method and then vitrified, group III: neat semen was vitrified, group IV: vitamin C (600 μM was added to prepared spermatozoa and then vitrified and group V: vitamin C (600 μM was added to neat semen and then vitrified. After warming, sperm analysis was done accordingly. For evaluating the sperm chromatin/DNA integrity status and acrosome reaction, we used toluidine blue (TB, acridine orange (AO, terminal transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate biotin end labeling (TUNEL and double staining tests. Results: All of the sperm parameters (count, motility, morphology and viability had significant differences (P < 0.05 between different groups, especially in group IV. Data showed sperm chromatin damages and acrosome reaction abnormality increased resulted of vitrification, but, in the groups that added vitamin C (IV, V rate of damages was decreased and this was notable in the group IV. Conclusion: Vitamin C can attenuate the detrimental effects of vitrification on sperm parameters, chromatin quality and rate of apoptosis in both neat semen and prepared spermatozoa of normozoospermic samples. Keywords: Vitrification, Spermatozoa, Vitamin C, Chromatin, Human sperm

  17. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  18. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modifications to the DNA and histone protein components of chromatin can modulate gene expression and genome stability. Understanding the physiological impact of changes in chromatin structure remains an important question in biology. As one example, in order to generate antibody diversity...... with somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, chromatin must be made accessible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-mediated deamination of cytosines in DNA. These lesions are recognized and removed by various DNA repair pathways but, if not handled properly, can lead to formation...... of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct roles...

  19. Explanation for excessive DNA single-strand breaks and endogenous repair foci in pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banáth, J P; Bañuelos, C A; Klokov, D; MacPhail, S M; Lansdorp, P M; Olive, P L

    2009-05-01

    Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) exhibit approximately 100 large gammaH2AX repair foci in the absence of measurable numbers of DNA double-strand breaks. Many of these cells also show excessive numbers of DNA single-strand breaks (>10,000 per cell) when analyzed using the alkaline comet assay. To understand the reasons for these unexpected observations, various methods for detecting DNA strand breaks were applied to wild-type mES cells and to mES cells lacking H2AX, ATM, or DNA-PKcs. H2AX phosphorylation and expression of other repair complexes were measured using flow and image analysis of antibody-stained cells. Results indicate that high numbers of endogenous gammaH2AX foci and single-strand breaks in pluripotent mES cells do not require ATM or DNA-PK kinase activity and appear to be associated with global chromatin decondensation rather than pre-existing DNA damage. This will limit applications of gammaH2AX foci analysis in mES cells to relatively high levels of initial or residual DNA damage. Excessive numbers of single-strand breaks in the alkaline comet assay can be explained by the vulnerability of replicating chromatin in mES cells to osmotic shock. This suggests that caution is needed in interpreting results with the alkaline comet assay when applied to certain cell types or after treatment with agents that make chromatin vulnerable to osmotic changes. Differentiation of mES cells caused a reduction in histone acetylation, gammaH2AX foci intensity, and DNA single-strand breakage, providing a link between chromatin structural organization, excessive gammaH2AX foci, and sensitivity of replicating mES cell chromatin to osmotic shock.

  20. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschini, Roberta, E-mail: meschini@unitus.it; Morucci, Elisa; Berni, Andrea; Lopez-Martinez, Wilner; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability. • Reduced radiation-induced clastogenicity in Ataxia telangiectasia cell lines. • Histone tails hyperacetylation reduces heterochromatin content favouring DSBs repair. - Abstract: At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post

  1. Breaking the silence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Hanne; Kirkevold, Marit; McCallin, Antoinette

    2012-01-01

    and individual interviews were analyzed using the grounded theory method. The findings revealed that the main concern of the patients was feeling isolated, which was resolved using a process of interactional integration. Interactional integration begins by breaking the silence to enable the progression from...

  2. Violent breaking wave impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Peregrine, D.H.; Bullock, G.N.

    2009-01-01

    When an ocean wave breaks against a steep-fronted breakwater, sea wall or a similar marine structure, its impact on the structure can be very violent. This paper describes the theoretical studies that, together with field and laboratory investigations, have been carried out in order to gain a bet...

  3. RNA polymerase III transcription - regulated by chromatin structure and regulator of nuclear chromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascali, Chiara; Teichmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription is regulated by modifications of the chromatin. DNA methylation and post-translational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and methylation have been linked to Pol III transcriptional activity. In addition to being regulated by modifications of DNA and histones, Pol III genes and its transcription factors have been implicated in the organization of nuclear chromatin in several organisms. In yeast, the ability of the Pol III transcription system to contribute to nuclear organization seems to be dependent on direct interactions of Pol III genes and/or its transcription factors TFIIIC and TFIIIB with the structural maintenance of chromatin (SMC) protein-containing complexes cohesin and condensin. In human cells, Pol III genes and transcription factors have also been shown to colocalize with cohesin and the transcription regulator and genome organizer CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF). Furthermore, chromosomal sites have been identified in yeast and humans that are bound by partial Pol III machineries (extra TFIIIC sites - ETC; chromosome organizing clamps - COC). These ETCs/COC as well as Pol III genes possess the ability to act as boundary elements that restrict spreading of heterochromatin.

  4. A Damage-Independent Role for 53BP1 that Impacts Break Order and Igh Architecture during Class Switch Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P. Rocha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During class switch recombination (CSR, B cells replace the Igh Cμ or δ exons with another downstream constant region exon (CH, altering the antibody isotype. CSR occurs through the introduction of AID-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs in switch regions and subsequent ligation of broken ends. Here, we developed an assay to investigate the dynamics of DSB formation in individual cells. We demonstrate that the upstream switch region Sμ is first targeted during recombination and that the mechanism underlying this control relies on 53BP1. Surprisingly, regulation of break order occurs through residual binding of 53BP1 to chromatin before the introduction of damage and independent of its established role in DNA repair. Using chromosome conformation capture, we show that 53BP1 mediates changes in chromatin architecture that affect break order. Finally, our results explain how changes in Igh architecture in the absence of 53BP1 could promote inversional rearrangements that compromise CSR.

  5. Rapid and reversible epigenome editing by endogenous chromatin regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Simon M G; Kirkland, Jacob G; Chory, Emma J; Husmann, Dylan; Calarco, Joseph P; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2017-09-15

    Understanding the causal link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation remains a central question in chromatin biology. To edit the epigenome we developed the FIRE-Cas9 system for rapid and reversible recruitment of endogenous chromatin regulators to specific genomic loci. We enhanced the dCas9-MS2 anchor for genome targeting with Fkbp/Frb dimerizing fusion proteins to allow chemical-induced proximity of a desired chromatin regulator. We find that mSWI/SNF (BAF) complex recruitment is sufficient to oppose Polycomb within minutes, leading to activation of bivalent gene transcription in mouse embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, Hp1/Suv39h1 heterochromatin complex recruitment to active promoters deposits H3K9me3 domains, resulting in gene silencing that can be reversed upon washout of the chemical dimerizer. This inducible recruitment strategy provides precise kinetic information to model epigenetic memory and plasticity. It is broadly applicable to mechanistic studies of chromatin in mammalian cells and is particularly suited to the analysis of endogenous multi-subunit chromatin regulator complexes.Understanding the link between epigenetic marks and gene regulation requires the development of new tools to directly manipulate chromatin. Here the authors demonstrate a Cas9-based system to recruit chromatin remodelers to loci of interest, allowing rapid, reversible manipulation of epigenetic states.

  6. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  7. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppal, Timsy; Jha, Hem C.; Verma, Subhash C.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  8. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  9. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  10. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  11. Analysis of DNA replication associated chromatin decondensation: in vivo assay for understanding chromatin remodeling mechanisms of selected proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysov, Sergiy; Bryant, Victoria L; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Of critical importance to many of the events underlying transcriptional control of gene expression are modifications to core and linker histones that regulate the accessibility of trans-acting factors to the DNA substrate within the context of chromatin. Likewise, control over the initiation of DNA replication, as well as the ability of the replication machinery to proceed during elongation through the multiple levels of chromatin condensation that are likely to be encountered, is known to involve the creation of chromatin accessibility. In the latter case, chromatin access will likely need to be a transient event so as to prevent total genomic unraveling of the chromatin that would be deleterious to cells. While there are many molecular and biochemical approaches in use to study histone changes and their relationship to transcription and chromatin accessibility, few techniques exist that allow a molecular dissection of the events underlying DNA replication control as it pertains to chromatin changes and accessibility. Here, we outline a novel experimental strategy for addressing the ability of specific proteins to induce large-scale chromatin unfolding (decondensation) in vivo upon site-specific targeting to an engineered locus. Our laboratory has used this powerful system in novel ways to directly address the ability of DNA replication proteins to create chromatin accessibility, and have incorporated modifications to the basic approach that allow for a molecular genetic analysis of the mechanisms and associated factors involved in causing chromatin decondensation by a protein of interest. Alternative approaches involving co-expression of other proteins (competitors or stimulators), concurrent drug treatments, and analysis of co-localizing histone modifications are also addressed, all of which are illustrative of the utility of this experimental system for extending basic findings to physiologically relevant mechanisms. Although used by our group to analyze

  12. Germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 mediates DNA repair through relaxation of chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Tao Yin

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR is an intrinsic barrier of cell to tumorigenesis initiated by genotoxic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying the DDR are not completely understood despite of extensive investigation. Recently, we have reported that ectopic expression of germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 is associated with tumor stem cell development, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show that PIWIL2 is required for the repair of DNA-damage induced by various types of genotoxic agents. Upon ultraviolet (UV irradiation, silenced PIWIL2 gene in normal human fibroblasts was transiently activated after treatment with UV light. This activation was associated with DNA repair, because Piwil2-deficienct mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mili(-/- MEFs were defective in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD repair after UV treatment. As a result, the UV-treated mili(-/- MEFs were more susceptible to apoptosis, as characterized by increased levels of DNA damage-associated apoptotic proteins, such as active caspase-3, cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and Bik. The impaired DNA repair in the mili(-/- MEFs was associated with the reductions of histone H3 acetylation and chromatin relaxation, although the DDR pathway downstream chromatin relaxation appeared not to be directly affected by Piwil2. Moreover, guanine-guanine (Pt-[GG] and double strand break (DSB repair were also defective in the mili(-/- MEFs treated by genotoxic chemicals Cisplatin and ionizing radiation (IR, respectively. The results indicate that Piwil2 can mediate DNA repair through an axis of Piwil2 → histone acetylation → chromatin relaxation upstream DDR pathways. The findings reveal a new role for Piwil2 in DNA repair and suggest that Piwil2 may act as a gatekeeper against DNA damage-mediated tumorigenesis.

  13. The ATRX syndrome protein forms a chromatin-remodeling complex with Daxx and localizes in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yutong; Gibbons, Richard; Yan, Zhijiang; Yang, Dafeng; McDowell, Tarra L; Sechi, Salvatore; Qin, Jun; Zhou, Sharleen; Higgs, Doug; Wang, Weidong

    2003-09-16

    ATRX syndrome is characterized by X-linked mental retardation associated with alpha-thalassemia. The gene mutated in this disease, ATRX, encodes a plant homeodomain-like finger and a SWI2/SNF2-like ATPase motif, both of which are often found in chromatin-remodeling enzymes, but ATRX has not been characterized biochemically. By immunoprecipitation from HeLa extract, we found that ATRX is in a complex with transcription cofactor Daxx. The following evidence supports that ATRX and Daxx are components of an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex: (i) Daxx and ATRX can be coimmunoisolated by antibodies specific for each protein; (ii) a proportion of Daxx cofractionates with ATRX as a complex of 1 MDa by gel-filtration analysis; (iii) in extract from cells of a patient with ATRX syndrome, the level of the Daxx-ATRX complex is correspondingly reduced; (iv) a proportion of ATRX and Daxx colocalize in promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies, with which Daxx had previously been located; and (v) the ATRX complex displays ATP-dependent activities that resemble those of other chromatin-remodeling complexes, including triple-helix DNA displacement and alteration of mononucleosome disruption patterns. But unlike the previously described SWI/SNF or NURD complexes, the ATRX complex does not randomize DNA phasing of the mononucleosomes, suggesting that it may remodel chromatin differently. Taken together, the results suggest that ATRX functions in conjunction with Daxx in a novel chromatin-remodeling complex. The defects in ATRX syndrome may result from inappropriate expression of genes controlled by this complex.

  14. Chromatin regulation at the frontier of synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Albert J.; Joung, J. Keith; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Collins, James J.

    2016-01-01

    As synthetic biology approaches are extended to diverse applications throughout medicine, biotechnology and basic biological research, there is an increasing need to engineer yeast, plant and mammalian cells. Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by the diverse biochemical and biophysical states of chromatin, which brings distinct challenges, as well as opportunities, over applications in bacteria. Recent synthetic approaches, including `epigenome editing', have allowed the direct and functional dissection of many aspects of physiological chromatin regulation. These studies lay the foundation for biomedical and biotechnological engineering applications that could take advantage of the unique combinatorial and spatiotemporal layers of chromatin regulation to create synthetic systems of unprecedented sophistication. PMID:25668787

  15. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty

    2015-01-01

    dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO......-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4....

  16. DNA packing in chromatine, a manifestation of the Bonnet transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Z; Lidin, S

    1988-08-01

    The packing of DNA is described using the formalism of differential geometry. Winding of the DNA double helix around the histone 2-5 octamer forming a nucleosome and the condensation of the so-formed bead-on-a-string chromatine aided by histone 1 is interpreted as two consecutive isometric, i.e. Bonnet, transformations. The DNA double helix can be approximated to a helicoid which can be transformed isometrically to a catenoid, an approximation of the nucleosome. Owing to the organization of the histone octamer the extended chromatine takes a helicoidal shape allowing a second Bonnet transformation to consummate the condensation into a chromatine fibre.

  17. Mechanism of chromatin degradation in thymocytes of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zotova, R.N.; Umanskij, S.R.; Tokarskaya, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    A biphase change in poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity of the thymocyte chromatin was observed after 10 Gy irradiation of rats: during the first minutes the incorporation of 14 C-NAD increased by 40% then started decreasing to make 110, 60 and 35% after 1, 2 and 3 h, respectively. Irradiation of rat thymus chromatin in vitro sharply decreased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. The possible role of changes in the poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis in the activation of nuclear Ca/Mg-dependent endonuclease and in the postirradiation degradation of the thymocyte chromatin is discussed

  18. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re-theorizat......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”......This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re...

  19. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  20. Predicting appointment breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, A G; Talaga, J

    1995-01-01

    The goal of physician referral services is to schedule appointments, but if too many patients fail to show up, the value of the service will be compromised. The authors found that appointment breaking can be predicted by the number of days to the scheduled appointment, the doctor's specialty, and the patient's age and gender. They also offer specific suggestions for modifying the marketing mix to reduce the incidence of no-shows.

  1. Single sector supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luty, Markus A.; Terning, John

    1999-01-01

    We review recent work on realistic models that break supersymmetry dynamically and give rise to composite quarks and leptons, all in a single sector. These models have a completely natural suppression of flavor-changing neutral currents, and the hierarchy of Yukawa couplings is explained by the dimensionality of composite states. The generic signatures are unification of scalar masses with different quantum numbers at the compositeness scale, and lighter gaugino, Higgsino, and third-generation sfermion masses

  2. Generation IV national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preville, M.; Sadhankar, R.; Brady, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the Generation IV National Program. This program involves evolutionary and innovative design with significantly higher efficiencies (∼50% compared to present ∼30%) - sustainable, economical, safe, reliable and proliferation resistant - for future energy security. The Generation IV Forum (GIF) effectively leverages the resources of the participants to meet these goals. Ten countries signed the GIF Charter in 2001

  3. Dual descriptions of supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intrilligator, K.; Thomas, S.

    1996-08-01

    Dynamical supersymmetry breaking is considered in models which admit descriptions in terms of electric, confined, or magnetic degrees of freedom in various limits. In this way, a variety of seemingly different theories which break supersymmetry are actually interrelated by confinement or duality. Specific examples are given in which there are two dual descriptions of the supersymmetry breaking ground state

  4. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  5. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  6. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  7. histone H3 predominantly mark the pericentromeric chromatin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANTOSH KUMAR SHARMA

    pericentromeric chromatin during mitosis in monokinetic plants. J. Genet. .... bigger), cytological preparations (easy to difficult) as well as their habitat ... Poaceae. Monocot. Land. 14. Triticum aestivum. Common wheat. Poaceae. Monocot. Land.

  8. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  9. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N.; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, and not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins and accumulate DDR signals. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  10. Determination of local chromatin composition by CasID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Anton, Tobias; Rombaut, Pascaline; Herzog, Franz; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2016-09-02

    Chromatin structure and function are determined by a plethora of proteins whose genome-wide distribution is typically assessed by immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Here, we developed a novel tool to investigate the local chromatin environment at specific DNA sequences. We combined the programmable DNA binding of dCas9 with the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA* (CasID) to biotinylate proteins in the direct vicinity of specific loci. Subsequent streptavidin-mediated precipitation and mass spectrometry identified both known and previously unknown chromatin factors associated with repetitive telomeric, major satellite and minor satellite DNA. With super-resolution microscopy, we confirmed the localization of the putative transcription factor ZNF512 at chromocenters. The versatility of CasID facilitates the systematic elucidation of functional protein complexes and locus-specific chromatin composition.

  11. Aberrant Chromatin Modification as a Mechanism of Prostate Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hongwu

    2004-01-01

    .... However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that aberrant chromatin modification plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression...

  12. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites

  13. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  14. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist

  15. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophorou, Maria A; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune...... and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel...... PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic...

  16. histone H3 predominantly mark the pericentromeric chromatin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANTOSH KUMAR SHARMA

    packaging of eukaryotic DNA in nucleoprotein complex known as .... The plant material used in the present study has ... materials (root tips/flower buds) were fixed in PHEMES ..... fications that mark active chromatin, while there are no data.

  17. Cytogenetic abnormality in man, wider implications of theories of sex chromatin origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILES, C P

    1962-01-01

    Female nuclei may be identified by means of sex chromatin. In general the number of sex chromatin bodies is one less than the number of X chromosomes. An exception to this rule is a case of sex chromatin-positive XO Turner's syndrome. This case suggests the possibility of sex chromatin-positive XY males, and it may be evidence for chromosomal differentiation.

  18. Arabidopsis RNA Polymerase V Mediates Enhanced Compaction and Silencing of Geminivirus and Transposon Chromatin during Host Recovery from Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursey, Tami; Regedanz, Elizabeth; Bisaro, David M

    2018-04-01

    Plants employ RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) to silence geminiviruses and transposable elements (TEs). We previously showed that canonical RdDM (Pol IV-RdDM) involving RNA polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and Pol V) is required for Arabidopsis thaliana to recover from infection with Beet curly top virus lacking a suppressor protein that inhibits methylation (BCTV L2 - ). Recovery, which is characterized by reduced viral DNA levels and symptom remission, allows normal floral development. Here, we used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) to confirm that >90% of BCTV L2 - chromatin is highly compacted during recovery, and a micrococcal nuclease-chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that this is largely due to increased nucleosome occupancy. Physical compaction correlated with augmented cytosine and H3K9 methylation and with reduced viral gene expression. We additionally demonstrated that these phenomena are dependent on Pol V and by extension the Pol IV-RdDM pathway. BCTV L2 - was also used to evaluate the impact of viral infection on host loci, including repressed retrotransposons Ta3 and Athila6A Remarkably, an unexpected Pol V-dependent hypersuppression of these TEs was observed, resulting in transcript levels even lower than those detected in uninfected plants. Hypersuppression is likely to be especially important for natural recovery from wild-type geminiviruses, as viral L2 and AL2 proteins cause ectopic TE expression. Thus, Pol IV-RdDM targets both viral and TE chromatin during recovery, simultaneously silencing the majority of viral genomes and maintaining host genome integrity by enforcing tighter control of TEs in future reproductive tissues. IMPORTANCE In plants, RdDM pathways use small RNAs to target cytosine and H3K9 methylation, thereby silencing DNA virus genomes and transposable elements (TEs). Further, Pol IV-RdDM involving Pol IV and Pol V is a key aspect of host

  19. Mechanism of chromatin degradation in thymocytes of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonova, L.V.; Nelipovich, P.A.; Umanskij, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Chromatin digestion in isolated thymocyte nuclei with DNAase I, micrococcal nuclease and nuclease from Serratia marcescens was studied. It was shown that 3 h after irradiation (10 Gy), the kinetics of accumulation of acid soluble and salt soluble products of DNA degradation, caused by exogenous nucleases, remains unchanged. The administration of cycloheximide does not influence the sensitivity of chromatin to DNAase I and somewhat increases the rate of salt soluble products formation upon the nuclease from S, marcescens treatment

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Symmetry Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, L. H.

    2005-11-01

    One of the most fruitful and enduring advances in theoretical physics during the last half century has been the development of the role played by symmetries. One needs only to consider SU(3) and the classification of elementary particles, the Yang Mills enlargement of Maxwell's electrodynamics to the symmetry group SU(2), and indeed the tremendous activity surrounding the discovery of parity violation in the weak interactions in the late 1950s. This last example is one of a broken symmetry, though the symmetry in question is a discrete one. It was clear to Gell-Mann, who first clarified the role of SU(3) in particle physics, that this symmetry was not exact. If it had been, it would have been much easier to discover; for example, the proton, neutron, Σ, Λ and Ξ particles would all have had the same mass. For many years the SU(3) symmetry breaking was assigned a mathematical form, but the importance of this formulation fell away when the quark model began to be taken seriously; the reason the SU(3) symmetry was not exact was simply that the (three, in those days) quarks had different masses. At the same time, and in a different context, symmetry breaking of a different type was being investigated. This went by the name of `spontaneous symmetry breaking' and its characteristic was that the ground state of a given system was not invariant under the symmetry transformation, though the interactions (the Hamiltonian, in effect) was. A classic example is ferromagnetism. In a ferromagnet the atomic spins are aligned in one direction only—this is the ground state of the system. It is clearly not invariant under a rotation, for that would change the ground state into a (similar but) different one, with the spins aligned in a different direction; this is the phenomenon of a degenerate vacuum. The contribution of the spin interaction, s1.s2, to the Hamiltonian, however, is actually invariant under rotations. As Coleman remarked, a little man living in a ferromagnet would

  1. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  2. Cytoplasmic chromatin triggers inflammation in senescence and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhixun; Ghosh, Kanad; Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Zhu, Jiajun; Sen, Payel; Wangensteen, Kirk J; Simithy, Johayra; Lan, Yemin; Lin, Yanping; Zhou, Zhuo; Capell, Brian C; Xu, Caiyue; Xu, Mingang; Kieckhaefer, Julia E; Jiang, Tianying; Shoshkes-Carmel, Michal; Tanim, K M Ahasan Al; Barber, Glen N; Seykora, John T; Millar, Sarah E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Garcia, Benjamin A; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2017-10-19

    Chromatin is traditionally viewed as a nuclear entity that regulates gene expression and silencing. However, we recently discovered the presence of cytoplasmic chromatin fragments that pinch off from intact nuclei of primary cells during senescence, a form of terminal cell-cycle arrest associated with pro-inflammatory responses. The functional significance of chromatin in the cytoplasm is unclear. Here we show that cytoplasmic chromatin activates the innate immunity cytosolic DNA-sensing cGAS-STING (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase linked to stimulator of interferon genes) pathway, leading both to short-term inflammation to restrain activated oncogenes and to chronic inflammation that associates with tissue destruction and cancer. The cytoplasmic chromatin-cGAS-STING pathway promotes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype in primary human cells and in mice. Mice deficient in STING show impaired immuno-surveillance of oncogenic RAS and reduced tissue inflammation upon ionizing radiation. Furthermore, this pathway is activated in cancer cells, and correlates with pro-inflammatory gene expression in human cancers. Overall, our findings indicate that genomic DNA serves as a reservoir to initiate a pro-inflammatory pathway in the cytoplasm in senescence and cancer. Targeting the cytoplasmic chromatin-mediated pathway may hold promise in treating inflammation-related disorders.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    The recent progress in pluripotent stem cell research has opened new avenues of disease modeling, drug screening, and transplantation of patient-specific tissues that had been unimaginable until a decade ago. The central mechanism underlying pluripotency is epigenetic gene regulation; the majority of cell signaling pathways, both extracellular and cytoplasmic, eventually alter the epigenetic status of their target genes during the process of activating or suppressing the genes to acquire or maintain pluripotency. It has long been thought that the chromatin of pluripotent stem cells is globally open to enable the timely activation of essentially all genes in the genome during differentiation into multiple lineages. The current article reviews descriptive observations and the epigenetic machinery relevant to what is supposed to be globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem cells. This includes microscopic appearance, permissive gene transcription, chromatin remodeling complexes, histone modifications, DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, dynamic movement of chromatin proteins, nucleosome accessibility and positioning, and long-range chromosomal interactions. Detailed analyses of each element, however, have revealed that the globally open chromatin hypothesis is not necessarily supported by some of the critical experimental evidence, such as genome-wide nucleosome accessibility and nucleosome positioning. Further understanding of the epigenetic gene regulation is expected to determine the true nature of the so-called globally open chromatin in pluripotent stem. PMID:24695097

  4. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  5. Inertial Symmetry Breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Christopher T.

    2018-03-19

    We review and expand upon recent work demonstrating that Weyl invariant theories can be broken "inertially," which does not depend upon a potential. This can be understood in a general way by the "current algebra" of these theories, independently of specific Lagrangians. Maintaining the exact Weyl invariance in a renormalized quantum theory can be accomplished by renormalization conditions that refer back to the VEV's of fields in the action. We illustrate the computation of a Weyl invariant Coleman-Weinberg potential that breaks a U(1) symmetry together,with scale invariance.

  6. Break the Pattern!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse, Cathrine; Trentemøller, Stine

    Break the Pattern! A critical enquiry into three scientific workplace cultures: Hercules, Caretakers and Worker Bees is the third publication of the international three year long project "Understanding Puzzles in the Gendered European Map" (UPGEM). By contrasting empirical findings from academic ...... (physics in culture) and discuss how physics as and in culture influence the perception of science, of work and family life, of the interplay between religion and science as well as how physics as culture can either hinder or promote the career of female scientists....

  7. Breaking the Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul Rind; Kirketerp, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The paper shortly reveals the history of a small school - the KaosPilots - dedicated to educate young people to carriers as entrepreneurs. In this contribution we want to explore how the KaosPilots managed to break the waves of institutionalised concepts and practices of teaching entrepreneurship....... Following the so-called 'Dogma' concept developed by Danish filmmakers, this contribution aim to explore the key elements making up the recipes guiding the entrepreneurship training program exercised by the school. Key factors forming a community of learning practice are outlined as well as the critical...... pedagogical elements on which the education in entrepreneurship rests....

  8. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  9. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  10. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  11. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  12. SAGE IV Pathfinder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing a unique, new occultation technique involving imaging, the SAGE IV concept will meet or exceed the quality of previous SAGE measurements at a small...

  13. More dynamical supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csaki, C.; Randall, L.; Skiba, W.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new class of theories which dynamically break supersymmetry based on the gauge group SU(n) x SU(3) x U(1) for even n. These theories are interesting in that no dynamical superpotential is generated in the absence of perturbations. For the example SU(4) x SU(3) x U(1) we explicitly demonstrate that all flat directions can be lifted through a renormalizable superpotential and that supersymmetry is dynamically broken. We derive the exact superpotential for this theory, which exhibits new and interesting dynamical phenomena. For example, modifications to classical constraints can be field dependent. We also consider the generalization to SU(n) x SU(3) x U(1) models (with even n>4). We present a renormalizable superpotential which lifts all flat directions. Because SU(3) is not confining in the absence of perturbations, the analysis of supersymmetry breaking is very different in these theories from the n=4 example. When the SU(n) gauge group confines, the Yukawa couplings drive the SU(3) theory into a regime with a dynamically generated superpotential. By considering a simplified version of these theories we argue that supersymmetry is probably broken. (orig.)

  14. Bootstrap Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Shu Hou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the emergence of a 125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, we explore the possibility of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking by strong Yukawa coupling of very heavy new chiral quarks Q . Taking the 125 GeV object to be a dilaton with suppressed couplings, we note that the Goldstone bosons G exist as longitudinal modes V L of the weak bosons and would couple to Q with Yukawa coupling λ Q . With m Q ≳ 700  GeV from LHC, the strong λ Q ≳ 4 could lead to deeply bound Q Q ¯ states. We postulate that the leading “collapsed state,” the color-singlet (heavy isotriplet, pseudoscalar Q Q ¯ meson π 1 , is G itself, and a gap equation without Higgs is constructed. Dynamical symmetry breaking is affected via strong λ Q , generating m Q while self-consistently justifying treating G as massless in the loop, hence, “bootstrap,” Solving such a gap equation, we find that m Q should be several TeV, or λ Q ≳ 4 π , and would become much heavier if there is a light Higgs boson. For such heavy chiral quarks, we find analogy with the π − N system, by which we conjecture the possible annihilation phenomena of Q Q ¯ → n V L with high multiplicity, the search of which might be aided by Yukawa-bound Q Q ¯ resonances.

  15. Breaking of ocean surface waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babanin, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Wind-generated waves are the most prominent feature of the ocean surface, and so are breaking waves manifested by the appearance of sporadic whitecaps. Such breaking represents one of the most interesting and most challenging problems for both fluid mechanics and physical oceanography. It is an intermittent random process, very fast by comparison with other processes in the wave breaking on the water surface is not continuous, but its role in maintaining the energy balance within the continuous wind-wave field is critical. Ocean wave breaking also plays the primary role in the air-sea exchange of momentum, mass and heat, and it is of significant importance for ocean remote sensing, coastal and maritime engineering, navigation and other practical applications. Understanding the wave breaking its occurrence, the breaking rates and even ability to describe its onset has been hindered for decades by the strong non-linearity of the process, together with its irregular and ferocious nature. Recently, this knowledge has significantly advanced, and the review paper is an attempt to summarise the facts into a consistent, albeit still incomplete picture of the phenomenon. In the paper, variety of definitions related to the were breaking are discussed and formulated and methods for breaking detection and measurements are examined. Most of attention is dedicated to the research of wave breaking probability and severity. Experimental, observational, numerical and statistical approaches and their outcomes are reviewed. Present state of the wave-breaking research and knowledge is analysed and main outstanding problems are outlined (Authors)

  16. Accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations in tissue-specific stem cells: the driving force of aging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schuler

    Full Text Available Accumulation of DNA damage leading to stem cell exhaustion has been proposed to be a principal mechanism of aging. Using 53BP1-foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs in mouse epidermis were analyzed for age-related DNA damage response (DDR. We observed increasing amounts of 53BP1-foci during the natural aging process independent of telomere shortening and after protracted low-dose radiation, suggesting substantial accumulation of DSBs in HFSCs. Electron microscopy combined with immunogold-labeling showed multiple small 53BP1 clusters diffusely distributed throughout the highly compacted heterochromatin of aged HFSCs, but single large 53BP1 clusters in irradiated HFSCs. These remaining 53BP1 clusters did not colocalize with core components of non-homologous end-joining, but with heterochromatic histone modifications. Based on these results we hypothesize that these lesions were not persistently unrepaired DSBs, but may reflect chromatin rearrangements caused by the repair or misrepair of DSBs. Flow cytometry showed increased activation of repair proteins and damage-induced chromatin modifications, triggering apoptosis and cellular senescence in irradiated, but not in aged HFSCs. These results suggest that accumulation of DNA damage-induced chromatin alterations, whose structural dimensions reflect the complexity of the initial genotoxic insult, may lead to different DDR events, ultimately determining the biological outcome of HFSCs. Collectively, our findings support the hypothesis that aging might be largely the remit of structural changes to chromatin potentially leading to epigenetically induced transcriptional deregulation.

  17. Beyond repair foci: DNA double-strand break repair in euchromatic and heterochromatic compartments analyzed by transmission electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Lorat

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated by ionizing radiation pose a serious threat to the preservation of genetic and epigenetic information. The known importance of local chromatin configuration in DSB repair raises the question of whether breaks in different chromatin environments are recognized and repaired by the same repair machinery and with similar efficiency. An essential step in DSB processing by non-homologous end joining is the high-affinity binding of Ku70-Ku80 and DNA-PKcs to double-stranded DNA ends that holds the ends in physical proximity for subsequent repair.Using transmission electron microscopy to localize gold-labeled pKu70 and pDNA-PKcs within nuclear ultrastructure, we monitored the formation and repair of actual DSBs within euchromatin (electron-lucent and heterochromatin (electron-dense in cortical neurons of irradiated mouse brain.While DNA lesions in euchromatin (characterized by two pKu70-gold beads, reflecting the Ku70-Ku80 heterodimer are promptly sensed and rejoined, DNA packaging in heterochromatin appears to retard DSB processing, due to the time needed to unravel higher-order chromatin structures. Complex pKu70-clusters formed in heterochromatin (consisting of 4 or ≥ 6 gold beads may represent multiple breaks in close proximity caused by ionizing radiation of highly-compacted DNA. All pKu70-clusters disappeared within 72 hours post-irradiation, indicating efficient DSB rejoining. However, persistent 53BP1 clusters in heterochromatin (comprising ≥ 10 gold beads, occasionally co-localizing with γH2AX, but not pKu70 or pDNA-PKcs, may reflect incomplete or incorrect restoration of chromatin structure rather than persistently unrepaired DNA damage.Higher-order organization of chromatin determines the accessibility of DNA lesions to repair complexes, defining how readily DSBs are detected and processed. DNA lesions in heterochromatin appear to be more complex, with multiple breaks in spatial vicinity inducing

  18. Small break loss of coolant accidents: Bottom and side break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, P.G.; Richter, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A LOCA can be caused, e.g. by a small break in the primary cooling system. The rate of fluid escaping through such a break will define the time until the core will be uncovered. Therefore the prediction of fluid loss and pressure transient is of major importance to plan for timely action in response to such an event. Stratification of the two phases might be present upstream of the break, thus, the location of the break relative to the vapor-liquid interface and the overall upstream fluid conditions are relevant for the calculation of fluid loss. Experimental results and analyses are presented here for small breaks at the bottom or at the side of a small pressure vessel. It was found that in such a case the onset of the so-called ''vapor pull through'' is important but swelling at sufficient depressurization rates of the liquid due to flashing is also of significance. It was also discovered that in the bottom break the flow rate is strongly dependent on the break entrance quality of the vapour-liquid mixture. The side break can be treated similarly to the bottom break if the interface level is above the break. The analyses developed on the basis of experimental observations showed reasonable agreement of predicted and measured pressure transients. It was possible to calculate the changing interface level and mixture void fraction history in a way compatible with the behavior observed during the experiments. Even though the experiments were performed at low pressures, this work should help to get a better understanding of physical phenomena occurring in a full scale small break LOCA. (orig./HP)

  19. Dancing on damaged chromatin. Functions of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in cellular responses to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kenta; Ohara, Maki; Seki, Ryota; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In order to preserve and protect genetic information, eukaryotic cells have developed a signaling or communications network to help the cell respond to DNA damage, and ATM and NBS1 are key players in this network. ATM is a protein kinase which is activated immediately after a DNA double strand break (DSB) is formed, and the resulting signal cascade generated in response to cellular DSBs is regulated by post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In addition, to ensure the efficient functioning of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, the highly ordered structure of eukaryotic chromatin must be appropriately altered to permit access of repair-related factors to DNA. These alterations are termed chromatin remodeling, and are executed by a specific remodeling complex in conjunction with histone modifications. Current advances in the molecular analysis of DNA damage responses have shown that the auto-phosphorylation of ATM and the interaction between ATM and NBS1 are key steps for ATM activation, and that the association of ATM and NBS1 is involved in chromatin remodeling. Identification of novel factors which function in ubiquitination (RNF8, Ubc13, Rap80, etc.) has also enabled us to understand more details of the early stages in DNA repair pathways which respond to DSBs. In this review, the focus is on the role of ATM and the RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 complex in DSB response pathways, and their role in DSB repair and in the regulation of chromatin remodeling. (author)

  20. Electroweak breaking in supersymmetric models

    CERN Document Server

    Ibáñez, L E

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking in supersymmetric versions of the standard model. After briefly reviewing the possible sources of supersymmetry breaking, we show how the required pattern of symmetry breaking can automatically result from the structure of quantum corrections in the theory. We demonstrate that this radiative breaking mechanism works well for a heavy top quark and can be combined in unified versions of the theory with excellent predictions for the running couplings of the model. (To be published in ``Perspectives in Higgs Physics'', G. Kane editor.)

  1. Circadian expression profiles of chromatin remodeling factor genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Gil; Lee, Kyounghee; Jang, Kiyoung; Seo, Pil Joon

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a biological time keeper mechanism that regulates biological rhythms to a period of approximately 24 h. The circadian clock enables organisms to anticipate environmental cycles and coordinates internal cellular physiology with external environmental cues. In plants, correct matching of the clock with the environment confers fitness advantages to plant survival and reproduction. Therefore, circadian clock components are regulated at multiple layers to fine-tune the circadian oscillation. Epigenetic regulation provides an additional layer of circadian control. However, little is known about which chromatin remodeling factors are responsible for circadian control. In this work, we analyzed circadian expression of 109 chromatin remodeling factor genes and identified 17 genes that display circadian oscillation. In addition, we also found that a candidate interacts with a core clock component, supporting that clock activity is regulated in part by chromatin modification. As an initial attempt to elucidate the relationship between chromatin modification and circadian oscillation, we identified novel regulatory candidates that provide a platform for future investigations of chromatin regulation of the circadian clock.

  2. Chromatin structure influence of DNA damage measurements by four assays: pulsed- and constant-field gel electrophoresis, DNA precipitation and non-denaturing filter elution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodek, D.; Olive, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    The of elution of DNA during non-denaturing filter elution (NFE) often correlates with cell sensitivity to radiation. The elution rate is influenced by two cellular factors: chromatin structure and the number of DNA-strand breaks (DSBs) produced in an intact cell by ionizing radiation. To determine which of the above factors is relevant to cell radiosensitivity, four assays were used to measure induction of DNA damage in three cell lines varying in radiosensitivity (V79, CHO, and L5178Y-R). Each of the assays, neutral filter elution (NFE), DNA precipitation, constant (CFGE) and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) have different physical basis for DNA damage measurement and might be differently affected by chromatin structure. Three of the methods used to measure DNA double-strand breaks gave different results: NFE was dependent on cell type and location of DNA relative to the replication fork, gel electrophoresis was independent of cell type but was affected by proximity to the replication fork, and the precipitation assay was independent of both cell type and replication status. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis produced the same results and constant field gel electrophoresis for 3 cell lines examined. Only NFE showed differences in sensitivity which correlated with cell survival following irradiation. The results suggest that three is the same initial amount of DSBs in cells from all three lines and that the sensitivity to radiation is determined by some additional factors, probably chromatin structure. (author). 18 refs, 5 figs

  3. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  4. Higher-order structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowary, P.T.; Widom, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a method for partially purifying chromatin from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) to a level suitable for studies of its higher-order folding. This has required the use of yeast strains that are free of the ubiquitous yeast killer virus. Results from dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction show that the yeast chromatin undergoes a cation-dependent folding into 30-nm filaments that resemble those characteristic of higher-cell chromatin; moreover, the packing of nucleosomes within the yeast 30-nm filaments is similar to that of higher cells. These results imply that yeast has a protein or protein domain that serves the role of the histone H 1 found in higher cells; physical and genetic studies of the yeast activity could help elucidate the structure and function of H 1. Images of the yeast 30-nm filaments can be used to test crossed-linker models for 30-nm filament structure

  5. Chromatin Regulation and the Histone Code in HIV Latency
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anne-Marie W; Margolis, David M

    2017-06-01

    The formation of a latent reservoir of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection hidden from immune clearance remains a significant obstacle to approaches to eradicate HIV infection. Towards an understanding of the mechanisms of HIV persistence, there is a growing body of work implicating epigenetic regulation of chromatin in establishment and maintenance of this latent reservoir. Here we discuss recent advances in the field of chromatin regulation, specifically in our understanding of the histone code, and how these discoveries relate to our current knowledge of the chromatin mechanisms linked to HIV transcriptional repression and the reversal of latency. We also examine mechanisms unexplored in the context of HIV latency and briefly discuss current therapies aimed at the induction of proviral expression within latently infected cells. We aim to emphasize that a greater understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms which govern HIV latency could lead to new therapeutic targets for latency reversal and clearance cure strategies.

  6. Fast neutron biological effects on normal and tumor chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, B.; Bugoi, Roxana; Paunica, Tatiana; Radu, Liliana

    1997-01-01

    Growing interest in neutron therapy and radioprotection requires complex studies on the mechanisms of neutron action on biological systems, especially on chromatin (the complex of deoxyribonucleic acid-DNA- with proteins in eukaryotic cells). Our study aims to investigate the fast neutrons induced damages in normal and tumor chromatin, studying thermal transition, intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence of chromatin-ethidium bromide complexes behavior versus irradiation dose. The Bucharest U-120 variable energy Cyclotron was employed as an intense source of fast neutrons produced by 13.5 MeV deuterons on a thick beryllium target (166.5 mg/cm 2 ) placed at 20 angle against the incident beam. The average energy is 5.24 MeV. The total yield at 0 angle is 6.7 x 10 16 n/sr·C·MeV. To determine neutron and gamma irradiation doses, home made thermoluminescent detectors-TLD(γ) and TLD (γ + n) were used: for gamma MgF 2 : Mn mixed with Teflon pellets (φ 12.5 mm, 0.6±0.1 mm thick) and for gamma plus neutrons MgF 2 :Mn mixed with 6 LiF and Teflon pellets (same dimensions). Using a 8.022 x 10 -2 albedo factor value and the equivalence 1Gy (n)=2·10 10 fast neutron/cm 2 , the dose for the irradiation of 1.2 x 10 2 Gy/μC, with an estimated precision of 15% C for neutrons and 7.8 x 10 -4 Gy/μC for gamma, at 10 cm behind Be target, was found, respectively. A diminution of the negative fluorescence intensity for chromatin-ethidium bromide complexes with the increasing of neutron dose (from 0.98 at 5 Gy to 0.85 at 100 Gy) was observed for normal chromatin. This fact reflects chromatin DNA injuries, with the decrease of double helix DNA proportion. To study the influence of gyrostan, thyroxine and D3 vitamin treatments on fast neutron radiolysis in tumor chromatin,10 mg/kg of anticancer drug gyrostan, 40μg/kg of hormonal compound thyroxine and 30,000 IU/kg of D3 vitamin were administrated, separately or associated, to Wistar rats bearing Walker carcinosarcoma. Representing

  7. INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Coordinates Metabolic Homeostasis with Cell Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme J. Gowans

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive survival requires the coordination of nutrient availability with expenditure of cellular resources. For example, in nutrient-limited environments, 50% of all S. cerevisiae genes synchronize and exhibit periodic bursts of expression in coordination with respiration and cell division in the yeast metabolic cycle (YMC. Despite the importance of metabolic and proliferative synchrony, the majority of YMC regulators are currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the INO80 chromatin-remodeling complex is required to coordinate respiration and cell division with periodic gene expression. Specifically, INO80 mutants have severe defects in oxygen consumption and promiscuous cell division that is no longer coupled with metabolic status. In mutant cells, chromatin accessibility of periodic genes, including TORC1-responsive genes, is relatively static, concomitant with severely attenuated gene expression. Collectively, these results reveal that the INO80 complex mediates metabolic signaling to chromatin to restrict proliferation to metabolically optimal states.

  8. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  9. R-parity breaking phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissani, F.

    1996-02-01

    We review various features of the R-parity breaking phenomenology, with particular attention to the low energy observables, and to the patterns of the R-parity breaking interactions that arise in Grand Unified models. (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  10. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  11. Model for the structure of the active nucleolar chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labhart, P.; Ness, P.; Banz, E.; Parish, R.; Koller, T.; Universitaet Zurich, Switzerland)

    1983-01-01

    Transcribed ribosomal genes of Xenopus laevis oocytes and of Dictyostelium discoideum were studied electron microscopically using step gradients at different ionic strengths. Under these conditions the fiber of the active chromatin appears smooth and is indistinguishable from free DNA. The accessibility of the coding region and of a nontranscribed spacer region to restriction enzymes and micrococcal nuclease were investigated. All of the results obtained are consistent with a model in which active nucleolar chromatin is mostly composed of free DNA and the components required for transcription. 50 references, 7 figures

  12. Chromatin versus pathogens: the function of epigenetics in plant immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bo; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    To defend against pathogens, plants have developed a sophisticated innate immunity that includes effector recognition, signal transduction, and rapid defense responses. Recent evidence has demonstrated that plants utilize the epigenetic control of gene expression to fine-tune their defense when challenged by pathogens. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of histone modifications (i.e., methylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination) and chromatin remodeling that contribute to plant immunity against pathogens. Functions of key histone-modifying and chromatin remodeling enzymes are discussed. PMID:26388882

  13. Chromatin Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Episomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    EBV latent infection is characterized by a highly restricted pattern of viral gene expression. EBV can establish latent infections in multiple different tissue types with remarkable variation and plasticity in viral transcription and replication. During latency, the viral genome persists as a multi-copy episome, a non-integrated-closed circular DNA with nucleosome structure similar to cellular chromosomes. Chromatin assembly and histone modifications contribute to the regulation of viral gene expression, DNA replication, and episome persistence during latency. This review focuses on how EBV latency is regulated by chromatin and its associated processes.

  14. A Method to Identify Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin Domains (NADs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Marie-Christine; Picart-Picolo, Ariadna; Pontvianne, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    The nuclear context needs to be taken into consideration to better understand the mechanisms shaping the epigenome and its organization, and therefore its impact on gene expression. For example, in Arabidopsis, heterochromatin is preferentially localized at the nuclear and the nucleolar periphery. Although chromatin domains associating with the nuclear periphery remain to be identified in plant cells, Nucleolus Associated chromatin Domains (NADs) can be identified thanks to a protocol allowing the isolation of pure nucleoli. We describe here the protocol enabling the identification of NADs in Arabidopsis. Providing the transfer of a nucleolus marker as described here in other crop species, this protocol is broadly applicable.

  15. Retention of the Native Epigenome in Purified Mammalian Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas H Ehrensberger

    Full Text Available A protocol is presented for the isolation of native mammalian chromatin as fibers of 25-250 nucleosomes under conditions that preserve the natural epigenetic signature. The material is composed almost exclusively of histones and DNA and conforms to the structure expected by electron microscopy. All sequences probed for were retained, indicating that the material is representative of the majority of the genome. DNA methylation marks and histone marks resembled the patterns observed in vivo. Importantly, nucleosome positions also remained largely unchanged, except on CpG islands, where nucleosomes were found to be unstable. The technical challenges of reconstituting biochemical reactions with native mammalian chromatin are discussed.

  16. Chromatin remodelling: the industrial revolution of DNA around histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anjanabha; Wittmeyer, Jacqueline; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin remodellers are specialized multi-protein machines that enable access to nucleosomal DNA by altering the structure, composition and positioning of nucleosomes. All remodellers have a catalytic ATPase subunit that is similar to known DNA-translocating motor proteins, suggesting DNA translocation as a unifying aspect of their mechanism. Here, we explore the diversity and specialization of chromatin remodellers, discuss how nucleosome modifications regulate remodeller activity and consider a model for the exposure of nucleosomal DNA that involves the use of directional DNA translocation to pump 'DNA waves' around the nucleosome.

  17. Internet Economics IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    edts.): Internet Economics IV Technical Report No. 2004-04, August 2004 Information Systems Laboratory IIS, Departement of Computer Science University of...level agreements (SLA), Information technology (IT), Internet address, Internet service provider 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18... technology and its economic impacts in the Internet world today. The second talk addresses the area of AAA protocol, summarizing authentication

  18. Uranium (IV) carboxylates - I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satpathy, K C; Patnaik, A K [Sambalpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1975-11-01

    A few uranium(IV) carboxylates with monochloro and trichloro acetic acid, glycine, malic, citric, adipic, o-toluic, anthranilic and salicylic acids have been prepared by photolytic methods. The I.R. spectra of these compounds are recorded and basing on the spectral data, structure of the compounds have been suggested.

  19. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  20. A polycomb group protein, PHF1, is involved in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in human cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Zehui; Jiang, Jie; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Yasui, Akira

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most toxic DNA damage arisen from endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stresses and are known to be repaired by either homologous recombination or nonhomologous end-joining processes. Although many proteins have been identified to participate in either of the processes, the whole processes still remain elusive. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic chromatin modifiers involved in gene silencing, cancer development and the maintenance of embry...

  1. Inflation from supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, I. [UMR CNRS 7589 Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Paris 6, LPTHE, Paris (France); University of Bern, Albert Einstein Center, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Chatrabhuti, A.; Isono, H.; Knoops, R. [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pathumwan, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2017-11-15

    We explore the possibility that inflation is driven by supersymmetry breaking with the superpartner of the goldstino (sgoldstino) playing the role of the inflaton. Moreover, we impose an R-symmetry that allows one to satisfy easily the slow-roll conditions, avoiding the so-called η-problem, and leads to two different classes of small-field inflation models; they are characterised by an inflationary plateau around the maximum of the scalar potential, where R-symmetry is either restored or spontaneously broken, with the inflaton rolling down to a minimum describing the present phase of our Universe. To avoid the Goldstone boson and be left with a single (real) scalar field (the inflaton), R-symmetry is gauged with the corresponding gauge boson becoming massive. This framework generalises a model studied recently by the present authors, with the inflaton identified by the string dilaton and R-symmetry together with supersymmetry restored at weak coupling, at infinity of the dilaton potential. The presence of the D-term allows a tuning of the vacuum energy at the minimum. The proposed models agree with cosmological observations and predict a tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial perturbations 10{sup -9}

  2. Symmetry breaking by bifundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    We derive all possible symmetry breaking patterns for all possible Higgs fields that can occur in intersecting brane models: bifundamentals and rank-2 tensors. This is a field-theoretic problem that was already partially solved in 1973 by Ling-Fong Li [1]. In that paper the solution was given for rank-2 tensors of orthogonal and unitary group, and U (N )×U (M ) and O (N )×O (M ) bifundamentals. We extend this first of all to symplectic groups. When formulated correctly, this turns out to be straightforward generalization of the previous results from real and complex numbers to quaternions. The extension to mixed bifundamentals is more challenging and interesting. The scalar potential has up to six real parameters. Its minima or saddle points are described by block-diagonal matrices built out of K blocks of size p ×q . Here p =q =1 for the solutions of Ling-Fong Li, and the number of possibilities for p ×q is equal to the number of real parameters in the potential, minus 1. The maximum block size is p ×q =2 ×4 . Different blocks cannot be combined, and the true minimum occurs for one choice of basic block, and for either K =1 or K maximal, depending on the parameter values.

  3. Symmetry and symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Lambert, D.; Brack, A.; Lachieze-Rey, M.; Emery, E.; Cohen-Tannoudji, G.; Sacquin, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The symmetry concept is a powerful tool for our understanding of the world. It allows a reduction of the volume of information needed to apprehend a subject thoroughly. Moreover this concept does not belong to a particular field, it is involved in the exact sciences but also in artistic matters. Living beings are characterized by a particular asymmetry: the chiral asymmetry. Although this asymmetry is visible in whole organisms, it seems it comes from some molecules that life always produce in one chirality. The weak interaction presents also the chiral asymmetry. The mass of particles comes from the breaking of a fundamental symmetry and the void could be defined as the medium showing as many symmetries as possible. The texts put together in this book show to a great extent how symmetry goes far beyond purely geometrical considerations. Different aspects of symmetry ideas are considered in the following fields: the states of matter, mathematics, biology, the laws of Nature, quantum physics, the universe, and the art of music. (A.C.)

  4. Two siblings with immunodeficiency, facial abnormalities and chromosomal instability without mutation in DNMT3B gene but liability towards malignancy; a new chromatin disorder delineation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neitzel Heidemarie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ICF syndrome (standing for Immunodeficiency, Centromere instability and Facial anomalies syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive immune disorder caused by mutations of the gene de novo DNA-methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B. However, in the literature similar clinical cases without such mutations are reported, as well. Results We report on a family in which the unrelated spouses had two female siblings sharing similar phenotypic features resembling ICF-syndrome, i.e. congenital abnormalities, immunodeficiency, developmental delay and high level of chromosomal instability, including high frequency of centromeric/pericentromeric rearrangements and breaks, chromosomal fragments despiralization or pulverization. However, mutations in DNMT3B could not be detected. Conclusion The discovery of a new so-called 'chromatin disorder' is suggested. Clinical, molecular genetic and cytogenetic characteristics are reported and compared to other 'chromatin disorders'.

  5. Two siblings with immunodeficiency, facial abnormalities and chromosomal instability without mutation in DNMT3B gene but liability towards malignancy; a new chromatin disorder delineation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polityko, Anna; Khurs, Olga; Rumyantseva, Natalia; Naumchik, Irina; Kosyakova, Nadezda; Tönnies, Holger; Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Weise, Anja; Liehr, Thomas

    2010-03-08

    ICF syndrome (standing for Immunodeficiency, Centromere instability and Facial anomalies syndrome) is a very rare autosomal recessive immune disorder caused by mutations of the gene de novo DNA-methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). However, in the literature similar clinical cases without such mutations are reported, as well. We report on a family in which the unrelated spouses had two female siblings sharing similar phenotypic features resembling ICF-syndrome, i.e. congenital abnormalities, immunodeficiency, developmental delay and high level of chromosomal instability, including high frequency of centromeric/pericentromeric rearrangements and breaks, chromosomal fragments despiralization or pulverization. However, mutations in DNMT3B could not be detected. The discovery of a new so-called 'chromatin disorder' is suggested. Clinical, molecular genetic and cytogenetic characteristics are reported and compared to other 'chromatin disorders'.

  6. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Horikoshi, Yasunori [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Shima, Hiroki [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Fukagawa, Tatsuo [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mishima (Japan); Ikura, Tsuyoshi [Laboratory of Chromatin Regulatory Network, Department of Mutagenesis, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishida, Takafumi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tashiro, Satoshi, E-mail: ktashiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA

  7. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Shima, Hiroki; Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Ishida, Takafumi; Nagata, Yasushi; Tashiro, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA

  8. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations (CRWMS M and O 1999b) and (CRWMS M and O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as line load. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding their 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.6) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance. The EDA IV concept includes more defense-in-depth layers than the VA reference design because of its backfill, drip shield, waste package shielding, and integral filler features. These features contribute to the low dose-rate to the public achieved during the first 10,000 years of repository life as shown in Figure 3. Investigation of the EDA IV concept has led to the following general conclusions: (1) The total life cycle cost for EDA IV is about $21.7 billion which equates to a $11.3 billion net present value (both figures rounded up). (2) The incidence of design basis events for EDA IV is similar to the VA reference design. (3) The emplacement of the waste packages in drifts will be similar to the VA reference design. However, heavier equipment may be required because the shielded waste package will be heavier. (4) The heavier

  9. Radiosensitivity modulating factors: Role of PARP-1, PARP-2 and Cdk5 proteins and chromatin implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudra, M.T.

    2011-12-01

    The post-translational modifications of DNA repair proteins and histone remodeling factors by poly(ADP-ribose)ylation and phosphorylation are essential for the maintenance of DNA integrity and chromatin structure, and in particular in response to DNA damaging produced by ionizing radiation (IR). Amongst the proteins implicated in these two processes are the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) and PARP-2, and the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk5: PARP-1 and 2 are involved in DNA single strand break (SSB) repair (SSBR) and Cdk5 depletion has been linked with increased cell sensitivity to PARP inhibition. We have shown by using HeLa cells stably depleted for either CdK5 or PARP-2, that the recruitment profile of PARP-1 and XRCC-1, two proteins involved in the short-patch (SP) SSBR sub-pathway, to DNA damage sites is sub-maximal and that of PCNA, a protein involved in the long-patch (LP) repair pathway, is increased in the absence of Cdk5 and decreased in the absence of PARP-2 suggesting that both Cdk5 and PARP-2 are involved in both SSBR sub-pathways. PARP-2 and Cdk5 also impact on the poly(ADP-ribose) levels in cells as in the absence of Cdk5 a hyper-activation of PARP-1 was found and in the absence of PARP-2 a reduction in poly(ADP-ribose) glyco-hydrolase (PARG) activity was seen. However, in spite of these changes no impact on the repair of SSBs induced by IR was seen in either the Cdk5 or PARP-2 depleted cells (Cdk5 KD or PARP-2 KD cells) but, interestingly, increased radiation sensitivity in terms of cell killing was noted in the Cdk5 depleted cells. We also found that Cdk5, PARP-2 and PARG were all implicated in the regulation of the recruitment and the dissociation of the chromatin-remodeling factor ALC1 from DNA damage sites suggesting a role for these three proteins in changes in chromatin structure after DNA photo-damage. These results, taken together with the observation that PARP-1 recruitment is sub-optimal in both Cdk5 KD and PARP-2 KD cells, show that

  10. Large-scale Comparative Study of Hi-C-based Chromatin 3D Structure Modeling Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex polymer molecule in eukaryotic cells, primarily consisting of DNA and histones. Many works have shown that the 3D folding of chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA expression. The recently proposed Chro- mosome

  11. Testing Whether Defective Chromatin Assembly in S-Phase Contributes to Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Peter

    2003-01-01

    .... We used a dominant negative mutant of (chromatin assembly factor-I) CAF1, a complex that assembles newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, to inhibit S-phase chromatin assembly and found that this induced S-phase arrest...

  12. Testing Whether Defective Chromatin Assembly in S-Phase Contributes to Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adams, Peter

    2004-01-01

    .... We used a dominant negative mutant of (chromatin assembly factor-I) CAF1, a complex that assembles newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, to inhibit S-phase chromatin assembly and found that this induced S-phase arrest...

  13. Relationship between chromatin structure and sensitivity to molecularly targeted auger electron radiation therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terry, S.Y.A.; Vallis, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The open structure of euchromatin renders it susceptible to DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR) compared with compact heterochromatin. The effect of chromatin configuration on the efficacy of Auger electron radiotherapy was investigated. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chromatin structure was

  14. Condensation of chromatin in transcriptional regions of an inactivated plant transgene: evidence for an active role of transcription in gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blokland, R; ten Lohuis, M; Meyer, P

    1997-12-01

    The chromatin structures of two epigenetic alleles of a transgene were investigated by measuring the local accessibility of transgene chromatin to endonucleases. The two epialleles represented the active, hypomethylated state of a transgene in line 17-I of Petunia hybrida, and a transcriptionally inactive, hypermethylated derivative of the same transgene in line 17-IV. In nuclear preparations the inactive epiallele was significantly less sensitive to DNasel digestion and nuclease S7 digestion than the transcriptionally active epiallele, whereas no significant differences in accessibility were observed between naked DNA samples of the two epialleles. Our data suggest that a condensed chromatin structure is specifically imposed on transcribed regions of the construct in line 17-IV. In contrast, in both epialleles the plasmid region of the transgene, which is not transcriptionally active in plants, retains the same accessibility to endonucleases as the chromosomal integration site. These data suggest that transcriptional inactivation is linked to the process of transcription, and imply that control of transgene expression via the use of inducible or tissue-specific promoters might prevent transgene silencing and conserve the active state of transgenes during sexual propagation.

  15. Chromatin-bound MDM2, a new player in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riscal, Romain; Le Cam, Laurent; Linares, Laetitia K

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein MDM2 is recognized as a major negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor but growing evidence indicates that its oncogenic activities extend beyond p53. We show that MDM2 is recruited to chromatin independently of p53 to regulate a transcriptional program implicated in amino acid metabolism and redox homeostasis.

  16. Chromatin-bound RNA and the neurobiology of psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tushir, J S; Akbarian, S

    2014-04-04

    A large, and still rapidly expanding literature on epigenetic regulation in the nervous system has provided fundamental insights into the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications in the context of neuronal plasticity in health and disease. Remarkably, however, very little is known about the potential role of chromatin-bound RNAs, including many long non-coding transcripts and various types of small RNAs. Here, we provide an overview on RNA-mediated regulation of chromatin structure and function, with focus on histone lysine methylation and psychiatric disease. Examples of recently discovered chromatin-bound long non-coding RNAs important for neuronal health and function include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense transcript (Bdnf-AS) which regulates expression of the corresponding sense transcript, and LOC389023 which is associated with human-specific histone methylation signatures at the chromosome 2q14.1 neurodevelopmental risk locus by regulating expression of DPP10, an auxillary subunit for voltage-gated K(+) channels. We predict that the exploration of chromatin-bound RNA will significantly advance our current knowledge base in neuroepigenetics and biological psychiatry. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eBeneke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose, the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP1, was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor.

  18. SAGA, TFIID and regulation of transcription through chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, A.W.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin has an important role in eukaryotic transcription. Research into this role is ongoing and genome-wide analysis has correlated various histone modifications to multiple elements in active and silent genes, such as enhancers, promoters and coding regions. Modifications often serve to recruit

  19. Interaction of maize chromatin-associated HMG proteins with mononucleosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichota, J.; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    maize HMGA and five different HMGB proteins with mononucleosomes (containing approx. 165 bp of DNA) purified from micrococcal nuclease-digested maize chromatin. The HMGB proteins interacted with the nucleosomes independent of the presence of the linker histone H1, while the binding of HMGA...

  20. Role of chromatin factors in Arabidopsis root stem cell maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornet, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells replenish the cells present in an organism throughout its lifetime and sustain growth. They have unique characteristics: the capability to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into several cell types. Recently, it has become clear that chromatin factors support these unique

  1. Control of trichome branching by Chromatin Assembly Factor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig Lars

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromatin dynamics and stability are both required to control normal development of multicellular organisms. Chromatin assembly factor CAF-1 is a histone chaperone that facilitates chromatin formation and the maintenance of specific chromatin states. In plants and animals CAF-1 is essential for normal development, but it is poorly understood which developmental pathways require CAF-1 function. Results Mutations in all three CAF-1 subunits affect Arabidopsis trichome morphology and lack of CAF-1 function results in formation of trichomes with supernumerary branches. This phenotype can be partially alleviated by external sucrose. In contrast, other aspects of the CAF-1 mutant phenotype, such as defective meristem function and organ formation, are aggravated by external sucrose. Double mutant analyses revealed epistatic interactions between CAF-1 mutants and stichel, but non-epistatic interactions between CAF-1 mutants and glabra3 and kaktus. In addition, mutations in CAF-1 could partly suppress the strong overbranching and polyploidization phenotype of kaktus mutants. Conclusion CAF-1 is required for cell differentiation and regulates trichome development together with STICHEL in an endoreduplication-independent pathway. This function of CAF-1 can be partially substituted by application of exogenous sucrose. Finally, CAF-1 is also needed for the high degree of endoreduplication in kaktus mutants and thus for the realization of kaktus' extreme overbranching phenotype.

  2. Trichostatin A induced histone acetylation causes decondensation of interphase chromatin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); M. Wachsmuth (Malte); M. Frank-Stöhr (Monika); M. Stöhr (Michael); C.P. Bacher (Christian); K. Rippe (Karsten)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of trichostatin A (TSA)-induced histone acetylation on the interphase chromatin structure was visualized in vivo with a HeLa cell line stably expressing histone H2A, which was fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein. The globally increased histone acetylation caused a

  3. Epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Somi; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-01-13

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of memory formation and maintenance has been a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Memory formation and maintenance are tightly controlled complex processes. Among the various processes occurring at different levels, gene expression regulation is especially crucial for proper memory processing, as some genes need to be activated while some genes must be suppressed. Epigenetic regulation of the genome involves processes such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These processes edit genomic properties or the interactions between the genome and histone cores. They then induce structural changes in the chromatin and lead to transcriptional changes of different genes. Recent studies have focused on the concept of chromatin remodeling, which consists of 3D structural changes in chromatin in relation to gene regulation, and is an important process in learning and memory. In this review, we will introduce three major epigenetic processes involved in memory regulation: DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation. We will also discuss general mechanisms of long-term memory storage and relate the epigenetic control of learning and memory to chromatin remodeling. Finally, we will discuss how epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to the pathologies of neurological disorders and cause memory-related symptoms.

  4. Effect of triiodothyronine on rat liver chromatin protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruh, J.; Tichonicky, L.

    1976-01-01

    1) Injection of triiodothyronine to rats stimulates protein kinase activity in liver chromatin nonhistone proteins. A significant increase was found after two daily injections. A 4-fold increase was observed with the purified enzyme after eight daily injections of the hormone. No variations were observed in cytosol protein kinase activity. Electrophoretic pattern, effect of heat denaturation, effect of p-hydroxymercuribenzoate seem to indicate that the enzyme present in treated rats is not identical to the enzyme in control animals, which suggests that thyroid hormone has induced nuclear protein kinase. Diiodothyronine, 3, 3', 5'-triiodothyronine have no effect on protein kinase. 2) Chromatin non-histone proteins isolated from rats injected with triiodothyronine incorporated more 32 P when incubated with [γ- 32 P]ATP than the chromatin proteins from untreated rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the in vitro 32 P incorporation. It is suggested that some of the biological activity of thyroid hormone could be mediated through its effect on chromatin non-histone proteins. (orig.) [de

  5. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-01-01

    to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results

  6. Connecting the dots: chromatin and alternative splicing in EMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warns, Jessica A; Davie, James R; Dhasarathy, Archana

    2016-02-01

    Nature has devised sophisticated cellular machinery to process mRNA transcripts produced by RNA Polymerase II, removing intronic regions and connecting exons together, to produce mature RNAs. This process, known as splicing, is very closely linked to transcription. Alternative splicing, or the ability to produce different combinations of exons that are spliced together from the same genomic template, is a fundamental means of regulating protein complexity. Similar to transcription, both constitutive and alternative splicing can be regulated by chromatin and its associated factors in response to various signal transduction pathways activated by external stimuli. This regulation can vary between different cell types, and interference with these pathways can lead to changes in splicing, often resulting in aberrant cellular states and disease. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which leads to cancer metastasis, is influenced by alternative splicing events of chromatin remodelers and epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of epigenetic factors including chromatin, chromatin remodelers, DNA methyltransferases, and microRNAs in the context of alternative splicing, and discuss their potential involvement in alternative splicing during the EMT process.

  7. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    , histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  8. Chromatin Structure in Cell Differentiation, Aging and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kheradmand Kia (Sima)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractChromatin is the structure that the eukaryotic genome is packaged into, allowing over a metre of DNA to fit into the small volume of the nucleus. It is composed of DNA and proteins, most of which are histones. This DNA-protein complex is the template for a number of essential cell

  9. Supersymmetry breaking with extra dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwirner, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    This talk reviews some aspects of supersymmetry breaking in the presence of extra dimensions. The first part is a general introduction, recalling the motivations for supersymmetry and extra dimensions, as well as some unsolved problems of four-dimensional models of supersymmetry breaking. The central part is a more focused introduction to a mechanism for (super)symmetry breaking, proposed first by Scherk and Schwarz, where extra dimensions play a crucial role. The last part is devoted to the description of some recent results and of some open problems. (author)

  10. Distributions of Low- and High-LET Radiation-Induced Breaks in Chromosomes are Associated with Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    To study the breakpoint along the length of the chromosome induced by low- and high-LET radiations, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to Cs-137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons at a low dose rate, and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The location of the breaks was identified using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) that paints Chromosome 3 in 23 different colored bands. The breakpoint distributions were found to be similar between rays of low and high dose rates and between the two high-LET radiation types. Detailed analysis of the chromosome break ends involved in inter- and intrachromosome exchanges revealed that only the break ends participating in interchromosome exchanges contributed to the hot spots found for low-LET. For break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges, the distributions for all four radiation scenarios were similar with clusters of breaks found in three regions. Analysis of the locations of the two break ends in Chromosome 3 that joined to form an intrachromosome exchange demonstrated that two breaks with a greater genomic separation may be more likely to rejoin than two closer breaks, indicating that chromatin folding can play an important role in the rejoining of chromosome breaks. Our study demonstrated that the gene-rich regions do not necessarily contain more breaks. The breakpoint distribution depends more on the likelihood that a break will join with another break in the same chromosome or in a different chromosome.

  11. A sputnik IV saga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  12. Stochastic mechanism of symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseyan, H.Z.

    1983-01-01

    A new symmetry breaking mechanism conditioned by presence of random fields in vacuum is proposed. Massive Yang-Mills fields finally arise, that may be interpreted as ''macroscopic'' manifestation of the ''microscopic'' Yang-Mills massless theory

  13. Dynamic breaking of a single gold bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pobelov, Ilya V.; Lauritzen, Kasper Primdal; Yoshida, Koji

    2017-01-01

    While one might assume that the force to break a chemical bond gives a measure of the bond strength, this intuition is misleading. If the force is loaded slowly, thermal fluctuations may break the bond before it is maximally stretched, and the breaking force will be less than the bond can sustain...... of a single Au-Au bond and show that the breaking force is dependent on the loading rate. We probe the temperature and structural dependencies of breaking and suggest that the paradox can be explained by fast breaking of atomic wires and slow breaking of point contacts giving very similar breaking forces....

  14. Retroviruses Hijack Chromatin Loops to Drive Oncogene Expression and Highlight the Chromatin Architecture around Proto-Oncogenic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Jillian M.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of the genome consists of intergenic and non-coding DNA sequences shown to play a major role in different gene regulatory networks. However, the specific potency of these distal elements as well as how these regions exert function across large genomic distances remains unclear. To address these unresolved issues, we closely examined the chromatin architecture around proto-oncogenic loci in the mouse and human genomes to demonstrate a functional role for chromatin looping in distal gene regulation. Using cell culture models, we show that tumorigenic retroviral integration sites within the mouse genome occur near existing large chromatin loops and that this chromatin architecture is maintained within the human genome as well. Significantly, as mutagenesis screens are not feasible in humans, we demonstrate a way to leverage existing screens in mice to identify disease relevant human enhancers and expose novel disease mechanisms. For instance, we characterize the epigenetic landscape upstream of the human Cyclin D1 locus to find multiple distal interactions that contribute to the complex cis-regulation of this cell cycle gene. Furthermore, we characterize a novel distal interaction upstream of the Cyclin D1 gene which provides mechanistic evidence for the abundant overexpression of Cyclin D1 occurring in multiple myeloma cells harboring a pathogenic translocation event. Through use of mapped retroviral integrations and translocation breakpoints, our studies highlight the importance of chromatin looping in oncogene expression, elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms crucial for distal cis-regulation, and in one particular instance, explain how a translocation event drives tumorigenesis through upregulation of a proto-oncogene. PMID:25799187

  15. Reg IV is a direct target of intestinal transcriptional factor CDX2 in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Naito

    Full Text Available REG4, which encodes Reg IV protein, is a member of the calcium-dependent lectin superfamily and potent activator of the epidermal growth factor receptor/Akt/activator protein-1 signaling pathway. Several human cancers overexpress Reg IV, and Reg IV expression is associated with intestinal phenotype differentiation. However, regulation of REG4 transcription remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether CDX2 regulates Reg IV expression in gastric cancer (GC cells. Expression of Reg IV and CDX2 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in 9 GC cell lines and 2 colon cancer cell lines. The function of the 5'-flanking region of the REG4 gene was characterized by luciferase assay. In 9 GC cell lines, endogenous Reg IV and CDX2 expression were well correlated. Using an estrogen receptor-regulated form of CDX2, rapid induction of Reg IV expression was observed in HT-29 cells. Reporter gene assays revealed an important role in transcription for consensus CDX2 DNA binding elements in the 5'-flanking region of the REG4 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CDX2 binds directly to the 5'-flanking region of REG4. These results indicate that CDX2 protein directly regulates Reg IV expression.

  16. Function of chromatin structure and dynamics in DNA damage, repair and misrepair: gamma-rays and protons in action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, L.; Falk, Martin; Falková, Iva; Davídková, Marie; Bačíková, Alena; Štefančíková, Lenka; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Lukášová, Emilie; Boreyko, A.; Krasavin, E.; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 83, SI (2014), s. 128-136 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12039; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12008 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : DNA double-strand breaks * Higher-order chromatin structure and DSB repair * Formation of chromosomal translocations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (UJF-V) Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  17. In the loop: how chromatin topology links genome structure to function in mechanisms underlying learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, L Ashley; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2017-04-01

    Different aspects of learning, memory, and cognition are regulated by epigenetic mechanisms such as covalent DNA modifications and histone post-translational modifications. More recently, the modulation of chromatin architecture and nuclear organization is emerging as a key factor in dynamic transcriptional regulation of the post-mitotic neuron. For instance, neuronal activity induces relocalization of gene loci to 'transcription factories', and specific enhancer-promoter looping contacts allow for precise transcriptional regulation. Moreover, neuronal activity-dependent DNA double-strand break formation in the promoter of immediate early genes appears to overcome topological constraints on transcription. Together, these findings point to a critical role for genome topology in integrating dynamic environmental signals to define precise spatiotemporal gene expression programs supporting cognitive processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Widespread Chromatin Accessibility at Repetitive Elements Links Stem Cells with Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. Gomez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is critical for differentiation and disease. However, features linking the chromatin environment of stem cells with disease remain largely unknown. We explored chromatin accessibility in embryonic and multipotent stem cells and unexpectedly identified widespread chromatin accessibility at repetitive elements. Integrating genomic and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that these sites of increased accessibility are associated with well-positioned nucleosomes marked by distinct histone modifications. Differentiation is accompanied by chromatin remodeling at repetitive elements associated with altered expression of genes in relevant developmental pathways. Remarkably, we found that the chromatin environment of Ewing sarcoma, a mesenchymally derived tumor, is shared with primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Accessibility at repetitive elements in MSCs offers a permissive environment that is exploited by the critical oncogene responsible for this cancer. Our data demonstrate that stem cells harbor a unique chromatin landscape characterized by accessibility at repetitive elements, a feature associated with differentiation and oncogenesis.

  19. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M; Hanson, Andrew J; Foster, Patricia L

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings provide in vivo evidence

  20. The two different isoforms of the RSC chromatin remodeling complex play distinct roles in DNA damage responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Chambers

    Full Text Available The RSC chromatin remodeling complex has been implicated in contributing to DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in a number of studies. Both survival and levels of H2A phosphorylation in response to damage are reduced in the absence of RSC. Importantly, there is evidence for two isoforms of this complex, defined by the presence of either Rsc1 or Rsc2. Here, we investigated whether the two isoforms of RSC provide distinct contributions to DNA damage responses. First, we established that the two isoforms of RSC differ in the presence of Rsc1 or Rsc2 but otherwise have the same subunit composition. We found that both rsc1 and rsc2 mutant strains have intact DNA damage-induced checkpoint activity and transcriptional induction. In addition, both strains show reduced non-homologous end joining activity and have a similar spectrum of DSB repair junctions, suggesting perhaps that the two complexes provide the same functions. However, the hypersensitivity of a rsc1 strain cannot be complemented with an extra copy of RSC2, and likewise, the hypersensitivity of the rsc2 strain remains unchanged when an additional copy of RSC1 is present, indicating that the two proteins are unable to functionally compensate for one another in DNA damage responses. Rsc1, but not Rsc2, is required for nucleosome sliding flanking a DNA DSB. Interestingly, while swapping the domains from Rsc1 into the Rsc2 protein does not compromise hypersensitivity to DNA damage suggesting they are functionally interchangeable, the BAH domain from Rsc1 confers upon Rsc2 the ability to remodel chromatin at a DNA break. These data demonstrate that, despite the similarity between Rsc1 and Rsc2, the two different isoforms of RSC provide distinct functions in DNA damage responses, and that at least part of the functional specificity is dictated by the BAH domains.

  1. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin

  2. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin

  3. Models of chromatin spatial organisation in the cell nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario

    2014-03-01

    In the cell nucleus chromosomes have a complex architecture serving vital functional purposes. Recent experiments have started unveiling the interaction map of DNA sites genome-wide, revealing different levels of organisation at different scales. The principles, though, which orchestrate such a complex 3D structure remain still mysterious. I will overview the scenario emerging from some classical polymer physics models of the general aspect of chromatin spatial organisation. The available experimental data, which can be rationalised in a single framework, support a picture where chromatin is a complex mixture of differently folded regions, self-organised across spatial scales according to basic physical mechanisms. I will also discuss applications to specific DNA loci, e.g. the HoxB locus, where models informed with biological details, and tested against targeted experiments, can help identifying the determinants of folding.

  4. Atomic force microscopy on chromosomes, chromatin and DNA: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Wouter; Strappe, Padraig

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the achievements and progress that has been made in the use of atomic force microscopy in DNA related research in the last 25 years. For this review DNA related research is split up in chromosomal-, chromatin- and DNA focused research to achieve a logical flow from large- to smaller structures. The focus of this review is not only on the AFM as imaging tool but also on the AFM as measuring tool using force spectroscopy, as therein lays its greatest advantage and future. The amazing technological and experimental progress that has been made during the last 25 years is too extensive to fully cover in this review but some key developments and experiments have been described to give an overview of the evolution of AFM use from 'imaging tool' to 'measurement tool' on chromosomes, chromatin and DNA. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Encounter times of chromatin loci influenced by polymer decondensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, A.; Holcman, D.

    2018-03-01

    The time for a DNA sequence to find its homologous counterpart depends on a long random search inside the cell nucleus. Using polymer models, we compute here the mean first encounter time (MFET) between two sites located on two different polymer chains and confined locally by potential wells. We find that reducing tethering forces acting on the polymers results in local decondensation, and numerical simulations of the polymer model show that these changes are associated with a reduction of the MFET by several orders of magnitude. We derive here new asymptotic formula for the MFET, confirmed by Brownian simulations. We conclude from the present modeling approach that the fast search for homology is mediated by a local chromatin decondensation due to the release of multiple chromatin tethering forces. The present scenario could explain how the homologous recombination pathway for double-stranded DNA repair is controlled by its random search step.

  6. Histone occurrence in chromatin from Peridinium balticum, a binucleate dinoflagellate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P J; Cox, E R

    1977-12-23

    Peridinium balticum is one of two dinoflagellates known to have dissimilar nuclei together in the same cell. One nucleus (dinokaryotic) has permanently condensed chromosomes, while the other (eukaryotic) does not have morphologically distinct chromosomes. Acid extracts of chromatin prepared from a mixture of dinokaryotic and eukaryotic nuclei and purified eukaryotic nuclei give four bands that co-migrate with four of the five histones from calf thymus when analyzed in urea-containing polyacrylamide gels.

  7. Circular chromatin complexes in human lymphocytes high-resolution autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becak, M.L.; Fukuda-Pizzocaro, K.; Santos, R. de C.S. dos; Brunner, O.

    1985-01-01

    Transcriptionally active chromatin fibers were observed in chromosomes presenting the loops/scaffold configuration. The active fibers showed altered nucleosomes and presented multiforked aspects which led to the formation of ring complexes. The ribonucleoprotein transcripts (RNP) appeared as networks of 0.1 μm or multiples tandemly disposed along the fiber. It is suggested that the ring complexes belong to the human genome. The possibility that these circular structures come from a prokaryote is also considered. (author) [pt

  8. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model.

  9. Induction of DNA damage in γ-irradiated nuclei stripped of nuclear protein classes: differential modulation of double-strand break and DNA-protein crosslink formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, L.-Y.; Friedman, L.R.; Oleinick, N.L.; Chiu, S.-M.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of chromatin proteins on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) and DNA-protein crosslinks (dpc) by γ-radiation was investigated. Low molecular weight non-histone proteins and classes of histones were extracted with increasing concentrations of NaC1, whereas nuclear matrix proteins were not extractable even by 2.0 M NACl. The yield of dsb increased with progressive removal of proteins from chromatin. The data support our previous conclusion that nuclear matrix protein rather than the majority of the histones are the predominant substrates for dpc production, although the involvement of a subset of tightly bound histones (H3 and H4) has not been excluded. This finding demonstrates that chromatin proteins can differentially modify the yield of two types of radiation-induced DNA lesions. (author)

  10. [Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of neutron scatter techniques to the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin with the long term objective of understanding how the enormous lengths of DNA are folded into chromosomes. Micrococcal nuclease digestion kinetics have defined two subnucleosome particles; the chromatosome with 168 bp DNA, the histone octamer and one H1 and the nucleosome core particle with 146 bp DNA and the histone octamer. As will be discussed, the structure of the 146 bp DNA core particle is known in solution at low resolution from neutron scatter studies and in crystals. Based on this structure, the authors have a working model for the chromatosome and the mode of binding of H1. In order to define the structure of the nucleosome and also the different orders of chromatin structures they need to know the paths of DNA that link nucleosomes and the factors associated with chromosome functions that act on those DNA paths. The major region for this situation is the inherent variabilities in nucleosome DNA sequences, in the histone subtypes and their states of chemical modification and in the precise locations of nucleosomes. Such variabilities obscure the underlying principles that govern the packaging of DNA into the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin. The only way to elucidate these principles is to study the structures of nucleosomes and oligonucleosomes that are fully defined. They have largely achieved these objectives

  11. Cytomorphologic features distinguishing Bethesda category IV thyroid lesions from parathyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid follicular cells share similar cytomorphological features with parathyroid. Without a clinical suspicion, the distinction between a thyroid neoplasm and an intrathyroidal parathyroid can be challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the distinguishing cytomorphological features of parathyroid (including intrathyroidal and Bethesda category IV (Beth-IV thyroid follicular lesions, which carry a 15%–30% risk of malignancy and are often followed up with surgical resection. Methods: A search was performed to identify “parathyroid” diagnoses in parathyroid/thyroid-designated fine-needle aspirations (FNAs and Beth-IV thyroid FNAs (follicular and Hurthle cell, all with diagnostic confirmation through surgical pathology, immunocytochemical stains, Afirma® analysis, and/or clinical correlation. Unique cytomorphologic features were scored (0-3 or noted as present versus absent. Statistical analysis was performed using R 3.3.1 software. Results: We identified five FNA cases with clinical suspicion of parathyroid neoplasm, hyperthyroidism, or thyroid lesion that had an eventual final diagnosis of the parathyroid lesion (all female; age 20–69 years and 12 Beth-IV diagnoses (11 female, 1 male; age 13–64 years. The following cytomorphologic features are useful distinguishing features (P value: overall pattern (0.001, single cells (0.001, cell size compared to red blood cell (0.01, nuclear irregularity (0.001, presence of nucleoli (0.001, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio (0.007, and nuclear chromatin quality (0.028. Conclusions: There are cytomorphologic features that distinguish Beth-IV thyroid lesions and (intrathyroidal parathyroid. These features can aid in rendering correct diagnoses and appropriate management.

  12. Hepatic imaging in stage IV-S neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, E.A. Jr.; Smith, W.L.; Iowa Univ., Iowa City; Cohen, M.D.; Kisker, C.T.; Platz, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Stage IV-S neuroblastoma describes a group of infants with tumor spread limited to liver, skin, or bone marrow. Such patients, who constitute about 25% of affected infants with neuroblastoma, may expect spontaneous tumor remission. We report 18 infants with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma, 83% of whom had liver involvement. Imaging investigations included Technetium 99m sulfur colloid scan, ultrasound, and CT. Two patterns of liver metastasis were noted: ill-defined nodules or diffuse tumor throughout the liver. Distinction of normal and abnormal liver with diffuse type metastasis could be quite difficult, particularly with liver scans. We conclude that patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma have ultrasound or CT examination as an initial workup, with nuclear medicine scans reserved for followup studies. (orig.)

  13. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  14. Cyclopentadienyluranium(IV) acetylacetonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, K.W.; Edwards, J.; Rickard, C.E.F.; Tempest, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Cyclopentadienyluranium(IV) acetylacetonate complexes, (eta 5 C 5 H 5 )UClsub(3-x)(acac)sub(x), where x = 1 or 2, and the corresponding bis triphenylphosphine oxide (tppo) complexes have been prepared. The bis cyclopentadienyl complexes, (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 U(acac) 2 and (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 UCl(acac)(tppo) 2 have also been prepared and are stable with respect to disproportionation, whereas (eta 5 C 5 H 5 ) 2 UCl(acac) is not. The IR and UV/visible spectra of the complexes are reported, together with some additional information on the UCl 2 (acac) 2 thf and -tppo systems. (author)

  15. The Heterochromatic Barrier to DNA Double Strand Break Repair: How to Get the Entry Visa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron A. Goodarzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent decades, a deep understanding of pathways that repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB has been gained from biochemical, structural, biophysical and cellular studies. DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two major DSB repair pathways, and both processes are now well understood. Recent work has demonstrated that the chromatin environment at a DSB significantly impacts upon DSB repair and that, moreover, dramatic modifications arise in the chromatin surrounding a DSB. Chromatin is broadly divided into open, transcriptionally active, euchromatin (EC and highly compacted, transcriptionally inert, heterochromatin (HC, although these represent extremes of a spectrum. The HC superstructure restricts both DSB repair and damage response signaling. Moreover, DSBs within HC (HC-DSBs are rapidly relocalized to the EC-HC interface. The damage response protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, is required for HC-DSB repair but is dispensable for the relocalization of HC-DSBs. It has been proposed that ATM signaling enhances HC relaxation in the DSB vicinity and that this is a prerequisite for HC-DSB repair. Hence, ATM is essential for repair of HC-DSBs. Here, we discuss how HC impacts upon the response to DSBs and how ATM overcomes the barrier that HC poses to repair.

  16. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...

  17. String breaking with Wilson loops?

    CERN Document Server

    Kratochvila, S; Kratochvila, Slavo; Forcrand, Philippe de

    2003-01-01

    A convincing, uncontroversial observation of string breaking, when the static potential is extracted from Wilson loops only, is still missing. This failure can be understood if the overlap of the Wilson loop with the broken string is exponentially small. In that case, the broken string ground state will only be seen if the Wilson loop is long enough. Our preliminary results show string breaking in the context of the 3d SU(2) adjoint static potential, using the L\\"uscher-Weisz exponential variance reduction approach. As a by-product, we measure the fundamental SU(2) static potential with improved accuracy and see clear deviations from Casimir scaling.

  18. Temporary core liquid level depression during cold-leg small-break LOCA effect of break size and power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Mimura, Y.; Kukita, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1989-01-01

    Cold-leg small break LOCA experiments (0.5-10% break) were conducted at the large scale test facility (LSTF), a volumetrically-scaled (1/48) simulator of a PWR, of the ROSA-IV Program. When a break area was less than 2.5% of the scaled cold-leg flow area, the core liquid level was temporarily further depressed to the bottom elevation of the crossover leg during the loop seal clearing early in the transient only by the manometric pressure balance since no coolant remained in the upper portion of the primary system. When the break size was larger than 5%, the core liquid level was temporarily further depressed lower than the bottom elevation of the crossover leg during the loop seal clearing since coolant remained at the upper portion of the primary system; the steam generator (SG) U-tube upflow side and the SG inlet plenum, due to counter current flow limiting by updrafting steam while the coolant drained. The amount of coolant trapped there was dependent on the vapor velocity (core power); the larger the core power, the lower the minimum core liquid level. The RELAP5/MOD2 code reasonable predicted phenomena observed in the experiments. (orig./DG)

  19. Chromatin organisation and cancer prognosis: a pan-cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleppe, Andreas; Albregtsen, Fritz; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana; Pradhan, Manohar; Nielsen, Birgitte; Hveem, Tarjei S; Askautrud, Hanne A; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Nesbakken, Arild; Trovik, Jone; Wæhre, Håkon; Tomlinson, Ian; Shepherd, Neil A; Novelli, Marco; Kerr, David J; Danielsen, Håvard E

    2018-03-01

    Chromatin organisation affects gene expression and regional mutation frequencies and contributes to carcinogenesis. Aberrant organisation of DNA has been correlated with cancer prognosis in analyses of the chromatin component of tumour cell nuclei using image texture analysis. As yet, the methodology has not been sufficiently validated to permit its clinical application. We aimed to define and validate a novel prognostic biomarker for the automatic detection of heterogeneous chromatin organisation. Machine learning algorithms analysed the chromatin organisation in 461 000 images of tumour cell nuclei stained for DNA from 390 patients (discovery cohort) treated for stage I or II colorectal cancer at the Aker University Hospital (Oslo, Norway). The resulting marker of chromatin heterogeneity, termed Nucleotyping, was subsequently independently validated in six patient cohorts: 442 patients with stage I or II colorectal cancer in the Gloucester Colorectal Cancer Study (UK); 391 patients with stage II colorectal cancer in the QUASAR 2 trial; 246 patients with stage I ovarian carcinoma; 354 patients with uterine sarcoma; 307 patients with prostate carcinoma; and 791 patients with endometrial carcinoma. The primary outcome was cancer-specific survival. In all patient cohorts, patients with chromatin heterogeneous tumours had worse cancer-specific survival than patients with chromatin homogeneous tumours (univariable analysis hazard ratio [HR] 1·7, 95% CI 1·2-2·5, in the discovery cohort; 1·8, 1·0-3·0, in the Gloucester validation cohort; 2·2, 1·1-4·5, in the QUASAR 2 validation cohort; 3·1, 1·9-5·0, in the ovarian carcinoma cohort; 2·5, 1·8-3·4, in the uterine sarcoma cohort; 2·3, 1·2-4·6, in the prostate carcinoma cohort; and 4·3, 2·8-6·8, in the endometrial carcinoma cohort). After adjusting for established prognostic patient characteristics in multivariable analyses, Nucleotyping was prognostic in all cohorts except for the prostate carcinoma

  20. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  1. Code breaking in the pacific

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Covers the historical context and the evolution of the technically complex Allied Signals Intelligence (Sigint) activity against Japan from 1920 to 1945 Describes, explains and analyzes the code breaking techniques developed during the war in the Pacific Exposes the blunders (in code construction and use) made by the Japanese Navy that led to significant US Naval victories

  2. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.L.; Burdman, G.; Chivukula, R.S.

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models

  3. Appointment breaking: causes and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, A G; Talaga, J

    1992-12-01

    From a review of research on health care appointment breaking, the authors find that patient demographic characteristics, psychosocial problems, previous appointment keeping, health beliefs, and situational factors predict no-show behavior. Suggestions are offered for designing the marketing mix to increase patient appointment keeping. Methods for mitigating the negative effects of no-shows on health care providers are described.

  4. Strong coupling electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burdman, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Chivukula, R.S. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-04-01

    The authors review models of electroweak symmetry breaking due to new strong interactions at the TeV energy scale and discuss the prospects for their experimental tests. They emphasize the direct observation of the new interactions through high-energy scattering of vector bosons. They also discuss indirect probes of the new interactions and exotic particles predicted by specific theoretical models.

  5. Oil prices: Breaks and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguera, José

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature of the stationarity of financial time series and the literature on oil and macroeconomics in several ways. First, it uses Kejriwal and Perron (2010) sequential procedure to endogenously determine multiple structural changes in real oil prices without facing the circular testing problem between structural changes and stationary assumptions of previous tests. Second, it performs a diagnostic check to detect the significance and magnitude of the potential breaks. Third, it uses the above information to test for the existence of stochastic trends in real oil prices, and fourth, it speculates about possible explanations for the break dates found in order to encourage further work and discussions. The exercise uses monthly data from January 1861 to August 2011. - Highlights: ► The model endogenously determine multiple structural changes in real oil prices. ► The methods used does not face the circular testing problem. ► It also detect the significance and magnitude of the breaks detected. ► It tests for the existence of stochastic trends. ► It explains the reasons for the break dates found

  6. Instantons and chiral symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, C.E.I.; McDougall, N.A.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed investigation of chiral symmetry breaking due to instanton dynamics is carried out, within the framework of the dilute gas approximation, for quarks in both the fundamental and adjoint representations of SU(2). The momentum dependence of the dynamical mass is found to be very similar in each representation. (orig.)

  7. Instantons and chiral symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, C.E.I.; McDougall, N.A. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Theoretical Physics)

    1984-10-22

    A detailed investigation of chiral symmetry breaking due to instanton dynamics is carried out, within the framework of the dilute gas approximation, for quarks in both the fundamental and adjoint representations of SU(2). The momentum dependence of the dynamical mass is found to be very similar in each representation.

  8. Inflationary implications of supersymmetry breaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghese, Andrea; Roest, Diederik; Zavala, Ivonne

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a general bound on the possibility to realise inflation in any minimal supergravity with F-terms. The derivation crucially depends on the sGoldstini, the scalar field directions that are singled out by spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. The resulting bound involves both slow-roll

  9. Aluminum break-point contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, Martina; Groot, R.A. de

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to study the contribution of a single Al atom to an aluminum breakpoint contact during the final stages of breaking and the initial stages of the formation of such a contact. A hysteresis effect is found in excellent agreement with experiment and the form of the

  10. Breaking Carbon Lock-in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Driscoll, Patrick Arthur

    2014-01-01

    This central focus of this paper is to highlight the ways in which path dependencies and increasing returns (network effects) serve to reinforce carbon lock-in in large-scale road transportation infrastructure projects. Breaking carbon lock-in requires drastic changes in the way we plan future...

  11. Pretreatment with UV light renders the chromatin in human fibroblasts more susceptible to the DNA-damaging agents bleomycin, gamma radiation and 8-methoxypsoralen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungman, Mats

    1989-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cultures were pretreated with either 254 nm UV light (UV) or methyl methanesulphonate (MMS), incubated at 37 0 C and subsequently challenged on ice with bleomycin (BLM), gamma-radiation or 8-methoxy-psoralen (MOP). The resulting number of challenge-induced DNA damages (measured as DNA strand breaks or cross-links) were compared with the numbers induced in similarly challenged but non-pretreated control cells. It was found that the timing of the subsequent challenge of cells pretreated with UV did significantly affect the amount of induced DNA damage. When the challenging agents were administered after a 10-20 min incubation period following UV pretreatment, the amount of induced DNA damage was increased 50% over control cells. In contrast, the timing of the subsequent challenge of cells pretreated with MMS has no influence on the level of challenge-induced damage. It is hypothesized that UV-irradiated chromatin undergoes a time-dependent decondensation that renders it more susceptible to the induction of strand breaks and cross-links by BLM, gamma-radiation and MOP. A possible role for chromatin decondensation in UV-induced excision repair is discussed. (author)

  12. Parental Break-Ups and Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dissing, Agnete S.; Dich, Nadya; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Parental break-up is wide spread, and the effects of parental break-up on children’s well-being are known. The evidence regarding child age at break-up and subsequent family arrangements is inconclusive. Aim: to estimate the effects of parental break-up on stress in pre-adolescent chi......Background: Parental break-up is wide spread, and the effects of parental break-up on children’s well-being are known. The evidence regarding child age at break-up and subsequent family arrangements is inconclusive. Aim: to estimate the effects of parental break-up on stress in pre......-adolescent children with a specific focus on age at break-up and post-breakup family arrangements. Methods: We used data from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Participants included 44 509 children followed from birth to age 11. Stress was self-reported by children at age 11, when the children also reported...... on parental break-up and post break-up family arrangements. Results: Twenty-one percent of the children had experienced a parental break-up at age 11, and those who had experienced parental break-up showed a higher risk of stress (OR:1.72, 95%CI:1.55;1.91) regardless of the child’s age at break-up. Children...

  13. Congenital bilateral neuroblastoma (stage IV-S): case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Lee, Hee Jung; Woo, Seong Ku; Lee, Sang Rak; Kim, Heung Sik

    2002-01-01

    Congenital neonatal neuroblastoma is not uncommon but bilateral adrenal neuroblastoma is rare, accounting for about ten percent of neuroblastomas in children. We report the US the MR findings of a stage IV-S congenital bilateral neuroblastoma occurring in a one-day-old neonate

  14. Aggregation of fragmented chromatin associated with the appearance of products of its nuclease treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanenkov, V.V.; Mironov, N.M.; Kupriyanova, E.I.; Shapot, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Isolated cell nuclei were incubated with nucleases, and then the chromatin was extracted with a low-salt buffer. When degradation of the nuclear chromatin DNase I or micrococcal nuclease is intensified, solubilization of the deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) in low-salt buffer at first increases, reaching a maximum in the case of hydrolysis of 2-4% of the nuclear DNA, but after intensive treatment with nucleases, it decreases sharply. Soluble fragmented chromatin is aggregated during treatment with DNase I. The addition of exogenous products of nuclease treatment of isolated nuclei to a preparation of gelatinous chromatin induces its aggregation. Pretreatment of nuclear chromatin with RNase prevents the solubilization of DNP by solutions with low ionic strength. Certain experimental data obtained using rigorous nuclease treatment are discussed; for their interpretation it is necessary to consider the effect of aggregation of fragmented chromatin by products of its nuclease degradation

  15. A Poly-ADP-Ribose Trigger Releases the Auto-Inhibition of a Chromatin Remodeling Oncogene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Hari R; Nardozza, Aurelio P; Möller, Ingvar R

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage triggers chromatin remodeling by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The oncogene and chromatin remodeler ALC1/CHD1L massively decompacts chromatin in vivo yet is inactive prior to DNA-damage-mediated PARP1 induction. We show that the interaction of the ALC1 macrodomain......-macrodomain interactions, promotes an ungated conformation, and activates the remodeler's ATPase. ALC1 fragments lacking the regulatory macrodomain relax chromatin in vivo without requiring PARP1 activation. Further, the ATPase restricts the macrodomain's interaction with PARP1 under non-DNA damage conditions. Somatic...... cancer mutants disrupt ALC1's auto-inhibition and activate chromatin remodeling. Our data show that the NAD+-metabolite and nucleic acid PAR triggers ALC1 to drive chromatin relaxation. Modular allostery in this oncogene tightly controls its robust, DNA-damage-dependent activation....

  16. Restoring chromatin after replication: How new and old histone marks come together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zusana; Groth, Anja

    2010-01-01

    In dividing cells genome stability and function rely on faithful transmission of both DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin. In the course of DNA replication chromatin undergoes transient genome-wide disruption followed by restoration on new DNA. This involves tight coordination of DNA...... replication and chromatin assembly processes in time and space. Dynamic recycling and de novo deposition of histones are fundamental for chromatin restoration. Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are thought to have a causal role in establishing distinct chromatin structures. Here we discuss PTMs...... present on new and parental histones and how they influence genome stability and restoration of epigenetically defined domains. Newly deposited histones must change their signature in the process of chromatin restoration, this may occur in a step-wise fashion involving replication-coupled processes...

  17. Autodigestion of chromatin in some radiosensitive and radioresistant mouse cells. Role of proteolysis and endonucleolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suciu, D.; Bojan, O.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented indicating that mouse thymus, spleen, kidney, lung and heart contain a protease activity with relatively high specificity for histones. It is suggested that degradation of chromatin occurring in irradiated lymphoid tissues is produced by the action of alkaline endonuclease in association with this histone protease. The autodigestion of chromatin was assessed by determining the release of soluble chromatin from cells suspended in sucrose media of low ionic strength. It was found that the protease inhibitors, phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride and especially NaHSO 3 , were also capable of depressing the activity of alkaline endonuclease, the fragmentation of chromatin, and the release of soluble chromatin. The results suggest that the release of histones from irradiated lymphoid tissues cannot be considered as a determinant step in the fragmentation of DNA in chromatin. (author)

  18. Temporal profiling of the chromatin proteome reveals system-wide responses to replication inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Gillespie, Peter J; Stewart, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Although the replication, expression, and maintenance of DNA are well-studied processes, the way that they are coordinated is poorly understood. Here, we report an analysis of the changing association of proteins with chromatin (the chromatin proteome) during progression through interphase...... of the cell cycle. Sperm nuclei were incubated in Xenopus egg extracts, and chromatin-associated proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry at different times. Approximately 75% of the proteins varied in abundance on chromatin by more than 15%, suggesting that the chromatin proteome is highly dynamic....... Proteins were then assigned to one of 12 different clusters on the basis of their pattern of chromatin association. Each cluster contained functional groups of proteins involved in different nuclear processes related to progression through interphase. We also blocked DNA replication by inhibiting either...

  19. Contribution of Topological Domains and Loop Formation to 3D Chromatin Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuthy Ea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations on 3D chromatin folding revealed that the eukaryote genomes are both highly compartmentalized and extremely dynamic. This review presents the most recent advances in topological domains’ organization of the eukaryote genomes and discusses the relationship to chromatin loop formation. CTCF protein appears as a central factor of these two organization levels having either a strong insulating role at TAD borders, or a weaker architectural role in chromatin loop formation. TAD borders directly impact on chromatin dynamics by restricting contacts within specific genomic portions thus confining chromatin loop formation within TADs. We discuss how sub-TAD chromatin dynamics, constrained into a recently described statistical helix conformation, can produce functional interactions by contact stabilization.

  20. Improving long term driving comfort by taking breaks - how break activity affects effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Sammonds, GM; Mansfield, NJ; Fray, M

    2017-01-01

    During long duration journeys, drivers are encouraged to take regular breaks. The benefits of breaks have been documented for safety; breaks may also be beneficial for comfort. The activity undertaken during a break may influence its effectiveness. Volunteers completed 3 journeys on a driving simulator. Each 130 min journey included a 10 min break after the first hour. During the break volunteers either stayed seated, left the simulator and sat in an adjacent room, or took a walk on a treadmi...

  1. A model of intrinsic symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Li; Li, Sheng; George, Thomas F.; Sun, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Different from the symmetry breaking associated with a phase transition, which occurs when the controlling parameter is manipulated across a critical point, the symmetry breaking presented in this Letter does not need parameter manipulation. Instead, the system itself suddenly undergoes symmetry breaking at a certain time during its evolution, which is intrinsic symmetry breaking. Through a polymer model, it is revealed that the origin of the intrinsic symmetry breaking is nonlinearity, which produces instability at the instance when the evolution crosses an inflexion point, where this instability breaks the original symmetry

  2. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a high...

  3. Scaffold Attachment Factor B1: A Novel Chromatin Regulator of Prostate Cancer Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0152 TITLE: Scaffold Attachment Factor B1: A Novel Chromatin Regulator of Prostate Cancer Metabolism PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0152 Scaffold Attachment Factor B1: A Novel Chromatin Regulator of Prostate Cancer Metabolism... chromatin immunoprecipitation-next generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) and integrative network modeling to identify the SAFB1 cistrome and the extent of

  4. Transcriptional decomposition reveals active chromatin architectures and cell specific regulatory interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennie, Sarah; Dalby, Maria; van Duin, Lucas

    2018-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is tightly coupled with chromosomal positioning and three-dimensional chromatin architecture. However, it is unclear what proportion of transcriptional activity is reflecting such organisation, how much can be informed by RNA expression alone and how this impacts disease...... proportion of total levels and is highly informative of topological associating domain activities and organisation, revealing boundaries and chromatin compartments. Furthermore, expression data alone accurately predict individual enhancer-promoter interactions, drawing features from expression strength...... between transcription and chromatin architecture....

  5. Osmotic stress alters chromatin condensation and nucleocytoplasmic transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finan, John D.; Leddy, Holly A. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Guilak, Farshid, E-mail: guilak@duke.edu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport increases under hyper-osmotic stress. {yields} The mechanism is a change in nuclear geometry, not a change in permeability of the nuclear envelope. {yields} Intracytoplasmic but not intranuclear diffusion is sensitive to osmotic stress. {yields} Pores in the chromatin of the nucleus enlarge under hyper-osmotic stress. -- Abstract: Osmotic stress is a potent regulator of biological function in many cell types, but its mechanism of action is only partially understood. In this study, we examined whether changes in extracellular osmolality can alter chromatin condensation and the rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport, as potential mechanisms by which osmotic stress can act. Transport of 10 kDa dextran was measured both within and between the nucleus and the cytoplasm using two different photobleaching methods. A mathematical model was developed to describe fluorescence recovery via nucleocytoplasmic transport. As osmolality increased, the diffusion coefficient of dextran decreased in the cytoplasm, but not the nucleus. Hyper-osmotic stress decreased nuclear size and increased nuclear lacunarity, indicating that while the nucleus was getting smaller, the pores and channels interdigitating the chromatin had expanded. The rate of nucleocytoplasmic transport was increased under hyper-osmotic stress but was insensitive to hypo-osmotic stress, consistent with the nonlinear osmotic properties of the nucleus. The mechanism of this osmotic sensitivity appears to be a change in the size and geometry of the nucleus, resulting in a shorter effective diffusion distance for the nucleus. These results may explain physical mechanisms by which osmotic stress can influence intracellular signaling pathways that rely on nucleocytoplasmic transport.

  6. Chromatin association of UHRF1 during the cell cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Gashgari, Bothayna

    2017-05-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING Finger domains 1 (UHRF1) is a nuclear protein that associates with chromatin. Regardless of the various functions of UHRF1 in the cell, one of its more important functions is its role in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns by the recruitment of DNMT1. Studies on UHRF1 based on this function have revealed the importance of UHRF1 during the cell cycle. Moreover, based on different studies various factors were described to be involved in the regulation of UHRF1 with different functionalities that can control its binding affinity to different targets on chromatin. These factors are regulated differently in a cell cycle specific manner. In light of this, we propose that UHRF1 has different binding behaviors during the cell cycle in regard to its association with chromatin. In this project, we first analyzed the binding behavior of endogenous UHRF1 from different unsynchronized cell systems in pull-down assays with peptides and oligonucleotides. Moreover, to analyze UHRF1 binding behavior during the cell cycle, we used two different approaches. First we sorted Jurkat and HT1080 cells based on their cell cycle stage using FACS analysis. Additionally, we synchronized HeLa cells to different stages of the cell cycle by chemical treatments, and used extracts from cellsorting and cell synchronization experiments for pull-down assays. We observed that UHRF1 in different cell systems has different preferences in regard to its binding to H3 unmodified and H3K9me3. Moreover, we detected that UHRF1, in general, displays different patterns between different stages of cell cycle; however, we cannot draw a final model for UHRF1 binding pattern during cell cycle.

  7. Analysis of Myc-induced histone modifications on target chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Martinato

    Full Text Available The c-myc proto-oncogene is induced by mitogens and is a central regulator of cell growth and differentiation. The c-myc product, Myc, is a transcription factor that binds a multitude of genomic sites, estimated to be over 10-15% of all promoter regions. Target promoters generally pre-exist in an active or poised chromatin state that is further modified by Myc, contributing to fine transcriptional regulation (activation or repression of the afferent gene. Among other mechanisms, Myc recruits histone acetyl-transferases to target chromatin and locally promotes hyper-acetylation of multiple lysines on histones H3 and H4, although the identity and combination of the modified lysines is unknown. Whether Myc dynamically regulates other histone modifications (or marks at its binding sites also remains to be addressed. Here, we used quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP to profile a total of 24 lysine-acetylation and -methylation marks modulated by Myc at target promoters in a human B-cell line with a regulatable c-myc transgene. Myc binding promoted acetylation of multiple lysines, primarily of H3K9, H3K14, H3K18, H4K5 and H4K12, but significantly also of H4K8, H4K91 and H2AK5. Dimethylation of H3K79 was also selectively induced at target promoters. A majority of target promoters showed co-induction of multiple marks - in various combinations - correlating with recruitment of the two HATs tested (Tip60 and HBO1, incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z and transcriptional activation. Based on this and previous findings, we surmise that Myc recruits the Tip60/p400 complex to achieve a coordinated histone acetylation/exchange reaction at activated promoters. Our data are also consistent with the additive and redundant role of multiple acetylation events in transcriptional activation.

  8. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made...

  9. Chromatin structure and epigenetics of tumour cells: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Hájek, R.; Harničarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 51-61 ISSN 1871-529X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC; LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : tumour cells * chromatin * radiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  10. Keeping it quiet: chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Paul M

    2013-12-01

    The human gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establish long-term latent infections associated with diverse human cancers. Viral oncogenesis depends on the ability of the latent viral genome to persist in host nuclei as episomes that express a restricted yet dynamic pattern of viral genes. Multiple epigenetic events control viral episome generation and maintenance. This Review highlights some of the recent findings on the role of chromatin assembly, histone and DNA modifications, and higher-order chromosome structures that enable gammaherpesviruses to establish stable latent infections that mediate viral pathogenesis.

  11. Quantitative Immunofluorescence Analysis of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Stefan; Németh, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of eu- and heterochromatin is nonrandom, heterogeneous, and dynamic, which is mirrored by specific spatiotemporal arrangements of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we describe a semiautomated method for the analysis of histone PTM localization patterns within the mammalian nucleus using confocal laser scanning microscope images of fixed, immunofluorescence stained cells as data source. The ImageJ-based process includes the segmentation of the nucleus, furthermore measurements of total fluorescence intensities, the heterogeneity of the staining, and the frequency of the brightest pixels in the region of interest (ROI). In the presented image analysis pipeline, the perinucleolar chromatin is selected as primary ROI, and the nuclear periphery as secondary ROI.

  12. Genomic and chromatin signals underlying transcription start-site selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2011-01-01

    A central question in cellular biology is how the cell regulates transcription and discerns when and where to initiate it. Locating transcription start sites (TSSs), the signals that specify them, and ultimately elucidating the mechanisms of regulated initiation has therefore been a recurrent theme....... In recent years substantial progress has been made towards this goal, spurred by the possibility of applying genome-wide, sequencing-based analysis. We now have a large collection of high-resolution datasets identifying locations of TSSs, protein-DNA interactions, and chromatin features over whole genomes...

  13. Nucleolar chromatin organization at different activities of soybean root meristematic cell nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2013-06-01

    Nucleolar chromatin, including nucleolus-associated chromatin as well as active and inactive condensed ribosomal DNA (rDNA) chromatin, derives mostly from secondary constrictions known as nucleolus organizer regions containing rDNA genes on nucleolus-forming chromosomes. This chromatin may occupy different nucleolar positions being in various condensation states which may imply different rDNA transcriptional competence. Sections of nucleoli originating from root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings grown at 25 °C (the control), then subjected to chilling stress (10 °C), and next transferred again to 25 °C (the recovery) were used to measure profile areas occupied by nucleolar condensed chromatin disclosed with sodium hydroxide methylation-acetylation plus uranyl acetate technique. The biggest total area of condensed chromatin was found in the nucleoli of chilled plants, while the smallest was found in those of recovered plants in relation to the amounts of chromatin in the control nucleoli. The condensed nucleolar chromatin, in the form of different-sized and different-shaped clumps, was mainly located in fibrillar centers. One can suppose that changes of condensed rDNA chromatin amounts might be a mechanism controlling the number of transcriptionally active rDNA genes as the nucleoli of plants grown under these experimental conditions show different transcriptional activity and morphology.

  14. MRN1 implicates chromatin remodeling complexes and architectural factors in mRNA maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Düring, Louis; Thorsen, Michael; Petersen, Darima

    2012-01-01

    A functional relationship between chromatin structure and mRNA processing events has been suggested, however, so far only a few involved factors have been characterized. Here we show that rsc nhp6¿¿ mutants, deficient for the function of the chromatin remodeling factor RSC and the chromatin....... Genetic interactions are observed between 2 µm-MRN1 and the splicing deficient mutants snt309¿, prp3, prp4, and prp22, and additional genetic analyses link MRN1, SNT309, NHP6A/B, SWI/SNF, and RSC supporting the notion of a role of chromatin structure in mRNA processing....

  15. Extracellular Matrix-Induced Chromatin Modifications in Normal and Malignant Human Breast Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beyec, Johanne

    2002-01-01

    .... The changes in gene expression that occur during differentiation or tumorigenesis are accompanied by characteristics patterns of chromatin reorganization, modulated, in part, through highly regulated...

  16. Effects of hyperthermia on repair of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, M.D.; Meyn, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested a relationship between the heat-induced changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensitivity. In an effort to further understand these relationships, we measured the level of initial DNA strand break damage and the DNA strand break rejoining kinetics in Chinese hamster ovary cells following combined hyperthermia and ionizing radiation treatments. The amount of protein associated with DNA measured as the ratio of [ 3 H)leucine to [ 14 C]thymidine was also compared in chromatin isolated from both heated and unheated cells. The results of these experiments show that the initial level of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks is significantly enhanced by a prior hyperthermia treatment of 43 0 C for 30 min. Treatments at higher temperatures and longer treatments at the same temperature magnified this effect. Hyperthermia was also shown to cause a substantial inhibition of the DNA strand break rejoining after irradiation. Both the initial level of DNA damage and the rejoining kinetics recovered to normal levels with incubation at 37 0 C between the hyperthermia and radiation treatments. Recovery of these parameters coincided with the return of the amount of protein associated with DNA to normal values, further suggesting a relationship between the changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensivivity

  17. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liu; Zheng Aihua; Yi Ling; Xu Chongren; Ding Mingxiao; Deng Hongkui

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation

  18. About the structure and stability of complex carbonates of thorium (IV), cerium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervin, Jacqueline

    1972-01-01

    This research thesis addressed the study of complex carbonates of cations of metals belonging to the IV A column, i.e. thorium (IV), zirconium (IV), hafnium (IV), and also cerium (IV) and uranium (VI), and more particularly focused on ionic compounds formed in solution, and also on the influence of concentration and nature of cations on stability and nature of the formed solid. The author first presents methods used in this study, discusses their precision and scope of validity. She reports the study of the formation of different complex ions which have been highlighted in solution, and the determination of their formation constants. She reports the preparation and study of the stability domain of solid complexes. The next part reports the use of thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectrometry, and crystallography for the structural study of these compounds

  19. Supersymmetry breaking by gaugino condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    We briefly review the status and some of the recent work on supersymmetry breaking by gaugino condensation effects in the context of superstring theories. This issue is intimately related to the structure of the effective potential coming from superstrings. Minimization of this not only allows to find the scale of supersymmetry breaking, but also to determine dynamically other fundamental parameters of the theory, in particular the gauge coupling constant at the unification point and the expectation values of the moduli which give the size and shape of the compactified space. In a multiple condensate scenario these get reasonable values which may, in turn, lead to a determination of the family mass hierarchy. Some directions for future work are examined too. (author). 23 refs

  20. Post accidental small breaks analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depond, G.; Gandrille, J.

    1980-04-01

    EDF ordered to FRAMATOME by 1977 to complete post accidental long term studies on 'First Contrat-Programme' reactors, in order to demonstrate the safety criteria long term compliance, to get information on NSSS behaviour and to improve the post accidental procedures. Convenient analytical models were needed and EDF and FRAMATOME respectively developped the AXEL and FRARELAP codes. The main results of these studies is that for the smallest breaks, it is possible to manually undertake cooling and pressure reducing actions by dumping the steam generators secondary side in order to meet the RHR operating specifications and perform long term cooling through this system. A specific small breaks procedure was written on this basis. The EDF and FRAMATOME codes are continuously improved; the results of a French set of separate effects experiments will be incorporated as well as integral system verification

  1. Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Grauslund, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks has been examined in several studies and reviews, but so far, no studies have successfully applied a systematic approach. In the present systematic review, we examined the need of follow-up after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) - diagnosed by slit...... published before 2012. Four levels of screening identified 13 studies suitable for inclusion in this systematic review. No meta-analysis was conducted as no data suitable for statistical analysis were identified. In total, the initial examination after symptomatic PVD identified 85-95% of subsequent retinal......-47% of cases, respectively. The cumulated incidence of RRD despite prophylactic treatment was 2.1-8.8%. The findings in this review suggest that follow-up after symptomatic PVD is only necessary in cases of incomplete retinal examination at presentation. Prophylactic treatment of symptomatic retinal breaks...

  2. Breaking through the tranfer tunnel

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the tunnel boring machine breaking through the transfer tunnel into the LHC tunnel. Proton beams will be transferred from the SPS pre-accelerator to the LHC at 450 GeV through two specially constructed transfer tunnels. From left to right: LHC Project Director, Lyn Evans; CERN Director-General (at the time), Luciano Maiani, and Director for Accelerators, Kurt Hubner.

  3. Models of electroweak symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Pomarol, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This chapter present models of electroweak symmetry breaking arising from strongly interacting sectors, including both Higgsless models and mechanisms involving a composite Higgs. These scenarios have also been investigated in the framework of five-dimensional warped models that, according to the AdS/CFT correspondence, have a four-dimensional holographic interpretation in terms of strongly coupled field theories. We explore the implications of these models at the LHC.

  4. Supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzert, K.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanism of supersymmetry breaking at finite temperature is still only partly understood. Though it has been proven that temperature always breaks supersymmetry, the spontaneous nature of this breaking remains unclear, in particular the role of the Goldstone fermion. The aim of this work is to unify two existing approaches to the subject. From a hydrodynamic point of view, it has been argued under very general assumptions that in any supersymmetric quantum field theory at finite temperature there should exist a massless fermionic collective excitation, named phonino because of the analogy to the phonon. In the framework of a self-consistent resummed perturbation theory, it is shown for the example of the Wess-Zumino model that this mode fits very well into the quantum field theoretical framework pursued by earlier works. Interpreted as a bound state of boson and fermion, it contributes to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identities in a way showing that supersymmetry is indeed broken spontaneously with the phonino playing the role of the Goldstone fermion. The second part of the work addresses the case of supersymmetric quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that also here the phonino exists and must be interpreted as the Goldstone mode. This knowledge allows a generalization to a wider class of models. (orig.)

  5. A Damage-Independent Role for 53BP1 that Impacts Break Order and Igh Architecture during Class Switch Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Pedro P; Raviram, Ramya; Fu, Yi; Kim, JungHyun; Luo, Vincent M; Aljoufi, Arafat; Swanzey, Emily; Pasquarella, Alessandra; Balestrini, Alessia; Miraldi, Emily R; Bonneau, Richard; Petrini, John; Schotta, Gunnar; Skok, Jane A

    2016-06-28

    During class switch recombination (CSR), B cells replace the Igh Cμ or δ exons with another downstream constant region exon (CH), altering the antibody isotype. CSR occurs through the introduction of AID-mediated double-strand breaks (DSBs) in switch regions and subsequent ligation of broken ends. Here, we developed an assay to investigate the dynamics of DSB formation in individual cells. We demonstrate that the upstream switch region Sμ is first targeted during recombination and that the mechanism underlying this control relies on 53BP1. Surprisingly, regulation of break order occurs through residual binding of 53BP1 to chromatin before the introduction of damage and independent of its established role in DNA repair. Using chromosome conformation capture, we show that 53BP1 mediates changes in chromatin architecture that affect break order. Finally, our results explain how changes in Igh architecture in the absence of 53BP1 could promote inversional rearrangements that compromise CSR. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative aspects of basic chromatin proteins in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P J

    1981-01-01

    Previous work on histone-like proteins in dinoflagellates is summarized, together with some new data to give an overview of basic proteins in these algae. The first two dinoflagellates studied were both found to contain one major acid-soluble protein that migrated to the same position in acidic-urea gels. When several other genera were studied however, it became apparent that the histone-like proteins from different dinoflagellates were similar but not identical. In view of the great diversity of living dinoflagellates it is speculated that further differences in dinoflagellate basic chromatin proteins will be revealed. Electrophoretic data from the eukaryotic (endosymbiont) nucleus of Peridinium balticum showed the presence of five major components. It is speculated that two of these proteins represent an H1-like doublet and two others correspond to the highly conserved histones H3 and H4. The fifth component is a new histone that may substitute for H2A and H2B in the nucleosome. Because histones and nucleosomes are present in all higher organisms but completely lacking in procaryotes, studies on basic proteins in dinoflagellates will provides insights into the evolution of histones and eucaryotic chromatin organization.

  7. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.

  8. The role of proteins and metal ions in the protection of chromatin DNA at fast neutrons action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Preoteasa, V.; Radulescu, I.; Constantinescu, B.

    1997-01-01

    The role of chromatin proteins and of some ions on the fast neutrons actions on chromatin DNA from rat Walker tumors was analysed. The DNA in chromatin is effectively protected against fast neutrons actions by DNA bound proteins and specially by histones, because of the limited accessibility of the condensed chromatin DNA to hydroxyl radicals and of the scavenging of radicals by the chromatin proteins. The ions utilised protect chromatin DNA against the damage produced ed by fast neutrons, through the induction of structural DNA changes with a less accessibility to OH radicals. (authors)

  9. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  10. Large-scale chromatin remodeling at the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus: a paradigm for multigene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Daniel J; Wood, Andrew L; Corcoran, Anne E

    2009-01-01

    V(D)J recombination in lymphocytes is the cutting and pasting together of antigen receptor genes in cis to generate the enormous variety of coding sequences required to produce diverse antigen receptor proteins. It is the key role of the adaptive immune response, which must potentially combat millions of different foreign antigens. Most antigen receptor loci have evolved to be extremely large and contain multiple individual V, D and J genes. The immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) and immunoglobulin kappa light chain (Igk) loci are the largest multigene loci in the mammalian genome and V(D)J recombination is one of the most complicated genetic processes in the nucleus. The challenge for the appropriate lymphocyte is one of macro-management-to make all of the antigen receptor genes in a particular locus available for recombination at the appropriate developmental time-point. Conversely, these large loci must be kept closed in lymphocytes in which they do not normally recombine, to guard against genomic instability generated by the DNA double strand breaks inherent to the V(D)J recombination process. To manage all of these demanding criteria, V(D)J recombination is regulated at numerous levels. It is restricted to lymphocytes since the Rag genes which control the DNA double-strand break step of recombination are only expressed in these cells. Within the lymphocyte lineage, immunoglobulin recombination is restricted to B-lymphocytes and TCR recombination to T-lymphocytes by regulation of locus accessibility, which occurs at multiple levels. Accessibility of recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking individual V, D and J genes at the nucleosomal level is the key micro-management mechanism, which is discussed in greater detail in other chapters. This chapter will explore how the antigen receptor loci are regulated as a whole, focussing on the Igh locus as a paradigm for the mechanisms involved. Numerous recent studies have begun to unravel the complex and

  11. Gibberellin-induced change in the structure of chromatin in wheat sprouts: decrease in the accessibility of DNA in preparations of soluble chromatin to the action of EcoRII methylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noskov, V.A.; Kintsurashvili, L.N.; Smirnova, T.A.; Manamsh'yan, T.A.; Kir'yanov, G.I.; Vanyushin, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    A method has been perfected for producing soluble chromatin from whole wheat sprouts at low ionic strength. The chromatin preparations isolated possess a native structure: they have a nucleosome organization. Under identical conditions the soluble wheat chromatin undergoes more profound degradation by DNase I and staphylococcal nuclease than the chromatin from the rat liver. The DNA contained in the isolated chromatin is capable of accepting CHnumber groups from S-[methyl- 3 H]-adenosylmethionine during incubation with DNA methylase EcoRII; not all the CC A/T GG sequences in DNA are methylated in vivo. Chromatin from gibberellin A 3 -treated wheat sprout DNA accepts 40% fewer CH 3 groups than that from the control sprouts, which is probably due to the greater compactness of the chromatin. In the case of longer incubation, the level of methylation of the chromatin falls, which may be associated with the presence of DNA-demethylating activity

  12. Hi-C Chromatin Interaction Networks Predict Co-expression in the Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Marc; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The three dimensional conformation of the genome in the cell nucleus influences important biological processes such as gene expression regulation. Recent studies have shown a strong correlation between chromatin interactions and gene co-expression. However, predicting gene co-expression from frequent long-range chromatin interactions remains challenging. We address this by characterizing the topology of the cortical chromatin interaction network using scale-aware topological measures. We demonstrate that based on these characterizations it is possible to accurately predict spatial co-expression between genes in the mouse cortex. Consistent with previous findings, we find that the chromatin interaction profile of a gene-pair is a good predictor of their spatial co-expression. However, the accuracy of the prediction can be substantially improved when chromatin interactions are described using scale-aware topological measures of the multi-resolution chromatin interaction network. We conclude that, for co-expression prediction, it is necessary to take into account different levels of chromatin interactions ranging from direct interaction between genes (i.e. small-scale) to chromatin compartment interactions (i.e. large-scale). PMID:25965262

  13. Regular character of chromatin degradation in lymphoid tissues after treatment with biological alkylating agents in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyasova, J.; Skalka, M.; Cejkova, M.

    1979-01-01

    The chromatin changes are reevaluated occurring in lymphoid tissues of mice treated with alkylating agents of the nitrogen-mustard type in relation to recent evidence on the nucleosomal organization of chromatin and to our new data on the regular character of chromatin degradation in lymphoid tissues of irradiated mice. DNA was isolated from nuclei at various intervals (1 to 18 h) after treatment of mice and subjected to gel electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Thymus chromatin from treated mice has been shown to degrade in a regular fashion and to yield discrete DNA fragments, resembling those that originate in lymphoid tissues of irradiated mice or in thymus nuclei digested with micrococcal nuclease in vitro. With increasing interval after treatment higher amounts of smaller DNA fragments appear. Chromatin in spleen cells responds to treatment in a similar way, whilst no degradation in vivo takes place in liver chromatin. Chromatin of LS/BL lymphosarcoma cells in mice treated with alkylating agents or with irradiation suffers from a similar regular degradation. The results stress the significance of the action of liberated or activated endogenous nuclease(s) in the development of chromatin damage in lymphoid cells after treatment with alkylating agents. (author)

  14. Functional delineation of three groups of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyer, L.A.; Logie, C.; Bonte, E; Becker, P.B.; Wade, P.A.; Wolff, A.P.; Wu, C.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Peterson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes antagonize the inhibitory effects of chromatin. We compare six different remodeling complexes: ySWI/SNF, yRSC, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2, dCHRAC, and dNURF. We find that each complex uses similar amounts of ATP to remodel nucleosomal arrays at nearly identical rates.

  15. Reading the maps: Organization and function of chromatin types in Drosophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunschweig, U.

    2010-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis shows that the Drosophila genome is organized in chromatin domains with many implications for gene regulation, nuclear organization, and evolution. Furthermore it provides examples of how maps of chromatin protein binding, combined with computational approaches, can

  16. Assembly of two transgenes in an artificial chromatin domain gives highly coordinated expression in tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynárová, L.; Loonen, A.; Mietkiewska, E.; Jansen, R.C.; Nao, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The chromatin loop model predicts that genes within the same chromatin domain exhibit coordinated regulation. We here present the first direct experimental support for this model in plants. Two reporter genes, the E. coli ß-glucuronidase gene and the firefly luciferase gene, driven by different

  17. Assembly of Two Transgenes in an Artificial Chromatin Domain Gives Highly Coordinated Expression in Tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynárová, Ludmila; Loonen, Annelies; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Nap, Jan-Peter

    The chromatin loop model predicts that genes within the same chromatin domain exhibit coordinated regulation. We here present the first direct experimental support for this model in plants. Two reporter genes, the E. coli β-glucuronidase gene and the firefly luciferase gene, driven by different

  18. Friend of Prmt1, a novel chromatin target of protein arginine methyltransferases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. van Dijk (Thamar); N. Gillemans (Nynke); C. Stein (Claudia); P. Fanis (Pavlos); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); J. Essers (Jeroen); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); U.M. Bauer (Uta-Maria); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe describe the isolation and characterization of Friend of Prmt1 (Fop), a novel chromatin target of protein arginine methyltransferases. Human Fop is encoded by C1orf77, a gene of previously unknown function. We show that Fop is tightly associated with chromatin, and that it is modified

  19. Modern human sperm freezing: Effect on DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Rahiminia

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Sperm in Vapour was healthier in terms of DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity. In contrast of higher motility and normal morphology; DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity were decreased in Vit. However, these findings were more acceptable in SSV or Vapour.

  20. High-throughput assessment of context-dependent effects of chromatin proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brueckner, L. (Laura); Van Arensbergen, J. (Joris); Akhtar, W. (Waseem); L. Pagie (Ludo); B. van Steensel (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chromatin proteins control gene activity in a concerted manner. We developed a high-throughput assay to study the effects of the local chromatin environment on the regulatory activity of a protein of interest. The assay combines a previously reported multiplexing strategy

  1. Small chromosomal regions position themselves autonomously according to their chromatin class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, Harmen J G; Haan, Josien C; Feodorova, Yana; Bijos, Dominika; Weuts, An; Theunis, Koen; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; Meuleman, Wouter; Pagie, Ludo; Thanisch, Katharina; Kumar, Parveen; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Marynen, Peter; van Steensel, Bas; Voet, Thierry; de Laat, Wouter; Solovei, Irina; Joffe, Boris

    2017-06-01

    The spatial arrangement of chromatin is linked to the regulation of nuclear processes. One striking aspect of nuclear organization is the spatial segregation of heterochromatic and euchromatic domains. The mechanisms of this chromatin segregation are still poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the link between the primary genomic sequence and chromatin domains. We analyzed the spatial intranuclear arrangement of a human artificial chromosome (HAC) in a xenospecific mouse background in comparison to an orthologous region of native mouse chromosome. The two orthologous regions include segments that can be assigned to three major chromatin classes according to their gene abundance and repeat repertoire: (1) gene-rich and SINE-rich euchromatin; (2) gene-poor and LINE/LTR-rich heterochromatin; and (3) gene-depleted and satellite DNA-containing constitutive heterochromatin. We show, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 4C-seq technologies, that chromatin segments ranging from 0.6 to 3 Mb cluster with segments of the same chromatin class. As a consequence, the chromatin segments acquire corresponding positions in the nucleus irrespective of their chromosomal context, thereby strongly suggesting that this is their autonomous property. Interactions with the nuclear lamina, although largely retained in the HAC, reveal less autonomy. Taken together, our results suggest that building of a functional nucleus is largely a self-organizing process based on mutual recognition of chromosome segments belonging to the major chromatin classes. © 2017 van de Werken et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  3. Induction of stable protein-deoxyribonucleic acid adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strniste, G.F.; Rall, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv)-light-mediated formation of protein-DNA adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin was investigated in an attempt to compare chromatin alterations induced in vitro with those observed in vivo. Three independent methods of analysis indicated stable protein-DNA associations: a membrane filter assay which retained DNA on the filter in the presence of high salt-detergent; a Sepharose 4B column assay in which protein eluted coincident with DNA; and a CsCl density gradient equilibrium assay which showed both protein and DNA banding at densities other than their respective native densities. Treatment of the irradiated chromatin with DNase provided further evidence that protein--DNA and not protein-protein adducts were being observed in the column assay. There is a fluence-dependent response of protein-DNA adduct formation when the chromatin is irradiated at low ionic strength and is linear for protein over the range studied. When the chromatin is exposed to differing conditions of pH, ionic strength, or divalent metal ion concentration, the quantity of adduct formed upon uv irradiation varies. Susceptibility to adduct formation can be partially explained in terms of the condensation state of the chromatin and other factors such as rearrangement, denaturation, and dissociation of the chromatin components. Besides providing information on the biological significance of these types of uv-induced lesions, this technique may be useful as a probe of chromatin structure

  4. Prediction of highly expressed genes in microbes based on chromatin accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that gene expression is dependent on chromatin structure in eukaryotes and it is likely that chromatin can play a role in bacterial gene expression as well. Here, we use a nucleosomal position preference measure of anisotropic DNA flexibility to predict highly expressed...

  5. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesne, Annick; Victor, Jean–Marc; Bécavin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. (perspective)

  6. Chromatin Controls DNA Replication Origin Selection, Lagging-Strand Synthesis, and Replication Fork Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurat, Christoph F; Yeeles, Joseph T P; Patel, Harshil; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2017-01-05

    The integrity of eukaryotic genomes requires rapid and regulated chromatin replication. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. Using purified yeast replication proteins and fully chromatinized templates, we have reconstituted this process in vitro. We show that chromatin enforces DNA replication origin specificity by preventing non-specific MCM helicase loading. Helicase activation occurs efficiently in the context of chromatin, but subsequent replisome progression requires the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription). The FACT-associated Nhp6 protein, the nucleosome remodelers INO80 or ISW1A, and the lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Esa1 each contribute separately to maximum DNA synthesis rates. Chromatin promotes the regular priming of lagging-strand DNA synthesis by facilitating DNA polymerase α function at replication forks. Finally, nucleosomes disrupted during replication are efficiently re-assembled into regular arrays on nascent DNA. Our work defines the minimum requirements for chromatin replication in vitro and shows how multiple chromatin factors might modulate replication fork rates in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  8. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Jenna; Ekwall, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  9. Direct Bandgap Group IV Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0049 Direct Bandgap group IV Materials Hung Hsiang Cheng NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY Final Report 01/21/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) NATIONAL TAIWAN UNIVERSITY 1 ROOSEVELT RD. SEC. 4 TAIPEI CITY, 10617 TW 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING...14. ABSTRACT Direct bandgap group IV materials have been long sought for in both academia and industry for the implementation of photonic devices

  10. Leaders break ground for INFINITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Community leaders from Mississippi and Louisiana break ground for the new INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility during a Nov. 20 ceremony. Groundbreaking participants included (l to r): Gottfried Construction representative John Smith, Mississippi Highway Commissioner Wayne Brown, INFINITY board member and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise, Stennis Director Gene Goldman, Studio South representative David Hardy, Leo Seal Jr. family representative Virginia Wagner, Hancock Bank President George Schloegel, Mississippi Rep. J.P. Compretta, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians representative Charlie Benn and Louisiana Sen. A.G. Crowe.

  11. Give Young Scientists a Break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, H. S.

    2009-11-01

    There has been much concern about the impact of tight funding on the careers of young scientists. When only a small percentage of grants are approved, even the smallest problem or error with an application can push it out of the funding range. Unfortunately, the relative lack of grant writing skills by new investigators often has this effect. To avoid a situation where only experienced investigators with polished writing skills are funded, the National Institutes of Health has instituted a more generous ranking scale for new investigators. Not surprisingly, some senior investigators have protested, calling it reverse discrimination. I say that their anger is misplaced. New investigators do deserve a break.

  12. Inflationary implications of supersymmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Andrea; Roest, Diederik; Zavala, Ivonne [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-23

    We discuss a general bound on the possibility to realise inflation in any minimal supergravity with F-terms. The derivation crucially depends on the sGoldstini, the scalar field directions that are singled out by spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. The resulting bound involves both slow-roll parameters and the geometry of the Kähler manifold of the chiral scalars. We analyse the inflationary implications of this bound, and in particular discuss to what extent the requirements of single field and slow-roll can both be met in F-term inflation.

  13. History of electroweak symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibble, T W B

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I recall the history of the development of the unified electroweak theory, incorporating the symmetry-breaking Higgs mechanism, as I saw it from my standpoint as a member of Abdus Salam's group at Imperial College. I start by describing the state of physics in the years after the Second World War, explain how the goal of a unified gauge theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions emerged, the obstacles encountered, in particular the Goldstone theorem, and how they were overcome, followed by a brief account of more recent history, culminating in the historic discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. (paper)

  14. Sediment transport under breaking waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Mayer, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The sediment transport in the surf zone is modelled by combining a Navier-Stokes solver, a free surface model, a turbulence model, and a sediment transport model. The flow solver is based on the finite volume technique for non-orthogonal grids. The model is capable of simulating the turbulence...... generated at the surface where the wave breaks as well as the turbulence generated near the bed due to the wave-motion and the undertow. In general, the levels of turbulent kinetic energy are found to be higher than experiments show. This results in an over prediction of the sediment transport. Nevertheless...

  15. Toxic effects of lead and nickel nitrate on rat liver chromatin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani-Chadegani Iii, Azra; Fani, Nesa; Abdossamadi, Sayeh; Shahmir, Nosrat

    2011-01-01

    The biological activity of heavy metals is related to their physicochemical interaction with biological receptors. In the present study, the effect of low concentrations of nickel nitrate and lead nitrate (lead nitrate to chromatin compared to nickel nitrate. Also, the binding affinity of lead nitrate to histone proteins free in solution was higher than nickel. On the basis of the results, it is concluded that lead reacts with chromatin components even at very low concentrations and induce chromatin aggregation through histone-DNA cross-links. Whereas, nickel nitrate is less effective on chromatin at low concentrations, suggesting higher toxicity of lead nitrate on chromatin compared to nickel. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes...... (heavy chromatin), defining a specific biochemical facet of THO function and a powerful tool of analysis. Here, we show that heavy chromatin distribution is dictated by gene boundaries and that the gene promoter is necessary and sufficient to convey THO sensitivity in these conditions. Single......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, L. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology, Babes National Institute, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: lilianajradu@yahoo.fr; Mihailescu, I. [Department of Lasers, Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics Institute, Bucharest (Romania); Radu, S. [Department of Computer Science, Polytechnics University, Bucharest (Romania); Gazdaru, D. [Department of Biophysics, Bucharest University (Romania)

    2007-09-21

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m{sup 2} was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy

  19. Snake-like chromatin in conjunctival cells of a population aged 30-60 years from Copenhagen City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    ophthalmology, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, Sjögrens Syndrome, epidemiology, imprint biopsy, snake-like chromatin......ophthalmology, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, Sjögrens Syndrome, epidemiology, imprint biopsy, snake-like chromatin...

  20. Elucidation of Chromatin Remodeling Machinery Involved in Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharma, Dipali

    2005-01-01

    .... Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we examined the chromatin status and repressor complex associated with silenced ER and changes in the key regulatory factors during reactivation by inhibitors of DNMT...

  1. Cytology of DNA Replication Reveals Dynamic Plasticity of Large-Scale Chromatin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiang; Zhironkina, Oxana A; Cherepanynets, Varvara D; Strelkova, Olga S; Kireev, Igor I; Belmont, Andrew S

    2016-09-26

    In higher eukaryotic interphase nuclei, the 100- to >1,000-fold linear compaction of chromatin is difficult to reconcile with its function as a template for transcription, replication, and repair. It is challenging to imagine how DNA and RNA polymerases with their associated molecular machinery would move along the DNA template without transient decondensation of observed large-scale chromatin "chromonema" fibers [1]. Transcription or "replication factory" models [2], in which polymerases remain fixed while DNA is reeled through, are similarly difficult to conceptualize without transient decondensation of these chromonema fibers. Here, we show how a dynamic plasticity of chromatin folding within large-scale chromatin fibers allows DNA replication to take place without significant changes in the global large-scale chromatin compaction or shape of these large-scale chromatin fibers. Time-lapse imaging of lac-operator-tagged chromosome regions shows no major change in the overall compaction of these chromosome regions during their DNA replication. Improved pulse-chase labeling of endogenous interphase chromosomes yields a model in which the global compaction and shape of large-Mbp chromatin domains remains largely invariant during DNA replication, with DNA within these domains undergoing significant movements and redistribution as they move into and then out of adjacent replication foci. In contrast to hierarchical folding models, this dynamic plasticity of large-scale chromatin organization explains how localized changes in DNA topology allow DNA replication to take place without an accompanying global unfolding of large-scale chromatin fibers while suggesting a possible mechanism for maintaining epigenetic programming of large-scale chromatin domains throughout DNA replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Atlantic Flyway review: Region IV - Fall 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Chandler S.

    2004-01-01

    We welcome the Eden Mill station in northeastern Maryland to Region IV this year. With three stations reporting their worst year ever, we really need to be refreshed. After a cool and wet July, August was hot and wet in the east. Temperatures in September remained close to normal, but thanks to tropical storms Henri (6-8 Sep) and Isabel (18 Sep), rainfall was excessive in the Chesapeake Bay states. The entire Northeast had cool weather in October, starting with an early freeze on 3 Oct that triggered some good banding days in our region. Precipitation was unusually spotty in October, but plentiful at most of the Region IV stations. November temperatures were consistently well above the norm, starting with a record-breaking 81 ø in Baltimore on the 1st.Four of the five Maryland stations had their best day on 19 or 20 Oct. One might expect some of the Virginia coastal stations, Chincoteague, Kiptopeke, and Back Bay, to share the same best day, but they did not. Three stations reported an increase in birds per net hour this year, while seven had a decline. Summarizing the changes in rank in Table 2, Gray Catbird was the species with the most (5) increases in rank (in excess of decreases), followed by junco (4) and Myrtle Warbler and Swamp Sparrow (3 each). Yellowthroat had the most decreases (5), followed by redstart (3).Myrtle Warbler (4572) was once again the most commonly banded species in Region IV, followed by White-throated Sparrow (1723), Gray Catbird (1349), and Western Palm Warbler (1090). Michelle Davis' station on Key Biscayne is the envy of the rest of us. Her top eight species were all warblers and there was not a Myrtle among them. Imagine having Parula, Prairie, and Worm-eating warblers fighting for sixth place!Not showing among the top ten, however, are other surprises. Several banders commented on Sawwhet Owls and Bicknell's Thrushes. Deanna Dawson banded a Cerulean Warbler at Patuxent. Danny Bystrak caught 138 Swamp Sparrows at Jug Bay. In addition

  3. Transcriptional and chromatin regulation during fasting – The genomic era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L.

    2015-01-01

    An elaborate metabolic response to fasting is orchestrated by the liver and is heavily reliant upon transcriptional regulation. In response to hormones (glucagon, glucocorticoids) many transcription factors (TFs) are activated and regulate various genes involved in metabolic pathways aimed at restoring homeostasis: gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis and amino acid shuttling. We summarize the recent discoveries regarding fasting-related TFs with an emphasis on genome-wide binding patterns. Collectively, the summarized findings reveal a large degree of co-operation between TFs during fasting which occurs at motif-rich DNA sites bound by a combination of TFs. These new findings implicate transcriptional and chromatin regulation as major determinants of the response to fasting and unravels the complex, multi-TF nature of this response. PMID:26520657

  4. Increased polyamines alter chromatin and stabilize autoantigens in autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H. Brooks

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are small cations with unique combinations of charge and length that give them many putative interactions in cells. Polyamines are essential since they are involved in replication, transcription, translation, and stabilization of macro-molecular complexes. However, polyamine synthesis competes with cellular methylation for S-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor. Also, polyamine degradation can generate reactive molecules like acrolein. Therefore, polyamine levels are tightly controlled. This control may be compromised in autoimmune diseases since elevated polyamine levels are seen in autoimmune diseases. Here a hypothesis is presented explaining how polyamines can stabilize autoantigens. In addition, the hypothesis explains how polyamines can inappropriately activate enzymes involved in NETosis, a process in which chromatin is modified and extruded from cells as extracellular traps that bind pathogens during an immune response. This polyamine-induced enzymatic activity can lead to an increase in NETosis resulting in release of autoantigenic material and tissue damage.

  5. Human Transcriptome and Chromatin Modifications: An ENCODE Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A decade-long project, led by several international research groups, called the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE, recently released an unprecedented amount of data. The ambitious project covers transcriptome, cistrome, epigenome, and interactome data from more than 1,600 sets of experiments in human. To make use of this valuable resource, it is important to understand the information it represents and the techniques that were used to generate these data. In this review, we introduce the data that ENCODE generated, summarize the observations from the data analysis, and revisit a computational approach that ENCODE used to predict gene expression, with a focus on the human transcriptome and its association with chromatin modifications.

  6. Causes and consequences of chromatin variation between inbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Hosseini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Variation at regulatory elements, identified through hypersensitivity to digestion by DNase I, is believed to contribute to variation in complex traits, but the extent and consequences of this variation are poorly characterized. Analysis of terminally differentiated erythroblasts in eight inbred strains of mice identified reproducible variation at approximately 6% of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHS. Only 30% of such variable DHS contain a sequence variant predictive of site variation. Nevertheless, sequence variants within variable DHS are more likely to be associated with complex traits than those in non-variant DHS, and variants associated with complex traits preferentially occur in variable DHS. Changes at a small proportion (less than 10% of variable DHS are associated with changes in nearby transcriptional activity. Our results show that whilst DNA sequence variation is not the major determinant of variation in open chromatin, where such variants exist they are likely to be causal for complex traits.

  7. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  8. [Effect of irradiation on the degradation of rat thymocyte chromatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsudzevich, B O; Parkhomets', Iu P; Andriĭchuk, T R; Iurkina, V V

    1998-01-01

    Genome instability of adaptive nature is formed under the experimental influence on a cell. Under critical conditions, strategy of organism is to damage the cells that cannot be restored and controlled by including the program of apoptosis. The ordered internucleosomal DNA degradation is considered to be one of the proof attributes of immunocompetent cell apoptosis. We investigated the effects of various doses of irradiation on the thymocytes chromatine fragmentation in 1,2,3 hours after a single X-ray exposure or after chronic influence in conditions of Chernobyl research base. By the means of electrophoresis in agarose and judging by polydeoxyribonucleotides accumulation we observed the "ladder pattern" of degradation in 3 hr after single 1 Gr irradiation (the smallest dose displaying the effect). We suppose that the influence of both chronic low-intensity irradiation taking place in Chernobyl and single X-ray exposure result in intensifying of DNA fragmentation in the cells of immunocompetent organs.

  9. Chromatin Constrains the Initiation and Elongation of DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devbhandari, Sujan; Jiang, Jieqing; Kumar, Charanya; Whitehouse, Iestyn; Remus, Dirk

    2017-01-05

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is faithfully replicated in a complex series of cell-cycle-regulated events that are incompletely understood. Here we report the reconstitution of DNA replication free in solution with purified proteins from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The system recapitulates regulated bidirectional origin activation; synthesis of leading and lagging strands by the three replicative DNA polymerases Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε; and canonical maturation of Okazaki fragments into continuous daughter strands. We uncover a dual regulatory role for chromatin during DNA replication: promoting origin dependence and determining Okazaki fragment length by restricting Pol δ progression. This system thus provides a functional platform for the detailed mechanistic analysis of eukaryotic chromosome replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromatin in fractal globule state: evidence from comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanasieva K. S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available At higher order levels chromatin is organized into loops that appear as a result of contacts between distant loci. The aim of this work was to investigate the length distribution of the DNA loops in nucleoids obtained after lysis of either whole cells or isolated cell nuclei. Methods. We used single cell gel electrophoresis to analyze the kinetics of the DNA loop migration from the two nucleoid types. Results. The kinetics of the DNA exit was found to have specific features for the two types of nucleoids. At the same time, in both cases, the DNA amount in the electrophoretic track depends linearly on the length of the longest loops in the track. Conclusions. We have concluded that for the loops up to ~ 100 kb the length distribution appears to be consistent with the fractal globule organization.

  11. Pyrimidine dimers in Drosophila chromatin become increasingly accessible after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.V.; Boyd, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A prokaryotic DNA-repair enzyme has been utilized as a probe for changes in the accessibility of pyrimidine dimers in Drosophila chromatin following UV irradiation. The results demonstrate a rapid cellular response to physiologically relevant doses of radiation which results in at least a 40% increase in accessible dimers. This increase occurs in two incision-deficient mutants which indicates that the excision-repair process, at or beyond the incision step, is not required or responsible for the increase. In the absence of excision the increase in accessibility persists for a least 2 days following irradiation. The observed increase in accessibility is inhibited by both novobiocin and coumermycin. These inhibitors do not inhibit the initial rate of incision, but do reduce dimer excision measured over more extended periods. A pre-incision process is proposed which actively exposes DNA lesions to excision repair. A fraction of the genome is postulated to be accessible without the intervention of that process. (Auth.)

  12. Comparative transmission genetics of introgressed chromatin in Gossypium (cotton) polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghmare, Vijay N; Rong, Junkang; Rogers, Carl J; Bowers, John E; Chee, Peng W; Gannaway, John R; Katageri, Ishwarappa; Paterson, Andrew H

    2016-04-01

    Introgression is widely acknowledged as a potential source of valuable genetic variation, and growing effort is being invested in analysis of interspecific crosses conferring transgressive variation. Experimental backcross populations provide an opportunity to study transmission genetics following interspecific hybridization, identifying opportunities and constraints to introgressive crop improvement. The evolutionary consequences of introgression have been addressed at the theoretical level, however, issues related to levels and patterns of introgression among (plant) species remain inadequately explored, including such factors as polyploidization, subgenome interaction inhabiting a common nucleus, and the genomic distribution and linkage relationships of introgressant alleles. We analyze introgression into the polyploid Gossypium hirsutum (upland cotton) from its sister G. tomentosum and compare the level and pattern with that of G. barbadense representing a different clade tracing to the same polyploidization. Across the genome, recurrent backcrossing to Gossypium hirsutum yielded only one-third of the expected average frequency of the G. tomentosum allele, although one unusual region showed preferential introgression. Although a similar rate of introgression is found in the two subgenomes of polyploid (AtDt) G. hirsutum, a preponderance of multilocus interactions were largely within the Dt subgenome. Skewed G. tomentosum chromatin transmission is polymorphic among two elite G. hirsutum genotypes, which suggests that genetic background may profoundly affect introgression of particular chromosomal regions. Only limited correspondence is found between G. hirsutum chromosomal regions that are intolerant to introgression from the two species, G. barbadense and G. tomentosum, concentrated near possible inversion polymorphisms. Complex transmission of introgressed chromatin highlights the challenges to utilization of exotic germplasm in crop improvement. © 2016

  13. Chromatin immunoprecipitation to analyze DNA binding sites of HMGA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Winter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HMGA2 is an architectonic transcription factor abundantly expressed during embryonic and fetal development and it is associated with the progression of malignant tumors. The protein harbours three basically charged DNA binding domains and an acidic protein binding C-terminal domain. DNA binding induces changes of DNA conformation and hence results in global overall change of gene expression patterns. Recently, using a PCR-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment procedure two consensus sequences for HMGA2 binding have been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this investigation chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments and bioinformatic methods were used to analyze if these binding sequences can be verified on chromatin of living cells as well. CONCLUSION: After quantification of HMGA2 protein in different cell lines the colon cancer derived cell line HCT116 was chosen for further ChIP experiments because of its 3.4-fold higher HMGA2 protein level. 49 DNA fragments were obtained by ChIP. These fragments containing HMGA2 binding sites have been analyzed for their AT-content, location in the human genome and similarities to sequences generated by a SELEX study. The sequences show a significantly higher AT-content than the average of the human genome. The artificially generated SELEX sequences and short BLAST alignments (11 and 12 bp of the ChIP fragments from living cells show similarities in their organization. The flanking regions are AT-rich, whereas a lower conservation is present in the center of the sequences.

  14. Alternative epigenetic chromatin states of polycomb target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri B Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb (PcG regulation has been thought to produce stable long-term gene silencing. Genomic analyses in Drosophila and mammals, however, have shown that it targets many genes, which can switch state during development. Genetic evidence indicates that critical for the active state of PcG target genes are the histone methyltransferases Trithorax (TRX and ASH1. Here we analyze the repertoire of alternative states in which PcG target genes are found in different Drosophila cell lines and the role of PcG proteins TRX and ASH1 in controlling these states. Using extensive genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, RNAi knockdowns, and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that, in addition to the known repressed state, PcG targets can reside in a transcriptionally active state characterized by formation of an extended domain enriched in ASH1, the N-terminal, but not C-terminal moiety of TRX and H3K27ac. ASH1/TRX N-ter domains and transcription are not incompatible with repressive marks, sometimes resulting in a "balanced" state modulated by both repressors and activators. Often however, loss of PcG repression results instead in a "void" state, lacking transcription, H3K27ac, or binding of TRX or ASH1. We conclude that PcG repression is dynamic, not static, and that the propensity of a target gene to switch states depends on relative levels of PcG, TRX, and activators. N-ter TRX plays a remarkable role that antagonizes PcG repression and preempts H3K27 methylation by acetylation. This role is distinct from that usually attributed to TRX/MLL proteins at the promoter. These results have important implications for Polycomb gene regulation, the "bivalent" chromatin state of embryonic stem cells, and gene expression in development.

  15. Distributed probing of chromatin structure in vivo reveals pervasive chromatin accessibility for expressed and non-expressed genes during tissue differentiation in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Ky

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue differentiation is accompanied by genome-wide changes in the underlying chromatin structure and dynamics, or epigenome. By controlling when, where, and what regulatory factors have access to the underlying genomic DNA, the epigenome influences the cell's transcriptome and ultimately its function. Existing genomic methods for analyzing cell-type-specific changes in chromatin generally involve two elements: (i a source for purified cells (or nuclei of distinct types, and (ii a specific treatment that partitions or degrades chromatin by activity or structural features. For many cell types of great interest, such assays are limited by our inability to isolate the relevant cell populations in an organism or complex tissue containing an intertwined mixture of other cells. This limitation has confined available knowledge of chromatin dynamics to a narrow range of biological systems (cell types that can be sorted/separated/dissected in large numbers and tissue culture models or to amalgamations of diverse cell types (tissue chunks, whole organisms. Results Transgene-driven expression of DNA/chromatin modifying enzymes provides one opportunity to query chromatin structures in expression-defined cell subsets. In this work we combine in vivo expression of a bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM with high throughput sequencing to sample tissue-specific chromatin accessibility on a genome-wide scale. We have applied the method (DALEC: Direct Asymmetric Ligation End Capture towards mapping a cell-type-specific view of genome accessibility as a function of differentiated state. Taking advantage of C. elegans strains expressing the DAM enzyme in diverse tissues (body wall muscle, gut, and hypodermis, our efforts yield a genome-wide dataset measuring chromatin accessibility at each of 538,000 DAM target sites in the C. elegans (diploid genome. Conclusions Validating the DALEC mapping results, we observe a strong association

  16. Snake-like chromatin in conjunctival cells of normal elderly persons and of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and other connective tissue diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Kirsten Birgitte

    1995-01-01

    Ophthalmology, snake-like chromatin, cytoplasm ratio, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, nucleus, goblet cell......Ophthalmology, snake-like chromatin, cytoplasm ratio, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, nucleus, goblet cell...

  17. Structural Break Tests Robust to Regression Misspecification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abi Morshed

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural break tests for regression models are sensitive to model misspecification. We show—analytically and through simulations—that the sup Wald test for breaks in the conditional mean and variance of a time series process exhibits severe size distortions when the conditional mean dynamics are misspecified. We also show that the sup Wald test for breaks in the unconditional mean and variance does not have the same size distortions, yet benefits from similar power to its conditional counterpart in correctly specified models. Hence, we propose using it as an alternative and complementary test for breaks. We apply the unconditional and conditional mean and variance tests to three US series: unemployment, industrial production growth and interest rates. Both the unconditional and the conditional mean tests detect a break in the mean of interest rates. However, for the other two series, the unconditional mean test does not detect a break, while the conditional mean tests based on dynamic regression models occasionally detect a break, with the implied break-point estimator varying across different dynamic specifications. For all series, the unconditional variance does not detect a break while most tests for the conditional variance do detect a break which also varies across specifications.

  18. A role for small RNAs in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, W.; Ba, Z.; Wu, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved complex mechanisms to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through coordinated actions of protein sensors, transducers, and effectors. Here we show that ∼21-nucleotide small RNAs are produced from the sequences in the vicinity of DSB sites in Arabidopsis and in human cells....... We refer to these as diRNAs for DSB-induced small RNAs. In Arabidopsis, the biogenesis of diRNAs requires the PI3 kinase ATR, RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), and Dicer-like proteins. Mutations in these proteins as well as in Pol V cause significant reduction in DSB repair efficiency. In Arabidopsis, di...

  19. ANALISIS KONDISI TERAS REAKTOR DAYA MAJU AP1000 PADA KECELAKAAN SMALL BREAK LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sofrany Ekariansyah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KONDISI TERAS REAKTOR DAYA MAJU AP1000 PADA KECELAKAAN SMALL BREAK LOCA. Kecelakaan yang diakibatkan oleh kehilangan pendingin (loss of coolant accident / LOCA dari sistem reaktor merupakan kejadian dasar desain yang tetap diantisipasi dalam desain reaktor daya yang mengadopsi teknologi Generasi II hingga IV. LOCA ukuran kecil (small break LOCA memiliki dampak yang lebih signifikan terhadap keselamatan dibandingkan LOCA ukuran besar (large break LOCA seperti terlihat pada kejadian Three-Mile Island (TMI. Fokus makalah adalah pada analisis small break LOCA pada reaktor daya maju Generasi III+ yaitu AP1000 dengan mensimulasikan tiga kejadian pemicu yaitu membukanya katup Automatic Depressurization System (ADS secara tak disengaja, putusnya salah satu pipa Direct Vessel Injection (DVI secara double-ended, dan putusnya pipa lengan dingin dengan diameter bocoran 10 inci. Metode yang digunakan adalah simulasi kejadian pada model AP1000 yang dikembangkan secara mandiri menggunakan program perhitungan RELAP5/SCDAP/Mod3.4. Dampak yang ingin dilihat adalah kondisi teras selama terjadinya small break LOCA yang terdiri dari pembentukan mixture level dan transien temperatur kelongsong bahan bakar. Hasil simulasi menunjukkan bahwa mixture level untuk semua kejadian small break LOCA berada di atas tinggi teras aktif yang menunjukkan tidak terjadinya core uncovery. Adanya mixture level berpengaruh pada transien temperatur kelongsong yang menurun dan menunjukkan pendinginan bahan bakar yang efektif. Hasil di atas juga identik dengan hasil perhitungan program lain yaitu NOTRUMP. Keefektifan pendinginan teras juga disebabkan oleh berfungsinya injeksi pendingin melalui fitur keselamatan pasif yang menjadi ciri reaktor daya AP1000. Secara keseluruhan, hasil analisis menunjukkan model AP1000 yang telah dikembangkan dengan RELAP5 dapat digunakan untuk keperluan analisis kecelakaan dasar desain pada reaktor daya maju AP1000. Kata kunci: analisis

  20. Modulation of chromatin structure by the FACT histone chaperone complex regulates HIV-1 integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Julien; Lesbats, Paul; Mauro, Eric; Lapaillerie, Delphine; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lopez, Angelica P; Benleulmi, Mohamed Salah; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Ruff, Marc; Llano, Manuel; Delelis, Olivier; Lavigne, Marc; Parissi, Vincent

    2017-07-28

    Insertion of retroviral genome DNA occurs in the chromatin of the host cell. This step is modulated by chromatin structure as nucleosomes compaction was shown to prevent HIV-1 integration and chromatin remodeling has been reported to affect integration efficiency. LEDGF/p75-mediated targeting of the integration complex toward RNA polymerase II (polII) transcribed regions ensures optimal access to dynamic regions that are suitable for integration. Consequently, we have investigated the involvement of polII-associated factors in the regulation of HIV-1 integration. Using a pull down approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we have selected the FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) complex as a new potential cofactor of HIV-1 integration. FACT is a histone chaperone complex associated with the polII transcription machinery and recently shown to bind LEDGF/p75. We report here that a tripartite complex can be formed between HIV-1 integrase, LEDGF/p75 and FACT in vitro and in cells. Biochemical analyzes show that FACT-dependent nucleosome disassembly promotes HIV-1 integration into chromatinized templates, and generates highly favored nucleosomal structures in vitro. This effect was found to be amplified by LEDGF/p75. Promotion of this FACT-mediated chromatin remodeling in cells both increases chromatin accessibility and stimulates HIV-1 infectivity and integration. Altogether, our data indicate that FACT regulates HIV-1 integration by inducing local nucleosomes dissociation that modulates the functional association between the incoming intasome and the targeted nucleosome.

  1. Non coding RNA: sequence-specific guide for chromatin modification and DNA damage signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia eFrancia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports suggest that ncRNAs are involved in DDR signaling and homology-mediated DNA repair. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  2. Large-scale Comparative Study of Hi-C-based Chromatin 3D Structure Modeling Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Cheng

    2018-05-17

    Chromatin is a complex polymer molecule in eukaryotic cells, primarily consisting of DNA and histones. Many works have shown that the 3D folding of chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA expression. The recently proposed Chro- mosome Conformation Capture technologies, especially the Hi-C assays, provide us an opportunity to study how the 3D structures of the chromatin are organized. Based on the data from Hi-C experiments, many chromatin 3D structure modeling methods have been proposed. However, there is limited ground truth to validate these methods and no robust chromatin structure alignment algorithms to evaluate the performance of these methods. In our work, we first made a thorough literature review of 25 publicly available population Hi-C-based chromatin 3D structure modeling methods. Furthermore, to evaluate and to compare the performance of these methods, we proposed a novel data simulation method, which combined the population Hi-C data and single-cell Hi-C data without ad hoc parameters. Also, we designed a global and a local alignment algorithms to measure the similarity between the templates and the chromatin struc- tures predicted by different modeling methods. Finally, the results from large-scale comparative tests indicated that our alignment algorithms significantly outperform the algorithms in literature.

  3. The effect of higher order chromatin structure on DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.; Warters, R.L.; Higashikubo, R.

    1985-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure are thought to play an important role in various radiobiological end points, i.e., DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival. The authors use here the isoleucine deprivation technique to decondense higher order chromatin structure and asses X-ray induced DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival on cells with decondensed chromatin as compared to controls. This chromatin decondensation manifests itself as a 30 fold decrease in nuclear area occupied by heterochromatin, an increased rate of Micrococcal nuclease digestion, 15% increased ethidium bromide intercalation and an altered binding capacity of Hl histone. These chromatin/nuclear changes do not affect X-ray induced DNA damage as measured by the alkaline elution technique or cell survival but slows DNA damage repair by 2 fold. Therefore, even though the chromatin appears more accessible to DNA damage and repair processes, these particular nuclear changes do not affect the DNA damaging effects of X-rays and in addition, repair is not enhanced by the ''relaxed'' state of chromatin. It is proposed that the altered metabolic state of isoleucine deprived cells provides a less efficient system for the repair of X-ray induced DNA damage

  4. [Automated morphometric evaluation of the chromatin structure of liver cell nuclei after vagotomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butusova, N N; Zhukotskiĭ, A V; Sherbo, I V; Gribkov, E N; Dubovaia, T K

    1989-05-01

    The morphometric analysis of the interphase chromatine structure of the hepatic cells nuclei was carried out on the automated TV installation for the quantitative analysis of images "IBAS-2" (by the OPTON firm, the FRG) according to 50 optical and geometric parameters during various periods (1.2 and 4 weeks) after the vagotomy operation. It is determined that upper-molecular organisation of chromatine undergoes the biggest changes one week after operation, and changes of granular component are more informative than changes of the nongranular component (with the difference 15-20%). It was also revealed that chromatine components differ in tinctorial properties, which are evidently dependent on physicochemical characteristics of the chromatine under various functional conditions of the cell. As a result of the correlation analysis the group of morphometric indices of chromatine structure was revealed, which are highly correlated with level of transcription activity of chromatine during various terms after denervation. The correlation quotient of these parameters is 0.85-0.97. The summing up: vagus denervation of the liver causes changes in the morphofunctional organisation of the chromatine.

  5. [Comparative investigation of the non-histone proteins of chromatin from pigeon erythroblasts and erythrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedina, A B; Gazarian, G G

    1976-01-01

    Chromosomal non-histone proteins are obtained from nuclei of two types of pigeon erythroid cells: erythroblasts (cells active in RNA synthesis) and erythrocytes (cells with repressed RNA synthesis). They are well soluble in solutions of low ionic strength. Electrophoretic separation of the obtained non-histone proteins in polyacrylamide gels with urea and SDS shows the presence of qualitative differences in the pattern of non-histone proteins of chromatine from erythroblasts and erythrocytes. By electrophoresis in urea some protein bands of non-histone proteins of chromatine from erythroblasts were found which disappear with the aging of cells. At the same time two protein fractions were observed in chromatine from erythrocytes which were absent in that of erythroblasts. Disappearance of some high molecular weight protein fractions from erythrocyte chromatine as compared to erythroblasts was observed by separation of the non-histone proteins in the presence of SDS. These fractions of the non-histone proteins disappearing during aging of cells are well extractable from erythroblast chromatine by 0.35 M NaCl solution. In the in vitro system with E. coli RNA polymerase addition of non-histone proteins of chromatine from erythroblasts to chromatine from erythrocytes increases RNA synthesis 2--3 times. At the same time addition of non-histone proteins from erythrocytes is either without any influence on this process or somewhat inhibiting.

  6. Real-Time Tracking of Parental Histones Reveals Their Contribution to Chromatin Integrity Following DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Dabin, Juliette; Chevallier, Odile; Leroy, Olivier; Baldeyron, Céline; Corpet, Armelle; Lomonte, Patrick; Renaud, Olivier; Almouzni, Geneviève; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-10-06

    Chromatin integrity is critical for cell function and identity but is challenged by DNA damage. To understand how chromatin architecture and the information that it conveys are preserved or altered following genotoxic stress, we established a system for real-time tracking of parental histones, which characterize the pre-damage chromatin state. Focusing on histone H3 dynamics after local UVC irradiation in human cells, we demonstrate that parental histones rapidly redistribute around damaged regions by a dual mechanism combining chromatin opening and histone mobilization on chromatin. Importantly, parental histones almost entirely recover and mix with new histones in repairing chromatin. Our data further define a close coordination of parental histone dynamics with DNA repair progression through the damage sensor DDB2 (DNA damage-binding protein 2). We speculate that this mechanism may contribute to maintaining a memory of the original chromatin landscape and may help preserve epigenome stability in response to DNA damage. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Symmetry breaking in gauge glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.

    1988-09-01

    In order to explain why nature selects the gauge groups of the Standard Model, Brene and Nielsen have proposed a way to break gauge symmetry which does not rely on the existence of a Higgs field. The observed gauge groups will in this scheme appear as the only surviving ones when this mechanism is applied to a random selection of gauge groups. The essential assumption is a discrete space-time with random couplings. Some working assumptions were made for computational reasons of which the most important is that quantum fluctuations were neclected. This work presents an example which under the same conditions show that a much wider class of groups than predicted by Brene and Nielsen will be broken. In particular no possible Standard Model Group survives unbroken. Numerical calculations support the analytical result. (orig.)

  8. Rotational Symmetry Breaking in Baby Skyrme Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Marek; Hen, Itay

    We discuss one of the most interesting phenomena exhibited by baby skyrmions - breaking of rotational symmetry. The topics we will deal with here include the appearance of rotational symmetry breaking in the static solutions of baby Skyrme models, both in flat as well as in curved spaces, the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby skyrmions, and finally, the appearance of spontaneous breaking of rotational symmetry in rotating baby skyrmions.

  9. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process.

  10. Big break for charge symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G.A. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle (United States); Kolck, U. van [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Two new experiments have detected charge-symmetry breaking, the mechanism responsible for protons and neutrons having different masses. Symmetry is a crucial concept in the theories that describe the subatomic world because it has an intimate connection with the laws of conservation. The theory of the strong interaction between quarks - quantum chromodynamics - is approximately invariant under what is called charge symmetry. In other words, if we swap an up quark for a down quark, then the strong interaction will look almost the same. This symmetry is related to the concept of {sup i}sospin{sup ,} and is not the same as charge conjugation (in which a particle is replaced by its antiparticle). Charge symmetry is broken by the competition between two different effects. The first is the small difference in mass between up and down quarks, which is about 200 times less than the mass of the proton. The second is their different electric charges. The up quark has a charge of +2/3 in units of the proton charge, while the down quark has a negative charge of -1/3. If charge symmetry was exact, the proton and the neutron would have the same mass and they would both be electrically neutral. This is because the proton is made of two up quarks and a down quark, while the neutron comprises two downs and an up. Replacing up quarks with down quarks, and vice versa, therefore transforms a proton into a neutron. Charge-symmetry breaking causes the neutron to be about 0.1% heavier than the proton because the down quark is slightly heavier than the up quark. Physicists had already elucidated certain aspects of charge-symmetry breaking, but our spirits were raised greatly when we heard of the recent work of Allena Opper of Ohio University in the US and co-workers at the TRIUMF laboratory in British Columbia, Canada. Her team has been trying to observe a small charge-symmetry-breaking effect for several years, using neutron beams at the TRIUMF accelerator. The researchers studied the

  11. High-resolution mapping reveals links of HP1 with active and inactive chromatin components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzo de Wit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 is commonly seen as a key factor of repressive heterochromatin, even though a few genes are known to require HP1-chromatin for their expression. To obtain insight into the targeting of HP1 and its interplay with other chromatin components, we have mapped HP1-binding sites on Chromosomes 2 and 4 in Drosophila Kc cells using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and the DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID technique. The resulting high-resolution maps show that HP1 forms large domains in pericentric regions, but is targeted to single genes on chromosome arms. Intriguingly, HP1 shows a striking preference for exon-dense genes on chromosome arms. Furthermore, HP1 binds along entire transcription units, except for 5' regions. Comparison with expression data shows that most of these genes are actively transcribed. HP1 target genes are also marked by the histone variant H3.3 and dimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2, which are both typical of active chromatin. Interestingly, H3.3 deposition, which is usually observed along entire transcription units, is limited to the 5' ends of HP1-bound genes. Thus, H3.3 and HP1 are mutually exclusive marks on active chromatin. Additionally, we observed that HP1-chromatin and Polycomb-chromatin are nonoverlapping, but often closely juxtaposed, suggesting an interplay between both types of chromatin. These results demonstrate that HP1-chromatin is transcriptionally active and has extensive links with several other chromatin components.

  12. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  13. Rock breaking methods to replace blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huisheng; Xie, Xinghua; Feng, Yuqing

    2018-03-01

    The method of breaking rock by blasting has a high efficiency and the cost is relatively low, but the associated vibration, flyrock, production of toxic gases since the 1970’s, the Western developed countries began to study the safety of breaking rock. This paper introduces different methods and their progress to safely break rock. Ideally, safe rock breaking would have little vibration, no fly stone, and no toxic gases, which can be widely used in municipal engineering, road excavation, high-risk mining, quarrying and complex environment.

  14. NPP Krsko small break LOCA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.; Petelin, S.; Peterlin, G.

    1987-01-01

    Parametric analysis of small break loss of coolant accident for the Krsko NPP was calculated by using RELAP5/MOD1 computer code. The model that was used in our calculations has been improved over several years and was previously tested in simulation (s) of start-up tests and known NPP Krsko transients. In our calculations we modelled automatic actions initiated by control, safety and protection systems. We also modelled the required operator actions as specified in emergency operating instructions. In small-break LOCA calculations, we varied break sizes in the cold leg. The influence of steam generator tube plugging on small break LOCA accidents was also analysed. (author)

  15. Give me a better break: Choosing workday break activities to maximize resource recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Emily M; Wu, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    Surprisingly little research investigates employee breaks at work, and even less research provides prescriptive suggestions for better workday breaks in terms of when, where, and how break activities are most beneficial. Based on the effort-recovery model and using experience sampling methodology, we examined the characteristics of employee workday breaks with 95 employees across 5 workdays. In addition, we examined resources as a mediator between break characteristics and well-being. Multilevel analysis results indicated that activities that were preferred and earlier in the work shift related to more resource recovery following the break. We also found that resources mediated the influence of preferred break activities and time of break on health symptoms and that resource recovery benefited person-level outcomes of emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, and organizational citizenship behavior. Finally, break length interacted with the number of breaks per day such that longer breaks and frequent short breaks were associated with more resources than infrequent short breaks. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Identification of RegIV as a novel GLI1 target gene in human pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GLI1 is the key transcriptional factor in the Hedgehog signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer. RegIV is associated with regeneration, and cell growth, survival, adhesion and resistance to apoptosis. We aimed to study RegIV expression in pancreatic cancer and its relationship to GLI1.GLI1 and RegIV expression were evaluated in tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissues of pancreatic cancer patients and 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry (IHC, and the correlation between them. The GLI1-shRNA lentiviral vector was constructed and transfected into PANC-1, and lentiviral vector containing the GLI1 expression sequence was constructed and transfected into BxPC-3. GLI1 and RegIV expression were evaluated by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Finally we demonstrated RegIV to be the target of GLI1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA.The results of IHC and qRT-PCR showed that RegIV and GLI1 expression was higher in pancreatic cancer tissues versus adjacent normal tissues (p<0.001. RegIV expression correlated with GLI1 expression in these tissues (R = 0.795, p<0.0001. These results were verified for protein (R = 0.939, p = 0.018 and mRNA expression (R = 0.959, p = 0.011 in 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines. RegIV mRNA and protein expression was decreased (94.7±0.3%, 84.1±0.5%; respectively when GLI1 was knocked down (82.1±3.2%, 76.7±2.2%; respectively by the RNAi technique. GLI1 overexpression in mRNA and protein level (924.5±5.3%, 362.1±3.5%; respectively induced RegIV overexpression (729.1±4.3%, 339.0±3.7%; respectively. Moreover, CHIP and EMSA assays showed GLI1 protein bound to RegIV promotor regions (GATCATCCA in pancreatic cancer cells.GLI1 promotes RegIV transcription by binding to the RegIV gene promoter in pancreatic cancer.

  17. A new and improved algorithm for the quantification of chromatin condensation from microscopic data shows decreased chromatin condensation in regenerating axolotl limb cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Sosnik

    Full Text Available The nuclear landscape plays an important role in the regulation of tissue and positional specific genes in embryonic and developing cells. Changes in this landscape can be dynamic, and are associated with the differentiation of cells during embryogenesis, and the de-differentiation of cells during induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC formation and in many cancers. However, tools to quantitatively characterize these changes are limited, especially in the in vivo context, where numerous tissue types are present and cells are arranged in multiple layers. Previous tools have been optimized for the monolayer nature of cultured cells. Therefore, we present a new algorithm to quantify the condensation of chromatin in two in vivo systems. We first developed this algorithm to quantify changes in chromatin compaction and validated it in differentiating spermatids in zebrafish testes. Our algorithm successfully detected the typical increase in chromatin compaction as these cells differentiate. We then employed the algorithm to quantify the changes that occur in amphibian limb cells as they participate in a regenerative response. We observed that the chromatin in the limb cells de-compacts as they contribute to the regenerating organ. We present this new tool as an open sourced software that can be readily accessed and optimized to quantify chromatin compaction in complex multi-layered samples.

  18. Structural hierarchy of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei based on small-angle neutron scattering: Fractal nature of the large-scale chromatin organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, D. V.; Filatov, M. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh.; Stellbrink, J.; Pantina, R. A.; Denisov, Yu. Yu.; Toperverg, B. P.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    The chromatin organization in chicken erythrocyte nuclei was studied by small-angle neutron scattering in the scattering-vector range from 1.5 x 10 -1 to 10 -4 A -1 with the use of the contrast-variation technique. This scattering-vector range corresponds to linear dimensions from 4 nm to 6 μm and covers the whole hierarchy of chromatin structures, from the nucleosomal structure to the entire nucleus. The results of the present study allowed the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) both the chromatin-protein structure and the structure of the nucleic acid component in chicken erythrocyte nuclei have mass-fractal properties, (2) the structure of the protein component of chromatin exhibits a fractal behavior on scales extending over two orders of magnitude, from the nucleosomal size to the size of an entire nucleus, and (3) the structure of the nucleic acid component of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei is likewise of a fractal nature and has two levels of organization or two phases with the crossover point at about 300-400 nm

  19. Effect of radiation and alkylating agents on chromatin degradation in normal and malignant lymphoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.I.; Yurashkova, V.; Ivannik, B.P.; Konov, A.V.; Drashil, V.

    1991-01-01

    Regularities of chromatin degradation in thymocytes and LS/BL tumor cells have been investigated. It has been shown that the rate of DNA degradation by Ca/Mg-dependent endonuclease in LS/BL tumor cells is 25 times lower than that in thymocytes, and radiation does not induce chormatin degradation. The alkylating agent TS 160 causes chromatin degradation in both LS/Bl cells and thymocytes. In contrast to radiation TS 160 inhibits the endogenous chromatin degradation by Ca/Mg-dependent endonuclease in thymocytes

  20. The global relationship between chromatin physical topology, fractal structure, and gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Tiwari, A; Ruhoff, P T

    2017-01-01

    in an empty space, but in a highly complex, interrelated, and dense nanoenvironment that profoundly influences chemical interactions. We explored the relationship between the physical nanoenvironment of chromatin and gene transcription in vitro. We analytically show that changes in the fractal dimension, D...... show that the increased heterogeneity of physical structure of chromatin due to increase in fractal dimension correlates with increased heterogeneity of gene networks. These findings indicate that the higher order folding of chromatin topology may act as a molecular-pathway independent code regulating...

  1. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) promoter targeting through a novel chromatin remodeling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shigeaki; Fujiki, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Hirochika

    2004-05-01

    We have purified nuclear complexes for Vitamin D receptor (VDR), and identified one of them as a novel ATP-dependent chromatine remodeling containing Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF), that is supposed to be responsible for Williams syndrome. This complex (WSTF including nucleosome assembly complex (WINAC)) exhibited an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity in vitro. Transient expression assays revealed that WINAC potentiates ligand-induced function of VDR in gene activation and repression. Thus, this study describes a molecular basis of the VDR function on chromosomal DNA through chromatine remodeling.

  2. Excision of x-ray-induced thymine damage in chromatin from heated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were performed to distinguish between two possible modes of hyperthermia-induced inhibition of thymine base damage excision from the DNA of CHO cells: (1) heat denaturation of excision enzyme(s) or (2) heat-induced alteration of the substrate for damage excision (chromatin). While hyperthermia (45 0 C, 15 min) had no apparent effect on the capacity of the excision enzymes to excise damage from DNA it had a dramatic effect (ca. 80% inhibition) on the ability of chromatin to serve as a substrate for unheated enzymes. These results suggest that hyperthermia-induced radiosensitization of CHO cells may be due primarily to lesions in the cellular chromatin

  3. Extensive chromatin remodelling and establishment of transcription factor 'hotspots' during early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; John, Sam

    2011-01-01

    hypersensitive site analysis to investigate the genome-wide changes in chromatin structure that accompany the binding of adipogenic transcription factors. These analyses revealed a dramatic and dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during the first hours of adipocyte differentiation that coincides...... and chromatin remodelling and is required for their establishment. Furthermore, a subset of early remodelled C/EBP-binding sites persists throughout differentiation and is later occupied by PPARγ, indicating that early C/EBP family members, in addition to their well-established role in activation of PPARγ...

  4. Phosphorylation of both nucleoplasmin domains is required for activation of its chromatin decondensation activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañuelos, Sonia; Omaetxebarria, Miren J; Ramos, Isbaal

    2007-01-01

    Nucleoplasmin (NP) is a histone chaperone involved in nucleosome assembly, chromatin decondensation at fertilization, and apoptosis. To carry out these activities NP has to interact with different types of histones, an interaction that is regulated by phosphorylation. Here we have identified...... are found at the tail domain, flanking the nuclear localization signal. Phosphorylation-mimicking mutations render a recombinant protein as active in chromatin decondensation as hyperphosphorylated NP isolated from Xenopus laevis eggs. Comparison of mutants in which the core and tail domains of the protein...... were independently or simultaneously "activated" indicates that activation or phosphorylation of both protein domains is required for NP to efficiently extract linker-type histones from chromatin....

  5. Alkaline gel electrophoresis assay to detect DNA strand breaks and repair mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Jose Carlos Pelielo de; Motta, Ellen Serri da; Oliveira, Marcia Betania Nunes de; Dantas, Flavio Jose da Silva; Araujo, Adriano Caldeira de

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can induce lesions in different cellular targets, including DNA. Stannous chloride (SnCl 2 ) is a ROS generator, leading to lethality in Escherichia coli (E. coli), with the base excision repair (BER) mechanism playing a role in this process. Many techniques have been developed to detect genotoxicity, as comet assay, in eukaryotic cells, and plasmid DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. In this study, an adaptation of the alkaline gel electrophoresis method was carried out to ascertain the induction of strand breaks by SnCl 2 in bacterial DNA, from E. coli BER mutants, and its repair pathway. Results obtained show that SnCl 2 was able to induce DNA strand breaks in all strains tested. Moreover, endonuclease IV and exonuclease III play a role in DNA repair. On the whole, data has shown that the alkaline gel electrophoresis assay could be used both for studying DNA strand breaks induction and for associated repair mechanisms. (author)

  6. Epidermal growth factor stimulating reparation of γ-ray-induced single-strand breaks predominantly in untranscribed DNA of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igusheva, O.A.; Bil'din, V.N.; Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggest that genomic DNA undergoes reparation unevenly because of different transcription activities of its particular sequence. It is highly probably that transcriptional factors are necessary for postion stages of excision reparation and for reparation of single-strand DNA breaks caused by ionizing radiation. There is evidence suggesting that DNA lesions inflicted by γ-radiation is preferentially initiated in transcribed rather than in untranscribed DNA species. This paper looks at the relationship between stimulatory effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on reparation of single-strand DNA breaks and reparation of the damage done to active and inert fragments of chromatin. The results show that EGF stimulates reparation of single-strand DNA breaks induced by γ-radiation more effectively in untranscribed than in transcribed DNA. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Dysregulation of chromatin remodelling complexes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibshirani, Michael; Zhao, Beibei; Gentil, Benoit J; Minotti, Sandra; Marques, Christine; Keith, Julia; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Rouaux, Caroline; Robertson, Janice; Durham, Heather D

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with paralysis resulting from dysfunction and loss of motor neurons. A common neuropathological finding is attrition of motor neuron dendrites, which make central connections vital to motor control. The chromatin remodelling complex, neuronal Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1)-associated factor complex (nBAF), is critical for neuronal differentiation, dendritic extension and synaptic function. We have identified loss of the crucial nBAF subunits Brg1, Brg1-associated factor 53b and calcium responsive transactivator in cultured motor neurons expressing FUS or TAR-DNA Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) mutants linked to familial ALS. When plasmids encoding wild-type or mutant human FUS or TDP-43 were expressed in motor neurons of dissociated spinal cord cultures prepared from E13 mice, mutant proteins in particular accumulated in the cytoplasm. Immunolabelling of nBAF subunits was reduced in proportion to loss of nuclear FUS or TDP-43 and depletion of Brg1 was associated with nuclear retention of Brg1 mRNA. Dendritic attrition (loss of intermediate and terminal dendritic branches) occurred in motor neurons expressing mutant, but not wild-type, FUS or TDP-43. This attrition was delayed by ectopic over-expression of Brg1 and was reproduced by inhibiting Brg1 activity either through genetic manipulation or treatment with the chemical inhibitor, (E)-1-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-3-((1R, 4R)-5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2, 5-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-yl)prop-2-en-1-one, demonstrating the importance of Brg1 to maintenance of dendritic architecture. Loss of nBAF subunits was also documented in spinal motor neurons in autopsy tissue from familial amyotrophic sclerosis (chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 with G4C2 nucleotide expansion) and from sporadic cases with no identified mutation, pointing to dysfunction of nBAF chromatin remodelling in multiple forms of ALS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  8. DNA Breaks and End Resection Measured Genome-wide by End Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andres; Sridharan, Sriram; Sciascia, Nicholas; Tubbs, Anthony; Meltzer, Paul; Sleckman, Barry P; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise during physiological transcription, DNA replication, and antigen receptor diversification. Mistargeting or misprocessing of DSBs can result in pathological structural variation and mutation. Here we describe a sensitive method (END-seq) to monitor DNA end resection and DSBs genome-wide at base-pair resolution in vivo. We utilized END-seq to determine the frequency and spectrum of restriction-enzyme-, zinc-finger-nuclease-, and RAG-induced DSBs. Beyond sequence preference, chromatin features dictate the repertoire of these genome-modifying enzymes. END-seq can detect at least one DSB per cell among 10,000 cells not harboring DSBs, and we estimate that up to one out of 60 cells contains off-target RAG cleavage. In addition to site-specific cleavage, we detect DSBs distributed over extended regions during immunoglobulin class-switch recombination. Thus, END-seq provides a snapshot of DNA ends genome-wide, which can be utilized for understanding genome-editing specificities and the influence of chromatin on DSB pathway choice. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Lie-algebra approach to symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    A formal Lie-algebra approach to symmetry breaking is studied in an attempt to reduce the arbitrariness of Lagrangian (Hamiltonian) models which include several free parameters and/or ad hoc symmetry groups. From Lie algebra it is shown that the unbroken Lagrangian vacuum symmetry can be identified from a linear function of integers which are Cartan matrix elements. In broken symmetry if the breaking operators form an algebra then the breaking symmetry (or symmetries) can be identified from linear functions of integers characteristic of the breaking symmetries. The results are applied to the Dirac Hamiltonian of a sum of flavored fermions and colored bosons in the absence of dynamical symmetry breaking. In the partially reduced quadratic Hamiltonian the breaking-operator functions are shown to consist of terms of order g 2 , g, and g 0 in the color coupling constants and identified with strong (boson-boson), medium strong (boson-fermion), and fine-structure (fermion-fermion) interactions. The breaking operators include a boson helicity operator in addition to the familiar fermion helicity and ''spin-orbit'' terms. Within the broken vacuum defined by the conventional formalism, the field divergence yields a gauge which is a linear function of Cartan matrix integers and which specifies the vacuum symmetry. We find that the vacuum symmetry is chiral SU(3) x SU(3) and the axial-vector-current divergence gives a PCAC -like function of the Cartan matrix integers which reduces to PCAC for SU(2) x SU(2) breaking. For the mass spectra of the nonets J/sup P/ = 0 - ,1/2 + ,1 - the integer runs through the sequence 3,0,-1,-2, which indicates that the breaking subgroups are the simple Lie groups. Exact axial-vector-current conservation indicates a breaking sum rule which generates octet enhancement. Finally, the second-order breaking terms are obtained from the second-order spin tensor sum of the completely reduced quartic Hamiltonian

  10. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  11. Ionizing-radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks: A direct and indirect lighting up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignard, Julien; Mirey, Gladys; Salles, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation has been extensively studied by biochemical or cell imaging techniques. Cell imaging development relies on technical advances as well as our knowledge of the cell DNA damage response (DDR) process. The DDR involves a complex network of proteins that initiate and coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair activities. As some DDR proteins assemble at DSBs in an established spatio-temporal pattern, visible nuclear foci are produced. In addition, post-translational modifications are important for the signaling and the recruitment of specific partners at damaged chromatin foci. We briefly review here the most widely used methods to study DSBs. We also discuss the development of indirect methods, using reporter expression or intra-nuclear antibodies, to follow the production of DSBs in real time and in living cells

  12. Controlling break-the-glass through alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriansyah, A.; Dongen, van B.F.; Zannone, N.

    2013-01-01

    Modern IT systems have to deal with unpredictable situations and exceptions more and more often. In contrast, security mechanisms are usually very rigid. Functionality like break-the-glass is thus employed to allow users to bypass security mechanisms in case of emergencies. However, break-the-glass

  13. Charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon form factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, Bastian, E-mail: kubis@hiskp.uni-bonn.de [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Theorie) and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    A quantitative understanding of charge-symmetry breaking is an increasingly important ingredient for the extraction of the nucleon's strange vector form factors. We review the theoretical understanding of the charge-symmetry-breaking form factors, both for single nucleons and for {sup 4}He.

  14. Charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon form factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, Bastian

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of charge-symmetry breaking is an increasingly important ingredient for the extraction of the nucleon’s strange vector form factors. We review the theoretical understanding of the charge-symmetry-breaking form factors, both for single nucleons and for 4 He.

  15. Breaking antidunes: Cyclic behavior due to hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deigaard, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic behavior of breaking antidunes (growth, breaking of surface wave, obliteration) is investigated by use of a numerical model. The model includes the transition between supercritical and transcritical flow. As the antidune grows the flow becomes transcritical and a hydraulic jump is form...

  16. Metastable Supersymmetry Breaking in a Cooling Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim S.

    2007-01-01

    I put metastable supersymmetry breaking in a cosmological context. I argue that under reasonable assumptions, the cooling down early Universe favors metastable SUSY-breaking vacua over the stable supersymmetric vacua. To illustrate the general argument, I analyze the early-Universe history of the Intriligator-Seiberg-Shih model

  17. The new break-even analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskaris, James; Regan, Katie

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the economic and legislative environment have complicated the capital acquisition landscape. Hospitals and health systems should: Question the assumptions that underlie their break-even analysis. Revamp the break-even calculator. Engage in discussions about the clinical aspects of equipment and technology acquisition decisions.

  18. Strongly coupled semidirect mediation of supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibe, M.; Izawa, K.-I.; Nakai, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Strongly coupled semidirect gauge mediation models of supersymmetry breaking through massive mediators with standard-model charges are investigated by means of composite degrees of freedom. Sizable mediation is realized to generate the standard-model gaugino masses for a small mediator mass without breaking the standard-model symmetries.

  19. Multiscale Simulation of Breaking Wave Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ole

    compare reasonably well. The incompressible and inviscid ALE-WLS model is coupled with the potential flow model of Engsig-Karup et al. [2009], to perform multiscale calculation of breaking wave impacts on a vertical breakwater. The potential flow model provides accurate calculation of the wave...... with a potential flow model to provide multiscale calculation of forces from breaking wave impacts on structures....

  20. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R.

    2005-01-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA + protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  1. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  2. Sulforaphane Modifies Histone H3, Unpacks Chromatin, and Primes Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillheim, Britta; Jansen, Irina; Baum, Stephani; Beesley, Alexander; Bolm, Carsten; Conrath, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    Modern crop production calls for agrochemicals that prime plants for enhanced defense. Reliable test systems for spotting priming-inducing chemistry, however, are rare. We developed an assay for the high-throughput search for compounds that prime microbial pattern-induced secretion of antimicrobial furanocoumarins (phytoalexins) in cultured parsley cells. The screen produced 1-isothiocyanato-4-methylsulfinylbutane (sulforaphane; SFN), a secondary metabolite in many crucifers, as a novel defense priming compound. While elucidating SFN's mode of action in defense priming, we found that in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) the isothiocyanate provokes covalent modification (K4me3, K9ac) of histone H3 in the promoter and promoter-proximal region of defense genes WRKY6 and PDF1 2 , but not PR1 SFN-triggered H3K4me3 and H3K9ac coincide with chromatin unpacking in the WRKY6 and PDF1 2 regulatory regions, primed WRKY6 expression, unprimed PDF1 2 activation, and reduced susceptibility to downy mildew disease ( Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis ). Because SFN also directly inhibits H arabidopsidis and other plant pathogens, the isothiocyanate is promising for the development of a plant protectant with a dual mode of action. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Adenovirus chromatin structure at different stages of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniell, E.; Groff, D.E.; Fedor, M.J.

    1981-12-01

    The authors investigated the structure of adenovirus deoxyribonecleic acid (DNA)-protein complexes in nuclei of infected cells by using micrococal nuclease. Parental (infecting) DNA was digested into multimers which had a unit fragment size that was indistinguishable from the size of the nucleosomal repeat of cellular chromatin. This pattern was maintained in parental DNA throughout infection. Similar repeating units were detected in hamster cells that were nonpermissive for human adenovirus and in cells pretreated with n-butyrate. Late in infection, the pattern of digestion of viral DNA was determined by two different experimental approaches. Nuclear DNA was electrophoresed, blotted, and hybridized with labeled viral sequences; in this procedure all virus-specific DNA was detected. This technique revealed a diffuse protected band of viral DNA that was smaller than 160 base pairs, but no discrete multimers. All regions of the genome were represented in the protected DNA. To examine the nuclease protection of newly replicated viral DNA, infected cells were labeled with (/sup 3/)thymidine after blocking of cellular DNA synthesis but not viral DNA synthesis. With this procedure they identified a repeating unit which was distinctly different from the cellular nucleosomal repeat. The authors found broad bands with midpoints at 200, 400, and 600 base pairs, as well as the limit digest material revealed by blotting. High-resolution acrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the viral species comprised a series of closely spaced bands ranging in size from less than 30 to 250 base pairs.

  4. ENCODE: A Sourcebook of Epigenomes and Chromatin Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yavartanoo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, since the Human Genome Project, the general view has been that the majority of the human genome is composed of junk DNA and has little or no selective advantage to the organism. Now we know that this conclusion is an oversimplification. In April 2003, the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI launched an international research consortium called Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE to uncover non-coding functional elements in the human genome. The result of this project has identified a set of new DNA regulatory elements, based on novel relationships among chromatin accessibility, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, transcription, and the occupancy of sequence-specific factors. The project gives us new insights into the organization and regulation of the human genome and epigenome. Here, we sought to summarize particular aspects of the ENCODE project and highlight the features and data that have recently been released. At the end of this review, we have summarized a case study we conducted using the ENCODE epigenome data.

  5. Two independent modes of chromatin organization revealed by cohesin removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Wibke; Abdennur, Nezar; Goloborodko, Anton; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Loe-Mie, Yann; Fonseca, Nuno A; Huber, Wolfgang; H Haering, Christian; Mirny, Leonid; Spitz, Francois

    2017-11-02

    Imaging and chromosome conformation capture studies have revealed several layers of chromosome organization, including segregation into megabase-sized active and inactive compartments, and partitioning into sub-megabase domains (TADs). It remains unclear, however, how these layers of organization form, interact with one another and influence genome function. Here we show that deletion of the cohesin-loading factor Nipbl in mouse liver leads to a marked reorganization of chromosomal folding. TADs and associated Hi-C peaks vanish globally, even in the absence of transcriptional changes. By contrast, compartmental segregation is preserved and even reinforced. Strikingly, the disappearance of TADs unmasks a finer compartment structure that accurately reflects the underlying epigenetic landscape. These observations demonstrate that the three-dimensional organization of the genome results from the interplay of two independent mechanisms: cohesin-independent segregation of the genome into fine-scale compartments, defined by chromatin state; and cohesin-dependent formation of TADs, possibly by loop extrusion, which helps to guide distant enhancers to their target genes.

  6. Interplay between chromatin modulators and histone acetylation regulates the formation of accessible chromatin in the upstream regulatory region of fission yeast fbp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Akira; Senmatsu, Satoshi; Asada, Ryuta; Abe, Takuya; Hoffman, Charles S; Ohta, Kunihiro; Hirota, Kouji

    2018-05-03

    Numerous noncoding RNA transcripts are detected in eukaryotic cells. Noncoding RNAs transcribed across gene promoters are involved in the regulation of mRNA transcription via chromatin modulation. This function of noncoding RNA transcription was first demonstrated for the fission yeast fbp1 gene, where a cascade of noncoding RNA transcription events induces chromatin remodeling to facilitate transcription factor binding. We recently demonstrated that the noncoding RNAs from the fbp1 upstream region facilitate binding of the transcription activator Atf1 and thereby promote histone acetylation. Histone acetylation by histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers (ADCRs) are implicated in chromatin remodeling, but the interplay between HATs and ADCRs in this process has not been fully elucidated. Here, we examine the roles played by two distinct ADCRs, Snf22 and Hrp3, and by the HAT Gcn5 in the transcriptional activation of fbp1. Snf22 and Hrp3 redundantly promote disassembly of chromatin in the fbp1 upstream region. Gcn5 critically contributes to nucleosome eviction in the absence of either Snf22 or Hrp3, presumably by recruiting Hrp3 in snf22∆ cells and Snf22 in hrp3∆ cells. Conversely, Gcn5-dependent histone H3 acetylation is impaired in snf22∆/hrp3∆ cells, suggesting that both redundant ADCRs induce recruitment of Gcn5 to the chromatin array in the fbp1 upstream region. These results reveal a previously unappreciated interplay between ADCRs and histone acetylation in which histone acetylation facilitates recruitment of ADCRs, while ADCRs are required for histone acetylation.

  7. Chromatin structure in the unicellular algae Olisthodiscus luteus, Crypthecodinium cohnii and Peridiniun balticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, P J; Burghardt, R C

    1980-01-01

    Isolated nuclei of the unicellular alga Olisthodiscus luteus, the uninucleate dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii and the binucleate dinoflagellate Peridinium balticum were lysed and deposited on grids by the microcentrifugation technique. The ultrastructure of the released chromatin fibers was compared to that of mouse liver nuclei. Chromatin from nuclei of Olisthodiscus luteus and the "eukaryotic" nuclei of Peridinium balticum, appeared as linear arrays of regularly repeating subunits which were identical in size and morphology to mouse nucleosomes. In contrast, the chromatin fibers from Crypthecodinium cohnii nuclei appeared as smoothe threads with a diameter of about 6.5 nm. Nuclear preparations containing mixtures of "dinokaryotic" and "eukaryotic" nuclei of Peridinium balticum also contained smooth fibers which most likely originated from the dinokaryotic nuclei. These and other results demonstrating the presence of nucleosomes in lower eukaryotes suggest that the subunit structure of chromatin arose very early in the evolution of the eukaryotic cell.

  8. Macrogenomic engineering via modulation of the scaling of chromatin packing density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Bauer, Greta M; Wu, Wenli; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Kendra, Alexis; Gladstein, Scott; Chandler, John E; VanDerway, David; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Ugolkov, Andrey; Billadeau, Daniel D; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Mazar, Andrew P; Roy, Hemant K; Szleifer, Igal; Shahabi, Shohreh; Backman, Vadim

    2017-11-01

    Many human diseases result from the dysregulation of the complex interactions between tens to thousands of genes. However, approaches for the transcriptional modulation of many genes simultaneously in a predictive manner are lacking. Here, through the combination of simulations, systems modelling and in vitro experiments, we provide a physical regulatory framework based on chromatin packing-density heterogeneity for modulating the genomic information space. Because transcriptional interactions are essentially chemical reactions, they depend largely on the local physical nanoenvironment. We show that the regulation of the chromatin nanoenvironment allows for the predictable modulation of global patterns in gene expression. In particular, we show that the rational modulation of chromatin density fluctuations can lead to a decrease in global transcriptional activity and intercellular transcriptional heterogeneity in cancer cells during chemotherapeutic responses to achieve near-complete cancer cell killing in vitro. Our findings represent a 'macrogenomic engineering' approach to modulating the physical structure of chromatin for whole-scale transcriptional modulation.

  9. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  10. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  11. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  12. Molecular composition of the W chromatin in some moth species studied by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sahara, K.; Marec, František; Eickhoff, U.; Traut, E.

    09, č. 1 (2001), s. 78 ISSN 0967-3849. [International Chromosome Conference /14./. 04.09.2001-08.09.2001, Wurzburg] Institutional research plan: CEZ:Av0Z5007907 Keywords : W chromatin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. Applications of high-throughput sequencing to chromatin structure and function in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, Ian

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing approaches have enabled direct interrogation of chromatin samples from mammalian cells. We are beginning to develop a genome-wide description of nuclear function during development, but further data collection, refinement, and integration are needed.

  14. Arabidopsis Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 is required for occupancy and position of a subset of nucleosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Munoz-Viana, R.; Wildhaber, T.; Trejo-Arellano, M.S.; Mozgová, Iva; Hennig, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 3 (2017), s. 363-374 ISSN 0960-7412 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * chromatin * CAF-1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  15. Introducing enteral feeding induces intestinal subclinical inflammation and respective chromatin changes in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Rhea; Krych, Lukasz; Rybicki, Verena

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze how enteral food introduction affects intestinal gene regulation and chromatin structure in preterm pigs. MATERIALS & METHODS: Preterm pigs were fed parenteral nutrition plus/minus slowly increasing volumes of enteral nutrition. Intestinal gene-expression and chromatin structure......; no significant differences for colostrum) with corresponding decondensed chromatin configurations. On histology this correlated with mild mucosal lesions, particularly in formula-fed pigs. In CaCo-2 cells, histone hyperacetylation led to a marked increase in TLR4 mRNA and increased IL8 expression upon...... stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (median: 7.0; interquartile range: 5.63-8.85) compared with naive cells (median 4.2; interquartile range: 2.45-6.33; p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Enteral feeding, particular with formula, induces subclinical inflammation in the premature intestine and more open chromatin...

  16. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  17. To spread or not to spread - chromatin modifications in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, M.; Lukas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifications in response to DNA damage are vital for genome integrity. Multiple proteins and pathways required to generate specialized chromatin domains around DNA lesions have been identified and the increasing amount of information calls for unifying concepts that would allow us...... to grasp the ever-increasing complexity. This review aims at contributing to this trend by focusing on feed-forward and feedback mechanisms, which in mammalian cells determine the extent of chromatin modifications after DNA damage. We highlight the emerging notion that the nodal points of these highly...... dynamic pathways operate in a rate-limiting mode, whose deregulation can disrupt physiological boundaries between damaged and undamaged chromatin, dictate repair pathway choice, and determine the fate of cells exposed to genotoxic stress....

  18. Research progress on dam-break floods

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jiansong; Bao, Kai; Zhang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Because of the catastrophic effects downstream of dam-break failure, more and more researchers around the world have been working on the study of dam-break flows to accurately forecast the downstream inundation mapping. With the rapid development of computer hardware and computing techniques, numerical study on dam-break flows has been a popular research subject. In the paper, the numerical methodologies used to solve the governing partial differential equations of dam-break flows are classified and summarized, and their characteristics and applications are discussed respectively. Furthermore, the fully-developed mathematical models developed in recent decades are reviewed, and also introduced the authors' on-going work. Finally, some possible future developments on modeling the dam-break flows and some solutions are presented and discussed. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. Dynamical study of symmetries: breaking and restauration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, P.

    1986-09-01

    First symmetry breaking (spontaneous) is explained and the physical implication discussed for infinite systems. The relation with phase transitions is indicated. Then the specific aspects of symmetry breaking in finite systems is treated and illustrated in detail for the case of translational invariance with the help of an oversimplified but exactly solvable model. The method of projection (restauration of symmetry) is explained for the static case and also applied to the model. Symmetry breaking in the dynamical case and for instance the notion of a soft mode responsible for the symmetry breaking is discussed in the case of superfluidity and another exactly solvable model is introduced. The Goldstone mode is treated in detail. Some remarks on analogies with the breaking of chiral symmetry are made. Some recent developments in the theory of symmetry restauration are briefly outlined [fr

  20. Research progress on dam-break floods

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jiansong

    2011-08-01

    Because of the catastrophic effects downstream of dam-break failure, more and more researchers around the world have been working on the study of dam-break flows to accurately forecast the downstream inundation mapping. With the rapid development of computer hardware and computing techniques, numerical study on dam-break flows has been a popular research subject. In the paper, the numerical methodologies used to solve the governing partial differential equations of dam-break flows are classified and summarized, and their characteristics and applications are discussed respectively. Furthermore, the fully-developed mathematical models developed in recent decades are reviewed, and also introduced the authors\\' on-going work. Finally, some possible future developments on modeling the dam-break flows and some solutions are presented and discussed. © 2011 IEEE.