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Sample records for chromatin body appearance

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation on sex chromatin body appearance and the sex chromosome aberrations in the potato tuber moth, phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic sexing technique based on the construction of a Balanced Lethal Strain (BLS) has been proposed for Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller). The isolation of female with T(W. Z) translocation is a fundamental step to develop such strain. Gamma irradiation was used to induce the requested translocations. The availability of sex-linked morphological marker is required to facilitate the detection of such mutations. Since a visible sex-linked marker has not been found in P. operculella, therefore main aim of our study was to determine the possibility of using sex heterochromatin body as a marker to identify the required translocated females. The appearance of sex heterochromatin body and the analysis of sex chromosomes in F1 females of irradiated P. operculella females were investigated. The percentage of abnormality in sex heterochromatin body in highly polyploid Malpighian tubule nuclei was increased by increasing the applied dose. Based on the appearance of this body, 3 mutant lines were isolated: elongated, small, fragmented lines. W chromosome was easily distinguished from Z chromosome when the analysis of pachytene sex chromosome bivalents of P. operculella females was carried out. The aberrations involved W chromosome directly influenced the appearance of sex heterochromatin body in highly polyploid somatic cells of the isolated mutant lines. The results showed that sex heterochromatin could be used as sex determination and cytogenetic marker in P. operculella. (Author)

  2. Internal and higher-order structure of chromatin nu bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olins, D E

    1977-01-01

    Based upon current biophysical data (including recent laser-Raman studies) of isolated nu bodies and inner histones, we have proposed that the chromatin subunit consists of a DNA-rich outer domain surrounding a protein core composed of ..cap alpha..-helical-rich histone globular regions, close-packed with dihedral point-group symmetry. Analysis of the effects of urea on isolated nu bodies suggest that these two domains respond differently: the DNA-rich shell exhibits noncooperative destabilization; the protein core undergoes cooperative destabilization. This differential response of the two regions of a nu body to a simple chemical perturbant (i.e., urea) may furnish a model for the conformational differences in nu bodies postulated for active chromatin. Nu bodies are believed to organize into 20-30 nm higher-order fibers in condensed regions of chromatin. However, the integrity of subunits in these thick fibers has recently been seriously challenged. Evidence from our laboratory, presented here, confirms that the 20-30 nm chromatin fibers consists of a close-packing of nu bodies. The chromatin subunits, therefore, retain their integrity within the higher-order fibers.

  3. Body Dissatisfaction among Adolescent Boys and Girls: The Effects of Body Mass, Peer Appearance Culture and Internalization of Appearance Ideals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Margaret; Nixon, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction is a significant risk factor in the onset of eating pathology and depression. Therefore, understanding predictors of negative body image is an important focus of investigation. This research sought to examine the contributions of body mass, appearance conversations with friends, peer appearance criticism and…

  4. The changing appearance of the body in working life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Çetin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  Today the features of the workers and changes in newly founded working areas bring about new demands in the physical appearance of body and dressing. From this point of view, this article will focus on the changing appearances of body in working life. It will be attempted to relate consumption and fashion with the physical appearance of  body in working life and employment application period. The reasons why specifically the bodies who work for service sector are rendered as distintive and  then are controlled in a way which fit suitable for organizations’ missions and visions will be discussed.

  5. The changing appearance of the body in working life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Çetin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the features of the workers and changes in newly founded working areas bring about new demands in the physical appearance of body and dressing. From this point of view, this article will focus on the changing appearances of body in working life. It will be attempted to relate consumption and fashion with the physical appearance of body in working life and employment application period. The reasons why specifically the bodies who work for service sector are rendered as distintive and then are controlled in a way which fit suitable for organizations’ missions and visions will be discussed.

  6. The changing appearance of the body in working life

    OpenAIRE

    Çetin, Ebru

    2009-01-01

     Today the features of the workers and changes in newly founded working areas bring about new demands in the physical appearance of body and dressing. From this point of view, this article will focus on the changing appearances of body in working life. It will be attempted to relate consumption and fashion with the physical appearance of  body in working life and employment application period. The reasons why specifically the bodies who work for service sector are rendered as distintive and  ...

  7. Appearance comparison in individuals with body dysmorphic disorder and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Martin; Veale, David; Miles, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Research investigating appearance comparison in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) remains very limited, despite the fact that this is one of the most commonly observed behaviors in individuals with the disorder. The present study investigated the self-reported extent and nature of appearance comparison in 35 BDD participants relative to 45 controls using a newly devised and a standardized appearance comparison measure. The results showed that BDD participants reported significantly higher levels of appearance comparison than controls. Individuals with BDD also reported greater levels of comparing in terms of the specific feature(s) of their appearance they were most concerned about as compared to overall appearance, whilst controls showed the opposite pattern. Levels of comparing in BDD participants increased as targets increased in terms of attractiveness, and individuals with BDD rated themselves as being markedly less attractive than targets, and feeling markedly less satisfied with their appearance after comparing. Cognitive-behavioral treatment implications are discussed. PMID:26379252

  8. Body Satisfaction and Physical Appearance in Gender Dysphoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Grift, Tim C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Steensma, Thomas D; De Cuypere, Griet; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Haraldsen, Ira R H; Dikmans, Rieky E G; Cerwenka, Susanne C; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-04-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD) is often accompanied by dissatisfaction with physical appearance and body image problems. The aim of this study was to compare body satisfaction with perceived appearance by others in various GD subgroups. Data collection was part of the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence. Between 2007 and 2012, 660 adults who fulfilled the criteria of the DSM-IV gender identity disorder diagnosis (1.31:1 male-to-female [MtF]:female-to-male [FtM] ratio) were included into the study. Data were collected before the start of clinical gender-confirming interventions. Sexual orientation was measured via a semi-structured interview whereas onset age was based on clinician report. Body satisfaction was assessed using the Body Image Scale. Congruence of appearance with the experienced gender was measured by means of a clinician rating. Overall, FtMs had a more positive body image than MtFs. Besides genital dissatisfaction, problem areas for MtFs included posture, face, and hair, whereas FtMs were mainly dissatisfied with hip and chest regions. Clinicians evaluated the physical appearance to be more congruent with the experienced gender in FtMs than in MtFs. Within the MtF group, those with early onset GD and an androphilic sexual orientation had appearances more in line with their gender identity. In conclusion, body image problems in GD go beyond sex characteristics only. An incongruent physical appearance may result in more difficult psychological adaptation and in more exposure to discrimination and stigmatization. PMID:26474976

  9. Body Satisfaction and Physical Appearance in Gender Dysphoria

    OpenAIRE

    van de Grift, Tim C.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Steensma, Thomas D.; De Cuypere, Griet; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Haraldsen, Ira R. H.; Dikmans, Rieky E. G.; Cerwenka, Susanne C.; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD) is often accompanied by dissatisfaction with physical appearance and body image problems. The aim of this study was to compare body satisfaction with perceived appearance by others in various GD subgroups. Data collection was part of the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence. Between 2007 and 2012, 660 adults who fulfilled the criteria of the DSM-IV gender identity disorder diagnosis (1.31:1 male-to-female [MtF]:female-to-male [FtM] ratio) were in...

  10. Body Image and the Appearance Culture Among Adolescent Girls and Boys: An Examination of Friend Conversations, Peer Criticism, Appearance Magazines, and the Internalization of Appearance Ideals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Diane Carlson; Vigfusdottir, Thorbjorg Helga; Lee, Yoonsun

    2004-01-01

    This research evaluates the contributions of three dimensions of appearance culture (appearance magazine exposure, appearance conversations with friends, and peer appearance criticism) and body mass index (BMI) to internalization of appearance ideals and body image dissatisfaction. Four hundred thirty-three girls and 347 boys in Grades 7 through…

  11. Intraorbital foreign body: clinical presentation, radiological appearance and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mujaini, Abdullah; Al-Senawi, Rana; Ganesh, Anuradha; Al-Zuhaibi, Sana; Al-Dhuhli, Humoud

    2008-03-01

    Intraorbital foreign bodies usually occur after a high velocity injury such as gunshot or industrial accidents; more rarely they occur following trivial trauma. A retained foreign body can give rise to serious complications, the most devastating of which is loss of the eye. This retrospective, interventional case report reviews the clinical features, radiological appearance and surgical management of two patients who presented at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman with intraorbital foreign bodies. Details of ocular history, preoperative ocular examination findings including visual acuity, surgical procedure and subsequent management were noted. The two patients, aged 10 years and 9 years old respectively, sustained orbital trauma with sharp objects. Both patients were found to have intraorbital foreign bodies that were documented clearly by computed tomography (CT) scans of the orbit. The first patient presented straight after injury, had no ocular involvement, underwent immediate surgical exploration and ended up with full recovery. The second patient presented to us after a delay of 4 days, and was found to have endophthalmitis. This patient ultimately lost all visual function in the affected eye. A CT scan is the modality of choice for orbital foreign body detection and localization. Early surgical exploration and foreign body extraction greatly influence the visual prognosis and final outcome. PMID:21654960

  12. Body actions change the appearance of facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fantoni

    Full Text Available Perception, cognition, and emotion do not operate along segregated pathways; rather, their adaptive interaction is supported by various sources of evidence. For instance, the aesthetic appraisal of powerful mood inducers like music can bias the facial expression of emotions towards mood congruency. In four experiments we showed similar mood-congruency effects elicited by the comfort/discomfort of body actions. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure, we let participants perform comfortable/uncomfortable visually-guided reaches and tested them in a facial emotion identification task. Through the alleged mediation of motor action induced mood, action comfort enhanced the quality of the participant's global experience (a neutral face appeared happy and a slightly angry face neutral, while action discomfort made a neutral face appear angry and a slightly happy face neutral. Furthermore, uncomfortable (but not comfortable reaching improved the sensitivity for the identification of emotional faces and reduced the identification time of facial expressions, as a possible effect of hyper-arousal from an unpleasant bodily experience.

  13. Negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increases pain perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Osumi

    Full Text Available Changing the visual body appearance by use of as virtual reality system, funny mirror, or binocular glasses has been reported to be helpful in rehabilitation of pain. However, there are interindividual differences in the analgesic effect of changing the visual body image. We hypothesized that a negative body image associated with changing the visual body appearance causes interindividual differences in the analgesic effect although the relationship between the visual body appearance and analgesic effect has not been clarified. We investigated whether a negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increased pain. Twenty-five healthy individuals participated in this study. To evoke a negative body image, we applied the method of rubber hand illusion. We created an "injured rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with pain, a "hairy rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with embarrassment, and a "twisted rubber hand" to evoke unpleasantness associated with deviation from the concept of normality. We also created a "normal rubber hand" as a control. The pain threshold was measured while the participant observed the rubber hand using a device that measured pain caused by thermal stimuli. Body ownership experiences were elicited by observation of the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand as well as the normal rubber hand. Participants felt more unpleasantness by observing the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand than the normal rubber hand and twisted rubber hand (p<0.001. The pain threshold was lower under the injured rubber hand condition than with the other conditions (p<0.001. We conclude that a negative body appearance associated with pain can increase pain sensitivity.

  14. Sperm Chromatin-Induced Ectopic Polar Body Extrusion in Mouse Eggs after ICSI and Delayed Egg Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Manqi; Li, Rong

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic chromosomes in an oocyte are not only a maternal genome carrier but also provide a positional signal to induce cortical polarization and define asymmetric meiotic division of the oocyte, resulting in polar body extrusion and haploidization of the maternal genome. The meiotic chromosomes play dual function in determination of meiosis: 1) organizing a bipolar spindle formation and 2) inducing cortical polarization and assembly of a distinct cortical cytoskeleton structure in the overlying cortex for polar body extrusion. At fertilization, a sperm brings exogenous paternal chromatin into the egg, which induces ectopic cortical polarization at the sperm entry site and leads to a cone formation, known as fertilization cone. Here we show that the sperm chromatin-induced fertilization cone formation is an abortive polar body extrusion due to lack of spindle induction by the sperm chromatin during fertilization. If experimentally manipulating the fertilization process to allow sperm chromatin to induce both cortical polarization and spindle formation, the fertilization cone can be converted into polar body extrusion. This suggests that sperm chromatin is also able to induce polar body extrusion, like its maternal counterpart. The usually observed cone formation instead of ectopic polar body extrusion induced by sperm chromatin during fertilization is due to special sperm chromatin compaction which restrains it from rapid spindle induction and therefore provides a protective mechanism to prevent a possible paternal genome loss during ectopic polar body extrusion. PMID:19787051

  15. Healthy appearances--distorted body images? Young adults negotiating body motives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimakka, Satu

    2014-02-01

    Drawing on focus group discussions, this article explores how young, Finnish university students view the cultural ideals of health and appearance. The young adults noted how body practices aiming at health can turn into unhealthy obsessions. As a result, a healthy-looking body may serve to cover an underlying body image distortion. Health and well-being were defined as appropriate motives for engaging in body projects, while appearance as a motive was questioned. I argue that the current promotion of health may cause individuals to experience pressure to outwardly appear healthy at the cost of neglecting the subjective experience of well-being, and that this may especially influence young women. PMID:23283598

  16. Appearance, body image and distress in facial dysmorphophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C S; Goldberg, D P

    1995-09-01

    Compared with surgical patients awaiting rhinoplasty and control subjects, dysmorphophobic patients were more dissatisfied with facial appearance, more anxious, more depressed, more neurotic and less extrovert. Morphanalysis, an objective measure of facial appearance, was applied to the first 11 dysmorphophobic and first 11 surgical subjects. The dysmorphophobic group had a variety of abnormal features that were not identified by medical practitioners or the patient. These subtle anomalies were often unrelated to the focus of dissatisfaction which was usually normal. A panel of lay judges rated the appearance of the dysmorphophobic group as being intermediate between the control and surgical groups but not significantly different from either. PMID:7484204

  17. Ephemeral protein binding to DNA shapes stable nuclear bodies and chromatin domains

    CERN Document Server

    Brackley, C A; Michieletto, D; Mouvet, F; Cook, P R; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy reveals that the contents of many (membrane-free) nuclear "bodies" exchange rapidly with the soluble pool whilst the underlying structure persists; such observations await a satisfactory biophysical explanation. To shed light on this, we perform large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of a chromatin fiber interacting with an ensemble of (multivalent) DNA-binding proteins; these proteins switch between two states -- active (binding) and inactive (non-binding). This system provides a model for any DNA-binding protein that can be modified post-translationally to change its affinity for DNA (e.g., like the phosphorylation of a transcription factor). Due to this out-of-equilibrium process, proteins spontaneously assemble into clusters of self-limiting size, as individual proteins in a cluster exchange with the soluble pool with kinetics like those seen in photo-bleaching experiments. This behavior contrasts sharply with that exhibited by "equilibrium", or non-switching, proteins that exis...

  18. Individual and Sociocultural Influences on Pre-Adolescent Girls' Appearance Schemas and Body Dissatisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinton, Meghan M.; Birch, Leann L.

    2006-01-01

    Appearance schemas, a suggested cognitive component of body image, have been associated with body dissatisfaction in adolescent and adult samples. This study examined girls' weight status (BMI), depression, and parent, sibling, peer, and media influences as predictors of appearance schemas in 173 pre-adolescent girls. Hierarchical regression…

  19. The interplay of personality and negative comments about appearance in predicting body image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; von Soest, Tilmann; Roald, Helge E; Skolleborg, Knut Chr

    2006-09-01

    This study investigates how personality traits in combination with frequency of and emotional reaction to negative comments about appearance while growing up are related to appearance evaluation and orientation among adult women. Nine hundred and seven participants from a representative sample of Norwegian women aged 22-55, answered questions measuring body image, personality (Big Five), and history of experiencing negative comments about appearance. Results indicated that only emotional reaction to negative comments about appearance significantly predicted both appearance evaluation and orientation, while frequency of negative comments did not. Being extrovert predicted more positive appearance evaluation and being more appearance oriented than being introvert. Scoring high on neuroticism was related to negative appearance evaluation and high appearance orientation. The findings demonstrate the importance of differentiating between the frequency and the emotional impact of teasing as well as including personality traits when studying body image. PMID:18089229

  20. Body Dysmorphic Symptoms, Functional Impairment, and Depression: The Role of Appearance-Based Teasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarden, Hilary; Renshaw, Keith D

    2016-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is associated with elevated social and occupational impairment and comorbid depression, but research on risk factors for body dysmorphic symptoms and associated outcomes is limited. Appearance-based teasing may be a potential risk factor. To examine the specificity of this factor, the authors assessed self-reported appearance-based teasing, body dysmorphic, and obsessive-compulsive symptom severity, functional impairment (i.e., social, occupational, family impairment), and depression in a nonclinical sample of undergraduates. As hypothesized, appearance-based teasing was positively correlated with body dysmorphic symptoms. The correlation between teasing and body dysmorphic symptoms was stronger than that between teasing and obsessive-compulsive symptom severity. Last, body dysmorphic symptom severity and appearance-based teasing interacted in predicting functional impairment and depression. Specifically, appearance-based teasing was positively associated with depression and functional impairment only in those with elevated body dysmorphic symptoms. When a similar moderation was tested with obsessive-compulsive, in place of body dysmorphic, symptom severity, the interaction was nonsignificant. Findings support theory that appearance-based teasing is a specific risk factor for body dysmorphic symptoms and associated functional impairment. PMID:25706778

  1. Appearance of differentiated cells derived from polar body nuclei in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eSakai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Bombyx mori, polar body nuclei are observed until 9h after egg lying, however, the fate of polar body nuclei remains unclear. To examine the fate of polar body nuclei, we employed a mutation of serosal cell pigmentation, pink-eyed white egg (pe. The heterozygous pe/+pe females produced black serosal cells in white eggs, while pe/pe females did not produce black serosal cells in white eggs. These results suggest that the appearance of black serosal cells in white eggs depends on the genotype (pe/ +pe of the mother. Because the polar body nuclei had +pe genes in the white eggs laid by a pe/ +pe female, polar body nuclei participate in development and differentiate into functional cell (serosal cells. Analyses of serosal cells pigmentation indicated that approximately 30% of the eggs contained polar-body-nucleus-derived cells. These results demonstrate that polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared at a high frequency under natural conditions. Approximately 80% of polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared near the anterior pole and the dorsal side, which is opposite to where embryogenesis occurs. The number of cells derived from the polar body nuclei was very low. Approximately 26 % of these eggs contained only one black serosal cell. PCR-based analysis revealed that the polar-body-nucleus-derived cells disappeared in late embryonic stages (stage 25. Overall, polar-body-nuclei-derived cells were unlikely to contribute to embryos.

  2. Negative comparisons about one's appearance mediate the relationship between Facebook usage and body image concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardouly, Jasmine; Vartanian, Lenny R

    2015-01-01

    Use of social media, such as Facebook, is pervasive among young women. Body dissatisfaction is also highly prevalent in this demographic. The present study examined the relationship between Facebook usage and body image concerns among female university students (N=227), and tested whether appearance comparisons on Facebook in general, or comparisons to specific female target groups (family members, close friends, distant peers [women one may know but do not regularly socialize with], celebrities) mediated this relationship. Results showed a positive relationship between Facebook usage and body image concerns, which was mediated by appearance comparisons in general, frequency of comparisons to close friends and distant peers, and by upward comparisons (judging one's own appearance to be worse) to distant peers and celebrities. Thus, young women who spend more time on Facebook may feel more concerned about their body because they compare their appearance to others (especially to peers) on Facebook. PMID:25462886

  3. Eating Regulation Styles, Appearance Schemas, and Body Satisfaction Predict Changes in Body Fat for Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ali Zaremba; Keiley, Margaret K.; Ryan, Aubrey E.; Radomski, Juliana Groves; Gropper, Sareen S.; Connell, Lenda Jo; Simmons, Karla P.; Ulrich, Pamela V.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and high body fat percentages are a major public health issue. The percentage of obese and overweight Americans has increased over the past 30 years. On average, overweight individuals with higher percent body fat than normal weight individuals are at increased risk for numerous negative outcomes both physically and mentally. A prime time…

  4. Old, down and out? Appearance, body work and positive ageing among elderly South Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving-Hwang, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    This article offers an as yet unexplored dimension of our current understanding of the ageing body in the context of contemporary South Korea. Drawing on interviews with twenty elderly women living in the greater Seoul metropolitan area, this article explores the role of appearance, body work, and the presentation of self in the women's everyday lived experiences. Existing research on the ageing female body in South Korea has primarily focused on the so-called noin munjae ('the elderly issue') discourse, within which the ageing body is framed as passive, undesirable, or out-of-control. Contrary to this, the elderly women's own narratives of everyday beauty practices suggest that the act of sustaining well-ordered appearance in later life allows for the enforcing of positive selves in the context of personal beauty and body work. Maintaining a positive appearance was shown to play an important part of their everyday lives, and functioned as a ritual of not only presenting an appearance that signified control over the ageing body, but to continue to enjoy it. The carefully calculated engagement with various non-surgical and surgical beauty practices also emerged as an embodied practice of mediating intersubjective social encounters through which self-esteem was engendered by evidencing the self's efforts to show respect to others. The findings of this study challenge dominant discourses in the west which present body work on the ageing female body as primarily self-indulgent, or driven by anxiety about the body's inability to fit within existing youthful beauty ideals. PMID:27531448

  5. DNA base damage generated in vivo in hepatic chromatin of mice upon whole body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA base lesions in hepatic chromatin formed upon whole-body irradiation of mice were studied. After γ-irradiating (20-470 Gy) and killing animals, chromatin was isolated from their livers and analysed by GC-MS. Five pyrimidine- and five purine-derived DNA lesions were identified and quantified: 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantoin, 5-hydroxycytosine, 5-(hydroxymethyl) uracil, 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoadenine, 2-hydroxyadenine, 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine, thymine glycol and 5,6-dihydroxy-uracil. Except for the latter two, amounts of these compounds were increased significantly over control levels in the dose range of 100-470 Gy. Above 200 Gy, a deviation from linearity was observed, although yields were increased in most cases up to 470 Gy. (Author)

  6. Shopping for clothes: Body satisfaction, appearance investment, and functions of clothing among female shoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiggemann, Marika; Lacey, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the link between clothing and body experience in women of different ages. Participants were 162 female clothes shoppers between the ages of 18 and 55 who completed questionnaire measures of body image, functions of clothing, self-esteem, and enjoyment of clothes shopping. It was found that clothing was worn primarily for assurance and fashion by women of all ages. On the other hand, BMI and body dissatisfaction were related to the use of clothing for camouflage purposes and to a more negative clothes shopping experience. Both components of appearance investment were related to choice of clothes for fashion and assurance. However, the self-evaluative salience component was negatively related, while the motivational salience was positively related, to enjoyment of clothes shopping. It was concluded that although clothing is an under-researched aspect of body image, it represents an important part of women's appearance management, whatever their age. PMID:19660999

  7. Personal and Appearance-Based Rejection Sensitivity in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Megan M.; Didie, Elizabeth R.; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2014-01-01

    Although rejection sensitivity may be an important feature of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), no studies have examined rejection sensitivity in a clinical sample and compared types of rejection sensitivity in individuals with BDD. Personal and appearance-based rejection sensitivity scores in forty-six patients diagnosed with BDD were compared with published norms. Associations between rejection sensitivity, BDD severity, and other clinical variables were examined. Personal and appearance-base...

  8. Body image and appearance perceptions from immigrant adolescents in Canada: An interpretive description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Melissa; Georgiades, Katholiki; Jack, Susan M; Couturier, Jennifer; Wahoush, Olive

    2015-09-01

    Body dissatisfaction has been linked to a number of poor health outcomes, including eating disorders. However, very few studies have investigated body dissatisfaction among immigrant adolescents. Using inductive qualitative inquiry, this study recruited a purposeful sample of immigrant adolescents (N=18, 78% female) with an eating disorder (n=8) and without an eating disorder (n=10). All adolescents were between 16 and 19 years of age (M=16.80, SD=0.89) and were recruited from three municipalities in Ontario. Each adolescent participated in a face-to-face, qualitative interview. Content analysis revealed descriptions of body image that were similar across the sample. The main themes emerging from this work include (a) the "moderately slim" and "moderately muscular" ideal, (b) the "slim and curvy paradox," (c) "ideal" privilege, (d) having an "expected" appearance, and (e) wishful comparisons. Findings have implications for reducing appearance-related dissatisfaction among immigrant adolescents in Canada. PMID:26363357

  9. Appearance-related teasing, body dissatisfaction, and disordered eating: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Jessie E; Schaefer, Lauren M; Burke, Natasha L; Mayhew, Laura L; Brannick, Michael T; Thompson, J Kevin

    2010-09-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between appearance and weight-based teasing and three outcome measures: body dissatisfaction, restrictive eating, and bulimic behaviors. Four meta-analyses were conducted. Fifty effect sizes (N=10,618) resulted in a moderate effect size of .39 for the relationship between weight teasing and body dissatisfaction; 24 effect sizes (N=7190) resulted in an effect size of .32 for the relationship between appearance teasing and body dissatisfaction; 20 effect sizes (N=4792) resulted in an effect size of .35 for the relationship between weight teasing and dietary restraint; and 22 effect sizes (N=5091) resulted in an effect size of .36 for the relationship between weight teasing and bulimic behaviors. Significant moderators that emerged were teasing measure type, publication type, study type, age group, and gender. The findings offer further support for the inclusion of strategies in body image and eating disorders' prevention and intervention programs that focus on handling negative, appearance-related commentary. PMID:20655287

  10. On the Appearance of Families of Efimov States in the Spinor Three-Body Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, V. E.; Greene, Chris H.; D`Incao, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Few-body systems with access to multiple internal levels exhibit richness beyond that typically found in their single-level counterparts. One example is that of Efimov states in strongly-correlated spinor three-body systems. In [V. E. Colussi, C. H. Greene, and J. P. D'Incao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 045302 (2014)] this problem was analyzed for spinor condensates finding a complex level structure as in an early work [Bulgac and Efimov, Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 22, 153 (1976)] in nuclear physics, and the impact of Efimov physics on the general form of the scattering observables was worked out. In this paper we discuss the appearance of novel families of Efimov states in the spinor three-body problem.

  11. Gamow's bicycle: The Appearance of Bodies at Relativistic Speeds and Apparent Superluminal Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Nowojewski, A

    2005-01-01

    A human creates an image basing on the information delivered by photons that arrived at his retina simultaneously. Due to finite and constant velocity of light these photons left the moving body at different times, since not all points of the body are equidistant. In other words its image represents the body as it was in several different times i.e. it is distorted and does not correspond to its real appearance. The useful experimental arrangement is set and then used to derive the general expression that transforms two-dimensional stationary shapes to their apparent forms, which could be photographed once they are set in motion. It is then used to simulate the so-called Gamow's bicycle combined out of circles and straight lines. The simulation outlines two important aspects of bike's motion: apparent distance of two points and apparent velocity which are then discussed thoroughly. It is found that the approaching body is elongated and its apparent speed is greater than its real one (under certain conditions ...

  12. The sudden appearance of diverse animal body plansduring the Cambrian explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Beautifully preserved organisms from the Lower Cambrian Maotianshan Shale in central Yunnan, southern China, document the sudden appearance of diverse metazoan body plans at phylum or subphylum levels, which were either short-lived or have continued to the present day. These 530 million year old fossil representatives of living animal groups provide us with unique insight into the foundations of living animal groups at their evolutionary roots. Among these diverse animal groups, many are conservative, changing very little since the Early Cambrian. Others, especially Panarthropoda (superphylum), however, evolved rapidly, with origination of novel body plans representing different evolutionary stages one after another in a very short geological period of Early Cambrian time. These nested body plans portray a novel big picture of pararthropod evolution as a progression of step-wise changes both in the head and the appendages. The evolution of the pararthropods displays how the head/trunk boundary progressively shifted to the posterior, and how the simple annulated soft uniramous appendages progressively changed into stalked eyes in the first head appendages, into whip-like sensorial and grasping organs in the second appendage, and into jointed and biramous bipartite limbs in the post-antennal appendages. Haikouella is one of most remarkable fossils representing the origin body plan of Cristozoa, or crest animals (procraniates+craniates). The anatomy of Early Cambrian crest animals, including Haikouella and Yunnanozoon, contributes to novel understanding and discussion for the origins of the vertebrate brain, neural crest cells, branchial system and vertebrae. PMID:19557680

  13. Modifying the Body: Canadian Men's Perspectives on Appearance and Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardelli, Rosemary; White, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In postmodern scholarship there has been a temporal shift to thinking of the body as malleable rather than fixed, which has opened space for the remaking of the self via the remaking of the body (Featherstone, 1991; Giddens, 1991). Among men, this process is thought to interact with shifting understandings of masculinity. In this study, 14…

  14. Influence of Appearance-Related TV Commercials on Body Image State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Ruhl, Ilka; Vocks, Silja

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of media exposure on body image state in eating-disordered (ED) patients. The attitudinal and perceptual components of body image are assessed, as well as any associations with dysfunctional cognitions and behavioral consequences. Twenty-five ED patients and 25 non-ED controls (ND) viewed commercials either…

  15. No body is perfect: the significance of habitual negative thinking about appearance for body dissatisfaction, eating disorder propensity, self-esteem and snacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanken, Bas; Tangelder, Yonne

    2011-06-01

    Thinking negatively about one's appearance may be a major source of unhappiness. It was investigated whether the habitual quality of negative body image thinking constitutes an additional vulnerability factor, i.e. when such thinking is repetitive and automatic. The cognitive content of negative body image thinking ('what') was distinguished from the habitual occurrence of such thinking ('how'). The mental habit component uniquely predicted explicit as well as implicit body dissatisfaction (the latter measured by an implicit association test) over and above cognitive content. Mental habit also accounted for eating disturbance propensity, low self-esteem and restrained snacking behaviour over and above cognitive content, even when controlled for body dissatisfaction. The habitual component of negative thinking about appearance thus seems a significant body image construct, has discriminant validity against body dissatisfaction, and constitutes a vulnerability factor for feelings of low self-worth and eating disturbance propensity. Implications for intervention strategies, such as mindfulness-based approaches, are discussed. PMID:21347977

  16. Health Versus Appearance Versus Body Competence: A Content Analysis Investigating Frames of Health Advice in Women's Health Magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, Jennifer Stevens; Hahn, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the extent to which women's health magazines advise readers to adopt healthy behaviors in order to look good (appearance frame), in order to feel good (health frame), or in order to perform better (body competence frame). A content analysis of 5 years of the 6 highest circulating U.S. women's health magazines revealed a higher frequency of health frames (32.6%) than appearance frames (24.8%) overall, but when beauty/health hybrid magazines (i.e., Shape and Self) were examined separately, appearance frames (32.8%) outnumbered health frames (26.5%). Compared to appearance and health frames, body competence frames were underrepresented (13.3% in the full sample). The visual sexual objectification of female models in women's health magazines was also investigated. Appearance-framed articles (43.2%) were significantly more likely to visually depict women with a high degree of skin exposure than health-framed articles (17.4%), and appearance-framed articles (34.8%) were more likely to focus on individual body parts than health-framed articles (21.3%). In addition, despite the magazines' editorial focus on health, the most frequent category of products advertised was appearance-enhancing products. Results are discussed in light of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) and objectification theory (Fredrickson & Roberts, 1997). PMID:27043477

  17. Men, appearance, and cosmetic surgery: The role of confidence, self-esteem, and comfort with the body

    OpenAIRE

    Rosemary Ricciardelli; Kimberley Ann Clow

    2009-01-01

    This paper situates male perceptions of the body within Bourdieu’s theories of human practice. Recent research (Bordo 1999; Featherstone 1991; Giddens 1991; Gill, Henwood, and McLean 2005) has suggested that perceptions of the body are important to men’s sense of confidence and that men see the body as a vehicle for personal improvement. To build on this research, an online survey investigated Canadian men’s perspectives on their appearance and their attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. A two-c...

  18. Bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies: Ultrasound, CT and MR appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, T.C.; Chong, S.F.; Lu, P.P. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Radiology; Mak, K.H. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    1998-05-01

    The radiological findings of ultrasound, CT and MR of a case of bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies is described. MRI is the investigation of choice and the intravenous gadolinium-enhanced usefulness was noted. The previous literature is also reviewed. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  19. Sociocultural Influences and Body Image in 9- to 12-Year-Old Girls: The Role of Appearance Schemas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Levina; Tiggemann, Marika

    2007-01-01

    This study tested whether an individual's beliefs about the importance of appearance in their life is a mediator of sociocultural influences on body dissatisfaction in young girls. Participants were 265 girls in Grades 4 to 7 (M age = 10.71 years) from 5 private primary schools in metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia. Girls completed…

  20. Similar but Different: Sociocultural Attitudes towards Appearance, Body Shape Dissatisfaction, and Weight Control Behaviors among Male and Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBate, Rita; Lewis, Melissa; Zhang, Yan; Blunt, Heather; Thompson, Sharon H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although females have a higher incidence of eating disorders than males, there is evidence that among college students both males and females are vulnerable to risk factors associated with eating disorders. Purpose: To explore the relationship between sociocultural attitudes towards appearance (SCATA), body shape (dis)satisfaction…

  1. Effects of local and whole body irradiation on appearance of osteoclasts during wound healing of tooth extraction sockets in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined effects of local and whole body irradiation before tooth extraction on appearance and differentiation of osteoclasts in the alveolar bone of rat maxillary first molars. Wistar rats weighting 100 g were divided into three groups: non-irradiation group, local irradiation group, and whole body irradiation group. In the local irradiation group, a field made with lead blocks was placed over the maxillary left first molar tooth. In the whole body irradiation group, the animals were irradiated in cages. Both groups were irradiated at 8 Gy. The number of osteoclasts around the interradicular alveolar bone showed chronological changes common to non-irradiated and irradiated animals. Several osteoclasts appeared one day after tooth extraction, and the maximal peak was observed 3 days after extraction. Local irradiation had no difference from non-irradiated controls. In animals receiving whole body irradiation, tooth extraction one day after irradiation caused smaller number of osteoclasts than that 7 day after irradiation during the experimental period. Whole body-irradiated rats had small osteoclasts with only a few nuclei and narrow resorption lacunae, indicating deficiency of radioresistant osteoclast precursor cells. Injection of intact bone marrow cells to whole body-irradiated animals immediately after tooth extraction recovered to some content the number of osteoclasts. These findings suggest that bone resorption in the wound healing of alveolar socket requires radioresistant, postmitotic osteoclast precursor cells from hematopoietic organs, but not from local sources around the alveolar socket, at the initial phase of wound healing. (author)

  2. Men, appearance, and cosmetic surgery: The role of confidence, self-esteem, and comfort with the body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Ricciardelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper situates male perceptions of the body within Bourdieu’s theories of human practice. Recent research (Bordo 1999; Featherstone 1991; Giddens 1991; Gill, Henwood, and McLean 2005 has suggested that perceptions of the body are important to men’s sense of confidence and that men see the body as a vehicle for personal improvement. To build on this research, an online survey investigated Canadian men’s perspectives on their appearance and their attitudes toward cosmetic surgery. A two-component approach to self-esteem was used, where self-confidence (the positive aspect and self-deprecation (the negative aspect were seen as independent but related concepts that underlie one’s feelings of self-worth. Self-deprecation, self-confidence, and comfort with one’s body uniquely predicted different aspects of men’s experiences, including attitudes about body shape, perceptions of others, pressures to lose weight, and perspectives regarding cosmetic surgery. For example, participants who were more comfortable with their bodies and lower in self-deprecation were happier with their current body shape and features, whereas participants who were less comfortable with their bodies and lower in confidence put more pressure on themselves to lose weight. In addition, lower confidence significantly predicted willingness to undergo cosmetic surgery.

  3. End products of cometary evolution - Cometary origin of earth-crossing bodies of asteroidal appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    The present state of the understanding of the dynamic mechanisms under which the orbits of some comets evolve into those observed for Apollo-Amor objects is reviewed. Observed Jupiter-family objects of asteroidal appearance, e.g., 1983SA, are much more likely to be of cometary rather than asteroidal origin. 'Decoupling' is facilitated by several mechanisms: perturbations by terrestrial planets, perturbations by Jupiter and the other giant planets, and nongravitational orbital changes caused by the loss of gas and dust from the comet. The dynamical time scale for decoupling is argued to be 100,000-1,000,000 yr, and almost all decoupled comets are likely to be of asteroidal appearance. Estimates can be made of the number of cometary Apollo-Amor 'asteroids', the observed number of earth-crossing active and inactive short-period comets, and the production rate of short-period comets. These estimates are compatible with other theoretical and observational inferences that suggest the presence of a significant population of Apollo objects that formerly were active comets.

  4. Young Adolescents' Body Dysmorphic Symptoms: Associations with Same- and Cross-Sex Peer Teasing via Appearance-based Rejection Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Haley J; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Mastro, Shawna; Farrell, Lara J; Waters, Allison M; Lavell, Cassie H

    2015-08-01

    In this study of young adolescents' (N = 188, M age  = 11.93, 54.8% females) body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) symptoms, we examined a theoretically-derived model to determine if symptoms could be explained by appearance-related teasing, general peer victimization, and social anxiety. BDD symptoms were assessed as distressing preoccupation with perceived appearance defects, social avoidance, and repeated grooming and appearance checking. Associations were expected to occur via the social-perceptual bias known as appearance-based rejection sensitivity (appearance-RS). The source of appearance teasing was also considered (same-sex vs. cross-sex peers), and age and gender moderation were assessed. As predicted, in a structural equation model, BDD symptoms were higher when adolescents self-reported more appearance teasing and higher social anxiety. Moreover, it was appearance teasing by cross-sex peers, rather than same-sex peers, that was uniquely associated with elevated BDD symptoms. These associations were partially mediated by appearance-RS. Notably, peer-reported general victimization was not associated with BDD symptoms. There was no evidence for gender moderation, but some age moderation was found, with stronger associations usually found among older compared to younger adolescents. The findings suggest that appearance-related social adversity, particularly cross-sex teasing, is linked with greater concerns about rejection due to appearance and, in turn, heightened BDD symptoms. This has important implications for understanding the development and treatment of BDD. Continued research to identify the social experiences and interpretative biases that contribute to BDD symptomology is needed. PMID:25582320

  5. Colocalization of PML bodies and PML/RARalpha microspeckles with up- and down-regulated loci and changes of chromatin structure in APL leukemia cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Falk, Martin; Lukášová, Emilie; Faretta, M.; Dellino, I.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Pellici, G. I.; Kozubek, Michal; Rochi, M.

    Brno : Masarykova univerzita v Brně, 2004 - (Kozubek, S.; Kozubek, M.), s. 8-23 ISBN 80-210-3560-9. [Biophysics of the Genome. Brno (CZ), 12.10.2004-13.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA MZd NC6987; GA AV ČR IAA1065203; GA AV ČR IBS5004010; GA AV ČR IAA5004306; GA ČR GA202/02/0804; GA MŠk ME 565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : acute promyelocytic leukemia * PML bodies * higher order chromatin structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. General bullying, appearance-related bullying and teasing and eating psychopathology: the mediation effect of body shame in a sample of adolescent girls

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Tânia Catarina Fonseca

    2013-01-01

    Literature has placed emphasis on the role of body shame in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Moreover, studies have emphasized the relationship between experiences of bullying and appearance-related teasing in the development of eating disorders in adolescents. However, research on body shame, bullying, appearance-related bullying and teasing, and their impact on eating psychopathology remains almost unexplored in adolescence. The current study tests a model aimed at un...

  7. Macronuclear chromatin structure dynamics in Colpoda inflata (Protista, Ciliophora) resting encystment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiano, L; Chessa, M G; Carrara, S; Tagliafierro, G; Delmonte Corrado, M U

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin structure dynamics of the Colpoda inflata macronucleus have been investigated in relation to its functional condition, concerning chromatin body extrusion regulating activity. Samples of 2- and 25-day-old resting cysts derived from a standard culture, and of 1-year-old resting cysts derived from a senescent culture, were examined by means of histogram analysis performed on acquired optical microscopy images. Three groups of histograms were detected in each sample. Histogram classification, clustering and matching were assessed in order to obtain the mean histogram of each group. Comparative analysis of the mean histogram showed a similarity in the grey level range of 25-day- and 1-year-old cysts, unlike the wider grey level range found in 2-day-old cysts. Moreover, the respective mean histograms of the three cyst samples appeared rather similar in shape. All this implies that macronuclear chromatin structural features of 1-year-old cysts are common to both cyst standard cultures. The evaluation of the acquired images and their respective histograms evidenced a dynamic state of the macronuclear chromatin, appearing differently condensed in relation to the chromatin body extrusion regulating activity of the macronucleus. The coexistence of a chromatin-decondensed macronucleus with a pycnotic extrusion body suggests that chromatin unable to decondense, thus inactive, is extruded. This finding, along with the presence of chromatin structural features common to standard and senescent cyst populations, supports the occurrence of 'rejuvenated' cell lines from 1-year-old encysted senescent cells, a phenomenon which could be a result of accomplished macronuclear renewal. PMID:10439214

  8. The Impact of Body Image and Afrocentric Appearance on Sexual Refusal Self-Efficacy in Early Adolescent African American Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plybon, Laura E.; Holmer, Heidi; Hunter, Alexis; Sheffield, Charity; Stephens, Christopher; Cavolo, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    Research examining the association between body image and sexual risk-taking has been mostly limited to clinical and/or White female samples. It is unclear whether body image plays a role in sexual risk-taking among African American early adolescent females. Moreover, research has neglected to consider body image within a cultural and ethnic…

  9. The Impact of Media on Body Image and Self-Esteem with Emphasis on Appearance Self-schema (The Case of Students at University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Kazemi

    2014-11-01

    Research findings indicate that being subject to Satellite TV images does in fact influence body image. Those subjects who watch satellite programs advertising beauty products and physical fitness or films in which attractive, beautiful and fit actors play, have a more negative attitude toward their appearance and body. This is because, we assume, seeing these models takes the standards and criteria of beauty at a higher level among subjects and makes it difficult for them to feel competent upon comparison. This upward comparison produce a negative feeling about one's appearance and body. Also, being subject to media images has a meaningful relationship with appearance self-schema in the sense that those subjects who are more subject to attractive media images obtain a higher score in appearance self-schema variable, which means appearance becomes more of a priority and centrality in their lives, pushing them toward more involvement in appearance-managing behavior. These subjects tend to interpret their life events according to appearance more than others. In fact, appearance turns into a kind of schema for them to process information and influence the interpretation of subsequent information as well. However, being subject to media images does not have a meaningful relationship with the level of self-esteem in this research. In order to account for this, we would argue that as an enduring structure, self-esteem is rather inflexible and resist influence in the face of short-term motivations. Its vacillations are not fast. Therefore, although seeing attractive media images can influence attitudes toward body and even make it negative, it is unlikely that subjects' levels of self-esteem change dramatically. As another finding, a meaningful relationship was found between appearance self-schema score and body image score. The variable of appearance self-schema indicates how much one invests in his or her physical appearance. Subjects with higher scores in appearance

  10. Swedish 18-Year-Olds' Identity Formation: Associations with Feelings about Appearance and Internalization of Body Ideals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangqvist, Maria; Frisen, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study with Swedish 18-year-olds (N = 714, 55.2% women) was to investigate identity formation in relation to body-esteem and body ideal internalization. These are all important aspects of adolescents' development, but little is known about how they are related. This study indicates that late adolescents' identity formation,…

  11. The Tripartite Influence model of body image and eating disturbance: a covariance structure modeling investigation testing the mediational role of appearance comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Patricia; Thompson, J Kevin; Obremski-Brandon, Karen; Coovert, Michael

    2002-11-01

    Recent theoretical approaches to the etiology of eating disorders and body image disturbances have begun to focus on multifactorial models. In the current study, the Tripartite Influence model was examined in a large sample of college females (ages 18-22). This model proposes that three primary core sources of influence--parents, peers and media--contribute to the development of body image and eating disturbances. Additionally, the model suggests that at least two factors mediate the relationship between influences and disturbance-appearance comparison and internalization of media information. In this study, appearance comparison was examined as a mediational link between peer, family and media influence variables and the outcome disturbance measures of eating dysfunction and body image dissatisfaction. Covariance structure modeling (CSM) was used to test the proposed pathways. The results indicated that appearance comparison mediated the effects of family and media influences on body dissatisfaction, which in turn influenced restrictive and bulimic behaviors. In addition, peer influences had a direct influence on restriction. Perfectionism was hypothesized to relate to body dissatisfaction, but was in fact found to influence appearance comparison. The findings were limited by the necessity of several modifications to the originally proposed models, yet offer replication and extension of previous work with appearance comparison and support for further testing of the Tripartite Influence model. PMID:12445590

  12. Appearance Culture in Nine- to 12-Year-Old Girls: Media and Peer Influences on Body Dissatisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Levina; Tiggemann, Marika

    2006-01-01

    Little research has investigated sociocultural factors in the development of body dissatisfaction in preadolescent girls. This study examined the combined influence of media and peer factors. The participants were 100 girls aged nine to 12 years. The girls completed questionnaire measures of media exposure (television and magazines), peer…

  13. Adolescents’ Social Network Site Use, Peer Appearance-Related Feedback, and Body Dissatisfaction: Testing a Mediation Model

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Dian A.; Peter, Jochen; Graaf, Hanneke; Nikken, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Previous correlational research indicates that adolescent girls who use social network sites more frequently are more dissatisfied with their bodies. However, we know little about the causal direction of this relationship, the mechanisms underlying this relationship, and whether this relationship also occurs among boys to the same extent. The present two-wave panel study (18 month time lag) among 604 Dutch adolescents (aged 11–18; 50.7 % female; 97.7 % native Dutch) aimed to fill these gaps i...

  14. Chromatin Structure and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Wolffe, Alan P

    1999-01-01

    The Third Edition of Chromatin: Structure and Function brings the reader up-to-date with the remarkable progress in chromatin research over the past three years. It has been extensively rewritten to cover new material on chromatin remodeling, histone modification, nuclear compartmentalization, DNA methylation, and transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors. The book is written in a clear and concise fashion, with 60 new illustrations. Chromatin: Structure and Function provides the reader with a concise and coherent account of the nature, structure, and assembly of chromatin and its active

  15. The face of appearance-related social pressure: gender, age and body mass variations in peer and parental pressure during adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Helfert, Susanne; Warschburger, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Background Appearance-related social pressure plays an important role in the development of a negative body image and self-esteem as well as severe mental disorders during adolescence (e.g. eating disorders, depression). Identifying who is particularly affected by social pressure can improve targeted prevention and intervention, but findings have either been lacking or controversial. Thus the aim of this study is to provide a detailed picture of gender, weight, and age-related variations in t...

  16. Perception of stress level, trunk appearance, body function and mental health in females with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated conservatively: a longitudinal analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Misterska, Ewa; Glowacki, Maciej; Latuszewska, Joanna; Adamczyk, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In the presented study, we aimed to assess changes over time in the perception of trunk deformity, body function, stress level and mental health in females with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) who were treated conservatively with a Cheneau brace, taking the Trunk Appearance Perception Scale (TAPS), Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) and Bad Sobberheim Stress Questionnaires (BSSQ) criteria of evaluation into consideration. Methods The study design was comprised of three quest...

  17. Investment in body image for self-definition results in greater vulnerability to the thin media than does investment in appearance management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Karen; Jarry, Josée L

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of thin images according to two dimensions of body-image (BI) investment. Ninety-five females were classified as high or low investors based on the Appearance Schemas Inventory-Revised Self-Evaluative Salience (SES) and Motivational Salience (MS) subscales. Participants viewed advertisements portraying either the thin ideal or products. Results indicated that both women high in SES and MS reported lowered appearance self-esteem but greater BI importance following thin exposures. However, only the high SES group reported greater BI dissatisfaction and importance of current-ideal discrepancies after seeing thin images. Although highly invested women (regardless of their motivation for investment) are more responsive to thin media images than are women low in investment, those invested for self-definition are affected on more dimensions than are those invested for appearance management. PMID:18405864

  18. Lower fractional anisotropy at the anterior body of the normal-appearing corpus callosum in multiple sclerosis versus symptomatic carotid occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Xin; Ma, Lin; Cai, Youquan [PLA General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Jiang, Weijian; Ma, Ning [Capital University of Medical Sciences, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Huang, Dehui [PLA General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Beijing (China); Wong, Edward Hochung [Prince of Wales Hospital, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Hong Kong (China)

    2009-09-15

    Not uncommonly, differentiating multiple sclerosis (MS) from ischemic cerebral vascular disease is difficult based on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We aim to determine whether preferential occult injury in the normal-appearing corpus callosum (NACC) is more severe in patients with MS than symptomatic carotid occlusion by comparing fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Eighteen patients (eight men, ten women; mean age, 38.6 years) with MS and 32 patients (24 men, eight women; mean age, 64.0 years) with symptomatic unilateral internal carotid occlusion were included. DTI (1.5 T) were performed at corpus callosum which were normal-appearing on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI. Mean FA was obtained from the genu, anterior body, posterior body, and splenium of NACC. Independent-sample t test statistical analysis was performed. The FA values in various regions of NACC were lower in the MS patients than symptomatic carotid occlusion patients, which was statistically different at the anterior body (0.67{+-}0.12 vs 0.74{+-}0.06, P=0.009), but not at genu, posterior body, and splenium (0.63{+-}0.09 vs 0.67{+-}0.07, P=0.13; 0.68{+-}0.09 vs 0.73{+-}0.05, P=0.07; 0.72{+-}0.09 vs 0.76{+-}0.05, P=0.13). MS patients have lower FA in the anterior body of NACC compared to patients with symptomatic carotid occlusion. It suggests that DTI has potential ability to differentiate these two conditions due to the more severe preferential occult injury at the anterior body of NACC in MS. (orig.)

  19. Effects of local and whole body irradiation on the appearance of osteoblasts during wound healing in tooth extraction sockets in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation before tooth extraction delays wound healing in the alveolar socket. This study examined the influences of local and whole body irradiation before tooth extraction on appearance of osteoblasts in the alveolar bone of rat maxillary first molars because bone formation is observed at the initial phase of wound healing. Several osteoblasts were generated 3 days after tooth extraction, and the number of cells increased day by day. Morphological studies showed there were little differences between local irradiation and non-irradiated controls. In contrast, the extraction wound in the whole body irradiation group showed delayed healing, and there was poor granulation tissue and very few osteoblasts at the bottom of the socket. An ultrastructural study showed that the osteoblasts in the extraction socket of whole body irradiation rats were smaller, and had poorly developed organelles. Injection of bone marrow cells to whole body-irradiated animals immediately after tooth extraction partially restored the number of osteoblasts. New periosteal bone formations outside of sockets showed little delay in the whole body irradiation group. These findings suggest that bone formation in the wound healing of extraction socket requires bone marrow cells from hematopoietic organs such as the bone marrow as well as local sources around the alveolar socket, during the initial phase of wound healing. (author)

  20. Where splicing joins chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    There are numerous data suggesting that two key steps in gene expression—transcription and splicing influence each other closely. For a long time it was known that chromatin modifications regulate transcription, but only recently it was shown that chromatin and histone modifications play a significant role in pre-mRNA splicing. Here we summarize interactions between splicing machinery and chromatin and discuss their potential functional significance. We focus mainly on histone acetylation and...

  1. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriks, Ivo A; Treffers, Louise W; Verlaan-de Vries, Matty; Olsen, Jesper V; Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2015-01-01

    identified dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the...

  2. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  3. Chromatin deregulation in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, Anne C; Foster, Benjamin M; Bartke, Till

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of chromatin by epigenetic mechanisms plays a central role in gene expression and is essential for development and maintenance of cell identity and function. Aberrant chromatin regulation is observed in many diseases where it leads to defects in epigenetic gene regulation resulting in pathological gene expression programmes. These defects are caused by inherited or acquired mutations in genes encoding enzymes that deposit or remove DNA and histone modifications and that shape chromatin architecture. Chromatin deregulation often results in neurodevelopmental disorders and intellectual disabilities, frequently linked to physical and developmental abnormalities, but can also cause neurodegenerative diseases, immunodeficiency, or muscle wasting syndromes. Epigenetic diseases can either be of monogenic origin or manifest themselves as complex multifactorial diseases such as in congenital heart disease, autism spectrum disorders, or cancer in which mutations in chromatin regulators are contributing factors. The environment directly influences the epigenome and can induce changes that cause or predispose to diseases through risk factors such as stress, malnutrition or exposure to harmful chemicals. The plasticity of chromatin regulation makes targeting the enzymatic machinery an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention and an increasing number of small molecule inhibitors against a variety of epigenetic regulators are in clinical use or under development. In this review, we will give an overview of the molecular lesions that underlie epigenetic diseases, and we will discuss the impact of the environment and prospects for epigenetic therapies. PMID:26188466

  4. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  5. Normal appearance of whole-body PET-like imaging at 1.5 T MRI%1.5TMRI全身类PET的正常表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继龙; 张宏斌; 彭荣杰; 杨润; 马雄伟; 李娅妮; 吕妍明; 王东平

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨1.5 T MRI全身“类PET”的正常表现。材料与方法对40名不同年龄组健康志愿者行1.5 T MR全身“类PET”成像,在AW4.6工作站上经Functool和3D-MIP后处理,获得最大信号强度投影、黑白反转及伪彩“类PET”图像,观察正常组织结构的信号,分析椎体、椎间盘信号信号与年龄的相关性。结果(1)脂肪、肌肉、两肺、肝脏、胃肠道、脑脊液呈低信号;(2)脑、脊髓、头颈部腺体、脾脏、胆囊、生殖腺以及椎间盘呈高信号;(3)椎体在儿童中呈高信号,在60岁以上健康志愿者中主要呈低信号;(4)椎体和椎间盘信号与年龄呈负相关(r=-0.6917,P<0.05;r=-0.7562,P<0.05)。结论正确认识“类PET”的正常表现将有利于对病变的诊断。%Objective: To investigate the normal appearance of whole-body PET-like imaging at 1.5 T MR scanner. Materials and Methods:Forty healthy volunteers with different age underwent whole-body PET-like MR examination at 1.5 T scanner. The data was reformatted using Functool and 3D-MIP software at AW4.6 workstation. Then, maximum intensity projection (MIP), inverted-gray-scale and pseudocolor processing PET-like images were obtained. Signal of the normal tissue was observed. Correlation between age and signal of lumbar vertebrae and intervertebral discs was analyzed. Results:(1) Fat, muscle, lungs, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and cerebrospinal fluid showed hypointensity. (2) Brain, spinal cord, glands of head and neck, spleen, gallbladder, genital gland, and intervertebral discs showed hyperintensity. (3) Vertebral body showed hyperintensity in children and mainly hypointensity in healthy volunteers over 60 years of age. (4) There were significant negative correlation between age and signal of lumbar vertebrae (r=-0.6917,P<0.05) and intervertebral discs (r=-0.7562,P<0.05). Conclusions: It will be beneifcial for diagnosis after correctly understanding normal appearance

  6. On Multiple Appearances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork Petersen, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    reduction and epoché to focus on how dancing bodies appear in a stage context. To test these tools’ ability to explore dancing bodies from a third-person perspective, I analyse the Danish choreographer Kitt Johnson’s solo performance Drift (2011) - focussing on her shifting physical appearance. While...... phenomenology helps me to describe the multiple and radically different guises that Johnson assumes in her piece, my analysis, ultimately, does not aim to distil a truer, more real being from her appearances as is often the case in phenomenological philosophy. I complement my analytical approach...... with the Deleuzian notion of becoming animal and suggest that Johnson stages what could, in Judith Butler’s terms, be called a critical contingency of bodily appearance....

  7. An autopsy case of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with the appearance of fused in sarcoma inclusions (basophilic inclusion body disease) clinically presenting corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Arifumi; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Fukatsu, Reiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yasushi; Hisanaga, Kinya

    2016-02-01

    We describe an autopsy case of basophilic inclusion body disease (BIBD), a subtype of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with the appearance of fused in sarcoma (FUS) inclusions (FTLD-FUS), clinically presenting corticobasal syndrome (CBS). A 54-year-old man initially developed worsening of stuttering and right hand clumsiness. Neurological examinations revealed rigidity in the right upper and lower extremities, buccofacial apraxia, and right-side dominant limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Neuroimaging showed asymmetric left-dominant brain atrophy and a cerebral blood flow reduction in the ipsilateral frontal region. At 56 years, his apraxia had advanced, and ideational apraxia was observed. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia had disappeared, and both conditions had become bilateral. He had a new onset of aphasia. His symptoms progressed and he died 9 years after the initial symptoms. The brain weighed 955 g. Diffuse brain atrophy was most obvious in the bilateral frontotemporal regions. The atrophy of the left superior frontal and precentral gyri and bilateral basal ganglia was remarkable. Histologically, there was a marked loss of neurons with gliosis in the affected areas, where basophilic neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions were observed. The inclusions were immunoreactive for FUS, p62, and TATA-binding protein-associated factor 15 (TAF15), but not for phosphorylated tau, transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43), neurofilament protein, or Ewing sarcoma (EWS). From these pathological findings, this case was diagnosed as having BIBD as an FTLD-FUS variant. Spinal cord lower motor neurons were spared in number, similar to primary lateral sclerosis. Mutations in FUS were undetectable. Common background pathologies for CBS include corticobasal degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, PSP, FTLD with phosphorylated TDP-43 inclusions (FTLD-TDP), Pick's disease, Lewy body disease and CJD. However, FTLD-FUS (BIBD

  8. Chromatin chemistry goes cellular.

    OpenAIRE

    W. Fischle; D. Schwarzer; Mootz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Analysing post-translational modifications of histone proteins as they occur within chromatin is challenging due to their large number and chemical diversity. A major step forward has now been achieved by using split intein chemistry to engineer functionalized histones within cells.

  9. Analysis of Chromatin Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: chromatin, nucleases, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, melting point, gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide, autoradiography, Southern blotting, Northern blotting, Sanger sequencing, restriction endonucleases, exonucleases, linker DNA, chloroform extraction, nucleosomes,…

  10. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188. ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  11. Proteomic interrogation of human chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana P Torrente

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins provide a scaffold for DNA packaging and a basis for epigenetic regulation and genomic maintenance. Despite understanding its functional roles, mapping the chromatin proteome (i.e. the "Chromatome" is still a continuing process. Here, we assess the biological specificity and proteomic extent of three distinct chromatin preparations by identifying proteins in selected chromatin-enriched fractions using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These experiments allowed us to produce a chromatin catalog, including several proteins ranging from highly abundant histone proteins to less abundant members of different chromatin machinery complexes. Using a Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor approach, we quantified relative abundances of the proteins across the chromatin enriched fractions giving a glimpse into their chromosomal abundance. The large-scale data sets also allowed for the discovery of a variety of novel post-translational modifications on the identified chromatin proteins. With these comparisons, we find one of the probed methods to be qualitatively superior in specificity for chromatin proteins, but inferior in proteomic extent, evidencing a compromise that must be made between biological specificity and broadness of characterization. Additionally, we attempt to identify proteins in eu- and heterochromatin, verifying the enrichments by characterizing the post-translational modifications detected on histone proteins from these chromatin regions. In summary, our results provide insights into the value of different methods to extract chromatin-associated proteins and provide starting points to study the factors that may be involved in directing gene expression and other chromatin-related processes.

  12. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  13. Terminology for the body in social interaction, as appearing in papers published in the journal 'Research on Language and Social Interaction', 1987-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2016-01-01

    This is a list of terms referring generally to the body in descriptions and analyses of social interaction, as used by authors in papers published in ROLSI. The list includes over 200 items, grouped according to common phrasing and within alphabetical order. The list was compiled in preparation for...

  14. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  15. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.; Hashimoto, Tatsunori Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  16. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira A Barkal

    Full Text Available Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding.

  17. Cas9 Functionally Opens Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkal, Amira A.; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Gifford, David K.; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Using a nuclease-dead Cas9 mutant, we show that Cas9 reproducibly induces chromatin accessibility at previously inaccessible genomic loci. Cas9 chromatin opening is sufficient to enable adjacent binding and transcriptional activation by the settler transcription factor retinoic acid receptor at previously unbound motifs. Thus, we demonstrate a new use for Cas9 in increasing surrounding chromatin accessibility to alter local transcription factor binding. PMID:27031353

  18. The Impact of Media on Body Image and Self-Esteem with Emphasis on Appearance Self-schema (The Case of Students at University of Isfahan)

    OpenAIRE

    Forough Kazemi; Masoud Kianpour; Ghasemi Vahid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Today's world, recognized as "the age of information", is a world in which media has penetrated into all and each aspects of human life in an unavoidable way. As one of the most advanced visual media tools, Satellite TV has been increasingly accessible for Iranian public in recent years, facilitating cultural and taste changes among Iranian families. Satellite programs, advertisements and images change peoples' attitudes regarding body and believes about beauty. They contain ...

  19. Epigenetics & chromatin: Interactions and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Henikoff (Steven); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOn 11 to 13 March 2013, BioMed Central will be hosting its inaugural conference, Epigenetics & Chromatin: Interactions and Processes, at Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA. Epigenetics & Chromatin has now launched a special article series based on the general themes of the confer

  20. The impact of phenotypic appearance on body weight and egg production in laying hens: a group-size- and experience-dependent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, R H; Liste, M G; Campderrich, I; Estevez, I

    2014-07-01

    Alterations of birds' phenotypic appearance (PA) may lead to unwanted behaviors, potentially impairing poultry welfare, health, and productive performance. Likewise, group size may play an important role modulating the expression of adaptive behaviors. This study evaluates whether changes in the PA of Hy-line Brown laying hens may affect their BW and egg production, and if so, whether these effects depend on group size. A total of 1,050 one-day-old chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 45 pens. Groups were of 10, 20, or 40 individuals (8 hens/m(2)). At arrival, the PA of 0, 30, 50, 70, or 100% of the birds within each group was artificially altered by marking the back of their heads black. The remaining birds within groups were unaltered. The 30% marked hens within groups of 10 individuals had a lower BW at 24 wk of age than their 70% unmarked counterparts, whereas the other groups showed similar BW. No differences were detected in egg laying performance during this phase. Next, within the initially homogeneous groups (0 and 100%), 30, 50, and 70% of the hens were either marked or unmarked (PA changed) sequentially at 34, 38, and 44 wk of age. Hens within the initially heterogeneous groups of 30, 50, and 70% marked birds remained unchanged and were used as controls. Groups of 40 individuals showed a reduction in BW gain and weekly hen-day-egg production after 30% PA changes, as compared with control counterparts. No differences were found in pens of 10 hens, and the groups of 20 showed intermediate results. A transient reduction in egg production was found after 50% PA changes. No further productive effects were observed after 70% changes. Our findings suggest that differences in hen appearance, which may occur due to variations in health status, injuries, and other natural causes, can be critical for production and welfare management practices depending both on the flock size and the birds' previous experience in exposure to group phenotypic heterogeneity. PMID

  1. Chromatin, epigenetics and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Tim C; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2005-03-01

    Epigenetics is a term that has changed its meaning with the increasing biological knowledge on developmental processes. However, its current application to stem cell biology is often imprecise and is conceptually problematic. This article addresses two different subjects, the definition of epigenetics and chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. We describe mechanisms that regulate chromatin changes and provide an overview of chromatin states of stem and differentiated cells. Moreover, a modification of the current epigenetics definition is proposed that is not restricted by the heritability of gene expression throughout cell divisions and excludes translational gene expression control. PMID:15819395

  2. Painting a Clearer Picture of Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Elizabeth H; Misteli, Tom; Shachar, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Elucidating chromatin's 3D shape is critical to understanding its function, but the fine structure of chromatin domains remains poorly resolved. In a recent report in Nature, Boettiger et al. (2016) visualize chromatin in super-resolution, gaining unprecedented insight into chromatin architecture. PMID:26906730

  3. Brain Function and Chromatin Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dulac, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of epigenetic control, including the potential for long-lasting, stable effects on gene expression that outlive an initial transient signal, could be of singular importance for post-mitotic neurons, which are subject to changes with short- to long-lasting influence on their activity and connectivity. Persistent changes in chromatin structure are thought to contribute to mechanisms of epigenetic inheritance. Recent advances in chromatin biology offer new avenues to investig...

  4. Chromatin remodeling, development and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development is a stepwise process in which multi-potent progenitor cells undergo lineage commitment, differentiation, proliferation and maturation to produce mature cells with restricted developmental potentials. This process is directed by spatiotemporally distinct gene expression programs that allow cells to stringently orchestrate intricate transcriptional activation or silencing events. In eukaryotes, chromatin structure contributes to developmental progression as a blueprint for coordinated gene expression by actively participating in the regulation of gene expression. Changes in higher order chromatin structure or covalent modification of its components are considered to be critical events in dictating lineage-specific gene expression during development. Mammalian cells utilize multi-subunit nuclear complexes to alter chromatin structure. Histone-modifying complex catalyzes covalent modifications of histone tails including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex, which disrupts histone-DNA contacts and induces nucleosome mobilization, requires energy from ATP hydrolysis for its catalytic activity. Here, we discuss the diverse functions of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes during mammalian development. In particular, the roles of these complexes during embryonic and hematopoietic development are reviewed in depth. In addition, pathological conditions such as tumor development that are induced by mutation of several key subunits of the chromatin remodeling complex are discussed, together with possible mechanisms that underlie tumor suppression by the complex

  5. Contribution of Topological Domains and Loop Formation to 3D Chromatin Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuthy Ea

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations on 3D chromatin folding revealed that the eukaryote genomes are both highly compartmentalized and extremely dynamic. This review presents the most recent advances in topological domains’ organization of the eukaryote genomes and discusses the relationship to chromatin loop formation. CTCF protein appears as a central factor of these two organization levels having either a strong insulating role at TAD borders, or a weaker architectural role in chromatin loop formation. TAD borders directly impact on chromatin dynamics by restricting contacts within specific genomic portions thus confining chromatin loop formation within TADs. We discuss how sub-TAD chromatin dynamics, constrained into a recently described statistical helix conformation, can produce functional interactions by contact stabilization.

  6. CT appearance of radiation injury of the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancers: Are patients with pulmonary emphysema also candidates for SBRT for lung cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of radiation injury to the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and evaluate the difference by the presence of pulmonary emphysema (PE) for small lung cancers. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 45 patients with 52 primary or metastatic lung cancers were enrolled. We evaluated the CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis (within 6 months) and radiation fibrosis (after 6 months) after SBRT. Clinical symptoms were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We also evaluated the relationship between CT appearance, clinical symptoms, and PE. Results: CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis was classified as follows: (1) diffuse consolidation, 38.5%; (2) patchy consolidation and ground-glass opacities (GGO), 15.4%; (3) diffuse GGO, 11.5%; (4) patchy GGO, 2.0%; (5) no evidence of increasing density, 32.6%. CT appearance of radiation fibrosis was classified as follows: (1) modified conventional pattern, 61.5%; (2) mass-like pattern, 17.3%; (3) scar-like pattern, 21.2%. Patients who were diagnosed with more than Grade 2 pneumonitis showed significantly less no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern than any other pattern (p = 0.0314, 0.0297, respectively). Significantly, most of these patients with no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern had PE (p = 0.00038, 0.00044, respectively). Conclusion: Computed tomographic appearance after SBRT was classified into five patterns of acute radiation pneumonitis and three patterns of radiation fibrosis. Our results suggest that SBRT can be also safely performed even in patients with PE

  7. Chromatin structure and DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation examines the structure and structural transitions of chromatin in relation to DNA damage. The ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro was examined following DNA photodamage introduced by two different agents. (1) 254-nm UV radiation and (2) trimethylpsoralen (plus near-UV radiation). Both agents are highly specific for DNA and form adducts predicted to cause different degrees of distortion in the DNA helix. The salt-induced structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers were monitored by both analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Our results show that even in the presence of extremely large, nonphysiological amounts of photodamage by either agent the ability of chromatin to fold into higher ordered structures is not affected. The compact, 30 nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA damage without any measurable changes in the overall size or degree of compaction of this structure. The distribution of pyrimidine dimers was mapped at the single nucleotide level in nucleosome core DNA from UV-irradiated mononucleosomes, chromatin fibers, and human cells in culture using the 3' → 5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase

  8. Single Molecule Studies of Chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeans, C; Thelen, M P; Noy, A

    2006-02-06

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged as chromatin, a highly ordered structure formed through the wrapping of the DNA around histone proteins, and further packed through interactions with a number of other proteins. In order for processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription to occur, the structure of chromatin must be remodeled such that the necessary enzymes can access the DNA. A number of remodeling enzymes have been described, but our understanding of the remodeling process is hindered by a lack of knowledge of the fine structure of chromatin, and how this structure is modulated in the living cell. We have carried out single molecule experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the packaging arrangements in chromatin from a variety of cell types. Comparison of the structures observed reveals differences which can be explained in terms of the cell type and its transcriptional activity. During the course of this project, sample preparation and AFM techniques were developed and optimized. Several opportunities for follow-up work are outlined which could provide further insight into the dynamic structural rearrangements of chromatin.

  9. Chromatin remodelers and their roles in chromatin organization

    OpenAIRE

    Strålfors, Annelie

    2012-01-01

    The DNA in the eukaryotic nucleus is organized into a complex DNA-protein structure called chromatin. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer. The nucleosomes form a “beads on a string” structure, which can be folded into higherorder structures that allow an extensive degree of DNA compaction. This compaction is so effective that 2 meters of DNA can fit into the human cell nucleus with a ...

  10. Condensation of interphase chromatin in nuclei of synchronized chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacsi, Mariann; Nagy, Gabor; Pinter, Gabor; Basnakian, Alexei G; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2005-01-01

    Reversibly permeabilized cells have been used to visualize interphase chromatin structures in the presence and absence of biotinylated nucleotides. By reversing permeabilization, it was possible to confirm the existence of a flexible chromatin folding pattern through a series of transient geometric forms such as supercoiled, circular forms, chromatin bodies, thin and thick fibers, and elongated chromosomes. Our results show that the incorporation of biotin-11-dUTP interferes with chromatin condensation, leading to the accumulation of decondensed chromatin structures. Chromatin condensation without nucleotide incorporation was also studied in cell populations synchronized by centrifugal elutriation. After reversal of permeabilization, nuclei were isolated and chromatin structures were visualized after DAPI staining by fluorescent microscopy. Decondensed veil-like structures were observed in the early S phase (at an average C-value of 2.21), supercoiled chromatin later in the early S (2, 55 C), fibrous structures in the early mid S phase (2, 76 C), ribboned structures in the mid-S phase (2, 98 C), continuous chromatin strings later in the mid-S phase (3,28), elongated prechromosomes in the late S-phase (3, 72 C), precondensed chromosomes at the end and after the S phase (3, 99 C). Fluorescent microscopy revealed that neither interphase nor metaphase chromosomes are separate entities but form a linear array arranged in a semicircle. Linear arrangement was confirmed by computer image analysis. PMID:15684719

  11. Hydrogen peroxide mediates higher order chromatin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, H; Konat, G W

    2003-01-01

    Although a large body of evidence supports a causative link between oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, the mechanisms are still elusive. We have recently demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the major mediator of oxidative stress triggers higher order chromatin degradation (HOCD), i.e. excision of chromatin loops at the matrix attachment regions (MARs). The present study was designed to determine the specificity of H(2)O(2) in respect to HOCD induction. Rat glioma C6 cells were exposed to H(2)O(2) and other oxidants, and the fragmentation of genomic DNA was assessed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE). S1 digestion before FIGE was used to detect single strand fragmentation. The exposure of C6 cells to H(2)O(2) induced a rapid and extensive HOCD. Thus, within 30 min, total chromatin was single strandedly digested into 50 kb fragments. Evident HOCD was elicited by H(2)O(2) at concentrations as low as 5 micro M. HOCD was mostly reversible during 4-8h following the removal of H(2)O(2) from the medium indicating an efficient relegation of the chromatin fragments. No HOCD was induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated nuclei indicating that HOCD-endonuclease is activated indirectly by cytoplasmic signal pathways triggered by H(2)O(2). The exposure of cells to a synthetic peroxide, i.e. tert-butyrylhydroperoxide (tBH) also induced HOCD, but to a lesser extent than H(2)O(2). Contrary to the peroxides, the exposure of cells to equitoxic concentration of hypochlorite and spermine NONOate, a nitric oxide generator, failed to induce rapid HOCD. These results indicate that rapid HOCD is not a result of oxidative stress per se, but is rather triggered by signaling cascades initiated specifically by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, the rapid and extensive HOCD was observed in several rat and human cell lines challenged with H(2)O(2), indicating that the process is not restricted to glial cells, but rather represents a general response of cells to H(2)O(2). PMID:12421592

  12. Guarding against Collateral Damage during Chromatin Transactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Lukas, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Signal amplifications are vital for chromatin function, yet they also bear the risk of transforming into unrestrained, self-escalating, and potentially harmful responses. Examples of inbuilt limitations are emerging, revealing how chromatin transactions are confined within physiological boundaries....

  13. Coming to terms with chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Faitelson, Liron; Hassan-Zadeh, Vahideh; Baghestani, Zahra; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2016-03-01

    Chromatin, once thought to serve only as a means to package DNA, is now recognized as a major regulator of gene activity. As a result of the wide range of methods used to describe the numerous levels of chromatin organization, the terminology that has emerged to describe these organizational states is often imprecise and sometimes misleading. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of chromatin architecture and propose terms to describe the various biochemical and structural states of chromatin. PMID:26223534

  14. Chromatin state dynamics during blood formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lara-Astiaso, David; Weiner, Assaf; Lorenzo-Vivas, Erika; Zaretsky, Irina; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; David, Eyal; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Mildner, Alexander; Winter, Deborah; Jung, Steffen; Friedman, Nir; Amit, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin modifications are crucial for development, yet little is known about their dynamics during differentiation. Hematopoiesis provides a well-defined model to study chromatin state dynamics, however technical limitations impede profiling of homogeneous differentiation intermediates. We developed a high sensitivity indexing-first chromatin immunoprecipitation approach (iChIP) to profile the dynamics of four chromatin modifications across 16 stages of hematopoietic differentiation. We ide...

  15. Predicting chromatin organization using histone marks

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jialiang; Marco, Eugenio; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of three dimensional chromatin organization is an important yet technically challenging task. To aid experimental effort and to understand the determinants of long-range chromatin interactions, we have developed a computational model integrating Hi-C and histone mark ChIP-seq data to predict two important features of chromatin organization: chromatin interaction hubs and topologically associated domain (TAD) boundaries. Our model accurately and robustly predicts these feat...

  16. Impact of Chromatin on HIV Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Agosto, Luis M.; Matthew Gagne; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin influences Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) integration and replication. This review highlights critical host factors that influence chromatin structure and organization and that also impact HIV integration, transcriptional regulation and latency. Furthermore, recent attempts to target chromatin associated factors to reduce the HIV proviral load are discussed.

  17. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain;

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet the...... challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...

  18. Spectroscopic study of laser irradiated chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, Liliana, E-mail: liliana1radu@gmail.com [V. Babes National Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology (Romania); Mihailescu, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Lasers (Romania); Gazdaru, Doina [Faculty of Physics, Bucharest University, Department of Biophysics (Romania); Preoteasa, V. [V. Babes National Institute, Department of Molecular Genetics and Radiobiology (Romania)

    2013-04-15

    The effects of three UV excimer laser radiations, with wavelengths of 193, 248 and 282 nm respectively, on the structure of chromatin (the complex of deoxyribonucleic acid with proteins that exists in eukaryotic cells nuclei) were investigated. The chromatin was extracted from livers of Winstar rats. The spectroscopic methods used are: fluorescence (Foerster) resonance energy transfer (FRET), time resolved fluorescence and steady-state fluorescence. A chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid radiolysis, a chromatin proteins damage and a change of the global chromatin structure on lasers action were indicated by this study. It exists some small differences between the actions of these three laser radiations.

  19. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  20. Generation of bivalent chromatin domains during cell fate decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Gobbi Marco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In self-renewing, pluripotent cells, bivalent chromatin modification is thought to silence (H3K27me3 lineage control genes while 'poising' (H3K4me3 them for subsequent activation during differentiation, implying an important role for epigenetic modification in directing cell fate decisions. However, rather than representing an equivalently balanced epigenetic mark, the patterns and levels of histone modifications at bivalent genes can vary widely and the criteria for identifying this chromatin signature are poorly defined. Results Here, we initially show how chromatin status alters during lineage commitment and differentiation at a single well characterised bivalent locus. In addition we have determined how chromatin modifications at this locus change with gene expression in both ensemble and single cell analyses. We also show, on a global scale, how mRNA expression may be reflected in the ratio of H3K4me3/H3K27me3. Conclusions While truly 'poised' bivalently modified genes may exist, the original hypothesis that all bivalent genes are epigenetically premarked for subsequent expression might be oversimplistic. In fact, from the data presented in the present work, it is equally possible that many genes that appear to be bivalent in pluripotent and multipotent cells may simply be stochastically expressed at low levels in the process of multilineage priming. Although both situations could be considered to be forms of 'poising', the underlying mechanisms and the associated implications are clearly different.

  1. Changes in chromatin-associated proteins of virus-infected tobacco leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Telgen, van, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms of viral infections in plants often resemble disturbances in growth and development. Therefore, symptoms appear to result from an interference of the virus with the regulation of growth and development of the host plant. Particularly the non-histone chromatin- associated proteins are considered to be the regulators of specific gene expression. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether upon infection of a plant with a virus, alterations occur in the non-histone chromatin-a...

  2. Characterization of the RNA content of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Rasmussen, Markus; Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Isaksson, Anders; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) constitutes a significant portion of the mammalian transcriptome. Emerging evidence suggests that it regulates gene expression in cis or trans by modulating the chromatin structure. To uncover the functional role of ncRNA in chromatin organization, we deep sequenced chromatin-associated RNAs (CARs) from human fibroblast (HF) cells. This resulted in the identification of 141 intronic regions and 74 intergenic regions harboring CARs. The intronic and intergenic CARs show s...

  3. Elastic Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Fagertun, Jens; Larsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a fusion of the active appearance model (AAM) and the Riemannian elasticity framework which yields a non-linear shape model and a linear texture model – the active elastic appearance model (EAM). The non-linear elasticity shape model is more flexible than the usual linear...... subspace model, and it is therefore able to capture more complex shape variations. Local rotation and translation invariance are the primary explanation for the additional flexibility. In addition, we introduce global scale invariance into the Riemannian elasticity framework which together with the local...

  4. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin's dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber's structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure. PMID:27345617

  5. Young men's endorsement and pursuit of appearance ideals: The prospective role of appearance investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Johanna; Rodgers, Rachel F; Frisén, Ann

    2016-03-01

    Appearance investment has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of body dissatisfaction. Despite this, few studies have explored men's investment in their appearance. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine appearance investment as a prospective predictor of young men's endorsement and pursuit of appearance ideals. A community sample of 187 young men participated in a study at ages 21 and 24. Hierarchical multiple regressions revealed that appearance investment, as hypothesized, was a prospective predictor of increases in leanness orientation, media-ideal internalization, and muscularity behaviors. However, appearance investment did not predict increases in muscularity dissatisfaction. The present findings highlight the importance of including appearance investment in sociocultural models of the development of men's body image, and suggest that appearance investment may be an important target variable to consider when designing body dissatisfaction prevention and intervention programs tailored to young men. PMID:26523688

  6. A Long-Distance Chromatin Affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denker, Annette; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor binding sequences result in correlated changes in chromatin composition locally and at sites hundreds of kilobases away. New studies demonstrate that this concordance is mediated via spatial chromatin interactions that constitute regulatory modules of the human genome

  7. Chromatin domain boundaries: insulators and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Hong WEI; De Pei LIU; Chih Chuan LIANG

    2005-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into functionally and structurally distinct domains, representing regulatory units for gene expression and chromosome behavior. DNA sequences that mark the border between adjacent domains are the insulators or boundary elements, which are required in maintenance of the function of different domains. Some insulators need others enable to play insulation activity. Chromatin domains are defined by distinct sets of post-translationally modified histones. Recent studies show that these histone modifications are also involved in establishment of sharp chromatin boundaries in order to prevent the spreading of distinct domains. Additionally, in some loci, the high-order chromatin structures for long-range looping interactions also have boundary activities, suggesting a correlation between insulators and chromatin loop domains. In this review, we will discuss recent progress in the field of chromatin domain boundaries.

  8. Wedgelet Enhanced Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Larsen, Rasmus; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille;

    2004-01-01

    Statistical region-based segmentation methods such as the Active Appearance Model (AAM) are used for establishing dense correspondences in images based on learning the variation in shape and pixel intensities in a training set. For low resolution 2D images correspondences can be recovered reliably...... in real-time. However, as resolution increases this becomes infeasible due to excessive storage and computational requirements. In this paper we propose to reduce the textural components by modelling the coefficients of a wedgelet based regression tree instead of the original pixel intensities. The...... wedgelet regression trees employed are based on triangular domains and estimated using cross validation. The wedgelet regression trees are functional descriptions of the intensity information and serve to 1) reduce noise and 2) produce a compact textural description. The wedgelet enhanced appearance model...

  9. $\\tau$ appearance and CNGS

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsu, M

    2002-01-01

    In December 1999, the CERN Council approved the CNGS project to explore neutrino oscillation physics in tau neutrino appearance. Super-KAMIOKANDE result indicate that the most probable solution in atmospheric neutrino disappearance is muon neutrino oscillation into a tau neutrino. CNGS is designed to detect nu /sub mu / to nu /sub tau / oscillations by a long baseline appearance experiment. CNGS a more is unique project than the other disappearance projects like K2K and NuMI. At least two experiments are in preparation in the CNGS project at LNGS. One is OPERA which was already approved in Feb. 2001 as CNGS1 using emulsion techniques which have proven their tau detection capability in Fermilab E872 DONUT. The other is ICARUS which was approved at LNGS using a liquid argon TPC. Both experiments will detect tau neutrino signal in theCNGS beam. (5 refs).

  10. Realistic Material Appearance Modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Filip, Jiří; Hatka, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2010, č. 81 (2010), s. 13-14. ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : bidirectional texture function * texture modelling Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/RO/haindl-realistic material appearance modelling.pdf

  11. Color appearance in stereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadia, Davide; Rizzi, Alessandro; Bonanomi, Cristian; Marini, Daniele; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2011-03-01

    The relationship between color and lightness appearance and the perception of depth has been studied since a while in the field of perceptual psychology and psycho-physiology. It has been found that depth perception affects the final object color and lightness appearance. In the stereoscopy research field, many studies have been proposed on human physiological effects, considering e.g. geometry, motion sickness, etc., but few has been done considering lightness and color information. Goal of this paper is to realize some preliminar experiments in Virtual Reality in order to determine the effects of depth perception on object color and lightness appearance. We have created a virtual test scene with a simple 3D simultaneous contrast configuration. We have created three different versions of this scene, each with different choices of relative positions and apparent size of the objects. We have collected the perceptual responses of several users after the observation of the test scene in the Virtual Theater of the University of Milan, a VR immersive installation characterized by a semi-cylindrical screen that covers 120° of horizontal field of view from an observation distance of 3.5 m. We present a description of the experiments setup and procedure, and we discuss the obtained results.

  12. Computational strategies to address chromatin structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    While the genetic information is contained in double helical DNA, gene expression is a complex multilevel process that involves various functional units, from nucleosomes to fully formed chromatin fibers accompanied by a host of various chromatin binding enzymes. The chromatin fiber is a polymer composed of histone protein complexes upon which DNA wraps, like yarn upon many spools. The nature of chromatin structure has been an open question since the beginning of modern molecular biology. Many experiments have shown that the chromatin fiber is a highly dynamic entity with pronounced structural diversity that includes properties of idealized zig-zag and solenoid models, as well as other motifs. This diversity can produce a high packing ratio and thus inhibit access to a majority of the wound DNA. Despite much research, chromatin’s dynamic structure has not yet been fully described. Long stretches of chromatin fibers exhibit puzzling dynamic behavior that requires interpretation in the light of gene expression patterns in various tissue and organisms. The properties of chromatin fiber can be investigated with experimental techniques, like in vitro biochemistry, in vivo imagining, and high-throughput chromosome capture technology. Those techniques provide useful insights into the fiber’s structure and dynamics, but they are limited in resolution and scope, especially regarding compact fibers and chromosomes in the cellular milieu. Complementary but specialized modeling techniques are needed to handle large floppy polymers such as the chromatin fiber. In this review, we discuss current approaches in the chromatin structure field with an emphasis on modeling, such as molecular dynamics and coarse-grained computational approaches. Combinations of these computational techniques complement experiments and address many relevant biological problems, as we will illustrate with special focus on epigenetic modulation of chromatin structure.

  13. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-12-15

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  14. The CT appearance of intraoral chewing gum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When imaged, intraoral chewing gum has the potential to be misdiagnosed. Chewing gum has a characteristic appearance on CT: it is ovoid in shape, hyperdense, and has small internal locules of air. Reports have described the appearance of gum on radiographs and abdominal CT images; however, no reports could be found detailing its appearance within the mouth. This report describes the appearance of intraoral chewing gum as well as the properties of the gum that lead to this appearance. Because of the potential for misdiagnosis, screening for intraoral foreign bodies should be considered prior to imaging. (orig.)

  15. Uterine Leiomyoma: Hysterosalpingographic Appearances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyoma is the most common benign tumor of genital tract. The etiology of myomasis unknown. Leiomyoma shows a broad spectrum of radiographic appearances depending on thenumber, size, and location of the tumor. The diagnostic method for uterine leiomyomas is basedprimarily on the clinical situation. Despite of the varied diagnostic options such as; transvaginalsonography, sonohysterography, hysteroscopy, laparoscopy and MRI; hysterosalpingography isstill one of the valuable imaging methods for identification of uterine leiomyoma.The various features of the proved leiomyoma are illustrated in this pictorial review. The incidence,risk factors and clinical features will also be discussed briefly.

  16. SUMO-2 Orchestrates Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo A. Hendriks

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Small ubiquitin-like modifiers play critical roles in the DNA damage response (DDR. To increase our understanding of SUMOylation in the mammalian DDR, we employed a quantitative proteomics approach in order to identify dynamically regulated SUMO-2 conjugates and modification sites upon treatment with the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS. We have uncovered a dynamic set of 20 upregulated and 33 downregulated SUMO-2 conjugates, and 755 SUMO-2 sites, of which 362 were dynamic in response to MMS. In contrast to yeast, where a response is centered on homologous recombination, we identified dynamically SUMOylated interaction networks of chromatin modifiers, transcription factors, DNA repair factors, and nuclear body components. SUMOylated chromatin modifiers include JARID1B/KDM5B, JARID1C/KDM5C, p300, CBP, PARP1, SetDB1, and MBD1. Whereas SUMOylated JARID1B was ubiquitylated by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and degraded by the proteasome in response to DNA damage, JARID1C was SUMOylated and recruited to the chromatin to demethylate histone H3K4.

  17. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  18. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Abdelmoumene, A.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Gailloud, M.C.; Resnick, D. [CHUV, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  19. Novel chromatin texture features for the classification of pap smears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejnordi, Babak E.; Moshavegh, Ramin; Sujathan, K.; Malm, Patrik; Bengtsson, Ewert; Mehnert, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a set of novel structural texture features for quantifying nuclear chromatin patterns in cells on a conventional Pap smear. The features are derived from an initial segmentation of the chromatin into bloblike texture primitives. The results of a comprehensive feature selection experiment, including the set of proposed structural texture features and a range of different cytology features drawn from the literature, show that two of the four top ranking features are structural texture features. They also show that a combination of structural and conventional features yields a classification performance of 0.954±0.019 (AUC±SE) for the discrimination of normal (NILM) and abnormal (LSIL and HSIL) slides. The results of a second classification experiment, using only normal-appearing cells from both normal and abnormal slides, demonstrates that a single structural texture feature measuring chromatin margination yields a classification performance of 0.815±0.019. Overall the results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed structural approach and that it is possible to detect malignancy associated changes (MACs) in Papanicoloau stain.

  20. Texture Enhanced Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Darkner, Sune;

    2007-01-01

    Statistical region-based registration methods such as the Active Appearance Model (AAM) are used for establishing dense correspondences in images. At low resolution, images correspondences can be recovered reliably in real-time. However, as resolution increases this becomes infeasible due to...... excessive storage and computational requirements. We propose to reduce the dimensionality of the textural components by selecting a subset of basis functions from a larger dictionary, estimate regression splines and model only the coeffcients of the retained basis functions. We demonstrate the use of two...... representation are superior to wavelet representations at high dimensionality-reduction rates. At low reduction rates an edge enhanced wavelet representation provides better segmentation accuracy than the full standard AAM model....

  1. Extensive Variation in Chromatin States Across Humans

    KAUST Repository

    Kasowski, M.

    2013-10-17

    The majority of disease-associated variants lie outside protein-coding regions, suggesting a link between variation in regulatory regions and disease predisposition. We studied differences in chromatin states using five histone modifications, cohesin, and CTCF in lymphoblastoid lines from 19 individuals of diverse ancestry. We found extensive signal variation in regulatory regions, which often switch between active and repressed states across individuals. Enhancer activity is particularly diverse among individuals, whereas gene expression remains relatively stable. Chromatin variability shows genetic inheritance in trios, correlates with genetic variation and population divergence, and is associated with disruptions of transcription factor binding motifs. Overall, our results provide insights into chromatin variation among humans.

  2. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bigeard, Jean

    2014-07-10

    In eukaryotes, most of the DNA is located in the nucleus where it is organized with histone proteins in a higher order structure as chromatin. Chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins contribute to DNA-related processes such as replication and transcription as well as epigenetic regulation. Protein functions are often regulated by PTMs among which phosphorylation is one of the most abundant PTM. Phosphorylation of proteins affects important properties, such as enzyme activity, protein stability, or subcellular localization. We here describe the main specificities of protein phosphorylation in plants and review the current knowledge on phosphorylation-dependent regulation of plant chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins. We also outline some future challenges to further elucidate protein phosphorylation and chromatin regulation.

  3. Saliency changes appearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Kerzel

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have suggested that the deployment of attention is linked to saliency. In contrast, very little is known about how salient objects are perceived. To probe the perception of salient elements, observers compared two horizontally aligned stimuli in an array of eight elements. One of them was salient because of its orientation or direction of motion. We observed that the perceived luminance contrast or color saturation of the salient element increased: the salient stimulus looked even more salient. We explored the possibility that changes in appearance were caused by attention. We chose an event-related potential indexing attentional selection, the N2pc, to answer this question. The absence of an N2pc to the salient object provides preliminary evidence against involuntary attentional capture by the salient element. We suggest that signals from a master saliency map flow back into individual feature maps. These signals boost the perceived feature contrast of salient objects, even on perceptual dimensions different from the one that initially defined saliency.

  4. Imaging appearances in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Gandikota; Melville, David M; Kaeley, Gurjit S; Brandon, Catherine J; Goyal, Janak R; Jacobson, Jon A; Jamadar, David A

    2013-01-01

    Gout is an ancient disease. Last decade has brought about significant advancement in imaging technology and real scientific growth in the understanding of the pathophysiology of gout, leading to the availability of multiple effective noninvasive diagnostic imaging options for gout and treatment options fighting inflammation and controlling urate levels. Despite this, gout is still being sub-optimally treated, often by nonspecialists. Increased awareness of optimal treatment options and an increasing role of ultrasound and dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in the diagnosis and management of gout are expected to transform the management of gout and limit its morbidity. DECT gives an accurate assessment of the distribution of the deposited monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in gout and quantifies them. The presence of a combination of the ultrasound findings of an effusion, tophus, erosion and the double contour sign in conjunction with clinical presentation may be able to obviate the need for intervention and joint aspiration in a certain case population for the diagnosis of gout. The purpose of this paper is to review imaging appearances of gout and its clinical applications. PMID:23585966

  5. Pulling chromatin apart: Unstacking or Unwrapping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Jean Marc

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the mechanical properties of chromatin is an essential step towards deciphering the physical rules of gene regulation. In the past ten years, many single molecule experiments have been carried out, and high resolution measurements of the chromatin fiber stiffness are now available. Simulations have been used in order to link those measurements with structural cues, but so far no clear agreement among different groups has been reached. Results We revisit here some of the most precise experimental results obtained with carefully reconstituted fibers. Conclusions We show that the mechanical properties of the chromatin fiber can be quantitatively accounted for by the stiffness of the DNA molecule and the 3D structure of the chromatin fiber.

  6. In vivo binding of retinol to chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have previously shown that exposure of responding cells to vitamin A leads to profound modifications of chromatin structure as revealed by an increased susceptibility to DNase I digestion, modified patterns of histone acetylation, and impaired synthesis of a nonhistone chromosomal protein. The present results show that these effects are most probably due to the direct interaction between retinol and chromatin, and analysis of mononucleosomes and higher oligomers obtained from retinol-treated cells shows that retinol is indeed tightly bound to chromatin. Enzymatic digestions of vitamin A containing nucleosomes with proteinase K, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2 support a model where the final binding of retinol to chromatin is mediated by a lipoprotein: the recognition of the binding sites on DNA being dictated by the proteic component while the hydrophobic retinol is solubilized in the fatty acid moiety

  7. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  8. The Chromatin Fiber: Multiscale Problems and Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Ozer, Gungor; Luque, Antoni; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    The structure of chromatin, affected by many factors from DNA linker lengths to posttranslational modifications, is crucial to the regulation of eukaryotic cells. Combined experimental and computational methods have led to new insights into its structural and dynamical features, from interactions due to the flexible core histone tails of the nucleosomes to the physical mechanism driving the formation of chromosomal domains. Here we present a perspective of recent advances in chromatin modelin...

  9. Linker Histones Incorporation Maintains Chromatin Fiber Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Lavelle, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Conde e Silva, Natalia; Le Cam, Eric; Victor, Jean-Marc; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized in supercoiled chromatin fibers, which undergo dynamic changes during such DNA metabolic processes as transcription or replication. Indeed, DNA-translocating enzymes like polymerases produce physical constraints in vivo. We used single-molecule micromanipulation by magnetic tweezers to study the response of chromatin to mechanical constraints in the same range as those encountered in vivo. We had previously shown that under positive torsional const...

  10. Etiology and Evaluation of Sperm Chromatin Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Tavalaee

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that human sperm chromatin anomalies adversely affect reproductive outcomesand infertile men possess substantially amount of sperm with chromatin anomalies than fertilemen.Routine semen analysis evaluates parameters such as sperm motility and morphology, but doesnot examine the nuclear DNA integrity of spermatozoa. It has been suggested that altered nuclearchromatin structure or damaged DNA in spermatozoa could modify the special cellular functionsof human spermatozoa, and thereby affect the fertility potential. Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI bypass the barriers to fertilization for such a sperm, then the effect of chromatin anomalies onthe development remains a concern. Therefore, it is essential to develop and use accurate diagnostictests, which may provide better prognostic capabilities than the standard sperm assessments. Thisreview discusses our current understanding of the structure and organization of sperm DNA,the different procedures for assessment of sperm chromatin anomalies including comet assay,Chromomycin A3 (CMA3, sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA, acridine orange test (AOT,terminal TdT-mediated dUTP-nick-end labelling (TUNEL assay, aniline blue and sperm chromatindispersion (SCD test and the impact of chromatin anomalies on reproductive outcome.

  11. Changes in chromatin-associated proteins of virus-infected tobacco leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telgen, van H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms of viral infections in plants often resemble disturbances in growth and development. Therefore, symptoms appear to result from an interference of the virus with the regulation of growth and development of the host plant. Particularly the non-histone chromatin- associated proteins are consid

  12. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  13. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H2O-D2O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  14. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC. Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, we observed that the replication foci contain decondensed chromatin as well as 80 and 130 nm globules, those were also found in condensed non-replicating chromatin domains. Using immunogolding, we demonstrated that DNA replication in S-phase PCC occurs in loose chromatin on the periphery of dense chromatin domains. Conclusion. Replication in PCC occurred in the decondensed chromatin neighboring the condensed chromatin without formation of special structures.

  15. The use and misuse of sex chromatin screening for 'gender identification' of female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, A

    1986-10-10

    According to the rules of sports organizations such as the International Olympic Committee, competitors registered as females must undergo a "gender verification" test that consists of screening with sex chromatin, followed by further tests in those with an abnormal or inconclusive result. The aims of the gender verification test have not been published but presumably they are to exclude from women's sports events males or other individuals whose muscle strength or body build gives them an unfair advantage over their competitors. It is shown herein that the sex chromatin screening method reveals only a small proportion of such individuals. Moreover, women with certain congenital chromosome abnormalities and other abnormal conditions without increased muscle strength are found to have "abnormal" sex chromatin. Thus, the present screening method is both inaccurate and discriminatory. It is proposed that the aims of gender identification should be defined and methods chosen that achieve the desired result. PMID:3761498

  16. Assessment of chromatin status (SCSA) in epididymal and ejaculated sperm in Iberian red deer, ram and domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Macias, Vanesa; Martinez-Pastor, Felipe; Alvarez, Mercedes; Garde, Jose Julian; Anel, Enrique; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino

    2006-11-01

    Abnormal chromatin condensation is not detected using classical techniques for sperm analysis. SCSA has demonstrated its usefulness in sperm chromatin analysis in several species (human, bull, stallion and boar). In this work, we studied sperm samples from red deer, ram and dog to analyze the differentiation of chromatin structure applying SCSA in epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa. Epididymal samples were obtained from the caput, corpus and cauda by means of cuts, and ejaculated ones were obtained by electroejaculation (deer), artificial vagina (ram) and digital manipulation (dog). SCSA results suggested different critical points in sperm maturation (spermatozoa with loose chromatin to more condensed chromatin) among species: from corpus to cauda in ram and from caput to corpus in deer and dog. Moreover, we also detected differences in ruminants and dog, reflected in the appearance of SCSA plots. Indeed, ram and deer samples rendered two peaks within the sperm main population (sperm with condensed chromatin), whereas only one was detected in dog. Although some differences were observed between cauda and ejaculated samples, SCSA parameters indicated good chromatin condensation, making these samples suitable for germplasm banking. Some species-dependent modifications in the analysis of the results may be necessary to take full advantage of its analytical power. PMID:16790270

  17. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:26933790

  18. Linker Histones Incorporation Maintains Chromatin Fiber Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Lavelle, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Conde e Silva, Natalia; Le Cam, Eric; Victor, Jean-Marc; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized in supercoiled chromatin fibers, which undergo dynamic changes during such DNA metabolic processes as transcription or replication. Indeed, DNA-translocating enzymes like polymerases produce physical constraints in vivo. We used single-molecule micromanipulation by magnetic tweezers to study the response of chromatin to mechanical constraints in the same range as those encountered in vivo. We had previously shown that under positive torsional constraints, nucleosomes can undergo a reversible chiral transition toward a state of positive topology. We demonstrate here that chromatin fibers comprising linker histones present a torsional plasticity similar to that of naked nucleosome arrays. Chromatosomes can undergo a reversible chiral transition toward a state of positive torsion (reverse chromatosome) without loss of linker histones. PMID:21641318

  19. Bacterial chromatin: converging views at different scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Remus T; Tark-Dame, Mariliis

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized and compactly folded into a structure referred to as bacterial chromatin or the nucleoid. An important role in genome folding is attributed to Nucleoid-Associated Proteins, also referred to as bacterial chromatin proteins. Although a lot of molecular insight in the mechanisms of operation of these proteins has been generated in the test tube, knowledge on genome organization in the cellular context is still lagging behind severely. Here, we discuss important advances in the understanding of three-dimensional genome organization due to the application of Chromosome Conformation Capture and super-resolution microscopy techniques. We focus on bacterial chromatin proteins whose proposed role in genome organization is supported by these approaches. Moreover, we discuss recent insights into the interrelationship between genome organization and genome activity/stability in bacteria. PMID:26942688

  20. The Excessive Appearance of Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalko, Rod

    2009-01-01

    This paper engages the appearance of disability in contemporary Western culture. Rather than taking disability for granted as a biomedical condition, I interrogate how disability is made to appear in our culture, including its appearance as a biomedical condition. Fundamentally, disability appears to us as a trouble and, as such, cultural…

  1. Tagged Chromosomal Insertion Site System: A Method to Study Lamina-Associated Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Jennifer C; Reddy, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the genome is important for chromatin regulation. This organization is nonrandom and appears to be tightly correlated with or regulated by chromatin state and scaffolding proteins. To understand how specific DNA and chromatin elements contribute to the functional organization of the genome, we developed a new tool-the tagged chromosomal insertion site (TCIS) system-to identify and study minimal DNA sequences that drive nuclear compartmentalization and applied this system to specifically study the role of cis elements in targeting DNA to the nuclear lamina. The TCIS system allows Cre-recombinase-mediated site-directed integration of any DNA fragment into a locus tagged with lacO arrays, thus enabling both functional molecular studies and positional analysis of the altered locus. This system can be used to study the minimal DNA sequences that target the nuclear periphery (or other nuclear compartments), allowing researchers to understand how genome-wide results obtained, for example, by DNA adenine methyltransferase identification, chromosome conformation capture (HiC), or related methods, connect to the actual organization of DNA and chromosomes at the single-cell level. Finally, TCIS allows one to test roles for specific proteins in chromatin reorganization and to determine how changes in nuclear environment affect chromatin state and gene regulation at a single locus. PMID:26778570

  2. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms.......Chromatin serves structural and functional roles crucial for genome stability and correct gene expression. This organization must be reproduced on daughter strands during replication to maintain proper overlay of epigenetic fabric onto genetic sequence. Nucleosomes constitute the structural...

  3. Painting by Numbers: Increasing the Parts List for Chromatin Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiuyi V.; Rando, Oliver J.

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, van Bemmel and colleagues (2013) report the genome-wide mapping of 42 novel chromatin factors, systematically identifying new components of the various chromatin domains present in fly cells. PMID:23438859

  4. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, M.L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; Grooth, de B.G.; Greve, J.

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to r

  5. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Gall, Le Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meetin

  6. CTCF Binding Polarity Determines Chromatin Looping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Elzo; Vos, Erica S M; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Verstegen, Marjon J A M; Teunissen, Hans; Splinter, Erik; Wijchers, Patrick J; Krijger, Peter H L; de Laat, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is an architectural protein involved in the three-dimensional (3D) organization of chromatin. In this study, we assayed the 3D genomic contact profiles of a large number of CTCF binding sites with high-resolution 4C-seq. As recently reported, our data also suggest that ch

  7. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control is a ...

  8. Impact of chromatin structure on PR signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    but also to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), as these receptors share many similarities regarding interaction with, and remodeling of, chromatin. Both receptors can bind nucleosomal DNA and have accordingly been described as pioneering factors. However recent genomic approaches (ChIP-seq and DHS...

  9. Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    With the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China, BGI, the largest genomics organization in the world, and Peking University Shenzhen Hospital, published online in Nature Geneticsics that the study on frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of thebladder on August 8th, 2011. Their study provides a valuable genetic basis for future studies on TCC,

  10. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin-modifying proteins mold the genome into areas that are accessible for transcriptional activity and areas that are transcriptionally silent. This epigenetic gene regulation allows for different transcriptional programs to be conducted in different cell types at different timepoints-despi...

  11. Factors affecting chromatin stability of bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, T A A; Rekkas, C A; Lymberopoulos, A G; Sioga, A; Dimitriadis, I; Papanikolaou, Th

    2008-03-01

    The structural stability of transcriptionally inert paternal chromatin is of vital importance for the fertilization process and early embryonic development. Accordingly, a series of eight experiments were conducted during a 7-month period to investigate: (1) effects of bull breed, individuality, successive ejaculations, semen quality characteristics (SQC), semen dilution rates and hypothermic storage of semen in a Tris-egg yolk extender on incidence of sperm nuclear chromatin instability (NCI), and (2) effects of the interaction between variation of NCI within a frozen ejaculate and variation of oocytes quality due to maturation time and/or season on the efficiency of in vitro embryo production (IVEP). Semen samples were collected once a week from six bulls using an AV and only ejaculates (n=220) of >0.30x10(9) sperm/ml and >or=60% motility were used. NCI was measured by: (1) detection of lysine-rich histones in sperm chromatin using aniline blue staining, (2) sperm susceptibility to acid-induced nuclear DNA denaturation in situ using acridine orange test, and (3) sperm susceptibility to nuclear chromatin decondensation (NCD). Bovine oocytes (n=695) were matured in vitro for 18 or 24 h, fertilized after sperm selection through a swim-up procedure and cultured for 72 h. The results showed that the 2nd ejaculates were superior to the 1st ones with respect to chromatin stability. Dilution of semen to 49.67+/-8.56x10(6) sperm/ml (1:19) decreased resistance of sperm to NCD. Cooling of semen had no significant effect on chromatin stability. Cryopreservation of semen augmented sperm vulnerability to DNA denaturation. Improvement of SQC (semen volume, sperm motility, velocity, viability and morphological normalcy) was generally concomitant with increase of sperm resistance to NCI. While Blonde d'Aquitaine bulls had a resistance to NCD higher than Limousine bulls in fresh semen, the former showed a greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation than the latter in cooled semen

  12. Research on the Test Indicator of Body Appearance and Its Evaluation in the Youth Sport Aerobics Test Competition in China%我国竞技健美操青少年测试赛身体形态测试指标与评价的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓莹; 王艳

    2011-01-01

    竞技健美操青少年测试赛作为联赛的资格赛于2008年正式开始运行,测试赛的测试指标体系中包含身体形态测试指标,而2009年取消了该指标,身体形态指标的重要性和必要性存在争议,该指标的“去”与“留”仍受到质疑。运用问卷调查法、专家访谈法、文献资料法、数理统计法等对青少年测试赛身体形态指标的实施效果与可行性进行了统计分析,论证身体形态测试指标的内容与评定标准,并提出了相应的对策,结果表明,身体形态指标重要且必要,应继续作为青少年测试赛测试指标。%The youth sport aerobics test competition was officially operated as the qualification game of the league in 2008.The test indication system of the test competition contains the body appearance test indicator,but the indicator was removed in 2009.There have been controversies about the importance and necessity of the body appearance indicator.Whether the indicator should be removed or stay is questioned.With methods including surveys,expert interview,reference information and mathematical statistics,statistical analysis is carried out on the implementation effect and feasibility of the body appearance indicator in the youth test competition,scientifically proving the contents and evaluation standard of the body appearance indicator,and raising the corresponding strategies.The conclusion proves that the rationality and necessity of the test indicator of body appearance has been very controversial.And it should continue to be the test indicator of the youth sport aerobics.

  13. Unusual imaging appearance of unicystic ameloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Kavitha Nadendla

    2012-01-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) refers to those cystic lesions that show clinical, radiographic, or gross features of a mandibular cyst, but on histologic examination show a typical ameloblastous epithelium lining part of the cystic cavity, with or without luminal and/or mural tumor growth. It accounts for 5-15% of all intraosseous ameloblastomas. We report a case of UA in a 35-year-old female with an unusual large multilocular (tennis racket) appearance on the right body of mandible and illustr...

  14. The landscape of accessible chromatin in mammalian preimplantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingyi; Huang, Bo; Chen, He; Yin, Qiangzong; Liu, Yang; Xiang, Yunlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Liu, Bofeng; Wang, Qiujun; Xia, Weikun; Li, Wenzhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Zheng, Hui; Ming, Jia; Zhang, Wenhao; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Geng; Xu, Feng; Chang, Zai; Na, Jie; Yang, Xuerui; Xie, Wei

    2016-06-30

    In mammals, extensive chromatin reorganization is essential for reprogramming terminally committed gametes to a totipotent state during preimplantation development. However, the global chromatin landscape and its dynamics in this period remain unexplored. Here we report a genome-wide map of accessible chromatin in mouse preimplantation embryos using an improved assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) approach with CRISPR/Cas9-assisted mitochondrial DNA depletion. We show that despite extensive parental asymmetry in DNA methylomes, the chromatin accessibility between the parental genomes is globally comparable after major zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Accessible chromatin in early embryos is widely shaped by transposable elements and overlaps extensively with putative cis-regulatory sequences. Unexpectedly, accessible chromatin is also found near the transcription end sites of active genes. By integrating the maps of cis-regulatory elements and single-cell transcriptomes, we construct the regulatory network of early development, which helps to identify the key modulators for lineage specification. Finally, we find that the activities of cis-regulatory elements and their associated open chromatin diminished before major ZGA. Surprisingly, we observed many loci showing non-canonical, large open chromatin domains over the entire transcribed units in minor ZGA, supporting the presence of an unusually permissive chromatin state. Together, these data reveal a unique spatiotemporal chromatin configuration that accompanies early mammalian development. PMID:27309802

  15. Diversity in the organization of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Centromeric chromatin is distinguished primarily by nucleosomes containing the histone variant cenH3, which organizes the kinetochore that links the chromosome to the spindle apparatus. Whereas budding yeast have simple 'point' centromeres with single cenH3 nucleosomes, and fission yeast have 'regional' centromeres without obvious sequence specificity, the centromeres of most organisms are embedded in highly repetitive 'satellite' DNA. Recent studies have revealed a remarkable diversity in centromere chromatin organization among different lineages, including some that have lost cenH3 altogether. We review recent progress in understanding point, regional and satellite centromeres, as well as less well-studied centromere types, such as holocentromeres. We also discuss the formation of neocentromeres, the role of pericentric heterochromatin, and the structure and composition of the cenH3 nucleosome. PMID:25956076

  16. On the topology of chromatin fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Victor, Jean-Marc; Wong, Hua; Lavelle, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The ability of cells to pack, use and duplicate DNA remains one of the most fascinating questions in biology. To understand DNA organization and dynamics, it is important to consider the physical and topological constraints acting on it. In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA is organized by proteins acting as spools on which DNA can be wrapped. These proteins can subsequently interact and form a structure called the chromatin fibre. Using a simple geometric model, we propose a general method for computing topological properties (twist, writhe and linking number) of the DNA embedded in those fibres. The relevance of the method is reviewed through the analysis of magnetic tweezers single molecule experiments that revealed unexpected properties of the chromatin fibre. Possible biological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:24098838

  17. On the topology of chromatin fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Victor, Jean-Marc; Wong, Hua; Lavelle, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The ability of cells to pack, use and duplicate DNA remains one of the most fascinating questions in biology. To understand DNA organization and dynamics, it is important to consider the physical and topological constraints acting on it. In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA is organized by proteins acting as spools on which DNA can be wrapped. These proteins can subsequently interact and form a structure called the chromatin fibre. Using a simple geometric model, we propose a general method fo...

  18. Chromatin regulation in drug addiction and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Renthal, William; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in gene expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatrie disorders, including drug addiction and depression, increasing evidence indicates that changes in gene expression in neurons, in the context of animal models of addiction and depression, are mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms that alter chromatin structure on specific gene promoters. This review discusses recent findings from behavioral, molecular, and bioinformatic approaches that are being u...

  19. Identification of alternative topological domains in chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across various r...

  20. Multiscale Identification of Topological Domains in Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Darya; Patro, Rob; Duggal, Geet; Kingsford, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Recent chromosome conformation capture experiments have led to the discovery of dense, contiguous, megabase-sized topological domains that are similar across cell types and conserved across species. These domains are strongly correlated with a number of chromatin markers and have since been included in a number of analyses. However, functionally-relevant domains may exist at multiple length scales. We introduce a new and efficient algorithm that is able to capture persistent domains across va...

  1. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs. (paper)

  2. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Jégu, Teddy

    2015-10-12

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression.

  3. National Needs for Appearance Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Maria E.

    2003-04-01

    Appearance greatly influences a customer's judgement of the quality and acceptability of manufactured products, as yearly there is approximately $700 billion worth of shipped goods for which overall appearance is critical to their sale. For example, appearance is reported to be a major factor in about half of automobile purchases. The appearance of an object is the result of a complex interaction of the light field incident upon the object, the scattering and absorption properties of the object, and human perception. The measurable attributes of appearance are divided into color (hue, saturation, and lightness) and geometry (gloss, haze). The nature of the global economy has increased international competition and the need to improve the quality of many manufactured products. Since the manufacturing and marketing of these products is international in scope, the lack of national appearance standard artifacts and measurement protocols results in a direct loss to the supplier. One of the primary missions of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is to strengthen the U.S. economy by working with industry to develop and apply technology, measurements and standards. The NIST Physics Laboratory has established an appearance metrology laboratory. This new laboratory provides calibration services for 0^o/45^o color standards and 20^o°, 60^o°, and 85^o° specular gloss, and research in the colorimetric characterization of gonioapparent including a new Standard Reference Material for metallic coatings (SRM 2017) and measurement protocols for pearlescent coatings. These services are NIST's first appearance metrology efforts in many years; a response to needs articulated by industry. These services are designed to meet demands for improved measurements and standards to enhance the acceptability of final products since appearance often plays a major role in their acceptability.

  4. Evolution, appearance, and occupational success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Anthony C; Roberts, Craig S

    2012-01-01

    Visual characteristics, including facial appearance, are thought to play an important role in a variety of judgments and decisions that have real occupational outcomes in many settings. Indeed, there is growing evidence suggesting that appearance influences hiring decisions and even election results. For example, attractive individuals are more likely to be hired, taller men earn more, and the facial appearance of candidates has been linked to real election outcomes. In this article, we review evidence linking physical appearance to occupational success and evaluate the hypothesis that appearance based biases are consistent with predictions based on evolutionary theories of coalition formation and leadership choice. We discuss why appearance based effects are so pervasive, addressing ideas about a "kernel of truth" in attributions and about coalitional psychology. We additionally highlight that appearance may be differently related to success at work according to the types of job or task involved. For example, leaders may be chosen because the characteristics they possess are seen as best suited to lead in particular situations. During a time of war, a dominant-appearing leader may inspire confidence and intimidate enemies while during peace-time, when negotiation and diplomacy are needed, interpersonal skills may outweigh the value of a dominant leader. In line with these ideas, masculine-faced leaders are favored in war-time scenarios while feminine-faced leaders are favored in peace-time scenarios. We suggest that such environment or task specific competencies may be prevalent during selection processes, whereby individuals whose appearance best matches perceived task competences are most likely selected, and propose the general term "task-congruent selection" to describe these effects. Overall, our review highlights how potentially adaptive biases could influence choices in the work place. With respect to certain biases, understanding their origin and current

  5. Radiological appearances of uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uterine fibroids, also known as leiomyomas, are the commonest uterine neoplasms. Although benign, they can be associated with significant morbidity and are the commonest indication for hysterectomy. They are often discovered incidentally when performing imaging for other reasons. Usually first identified with USG, they can be further characterized with MRI. They are usually easily recognizable, but degenerate fibroids can have unusual appearances. In this article, we describe the appearances of typical and atypical uterine fibroids, unusual fibroid variants and fibroid mimics on different imaging modalities. Knowledge of the different appearances of fibroids on imaging is important as it enables prompt diagnosis and thereby guides treatment

  6. Time-Lapse Dynamics of the Mouse Oocyte Chromatin Organisation during Meiotic Resumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Belli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian oocyte, distinct patterns of centromeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin localisation correlate with the gamete’s developmental competence. Mouse antral oocytes display two main types of chromatin organisation: SN oocytes, with a ring of Hoechst-positive chromatin surrounding the nucleolus, and NSN oocytes lacking this ring. When matured to MII and fertilised, only SN oocytes develop beyond the 2-cell, and reach full term. To give detailed information on the dynamics of the SN or NSN chromatin during meiosis resumption, we performed a 9 hr time-lapse observation. The main significant differences recorded are: (1 reduction of the nuclear area only in SN oocytes; (2 ~17 min delay of GVBD in NSN oocytes; (3 chromatin condensation, after GVBD, in SN oocytes; (4 formation of 4-5 CHCs in SN oocytes; (5 increase of the perivitelline space, ~57 min later in NSN oocytes; (6 formation of a rosette-like disposition of CHCs, ~84 min later in SN oocytes; (7 appearance of the MI plate ~40 min later in NSN oocytes. Overall, we described a pathway of transition from the GV to the MII stage that is punctuated of discrete recordable events showing their specificity and occurring with different time kinetics in the two types of oocytes.

  7. Time-Lapse Dynamics of the Mouse Oocyte Chromatin Organisation during Meiotic Resumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Carlo Alberto; Zuccotti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian oocyte, distinct patterns of centromeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin localisation correlate with the gamete's developmental competence. Mouse antral oocytes display two main types of chromatin organisation: SN oocytes, with a ring of Hoechst-positive chromatin surrounding the nucleolus, and NSN oocytes lacking this ring. When matured to MII and fertilised, only SN oocytes develop beyond the 2-cell, and reach full term. To give detailed information on the dynamics of the SN or NSN chromatin during meiosis resumption, we performed a 9 hr time-lapse observation. The main significant differences recorded are: (1) reduction of the nuclear area only in SN oocytes; (2) ~17 min delay of GVBD in NSN oocytes; (3) chromatin condensation, after GVBD, in SN oocytes; (4) formation of 4-5 CHCs in SN oocytes; (5) increase of the perivitelline space, ~57 min later in NSN oocytes; (6) formation of a rosette-like disposition of CHCs, ~84 min later in SN oocytes; (7) appearance of the MI plate ~40 min later in NSN oocytes. Overall, we described a pathway of transition from the GV to the MII stage that is punctuated of discrete recordable events showing their specificity and occurring with different time kinetics in the two types of oocytes. PMID:24864231

  8. Genome-wide chromatin remodeling identified at GC-rich long nucleosome-free regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Schwarzbauer

    Full Text Available To gain deeper insights into principles of cell biology, it is essential to understand how cells reorganize their genomes by chromatin remodeling. We analyzed chromatin remodeling on next generation sequencing data from resting and activated T cells to determine a whole-genome chromatin remodeling landscape. We consider chromatin remodeling in terms of nucleosome repositioning which can be observed most robustly in long nucleosome-free regions (LNFRs that are occupied by nucleosomes in another cell state. We found that LNFR sequences are either AT-rich or GC-rich, where nucleosome repositioning was observed much more prominently in GC-rich LNFRs - a considerable proportion of them outside promoter regions. Using support vector machines with string kernels, we identified a GC-rich DNA sequence pattern indicating loci of nucleosome repositioning in resting T cells. This pattern appears to be also typical for CpG islands. We found out that nucleosome repositioning in GC-rich LNFRs is indeed associated with CpG islands and with binding sites of the CpG-island-binding ZF-CXXC proteins KDM2A and CFP1. That this association occurs prominently inside and also prominently outside of promoter regions hints at a mechanism governing nucleosome repositioning that acts on a whole-genome scale.

  9. The chromatin remodeler SPLAYED regulates specific stress signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Walley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are continuously exposed to a myriad of environmental stresses. Central to an organism's survival is the ability to mount a robust transcriptional response to the imposed stress. An emerging mechanism of transcriptional control involves dynamic changes in chromatin structure. Alterations in chromatin structure are brought about by a number of different mechanisms, including chromatin modifications, which covalently modify histone proteins; incorporation of histone variants; and chromatin remodeling, which utilizes ATP hydrolysis to alter histone-DNA contacts. While considerable insight into the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling has been gained, the biological role of chromatin remodeling complexes beyond their function as regulators of cellular differentiation and development has remained poorly understood. Here, we provide genetic, biochemical, and biological evidence for the critical role of chromatin remodeling in mediating plant defense against specific biotic stresses. We found that the Arabidopsis SWI/SNF class chromatin remodeling ATPase SPLAYED (SYD is required for the expression of selected genes downstream of the jasmonate (JA and ethylene (ET signaling pathways. SYD is also directly recruited to the promoters of several of these genes. Furthermore, we show that SYD is required for resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea but not the biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. These findings demonstrate not only that chromatin remodeling is required for selective pathogen resistance, but also that chromatin remodelers such as SYD can regulate specific pathways within biotic stress signaling networks.

  10. PTEN Interacts with Histone H1 and Controls Chromatin Condensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Hong Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and dynamics are integral to global gene transcription. Histone modification influences chromatin status and gene expression. PTEN plays multiple roles in tumor suppression, development, and metabolism. Here, we report on the interplay of PTEN, histone H1, and chromatin. We show that loss of PTEN leads to dissociation of histone H1 from chromatin and decondensation of chromatin. PTEN deletion also results in elevation of histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16, an epigenetic marker for chromatin activation. We found that PTEN and histone H1 physically interact through their C-terminal domains. Disruption of the PTEN C terminus promotes the chromatin association of MOF acetyltransferase and induces H4K16 acetylation. Hyperacetylation of H4K16 impairs the association of PTEN with histone H1, which constitutes regulatory feedback that may reduce chromatin stability. Our results demonstrate that PTEN controls chromatin condensation, thus influencing gene expression. We propose that PTEN regulates global gene transcription profiling through histones and chromatin remodeling.

  11. Appearance can be deceiving: using appearance models in color imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Garrett M.

    2007-01-01

    As color imaging has evolved through the years, our toolset for understanding has similarly evolved. Research in color difference equations and uniform color spaces spawned tools such as CIELAB, which has had tremendous success over the years. Research on chromatic adaptation and other appearance phenomena then extended CIELAB to form the basis of color appearance models, such as CIECAM02. Color difference equations such as CIEDE2000 evolved to reconcile weaknesses in areas of the CIELAB space. Similarly, models such as S-CIELAB were developed to predict more spatially complex color difference calculations between images. Research in all of these fields is still going strong and there seems to be a trend towards unification of some of the tools, such as calculating color differences in a color appearance space. Along such lines, image appearance models have been developed that attempt to combine all of the above models and metric into one common framework. The goal is to allow the color imaging research to pick and choose the appropriate modeling toolset for their needs. Along these lines, the iCAM image appearance model framework was developed to study a variety of color imaging problems. These include image difference and image quality evaluations as well gamut mapping and high-dynamic range (HDR) rendering. It is important to stress that iCAM was not designed to be a complete color imaging solution, but rather a starting point for unifying models of color appearance, color difference, and spatial vision. As such the choice of model components is highly dependent on the problem being addressed. For example, with CIELAB it clearly evident that it is not necessary to use the associated color difference equations to have great success as a deviceindependent color space. Likewise, it may not be necessary to use the spatial filtering components of an image appearance model when performing image rendering. This paper attempts to shed some light on some of the

  12. Appearance questions can be misleading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel; Markman, Ellen M.

    2005-01-01

    , children were at near ceiling levels in each of our manipulations while they failed the standard versions of the tasks. Moreover, we show how this discourse-based explanation accounts for findings in the literature. Thus children master the appearance-reality distinction by the age of 3 but the standard...... task masks this understanding because of the discourse structure involved in talking about appearances. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  13. Inverstigation of chromatin folding patterns by atomic force microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYi; OUYANGZhenqian; 等

    1999-01-01

    The chromatin folding patterns in air and liquid were studied by atomic force microscopy(AFM),A gentle water-air interface method was adopted to spread chromatin from interphase nucleus of chicken erythrocyte.The chromatin was absorbed on APS-mica surface and studied with AFM,Beads-on a-string were observed and many higher-order structrues such as superbeads with dimensions 40-60nm in diameter and 4-7nm in height were found to string together to make chromation fibers.When sample spreading and absorbing time were shortened.higher-order chromatin fibers with 60-120nm in width were observed in air as well as under water environment.These chromatin structures may reflect chromatin folding patterns in the living cells.

  14. Prevalence of X-chromatin in Jordanian women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the distribution of X-chromatin among Jordanian women at different age groups. Results will be compared with other studies for possible racial and environmental effects on X-chromatin distribution. Blood samples were drawn from all women subjected to this study by finger prick and stained with Wright's stain. X-chromatin positive polymorphonuclear cells were counted and corrected for percentage. Samples were taken during the late 2002 and early 2003 from healthy women attending routine checkup in health centers in Northern Jordan. The number of X-chromatin was highest in the 50 and above years age group. The number of X-chromatin was 14-18% in other age groups. These results were in accordance with other studies. It seems that racial and environmental factors are ineffective on distribution of X-chromatin in Jordanian women. These data could be used as as reference for further studies. (author)

  15. Role of histone modifications in defining chromatin structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Kathy A; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nuclei are not uniformly organized, but rather contain distinct chromatin elements, with each state having a defined biochemical structure and biological function. These are recognizable by their distinct architectures and molecular components, which can change in response to cellular stimuli or metabolic requirements. Chromatin elements are characterized by the fundamental histone and DNA components, as well as other associated non-histone proteins and factors. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins in particular often correlate with a specific chromatin structure and function. Patterns of histone modifications are implicated as having a role in directing the level of chromatin compaction, as well as playing roles in multiple functional pathways directing the readout of distinct regions of the genome. We review the properties of various chromatin elements and the apparent links of histone modifications with chromatin organization and functional output. PMID:18225984

  16. Long Noncoding RNAs, Chromatin, and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Caley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the genome of a multicellular organism can orchestrate the differentiation of trillions of cells and many organs, all from a single fertilized egg, is the subject of intense study. Different cell types can be defined by the networks of genes they express. This differential expression is regulated at the epigenetic level by chromatin modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, which interact with structural and enzymatic proteins, resulting in the activation or silencing of any given gene. While detailed mechanisms are emerging on the role of different chromatin modifications and how these functions are effected at the molecular level, it is still unclear how their deposition across the epigenomic landscape is regulated in different cells. A raft of recent evidence is accumulating that implicates long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in these processes. Most genomes studied to date undergo widespread transcription, the majority of which is not translated into proteins. In this review, we will describe recent work suggesting that lncRNAs are more than transcriptional "noise", but instead play a functional role by acting as tethers and guides to bind proteins responsible for modifying chromatin and mediating their deposition at specific genomic locations. We suggest that lncRNAs are at the heart of developmental regulation, determining the epigenetic status and transcriptional network in any given cell type, and that they provide a means to integrate external differentiation cues with dynamic nuclear responses through the regulation of a metastable epigenome. Better characterization of the lncRNA-protein "interactome" may eventually lead to a new molecular toolkit, allowing researchers and clinicians to modulate the genome at the epigenetic level to treat conditions such as cancer.

  17. Ultrastructural organization of replicating chromatin in prematurely condensed chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Arifulin E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The ultrastructural aspect of replicating chromatin organization is a matter of dispute. Here, we have analyzed the ultrastructural organization of replication foci using prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC). Methods. To investigate the ultrastructure of replicating chromatin, we have used correlative light and electron microscopy as well as immunogold staining. Results. Replication in PCC occurs in the gaps between condensed chromatin domains. Using correlative light and electron mic...

  18. Combinatorial epigenetic patterns as quantitative predictors of chromatin biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cieślik, Marcin; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is the most widely used method for characterizing the epigenetic states of chromatin on a genomic scale. With the recent availability of large genome-wide data sets, often comprising several epigenetic marks, novel approaches are required to explore functionally relevant interactions between histone modifications. Computational discovery of "chromatin states" defined by such combinatorial interactions enabled desc...

  19. Single-epitope recognition imaging of native chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Hongda; Dalal Yamini; Henikoff Steven; Lindsay Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Direct visualization of chromatin has the potential to provide important insights into epigenetic processes. In particular, atomic force microscopy (AFM) can visualize single nucleosomes under physiological ionic conditions. However, AFM has mostly been applied to chromatin that has been reconstituted in vitro, and its potential as a tool for the dissection of native nucleosomes has not been explored. Recently we applied AFM to native Drosophila chromatin containing the ce...

  20. Nanoscale changes in chromatin organization represent the initial steps of tumorigenesis: a transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear alterations are a well-known manifestation of cancer. However, little is known about the early, microscopically-undetectable stages of malignant transformation. Based on the phenomenon of field cancerization, the tissue in the field of a tumor can be used to identify and study the initiating events of carcinogenesis. Morphological changes in nuclear organization have been implicated in the field of colorectal cancer (CRC), and we hypothesize that characterization of chromatin alterations in the early stages of CRC will provide insight into cancer progression, as well as serve as a biomarker for early detection, risk stratification and prevention. For this study we used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of nuclei harboring pre-neoplastic CRC alterations in two models: a carcinogen-treated animal model of early CRC, and microscopically normal-appearing tissue in the field of human CRC. We quantify the chromatin arrangement using approaches with two levels of complexity: 1) binary, where chromatin is separated into areas of dense heterochromatin and loose euchromatin, and 2) grey-scale, where the statistics of continuous mass-density distribution within the nucleus is quantified by its spatial correlation function. We established an increase in heterochromatin content and clump size, as well as a loss of its characteristic peripheral positioning in microscopically normal pre-neoplastic cell nuclei. Additionally, the analysis of chromatin density showed that its spatial distribution is altered from a fractal to a stretched exponential. We characterize quantitatively and qualitatively the nanoscale structural alterations preceding cancer development, which may allow for the establishment of promising new biomarkers for cancer risk stratification and diagnosis. The findings of this study confirm that ultrastructural changes of chromatin in field carcinogenesis represent early neoplastic events leading to the development of well

  1. Face Alignment using Boosted Appeareance Model (Discriminative Appearance Model)

    OpenAIRE

    Muddamsetty, Satya Mahesh

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores decriminative face alignment using Boosted Appearance Model (BAM). In this method face alignment is done by maximizing the score of the trained two classifier which learns both correct and incorrect alignment and is able to distinguish correct and incorrect alignment so that the correct alignment gets maximum positve score. During the training stage we trained Point Distribution Model (PDM) which acts as shape model and a boosting based classifier based on Haar like Recta...

  2. Hypothesis for the influence of fixatives on the chromatin patterns of interphase nuclei, based on shrinkage and retraction of nuclear and perinuclear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignold, L P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear chromatin patterns are used to distinguish normal and abnormal cells in histopathology and cytopathology. However, many chromatin pattern features are affected by aspects of tissue processing, especially fixation. Major effects of aldehyde and/or ethanol fixation on nuclei in the living state include shrinkage, chromatin aggregation and production of a 'chromatinic rim'. The mechanisms of these effects are poorly understood. In the past, possible mechanisms of fixation-induced morphological change have been considered only in terms of the theoretical model of the nucleus, which involves only a random tangle of partly unfolded chromosomes contained within the nuclear membrane. Such a model provides no basis for chromatin to be associated with the nuclear envelope, and hence no obvious clue to a mechanism for the formation of the 'chromatinic rim' in fixed nuclei. In recent years, two new models of nuclear structure have been described. The nuclear membrane-bound, chromosomal-domain model is based on the discoveries of chromatin-nuclear membrane attachments and of the localisation of the chromatin of each chromosome within discrete, exclusive parts of the nucleus (the 'domain' of each partly unfolded chromosome). The nuclear matrix/scaffold model is based on the discovery of relatively insoluble proteins in nuclei, which it suggests forms a 'matrix' and modulates gene expression by affecting transcription of DNA. Here, a hypothesis for fixation-associated chromatin pattern formation based mainly on the first model but partially relying on the second, is presented. The hypothesis offers explanations of the variations of appearance of nuclei according to fixation (especially air-drying versus wet-fixation with formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or ethanol); the appearances of the nuclei of more metabolically active versus less metabolically active cells of the same type; the appearances of nuclei after fixation with osmium tetroxide; and of the marked central

  3. Color Categories and Color Appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A.; Kay, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We examined categorical effects in color appearance in two tasks, which in part differed in the extent to which color naming was explicitly required for the response. In one, we measured the effects of color differences on perceptual grouping for hues that spanned the blue-green boundary, to test whether chromatic differences across the boundary…

  4. CT appearances of talc pleurodesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanaswamy, S. [Department of Radiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Kamath, S. [Department of Radiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: srikanthmn@yahoo.com; Williams, M. [Department of Radiology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Aim: To report the computed tomography (CT) appearances of talc pleurodesis in the management of patients with pleural effusions and spontaneous pneumothorax. Materials and methods: The post-pleurodesis CT studies of 16 patients obtained over a 5-year period were reviewed. The mean age was 63 years (range 41-79 years). Ten patients were male. After pleurodesis, nine patients underwent a single chest CT examination and seven patients underwent more than one. Results: The characteristic finding observed in all patients, except one, was the presence of high-density deposits in the posterior basal regions of the pleural space. These were typically linear in seven patients, nodular in two, and a combination of linear and nodular in six. In five patients talc deposits were present on both the visceral and parietal pleura separated by an effusion (a variant of the split pleura sign). Talc deposits extended into an interlobar fissure with associated fissural thickening in five patients. In patients who underwent more than one CT study, the appearances remained stable. Conclusions: The typical finding was the presence of high attenuation areas in the posterior basal regions of the pleural space. Two new appearances were observed: extension of talc deposits into the fissure and the presence of a variant of the split pleura sign. It is important to recognize these CT appearances so as not to confuse them with other conditions such as asbestos exposure.

  5. CT appearances of talc pleurodesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To report the computed tomography (CT) appearances of talc pleurodesis in the management of patients with pleural effusions and spontaneous pneumothorax. Materials and methods: The post-pleurodesis CT studies of 16 patients obtained over a 5-year period were reviewed. The mean age was 63 years (range 41-79 years). Ten patients were male. After pleurodesis, nine patients underwent a single chest CT examination and seven patients underwent more than one. Results: The characteristic finding observed in all patients, except one, was the presence of high-density deposits in the posterior basal regions of the pleural space. These were typically linear in seven patients, nodular in two, and a combination of linear and nodular in six. In five patients talc deposits were present on both the visceral and parietal pleura separated by an effusion (a variant of the split pleura sign). Talc deposits extended into an interlobar fissure with associated fissural thickening in five patients. In patients who underwent more than one CT study, the appearances remained stable. Conclusions: The typical finding was the presence of high attenuation areas in the posterior basal regions of the pleural space. Two new appearances were observed: extension of talc deposits into the fissure and the presence of a variant of the split pleura sign. It is important to recognize these CT appearances so as not to confuse them with other conditions such as asbestos exposure

  6. Organization of higher-level chromatin structures (chromomere, chromonema and chromatin block) examined using visible light-induced chromatin photo-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval, E V; Prusov, A N; Kireev, I I; Fais, D; Polyakov, V Yu

    2002-01-01

    The method of chromatin photo-stabilization by the action of visible light in the presence of ethidium bromide was used for investigation of higher-level chromatin structures in isolated nuclei. As a model we used rat hepatocyte nuclei isolated in buffers which stabilized or destabilized nuclear matrix. Several higher-level chromatin structures were visualized: 100nm globules-chromomeres, chains of chromomeres-chromonemata, aggregates of chromomeres-blocks of condensed chromatin. All these structures were completely destroyed by 2M NaCl extraction independent of the matrix state, and DNA was extruded from the residual nuclei (nuclear matrices) into a halo. These results show that nuclear matrix proteins do not play the main role in the maintenance of higher-level chromatin structures. Preliminary irradiation led to the reduction of the halo width in the dose-dependent manner. In regions of condensed chromatin of irradiated nucleoids there were discrete complexes consisting of DNA fibers radiating from an electron-dense core and resembling the decondensed chromomeres or the rosette-like structures. As shown by the analysis of proteins bound to irradiated nuclei upon high-salt extraction, irradiation presumably stabilized the non-histone proteins. These results suggest that in interphase nuclei loop domains are folded into discrete higher-level chromatin complexes (chromomeres). These complexes are possibly maintained by putative non-histone proteins, which are extracted with high-salt buffers from non-irradiated nuclei. PMID:12127937

  7. Imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objection: To analyze the imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the X-ray and CT findings of 3 patients with cholesterol pneumonia confirmed pathologically and reviewed correlative literature. Results: Lesions similar to mass were found in X-ray and CT imaging of three cases. Two of them appeared cavity with fluid-level and one showed multiple ring enhancement after CT contrast. The course of disease was very. long and it had no respond to antibiotic therapy. Amounts of foam cells rich in cholesterol crystal were detected in pathological examination. Conclusions: Cholesterol pneumonia is a rare chronic pulmonary idiopathic disease, and the radiological findings can do some help to its diagnosis. (authors)

  8. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.)

  9. Youth Discrimination Based on Appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier Galland

    2006-01-01

    People sometimes feel that their rights have been violated or their dignity attacked in some of their social relationships. This is most often reported by young people. Young people are much more sensitive to different forms of ostracism than adults, and are particularly sensitive to attacks on their self-image: they complain more of humiliation than injustice or rights violation. Young people, particularly large girls and thin boys, believe that their physical appearance is the main reason f...

  10. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.)

  11. Cerebral candidiasis. Computed tomography appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaabane, M.; Ladeb, M.F.; Bouhaouala, M.H.; Ben Hammouda, M.; Ataalah, R.; Gannouni, A.; Krifa, H.

    1989-07-01

    A three year old child who had been suffering from oral candidiasis since the age of 1 year presented with osteitis of the clavicle, 2 cerebral frontal abscesses and an occipital abscess which extended across the calvaria and was associated with osteolysis. Histological and microbiological studies following surgery confirmed the diagnosis of candidiasis in this girl who was found to have IgA immunodefinciency. The authors report the computed tomographic appearance of the cerebral lesions and review the literature. (orig.).

  12. Object knowledge modulates colour appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Christoph; Valkova, Hanna; Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the memory colour effect for colour diagnostic artificial objects. Since knowledge about these objects and their colours has been learned in everyday life, these stimuli allow the investigation of the influence of acquired object knowledge on colour appearance. These investigations are relevant for questions about how object and colour information in high-level vision interact as well as for research about the influence of learning and experience on perception in general. In o...

  13. The AID-induced DNA damage response in chromatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Jeremy A; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-01-01

    formation of oncogenic chromosomal translocations. In this review, we focus the discussion on how chromatin-modifying activities and -binding proteins contribute to the native chromatin environment in which AID-induced DNA damage is targeted and repaired. Outstanding questions remain regarding the direct...

  14. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bandle, Russell; John, Sam;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on la...

  15. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  16. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, K Gh M; El-Sokary, A A E; Abdel-Ghaffar, A E; Abou El-Roos, M E A; Ahmed, Y F

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (Partificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  17. Lessons from Anaplasma phagocytophilum: Chromatin Remodeling by Bacterial Effectors

    OpenAIRE

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens can alter global host gene expression via histone modifications and chromatin remodeling in order to subvert host responses, including those involved with innate immunity, allowing for bacterial survival. Shigella flexneri, Listeria monocytogenes, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum express effector proteins that modify host histones and chromatin structure. A. phagocytophilum modulates granulocyte respiratory burst in part by dampening transcription of se...

  18. Nuclear visions enhanced: chromatin structure, organization and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Meshorer, Eran; Herrmann, Harald; Raška, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The EMBO Workshop on ‘Chromatin Structure, Organization and Dynamics' took place in April 2011 in Prague, Czech Republic. Participants presented data on the generation of models of the genome, working to correlate changes in the organization of chromatin with the functional state of the genome.

  19. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are unfamiliar with. These postmortem changes, such as the formation of gas and edema, should not be mistaken for pathological processes that occur in living persons. In this review we discuss the normal postmortem thoraco-abdominal changes and how these appear on CT images, as well as how to differentiate these findings from those of pathological processes. (orig.)

  20. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.-K., E-mail: leewk33@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Van Tonder, F.; Tartaglia, C.J.; Dagia, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, St Vincent' s Hospital, University of Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia); Cazzato, R.L. [Department of Radiology, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Rome (Italy); Duddalwar, V.A. [Department of Radiology, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Chang, S.D. [Department of Medical Imaging, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, British Columbia (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  1. Normal pediatric postmortem CT appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Willemijn M.; Bosboom, Dennis G.H.; Koopmanschap, Desiree H.J.L.M. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijn, Rick R. van [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem radiology is a rapidly developing specialty that is increasingly used as an adjunct to or substitute for conventional autopsy. The goal is to find patterns of disease and possibly the cause of death. Postmortem CT images bring to light processes of decomposition most radiologists are unfamiliar with. These postmortem changes, such as the formation of gas and edema, should not be mistaken for pathological processes that occur in living persons. In this review we discuss the normal postmortem thoraco-abdominal changes and how these appear on CT images, as well as how to differentiate these findings from those of pathological processes. (orig.)

  2. CT appearances of abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to review and illustrate the spectrum of computed tomography (CT) appearances of abdominal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis can affect any organ or tissue in the abdomen, and can be mistaken for other inflammatory or neoplastic conditions. The most common sites of tuberculosis in the abdomen include lymph nodes, genitourinary tract, peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal tract. The liver, spleen, biliary tract, pancreas and adrenals are rarely affected, but are more likely in HIV-seropositive patients and in miliary tuberculosis. This article should alert the radiologist to consider abdominal tuberculosis in the correct clinical setting to ensure timely diagnosis and enable appropriate treatment.

  3. CT appearances of pleural tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salahudeen, H.M. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hmdsal@gmail.com; Hoey, E.T.D. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Robertson, R.J.; Darby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is the imaging technique of choice for characterizing pleural masses with respect to their location, composition, and extent. CT also provides important information regarding invasion of the chest wall and surrounding structures. A spectrum of tumours can affect the pleura of which metastatic adenocarcinoma is the commonest cause of malignant pleural disease, while malignant mesothelioma is the most common primary pleural tumour. Certain CT features help differentiate benign from malignant processes. This pictorial review highlights the salient CT appearances of a range of tumours that may affect the pleura.

  4. Phosphorylation of histone variant regions in chromatin: unlocking the linker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G R

    2001-01-01

    Histone variants illuminate the behavior of chromatin through their unique structures and patterns of postsynthetic modification. This review examines the literature on heteromorphous histone structures in chromatin, structures that are primary targets for histone kinases and phosphatases in vivo. Special attention is paid to certain well-studied experimental systems: mammalian culture cells, chicken erythrocytes, sea urchin sperm, wheat sprouts, Tetrahymena, and budding yeast. A common theme emerges from these studies. Specialized, highly basic structures in histone variants promote chromatin condensation in a variety of developmental situations. Before, and sometimes after condensed chromatin is formed, the chromatin is rendered soluble by phosphorylation of the heteromorphous regions, preventing their interaction with linker DNA. A simple structural model accounting for histone variation and phosphorylation is presented. PMID:11467741

  5. Genome maintenance in the context of 4D chromatin condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sonia; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wen H

    2016-08-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packaged in the three-dimensional nuclear space by forming loops, domains, and compartments in a hierarchical manner. However, when duplicated genomes prepare for segregation, mitotic cells eliminate topologically associating domains and abandon the compartmentalized structure. Alongside chromatin architecture reorganization during the transition from interphase to mitosis, cells halt most DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. The intrinsically condensed chromatin serves as a sophisticated signaling module subjected to selective relaxation for programmed genomic activities. To understand the elaborate genome-epigenome interplay during cell cycle progression, the steady three-dimensional genome requires a time scale to form a dynamic four-dimensional and a more comprehensive portrait. In this review, we will dissect the functions of critical chromatin architectural components in constructing and maintaining an orderly packaged chromatin environment. We will also highlight the importance of the spatially and temporally conscious orchestration of chromatin remodeling to ensure high-fidelity genetic transmission. PMID:27098512

  6. Data on the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-09-01

    Here, we use LC-MS/MS and SWATH-MS to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos (DREX). This system allows easy manipulation of distinct aspects of chromatin assembly such as post-translational histone modifications, the levels of histone chaperones and the concentration of distinct DNA binding factors. In total, 480 proteins have been quantified as chromatin enriched factors and their binding kinetics have been monitored in the time course of 15 min, 1 h and 4 h of chromatin assembly. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach, Völker-Albert et al., 2016 "A quantitative proteomic analysis of in vitro assembled chromatin" [1], has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier submission number PRIDE: PXD002537 and PRIDE: PXD003445. PMID:27331114

  7. On the mechanochemical machinery underlying chromatin remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.

    This dissertation discuss two recent efforts, via a unique combination of structural bioinformatics and density functional theory, to unravel some of the details concerning how molecular machinery within the eukaryotic cell nucleus controls chromatin architecture. The first, a study of the 5-methylation of cytosine in 5'-CG-3' : 5'-CG-3' base-pair steps, reveals that the methyl groups roughen the local elastic energy landscape of the DNA. This enhances the probability of the canonical B-DNA structure transitioning into the undertwisted A-like and overtwisted C-like forms seen in nucleosomes, or looped segments of DNA bound to histones. The second part focuses on the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. The arginine residues are ob- served to apply a tunable mechanical load to the backbone, enabling precision-controlled activation of DNA deformations.

  8. Chromatin structure near transcriptionally active genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypersensitive domains are the most prominent features of transcriptionally active chromatin. In the case of the β/sup A/-globin gene, it seems likely that two or more protein factors are capable of binding to the DNA so tightly that the nucleosome is prevented from binding. We have shown that nucleosomes, once bound in the assembly process in vitro, cannot be displaced. The interaction of the 5S gene transcription factor TFIIIA with its target DNA also is blocked by histones, and it has been suggested that the activation of the gene must occur during replication, before histones are reassembled on the DNA. We suppose that a similar mechanism may govern the binding of the hypersensitivity factors. It should be noted that nucleosomes are excluded not only from the sites to which the factors bind, but also from the regions between the two domains and at either side. 12 refs., 6 figs

  9. Histone modifications and lamin A regulate chromatin protein dynamics in early embryonic stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Melcer, Shai; Hezroni, Hadas; Rand, Eyal; Nissim-Rafinia, Malka; Skoultchi, Arthur; Stewart, Colin L.; Bustin, Michael; Meshorer, Eran

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are characterized by unique epigenetic features including decondensed chromatin and hyperdynamic association of chromatin proteins with chromatin. Here we investigate the potential mechanisms that regulate chromatin plasticity in embryonic stem cells. Using epigenetic drugs and mutant embryonic stem cells lacking various chromatin proteins, we find that histone acetylation, G9a-mediated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation and lamin A expression, all affect chromatin pr...

  10. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po;

    2014-01-01

    such as CAF-1, DNMT1 and SUV39h1 are enriched in nascent chromatin, whereas 170 factors including histone H1, DNMT3, MBD1-3 and PRC1 show delayed association. This correlates with H4K5K12diAc removal and H3K9me1 accumulation, whereas H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 remain unchanged. Finally, we combine NCC...

  11. Three-Dimensional, Live-Cell Imaging of Chromatin Dynamics in Plant Nuclei Using Chromatin Tagging Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Takeshi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    In plants, chromatin dynamics spatiotemporally change in response to various environmental stimuli. However, little is known about chromatin dynamics in the nuclei of plants. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional, live-cell imaging method that can monitor chromatin dynamics in nuclei via a chromatin tagging system that can visualize specific genomic loci in living plant cells. The chromatin tagging system is based on a bacterial operator/repressor system in which the repressor is fused to fluorescent proteins. A recent refinement of promoters for the system solved the problem of gene silencing and abnormal pairing frequencies between operators. Using this system, we can detect the spatiotemporal dynamics of two homologous loci as two fluorescent signals within a nucleus and monitor the distance between homologous loci. These live-cell imaging methods will provide new insights into genome organization, development processes, and subnuclear responses to environmental stimuli in plants. PMID:27557696

  12. Ischiopubic insufficiency fractures: MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To evaluate the MRI appearances in insufficiency fractures. Design. A retrospective analysis of spin echo MR images with gadolinium-enhancement was undertaken with the emphasis on the signal change and the shape of the fracture gap and the adjacent bone marrow. Patients. Five elderly women who had ischiopubic insufficiency fractures (pubis, 4; ischium 1) underwent MRI to exclude the possibility of pathologic fractures. Results and conclusions. In no case was contrast enhancement noted at the fracture gap or the adjacent bone marrow, but a cleft-life, elongated bright signal area suggesting ''fluid collection'' was noted within the fracture gap. Absence of contrast enhancement and ''fluid collection'' at the fracture gap might suggest nonunion of a fracture, which is additional information provided only by MRI. (orig.)

  13. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA+ protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  14. Minireview: role of kinases and chromatin remodeling in progesterone signaling to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, Guillermo P; Nacht, A Silvina; Zaurín, Roser; Ballaré, Cecilia; Clausell, Jaime; Beato, Miguel

    2010-11-01

    Steroid hormones regulate gene expression by interaction of their receptors with hormone-responsive elements on DNA or with other transcription factors, but they can also activate cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Rapid activation of Erk by progestins via an interaction of the progesterone receptor (PR) with the estrogen receptor is critical for transcriptional activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter and other progesterone target genes. Erk activation leads to the phosphorylation of PR, activation of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1, and the recruitment of a complex of the three activated proteins and of P300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) to a single nucleosome, resulting in the phosphoacetylation of histone H3 and the displacement of heterochromatin protein 1γ. Hormone-dependent gene expression requires ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes. Two switch/sucrose nonfermentable-like complexes, Brahma-related gene 1-associated factor (BAF) and polybromo-BAF are present in breast cancer cells, but only BAF is recruited to the MMTV promoter and cooperates with PCAF during activation of hormone-responsive promoters. PCAF acetylates histone H3 at K14, an epigenetic mark recognized by BAF subunits, thus anchoring the complex to chromatin. BAF catalyzes localized displacement of histones H2A and H2B, facilitating access of nuclear factor 1 and additional PR complexes to the hidden hormone-responsive elements on the MMTV promoter. The linker histone H1 is a structural component of chromatin generally regarded as a general repressor of transcription. However, it contributes to a better regulation of the MMTV promoter by favoring a more homogeneous nucleosome positioning, thus reducing basal transcription and actually enhancing hormone induced transcription. During transcriptional activation, H1 is phosphorylated and displaced from the promoter. The kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 2 is activated after progesterone treatment and could

  15. Characteristics of thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated thymine dimer excision from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) chromatin in the cell-free reconstruction system. The normal-cell extract performed specific dimer excision from native chromatin and DNA isolated from 100 J/m2-irradiated cells. Such an excision in vitro was rapid and required high concentrations of extract. The extracts of XP group A, C and G cells were unable to excise from their own native-chromatin, but capable of excising from chromatin deprived of loosely bound nonhistone proteins with 0.35 M NaCl, as were from purified DNA. Thus, group A, C and G cells are most likely to be defective in the specific XP factors facilitating the excising activity under multicomponent regulation at the chromatin level. Further, either of group A, C and G extracts successfully complemented the native chromatin of the alternative groups. Uniquely, the XP group D extract excised dimers from native chromatin in the normal fashion under the condition. These results suggest that XP group A, C, D and G cells examined may not be defective in the dimer specific endonuclease and exonuclease per se. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  17. PREDICTION OF CHROMATIN STATES USING DNA SEQUENCE PROPERTIES

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabri, Rihab R.

    2013-06-01

    Activities of DNA are to a great extent controlled epigenetically through the internal struc- ture of chromatin. This structure is dynamic and is influenced by different modifications of histone proteins. Various combinations of epigenetic modification of histones pinpoint to different functional regions of the DNA determining the so-called chromatin states. How- ever, the characterization of chromatin states by the DNA sequence properties remains largely unknown. In this study we aim to explore whether DNA sequence patterns in the human genome can characterize different chromatin states. Using DNA sequence motifs we built binary classifiers for each chromatic state to eval- uate whether a given genomic sequence is a good candidate for belonging to a particular chromatin state. Of four classification algorithms (C4.5, Naive Bayes, Random Forest, and SVM) used for this purpose, the decision tree based classifiers (C4.5 and Random Forest) yielded best results among those we evaluated. Our results suggest that in general these models lack sufficient predictive power, although for four chromatin states (insulators, het- erochromatin, and two types of copy number variation) we found that presence of certain motifs in DNA sequences does imply an increased probability that such a sequence is one of these chromatin states.

  18. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsy Uppal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  19. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle

  20. CTCF-Mediated Functional Chromatin Interactome in Pluripotent Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoko, Lusy; Xu, Han; Li, Guoliang; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chew, Elaine; Schnapp, Marie; Lee, Charlie Wah Heng; Ye, Chaopeng; Ping, Joanne Lim Hui; Mulawadi, Fabianus; Wong, Eleanor; Sheng, Jianpeng; Zhang, Yubo; Poh, Thompson; Chan, Chee Seng; Kunarso, Galih; Shahab, Atif; Bourque, Guillaume; Cacheux-Rataboul, Valere; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ruan, Yijun; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are viewed as functional organizations that orchestrate spatial and temporal gene regulation. CTCF, the most characterized insulator-binding protein, has been implicated as a key genome organizer. Yet, little is known about CTCF-associated higher order chromatin structures at a global scale. Here, we applied Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End-Tag sequencing to elucidate the CTCF-chromatin interactome in pluripotent cells. From this analysis, 1,480 cis and 336 trans interacting loci were identified with high reproducibility and precision. Associating these chromatin interaction loci with their underlying epigenetic states, promoter activities, enhancer binding and nuclear lamina occupancy, we uncovered five distinct chromatin domains that suggest potential new models of CTCF function in chromatin organization and transcriptional control. Specifically, CTCF interactions demarcate chromatin-nuclear membrane attachments and influence proper gene expression through extensive crosstalk between promoters and regulatory elements. This highly complex nuclear organization offers insights towards the unifying principles governing genome plasticity and function. PMID:21685913

  1. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  2. Chromatinization of the KSHV Genome During the KSHV Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uppal, Timsy [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Jha, Hem C. [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia Street, MS 320, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Robertson, Erle S., E-mail: erle@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology and the Tumor Virology Program of the Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 201E Johnson Pavilion, 3610 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-14

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma herpesvirus family and is the causative agent of various lymphoproliferative diseases in humans. KSHV, like other herpesviruses, establishes life-long latent infection with the expression of a limited number of viral genes. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated by both the viral and cellular factors. Recent advancements in identifying the expression profiles of viral transcripts, using tilling arrays and next generation sequencing have identified additional coding and non-coding transcripts in the KSHV genome. Determining the functions of these transcripts will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms utilized by KSHV in altering cellular pathways involved in promoting cell growth and tumorigenesis. Replication of the viral genome is critical in maintaining the existing copies of the viral episomes during both latent and lytic phases of the viral life cycle. The replication of the viral episome is facilitated by viral components responsible for recruiting chromatin modifying enzymes and replication factors for altering the chromatin complexity and replication initiation functions, respectively. Importantly, chromatin modification of the viral genome plays a crucial role in determining whether the viral genome will persist as latent episome or undergo lytic reactivation. Additionally, chromatinization of the incoming virion DNA, which lacks chromatin structure, in the target cells during primary infection, helps in establishing latent infection. Here, we discuss the recent advancements on our understating of KSHV genome chromatinization and the consequences of chromatin modifications on viral life cycle.

  3. Tagging of MADS domain proteins for chromatin immunoprecipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Zuijlen Lisette GC

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most transcription factors fulfill their role in complexes and regulate their target genes upon binding to DNA motifs located in upstream regions or introns. To date, knowledge about transcription factor target genes and their corresponding transcription factor binding sites are still very limited. Two related methods that allow in vivo identification of transcription factor binding sites are chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and chromatin affinity purification (ChAP. For ChAP, the protein of interest is tagged with a peptide or protein, which can be used for affinity purification of the protein-DNA complex and hence, the identification of the target gene. Results Here, we present the results of experiments aiming at the development of a generic tagging approach for the Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins AGAMOUS, SEPALLATA3, and FRUITFULL. For this, Arabidopsis wild type plants were transformed with constructs containing a MADS-box gene fused to either a double Strep-tag® II-FLAG-tag, a triple HA-tag, or an eGFP-tag, all under the control of the constitutive double 35S Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV promoter. Strikingly, in all cases, the number of transformants with loss-of-function phenotypes was much larger than those with an overexpression phenotype. Using endogenous promoters in stead of the 35S CaMV resulted in a dramatic reduction in the frequency of loss-of-function phenotypes. Furthermore, pleiotropic defects occasionally caused by an overexpression strategy can be overcome by using the native promoter of the gene. Finally, a ChAP result is presented using GFP antibody on plants carrying a genomic fragment of a MADS-box gene fused to GFP. Conclusion This study revealed that MADS-box proteins are very sensitive to fusions with small peptide tags and GFP tags. Furthermore, for the expression of chimeric versions of MADS-box genes it is favorable to use the entire genomic region in frame to the tag of choice

  4. Nucleosome positioning and composition modulate in silico chromatin flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauvelin, N.; Lo, P.; Kulaeva, O. I.; Nizovtseva, E. V.; Diaz-Montes, J.; Zola, J.; Parashar, M.; Studitsky, V. M.; Olson, W. K.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic organization of chromatin plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression and in other fundamental cellular processes. The underlying physical basis of these activities lies in the sequential positioning, chemical composition, and intermolecular interactions of the nucleosomes—the familiar assemblies of ˜150 DNA base pairs and eight histone proteins—found on chromatin fibers. Here we introduce a mesoscale model of short nucleosomal arrays and a computational framework that make it possible to incorporate detailed structural features of DNA and histones in simulations of short chromatin constructs. We explore the effects of nucleosome positioning and the presence or absence of cationic N-terminal histone tails on the ‘local’ inter-nucleosomal interactions and the global deformations of the simulated chains. The correspondence between the predicted and observed effects of nucleosome composition and numbers on the long-range communication between the ends of designed nucleosome arrays lends credence to the model and to the molecular insights gleaned from the simulated structures. We also extract effective nucleosome-nucleosome potentials from the simulations and implement the potentials in a larger-scale computational treatment of regularly repeating chromatin fibers. Our results reveal a remarkable effect of nucleosome spacing on chromatin flexibility, with small changes in DNA linker length significantly altering the interactions of nucleosomes and the dimensions of the fiber as a whole. In addition, we find that these changes in nucleosome positioning influence the statistical properties of long chromatin constructs. That is, simulated chromatin fibers with the same number of nucleosomes exhibit polymeric behaviors ranging from Gaussian to worm-like, depending upon nucleosome spacing. These findings suggest that the physical and mechanical properties of chromatin can span a wide range of behaviors, depending on nucleosome

  5. Galaxies appear simpler than expected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, M J; Romano, J D; Garcia-Appadoo, D A; West, A A; Dalcanton, J J; Cortese, L

    2008-10-23

    Galaxies are complex systems the evolution of which apparently results from the interplay of dynamics, star formation, chemical enrichment and feedback from supernova explosions and supermassive black holes. The hierarchical theory of galaxy formation holds that galaxies are assembled from smaller pieces, through numerous mergers of cold dark matter. The properties of an individual galaxy should be controlled by six independent parameters including mass, angular momentum, baryon fraction, age and size, as well as by the accidents of its recent haphazard merger history. Here we report that a sample of galaxies that were first detected through their neutral hydrogen radio-frequency emission, and are thus free from optical selection effects, shows five independent correlations among six independent observables, despite having a wide range of properties. This implies that the structure of these galaxies must be controlled by a single parameter, although we cannot identify this parameter from our data set. Such a degree of organization appears to be at odds with hierarchical galaxy formation, a central tenet of the cold dark matter model in cosmology. PMID:18948949

  6. Appearing truthful generalizes across different deception situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mark G; Ekman, Paul

    2004-03-01

    The authors investigated whether the ability to appear truthful is specific to deception situations. Male participants were interrogated after they took part in 2 high-stake deception situations, one involving a mock crime and another involving a false opinion. The videotaped interrogations from each situation were shown to independent groups of undergraduate observers. The proportion of observers who judged each participant as truthful in one situation correlated highly with the proportion of observers who judged the same participant as truthful in the other situation. This was not correlated with physiognomy judgments. Follow-up studies revealed that although the participants showed consistency in their facial, body, and paralinguistic behaviors across situations, observers' judgments seemed to be driven only by the consistency of the dynamic facial behaviors. These results are discussed in terms of the evolutionary importance of the face in communication. PMID:15008651

  7. Interaction and conformational changes of chromatin with divalent ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Borochov, N; Ausio, J; Eisenberg, H

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of divalent ions with chromatin towards a closer understanding of the role of metal ions in the cell nucleus. The first row transition metal ion chlorides MnCl2, CoCl2, NiCl2 and CuCl2 lead to precipitation of chicken erythrocyte chromatin at a significantly lower concentration than the alkali earth metal chlorides MgCl2, CaCl2 and BaCl2. A similar distinction can be made for the compaction of chromatin to the "30 nm" solenoid higher order structure which ...

  8. The evolutionary history of histone H3 suggests a deep eukaryotic root of chromatin modifying mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postberg Jan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenotype of an organism is an outcome of both its genotype, encoding the primary sequence of proteins, and the developmental orchestration of gene expression. The substrate of gene expression in eukaryotes is the chromatin, whose fundamental units are nucleosomes composed of DNA wrapped around each two of the core histone types H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Key regulatory steps involved in the determination of chromatin conformations are posttranslational modifications (PTM at histone tails as well as the assembly of histone variants into nucleosomal arrays. Although the mechanistic background is fragmentary understood, it appears that the chromatin signature of metazoan cell types is inheritable over generations. Even less understood is the conservation of epigenetic mechanisms among eukaryotes and their origins. Results In the light of recent progress in understanding the tree of eukaryotic life we discovered the origin of histone H3 by phylogenetic analyses of variants from all supergroups, which allowed the reconstruction of ancestral states. We found that H3 variants evolved frequently but independently within related species of almost all eukaryotic supergroups. Interestingly, we found all core histone types encoded in the genome of a basal dinoflagellate and H3 variants in two other species, although is was reported that dinoflagellate chromatin is not organized into nucleosomes. Most probably one or more animal/nuclearid H3.3-like variants gave rise to H3 variants of all opisthokonts (animals, choanozoa, fungi, nuclearids, Amoebozoa. H3.2 and H3.1 as well as H3.1t are derivatives of H3.3, whereas H3.2 evolved already in early branching animals, such as Trichoplax. H3.1 and H3.1t are probably restricted to mammals. We deduced a model for protoH3 of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA confirming a remarkable degree of sequence conservation in comparison to canonical human H3.1. We found evidence that multiple PTMs are

  9. Lamin C and chromatin organization in Drosophila

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. V. Gurudatta; L. S. Shashidhara; Veena K. Parnaik

    2010-04-01

    Drosophila lamin C (LamC) is a developmentally regulated component of the nuclear lamina. The lamC gene is situated in the fifth intron of the essential gene tout velu (ttv). We carried out genetic analysis of lamC during development. Phenotypic analyses of RNAi-mediated downregulation of lamC expression as well as targeted misexpression of lamin C suggest a role for lamC in cell survival. Of particular interest in the context of laminopathies is the caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by the overexpression of lamin C. Interestingly, misexpression of lamin C in the central nervous system, where it is not normally expressed, did not affect organization of the nuclear lamina. lamC mutant alleles suppressed position effect variegation normally displayed at near-centromeric and telomeric regions. Further, both downregulation and misexpression of lamin C affected the distribution of heterochromatin protein 1. Our results suggest that Drosophila lamC has a tissue-specific role during development and is required for chromatin organization.

  10. Centromeric chromatin and its dynamics in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermontova, Inna; Sandmann, Michael; Mascher, Martin; Schmit, Anne-Catherine; Chabouté, Marie-Edith

    2015-07-01

    Centromeres are chromatin structures that are required for proper separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. The centromere is composed of centromeric DNA, often enriched in satellite repeats, and kinetochore complex proteins. To date, over 100 kinetochore components have been identified in various eukaryotes. Kinetochore assembly begins with incorporation of centromeric histone H3 variant CENH3 into centromeric nucleosomes. Protein components of the kinetochore are either present at centromeres throughout the cell cycle or localize to centromeres transiently, prior to attachment of microtubules to each kinetochore in prometaphase of mitotic cells. This is the case for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) proteins in animal cells. The SAC complex ensures equal separation of chromosomes between daughter nuclei by preventing anaphase onset before metaphase is complete, i.e. the sister kinetochores of all chromosomes are attached to spindle fibers from opposite poles. In this review, we focus on the organization of centromeric DNA and the kinetochore assembly in plants. We summarize recent advances regarding loading of CENH3 into the centromere, and the subcellular localization and protein-protein interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in kinetochore assembly and function. We describe the transcriptional activity of corresponding genes based on in silico analysis of their promoters and cell cycle-dependent expression. Additionally, barley homologs of all selected A. thaliana proteins have been identified in silico, and their sequences and domain structures are presented. PMID:25976696

  11. DNA-Protein interactions in nucleosomes and in Chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosslinking induced by ultraviolet light irradiation at 254 nm has been utilized to investigate the structure of chromatin and isolated nucleosomes. The results presented here imply that the four core histones, as well as histone H1, have reactive groups within a bond length of the DNA bases. In nucleosomes depleted of H1, all of the core histones react similarly with the DNA and form crosslinks. In chromatin, the rate of crosslinking of all histones to DNA is essentially similar. Comparison of mononucleosomes, dinucleosomes and whole chromatin shows that the rate of crosslinking increase significantly with increasing number of connected nucleosomes. These differences in the rate of crosslinking are interpreted in terms of interactions between neighbouring nucleosomes on the chromatin fiber, which are absent in an isolated mononucleosome. (orig.)

  12. Probing Chromatin-modifying Enzymes with Chemical Tools

    KAUST Repository

    Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-02-04

    Chromatin is the universal template of genetic information in all eukaryotic organisms. Chemical modifications of the DNA-packaging histone proteins and the DNA bases are crucial signaling events in directing the use and readout of eukaryotic genomes. The enzymes that install and remove these chromatin modifications as well as the proteins that bind these marks govern information that goes beyond the sequence of DNA. Therefore, these so-called epigenetic regulators are intensively studied and represent promising drug targets in modern medicine. We summarize and discuss recent advances in the field of chemical biology that have provided chromatin research with sophisticated tools for investigating the composition, activity, and target sites of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins.

  13. Shelterin Protects Chromosome Ends by Compacting Telomeric Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaria, Jigar N; Qin, Peiwu; Berk, Veysel; Chu, Steven; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2016-02-11

    Telomeres, repetitive DNA sequences at chromosome ends, are shielded against the DNA damage response (DDR) by the shelterin complex. To understand how shelterin protects telomere ends, we investigated the structural organization of telomeric chromatin in human cells using super-resolution microscopy. We found that telomeres form compact globular structures through a complex network of interactions between shelterin subunits and telomeric DNA, but not by DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, or histone trimethylation at telomeres and subtelomeric regions. Mutations that abrogate shelterin assembly or removal of individual subunits from telomeres cause up to a 10-fold increase in telomere volume. Decompacted telomeres accumulate DDR signals and become more accessible to telomere-associated proteins. Recompaction of telomeric chromatin using an orthogonal method displaces DDR signals from telomeres. These results reveal the chromatin remodeling activity of shelterin and demonstrate that shelterin-mediated compaction of telomeric chromatin provides robust protection of chromosome ends against the DDR machinery. PMID:26871633

  14. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  15. Insights into Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Rosa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The packaging of chromatin into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell requires an extraordinary degree of compaction and physical organization. In recent years, it has been shown that this organization is dynamically orchestrated to regulate responses to exogenous stimuli as well as to guide complex cell-type-specific developmental programs. Gene expression is regulated by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus, by distinct nucleosome compositions accomplished via differential modifications on the histone tails and through the replacement of core histones by histone variants. In this review, we focus on these aspects of chromatin organization and discuss novel approaches such as live cell imaging and photobleaching as important tools likely to give significant insights into our understanding of the very dynamic nature of chromatin and chromatin regulatory processes. We highlight the contribution plant studies have made in this area showing the potential advantages of plants as models in understanding this fundamental aspect of biology.

  16. Does seminal fluid viscosity influence sperm chromatin integrity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, K; Padwal, V; Balaiah, D

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to investigate whether viscosity alters sperm chromatin integrity. Semen samples were obtained from 269 men attending the infertility clinic. The viscosity was measured quantitatively by needle and syringe method and the viscosity ratio was calculated against distilled water. The chromatin integrity was evaluated by in vitro decondensation test using 1% SDS and 6 mM EDTA. According to the viscosity ratios the samples were divided into 2 groups: I, normal (ratio 9, n = 30) viscosity. Chromatin integrity was significantly lower in the group with higher viscosity. Significant decrease in sperm count and motility were seen in group II as compared to group I. Thus, hyperviscosity of seminal fluid alters the sperm chromatin integrity. PMID:11028927

  17. Nuclear envelope and chromatin, lock and key of genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Sophie; Foiani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    More than as an inert separation between the inside and outside of the nucleus, the nuclear envelope (NE) constitutes an active toll, which controls the import and export of molecules, and also a hub for a diversity of genomic processes, such as transcription, DNA repair, and chromatin dynamics. Proteins localized at the inner surface of the NE (such as lamins, nuclear pore proteins, lamin-associated proteins) interact with chromatin in a dynamic manner, contributing to the establishment of topological domains. In this review, we address the complex interplay between chromatin and NE. We discuss the divergence of this cross talk during evolution and comment both on the current established models and the most recent findings. In particular, we focus our attention on how the NE cooperates with chromatin in protecting the genome integrity. PMID:26008788

  18. Chromatin structure modulates DNA repair by photolyase in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Suter, B.; Livingstone-Zatchej, M; Thoma, F

    1997-01-01

    Yeast and many other organisms use nucleotide excision repair (NER) and photolyase in the presence of light (photoreactivation) to repair cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), a major class of DNA lesions generated by UV light. To study the role of photoreactivation at the chromatin level in vivo, we used yeast strains which contained minichromosomes (YRpTRURAP, YRpCS1) with well-characterized chromatin structures. The strains were either proficient (RAD1) or deficient (rad1 delta) in NER. In...

  19. Unsupervised pattern discovery in human chromatin structure through genomic segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael M; Buske, Orion J; Wang, Jie; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-05-01

    We trained Segway, a dynamic Bayesian network method, simultaneously on chromatin data from multiple experiments, including positions of histone modifications, transcription-factor binding and open chromatin, all derived from a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. In an unsupervised fashion, we identified patterns associated with transcription start sites, gene ends, enhancers, transcriptional regulator CTCF-binding regions and repressed regions. Software and genome browser tracks are at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/proj/segway/. PMID:22426492

  20. Higher order chromatin structure: bridging physics and biology

    OpenAIRE

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Mirny, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in microscopy and genomic techniques have provided new insight into spatial chromatin organization inside of the nucleus. In particular, chromosome conformation capture data has highlighted the relevance of polymer physics for high-order chromatin organization. In this context, we review basic polymer states, discuss how an appropriate polymer model can be determined from experimental data, and examine the success and limitations of various polymer models of high-order interph...

  1. How does the chromatin fiber deal with topological constraints?

    OpenAIRE

    Barbi, Maria; Mozziconacci, Julien; Victor, Jean-Marc

    2004-01-01

    In the nuclei of eukaryotic cells, DNA is packaged through several levels of compaction in an orderly retrievable way that enables the correct regulation of gene expression. The functional dynamics of this assembly involves the unwinding of the so-called 30 nm chromatin fiber and accordingly imposes strong topological constraints. We present a general method for computing both the twist and the writhe of any winding pattern. An explicit derivation is implemented for the chromatin fiber which ...

  2. Characterization of human UTF1, a chromatin-associated protein with repressor activity expressed in pluripotent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne M Kooistra; Thummer, Rajkumar P.; Eggen, Bart J.L.

    2009-01-01

    In mice, during early embryonic development UTF1 (undifferentiated embryonic cell transcription factor 1) is expressed in the inner cell mass of blastocysts and in adult animals expression is restricted to the gonads. (Embryonic) Cells expressing UTF1 are generally considered pluripotent, meaning they can differentiate into all cell types of the adult body. In mouse it was shown that UTF1 is tightly associated with chromatin and that it is required for proper differentiation of embryonic carc...

  3. Chromatin architecture, CTCF and V(D)J recombination: managing long-distance relationships at antigen receptor loci1

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Han-Yu; Krangel, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The rearrangement of T and B lymphocyte antigen receptor loci occurs within a highly complex chromosomal environment and is orchestrated through complex mechanisms. Over the past decade, a large body of literature has highlighted the significance of chromatin architecture at antigen receptor loci in supporting the genomic assembly process: in preparation for recombination, these loci tend to contract and form multiple loops that shorten the distances between gene segments and facilitate recom...

  4. Complimentary Weightism: The Potential Costs of Appearance-Related Commentary for Women's Self-Objectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, Rachel M.; Herbozo, Sylvia; Thompson, J. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of receiving compliments about appearance. An ethnically diverse sample of 220 college women completed self-report measures of appearance commentary, trait self-objectification, body surveillance, and body dissatisfaction. Results indicated that the impact of appearance criticisms and compliments, but not their…

  5. ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Factors and Their Roles in Affecting Nucleosome Fiber Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Lusser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors of the SNF2 family are key components of the cellular machineries that shape and regulate chromatin structure and function. Members of this group of proteins have broad and heterogeneous functions ranging from controlling gene activity, facilitating DNA damage repair, promoting homologous recombination to maintaining genomic stability. Several chromatin remodeling factors are critical components of nucleosome assembly processes, and recent reports have identified specific functions of distinct chromatin remodeling factors in the assembly of variant histones into chromatin. In this review we will discuss the specific roles of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors in determining nucleosome composition and, thus, chromatin fiber properties.

  6. Minor groove binder distamycin remodels chromatin but inhibits transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parijat Majumder

    Full Text Available The condensed structure of chromatin limits access of cellular machinery towards template DNA. This in turn represses essential processes like transcription, replication, repair and recombination. The repression is alleviated by a variety of energy dependent processes, collectively known as "chromatin remodeling". In a eukaryotic cell, a fine balance between condensed and de-condensed states of chromatin helps to maintain an optimum level of gene expression. DNA binding small molecules have the potential to perturb such equilibrium. We present herein the study of an oligopeptide antibiotic distamycin, which binds to the minor groove of B-DNA. Chromatin mobility assays and circular dichroism spectroscopy have been employed to study the effect of distamycin on chromatosomes, isolated from the liver of Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that distamycin is capable of remodeling both chromatosomes and reconstituted nucleosomes, and the remodeling takes place in an ATP-independent manner. Binding of distamycin to the linker and nucleosomal DNA culminates in eviction of the linker histone and the formation of a population of off-centered nucleosomes. This hints at a possible corkscrew type motion of the DNA with respect to the histone octamer. Our results indicate that distamycin in spite of remodeling chromatin, inhibits transcription from both DNA and chromatin templates. Therefore, the DNA that is made accessible due to remodeling is either structurally incompetent for transcription, or bound distamycin poses a roadblock for the transcription machinery to advance.

  7. Structural Basis of Polycomb Bodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmigová, J.; Juda, P.; Krejčí, Jana; Raška, I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2014), s. 13-20. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G157; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0030 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Polycomb group proteins * Polycomb body * post-translational chromatin modifications Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  8. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  9. Predicting interest in cosmetic surgery: interactive effects of appearance-based rejection sensitivity and negative appearance comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lora E; Calogero, Rachel M; Harwin, Melissa J; DiRaddo, Ann Marie

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated effects of appearance-based rejection sensitivity (Appearance-RS) - the dispositional tendency to anxiously expect rejection based on one's appearance - in a sample of 133 American college students. Participants were randomly assigned to write an essay about either a negative or positive appearance comment they had received in the past. Compared to participants with lower Appearance-RS, those with higher Appearance-RS felt more rejected and expressed greater interest in cosmetic surgery after recalling a negative versus positive appearance comment. Content analysis of the essays revealed that negative appearance comments were most often made in reference to one's body weight/shape/size; positive appearance comments were most often made in reference to one's overall appearance. Peers/friends/romantic partners were the most frequently cited source of both positive and negative appearance comments. Overall, this research suggests that the interaction between the person and the situation is important to consider when predicting cosmetic surgery interest. PMID:19409866

  10. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response

  11. Structural Fluctuations of the Chromatin Fiber within Topologically Associating Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiana, Guido; Amitai, Assaf; Pollex, Tim; Piolot, Tristan; Holcman, David; Heard, Edith; Giorgetti, Luca

    2016-03-29

    Experiments based on chromosome conformation capture have shown that mammalian genomes are partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs), within which the chromatin fiber preferentially interacts. TADs may provide three-dimensional scaffolds allowing genes to contact their appropriate distal regulatory DNA sequences (e.g., enhancers) and thus to be properly regulated. Understanding the cell-to-cell and temporal variability of the chromatin fiber within TADs, and what determines them, is thus of great importance to better understand transcriptional regulation. We recently described an equilibrium polymer model that can accurately predict cell-to-cell variation of chromosome conformation within single TADs, from chromosome conformation capture-based data. Here we further analyze the conformational and energetic properties of our model. We show that the chromatin fiber within TADs can easily fluctuate between several conformational states, which are hierarchically organized and are not separated by important free energy barriers, and that this is facilitated by the fact that the chromatin fiber within TADs is close to the onset of the coil-globule transition. We further show that in this dynamic state the properties of the chromatin fiber, and its contact probabilities in particular, are determined in a nontrivial manner not only by site-specific interactions between strongly interacting loci along the fiber, but also by nonlocal correlations between pairs of contacts. Finally, we use live-cell experiments to measure the dynamics of the chromatin fiber in mouse embryonic stem cells, in combination with dynamical simulations, and predict that conformational changes within one TAD are likely to occur on timescales that are much shorter than the duration of one cell cycle. This suggests that genes and their regulatory elements may come together and disassociate several times during a cell cycle. These results have important implications for transcriptional

  12. Body image inflexibility mediates the relationship between body image evaluation and maladaptive body image coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Serafino G

    2016-03-01

    Body image inflexibility, the unwillingness to experience negative appearance-related thoughts and emotions, is associated with negative body image and eating disorder symptoms. The present study investigated whether body image inflexibility mediated the relationship between body image evaluation and maladaptive body image coping strategies (appearance-fixing and experiential avoidance) in a college and community sample comprising 156 females aged 18-51 years (M=22.76, SD=6.96). Controlling for recruitment source (college vs. community), body image inflexibility fully mediated the relationship between body image evaluation and maladaptive body image coping strategies. Results indicated that an unwillingness to experience negative appearance-related thoughts and emotions is likely responsible for negative body image evaluation's relationship to appearance-fixing behaviours and experiential avoidance. Findings support extant evidence that interventions that explicitly target body image inflexibility, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, may have utility in treating body dissatisfaction in nonclinical populations. PMID:26595857

  13. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor I with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Daniel C B; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, CDC28, phosphorylates Cac1p on serines 94 and 515 in early S phase and regulates its association with chromatin, but not its association with PCNA. Mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites of CDC28 but not of CDC7 substantially reduce the in vivo phosphorylation of Cac1p. However, mutations in the putative CDC7 target sites on Cac1p reduce its stability. The association of CAF-I with chromatin is impaired in a cdc28-1 mutant and to a lesser extent in a cdc7-1 mutant. In addition, mutations in the Cac1p-phosphorylation sites by both CDC28 and CDC7 reduce gene silencing at the telomeres. We propose that this phosphorylation represents a regulatory step in the recruitment of CAF-I to chromatin in early S phase that is distinct from the association of CAF-I with PCNA. Hence, we implicate CDC28 in the regulation of chromatin reassembly during DNA replication. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights on the links between cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and chromatin reassembly. PMID:25602519

  14. Activation of tachykinin, neurokinin 3 receptors affects chromatin structure and gene expression by means of histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Amit; Sylar, Elise; Flynn, Francis W

    2012-12-01

    The tachykinin, neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) is a g-protein coupled receptor that is broadly distributed in the nervous system and exerts its diverse physiological actions through multiple signaling pathways. Despite the role of the receptor system in a range of biological functions, the effects of NK3R activation on chromatin dynamics and gene expression have received limited attention. The present work determined the effects of senktide, a selective NK3R agonist, on chromatin organization, acetylation, and gene expression, using qRT-PCR, in a hypothalamic cell line (CLU 209) that expresses the NK3R. Senktide (1 nM, 10nM) caused a relaxation of chromatin, an increase in global acetylation of histone H3 and H4, and an increase in the expression of a common set of genes involved in cell signaling, cell growth, and synaptic plasticity. Pretreatment with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor (garcinol and 2-methylene y-butylactone), that inhibits p300, p300/CREB binding protein (CBP) associated factor (PCAF), and GCN 5, prevented the senktide-induced increase in expression of most, but not all, of the genes upregulated in response to 1 nM and 10nM senktide. Treatment with 100 nM had the opposite effect: a reduction in chromatin relaxation and decreased acetylation. The expression of four genes was significantly decreased and the HAT inhibitor had a limited effect in blocking the upregulation of genes in response to 100 nM senktide. Activation of the NK3R appears to recruit multiple pathways, including acetylation, and possibly histone deactylases, histone methylases, or DNA methylases to affect chromatin structure and gene expression. PMID:22985858

  15. Chromatin: a tunable spring at work inside chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haïm, E; Lesne, A; Victor, J M

    2001-11-01

    This paper focuses on mechanical aspects of chromatin biological functioning. Within a basic geometric modeling of the chromatin assembly, we give a complete set of elastic constants (twist and bend persistence lengths, stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling constant) of the so-called 30-nm chromatin fiber, in terms of DNA elastic properties and geometric properties of the fiber assembly. The computation naturally embeds the fiber within a current analytical model known as the "extensible wormlike rope," allowing a straightforward prediction of the force-extension curves. We show that these elastic constants are strongly sensitive to the linker length, up to 1 bp, or equivalently to its twist, and might locally reach very low values, yielding a highly flexible and extensible domain in the fiber. In particular, the twist-stretch coupling constant, reflecting the chirality of the chromatin fiber, exhibits steep variations, and sign changes when the linker length is varied. We argue that this tunable elasticity might be a key feature for chromatin function, for instance, in the initiation and regulation of transcription. PMID:11735982

  16. Brd2 gene disruption causes ‘metabolically healthy’ obesity: Epigenetic and chromatin-based mechanisms that uncouple obesity from Type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fangnian; Deeney, Jude T.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2013-01-01

    Disturbed body energy balance can lead to obesity and obesity-driven diseases such as Type 2 diabetes, which have reached an epidemic level. Evidence indicates that obesity induced inflammation is a major cause of insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Environmental factors, such as nutrients, affect body energy balance through epigenetic or chromatin-based mechanisms. As a bromodomain and external domain family transcription regulator, Brd2 regulates expression of many genes through interpr...

  17. Interactions of chromatin context, binding site sequence content, and sequence evolution in stress-induced p53 occupancy and transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs. To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, gene expression, H3K4me3, chromatin accessibility (DNase 1 hypersensitivity, DHS, ENCODE chromatin states, p53RE sequence, and evolutionary conservation. We observed that the inducible expression of p53-regulated genes was associated with the steady-state chromatin status of the cell. Most highly inducible p53-regulated genes were suppressed at baseline and marked by repressive histone modifications or displayed CTCF binding. Comparison of p53RE sequences residing in different chromatin contexts demonstrated that weaker p53REs resided in open promoters, while stronger p53REs were located within enhancers and repressed chromatin. p53 occupancy was strongly correlated with similarity of the target DNA sequences to the p53RE consensus, but surprisingly, inversely correlated with pre-existing nucleosome accessibility (DHS and evolutionary conservation at the p53RE. Occupancy by p53 of REs that overlapped transposable element (TE repeats was significantly higher (p<10-7 and correlated with stronger p53RE sequences (p<10-110 relative to nonTE-associated p53REs, particularly for MLT1H, LTR10B, and Mer61 TEs. However, binding at these elements was generally not associated with transactivation of adjacent genes. Occupied p53REs located in L2-like TEs were unique in displaying highly negative PhyloP scores (predicted fast-evolving and being associated with altered H3K4me3 and DHS levels. These results underscore the systematic interaction between chromatin status and p53

  18. The Proportion of Chromatin Graded between Closed and Open States Determines the Level of Transcripts Derived from Distinct Promoters in the CYP19 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotomura, Naoe; Harada, Nobuhiro; Ishihara, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The human CYP19 gene encodes aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens. CYP19 mRNA variants are transcribed mainly from three promoters. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the relative amounts of each of the three transcripts and determine the on/off state of the promoters. While some of the promoters were silent, CYP19 mRNA production differed among the other promoters, whose estimated transcription levels were 0.001% to 0.1% of that of the TUBB control gene. To investigate the structural aspects of chromatin that were responsible for this wide range of activity of the CYP19 promoters, we used a fractionation protocol, designated SEVENS, which sequentially separates densely packed nucleosomes from dispersed nucleosomes. The fractional distribution of each inactive promoter showed a similar pattern to that of the repressed reference loci; the inactive regions were distributed toward lower fractions, in which closed chromatin comprising packed nucleosomes was enriched. In contrast, active CYP19 promoters were raised toward upper fractions, including dispersed nucleosomes in open chromatin. Importantly, these active promoters were moderately enriched in the upper fractions as compared to active reference loci, such as the TUBB promoter; the proportion of open chromatin appeared to be positively correlated to the promoter strength. These results, together with ectopic transcription accompanied by an increase in the proportion of open chromatin in cells treated with an H3K27me inhibitor, indicate that CYP19 mRNA could be transcribed from a promoter in which chromatin is shifted toward an open state in the equilibrium between closed and open chromatin. PMID:26020632

  19. The Proportion of Chromatin Graded between Closed and Open States Determines the Level of Transcripts Derived from Distinct Promoters in the CYP19 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoe Kotomura

    Full Text Available The human CYP19 gene encodes aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens. CYP19 mRNA variants are transcribed mainly from three promoters. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the relative amounts of each of the three transcripts and determine the on/off state of the promoters. While some of the promoters were silent, CYP19 mRNA production differed among the other promoters, whose estimated transcription levels were 0.001% to 0.1% of that of the TUBB control gene. To investigate the structural aspects of chromatin that were responsible for this wide range of activity of the CYP19 promoters, we used a fractionation protocol, designated SEVENS, which sequentially separates densely packed nucleosomes from dispersed nucleosomes. The fractional distribution of each inactive promoter showed a similar pattern to that of the repressed reference loci; the inactive regions were distributed toward lower fractions, in which closed chromatin comprising packed nucleosomes was enriched. In contrast, active CYP19 promoters were raised toward upper fractions, including dispersed nucleosomes in open chromatin. Importantly, these active promoters were moderately enriched in the upper fractions as compared to active reference loci, such as the TUBB promoter; the proportion of open chromatin appeared to be positively correlated to the promoter strength. These results, together with ectopic transcription accompanied by an increase in the proportion of open chromatin in cells treated with an H3K27me inhibitor, indicate that CYP19 mRNA could be transcribed from a promoter in which chromatin is shifted toward an open state in the equilibrium between closed and open chromatin.

  20. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  1. Sliding and peeling of histone during chromatin remodelling

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific stretches of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. We investigate the mechanism of peeling of the histone spool, and its complete detachment, from the dsDNA by a CRE. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean times for histone detachment. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the measurable quantities can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments.

  2. H4K44 Acetylation Facilitates Chromatin Accessibility during Meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialei Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination hotspots are associated with histone post-translational modifications and open chromatin. However, it remains unclear how histone modifications and chromatin structure regulate meiotic recombination. Here, we identify acetylation of histone H4 at Lys44 (H4K44ac occurring on the nucleosomal lateral surface. We show that H4K44 is acetylated at pre-meiosis and meiosis and displays genome-wide enrichment at recombination hotspots in meiosis. Acetylation at H4K44 is required for normal meiotic recombination, normal levels of double-strand breaks (DSBs during meiosis, and optimal sporulation. Non-modifiable H4K44R results in increased nucleosomal occupancy around DSB hotspots. Our results indicate that H4K44ac functions to facilitate chromatin accessibility favorable for normal DSB formation and meiotic recombination.

  3. MNase titration reveals differences between nucleosome occupancy and chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieczkowski, Jakub; Cook, April; Bowman, Sarah K; Mueller, Britta; Alver, Burak H; Kundu, Sharmistha; Deaton, Aimee M; Urban, Jennifer A; Larschan, Erica; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E; Tolstorukov, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin accessibility plays a fundamental role in gene regulation. Nucleosome placement, usually measured by quantifying protection of DNA from enzymatic digestion, can regulate accessibility. We introduce a metric that uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion in a novel manner to measure chromatin accessibility by combining information from several digests of increasing depths. This metric, MACC (MNase accessibility), quantifies the inherent heterogeneity of nucleosome accessibility in which some nucleosomes are seen preferentially at high MNase and some at low MNase. MACC interrogates each genomic locus, measuring both nucleosome location and accessibility in the same assay. MACC can be performed either with or without a histone immunoprecipitation step, and thereby compares histone and non-histone protection. We find that changes in accessibility at enhancers, promoters and other regulatory regions do not correlate with changes in nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, high nucleosome occupancy does not necessarily preclude high accessibility, which reveals novel principles of chromatin regulation. PMID:27151365

  4. Structural plasticity of single chromatin fibers revealed by torsional manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Bancaud, Aurelien; Barbi, Maria; Wagner, Gaudeline; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe; Croquette, Vincent; Victor, Jean-Marc; Prunell, Ariel; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are used to study the mechanical response under torsion of single nucleosome arrays reconstituted on tandem repeats of 5S positioning sequences. Regular arrays are extremely resilient and can reversibly accommodate a large amount of supercoiling without much change in length. This behavior is quantitatively described by a molecular model of the chromatin 3-D architecture. In this model, we assume the existence of a dynamic equilibrium between three conformations of the nucleosome, which are determined by the crossing status of the entry/exit DNAs (positive, null or negative). Torsional strain, in displacing that equilibrium, extensively reorganizes the fiber architecture. The model explains a number of long-standing topological questions regarding DNA in chromatin, and may provide the ground to better understand the dynamic binding of most chromatin-associated proteins.

  5. Rapid genome-scale mapping of chromatin accessibility in tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grøntved Lars

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The challenge in extracting genome-wide chromatin features from limiting clinical samples poses a significant hurdle in identification of regulatory marks that impact the physiological or pathological state. Current methods that identify nuclease accessible chromatin are reliant on large amounts of purified nuclei as starting material. This complicates analysis of trace clinical tissue samples that are often stored frozen. We have developed an alternative nuclease based procedure to bypass nuclear preparation to interrogate nuclease accessible regions in frozen tissue samples. Results Here we introduce a novel technique that specifically identifies Tissue Accessible Chromatin (TACh. The TACh method uses pulverized frozen tissue as starting material and employs one of the two robust endonucleases, Benzonase or Cyansase, which are fully active under a range of stringent conditions such as high levels of detergent and DTT. As a proof of principle we applied TACh to frozen mouse liver tissue. Combined with massive parallel sequencing TACh identifies accessible regions that are associated with euchromatic features and accessibility at transcriptional start sites correlates positively with levels of gene transcription. Accessible chromatin identified by TACh overlaps to a large extend with accessible chromatin identified by DNase I using nuclei purified from freshly isolated liver tissue as starting material. The similarities are most pronounced at highly accessible regions, whereas identification of less accessible regions tends to be more divergence between nucleases. Interestingly, we show that some of the differences between DNase I and Benzonase relate to their intrinsic sequence biases and accordingly accessibility of CpG islands is probed more efficiently using TACh. Conclusion The TACh methodology identifies accessible chromatin derived from frozen tissue samples. We propose that this simple, robust approach can be applied

  6. Single-epitope recognition imaging of native chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct visualization of chromatin has the potential to provide important insights into epigenetic processes. In particular, atomic force microscopy (AFM can visualize single nucleosomes under physiological ionic conditions. However, AFM has mostly been applied to chromatin that has been reconstituted in vitro, and its potential as a tool for the dissection of native nucleosomes has not been explored. Recently we applied AFM to native Drosophila chromatin containing the centromere-specific histone 3 (CenH3, showing that it is greatly enriched in smaller particles. Taken together with biochemical analyses of CenH3 nucleosomes, we propose that centromeric nucleosomes are hemisomes, with one turn of DNA wrapped around a particle consisting of one molecule each of centromere-specific CenH3, H4, H2A and H2B. Results Here we apply a recognition mode of AFM imaging to directly identify CenH3 within histone core particles released from native centromeric chromatin. More than 90% of these particles were found to be tetrameric in height. The specificity of recognition was confirmed by blocking with a CenH3 peptide, and the strength of the interaction was quantified by force measurements. These results imply that the particles imaged by AFM are indeed mature CenH3-containing hemisomes. Conclusion Efficient and highly specific recognition of CenH3 in histone core particles isolated from native centromeric chromatin demonstrates that tetramers are the predominant form of centromeric nucleosomes in mature tetramers. Our findings provide proof of principle that this approach can yield insights into chromatin biology using direct and rapid detection of native nucleosomes in physiological salt concentrations.

  7. Phenotypic plasticity in Drosophila pigmentation caused by temperature sensitivity of a chromatin regulator network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Gibert

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to produce contrasting phenotypes in different environments. Although many examples have been described, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood. In particular, it is not clear how phenotypic plasticity is related to buffering, the maintenance of a constant phenotype against genetic or environmental variation. We investigate here the genetic basis of a particularly well described plastic phenotype: the abdominal pigmentation in female Drosophila melanogaster. Cold temperature induces a dark pigmentation, in particular in posterior segments, while higher temperature has the opposite effect. We show that the homeotic gene Abdominal-B (Abd-B has a major role in the plasticity of pigmentation in the abdomen. Abd-B plays opposite roles on melanin production through the regulation of several pigmentation enzymes. This makes the control of pigmentation very unstable in the posterior abdomen, and we show that the relative spatio-temporal expression of limiting pigmentation enzymes in this region of the body is thermosensitive. Temperature acts on melanin production by modulating a chromatin regulator network, interacting genetically with the transcription factor bric-à-brac (bab, a target of Abd-B and Hsp83, encoding the chaperone Hsp90. Genetic disruption of this chromatin regulator network increases the effect of temperature and the instability of the pigmentation pattern in the posterior abdomen. Colocalizations on polytene chromosomes suggest that BAB and these chromatin regulators cooperate in the regulation of many targets, including several pigmentation enzymes. We show that they are also involved in sex comb development in males and that genetic destabilization of this network is also strongly modulated by temperature for this phenotype. Thus, we propose that phenotypic plasticity of pigmentation is a side effect reflecting a global impact of temperature on epigenetic mechanisms

  8. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Relster, Mette Marie; Greve, Katrine Buch Viden;

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes regulate cellular identity through epigenetic programming of chromatin. Here, we show that SSX2, a germline-specific protein ectopically expressed in melanoma and other types of human cancers, is a chromatin-associated protein that antagonizes BMI1 and EZH2 PcG body...

  9. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  10. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  11. Modulation of chromatin modifying complexes by noncoding RNAs in trans

    OpenAIRE

    Názer, Ezequiel; Lei, Elissa P.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a central role for ncRNA in numerous aspects of chromatin function. For instance, ncRNAs can act as a scaffold for the recruitment of certain chromatin modifying complexes to specific sites within the genome. It is easily imaginable how this can occur in cis, but examples also exist whereby targeting of complexes by ncRNA occurs in trans to the site of transcription. Moreover, association of an ncRNA with a particular locus can trigger localization of the gene to ...

  12. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles of the...... polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  13. Effect of γ-radiation on the interaction between DNA and nonhiston proteins of the chromatin and nuclear sap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of the chromatin nonhiston proteins (NHP) and nuclear sap proteins (PNS) with DNA has been studied by two methods: by fixing the protein/14C-DNA complexes on nitrocellulose filters and by the chromatography of proteins, labelled with 32P, on polyacrylamide-agar columns containing DNA. Irradiated DNA has been shown to bind a little larger amount of NHP and PNS, and much more firmly, than native DNA. The effect increases with dose, and it is connected with the appearance of denaturated sites in DNA. Irradiation of NHP does not essentially influence their ability to bind DNA but deranges a specific interaction between part of NHP and homologous DNA. A possible role of radiation impairment of DNA interactions with NHP and PNS in modifying the structure and function of the chromatin is discussed

  14. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  15. CDC28 phosphorylates Cac1p and regulates the association of chromatin assembly factor i with chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery, Daniel CB; Kakusho, Naoko; You, Zhiying; Gharib, Marlene; Wyse, Brandon; Drury, Erin; Weinreich, Michael; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin Assembly Factor I (CAF-I) plays a key role in the replication-coupled assembly of nucleosomes. It is expected that its function is linked to the regulation of the cell cycle, but little detail is available. Current models suggest that CAF-I is recruited to replication forks and to chromatin via an interaction between its Cac1p subunit and the replication sliding clamp, PCNA, and that this interaction is stimulated by the kinase CDC7. Here we show that another kinase, ...

  16. Interaction of maize chromatin-associated HMG proteins with mononucleosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichota, J.; Grasser, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    maize HMGA and five different HMGB proteins with mononucleosomes (containing approx. 165 bp of DNA) purified from micrococcal nuclease-digested maize chromatin. The HMGB proteins interacted with the nucleosomes independent of the presence of the linker histone H1, while the binding of HMGA in the...

  17. Linking Morphogen and Chromatin in the Hair Follicle

    OpenAIRE

    Mesa, Kailin R; Greco, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Xiong et al. (2013) identify a critical role for the chromatin remodeler, Brg1, in hair follicle stem cell maintenance and epidermal repair. Brg1 interacts with the Shh9 signaling pathway to create a positive feedback loop that fuels hair follicle growth.

  18. ATP independent and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unraveling the biochemistry of chromatin dynamics during DNA replication, repair, recombination as well as transcription is the current challenge in biology. The nucleosomes containing histone octamer are the crucial elements responsible for winding and unwinding eukaryotic DNA. During DNA centric events, these nucleosomes translocate along the DNA with concomitant covalent modifications of histones. We explored these mechanisms in wheat seedlings after irradiation with survivable dose of 60Co-γ radiations. The histones isolated from irradiated seedlings showed that global acetylation of H3 decreased and H4 increased in dose depend manner till 100 grays. Time course of individual modifications showed that for H3K4 and H3K9 acetylation decreased, whereas H3S10, phosphorylation increased. There were fluctuations in acetylation of H4K5, H4K12 and H4K16, whereas H4K8 showed hyperacetylation. We found ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity as trans-transfer of the nucleosomes from wheat native donor chromatin on a labeled nucleosome positioning sequence and cis-transfer of the mononucleosomes in vitro. However, there was no significant change in this activity in extracts obtained from irradiated wheat seedlings. This is the first report on, demonstration of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity and site specific H3 and H4 modifications in response to exposure to ionizing radiation in case of plants. (author)

  19. Chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, Godelieve

    2012-01-01

    During my PhD project, I studied the role of several chromatin remodelers in the DNA double strand break (DSB) response. We discovered that both CHD4 and SMARCA5 are required for ubiquitin signaling through the E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168, which is a central signaling event in the response

  20. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  1. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. PMID:24522270

  2. Rearrangement of chromatin domains during development in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassetzky, Y; Hair, A; Méchali, M

    2000-06-15

    A dynamic change in the organization of different gene domains transcribed by RNA polymerase I, II, or III occurs during the progression from quiescent [pre-midblastula transition (pre-MBT)] to active (post-MBT) embryos during Xenopus development. In the rDNA, c-myc, and somatic 5S gene domains, a transition from random to specific anchorage to the nuclear matrix occurs when chromatin domains become active. The keratin gene domain was also randomly associated to the nuclear matrix before MBT, whereas a defined attachment site was found in keratinocytes. In agreement with this specification, ligation-mediated (LM)-PCR genomic footprinting carried out on the subpopulation of 5S domains specifically attached to the matrix reveals the hallmarks of determined chromatin after the midblastula transition. In contrast, the same analysis performed on the total 5S gene population does not reveal specific chromatin organization, validating the use of nuclear matrix fractionation to unveil active chromatin domains. These data provide a means for the determination of active chromosomal territories in the embryo and emphasize the role of nuclear architecture in regulated gene expression during development. PMID:10859171

  3. Effect of triiodothyronine on rat liver chromatin protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1) Injection of triiodothyronine to rats stimulates protein kinase activity in liver chromatin nonhistone proteins. A significant increase was found after two daily injections. A 4-fold increase was observed with the purified enzyme after eight daily injections of the hormone. No variations were observed in cytosol protein kinase activity. Electrophoretic pattern, effect of heat denaturation, effect of p-hydroxymercuribenzoate seem to indicate that the enzyme present in treated rats is not identical to the enzyme in control animals, which suggests that thyroid hormone has induced nuclear protein kinase. Diiodothyronine, 3, 3', 5'-triiodothyronine have no effect on protein kinase. 2) Chromatin non-histone proteins isolated from rats injected with triiodothyronine incorporated more 32P when incubated with [γ-32P]ATP than the chromatin proteins from untreated rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the in vitro 32P incorporation. It is suggested that some of the biological activity of thyroid hormone could be mediated through its effect on chromatin non-histone proteins. (orig.)

  4. Control of the Transition to Flowering by Chromatin Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuehui He

    2009-01-01

    The timing of floral transition is critical to reproductive success in angiosperms and is genetically controlled by a network of flowering genes.In Arabidopsis,expression of certain flowering genes is regulated by various chromatin modifications,among which are two central regulators of flowering,namely FLOWERING LOCUS C(FLC) and FLOWERING LOCUS T(FT).Recent studies have revealed that a number of chromatin-modifying components are involved in activation or repression of FLC expression.Activation of FLC expression is associated with various 'active' chromatin modifications including acetylation of core histone tails,histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) methylation,H2B monoubiquitination,H3 lysine-36 (H3K36) di- and tri-methylation and deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z,whereas various 'repressive' histone modifications are associated with FLC repression,including histone deacetylation,H3K4 demethylation,histone H3 lysine-9(H3Kg) and H3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methylation,and histone arginine methylation.In addition,recent studies have revealed that Polycomb group gene-mediated transcriptional-silencing mechanism not only represses FLC expression,but also directly represses FT expression.Regulation of FLC expression provides a paradigm for control of the expression of other developmental genes in plants through chromatin mechanisms.

  5. Drosophila PIWI associates with chromatin and interacts directly with HP1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower-Toland, Brent; Findley, Seth D; Jiang, Ling; Liu, Li; Yin, Hang; Dus, Monica; Zhou, Pei; Elgin, Sarah C R; Lin, Haifan

    2007-09-15

    The interface between cellular systems involving small noncoding RNAs and epigenetic change remains largely unexplored in metazoans. RNA-induced silencing systems have the potential to target particular regions of the genome for epigenetic change by locating specific sequences and recruiting chromatin modifiers. Noting that several genes encoding RNA silencing components have been implicated in epigenetic regulation in Drosophila, we sought a direct link between the RNA silencing system and heterochromatin components. Here we show that PIWI, an ARGONAUTE/PIWI protein family member that binds to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), strongly and specifically interacts with heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a), a central player in heterochromatic gene silencing. The HP1a dimer binds a PxVxL-type motif in the N-terminal domain of PIWI. This motif is required in fruit flies for normal silencing of transgenes embedded in heterochromatin. We also demonstrate that PIWI, like HP1a, is itself a chromatin-associated protein whose distribution in polytene chromosomes overlaps with HP1a and appears to be RNA dependent. These findings implicate a direct interaction between the PIWI-mediated small RNA mechanism and heterochromatin-forming pathways in determining the epigenetic state of the fly genome. PMID:17875665

  6. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  7. Chromatin Proteomics Reveals Variable Histone Modifications during the Life Cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Teresa Cristina Leandro; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Lopes, Mariana de Camargo; Martil, Daiana Evelin; Iwai, Leo Kei; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Machado, Fabrício Castro; de Lima-Stein, Mariana L; Thiemann, Otavio Henrique; Elias, Maria Carolina; Janzen, Christian; Schenkman, Sergio; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas

    2016-06-01

    Histones are well-conserved proteins that form the basic structure of chromatin in eukaryotes and undergo several post-translational modifications, which are important for the control of transcription, replication, DNA damage repair, and chromosome condensation. In early branched organisms, histones are less conserved and appear to contain alternative sites for modifications, which could reveal evolutionary unique functions of histone modifications in gene expression and other chromatin-based processes. Here, by using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified and quantified histone post-translational modifications in two life cycle stages of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease. We detected 44 new modifications, namely: 18 acetylations, seven monomethylations, seven dimethylations, seven trimethylations, and four phosphorylations. We found that replicative (epimastigote stage) contains more histone modifications than nonreplicative and infective parasites (trypomastigote stage). Acetylations of lysines at the C-terminus of histone H2A and methylations of lysine 23 of histone H3 were found to be enriched in trypomastigotes. In contrast, phosphorylation in serine 23 of H2B and methylations of lysine 76 of histone H3 predominates in proliferative states. The presence of one or two methylations in the lysine 76 was found in cells undergoing mitosis and cytokinesis, typical of proliferating parasites. Our findings provide new insights into the role of histone modifications related to the control of gene expression and cell-cycle regulation in an early divergent organism. PMID:27108550

  8. The epigenetic regulation of cell cycle and chromatin dynamic by sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Redondo, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL) The chromatin consists of a hierarchical and dynamical structure that is modulated during the different cell cycle stages in order to maintain genome integrity and preserve the genetic information coded in the DNA. The dynamic structure of the chromatin depends on the coordination of the different chromatin remodeling processes: histone modifications, chromatin remodeling enzymes/complexes, DNA methylation and chr...

  9. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  10. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  11. Histological appearance of postmortem pink teeth: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B K Charan Gowda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents images and histological changes in the dentin of two cases involving posmortem pink teeth. Postmortem pink teeth were noted among two deceased male individuals. Pink teeth were noted during autopsy examination after twelve days in one corpse, and eight days following death in the second case. During the examination decomposition and putrefaction of the body was noted. Cause of death was drowning in one case and haemorrhages and shock in another. A central incisor tooth was obtained from each body. Both teeth exhibited a pink appearance and the intensity was more pronounced in the cervical region. Although pink teeth can be noted in death due to asphyxia, carbon monoxide poisoning and so on, it is necessary to study the exact role behind the appearance of pink teeth and try to incorporate the finding medico legally.

  12. Intracranial germinoma; typical CT appearances and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The typical CT appearances of intracranial germinomas are described in three cases. These consist of an isodense or hyperdense tumour in the mid-line, originating from the pineal body or infundibulum, with marked increase in density on contrast enhancement. Periventricular tumour expansion in relation to the entire supratentorial ventricular system is characteristic. The rapid tumour regression after small doses of radiation is stressed and complete regression of the tumour, as seen on CT, is a sign of its radio-curability. (orig.)

  13. The Frequency, Nature, and Effects of Naturally Occurring Appearance-Focused Social Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Tricia M.; Crowther, Janis H.; Mickelson, Kristin D.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the effects of naturally occurring appearance-focused social comparisons on women's affect, body satisfaction, and weight-related cognitions. During their daily activities, women reporting body dissatisfaction (n = 53) and women reporting body satisfaction (n = 34) recorded their reactions to comparison information.…

  14. The body as art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D J; Barker, M J

    2002-07-01

    For millennia people have altered the appearance of their bodies with cosmetics, jewellery, tattoos, piercings, and other surgical procedures. It would appear that they wish to conform to a perceived 'ideal body', although the actual appearance of such a body is subject to temporal, cultural and geographical change. In contemporary society the media are largely responsible for providing the yardsticks against which individual body shape is measured. Today the desired form is generally young, slim, tanned and blemish-free. Sadly, dissatisfaction with body image can be the source of great unhappiness and may even lead to suicide. Interested scholars have debated the meaning of beauty for centuries but it seems that every human society has its own standards. At the simplest it would appear that youth and symmetry are the most highly prized ingredients. There is no doubt that those who fit the conventional standards of attractiveness are treated better by society. Individuals have an inalienable right to their own body appearance, and to alter it as they see fit, however such modifications may not always be in their own best interests. Practitioners of cosmetic procedures must be alert to clients with histories of weight fluctuation, unrealistic body image, or low self-esteem. Psychological disorders may present with dysmorphophobic symptoms. Doctors providing cosmetic services need to be adept at diagnosing psychological illness. PMID:17147524

  15. Michel Foucault's bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Potte-Bonneville, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    How is it possible for Foucault to present the body at the same time as the foundation and the result of history, as condition and horizon of the theory that takes hold of it ? One has to pay attention to the various registers in which Foucault distributes the acceptations ordinarily confused with the general notion of the body : from "my body" (as it appears in Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology) to "the body' (as it is understood by modern medicine) ; from this body as an object for positive exp...

  16. Online maintaining appearance model using particle filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siying; Lan, Tian; Wang, Jianyu; Ni, Guoqiang

    2008-03-01

    Tracking by foreground matching heavily depends on the appearance model to establish object correspondences among frames and essentially, the appearance model should encode both the difference part between the object and background to guarantee the robustness and the stable part to ensure tracking consistency. This paper provides a solution for online maintaining appearance models by adjusting features in the model. Object appearance is co-modeled by a subset of Haar features selected from the over-complete feature dictionary which encodes the discriminative part of object appearance and the color histogram which describes the stable appearance. During the particle filtering process, feature values both from background patches and object observations are sampled efficiently by the aid of "foreground" and "background" particles respectively. Based on these sampled values, top-ranked discriminative features are added and invalid features are removed out to ensure the object being distinguishable from current background according to the evolving appearance model. The tracker based on this online appearance model maintaining technique has been tested on people and car tracking tasks and promising experimental results are obtained.

  17. Salt and divalent cations affect the flexible nature of the natural beaded chromatin structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Griffith, J

    1977-01-01

    A natural chromatin containing simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA and histone has been used to examine changes in chromatin structure caused by various physical and chemical treatments. We find that histone H1 depleted chromatin is more compact in solutions of 0.15M NaCl or 2 mM MgCl2 than in 0.01 M Na...... therefore contains more DNA than the 140 base pair "core particle". The natural variation in the bridge length is consistent with the broad bands observed after nuclease digestion of chromatin. Chromatin prepared for EM without fixation containing long 20A to 30A fibers possibly complexed with protein....

  18. The Candida albicans Histone Acetyltransferase Hat1 Regulates Stress Resistance and Virulence via Distinct Chromatin Assembly Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tscherner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human fungal pathogens like Candida albicans respond to host immune surveillance by rapidly adapting their transcriptional programs. Chromatin assembly factors are involved in the regulation of stress genes by modulating the histone density at these loci. Here, we report a novel role for the chromatin assembly-associated histone acetyltransferase complex NuB4 in regulating oxidative stress resistance, antifungal drug tolerance and virulence in C. albicans. Strikingly, depletion of the NuB4 catalytic subunit, the histone acetyltransferase Hat1, markedly increases resistance to oxidative stress and tolerance to azole antifungals. Hydrogen peroxide resistance in cells lacking Hat1 results from higher induction rates of oxidative stress gene expression, accompanied by reduced histone density as well as subsequent increased RNA polymerase recruitment. Furthermore, hat1Δ/Δ cells, despite showing growth defects in vitro, display reduced susceptibility to reactive oxygen-mediated killing by innate immune cells. Thus, clearance from infected mice is delayed although cells lacking Hat1 are severely compromised in killing the host. Interestingly, increased oxidative stress resistance and azole tolerance are phenocopied by the loss of histone chaperone complexes CAF-1 and HIR, respectively, suggesting a central role for NuB4 in the delivery of histones destined for chromatin assembly via distinct pathways. Remarkably, the oxidative stress phenotype of hat1Δ/Δ cells is a species-specific trait only found in C. albicans and members of the CTG clade. The reduced azole susceptibility appears to be conserved in a wider range of fungi. Thus, our work demonstrates how highly conserved chromatin assembly pathways can acquire new functions in pathogenic fungi during coevolution with the host.

  19. Chromatin structure analysis based on a hierarchic texture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, G; Beil, M; Guski, H

    1995-02-01

    The quantification of chromatin structures is an important part of nuclear grading of malignant and premalignant lesions. In order to achieve high accuracy, computerized image analysis systems have been applied in this process. Chromatin texture analysis of cell nuclei requires a suitable texture model. A hierarchic model seemed to be most compatible for this purpose. It assumes that texture consists of homogeneous regions (textons). Based on this model, two approaches to texture segmentation and feature extraction were investigated using sections of cervical tissue. We examined the reproducibility of the measurement under changing optical conditions. The coefficients of variations of the texture features ranged from 2.1% to 16.9%. The features were tested for their discriminating capability in a pilot study including 30 cases of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma. The overall classification accuracy reached 65%. This study presents an automated technique for texture analysis that is similar to human perception. PMID:7766266

  20. Proteomics and the genetics of sperm chromatin condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rafael Oliva; Judit Castillo

    2011-01-01

    Spermatogenesis involves extremely marked cellular, genetic and chromatin changes resulting in the generation of the highly specialized sperm cell. Proteomics allows the identification of the proteins that compose the spermatogenic cells and the study of their function. The recent developments in mass spectrometry (MS) have markedly increased the throughput to identify and to study the sperm proteins. Catalogs of thousands of testis and spermatozoan proteins in human and different model species are becoming available, setting up the basis for subsequent research, diagnostic applications and possibly the future development of specific treatments. The present review intends to summarize the key genetic and chromatin changes at the different stages of spermatogenesis and in the mature sperm cell and to comment on the presently available proteomic studies.

  1. Measured appearance energies of Cn+ (3 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used mass spectrometric techniques to determine the appearance energies for the formation of small, singly charged Cn+ fragment ions (3 60 under single collision conditions. The measured appearance energies range from 79 eV (C3+) to 91 eV (C10+) and show, within the experimental error bar of ± 5 eV, little variation with the cluster size. This result is distinctly different from the behaviour of the previously measured appearance energies for the large fragment ions C58+ to C44+ and indicates that the small fragment ions are the result of a different fragmentation pathway. (author)

  2. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity to......Earlier work has demonstrated generative models capable of synthesising near photo-realistic grey-scale images of objects. These models have been augmented with colour information, and recently with edge information. This paper extends the active appearance model framework by modelling the...

  3. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity to......Earlier work has demonstrated generative models capable of synthesising near photo-realistic grey-scale images of objects. These models have been augmented with colour information, and recently with edge information. This paper extends the Active Appearance Model framework by modelling the...

  4. Integrative annotation of chromatin elements from ENCODE data

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Michael M.; Ernst, Jason; Wilder, Steven P.; Kundaje, Anshul; Harris, Robert S.; Libbrecht, Max; Giardine, Belinda; Ellenbogen, Paul M.; Bilmes, Jeffrey A.; Birney, Ewan; Hardison, Ross C.; Dunham, Ian; Kellis, Manolis; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-01-01

    The ENCODE Project has generated a wealth of experimental information mapping diverse chromatin properties in several human cell lines. Although each such data track is independently informative toward the annotation of regulatory elements, their interrelations contain much richer information for the systematic annotation of regulatory elements. To uncover these interrelations and to generate an interpretable summary of the massive datasets of the ENCODE Project, we apply unsupervised learnin...

  5. Unsupervised pattern discovery in human chromatin structure through genomic segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Michael M.; Buske, Orion J; Wang, Jie; Weng, Zhiping; Bilmes, Jeff A.; Noble, William Stafford

    2012-01-01

    We applied a dynamic Bayesian network method that identifies joint patterns from multiple functional genomics experiments to ChIP-seq histone modification and transcription factor data, and DNaseI-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin readouts from the human cell line K562. In an unsupervised fashion, we identified patterns associated with transcription start sites, gene ends, enhancers, CTCF elements, and repressed regions. Software and genome browser tracks are at http://noble.gs.washington.edu/...

  6. Effect of saffron on rat sperm chromatin integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mardani; Ahmad Vaez; Shahnaz Razavi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Currently, relation between reactive oxygen species (ROS) ROS concentration and semen quality was indicated. Saffron has traditionally been not only considered as a food additive but also as a medicinal herb, which has a good antioxidant properties. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection potency of saffron and vitamin E on sperm chromatin integrity. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats divided equally into saffron (100 mg/kg), vitamin E (10...

  7. Chromatin condensation of Xist genomic loci during oogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    Repression of maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) during preimplantation in mouse embryos is essential for establishing imprinted X chromosome inactivation. Nuclear transplantation (NT) studies using nuclei derived from non-growing (ng) and full-grown (fg) oocytes have indicated that maternal-specific repressive modifications are imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis, as well as on autosomal imprinted genes. Recent studies have revealed that histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) enrichments on Xm-Xist promoter regions are involved in silencing at the preimplantation stages. However, whether H3K9me3 is imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis is not known. Here, we dissected the chromatin states in ng and fg oocytes and early preimplantation stage embryos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments against H3K9me3 revealed that there was no significant enrichment within the Xm-Xist region during oogenesis. However, NT embryos with ng nuclei (ngNT) showed extensive Xm-Xist derepression and H3K9me3 hypomethylation of the promoter region at the 4-cell stage, which corresponds to the onset of paternal Xist expression. We also found that the chromatin state at the Xist genomic locus became markedly condensed as oocyte growth proceeded. Although the condensed Xm-Xist genomic locus relaxed during early preimplantation phases, the extent of the relaxation across Xm-Xist loci derived from normally developed oocytes was significantly smaller than those of paternal-Xist and ngNT-Xist genomic loci. Furthermore, Xm-Xist from 2-cell metaphase nuclei became derepressed following NT. We propose that chromatin condensation is associated with imprinted Xist repression and that skipping of the condensation step by NT leads to Xist activation during the early preimplantation phase. PMID:26459223

  8. Nucleosome conformational flexibility in experiments with single chromatin fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sivolob A. V.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the chromatin nucleosome organization play an ever increasing role in our comprehension of mechanisms of the gene activity regulation. This minireview describes the results on the nucleosome conformational flexibility, which were obtained using magnetic tweezers to apply torsion to oligonucleosome fibers reconstituted on single DNA molecules. Such an approach revealed a new structural form of the nucleosome, the reversome, in which DNA is wrapped in a right-handed superhelix around...

  9. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi; Kohno, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium...

  10. Chaperone-mediated assembly of centromeric chromatin in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Furuyama, Takehito; Dalal, Yamini; Henikoff, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Every eukaryotic chromosome requires a centromere for attachment to spindle microtubules for chromosome segregation. Although centromeric DNA sequences vary greatly among species, centromeres are universally marked by the presence of a centromeric histone variant, centromeric histone 3 (CenH3), which replaces canonical histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes. Conventional chromatin is maintained in part by histone chaperone complexes, which deposit the S phase-limited (H3) and constitutive (H3....

  11. Chromatin structure and epigenetics of tumour cells: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Hájek, R.; Harničarová, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 51-61. ISSN 1871-529X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : tumour cells * chromatin * radiation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  12. Spermine-induced aggregation of DNA, nucleosome, and chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Raspaud, E.; Chaperon, I; Leforestier, A; Livolant, F

    1999-01-01

    We have analyzed the conditions of aggregation or precipitation of DNA in four different states: double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), mononucleosome core particles (NCP), and H1-depleted chromatin fragments (ChF) in the presence of the multivalent cation spermine (4+). In an intermediate regime of DNA concentration, these conditions are identical for the four states. This result demonstrates that the mechanism involved is general from flexible chains to rigid rods and qua...

  13. Chromatin structure in relation to telomere length maintenance in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fajkus, Jiří; Mozgová, I.; Procházková Schrumpfová, P.; Majerová, E.; Fojtová, M.

    Zürich, 2009. s. 1. [European Workshop on Plant Chromatin. 03.09.2009-04.09.2009, Zürich] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD204/08/H054; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1530; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : telomere * HMGB1 protein * DNA methylation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Transcription within Condensed Chromatin: Steric Hindrance Facilitates Elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Bécavin, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Victor, Jean-Marc; Lesne, Annick

    2010-01-01

    During eukaryotic transcription, RNA-polymerase activity generates torsional stress in DNA, having a negative impact on the elongation process. Using our previous studies of chromatin fiber structure and conformational transitions, we suggest that this torsional stress can be alleviated, thanks to a tradeoff between the fiber twist and nucleosome conformational transitions into an activated state named “reversome”. Our model enlightens the origin of polymerase pauses, and leads to the counter...

  15. Structural plasticity of single chromatin fibers revealed by torsional manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bancaud, Aurelien; Silva, Natalia Conde e; Barbi, Maria; Wagner, Gaudeline; Allemand, Jean-Francois; Mozziconacci, Julien; Lavelle, Christophe; Croquette, Vincent; Victor, Jean-Marc; Prunell, Ariel; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are used to study the mechanical response under torsion of single nucleosome arrays reconstituted on tandem repeats of 5S positioning sequences. Regular arrays are extremely resilient and can reversibly accommodate a large amount of supercoiling without much change in length. This behavior is quantitatively described by a molecular model of the chromatin 3-D architecture. In this model, we assume the existence of a dynamic equilibrium between three conformations of the nucle...

  16. Quality of histone modification antibodies undermines chromatin biology research

    OpenAIRE

    Goran Kungulovski; Albert Jeltsch

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification (PTM) antibodies are essential research reagents in chromatin biology. However, they suffer from variable properties and insufficient documentation of quality. Antibody manufacturers and vendors should provide detailed lot-specific documentation of quality, rendering further quality checks by end-customers unnecessary. A shift from polyclonal antibodies towards sustainable reagents like monoclonal or recombinant antibodies or histone binding domains wou...

  17. Chromatin Loops as Allosteric Modulators of Enhancer-Promoter Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Mirny, Leonid A.; Doyle, Boryana G.; Imakaev, Maksim Viktorovich

    2014-01-01

    The classic model of eukaryotic gene expression requires direct spatial contact between a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter. Recent Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) studies show that enhancers and promoters are embedded in a complex network of looping interactions. Here we use a polymer model of chromatin fiber to investigate whether, and to what extent, looping interactions between elements in the vicinity of an enhancer-promoter pair can influence their contact frequency. Our equi...

  18. Changes in chromatin state in donors subjected to physical stress

    OpenAIRE

    Shckorbatov, Yuriy; Samokhvalov, Valeriy; Bevziuk, Dariya; Kovaliov, Maxim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate changes in chromatin of human buccal epithelium under the influence of stressing factor - dosed physical activity. Investigations were performed in a group of students (13 men) of age 19-23. Cells were stained on a slide by a 2% orcein solution in 45% acetic acid during 1 h. The following physiological indexes were determined: arterial blood pressure, pulse frequency, and frequency of breathing. The physical stress produced by the dosed physical...

  19. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model. PMID:662693

  20. Radiosensitivity: a role of ATM in chromatin modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin architecture plays an important role in DNA-template based processes, including transcription, DNA damage repair, replication, and apoptosis. Post-translational modification of histones and non-histone proteins through actions of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) regulates chromatin conformation, resulting in the control of accessibility of proteins to target sites. Some of these proteins are involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair process (ie. Rb, E2F1, p21, p53 and BRCA 1 and 2). However, the mechanism underlying the role of chromatin modification on cellular intrinsic radiation sensitivity is poorly understood. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the product of the gene mutated in cells from patients with the radiation sensitivity syndrome of ataxia-telangiectasia, has been shown to be involved in multiple DNA damage-induced signal transduction pathways. Previously, we have observed that ATM interacts with histone deacetylase HDAC1 both in vivo and in vitro and its complex exhibits deacetylase activity in response to ionizing radiation. Further studies have suggested that ATM is involved in the regulation of p53 via post-translational modification. Using isogenic AT cell lines, which show radiation sensitivity differences (Do 0.7 and 1.4 Gy), we performed microarray analyses of gene expression at various intervals following irradiation. These data provide evidence for distinctive ATM-dependent or -independent radiation-mediated gene regulation patterns

  1. High sperm chromatin stability in semen with high viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Sánchez, A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effects of high semen viscosity on sperm chromatin stability. Semen samples obtained from men with normal and high viscosity were studied. Sperm chromatin stability was tested by exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) only and SDS together with a zinc-chelating agent, disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate (SDS+EDTA). After SDS incubation, stable sperm was 61.36 +/- 3.0 and 54.71 +/- 3.42% for normal and high semen viscosity, respectively (P:NS), and after SDS+EDTA, it was further reduced to 12.48 +/- 0.99% in semen samples with normal consistency and in a less magnitude in semen samples with high viscosity (25.6 +/- 5.2). Comparing values obtained in SDS+EDTA, a high sperm stability was observed in samples with hyperviscosity (p hyperviscosity is associated with a high sperm chromatin stability in situations when a zinc-chelating agent is present. PMID:8122934

  2. Breast Hemangioma: MR Appearance with Histopathological Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast hemangioma is a rare tumor and when small, it may be difficult to diagnose using conventional imaging techniques. In this report the MR appearance is described with histopathological correlation.

  3. Breast Hemangioma: MR Appearance with Histopathological Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Rasha Ameen; Uday Mandalia; Amanda (Anne) Marr; Paula Mckensie

    2012-01-01

    Breast hemangioma is a rare tumor and when small, it may be difficult to diagnose using conventional imaging techniques. In this report the MR appearance is described with histopathological correlation.

  4. POEMS syndrome: radiographic appearance with MRI correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Suzanne T. [Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Beasley, H.S. [Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Daffner, Richard H. [Allegheny General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal/Trauma Radiology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2006-09-15

    POEMS syndrome is a rare disorder in which patients present with the hallmark signs of polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes. Many other clinical findings are also often present, most notably osseous lesions. The MRI appearance of the bony lesions in POEMS syndrome has been described in five cases, four of which are in the non-English literature. We report the MRI appearance of the osseous lesions in a patient with POEMS syndrome who presented with sciatic neuropathy. (orig.)

  5. FAME - A Flexible Appearance Modelling Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    Combined modelling of pixel intensities and shape has proven to be a very robust and widely applicable approach to interpret images. As such the Active Appearance Model (AAM) framework has been applied to a wide variety of problems within medical image analysis. This paper summarises AAM applications within medicine and describes a public domain implementation, namely the Flexible Appearance Modelling Environment (FAME). We give guidelines for the use of this research platform, and show that ...

  6. Preliminary study of sperm chromatin characteristics of the brachyuran crab Maja brachydactyla. Histones and nucleosome-like structures in decapod crustacean sperm nuclei previously described without SNBPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, K; Ausió, J; Chiva, M

    2009-10-01

    An interesting characteristic of decapod crustacean sperm nuclei is that they do not contain highly packaged chromatin. In the present study we re-examine the presence of DNA-interacting proteins in sperm nuclei of the brachyuran Maja brachydactyla. Although previous reports have indicated that, unlike the majority of sperm cells, DNA of decapod sperm is not organized by basic proteins, in this work we show that: (1) histones are present in sperm of M. brachydactyla; (2) histones are associated with sperm DNA; (3) histone H3 appears in lower proportions than the other core histones, while histone H2B appears in higher proportions; and (4) histone H3 in sperm nuclei is acetylated. This work complements a previous study of sperm histones of Cancer pagurus and supports the suggestion that decapod crustacean sperm chromatin deserves further attention. PMID:19324386

  7. The protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK changes the topology of chromatin and reduces the efficiency of DNA replication in a chromatin-specific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexiadis, V; Waldmann, T; Andersen, Jens S.; Mann, M; Knippers, R; Gruss, C

    2000-01-01

    The structure of chromatin regulates the genetic activity of the underlying DNA sequence. We report here that the protein encoded by the proto-oncogene DEK, which is involved in acute myelogenous leukemia, induces alterations of the superhelical density of DNA in chromatin. The change in topology...

  8. Body Image and Body Dysmorphic Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas-Aragones, Lucia; Marron, Servando E

    2016-08-23

    Most people would like to change something about their bodies and the way that they look, but for some it becomes an obsession. A healthy skin plays an important role in a person's physical and mental wellbeing, whereas a disfiguring appearance is associated with body image concerns. Skin diseases such as acne, psoriasis and vitiligo produce cosmetic disfigurement and patients suffering these and other visible skin conditions have an increased risk of depression, anxiety, feelings of stigmatization and self-harm ideation. Body image affects our emotions, thoughts, and behaviours in everyday life, but, above all, it influences our relationships. Furthermore, it has the potential to influence our quality of life. Promotion of positive body image is highly recommended, as it is important in improving people's quality of life, physical health, and health-related behaviors. Dermatologists have a key role in identifying body image concerns and offering patients possible treatment options. PMID:27283435

  9. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  10. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    CERN Document Server

    Stuchlik, Zdenek; 10.1088/0264-9381/27/21/215017

    2011-01-01

    We study optical phenomena related to appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by the string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by the standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by the string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with descending spin. This behavior differs substantially from appearance of discs orbit...

  11. Advanced textural representation of materials appearance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Filip, Jiří

    New York: ACM, 2011 - (Sander, P.), s. 1-84 ISBN 978-1-4503-1135-9. [SIGGRAPH Asia 2011. Hong Kong (CN), 12.12.2011-15.12.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0593; GA ČR GAP103/11/0335 Grant ostatní: CESNET(CZ) 387/2010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : visual texture * Bidirectional Texture Function * materials appearance Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/RO/haindl-advanced textural representation of materials appearance.pdf

  12. Probabilistic localization and mapping in appearance space

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, Mark; Newman, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the problem of place recognition for mobile robots. How can a robot determine its location from an image or sequence of images, without any prior knowledge of its position, even in a world where many places look identical? We outline a new probabilistic approach to the problem, which we call Fast Appearance Based Mapping or FAB-MAP. Our map of the environment consists of a set of discrete locations, each with an associated appearance model. For every observation ...

  13. Neuronal accumulation of unrepaired DNA in a novel specific chromatin domain: structural, molecular and transcriptional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Garrido, Jorge; Casafont, Iñigo; Tapia, Olga; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that defective DNA repair in neurons with accumulation of DNA lesions and loss of genome integrity underlies aging and many neurodegenerative disorders. An important challenge is to understand how neurons can tolerate the accumulation of persistent DNA lesions without triggering the apoptotic pathway. Here we study the impact of the accumulation of unrepaired DNA on the chromatin architecture, kinetics of the DNA damage response and transcriptional activity in rat sensory ganglion neurons exposed to 1-to-3 doses of ionizing radiation (IR). In particular, we have characterized the structural, molecular and transcriptional compartmentalization of unrepaired DNA in persistent DNA damaged foci (PDDF). IR induced the formation of numerous transient foci, which repaired DNA within the 24 h post-IR, and a 1-to-3 PDDF. The latter concentrate DNA damage signaling and repair factors, including γH2AX, pATM, WRAP53 and 53BP1. The number and size of PDDF was dependent on the doses of IR administered. The proportion of neurons carrying PDDF decreased over time of post-IR, indicating that a slow DNA repair occurs in some foci. The fine structure of PDDF consisted of a loose network of unfolded 30 nm chromatin fiber intermediates, which may provide a structural scaffold accessible for DNA repair factors. Furthermore, the transcription assay demonstrated that PDDF are transcriptionally silent, although transcription occurred in flanking euchromatin. Therefore, the expression of γH2AX can be used as a reliable marker of gene silencing in DNA damaged neurons. Moreover, PDDF were located in repressive nuclear environments, preferentially in the perinucleolar domain where they were frequently associated with Cajal bodies or heterochromatin clumps forming a structural triad. We propose that the sequestration of unrepaired DNA in discrete PDDF and the transcriptional silencing can be essential to preserve genome stability and prevent the synthesis of

  14. Genital Appearance Dissatisfaction: Implications for Women's Genital Image Self-Consciousness, Sexual Esteem, Sexual Satisfaction, and Sexual Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, Vanessa R.; Calabrese, Sarah K.; Rima, Brandi N.; Zucker, Alyssa N.

    2010-01-01

    Findings regarding the link between body image and sexuality have been equivocal, possibly because of the insensitivity of many body image measures to potential variability across sensory aspects of the body (e.g., appearance versus odor), individual body parts (e.g., genitalia versus thighs), and social settings (e.g., public versus intimate).…

  15. Multiscale effect of paint pulverization orientation on appearance after painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The perceived quality of a vehicle is strongly affected by paint appearance that shares major part of the outer car body panels. The painting process modifies the surface topography in a wide range of roughness and waviness scales, and consequently modifies the functionality of the surface in terms of appearance. Since painting process is a multistage process leading to stratified surfaces, a multiscale surface topography characterization approach is suited. In this paper, 2D multiscale signature of the painting process was introduced and applied to track the effect of the painting process working variable on painted surface topography in a wide range of wavelength. To this aim, experimental painting tests were performed using three painting orientation modes (horizontal, oblique and vertical) on random and deterministic metal sheet surface textures. Results show that the painting orientation mode affect only the wavelength band greater than 500 μm and optimal painting orientation depends strongly on the texture of the initial sheet surface.

  16. Multiscale effect of paint pulverization orientation on appearance after painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, S [Arts and Metiers ParisTech, LMPF, rue St Dominique - BP 508, 51006 Chalons-en-Champagne (France); Zahouani, H [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, LTDS UMR CNRS 5513, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69131 Ecully Cedex (France); Piezanowski, J, E-mail: sabeur.mezghani@ensam.eu [Arcelor Ledeep Florange, 17 Avenue des Tilleuls, 57191 Florange (France)

    2011-08-19

    The perceived quality of a vehicle is strongly affected by paint appearance that shares major part of the outer car body panels. The painting process modifies the surface topography in a wide range of roughness and waviness scales, and consequently modifies the functionality of the surface in terms of appearance. Since painting process is a multistage process leading to stratified surfaces, a multiscale surface topography characterization approach is suited. In this paper, 2D multiscale signature of the painting process was introduced and applied to track the effect of the painting process working variable on painted surface topography in a wide range of wavelength. To this aim, experimental painting tests were performed using three painting orientation modes (horizontal, oblique and vertical) on random and deterministic metal sheet surface textures. Results show that the painting orientation mode affect only the wavelength band greater than 500 {mu}m and optimal painting orientation depends strongly on the texture of the initial sheet surface.

  17. Identification of the ISWI Chromatin Remodeling Complex of the Early Branching Eukaryote Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Ridewood, Sophie; Ling, Alexandra; Witmer, Kathrin; Kushwaha, Manish; Wiesler, Simone; Wickstead, Bill; Wood, Jennifer; Rudenko, Gloria

    2015-11-01

    ISWI chromatin remodelers are highly conserved in eukaryotes and are important for the assembly and spacing of nucleosomes, thereby controlling transcription initiation and elongation. ISWI is typically associated with different subunits, forming specialized complexes with discrete functions. In the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, TbISWI down-regulates RNA polymerase I (Pol I)-transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression sites (ESs), which are monoallelically expressed. Here, we use tandem affinity purification to determine the interacting partners of TbISWI. We identify three proteins that do not show significant homology with known ISWI-associated partners. Surprisingly, one of these is nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), which we had previously shown to play a role in ES control. In addition, we identify two novel ISWI partners, regulator of chromosome condensation 1-like protein (RCCP) and phenylalanine/tyrosine-rich protein (FYRP), both containing protein motifs typically found on chromatin proteins. Knockdown of RCCP or FYRP in bloodstream form T. brucei results in derepression of silent variant surface glycoprotein ESs, as had previously been shown for TbISWI and NLP. All four proteins are expressed and interact with each other in both major life cycle stages and show similar distributions at Pol I-transcribed loci. They are also found at Pol II strand switch regions as determined with ChIP. ISWI, NLP, RCCP, and FYRP therefore appear to form a single major ISWI complex in T. brucei (TbIC). This reduced complexity of ISWI regulation and the presence of novel ISWI partners highlights the early divergence of trypanosomes in evolution. PMID:26378228

  18. Radiological appearances of papillary breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review illustrates the varied appearances of benign and malignant papillary breast tumours, as identified by a breast cancer-screening programme. The commonest mammographic appearance of a papillary tumour is as a soft-tissue mass, with calcification present in less than half of cases. When calcification is present the pattern is variable, but clusters of pleomorphic calcification can occur, sometimes resembling the mammographic appearance of invasive ductal carcinoma. Ultrasonography of papillary lesions typically shows a solid, oval, intraductal mass, often associated with duct dilatation. A cystic component is also commonly seen, and lesions may appear hypervascular on colour Doppler ultrasound. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a high sensitivity, but low specificity for detecting papillary tumours, and is useful in establishing the extent and distribution of lesions in patients with multiple papillomatosis. Despite a benign histology on core biopsy, an argument exists for complete surgical excision of all papillary tumours, as a significant proportion of papillomas will contain foci of atypia or overt malignant change

  19. Lit appearance modeling of illumination systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshel, R. John

    2002-09-01

    In illumination systems the look and feel are often more important than objective criterion, such as uniformity and efficiency. The reason for this is two fold: the lit appearance often sells an item and substantial variation in the illumination distribution (up to 50%) over a broad region is not noticeable to an observer. Therefore, subjective criterion, such as the lit appearance, typically plays a crucial role in the development of an illumination system. Additionally, by using computer models to ascertain the lit appearance before manufacture of the system, it allows the designer to modify the system while not demanding investment to produce prototypes. I discuss methods of determining the lit appearance for illumination systems. This modeling includes the inclusion of material and surface properties, such as surface finish, spectral transmission, and internal scattering; the response of the human eye; and the amount of rays that must be traced. By archiving the ray data, animations as a function of position and angle can be developed. Examples are developed to highlight the utility of this technique. These examples include taillights for the automotive industry and a backlit LCD screen for a laptop. Animations of these models demonstrate their luminance.

  20. Enhanced tau neutrino appearance through invisible decay

    CERN Document Server

    Pagliaroli, Giulia; Mannarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The decay of neutrino mass eigenstates leads to a change of the conversion and survival probability of neutrino flavor eigenstates. Remarkably, we find that the neutrino decay provides an enhancement of the expected tau appearance signal with respect to the standard oscillation scenario for the long-baseline OPERA experiment. The increase of the $\

  1. FAME - A Flexible Appearance Modelling Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    applications within medicine and describes a public domain implementation, namely the Flexible Appearance Modelling Environment (FAME). We give guidelines for the use of this research platform, and show that the optimisation techniques used renders it applicable to interactive medical applications. To increase...

  2. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNeill, G

    2009-09-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  3. Designing visual appearance using a structured surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Villads Egede; Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Smitrup, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach for designing nanostructured surfaces with prescribed visual appearances, starting at design analysis and ending with a fabricated sample. The method is applied to a silicon wafer structured using deep ultraviolet lithography and dry etching and includes preliminary design ...

  4. Body composition in detoxified alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, J L; Pendergast, D E

    1990-04-01

    Body composition was evaluated in healthy detoxified alcoholics (aged 20-39) and lifestyle controls, with the expectation that prolonged, excessive consumption of alcohol may bring about nutritional or toxicologic alterations in the relationship between body fat and lean body mass. Body fat was assessed by measurements of skin-fold thickness and by means of bioelectric impedance methodology. No noteworthy differences were observed between alcoholics and controls with regard to the relationship between lean body mass and body fat or in the relationship between extracellular and intracellular water. It would appear that 15-20 years of heavy alcohol consumption does not necessarily alter body composition in healthy, young alcoholics. PMID:2190482

  5. Complexity of chromatin folding is captured by the strings and binders switch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Mariano; Chotalia, Mita; Fraser, James; Lavitas, Liron-Mark; Dostie, Josée; Pombo, Ana; Nicodemi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin has a complex spatial organization in the cell nucleus that serves vital functional purposes. A variety of chromatin folding conformations has been detected by single-cell imaging and chromosome conformation capture-based approaches. However, a unified quantitative framework describing spatial chromatin organization is still lacking. Here, we explore the "strings and binders switch" model to explain the origin and variety of chromatin behaviors that coexist and dynamically change within living cells. This simple polymer model recapitulates the scaling properties of chromatin folding reported experimentally in different cellular systems, the fractal state of chromatin, the processes of domain formation, and looping out. Additionally, the strings and binders switch model reproduces the recently proposed "fractal-globule" model, but only as one of many possible transient conformations. PMID:22988072

  6. Exploring Feminist Women's Body Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lisa R.; Nemeroff, Carol J.; Russo, Nancy Felipe

    2004-01-01

    In a qualitative investigation of young feminists' experience of body consciousness, 25 feminist women each participated in one of 6 focus groups examining the ways they experienced body image and negotiated cultural messages about women's appearance. Participants described their experience with objectification and its impact on their body image,…

  7. Direct Measurement of Local Chromatin Fluidity Using Optical Trap Modulation Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roopa, T.; Shivashankar, G. V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromatin assembly is condensed by histone tail-tail interactions and other nuclear proteins into a highly compact structure. Using an optical trap modulation force spectroscopy, we probe the effect of tail interactions on local chromatin fluidity. Chromatin fibers, purified from mammalian cells, are tethered between a microscope coverslip and a glass micropipette. Mechanical unzipping of tail interactions, using the micropipette, lead to the enhancement of local fluidity. This is measured us...

  8. Chromatin preparation and ChIP from Drosophila brain and discs tissues

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Constance Richter, Katarzyna Oktaba, Juerg Mueller & Juergen A. Knoblich ### Abstract Chromatin preparation and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol as described in Oktaba et al., 2008, Dev Cell, 15, 877-89. The protocol includes description of chromatin preparation from larval tissues, ChIP and quantitative analysis of ChIP material. ### Procedure **1. First “fast” dissection**: Dissect for 20 minutes third instar larvae in ice-cold PBS and remove gu...

  9. The Proteomic Investigation of Chromatin Functional Domains Reveals Novel Synergisms among Distinct Heterochromatin Components*

    OpenAIRE

    Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic, well-structured nucleoprotein complex of DNA and proteins that controls virtually all DNA transactions. Chromatin dynamicity is regulated at specific loci by the presence of various associated proteins, histones, post-translational modifications, histone variants, and DNA methylation. Until now the characterization of the proteomic component of chromatin domains has been held back by the challenge of enriching distinguishable, homogeneous regions for subsequent ...

  10. A chromatin activity based chemoproteomic approach reveals a transcriptional repressome for gene-specific silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Cui; Yu, Yanbao; Liu, Feng; Wei, Xin; Wrobel, John A; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; Zhou, Li; Jin, Jian; Chen, Xian

    2014-01-01

    Immune cells develop endotoxin tolerance (ET) after prolonged stimulation. ET increases the level of a repression mark H3K9me2 in the transcriptional-silent chromatin specifically associated with pro-inflammatory genes. However, it is not clear what proteins are functionally involved in this process. Here we show that a novel chromatin activity based chemoproteomic (ChaC) approach can dissect the functional chromatin protein complexes that regulate ET-associated inflammation. Using UNC0638 th...

  11. A critical role for chromatin in mounting a synergistic transcriptional response to GAL4-VP16.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, C; Gralla, J D

    1994-01-01

    The role of chromatin in mounting a synergistic transcriptional response to GAL4-VP16 was investigated. Strong synergy was observed when chromatin templates were used in vitro. The synergy was severely reduced when naked DNA templates were transcribed. In vivo synergy was strong when nonreplicating templates were used. However, the use of replicating templates, which involved transient disruptions of chromatin, led to strong reductions in synergy. In both of these low-synergy responses, trans...

  12. Chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning reveals rapid evolutionary patterns of centromeric DNA in Oryza species

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye-Ran; Zhang, Wenli; Langdon, Tim; Jin, Weiwei; Yan, Huihuang; Cheng, Zhukuan; Jiang, Jiming

    2005-01-01

    The functional centromeres of rice (Oryza sativa, AA genome) chromosomes contain two key DNA components: the CRR centromeric retrotransposons and a 155-bp satellite repeat, CentO. However, several wild Oryza species lack the CentO repeat. We developed a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based technique to clone DNA fragments derived from chromatin containing the centromeric histone H3 variant CenH3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation cloning was carried out in the CentO-less species Oryza rhizomatis (...

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cren7, a novel chromatin protein conserved among Crenarchaea

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Li; Feng, Yingang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Yao, Hongwei; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jinfeng; Huang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Archaea contain a variety of chromatin proteins consistent with the evolution of different genome packaging mechanisms. Among the two main kingdoms in the Archaea, Euryarchaeota synthesize histone homologs, whereas Crenarchaeota have not been shown to possess a chromatin protein conserved at the kingdom level. We report the identification of Cren7, a novel family of chromatin proteins highly conserved in the Crenarchaeota. A small, basic, methylated and abundant protein, Cren7 displays a high...

  14. Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics for the Analysis of Chromatin Structure and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Soldi; Alessandro Cuomo; Michael Bremang; Tiziana Bonaldi

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly structured nucleoprotein complex made of histone proteins and DNA that controls nearly all DNA-dependent processes. Chromatin plasticity is regulated by different associated proteins, post-translational modifications on histones (hPTMs) and DNA methylation, which act in a concerted manner to enforce a specific “chromatin landscape”, with a regulatory effect on gene expression. Mass Spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful analytical strategy to detect histone PTMs, re...

  15. Appearing consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chernobyl is the greatest world's tragedy after Chirosima. Global results of this tragedy is already being seen. They are the people who have received radiation dose. the first type of cancer 5 years after Chernobyl accident was the thyroid gland cancer, the reason of it, large quantities of radioactive iodine in the air, food products, milk of cattle and finally their collection in the thyroid gland cancer entering the human body. Period all of a sudden after 10 years completed the next latent type of cancer was leykoz. Giving rise to this type of cancer more sensitive to radiation of the body - a violation of the spinal brain function. After 20 years passing from the accident in the first generation one ill child must be born cause of undergoing to radiation father or mother from each three days in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine

  16. Uncommon locations of hydatid disease: CT appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossios, K.J.; Kontoyiannis, D.S. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Ioannina, GR-450 01 Ioannina (Greece); Dascalogiannaki, M.; Gourtsoyiannis, N.C. [Department of Radiology, University of Crete Medical School, GR-711 10 Iraklion (Greece)

    1997-10-01

    Hydatid disease (HD), already known by Hippocrates, is prevalent and widespread in most sheep-raising countries in Asia, Australia, South America, Near East, and southern Europe. The disease is most commonly due to Echinococcus granulosus and may occur in any organ or tissue. The location is mostly hepatic (75%) and pulmonary (15%), and only 10% occur in the rest of the body. Imaging modalities such as US, CT, and MR imaging are helpful in diagnosing the disease. The reliability of each method depends on the cyst`s location in the body. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the use of CT in depicting some unusual locations of HD besides the liver and lung. (orig.). With 18 figs.

  17. Evolution of histone 2A for chromatin compaction in eukaryotes

    OpenAIRE

    Macadangdang, Benjamin R; Oberai, Amit; Spektor, Tanya; Campos, Oscar A; Sheng, Fang; Carey, Michael F.; Vogelauer, Maria; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest There are up to three meters of DNA in a human cell. To fit this length into the cell's nucleus in an organized manner, DNA is wrapped around proteins called histones and then tightly packaged to form a structure called chromatin. The interaction between the histones and the DNA is helped by certain amino acids on the surface of the histones fitting snugly into the DNA molecule. Plants and animals have genomes that are significantly larger than those of single-celled organisms. H...

  18. Effects of nuclear isolation on psoralen affinity for chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tested the effects of nuclear isolation on intercalation of TMP (a psoralen) at specific sequences and in total DNA of cultured human cells. DNA in nuclei photobound about 20% more TMP than in cells and about 10% as much as purified DNA. In contrast, a transcribed ras gene and a randomly selected polymorphic sequence each bound about 20% more TMP than total DNA in cells. However, in nuclei, as in purified DNA, both sequences were just as sensitive as total DNA. Apparently, chromatin in cells exists within diverse TMP-binding environments and some of this diversity was lost upon nuclear isolation

  19. Chromatin immunoselection defines a TAL-1 target gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen-Kaminsky, S; Maouche-Chrétien, L; Vitelli, L; Vinit, M A; Blanchard, I; M. Yamamoto; Peschle, C; Roméo, P H

    1998-01-01

    Despite the major functions of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TAL-1 in hematopoiesis and T-cell leukemogenesis, no TAL-1 target gene has been identified. Using immunoprecipitation of genomic fragments bound to TAL-1 in the chromatin of murine erythro-leukemia (MEL) cells, we found that 10% of the immunoselected fragments contained a CAGATG or a CAGGTG E-box, followed by a GATA site. We studied one of these fragments containing two E-boxes, CAGATG and CAGGTC, followed by a GAT...

  20. Evaluation of sperm chromatin structure in boar semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszewska Dorota

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt to evaluate sperm chromatin structure in the semen of insemination boars. Preparations of semen were stained with acridine orange, aniline blue, and chromomycin A3. Abnormal protamination occurred more frequently in young individuals whose sexual development was not yet complete, but may also be an individual trait. This possibility is important to factor into the decision regarding further exploitation of insemination boars. Thus a precise assessment of abnormalities in the protamination process would seem to be expedient as a tool supplementing morphological and molecular evaluation of semen. Disruptions in nucleoprotein structure can be treated as indicators of the biological value of sperm cells.

  1. Erythroid-specific gene chromatin has an altered association with linker histones.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridsdale, J A; Rattner, J.B.; Davie, J R

    1988-01-01

    The chromatin of several genes was assayed for sensitivity to DNAase I and for solubility as polynucleosomes in 0.15 M NaCl. The degree of solubility of chromatin fragments as polynucleosomes in 0.15 M NaCl correlates well with the sensitivity to DNAase I for several genes. Chromatin of repressed, housekeeping and erythroid-specific genes can be distinguished as distinct groups by the degree to which they display these properties. NaCl precipitation of chromatin fragments stripped and then re...

  2. PAPER’S APPEARANCE: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Hubbe

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This review article highlights progress in understanding the optical properties of paper. Paper’s appearance can be defined in terms of its opacity, brightness, color, fluorescent properties, gloss, and various quantities related to its uniformity. The phenomena that give rise to paper’s optical properties, especially its ability to scatter and absorb visible light, are highly dependent on paper’s structure and its chemical composition. In an effort to engineer low-cost products having relative high opacity and brightness, it is necessary to optimize the material selection and processing conditions. The dimensions of solid materials and void structures within the paper are key factors for optimizing the optical properties. In addition, additives including bleaching agents, mineral particles, dyes, and fluorescent whitening agents can impact paper’s optical properties Paper’s appearance depends, in subtle ways, on the processes of its manufacture.

  3. HRCT appearance of localized organizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the CT, especially HRCT appearance of localized organizing pneumonia. Methods: The CT scans of nine patients with histologically proved localized organizing pneumonia were studied retrospectively. Results: The size of the lesions in nine cases varied from 2 to 4 cm (average 2.5 cm). Eight lesions were located in the peripheral lung parenchyma near the pleural surface. The lesions were detected as round in four, anomaly in five. The margin of six lesions had inward bow indentation. Infiltrating lesions in surrounding structures were found in four cases. Conclusion: The CT, especially HRCT appearance of localized organizing pneumonia shows some features that can make most of them to be differentiated from other lesions

  4. Very Severe Aplastic Anemia appearing after Thymectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chi Young; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Yoo Jin; Park, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Kim, Chun Choo

    2003-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of thymoma and is extremely infrequent after thymectomy. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with very severe aplastic anemia appearing sixteen months after thymectomy for a thymoma. She underwent thymectomy for a thymoma in April 2000. Preoperative examination revealed no hematologic abnormality. About sixteen months after the operation, she was readmitted because of pancytopenia with cough and fever. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a very severe h...

  5. The Appearance of Knowledge in Growth Theory

    OpenAIRE

    O. Olsson

    2001-01-01

    The paper analyzes the appearance of knowledge in growth theory in relation to some fundamental notions in epistemology and the philosophy of science. Based on a brief account of epistemological theory, I discuss the treatment of knowledge in growth models starting from Solow (1956). My results suggest that although some important insights have been made - for instance the distinction between propositional and procedural knowledge and between knowledge gained by experience and by education - ...

  6. Disability, Appearance, politics. A comment from theology

    OpenAIRE

    Moldenhagen, Dag Helge

    2010-01-01

    Within western political culture an increasing emphasis has been placed on the anesthetization of life. One of the victims to this change is people with disability. People with disability now recognize a shift in political attitude. While change in “look” and “posture” earlier were tolerated as part of a human register of appearance, a shift of lifestyles and fashioned icons of beauty coupled with a logic of how citizens ought to be given status frame disability into a negative ...

  7. Fracture of the orbit: computed tomography appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main mechanisms of orbital fractures and their clinical symptoms are exposed. The computed tomographic appearance is described and the implication of computed tomography for therapeutic indications is evaluated as a function of clinical symptoms: visual impairment, anomaly of pupillary reaction to light, ophthalmoplegia, exophthalmos and associated injuries such as intracranial hematomas. The role of computed tomography for the follow-up of these patients is considered

  8. CT appearance and features of tubal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the CT appearance and features of tubal pregnancy. Methods: Precontrast and postcontrast CT scans were employed in 38 patients who were clinically and ultrasonographically suspected of tubal pregnancy. 34 of them were verified as tubal pregnancy through operative pathology. Results: 1. The direct CT imaging feature was the whole pregnancies sac (4/34, 11.8%) or half-baked pregnancies sac (14/34, 41.2%); 2. The indirect CT imaging features were: (1) abnormal density image, which could be enhanced, in a cystic mass around adnexal area (8/34, 23.5%); (2) mix density mass around adnexal area, which was mainly solid and had mild to moderate inhomogeneous enhancement (19/34, 55.9%); (3) large area irregular shadow with high density were found beside the uterus, with no enhancement (3/34, 8.8%). (4) bloody density in uterus-rectum-fossa (23/34, 67.6%). 3. The CT imaging features of tubal pregnancy was classified as: (1) Pregnant sac type (4/34, 11.8%); (2) Cystic (8/34, 23.5%); (3) Massive type (17/34, 50%); (4) Chronic mass type (2/34, 5.9%); (5) Bleeding type (3/34, 8.8%). 4. The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy related with the pregnancy location; 5. The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy related with the clinical significant. Conclusion: The CT imaging appearance of tubal pregnancy has some features, which can help in the diagnosis or differential diagnosis of the pelvis masses. CT scan is an effective supplementary attempt to the clinically and ultrasonographically suspected tubal pregnancy patients

  9. Simulating the mammographic appearance of circumscribed lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimization performance of digital image post-processing techniques in mammography requires controlled conditions of data sets permitting quantitative representation of image characteristics of pathological findings. Digital test objects, although objective and quantitative, do not mimic mammographic appearance and clinical data sets do not provide adequate sets of values of the various pathological finding characteristics. This can be overcome by digital simulation of pathological findings and superimposition on mammographic images. A simple method for simulation of mammographic appearance of radiopaque and/or radiolucent circumscribed lesions is presented. Circumscribed lesions are simulated using grey-level transformation functions which shift and compress the range of the initial pixel grey-level values in a region of interest (ROI) of a digitized mammographic image, according to grey-level analysis in 200 ROIs of real circumscribed lesions from digitized mammographic images. Simulation addresses lesion image characteristics, such as elliptical shape, orientation, halo sign for radiopaque lesions and capsule for radiolucent lesions, and is implemented in a user-driven PC-based interactive application. The appearance of the lesions is evaluated by six radiologists on a sample of 60 real and 60 simulated radiopaque lesions with the use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The area under the ROC curve, pooling the responses of the observers, was 0.55±0.03 indicating no statistically significant difference between real and simulated lesions (p>0.05). The method adequately simulates the mammographic appearance of circumscribed lesions and could be used to generate circumscribed lesion data sets for performance evaluation of image processing techniques, as well as education purposes. (orig.)

  10. Primes Appearing in Prime Tower Factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Devlin, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We introduce and consider a certain probability question involving elementary number theory and the likelihood that a fixed prime will appear in a certain recursively defined factorization of an integer. We derive several convergent infinite products for this probability, which we are unable to simplify to obtain closed form solutions. However, we are able to implement these formulas in the development of algorithms to obtain arbitrarily close rigorous bounds on the probabilities in question.

  11. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuWang; AihuaZheng; LingYi; ChongrenXu; MingxiaoDing; HongkuiDeng

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation.

  12. [RNA responsible for conferring a DNase I sensitive structure on albumin gene in assembled chromatin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhan-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Fang; Zhai, Yu; Song, Shu-Xia

    2003-01-01

    Although the set of genes is virtually the same in all tissues,differential gene expression is appeared in cells of different kinds. Differentiation and ageing are associated with regulation of gene expression that is a fundamental mechanism in eukaryotic development and survival. The sensitivity to DNase I of actively transcribed genes seems to be a general phenomenon. The purpose of the study is to test whether RNAs obtained from different organs or cells can enhance susceptibility of albumin gene to DNase I digestion in BALB/c mouse brain chromatin assembled.RNAs extracted from rat liver, lung, kidney, brain, tRNA from yeast and synthesized RNAs (23 nt completed with mouse alb gene) were added to a system of chromatin reconstitution that was achieved by dialysis from high ionic strength solution. Assembled chromatin was digested with DNase I (12.5 microg/mL) at 20 degrees for 1 min, then PCR assay was used to detect the level of albumin gene digested. PCR products (1200 bp) were run on a 6% polyacylamide gel and analyzed by silver stain assay. RNAs from different organs and synthesized RNAs all increased the sensitivity of albumin gene to DNase I attack in mouse assembled chromatin. The effect was more obvious in liver and lung RNAs than in kidney and brain ones. tRNA from yeast did not enhance the sensitivity of albumin gene to DNase I digestion. RNA increased albumin gene sensitivity to DNase I in a dose-dependent manner. We report here for the first time that RNAs can enhance susceptibility of albumin gene to DNase I digestion. The effect is associated with RNA sources or sequences. It is generally agreed that the formation of gene sensitivity to DNase I, by unfolding of a tightly packed chromatin fiber, is the first step in gene activation, then RNAs that recognize complementary DNA sequences may be the specific factors that affect DNA supercoiling and determine the sensitivity of gene to DNase I digestion. Here we describes "RNA Population Gene Activating

  13. Appearance detection device for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a device for detecting the appearance of fuel assemblies for a power plant, in which the device photographs corners of fuel assemblies by a TV-camera to perform detection with higher reliability. Namely, heretofore, fuel assembly to substantially square pillar shape for a BWR and a PWR has been rotated and one or two faces have been detected from the front by the TV-camera. In the present invention, a TV-camera used exclusively for corners is additionally disposed on or near the diagonal line of the corners. With such a constitution, corners of the fuel assemblies can be photographed simultaneously with the conventional appearance test. As a result, since appearance test for the front and the corners can be conducted at the same time, extremely effective detection can be conducted in terms of detection of a rupture of grids and prevention of dead angle. The corners of assemblies which tend to undergo damages upon charge/discharge of fuels can be detected carefully. Accordingly, a highly reliable detection can be conducted. (I.S.)

  14. Asymmetrical Body Perception: A Possible Role for Neural Body Representations

    OpenAIRE

    Linkenauger, Sally A.; Witt, Jessica K.; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Stefanucci, Jeanine K.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Perception of one's body is related not only to the physical appearance of the body, but also to the neural representation of the body. The brain contains many body maps that systematically differ between right- and left-handed people. In general, the cortical representations of the right arm and right hand tend to be of greater area in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere for right-handed people, whereas these cortical representations tend to be symmetrical across hemispheres for...

  15. Chromatin Assembly at Kinetochores Is Uncoupled from DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Richard D.; Monier, Karine; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2000-01-01

    The specification of metazoan centromeres does not depend strictly on centromeric DNA sequences, but also requires epigenetic factors. The mechanistic basis for establishing a centromeric “state” on the DNA remains unclear. In this work, we have directly examined replication timing of the prekinetochore domain of human chromosomes. Kinetochores were labeled by expression of epitope-tagged CENP-A, which stably marks prekinetochore domains in human cells. By immunoprecipitating CENP-A mononucleosomes from synchronized cells pulsed with [3H]thymidine we demonstrate that CENP-A–associated DNA is replicated in mid-to-late S phase. Cytological analysis of DNA replication further demonstrated that centromeres replicate asynchronously in parallel with numerous other genomic regions. In contrast, quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrates that CENP-A protein synthesis occurs later, in G2. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and transient transfection in the presence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA replication, show that CENP-A can assemble into centromeres in the absence of DNA replication. Thus, unlike most genomic chromatin, histone synthesis and assembly are uncoupled from DNA replication at the kinetochore. Uncoupling DNA replication from CENP-A synthesis suggests that regulated chromatin assembly or remodeling could play a role in epigenetic centromere propagation. PMID:11086012

  16. Synaptic, transcriptional and chromatin genes disrupted in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rubeis, Silvia; He, Xin; Goldberg, Arthur P; Poultney, Christopher S; Samocha, Kaitlin; Cicek, A Erucment; Kou, Yan; Liu, Li; Fromer, Menachem; Walker, Susan; Singh, Tarinder; Klei, Lambertus; Kosmicki, Jack; Shih-Chen, Fu; Aleksic, Branko; Biscaldi, Monica; Bolton, Patrick F; Brownfeld, Jessica M; Cai, Jinlu; Campbell, Nicholas G; Carracedo, Angel; Chahrour, Maria H; Chiocchetti, Andreas G; Coon, Hilary; Crawford, Emily L; Curran, Sarah R; Dawson, Geraldine; Duketis, Eftichia; Fernandez, Bridget A; Gallagher, Louise; Geller, Evan; Guter, Stephen J; Hill, R Sean; Ionita-Laza, Juliana; Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia; Kilpinen, Helena; Klauck, Sabine M; Kolevzon, Alexander; Lee, Irene; Lei, Irene; Lei, Jing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Ma'ayan, Avi; Marshall, Christian R; McInnes, Alison L; Neale, Benjamin; Owen, Michael J; Ozaki, Noriio; Parellada, Mara; Parr, Jeremy R; Purcell, Shaun; Puura, Kaija; Rajagopalan, Deepthi; Rehnström, Karola; Reichenberg, Abraham; Sabo, Aniko; Sachse, Michael; Sanders, Stephan J; Schafer, Chad; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Skuse, David; Stevens, Christine; Szatmari, Peter; Tammimies, Kristiina; Valladares, Otto; Voran, Annette; Li-San, Wang; Weiss, Lauren A; Willsey, A Jeremy; Yu, Timothy W; Yuen, Ryan K C; Cook, Edwin H; Freitag, Christine M; Gill, Michael; Hultman, Christina M; Lehner, Thomas; Palotie, Aaarno; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Sklar, Pamela; State, Matthew W; Sutcliffe, James S; Walsh, Christiopher A; Scherer, Stephen W; Zwick, Michael E; Barett, Jeffrey C; Cutler, David J; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; Daly, Mark J; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-11-13

    The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR < 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones. PMID:25363760

  17. Chromatin factors affecting DNA repair in mammalian cell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating chromatin factors that participate in the incision step of DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. Localization of repair activity within nuclei, the stability and extractability of activity, the specificity for recognizing damage in chromatin or purified DNA as substrates are of interest in this investigation of human cells, CHO cells, and their radiation sensitive mutants. We have developed procedures that provide nuclei in which their DNA behaves as a collection of circular molecules. The integrity of the DNA in human nuclei can be maintained during incubation in appropriate buffers for as long as 60 minutes. When cells or nuclei are exposed to uv light prior to incubation, incisions presumably associated with DNA repair can be demonstrated. Incision activity is stable to prior extraction of nuclei with 0.6 M NaCl, which removes many nonhistone proteins. Our studies are consistent with an hypothesis that factors responsible for initiating DNA repair are localized in the nuclear matrix. 18 references, 3 figures

  18. SF3B1 Association with Chromatin Determines Splicing Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Kfir

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Much remains unknown concerning the mechanism by which the splicing machinery pinpoints short exons within intronic sequences and how splicing factors are directed to their pre-mRNA targets. One probable explanation lies in differences in chromatin organization between exons and introns. Proteomic, co-immunoprecipitation, and sedimentation analyses described here indicate that SF3B1, an essential splicing component of the U2 snRNP complex, is strongly associated with nucleosomes. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses reveal that SF3B1 specifically binds nucleosomes located at exonic positions. SF3B1 binding is enriched at nucleosomes positioned over short exons flanked by long introns that are also characterized by differential GC content between exons and introns. Disruption of SF3B1 binding to such nucleosomes affects splicing of these exons similarly to SF3B1 knockdown. Our findings suggest that the association of SF3B1 with nucleosomes is functionally important for splice-site recognition and that SF3B1 conveys splicing-relevant information embedded in chromatin structure.

  19. Body dysmorphic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, D

    2004-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is defined as a preoccupation with an "imagined" defect in one's appearance. Alternatively, where there is a slight physical anomaly, then the person's concern is markedly excessive. The preoccupation is associated with many time consuming rituals such as mirror gazing or constant comparing. BDD patients have a distorted body image, which may be associated with bullying or abuse during childhood or adolescence. Such patients have a poor quality of life, are soci...

  20. CT appearance of the uterine adenomyosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT findings in 37 cases with pathological diagnosis of uterine adenomyosis were reviewed retrospectively. The attenuation coefficient of adenomyosis is almost the same as normal parenchyma on both plain and enhanced CT. The margin was obscure except for one case. In focal type, deviation of the endometrium and deformity of the uterus may be a clue to the detection of adenomyosis. But differential diagnosis of adenomyosis from leiomyoma with ill-defined margin was very difficult. In diffuse type, the uterine body is swollen without deviation of the endometrium. This type can be diagnosed if the endometrium is identified clearly. (author)

  1. CT appearance of the uterine adenomyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsumata, Yasushi; Noda, Masanobu; Tanaka, Mariko; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Okazaki, Atsushi; Kato, Shingo; Maehara, Tadayuki; Tsukada, Ichiro; Ishiko, Toshitaka

    1989-02-01

    CT findings in 37 cases with pathological diagnosis of uterine adenomyosis were reviewed retrospectively. The attenuation coefficient of adenomyosis is almost the same as normal parenchyma on both plain and enhanced CT. The margin was obscure except for one case. In focal type, deviation of the endometrium and deformity of the uterus may be a clue to the detection of adenomyosis. But differential diagnosis of adenomyosis from leiomyoma with ill-defined margin was very difficult. In diffuse type, the uterine body is swollen without deviation of the endometrium. This type can be diagnosed if the endometrium is identified clearly.

  2. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuchlik, Zdenek; Schee, Jan, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@fpf.slu.c, E-mail: jan.schee@fpf.slu.c [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezrucovo nam. 13, Opava (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-07

    We study optical phenomena related to the appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable us to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with the growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with the descending spin. This behaviour differs substantially from the appearance of discs orbiting black holes enabling thus, at least in principle, to distinguish clearly the Kerr superspinars and black holes. In vicinity of a Kerr superspinar the non-escaped photons have to be separated to those captured by the superspinar and those being trapped in its strong gravitational field leading to self-illumination of the disc that could even influence its structure and cause self-reflection effect of radiation of the disc. The amount of trapped photons grows with descending superspinar spin. We thus can expect significant self-illumination effects in the field of Kerr superspinars with near-extreme spin a {approx} 1.

  3. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan

    2010-11-01

    We study optical phenomena related to the appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable us to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with the growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with the descending spin. This behaviour differs substantially from the appearance of discs orbiting black holes enabling thus, at least in principle, to distinguish clearly the Kerr superspinars and black holes. In vicinity of a Kerr superspinar the non-escaped photons have to be separated to those captured by the superspinar and those being trapped in its strong gravitational field leading to self-illumination of the disc that could even influence its structure and cause self-reflection effect of radiation of the disc. The amount of trapped photons grows with descending superspinar spin. We thus can expect significant self-illumination effects in the field of Kerr superspinars with near-extreme spin a ~ 1.

  4. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm3) and mucinous (6358.2 cm3) subtypes (p = 0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim

  5. Ultrasound appearance of chronic mammary duct ectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammary duct ectasia (MDE), also called periductal mastitis, mammary dysplasia, or plasma cell mastitis, is a benign condition of the mammary gland first described by Haagensen in 1951. The etiology of MDE is unknown and its pathogenesis still controversial; the periductal inflammation could be either the cause or the result of dilated damaged ducts. The process is usually bilateral and asymptomatic, with only a small percentage of patients presenting with symptoms that may include long course of tumour formation, usually subareolar breast lumps, nipple discharge, nipple retraction, mastalgia, and mammary abscess or fistulas. Mammographic presentation of MDE is well known; its features include periductal calcification, benign intraductal calcification, and retroareolar duct dilatation. The periductal calcification results from dystrophic calcification and forms calcified rings or very dense, oval, elongated calcifications, each with a central lucency representing the dilated duct. Intraductal calcifications of duct ectasia represent inspissated intraductal material and are typically of uniform high density, often needle-like, and occasionally branching. Occasionally, there are no mammographic findings, and the diagnosis must rely on sonographic features. Appearance of MDE on ultrasonography (US) depends on the stage of the disease and the contents of the dilated ducts. The acute presentation has been demonstrated in the literature more often than has its chronic counterpart. In the former, duct content can vary from anechoic to isoechoic with surrounding fatty tissue. In chronic MDE, episodes of inflammation are longer. This tends to result in secretions that have a more solid, cheesy texture, partly due to cholesterol crystals, foam cells, and inflammatory cells. For both types of MDE, the appearance can mimic high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on US. In this essay, 2 chronic MDE cases are presented and their US appearance discussed. Our goal is to explore

  6. Ultrasound appearance of chronic mammary duct ectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne, N. [Ottawa Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: nathalie_duchesne_22@yahoo.ca; Skolnik, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Family Medicine, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bilmer, S. [Ottawa Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-12-15

    Mammary duct ectasia (MDE), also called periductal mastitis, mammary dysplasia, or plasma cell mastitis, is a benign condition of the mammary gland first described by Haagensen in 1951. The etiology of MDE is unknown and its pathogenesis still controversial; the periductal inflammation could be either the cause or the result of dilated damaged ducts. The process is usually bilateral and asymptomatic, with only a small percentage of patients presenting with symptoms that may include long course of tumour formation, usually subareolar breast lumps, nipple discharge, nipple retraction, mastalgia, and mammary abscess or fistulas. Mammographic presentation of MDE is well known; its features include periductal calcification, benign intraductal calcification, and retroareolar duct dilatation. The periductal calcification results from dystrophic calcification and forms calcified rings or very dense, oval, elongated calcifications, each with a central lucency representing the dilated duct. Intraductal calcifications of duct ectasia represent inspissated intraductal material and are typically of uniform high density, often needle-like, and occasionally branching. Occasionally, there are no mammographic findings, and the diagnosis must rely on sonographic features. Appearance of MDE on ultrasonography (US) depends on the stage of the disease and the contents of the dilated ducts. The acute presentation has been demonstrated in the literature more often than has its chronic counterpart. In the former, duct content can vary from anechoic to isoechoic with surrounding fatty tissue. In chronic MDE, episodes of inflammation are longer. This tends to result in secretions that have a more solid, cheesy texture, partly due to cholesterol crystals, foam cells, and inflammatory cells. For both types of MDE, the appearance can mimic high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on US. In this essay, 2 chronic MDE cases are presented and their US appearance discussed. Our goal is to explore

  7. Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Physical Appearance Comparison Scale-Revised in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Atari; Saeed Akbari-Zardkhaneh; Mehrnoosh Soufiabadi; Leila Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The comparison of physical appearance may play an important role in many body-related variables. The Physical Appearance Comparison Scale-Revised (PACS-R) is a recently developed instrument for measurement of physical appearance comparisons in a number of contexts. The aim of the present study was to validate the Persian version of this scale. Methods: The scale was administered following a standard back-translation procedure. The sample consisted of 206 female university students...

  8. Rapid Material Appearance Acquisition Using Consumer Hardware

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Vávra, Radomír; Krupička, Mikuláš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 10 (2014), s. 19785-19805. ISSN 1424-8220 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02652S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10911S; GA ČR GAP103/11/0335 Grant ostatní: EC FP7, European Reintegration Grant(BE) 239294 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : measurement setup * material appearance * BTF * ABRDF * visual psychophysics Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/RO/filip-0433583.pdf

  9. BRDF Slices: Accurate Adaptive Anisotropic Appearance Acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Vávra, Radomír; Haindl, Michal; Žid, Pavel; Krupička, Mikuláš; Havran, V.

    New York: IEEE Computer Society Conference Publishing Services, 2013, s. 1468-1473. ISBN 978-0-7695-4990-3. ISSN 2160-7508. [Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition. Portland, OR (US), 23.06.2013-28.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0335 Grant ostatní: EC FP7, European Reintegration Grant(BE) 239294 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : BRDF slices * adaptive anisotropic material appearance * measurement device Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/RO/filip-0393865.pdf

  10. Tracking Eyes using Shape and Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Nielsen, Mads; Hansen, John Paulin;

    2002-01-01

    multi-modal interactions based on video tracking systems. Robust methods are needed to track the eyes using web cameras due to the poor image quality. A real-time tracking scheme using a mean-shift color tracker and an Active Appearance Model of the eye is proposed. From this model, it is possible to......We propose a non-intrusive eye tracking system intended for the use of everyday gaze typing using web cameras. We argue that high precision in gaze tracking is not needed for on-screen typing due to natural language redundancy. This facilitates the use of low-cost video components for advanced...

  11. Predicting Environment Illumination Effects on Material Appearance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filip, Jiří; Haindl, Michal; Stančík, J.

    Piscataway : IEEE Press, 2012, s. 2075-2078. ISBN 978-1-4673-2216-4. [ICPR 2012 - The 21st International Conference on Pattern Recognition. Tsukuba (JP), 11.11.2012-15.11.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0335; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Grant ostatní: Evropska komise(BE) EC Marie Curie ERG 239294; CESNET(CZ) 409 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Illumination perception * texture * BTF Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/RO/filip-predicting environment illumination effects on material appearance.pdf

  12. Magnetic resonace appearance of Gall Bladder Ascariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Prafull

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Ascariasis is a common disease in many developing countries and is a common cause of biliary and pancreatic diseases in endemic areas. Numerous studies have been published on biliary tract ascariasis. All these have documented ultrasonography as the primary imaging modality for biliary tract ascariasis. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP has been the latest entrant for the study of bilary tract. MRCP findings of biliary tract ascariasis have been scarcely documented. MRCP is a unique non-invasive investigation for demonstrating ascariasis in Gall bladder and bilary tract clearly. We present MR appearances of Gall bladder and biliary tract in a proven case of biliary ascariasis.

  13. Differential affinity of mammalian histone H1 somatic subtypes for DNA and chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Xavier

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone H1 is involved in the formation and maintenance of chromatin higher order structure. H1 has multiple isoforms; the subtypes differ in timing of expression, extent of phosphorylation and turnover rate. In vertebrates, the amino acid substitution rates differ among subtypes by almost one order of magnitude, suggesting that each subtype might have acquired a unique function. We have devised a competitive assay to estimate the relative binding affinities of histone H1 mammalian somatic subtypes H1a-e and H1° for long chromatin fragments (30–35 nucleosomes in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl at constant stoichiometry. Results The H1 complement of native chromatin was perturbed by adding an additional amount of one of the subtypes. A certain amount of SAR (scaffold-associated region DNA was present in the mixture to avoid precipitation of chromatin by excess H1. SAR DNA also provided a set of reference relative affinities, which were needed to estimate the relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin from the distribution of the subtypes between the SAR and the chromatin. The amounts of chromatin, SAR and additional H1 were adjusted so as to keep the stoichiometry of perturbed chromatin similar to that of native chromatin. H1 molecules freely exchanged between the chromatin and SAR binding sites. In conditions of free exchange, H1a was the subtype of lowest affinity, H1b and H1c had intermediate affinities and H1d, H1e and H1° the highest affinities. Subtype affinities for chromatin differed by up to 19-fold. The relative affinities of the subtypes for chromatin were equivalent to those estimated for a SAR DNA fragment and a pUC19 fragment of similar length. Avian H5 had an affinity ~12-fold higher than H1e for both DNA and chromatin. Conclusion H1 subtypes freely exchange in vitro between chromatin binding sites in physiological salt (0.14 M NaCl. The large differences in relative affinity of the H1 subtypes for

  14. Female appearance: facial and bodily attractiveness as shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATRIN SCHAEFER

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Human physical attractiveness is supposed to reflect developmental stability (i.e. the ability of individuals to maintain stable development of their morphology under a given environmental condition and physiological status. Hence, evolutionary psychologists have suggested that appearance may not only reveal so called ‘honest signals’ but even comprise a single ornament of mate value. However, it is still a matter of debate which physical features affect the ratings of female beauty, and whether these features are truly associated with aspects of developmental and physiological status. Here we present morphometric data of images of faces and bodies from 92 women together with ratings of attractiveness by 60 men. A total of 101 somatometric landmarks were digitized as two-dimensional coordinates from three views: facial, front and back full-body view. These image sets were analyzed separately by means of geometric morphometric methodology (GMM. Attractiveness ratings of the face and body were significantly associated with both (i the amount of fluctuating asymmetry (as a measure of developmental stability, and (ii specific localized shape differences in regions of known estrogen sensitivity. The results support the notion that ratings of women’s physical attractiveness are indeed based on indicators of developmental stability and physiological status.

  15. Rapid Material Appearance Acquisition Using Consumer Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Filip

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A photo-realistic representation of material appearance can be achieved by means of bidirectional texture function (BTF capturing a material’s appearance for varying illumination, viewing directions, and spatial pixel coordinates. BTF captures many non-local effects in material structure such as inter-reflections, occlusions, shadowing, or scattering. The acquisition of BTF data is usually time and resource-intensive due to the high dimensionality of BTF data. This results in expensive, complex measurement setups and/or excessively long measurement times. We propose an approximate BTF acquisition setup based on a simple, affordable mechanical gantry containing a consumer camera and two LED lights. It captures a very limited subset of material surface images by shooting several video sequences. A psychophysical study comparing captured and reconstructed data with the reference BTFs of seven tested materials revealed that results of our method show a promising visual quality. Speed of the setup has been demonstrated on measurement of human skin and measurement and modeling of a glue dessication time-varying process. As it allows for fast, inexpensive, acquisition of approximate BTFs, this method can be beneficial to visualization applications demanding less accuracy, where BTF utilization has previously been limited.

  16. Auger electron appearance potential spectrum of Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons are accelerated onto a solid polycrystalline Ni surface. These primary electrons interact with the surface to produce one of two phenomena: x-ray fluorescence, or Auger electron emission. Auger Electron Appearance Potential Spectroscopy (AEAPS) is a process by which the Auger component of the secondary electron flux is analysed to extract qualitative information about the electronic structure of the empty conduction band states. In AEAPS, the threshold behavior of the Auger transitions is examined by taking the first derivative of the secondary electron current with respect to the incident electron energy using the potential modulation technique. Width of the empty band, degree of localization of the conduction band wave functions, overlapping of the 3d band with the 4s, and satellite phenomena are among the important parameters ascertainable by AEAPS. The present AEAPS measurements of L3 levels of Ni are compared with the reported data from Soft X-ray Appear nce Potential Spectroscopy (SXAPS) of Ni. SXAPS is a complimentary process of AEAPS in that it examines the secondary xray fluorescence from the surface in much the same way as AEAPS examines the total electron yield. AEAPS, used alone, or in conjunction with SXAPS, is considered to be a powerful technique for the systematic investgation of series of metals, such as the transition, or lanthanide series

  17. Appearance detection device for fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prevent invention provides an appearance detection device which improves accuracy of images on a display and facilitates editing and selection of images upon detection of appearance of a reactor fuel assembly. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) television cameras movable along fuel assemblies of a reactor, (2) a detection means for detecting the positions of the television cameras, (3) a convertor for converting analog image signals of the television cameras to digital image signals, (4) a memory means for sampling a predetermined portion of the images of the television camera and storing it together with the position signal obtained by the detection means and (5) a computer for selecting a plurality of images and positions from the above-mentioned means and joining them to one or a plurality of static images of the fuel assembly. At least two television cameras are disposed oppositely with each other. Then, position signals of the television cameras are designated by the stored sampling signals, and the fuel assembly at the position can be displayed quickly. It is scrolled, compressed or enlarged and formed into images. (I.S.)

  18. Genital Appearance Dissatisfaction: Implications for Women’s Genital Image Self-Consciousness, Sexual Esteem, Sexual Satisfaction, and Sexual Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Schick, Vanessa R.; Calabrese, Sarah K.; Rima, Brandi N.; Zucker, Alyssa N.

    2010-01-01

    Findings regarding the link between body image and sexuality have been equivocal, possibly because of the insensitivity of many of body image measures to potential variability across sensory aspects of the body (e.g., appearance versus odor), individual body parts (e.g., genitalia versus thighs), and social settings (e.g., public versus intimate). The current study refined existing methods of evaluating women’s body image in the context of sexuality by focusing upon two highly specified dimen...

  19. Chromatin and epigenetics in all their states: Meeting report of the first conference on Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits - January 14 - 15, 2016 - Strasbourg, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Till; Jamge, Suraj; Klemme, Sonja; Komar, Dorota Natalia; Le Gall, Sabine; Mikulski, Pawel; Schmidt, Martin; Zicola, Johan; Berr, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    In January 2016, the first Epigenetic and Chromatin Regulation of Plant Traits conference was held in Strasbourg, France. An all-star lineup of speakers, a packed audience of 130 participants from over 20 countries, and a friendly scientific atmosphere contributed to make this conference a meeting to remember. In this article we summarize some of the new insights into chromatin, epigenetics, and epigenomics research and highlight nascent ideas and emerging concepts in this exciting area of research. PMID:27184433

  20. Perceived functional impact of abnormal facial appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Marlene; Borah, Gregory L

    2003-06-01

    Functional facial deformities are usually described as those that impair respiration, eating, hearing, or speech. Yet facial scars and cutaneous deformities have a significant negative effect on social functionality that has been poorly documented in the scientific literature. Insurance companies are declining payments for reconstructive surgical procedures for facial deformities caused by congenital disabilities and after cancer or trauma operations that do not affect mechanical facial activity. The purpose of this study was to establish a large, sample-based evaluation of the perceived social functioning, interpersonal characteristics, and employability indices for a range of facial appearances (normal and abnormal). Adult volunteer evaluators (n = 210) provided their subjective perceptions based on facial physical appearance, and an analysis of the consequences of facial deformity on parameters of preferential treatment was performed. A two-group comparative research design rated the differences among 10 examples of digitally altered facial photographs of actual patients among various age and ethnic groups with "normal" and "abnormal" congenital deformities or posttrauma scars. Photographs of adult patients with observable congenital and posttraumatic deformities (abnormal) were digitally retouched to eliminate the stigmatic defects (normal). The normal and abnormal photographs of identical patients were evaluated by the large sample study group on nine parameters of social functioning, such as honesty, employability, attractiveness, and effectiveness, using a visual analogue rating scale. Patients with abnormal facial characteristics were rated as significantly less honest (p = 0.007), less employable (p = 0.001), less trustworthy (p = 0.01), less optimistic (p = 0.001), less effective (p = 0.02), less capable (p = 0.002), less intelligent (p = 0.03), less popular (p = 0.001), and less attractive (p = 0.001) than were the same patients with normal facial

  1. Genome-wide analysis of interactions between ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jiang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and the covalent modification of histones play central roles in determining chromatin structure and function. Although several specific interactions between these two activities have been elaborated, the global landscape remains to be elucidated. Results In this paper, we have developed a computational method to generate the first genome-wide landscape of interactions between ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and the covalent modification of histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our method succeeds in identifying known interactions and uncovers many previously unknown interactions between these two activities. Analysis of the genome-wide picture revealed that transcription-related modifications tend to interact with more chromatin remodelers. Our results also demonstrate that most chromatin remodeling-modification interactions act via interactions of remodelers with both histone-modifying enzymes and histone residues. We also found that the co-occurrence of both modification and remodeling has significantly different influences on multiple gene features (e.g. nucleosome occupancy compared with the presence of either one. Conclusion We gave the first genome-wide picture of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling-histone modification interactions. We also revealed how these two activities work together to regulate chromatin structure and function. Our results suggest that distinct strategies for regulating chromatin activity are selectively employed by genes with different properties.

  2. Radiolysis of chromatin extracted from cultured mammalian cells: formation of DNA-protein cross links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromatin extracted from Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts has been examined for the formation of radiation-induced DNA-protein cross links, using a membrane filter assay. The relative efficiencies of the aqueous radical intermediates, 0H., esub(aq)- and 02-, were investigated. Cross links were found in gamma-irradiated isolated chromatin and in chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation. When isolated chromatin was irradiated under conditions in which the chromosomal proteins were dissociated from the DNA, no cross links were detectable. The most efficient radical for the production of cross links in irradiated, isolated chromatin was found to be the hydroxyl radical, whereas, the superoxide radical was essentially ineffective. For chromatin irradiated in the cell before isolation, the greatest effect was seen for cells irradiated in an atmosphere of nitrous oxide, suggesting the hydroxyl radical may be involved in the formation of cross links in intact cells also. The formation of cross links in chromatin irradiated in cells before isolation was considerably less efficient than in irradiated, isolated chromatin. (author)

  3. Induction of stable protein-deoxyribonucleic acid adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (uv)-light-mediated formation of protein-DNA adducts in Chinese hamster cell chromatin was investigated in an attempt to compare chromatin alterations induced in vitro with those observed in vivo. Three independent methods of analysis indicated stable protein-DNA associations: a membrane filter assay which retained DNA on the filter in the presence of high salt-detergent; a Sepharose 4B column assay in which protein eluted coincident with DNA; and a CsCl density gradient equilibrium assay which showed both protein and DNA banding at densities other than their respective native densities. Treatment of the irradiated chromatin with DNase provided further evidence that protein--DNA and not protein-protein adducts were being observed in the column assay. There is a fluence-dependent response of protein-DNA adduct formation when the chromatin is irradiated at low ionic strength and is linear for protein over the range studied. When the chromatin is exposed to differing conditions of pH, ionic strength, or divalent metal ion concentration, the quantity of adduct formed upon uv irradiation varies. Susceptibility to adduct formation can be partially explained in terms of the condensation state of the chromatin and other factors such as rearrangement, denaturation, and dissociation of the chromatin components. Besides providing information on the biological significance of these types of uv-induced lesions, this technique may be useful as a probe of chromatin structure

  4. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook;

    2015-01-01

    facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated...

  5. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Jenna [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: karl.ekwall@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Center for Biosciences, Karolinska Institutet (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, University College Sodertorn, NOVUM, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  6. A Testis-Specific Chaperone and the Chromatin Remodeler ISWI Mediate Repackaging of the Paternal Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile M. Doyen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During spermatogenesis, the paternal genome is repackaged into a non-nucleosomal, highly compacted chromatin structure. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that Drosophila sperm chromatin proteins are characterized by a motif related to the high-mobility group (HMG box, which we termed male-specific transcript (MST-HMG box. MST77F is a MST-HMG-box protein that forms an essential component of sperm chromatin. The deposition of MST77F onto the paternal genome requires the chaperone function of tNAP, a testis-specific NAP protein. MST77F, in turn, enables the stable incorporation of MST35Ba and MST35Bb into sperm chromatin. Following MST-HMG-box protein deposition, the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler ISWI mediates the appropriate organization of sperm chromatin. Conversely, at fertilization, maternal ISWI targets the paternal genome and drives its repackaging into de-condensed nucleosomal chromatin. Failure of this transition in ISWI mutant embryos is followed by mitotic defects, aneuploidy, and haploid embryonic divisions. Thus, ISWI enables bi-directional transitions between two fundamentally different forms of chromatin.

  7. A Model of Repetitive-DNA-Organized Chromatin Network of Interphase Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available During interphase, chromosomes are relatively de-condensed in the nuclear space. Interphase chromosomes are known to occupy nuclear space in a non-random manner (chromosome territory; however, their internal structures are poorly defined. In particular, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms that govern the internal organization of interphase chromosomes. The author recently proposed that pairing (or interaction of repetitive DNA-containing chromatin regions is a critical driving force that specifies the higher-order organization of eukaryotic chromosomes. Guided by this theoretical framework and published experimental data on the structure of interphase chromosomes and the spatial distribution of repetitive DNA in interphase nuclei, I postulate here a molecular structure of chromatin organization in interphase chromosomes. According to this model, an interphase chromosome is a chromatin mesh (or lattice that is formed by repeat pairing (RP. The mesh consists of two types of structural components: chromosome nodes and loose chromatin fibers. Chromosome nodes are DNA repeat assemblies (RAs that are formed via RP, while loose fibers include chromatin loops that radiate from the nodes. Different loops crosslink by RPs and form a large integrated chromatin network. I suggest that the organization of the chromatin network of a given interphase chromosome is intrinsically specified by the distribution of repetitive DNA elements on the linear chromatin. The stability of the organization is governed by the collection of RA-formed nodes, and the dynamics of the organization is driven by the assembling and disassembling of the nodes.

  8. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity. (perspective)

  9. Restoring chromatin after replication: How new and old histone marks come together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zusana; Groth, Anja

    2010-01-01

    In dividing cells genome stability and function rely on faithful transmission of both DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin. In the course of DNA replication chromatin undergoes transient genome-wide disruption followed by restoration on new DNA. This involves tight coordination of DNA...

  10. Assembly of Two Transgenes in an Artificial Chromatin Domain Gives Highly Coordinated Expression in Tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynárová, Ludmila; Loonen, Annelies; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Nap, Jan-Peter

    2002-01-01

    The chromatin loop model predicts that genes within the same chromatin domain exhibit coordinated regulation. We here present the first direct experimental support for this model in plants. Two reporter genes, the E. coli β-glucuronidase gene and the firefly luciferase gene, driven by different prom

  11. Active Appearance Model Based Hand Gesture Recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the application of hand gesture recognition in monocular image sequences using Active Appearance Model (AAM). For this work, the proposed algorithm is conposed of constructing AAMs and fitting the models to the interest region. In training stage, according to the manual labeled feature points, the relative AAM is constructed and the corresponding average feature is obtained. In recognition stage, the interesting hand gesture region is firstly segmented by skin and movement cues.Secondly, the models are fitted to the image that includes the hand gesture, and the relative features are extracted.Thirdly, the classification is done by comparing the extracted features and average features. 30 different gestures of Chinese sign language are applied for testing the effectiveness of the method. The Experimental results are given indicating good performance of the algorithm.

  12. Very severe aplastic anemia appearing after thymectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chi Young; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Yoo Jin; Park, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Kim, Chun Choo

    2003-03-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of thymoma and is extremely infrequent after thymectomy. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with very severe aplastic anemia appearing sixteen months after thymectomy for a thymoma. She underwent thymectomy for a thymoma in April 2000. Preoperative examination revealed no hematologic abnormality. About sixteen months after the operation, she was readmitted because of pancytopenia with cough and fever. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a very severe hypoplasia in all the three cell lines with over 80% fatty tissue, and chest CT revealed no recurrence of thymoma. Her aplastic anemia had responded to cyclosporine A and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). PMID:12760272

  13. Surgical transposition of the ovary: Radiologic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therapeutic irradiation of the pelvis of a young female patient will result in loss of ovarian function. In a surgical technique termed ovarian transposition, the ovary is repositioned to the iliac fossa or paracolic gutter outside the radiation field. The computed tomographic (CT) scans and sonograms of five patients with cervical carcinoma who underwent this procedure were reviewed. The normal transposed ovary was of soft-tissue attenuation, often with one or more small cysts. Large cysts developed in the ovaries of three patients. One cyst was functional, another was due to a mesothelial inclusion cyst, and the third was most probably related to the transposition itself. Since the transposed ovary is difficult to palpate, CT or sonography can be used to demonstrate and follow up a cystic mass. Recognition of the appearance and location of the transposed ovary is important to avoid misinterpretation of a solid or cystic mass in patients who are at risk for tumor recurrence

  14. Rethinking Robot Vision - Combining Shape and Appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J. Schlemmer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Equipping autonomous robots with vision sensors provides a multitude of advantages by simultaneously bringing up difficulties with regard to different illumination conditions. Furthermore, especially with service robots, the objects to be handled must somehow be learned for a later manipulation. In this paper we summarise work on combining two different vision sensors, namely a laser range scanner and a monocular colour camera, for shape-capturing, detecting and tracking of objects in cluttered scenes without the need of intermediate user interaction. The use of different sensor types provides the advantage of separating the shape and the appearance of the object and therefore overcome the problem with changing illumination conditions. We describe the framework and its components of visual shape-capturing, fast 3D object detection and robust tracking as well as examples that show the feasibility of this approach.

  15. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment tasked to make a precision measurement of the neutrino mixing parameters associated with the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Using a high powered neutrino beam from the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab, it compares the neutrino energy spectrum for neutrino interactions observed in two large detectors located at Fermilab and in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota at a distance of 735 km. We have recently presented muon-neutrino disappearance results after two years of data taking. Beyond those results there is the possibility that for a mixing angle related to electron-neutrino appearance in the vicinity of the current experimental limit, MINOS could make an initial measurement of this parameter. We present a method for particle identification of electron neutrinos and show several techniques being used to study the background contributions for this analysis in the non-oscillated data at the Near Detector

  16. Radiological appearances in the near-drowned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, K.

    1981-10-01

    Three patients who were unconscious when rescued from drowning had radiographic studies of their lungs carried out after several hours, or on the following day. The findings had to be interpreted as pulmonary oedema. The most seriously affected patient showed the picture of massive acute interstitial oedema on the second day. After initial regression, coarse shadows developed, indicating the alveolar form of pulmonary oedema. The sputum contained candida, but there was no evidence of pulmonary candidiasis. In two patients there were transient signs of limited atelectases. Two patients were re-examined after five years. There were no features which could be interpreted as a consequence of the drowning episode. The radiographic appearances showed minor changes which could be due to mild pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Radiological appearances in the near-drowned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three patients who were unconscious when rescued from drowning had radiographic studies of their lungs carried out after several hours, or on the following day. The findings had to be interpreted as pulmonary oedema. The most seriously affected patient showed the picture of massive acute interstitial oedema on the second day. After initial regression, coarse shadows developed, indicating the alveolar form of pulmonary oedema. The sputum contained candida, but there was no evidence of pulmonary candidiasis. In two patients there were transient signs of limited atelectases. Two patients were re-examined after five years. There were no features which could be interpreted as a consequence of the drowning episode. The radiographic appearances showed minor changes which could be due to mild pulmonary fibrosis. (orig.)

  18. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces egress channels through marginalized host chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllys, Markko; Ruokolainen, Visa; Aho, Vesa; Smith, Elizabeth A; Hakanen, Satu; Peri, Piritta; Salvetti, Anna; Timonen, Jussi; Hukkanen, Veijo; Larabell, Carolyn A; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2016-01-01

    Lytic infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces profound modification of the cell nucleus including formation of a viral replication compartment and chromatin marginalization into the nuclear periphery. We used three-dimensional soft X-ray tomography, combined with cryogenic fluorescence, confocal and electron microscopy, to analyse the transformation of peripheral chromatin during HSV-1 infection. Our data showed an increased presence of low-density gaps in the marginalized chromatin at late infection. Advanced data analysis indicated the formation of virus-nucleocapsid-sized (or wider) channels extending through the compacted chromatin of the host. Importantly, confocal and electron microscopy analysis showed that these gaps frequently contained viral nucleocapsids. These results demonstrated that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of channels penetrating the compacted layer of cellular chromatin and allowing for the passage of progeny viruses to the nuclear envelope, their site of nuclear egress. PMID:27349677

  19. Early aberrations in chromatin dynamics in embryos produced under In vitro conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Rahul Shahaji; Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, Frantisek;

    2012-01-01

    standard to that of embryos produced by IVF, parthenogenetic activation (PA), or SCNT. In contrast to IV embryos, chromatin spatial and temporal dynamics in PA, IVF, and SCNT embryos were altered; starting with aberrant chromatin-nuclear envelope interactions at the two-cell stage, delayed chromatin...... decondensation and nucleolar development at the four-cell stage, and ultimately culminating in failure of proper first lineage segregation at the blastocyst stage, demonstrated by poorly defined inner cell mass. Interestingly, in vitro produced (IVP) embryos also lacked a heterochromatin halo around nucleolar...... precursors, indicating imperfections in global chromatin remodeling after fertilization/activation. Porcine IV-produced zygotes and embryos display a well-synchronized pattern of chromatin dynamics compatible with genome activation and regular nucleolar formation at the four-cell stage. Production of porcine...

  20. Unique sex chromosome systems in Ellobius: How do male XX chromosomes recombine and undergo pachytene chromatin inactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveevsky, Sergey; Bakloushinskaya, Irina; Kolomiets, Oxana

    2016-01-01

    Most mammalian species have heteromorphic sex chromosomes in males, except for a few enigmatic groups such as the mole voles Ellobius, which do not have the Y chromosome and Sry gene. The Ellobius (XX ♀♂) system of sex chromosomes has no analogues among other animals. The structure and meiotic behaviour of the two X chromosomes were investigated for males of the sibling species Ellobius talpinus and Ellobius tancrei. Their sex chromosomes, despite their identical G-structure, demonstrate short synaptic fragments and crossover-associated MLH1 foci in both telomeric regions only. The chromatin undergoes modifications in the meiotic sex chromosomes. SUMO-1 marks a small nucleolus-like body of the meiotic XX. ATR and ubiH2A are localized in the asynaptic area and the histone γH2AFX covers the entire XX bivalent. The distribution of some markers of chromatin inactivation differentiates sex chromosomes of mole voles from those of other mammals. Sex chromosomes of both studied species have identical recombination and meiotic inactivation patterns. In Ellobius, similar chromosome morphology masks the functional heteromorphism of the male sex chromosomes, which can be seen at meiosis. PMID:27425629

  1. Time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer in the study of excimer laser damage of chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, L.; Mihailescu, I.; Radu, S.; Gazdaru, D.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of chromatin damage produced by a 248 nm excimer laser radiation, for doses of 0.3-3 MJ/m 2 was carried out by time-resolved spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The chromatin was extracted from a normal and a tumoral tissue of Wistar rats. The decrease with laser dose of the relative contribution of the excited state lifetimes of ethidium bromide (EtBr) bounded to chromatin constitutes an evidence of the reduction of chromatin deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand structure. FRET was performed from dansyl chloride to acridine orange, both coupled to chromatin. The increase of the average distance between these ligands, under the action of laser radiation, reflects a loosening of the chromatin structure. The radiosensitivity of tumor tissue chromatin is higher than that of a normal tissue. The determination of the chromatin structure modification in an excimer laser field can be of interest in laser therapy.

  2. The protective role of body appreciation against media-induced body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel; Tiggemann, Marika; Clark, Levina

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the protective role of positive body image against negative effects produced by viewing thin-idealised media. University women (N=68) completed trait measures of body appreciation and media protective strategies. At a subsequent session, participants viewed 11 thin-ideal advertisements. Body dissatisfaction was assessed before and after advertisement exposure, and state measures of self-objectification, appearance comparison, and media protective strategies were completed. Results indicated that body appreciation predicted less change in body dissatisfaction following exposure, such that participants with low body appreciation experienced increased body dissatisfaction, while those with high body appreciation did not. Although state appearance comparison predicted increased body dissatisfaction, neither state self-objectification nor appearance comparison accounted for body appreciation's protective effect. Trait and state media protective strategies positively correlated with body appreciation, but also did not account for body appreciation's protective effect. The results point to intervention targets and highlight future research directions. PMID:26311661

  3. Assembly of telomeric chromatin to create ALTernative endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Almouzni, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    Circumvention of the telomere length-dependent mechanisms that control the upper boundaries of cellular proliferation is necessary for the unlimited growth of cancer. Most cancer cells achieve cellular immortality by up-regulating the expression of telomerase to extend and maintain their telomere length. However, a small but significant number of cancers do so via the exchange of telomeric DNA between chromosomes in a pathway termed alternative lengthening of telomeres, or ALT. Although it remains to be clarified why a cell chooses the ALT pathway and how ALT is initiated, recently identified mutations in factors that shape the chromatin and epigenetic landscape of ALT telomeres are shedding light on these mechanisms. In this review, we examine these recent findings and integrate them into the current models of the ALT mechanism. PMID:25172551

  4. Chromatin Dynamics in Vivo: A Game of Musical Chairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël P. Melters

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Histones are a major component of chromatin, the nucleoprotein complex fundamental to regulating transcription, facilitating cell division, and maintaining genome integrity in almost all eukaryotes. In addition to canonical, replication-dependent histones, replication-independent histone variants exist in most eukaryotes. In recent years, steady progress has been made in understanding how histone variants assemble, their involvement in development, mitosis, transcription, and genome repair. In this review, we will focus on the localization of the major histone variants H3.3, CENP-A, H2A.Z, and macroH2A, as well as how these variants have evolved, their structural differences, and their functional significance in vivo.

  5. Modulation of the Chromatin Phosphoproteome by the Haspin Protein Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin;

    2014-01-01

    protein- protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg2 and Lys4 adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine......Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr3 of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date......, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin- associated proteins and identified a Haspin...

  6. Live visualization of chromatin dynamics with fluorescent TALEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanari, Yusuke; Ziegler-Birling, Céline; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2013-11-01

    The spatiotemporal organization of genomes in the nucleus is an emerging key player to regulate genome function. Live imaging of nuclear organization dynamics would be a breakthrough toward uncovering the functional relevance and mechanisms regulating genome architecture. Here, we used transcription activator-like effector (TALE) technology to visualize endogenous repetitive genomic sequences. We established TALE-mediated genome visualization (TGV) to label genomic sequences and follow nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics in cultured mouse cells and in the living organism. TGV is highly specific, thus allowing differential labeling of parental chromosomes by distinguishing between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our findings provide a framework to address the function of genome architecture through visualization of nuclear dynamics in vivo. PMID:24096363

  7. Impact of sperm DNA chromatin in the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Dimitrios; Miller, David; Griffin, Darren K; Tempest, Helen G

    2016-02-01

    The paternal contribution to fertilization and embryogenesis is frequently overlooked as the spermatozoon is often considered to be a silent vessel whose only function is to safely deliver the paternal genome to the maternal oocyte. In this article, we hope to demonstrate that this perception is far from the truth. Typically, infertile men have been unable to conceive naturally (or through regular IVF), and therefore, a perturbation of the genetic integrity of sperm heads in infertile males has been under-considered. The advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) however has led to very successful treatment of male factor infertility and subsequent widespread use in IVF clinics worldwide. Until recently, little concern has been raised about the genetic quality of sperm in ICSI patients or the impact genetic aberrations could have on fertility and embryogenesis. This review highlights the importance of chromatin packaging in the sperm nucleus as essential for the establishment and maintenance of a viable pregnancy. PMID:26678492

  8. H3K9 acetylation and radial chromatin positioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strašák, Luděk; Bártová, Eva; Harničarová, Andrea; Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Krejčí, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 220, č. 1 (2009), s. 91-101. ISSN 0021-9541 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5004306; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0978 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GP310/07/P480 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chromatin structure * RIDGE and anti-RIDGE regions * H3K9 acetylation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.586, year: 2009

  9. Mutations in chromatin machinery and pediatric high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulla, Rishi R; Saratsis, Amanda Muhs; Hashizume, Rintaro

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumor of childhood. Of these, approximately one-third are gliomas that exhibit diverse biological behaviors in the unique context of the developing nervous system. Although low-grade gliomas predominate and have favorable outcomes, up to 20% of pediatric gliomas are high-grade. These tumors are a major contributor to cancer-related morbidity and mortality in infants, children, and adolescents, with long-term survival rates of only 10 to 15%. The recent discovery of somatic oncogenic mutations affecting chromatin regulation in pediatric high-grade glioma has markedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, and these findings have stimulated the development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting epigenetic regulators for disease treatment. We review the current perspective on pediatric high-grade glioma genetics and epigenetics, and discuss the emerging and experimental therapeutics targeting the unique molecular abnormalities present in these deadly childhood brain tumors. PMID:27034984

  10. Quantitative Immunofluorescence Analysis of Nucleolus-Associated Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillinger, Stefan; Németh, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear distribution of eu- and heterochromatin is nonrandom, heterogeneous, and dynamic, which is mirrored by specific spatiotemporal arrangements of histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we describe a semiautomated method for the analysis of histone PTM localization patterns within the mammalian nucleus using confocal laser scanning microscope images of fixed, immunofluorescence stained cells as data source. The ImageJ-based process includes the segmentation of the nucleus, furthermore measurements of total fluorescence intensities, the heterogeneity of the staining, and the frequency of the brightest pixels in the region of interest (ROI). In the presented image analysis pipeline, the perinucleolar chromatin is selected as primary ROI, and the nuclear periphery as secondary ROI. PMID:27576710

  11. Combined chromatin and expression analysis reveals specific regulatory mechanisms within cytokine genes in the macrophage early immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesus Iglesias

    Full Text Available Macrophages play a critical role in innate immunity, and the expression of early response genes orchestrate much of the initial response of the immune system. Macrophages undergo extensive transcriptional reprogramming in response to inflammatory stimuli such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS.To identify gene transcription regulation patterns involved in early innate immune responses, we used two genome-wide approaches--gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq analysis. We examined the effect of 2 hrs LPS stimulation on early gene expression and its relation to chromatin remodeling (H3 acetylation; H3Ac and promoter binding of Sp1 and RNA polymerase II phosphorylated at serine 5 (S5P RNAPII, which is a marker for transcriptional initiation. Our results indicate novel and alternative gene regulatory mechanisms for certain proinflammatory genes. We identified two groups of up-regulated inflammatory genes with respect to chromatin modification and promoter features. One group, including highly up-regulated genes such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF, was characterized by H3Ac, high CpG content and lack of TATA boxes. The second group, containing inflammatory mediators (interleukins and CCL chemokines, was up-regulated upon LPS stimulation despite lacking H3Ac in their annotated promoters, which were low in CpG content but did contain TATA boxes. Genome-wide analysis showed that few H3Ac peaks were unique to either +/-LPS condition. However, within these, an unpacking/expansion of already existing H3Ac peaks was observed upon LPS stimulation. In contrast, a significant proportion of S5P RNAPII peaks (approx 40% was unique to either condition. Furthermore, data indicated a large portion of previously unannotated TSSs, particularly in LPS-stimulated macrophages, where only 28% of unique S5P RNAPII peaks overlap annotated promoters. The regulation of the inflammatory response appears to occur in a very specific manner at

  12. Chromatin remodeling by curcumin alters endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Akbarizadeh, Amin Reza; Delju, Fatemeh; Rannug, Agneta

    2016-05-25

    The aim of this study was to gain more information about the mechanisms that regulate expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) target gene CYP1A1. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and Huh7) and human immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT) were treated with different concentrations of the dietary polyphenolic compound curcumin (CUR) alone or in combination with the natural AHR agonist 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). In an earlier study, we described that CUR can activate the AHR indirectly by inhibiting metabolic clearance of FICZ. Here, we measured cell viability, activation of AHR signaling, oxidative stress and histone modifying activities in response to CUR at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 50 μM. We observed apparent non-linear responses on cell viability and activation of AHR signaling. The CYP1A1 expression and the CYP1A1 enzyme activity in the presence of CUR reflected the histone acetylation efficiency observed in nuclear extracts. At the lowest concentration, CUR significantly decreased histone deacetylase activity and increased the FICZ-induced CYP1A1 activity. In contrast, at the highest concentration, CUR increased the formation of reactive oxygen species, significantly inhibited histone acetylation, and temporally decreased FICZ-induced CYP1A1 activity. The results suggest that CUR can both increase and decrease the accessibility of DNA and thereby influence transcriptional responses to the ligand-activated AHR. This suggestion was supported by the fact that chromatin remodeling treatments with trichostatin A, p300, or 5-aza-dC increased CYP1A1 transcription. We conclude that the AHR-dependent transcriptional efficiency is modified by factors that influence the cellular redox status and the chromatin structure. PMID:27041069

  13. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072194

  14. Plasticity of Fission Yeast CENP-A Chromatin Driven by Relative Levels of Histone H3 and H4

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Araceli G.; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; William Richardson; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Allshire, Robin C.; Pidoux, Alison L.

    2007-01-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone...

  15. "Appearance potent"? A content analysis of UK gay and straight men's magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Glen S; Fawkner, Helen; Slater, Amy; Tiggemann, Marika

    2014-09-01

    With little actual appraisal, a more 'appearance potent' (i.e., a reverence for appearance ideals) subculture has been used to explain gay men's greater body dissatisfaction in comparison to straight men's. This study sought to assess the respective appearance potency of each subculture by a content analysis of 32 issues of the most read gay (Attitude, Gay Times) and straight men's magazines (Men's Health, FHM) in the UK. Images of men and women were coded for their physical characteristics, objectification and nudity, as were the number of appearance adverts and articles. The gay men's magazines featured more images of men that were appearance ideal, nude and sexualized than the straight men's magazines. The converse was true for the images of women and appearance adverts. Although more research is needed to understand the effect of this content on the viewer, the findings are consistent with a more appearance potent gay male subculture. PMID:25129685

  16. Imaging appearance in papillary endolymphatic sac tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging findings on CT, MRI, and angiography in patients with papillary, endolymphatic sac tumors (PELSTs) . Methods: CT and MR imaging studies in 5 patients (aged 12 - 41 years) with histopathologically proved papillary endolymphatic sac tumors were retrospectively reviewed, and four of the five also underwent angiograms. CT scans were evaluated for bone erosion and calcification, MR images for signal intensity changes, enhancement patterns, and flow voids, and angiograms for tumor blood supply. Results: All tumors were destructive, containing calcifications centered in the retrolabyrinthine region and showing irregular hone margins on CT. MR imaging appearance varied with lesion size and nature. Three of the five tumors showed a high-signal intensity margin on unenhanced T1 and T2-weighted images, and the margins were more clear with fat-suppress imaging. The others were heterogeneous and contained cystic high-signal intensity area on both T1 and T2 weighted images. All the tumors showed irregular low signal intensity within the endolymphatic sac anatomically and flow voids signals. The blood supply arose predominantly from the external carotid artery. Two tumors had additional supply from posterior circulation. Conclusion: Papillary endolymphatic sac tumors are destructive and hypervascular lesions that arise from the retrolabyrinthine region in the temporal hone. These imaging findings combined with the original location may help distinguish PELSTs from other more common arid aggressive temporal bone tumors

  17. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orchanian, Mhair-armen Hagop [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes a search for ve appearance in the two-detector long-baseline MINOS neutrino experiment at Fermilab, based on a data set representing an exposure of 8.2×1020 protons on the NuMI target. The analysis detailed herein represents an increase in sensitivity to the θ13 mixing angle of approximately 25% over previous analyses, due to improvements in the event discriminant and fitting technique. Based on our observation, we constrain the value of θ13 further, finding 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13< 0.12(0.20) at the 90% confidence level for δCP = 0 and the normal (inverted) neutrino mass hierarchy. The best-fit value is 2 sin2θ 23 sin2θ 13 = 0.041+0.047 -0.031(0.079+0.071 -0.053) under the same assumptions. We exclude the θ 13 = 0 hypothesis at the 89% confidence level.

  18. A Simplification Algorithm Based On Appearance Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper present a new simplification algorithm named EQEM which is based on the QEM algorith to simplify geometry model with texture. The algorithm used a new framework to integrate geometry and texture factor into simplification process. In the framework, an error metric descriptor is described in detail. Firstly, Gauss curvature of the vertex should be calculated to assure good geometry similarity. Then, the descriptor take into account the visual importance in the simplification. In this way, we introduce a method of edge detection algorithm in image processing, which use mallat wavelet method to quickly extract the distinct edges from a texture image. Also, we compute the color distance of the vertices which are not belonged to any edges as the supplement of the metric descriptor. Experiment prove the simplification can make the sharp-simplified model keep similar appearance. For the descriptor is extended from the QEM error metric and can also be calculated by matrix multiplication, the algorithm is with high efficiency. After all, for all the parameters in the error metric formula are adjustable, algorithm can fit for different type of the mesh models and simplification scale.

  19. Calcified trichinosis of pectoral muscle: mammographic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By mammographic screening we had detected six asymptomatic women who showed numerious tiny and well-delineated round to ovoid microcalcification superimposed on pectoral shadows, in the oblique medio-lateral (OML) view. Our objective was to achieve a better evaluation of these calcifications and investigate their origin. Magnified mammograms of pectoral muscles were done in the six women. A questionnaire concerning the patients' diets was also administered. Trichinella antibody titres were quantified by sero-agglutination. Microcalcifications within pectoral muscle fibres were demonstrated in all the cases. Five women admitted to having eaten home-made pork products in the past. One of them showed a slightly elevated antibody titre. We confirmed the suspected diagnosis of calcified trichinosis by a surgical biopsy of the pectoral muscle performed on one of the patients. We conclude that chronic calcified trichinosis of the pectoral muscle can be visualised in the OML view of a conventional mammogram. The mammographic appearance of this entity is very characteristic and biopsy would not be required for its diagnosis in the future. (orig.)

  20. Calcified trichinosis of pectoral muscle: mammographic appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apesteguia, L. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Murillo, A. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Biurrun, J. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Garcia-Rostan, G. [Servicio Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Reta, A. [Servicio de Analisis Clinicos, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain); Dominguez, F. [Servicio Cirugia, Hospital Virgen del Camino, Pamplona (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    By mammographic screening we had detected six asymptomatic women who showed numerious tiny and well-delineated round to ovoid microcalcification superimposed on pectoral shadows, in the oblique medio-lateral (OML) view. Our objective was to achieve a better evaluation of these calcifications and investigate their origin. Magnified mammograms of pectoral muscles were done in the six women. A questionnaire concerning the patients` diets was also administered. Trichinella antibody titres were quantified by sero-agglutination. Microcalcifications within pectoral muscle fibres were demonstrated in all the cases. Five women admitted to having eaten home-made pork products in the past. One of them showed a slightly elevated antibody titre. We confirmed the suspected diagnosis of calcified trichinosis by a surgical biopsy of the pectoral muscle performed on one of the patients. We conclude that chronic calcified trichinosis of the pectoral muscle can be visualised in the OML view of a conventional mammogram. The mammographic appearance of this entity is very characteristic and biopsy would not be required for its diagnosis in the future. (orig.)

  1. The significance of appearance in physician-nurse collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, H.; Christensen, O.M.; Berthelsen, C.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: According to nurses' assessment, physician-nurse collaboration is problematic. The aim of the study was to investigate whether nurses believe physicians' appearances is significant for their ability to collaborate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a single-blinded, quasi......-experimental intervention study. All physicians included will undergo a total plastic surgical body makeover. Half of the included physicians are to be operated with a view to enhance their physical features, half to weaken their physical features. Multifactorial ANOVA analysis will be used to secure the division. The...... Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration will be used for baseline and follow-up study of the nurses' assessment. RESULTS: Due to ethical considerations, researchers had difficulties finding surgeons prepared to perform procedures aiming at weakening the physicians' physical...

  2. Body Odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Body Odor Posted under Health Guides . Updated 29 October 2014. + ... guy has to deal with. What causes body odor? During puberty, your sweat glands become much more ...

  3. Body Hygiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Diaper-Changing Steps for Childcare Settings Body Hygiene Dental Hygiene Water Fluoridation Facial Cleanliness Fish Pedicures and ... spread of hygiene-related diseases . Topics for Body Hygiene Facial Cleanliness Dental Hygiene Water Fluoridation Fish Pedicures and Fish Spas ...

  4. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help your child have a healthy body image Cosmetic surgery Breast surgery Botox Liposuction Varicose or spider veins Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) Eating disorders Anorexia nervosa Binge eating ... nervosa Cosmetics and your health Depression during and after pregnancy ...

  5. Body Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  6. Essential role of chromatin remodeling protein Bptf in early mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Landry

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the biological functions of the chromatin remodeling protein Bptf (Bromodomain PHD-finger Transcription Factor, the largest subunit of NURF (Nucleosome Remodeling Factor in a mammal. Bptf mutants manifest growth defects at the post-implantation stage and are reabsorbed by E8.5. Histological analyses of lineage markers show that Bptf(-/- embryos implant but fail to establish a functional distal visceral endoderm. Microarray analysis at early stages of differentiation has identified Bptf-dependent gene targets including homeobox transcriptions factors and genes essential for the development of ectoderm, mesoderm, and both definitive and visceral endoderm. Differentiation of Bptf(-/- embryonic stem cell lines into embryoid bodies revealed its requirement for development of mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm tissue lineages, and uncovered many genes whose activation or repression are Bptf-dependent. We also provide functional and physical links between the Bptf-containing NURF complex and the Smad transcription factors. These results suggest that Bptf may co-regulate some gene targets of this pathway, which is essential for establishment of the visceral endoderm. We conclude that Bptf likely regulates genes and signaling pathways essential for the development of key tissues of the early mouse embryo.

  7. Effects of Gene Dose, Chromatin, and Network Topology on Expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hangnoh; Cho, Dong-Yeon; Whitworth, Cale; Eisman, Robert; Phelps, Melissa; Roote, John; Kaufman, Thomas; Cook, Kevin; Russell, Steven; Przytycka, Teresa; Oliver, Brian

    2016-09-01

    Deletions, commonly referred to as deficiencies by Drosophila geneticists, are valuable tools for mapping genes and for genetic pathway discovery via dose-dependent suppressor and enhancer screens. More recently, it has become clear that deviations from normal gene dosage are associated with multiple disorders in a range of species including humans. While we are beginning to understand some of the transcriptional effects brought about by gene dosage changes and the chromosome rearrangement breakpoints associated with them, much of this work relies on isolated examples. We have systematically examined deficiencies of the left arm of chromosome 2 and characterize gene-by-gene dosage responses that vary from collapsed expression through modest partial dosage compensation to full or even over compensation. We found negligible long-range effects of creating novel chromosome domains at deletion breakpoints, suggesting that cases of gene regulation due to altered nuclear architecture are rare. These rare cases include trans de-repression when deficiencies delete chromatin characterized as repressive in other studies. Generally, effects of breakpoints on expression are promoter proximal (~100bp) or in the gene body. Effects of deficiencies genome-wide are in genes with regulatory relationships to genes within the deleted segments, highlighting the subtle expression network defects in these sensitized genetic backgrounds. PMID:27599372

  8. Body embellishment

    OpenAIRE

    Zellweger, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The exhibition Body Embellishment explores the most innovative artistic expression in the 21st-century international arenas of body extension, augmentation, and modification, focusing on jewelry, tattoos, nail arts, and fashion. The areas of focus are jewelry, tattoos, nail arts, and fashion. Avant-garde jewelry consciously engages the body by intersecting and expanding the planes of the human form. Tattoos are at once on and in the body. Nail art, from manicures to pedicures, has humble ...

  9. Body Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2000-01-01

    Body clocks” are biological methods of controling body activities.Every living thing has one. In humans, a body clock controls normal periods of sleeping and waking. It controls the time swhen you are most likely to feel pain.Eating, sleeping and exercising at about the same time each day will help keep body activities normal. But changes in your life, a new job, for example, destroy the balance and thus cause health problems.

  10. Delayed appearance of high altitude retinal hemorrhages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barthelmes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal hemorrhages have been described as a component of high altitude retinopathy (HAR in association with altitude illness. In this prospective high altitude study, we aimed to gain new insights into the pathophysiology of HAR and explored whether HAR could be a valid early indicator of altitude illness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 28 mountaineers were randomly assigned to two ascent profiles during a research expedition to Mt. Muztagh Ata (7546 m/24,751 ft. Digital fundus photographs were taken prior to expedition at 490 m (1,607 ft, during expedition at 4497 m (14,750 ft = base camp, 5533 m (18,148 ft, 6265 m (20,549 ft, 6865 m (22,517 ft and 4.5 months thereafter at 490 m. Number, size and time of occurrence of hemorrhages were recorded. Oxygen saturation (SpO₂ and hematocrit were also assessed. 79% of all climbers exhibited retinal hemorrhages during the expedition. Number and area of retinal bleeding increased moderately to medium altitudes (6265 m. Most retinal hemorrhages were detected after return to base camp from a high altitude. No post-expeditional ophthalmic sequelae were detected. Significant negative (SpO₂ Beta: -0.4, p<0.001 and positive (hematocrit Beta: 0.2, p = 0.002, time at altitude Beta: 0.33, p = 0.003 correlations with hemorrhages were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: When closely examined, a very large amount of climbers exhibit retinal hemorrhages during exposure to high altitudes. The incidence of retinal hemorrhages may be greater than previously appreciated as a definite time lag was observed between highest altitude reached and development of retinal bleeding. Retinal hemorrhages should not be considered warning signs of impending severe altitude illness due to their delayed appearance.

  11. Lichen-forming fungus Caloplaca flavoruscens inhibits transcription factors and chromatin remodeling system in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Youngho; Cha, Jaeyul; Chiang, Jennifer; Tran, Grant; Nislow, Corey; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2016-06-01

    Lichen-forming fungi and extracts derived from them have been used as alternative medicine sources for millennia and recently there has been a renewed interest in their known bioactive properties for anticancer agents, cosmetics and antibiotics. Although lichen-forming fungus-derived compounds are biologically and commercially valuable, few studies have been performed to determine their modes of action. This study used chemical-genetic and chemogenomic high-throughput analyses to gain insight into the modes of action of Caloplaca flavoruscens extracts. High-throughput screening of 575 lichen extracts was performed and 39 extracts were identified which inhibited yeast growth. A C. flavoruscens extract was selected as a promising antifungal and was subjected to genome-wide haploinsufficiency profiling and homozygous profiling assays. These screens revealed that yeast deletion strains lacking Rsc8, Pro1 and Toa2 were sensitive to three concentrations (IC25.5, IC25 and IC50, respectively) of C. flavoruscens extract. Gene-enrichment analysis of the data showed that C. flavoruscens extracts appear to perturb transcription and chromatin remodeling. PMID:27190156

  12. The appearance of liquid surfaces and layers in routine radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As has been demonstrated, the interfaces between a gas and a body fluid or a contrast medium may be visualized in the radiographic image as various kinds of boundaries, as also may interfaces between a contrast medium and a body fluid. These can provide little diagnostic information. Data of clinical value are usually derived from boundaries that represent bounding surfaces of anatomic structures touched by the roentgen rays. In the interpretation of the radiographic image it is important to recognize whether a boundary represents an anatomic structure, a liquid surface or a diffusion layer. It is a traditional view that a liquid surface is visualized by a horizontal beam as a straight horizontal boundary and that the imaged surface is then also horizontal. As has been shown in the earlier investigations and the present one, this is not always the case, for these boundaries are usually curved with an upward concavity. It is important to bear in mind that also rays departing considerably from the horizontal may still touch the liquid surface in its meniscoid. Even a vertical beam will form a boundary when touching a meniscoid. It would also appear that the simple layering phenomenon can present difficulty in interpretation. Examples of this phenomenon that illustrate particularly important situations have been presented. Ambiguity associated with the interpretation of images produced by a vertical beam may be resolved with the aid of supplementary films exposed with a horizontal beam. (orig.)

  13. Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holin, Anna Maria; /University Coll. London

    2010-06-01

    The MINOS experiment is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment which sends a high intensity muon neutrino beam through two functionally identical detectors, a Near detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois, 1km from the beam source, and a Far detector, 734km away, in the Soudan Mine in Minnesota. MINOS may be able to measure the neutrino mixing angle parameter sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} for the first time. Detector granularity, however, makes it very hard to distinguish any {nu}{sub e} appearance signal events characteristic of a non-zero value of {theta}{sub 13} from background neutral current (NC) and short-track {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current (CC) events. Also, uncertainties in the hadronic shower modeling in the kinematic region characteristic of this analysis are relatively large. A new data-driven background decomposition method designed to address those issues is developed and its results presented. By removing the long muon tracks from {nu}{sub {mu}}-CC events, the Muon Removed Charge Current (MRCC) method creates independent pseudo-NC samples that can be used to correct the MINOS Monte Carlo to agree with the high-statistics Near detector data and to decompose the latter into components so as to predict the expected Far detector background. The MRCC method also provides an important cross-check in the Far detector to test the background in the signal selected region. MINOS finds a 1.0-1.5 {sigma} {nu}{sub e}-CC excess above background in the Far detector data, depending on method used, for a total exposure of 3.14 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target. Interpreting this excess as signal, MINOS can set limits on sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}. Using the MRCC method, MINOS sets a limit of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.265 at the 90% confidence limit for a CP-violating phase {delta} = 0.

  14. Chromatin Targeting of de Novo DNA Methyltransferases by the PWWP Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-ZiGe; Min-TiePu; HumairaGowher; Hai-PingWu; Jian-PingDing; AlbertJeltsch; Guo-LiangXu

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns of mammalian genomes are generated in gametogenesis and early embryonic development. Two de novo DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b, are responsible for the process. Both en-zymes contain a long N-terminal regulatory region linked to a conserved C-terminal domain responsible forthe catalytic activity. Although a PWWP domain in the N-terminal region has been shown to bind DNA in vitro, it is unclear how the DNA methyltransferases access their substrate in chromatin in vivo. We show here that the two proteins are associated with chromatin including mitotic chromosomes in mammalian cells, and the PWWP domain is essential for the chromatin targeting of the enzymes. The functional significance of PWWPmediated chromatin targeting is suggested by the fact that a missense mutation in this domain of human DNMT3B causes immunodeficiency, centromeric heterochromatin instability, facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome, which is characterized by loss of methylation insatellite DNA, pericentromeric instability, and immunodeficiency. We demonstrate that the mutant protein completely loses its chromatin targeting capacity. Our data establish the PWWP domain as a novel chromatin/chromosome-targeting module and suggest that the PWWP-mediated chromatin association is essential for the function of the de novo methyltransferases during development.

  15. Organophosphorous pesticide exposure alters sperm chromatin structure in Mexican agricultural workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate alterations in sperm chromatin structure in men occupationally exposed to a mixture of organophosphorus pesticides (OP) because these alterations have been proposed to compromise male fertility and offspring development. Chromatin susceptibility to in situ acid-induced denaturation structure was assessed by the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Urinary levels of alkylphosphates (DAP) were used to assess exposure. Diethylthiophosphate (DETP) was the most frequent OP metabolite found in urine samples indicating that compounds derived from thiophosphoric acid were mainly used. Chromatin structure was altered in most samples. About 75% of semen samples were classified as having poor fertility potential (>30% of Percentage of DNA Fragmentation Index [DFI%]), whereas individuals without OP occupational exposure showed average DFI% values of 9.9%. Most parameters of conventional semen analysis were within normality except for the presence of immature cells (IGC) in which 82% of the samples were above reference values. There were significant direct associations between urinary DETP concentrations and mean DFI and SD-DFI but marginally (P = 0.079) with DFI%, after adjustment for potential confounders, including IGC. This suggests that OP exposure alters sperm chromatin condensation, which could be reflected in an increased number of cells with greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation. This study showed that human sperm chromatin is a sensitive target to OP exposure and may contribute to adverse reproductive outcomes. Further studies on the relevance of protein phosphorylation as a possible mechanism by which OP alter sperm chromatin are required

  16. Non coding RNA: sequence-specific guide for chromatin modification and DNA damage signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia eFrancia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports suggest that ncRNAs are involved in DDR signaling and homology-mediated DNA repair. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair.

  17. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) regulates chromatin organization through histone H3 modification and DNA methylation of the first cell cycle of mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Histone modification of the mouse pronuclei is regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Hypermethylation of the mouse female pronuclei is maintained by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Parp1 is physically interacted with Suz12, which may function in the pronuclei. •Poly(ADP-ribosylation) affects ultrastructure of chromatin of the mouse pronucleus. -- Abstract: We examined the roles of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in chromatin remodeling during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos. Drug-based inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosylation) by a PARP inhibitor, PJ-34, revealed up-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in male pronuclei and down-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 27 (H3K27). Association of poly(ADP-ribosylation) with histone modification was suggested to be supported by the interaction of Suz12, a histone methyltransferase in the polycomb complex, with Parp1. PARP activity was suggested to be required for a proper localization and maintenance of Suz12 on chromosomes. Notably, DNA methylation level of female pronuclei in one-cell embryos was robustly decreased by PJ-34. Electron microscopic analysis showed a frequent appearance of unusual electron-dense areas within the female pronuclei, implying the disorganized and hypercondensed chromatin ultrastructure. These results show that poly(ADP-ribosylation) is important for the integrity of non-equivalent epigenetic dynamics of pronuclei during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos

  18. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) regulates chromatin organization through histone H3 modification and DNA methylation of the first cell cycle of mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Tomoharu, E-mail: osada.tomoharu@mg.medience.co.jp [Advanced Medical Science Research Department, Mitsubishi Chemical Medience Corporation, 14-1 Sunayama, Kamisu-shi, Ibaragi 314-0255 (Japan); Department of Regenerative and Developmental Biology, Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences (MITILS), 11 Minamiooya, Machida-shi, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan); Rydén, Anna-Margareta [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Masutani, Mitsuko, E-mail: mmasutan@ncc.go.jp [Division of Genome Stability Research, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Histone modification of the mouse pronuclei is regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Hypermethylation of the mouse female pronuclei is maintained by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Parp1 is physically interacted with Suz12, which may function in the pronuclei. •Poly(ADP-ribosylation) affects ultrastructure of chromatin of the mouse pronucleus. -- Abstract: We examined the roles of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in chromatin remodeling during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos. Drug-based inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosylation) by a PARP inhibitor, PJ-34, revealed up-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in male pronuclei and down-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 27 (H3K27). Association of poly(ADP-ribosylation) with histone modification was suggested to be supported by the interaction of Suz12, a histone methyltransferase in the polycomb complex, with Parp1. PARP activity was suggested to be required for a proper localization and maintenance of Suz12 on chromosomes. Notably, DNA methylation level of female pronuclei in one-cell embryos was robustly decreased by PJ-34. Electron microscopic analysis showed a frequent appearance of unusual electron-dense areas within the female pronuclei, implying the disorganized and hypercondensed chromatin ultrastructure. These results show that poly(ADP-ribosylation) is important for the integrity of non-equivalent epigenetic dynamics of pronuclei during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos.

  19. Chromatin dynamics and the role of G9a in gene regulation and enhancer silencing during early mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylicz, Jan J; Dietmann, Sabine; Günesdogan, Ufuk; Hackett, Jamie A; Cougot, Delphine; Lee, Caroline; Surani, M Azim

    2015-01-01

    Early mouse development is accompanied by dynamic changes in chromatin modifications, including G9a-mediated histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), which is essential for embryonic development. Here we show that genome-wide accumulation of H3K9me2 is crucial for postimplantation development, and coincides with redistribution of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)-dependent histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). Loss of G9a or EZH2 results in upregulation of distinct gene sets involved in cell cycle regulation, germline development and embryogenesis. Notably, the H3K9me2 modification extends to active enhancer elements where it promotes developmentally-linked gene silencing and directly marks promoters and gene bodies. This epigenetic mechanism is important for priming gene regulatory networks for critical cell fate decisions in rapidly proliferating postimplantation epiblast cells. PMID:26551560

  20. High-resolution mapping reveals links of HP1 with active and inactive chromatin components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzo de Wit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 is commonly seen as a key factor of repressive heterochromatin, even though a few genes are known to require HP1-chromatin for their expression. To obtain insight into the targeting of HP1 and its interplay with other chromatin components, we have mapped HP1-binding sites on Chromosomes 2 and 4 in Drosophila Kc cells using high-density oligonucleotide arrays and the DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID technique. The resulting high-resolution maps show that HP1 forms large domains in pericentric regions, but is targeted to single genes on chromosome arms. Intriguingly, HP1 shows a striking preference for exon-dense genes on chromosome arms. Furthermore, HP1 binds along entire transcription units, except for 5' regions. Comparison with expression data shows that most of these genes are actively transcribed. HP1 target genes are also marked by the histone variant H3.3 and dimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2, which are both typical of active chromatin. Interestingly, H3.3 deposition, which is usually observed along entire transcription units, is limited to the 5' ends of HP1-bound genes. Thus, H3.3 and HP1 are mutually exclusive marks on active chromatin. Additionally, we observed that HP1-chromatin and Polycomb-chromatin are nonoverlapping, but often closely juxtaposed, suggesting an interplay between both types of chromatin. These results demonstrate that HP1-chromatin is transcriptionally active and has extensive links with several other chromatin components.

  1. Structural hierarchy of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei based on small-angle neutron scattering: Fractal nature of the large-scale chromatin organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromatin organization in chicken erythrocyte nuclei was studied by small-angle neutron scattering in the scattering-vector range from 1.5 x 10-1 to 10-4 A-1 with the use of the contrast-variation technique. This scattering-vector range corresponds to linear dimensions from 4 nm to 6 μm and covers the whole hierarchy of chromatin structures, from the nucleosomal structure to the entire nucleus. The results of the present study allowed the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) both the chromatin-protein structure and the structure of the nucleic acid component in chicken erythrocyte nuclei have mass-fractal properties, (2) the structure of the protein component of chromatin exhibits a fractal behavior on scales extending over two orders of magnitude, from the nucleosomal size to the size of an entire nucleus, and (3) the structure of the nucleic acid component of chromatin in chicken erythrocyte nuclei is likewise of a fractal nature and has two levels of organization or two phases with the crossover point at about 300-400 nm

  2. Role of the BAHD1 Chromatin-Repressive Complex in Placental Development and Regulation of Steroid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakisic, Goran; Wendling, Olivia; Libertini, Emanuele; Radford, Elizabeth J.; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Champy, Marie-France; Wattenhofer-Donzé, Marie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Feunteun, Jean; Sorg, Tania; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    BAHD1 is a vertebrate protein that promotes heterochromatin formation and gene repression in association with several epigenetic regulators. However, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ablation of the Bahd1 gene results in hypocholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and decreased body fat in mice. It also causes placental growth restriction with a drop of trophoblast glycogen cells, a reduction of fetal weight and a high neonatal mortality rate. By intersecting transcriptome data from murine Bahd1 knockout (KO) placentas at stages E16.5 and E18.5 of gestation, Bahd1-KO embryonic fibroblasts, and human cells stably expressing BAHD1, we also show that changes in BAHD1 levels alter expression of steroid/lipid metabolism genes. Biochemical analysis of the BAHD1-associated multiprotein complex identifies MIER proteins as novel partners of BAHD1 and suggests that BAHD1-MIER interaction forms a hub for histone deacetylases and methyltransferases, chromatin readers and transcription factors. We further show that overexpression of BAHD1 leads to an increase of MIER1 enrichment on the inactive X chromosome (Xi). In addition, BAHD1 and MIER1/3 repress expression of the steroid hormone receptor genes ESR1 and PGR, both playing important roles in placental development and energy metabolism. Moreover, modulation of BAHD1 expression in HEK293 cells triggers epigenetic changes at the ESR1 locus. Together, these results identify BAHD1 as a core component of a chromatin-repressive complex regulating placental morphogenesis and body fat storage and suggest that its dysfunction may contribute to several human diseases. PMID:26938916

  3. Nucleosomal organization of chromatin in sperm nuclei of the bivalve mollusc Aulacomya ater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, C; Ruiz, S

    1991-03-13

    The sperm nuclei of Aulacomya ater, family Mitylidae, contain three proteins (X, Aa5 and Aa6) which are specific to this cell type coexisting with a set of five somatic-type histones. Information about the chromatin structure resulting from this kind of association is scarce. Therefore, we have probed the structure of this sperm chromatin through digestion with micrococcal nuclease in combination with salt fractionation. The data obtained have allowed us to propose a nucleosomal arrangement for this chromatin. However, two types of nucleosomes would be present in agreement with their protein components. PMID:1861676

  4. Making the case for chromatin profiling: a new tool to investigate the immune-regulatory landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Deborah R; Jung, Steffen; Amit, Ido

    2015-09-15

    Recent technological advances have enabled researchers to accurately and efficiently assay the chromatin dynamics of scarce cell populations. In this Opinion article, we advocate the application of these technologies to central questions in immunology. Unlike changes to other molecular structures in the cell, chromatin features can reveal the past (developmental history), present (current activity) and future (potential response to challenges) of a given immune cell type; chromatin profiling is therefore an important new tool for studying the immune-regulatory networks of health and disease. PMID:26272294

  5. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  6. Genome-wide profiling of salt fractions maps physical properties of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Henikoff, Steven; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Sakai, Akiko; Loeb, Gabriel B.; Ahmad, Kami

    2009-01-01

    We applied genome-wide profiling to successive salt-extracted fractions of micrococcal nuclease-treated Drosophila chromatin. Chromatin fractions extracted with 80 mM or 150 mM NaCl after digestion contain predominantly mononucleosomes and represent classical “active” chromatin. Profiles of these low-salt soluble fractions display phased nucleosomes over transcriptionally active genes that are locally depleted of histone H3.3 and correspond closely to profiles of histone H2Av (H2A.Z) and RNA ...

  7. Internalized Sexualization and Its Relation to Sexualized Appearance, Body Surveillance, and Body Shame among Early Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Sarah J.; Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2016-01-01

    Sexually objectifying messages about girls and women are common in U.S. popular culture. As a consequence of exposure to such messages, girls may develop "internalized sexualization," or internalization of the belief that sexual attractiveness to males is an important aspect of their identity. We hypothesized that internalized…

  8. Body checking behaviors in men

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, D. Catherine; Anderson, Drew A.; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Males have been facing increasing pressure from the media to attain a lean, muscular physique, and are at risk for body dissatisfaction, disturbed eating and exercise behaviors, and abuse of appearance- and performance-enhancing drugs (APEDs). The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between body checking and mood, symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, importance of shape and weight, and APED use in undergraduate males. Body checking in males was correlated with weight and shape ...

  9. Overweight perception among adolescent girls in relation to appearance of female characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Jolanda S.; Rasanen, Leena; Gustafsson, Per A.; Nelson, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Overweight perception has been shown to be important for health related adolescent behavior, particularly in girls. Body perception may be affected by bodily changes, especially changes visible for others. Female pubertal development is characterized by many physical changes, such as accelerated growth and altered body fat distribution. This study examined the role of appearance of female characteristics in the risk for overweight perception among healthy adolescent girls. Methods...

  10. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A;

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  11. The ‘Mini Brain’ Appearance of Plasmocytoma: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Çalışkan; Recep Savaş

    2015-01-01

    There are several tumoral pathologies involving the axial skeleton, particularly the vertebral body and rarely typical or pathognomonic radiographic appearance are available. “Mini brain” appearance on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as defined in solitary plasmacytoma, is considered a rare but characteristic finding for plasmacytoma and resembles a cross-section of the sulci of the brain. Slow-growing tumor lysis and destruction, compensatory coarsening of trabeculae and cortical thickeni...

  12. Development and validation of the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-4 (SATAQ-4)

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Lauren M.; Burke, Natasha L.; Thompson, J. Kevin; Dedrick, Robert F.; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Calogero, Rachel M.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.; Higgins, Mary K.; Frederick, David A.; Kelly, Mackenzie; Anderson, Drew A.; Schaumberg, Katherine; Nerini, Amanda; Stefanile, Cristina; DITTMAR, HELGA

    2015-01-01

    The Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) and its earlier versions are measures designed to assess societal and interpersonal aspects of appearance ideals. Correlational, structural equation modeling, and prospective studies of the SATAQ-3 have shown consistent and significant associations with measures of body image disturbance and eating pathology. In the current investigation, the SATAQ-3 was revised to improve upon some conceptual limitations and was evaluat...

  13. Chromatin and Cell Wall Staining of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeasts grow by tip extension, maintaining a constant width until they reach a critical size threshold and divide. Division by medial fission-which gives these yeast their name-generates a new end that arises from the site of cytokinesis. The old end, which was produced during the previous cell cycle, initiates progression of the new cell cycle, and in G2, the new end is activated in a process termed new-end takeoff (NETO). In this protocol, the fluorescent stains calcofluor and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) are used to give a rapid and informative assessment of morphogenesis and cell-cycle progression in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Calcofluor reveals the timing of NETO because it stains the birth scars that are generated at new ends by cytokinesis less efficiently than the rest of the cell wall. Intense calcofluor staining of the septum and measurement of cell length are also widely used to identify dividing cells and to gauge the timing of mitotic commitment. Staining nuclei with DAPI identifies mono- and binucleated cells and complements the calcofluor staining procedure to evaluate the stages of the cell cycle and identify mitotic errors. Equally simple DAPI staining procedures reveal chromatin structure in higher resolution, facilitating more accurate staging of mitotic progression and characterization of mitotic errors. PMID:27250942

  14. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  15. The paternal hidden agenda: Epigenetic inheritance through sperm chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Deepika; Dhawan, Jyotsna; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2010-07-01

    Epigenetic modifications play a crucial role in developmental gene regulation. These modifications, being reversible, provide a layer of information over and above the DNA sequence, that has plasticity and leads to the generation of cell type-specific epigenomes during cellular differentiation. In almost all higher eukaryotes, the oocyte provides not only its cytoplasm, mitochondria, maternally deposited RNA and proteins but also an epigenetic component in the form of DNA and histone-modifications. During spermeiogenesis however, most of the histones are replaced by protamines, leading to a loss of the epigenetic component. The sperm is, therefore, viewed as a passive carrier of the paternal genome with a disproportionate, lower epigenetic contribution except for DNA methylation, to the next generation. A recent study overturns this view by demonstrating a locus-specific retention of histones, with specific modifications in the sperm chromatin at the promoters of developmentally important genes. This programmed retention of epigenetic marks with a role in embryonic development is suggested to offset, in some measure, the dominant maternal effect. This new finding helps in addressing the question of epigenetic transmission of environmental and 'lifestyle' experiences across generations and raises the question of 'parental conflict' at the loci that may be differentially marked. PMID:20448473

  16. Gene Expression and Chromatin Modifications Associated with Maize Centromeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hainan Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENH3, a variant of histone H3. Centromeres in most plant species contain exclusively highly repetitive DNA sequences, which has hindered research on structure and function of centromeric chromatin. Several maize centromeres have been nearly completely sequenced, providing a sequence-based platform for genomic and epigenomic research of plant centromeres. Here we report a high resolution map of CENH3 nucleosomes in the maize genome. Although CENH3 nucleosomes are spaced ∼190 bp on average, CENH3 nucleosomes that occupied CentC, a 156-bp centromeric satellite repeat, showed clear positioning aligning with CentC monomers. Maize centromeres contain alternating CENH3-enriched and CENH3-depleted subdomains, which account for 87% and 13% of the centromeres, respectively. A number of annotated genes were identified in the centromeres, including 11 active genes that were located exclusively in CENH3-depleted subdomains. The euchromatic histone modification marks, including H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9ac, detected in maize centromeres were associated mainly with the active genes. Interestingly, maize centromeres also have lower levels of the heterochromatin histone modification mark H3K27me2 relative to pericentromeric regions. We conclude that neither H3K27me2 nor the three euchromatic histone modifications are likely to serve as functionally important epigenetic marks of centromere identity in maize.

  17. Gene Expression and Chromatin Modifications Associated with Maize Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hainan; Zhu, Xiaobiao; Wang, Kai; Gent, Jonathan I; Zhang, Wenli; Dawe, R Kelly; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres are defined by the presence of CENH3, a variant of histone H3. Centromeres in most plant species contain exclusively highly repetitive DNA sequences, which has hindered research on structure and function of centromeric chromatin. Several maize centromeres have been nearly completely sequenced, providing a sequence-based platform for genomic and epigenomic research of plant centromeres. Here we report a high resolution map of CENH3 nucleosomes in the maize genome. Although CENH3 nucleosomes are spaced ∼190 bp on average, CENH3 nucleosomes that occupied CentC, a 156-bp centromeric satellite repeat, showed clear positioning aligning with CentC monomers. Maize centromeres contain alternating CENH3-enriched and CENH3-depleted subdomains, which account for 87% and 13% of the centromeres, respectively. A number of annotated genes were identified in the centromeres, including 11 active genes that were located exclusively in CENH3-depleted subdomains. The euchromatic histone modification marks, including H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3K9ac, detected in maize centromeres were associated mainly with the active genes. Interestingly, maize centromeres also have lower levels of the heterochromatin histone modification mark H3K27me2 relative to pericentromeric regions. We conclude that neither H3K27me2 nor the three euchromatic histone modifications are likely to serve as functionally important epigenetic marks of centromere identity in maize. PMID:26564952

  18. Dual Chromatin and Cytoskeletal Remodeling by SETD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In Young; Powell, Reid T; Tripathi, Durga Nand; Dere, Ruhee; Ho, Thai H; Blasius, T Lynne; Chiang, Yun-Chen; Davis, Ian J; Fahey, Catherine C; Hacker, Kathryn E; Verhey, Kristen J; Bedford, Mark T; Jonasch, Eric; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Walker, Cheryl Lyn

    2016-08-11

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of tubulin specify microtubules for specialized cellular functions and comprise what is termed a "tubulin code." PTMs of histones comprise an analogous "histone code," although the "readers, writers, and erasers" of the cytoskeleton and epigenome have heretofore been distinct. We show that methylation is a PTM of dynamic microtubules and that the histone methyltransferase SET-domain-containing 2 (SETD2), which is responsible for H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) of histones, also methylates α-tubulin at lysine 40, the same lysine that is marked by acetylation on microtubules. Methylation of microtubules occurs during mitosis and cytokinesis and can be ablated by SETD2 deletion, which causes mitotic spindle and cytokinesis defects, micronuclei, and polyploidy. These data now identify SETD2 as a dual-function methyltransferase for both chromatin and the cytoskeleton and show a requirement for methylation in maintenance of genomic stability and the integrity of both the tubulin and histone codes. PMID:27518565

  19. HJURP is involved in the expansion of centromeric chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpelescu, Marinela; Hori, Tetsuya; Toyoda, Atsushi; Misu, Sadahiko; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Obuse, Chikashi; Fujiyama, Asao; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2015-08-01

    The CENP-A-specific chaperone HJURP mediates CENP-A deposition at centromeres. The N-terminal region of HJURP is responsible for binding to soluble CENP-A. However, it is unclear whether other regions of HJURP have additional functions for centromere formation and maintenance. In this study, we generated chicken DT40 knockout cell lines and gene replacement constructs for HJURP to assess the additional functions of HJURP in vivo. Our analysis revealed that the middle region of HJURP associates with the Mis18 complex protein M18BP1/KNL2 and that the HJURP-M18BP1 association is required for HJURP function. In addition, on the basis of the analysis of artificial centromeres induced by ectopic HJURP localization, we demonstrate that HJURP exhibits a centromere expansion activity that is separable from its CENP-A-binding activity. We also observed centromere expansion surrounding natural centromeres after HJURP overexpression. We propose that this centromere expansion activity reflects the functional properties of HJURP, which uses this activity to contribute to the plastic establishment of a centromeric chromatin structure. PMID:26063729

  20. Micro- and nanoscale devices for the investigation of epigenetics and chromatin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Carlos A.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2013-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the blueprint on which life is based and transmitted, but the way in which chromatin -- a dynamic complex of nucleic acids and proteins -- is packaged and behaves in the cellular nucleus has only begun to be investigated. Epigenetic modifications sit 'on top of' the genome and affect how DNA is compacted into chromatin and transcribed into ribonucleic acid (RNA). The packaging and modifications around the genome have been shown to exert significant influence on cellular behaviour and, in turn, human development and disease. However, conventional techniques for studying epigenetic or conformational modifications of chromosomes have inherent limitations and, therefore, new methods based on micro- and nanoscale devices have been sought. Here, we review the development of these devices and explore their use in the study of DNA modifications, chromatin modifications and higher-order chromatin structures.

  1. Identification of noncoding transcripts from within CENP-A chromatin at fission yeast centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Shik; Strålfors, Annelie; Castillo, Araceli G; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Ekwall, Karl; Allshire, Robin C

    2011-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A is the most favored candidate for an epigenetic mark that specifies the centromere. In fission yeast, adjacent heterochromatin can direct CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin establishment, but the underlying features governing where CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembles are unknown. We show that, in addition to centromeric regions, a low level of CENP-A(Cnp1) associates with gene promoters where histone H3 is depleted by the activity of the Hrp1(Chd1) chromatin-remodeling factor. Moreover, we demonstrate that noncoding RNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin at centromeres. These analyses reveal a similarity between centromeres and a subset of RNAPII genes and suggest a role for remodeling at RNAPII promoters within centromeres that influences the replacement of histone H3 with CENP-A(Cnp1). PMID:21531710

  2. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  3. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  4. Discovery and Characterization of Chromatin States for Systematic Annotation of the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis

    A plethora of epigenetic modifications have been described in the human genome and shown to play diverse roles in gene regulation, cellular differentiation and the onset of disease. Although individual modifications have been linked to the activity levels of various genetic functional elements, their combinatorial patterns are still unresolved and their potential for systematic de novo genome annotation remains untapped. Here, we use a multivariate Hidden Markov Model to reveal chromatin states in human T cells, based on recurrent and spatially coherent combinations of chromatin marks.We define 51 distinct chromatin states, including promoter-associated, transcription-associated, active intergenic, largescale repressed and repeat-associated states. Each chromatin state shows specific enrichments in functional annotations, sequence motifs and specific experimentally observed characteristics, suggesting distinct biological roles. This approach provides a complementary functional annotation of the human genome that reveals the genome-wide locations of diverse classes of epigenetic function.

  5. Active remodeling of chromatin and implications for in-vivo folding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, N; Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Kumar, P B Sunil; Rao, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Recent high resolution experiments have provided a quantitative description of the statistical properties of interphase chromatin at large scales. These findings have stimulated a search for generic physical interactions that give rise to such specific statistical conformations. Here, we show that an active chromatin model of in-vivo folding, based on the interplay between polymer elasticity, confinement, topological constraints and active stresses arising from the (un)binding of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling proteins gives rise to steady state conformations consistent with these experiments. Our results lead us to conjecture that the chromatin conformation resulting from this active folding optimizes information storage by co-locating gene loci which share transcription resources.

  6. Protocol: methodology for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Strenkert Daniela; Schmollinger Stefan; Schroda Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report on a detailed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protocol is suitable for the analysis of nucleosome occupancy, histone modifications and transcription factor binding sites at the level of mononucleosomes for targeted and genome-wide studies. We describe the optimization of conditions for crosslinking, chromatin fragmentation and antibody titer determination and provide recommendations and an example f...

  7. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. → Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. → Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. → Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  8. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres is characterized by reduced compaction of telomeric chromatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Episkopou, Charikleia; Draskovic, Irena; Van Beneden, Amandine; Tilman, Gaëlle; Mattiussi, Marina; Gobin, Matthieu; Arnoult, Nausica; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Decottignies, Anabelle

    2014-01-01

    International audience Proper telomeric chromatin configuration is thought to be essential for telomere homeostasis and stability. Previous studies in mouse suggested that loss of heterochromatin marks at telomeres might favor onset of Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) pathway, by promoting homologous recombination. However, analysis of chromatin status at human ALT telomeres has never been reported. Here, using isogenic human cell lines and cellular hybrids, which rely either on ...

  9. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation protocol for global analysis through massive parallel sequencing (reChIP-seq)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Marco Antonio Mendoza-Parra, Shankaranarayanan Pattabhiraman & Hinrich Gronemeyer ### Abstract Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) is increasingly used to study protein-chromatin interactions or local epigenetic modifications at genome-wide scale. ChIP-seq can be performed directly with several ng of immunoprecipitated DNA, which is generally obtained from a several million cells, depending on the quality of the antibody. ChI...

  10. Genome Wide Analysis of Chromatin Regulation by Cocaine Reveals a Novel Role for Sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Renthal, William; Kumar, Arvind; Xiao, Guanghua; Wilkinson, Matthew; Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; Sikder, Devanjan; Robison, Alfred J.; LaPlant, Quincey; Dietz, David M.; Russo, Scott J.; Vialou, Vincent; Chakravarty, Sumana; Kodadek, Thomas J.; Stack, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Changes in gene expression contribute to the long-lasting regulation of the brain’s reward circuitry seen in drug addiction, however, the specific genes regulated and the transcriptional mechanisms underlying such regulation remain poorly understood. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with promoter microarray analysis to characterize genome-wide chromatin changes in the mouse nucleus accumbens, a crucial brain reward region, after repeated cocaine administration. Our findings...

  11. Complete in vitro DNA replication of SV40 chromatin in digitonin-treated permeable cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Oda,Takuzo; Watanabe,Sekiko; Hanakawa,Shiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    1980-01-01

    A permeable cell system has been developed by treatment with digitonin for studying in vitro DNA replication of chromatin. DNA replication of simian virus 40 nucleoprotein complexes (SV40 chromatin) in digitonin-treated permeable cells was analyzed by electrophoresis in agarose-gel. Autoradiography of the agarose-gel revealed that [32P]dCTP was incorporated in SV40 DNA I, II and replicating intermediates. The time course of the incorporation indicated the complete replication of SV40 DNA and ...

  12. An in vitro reconstitution system for the assessment of chromatin protein fluidity during Xenopus development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Inui, Masafumi; Hayashi, Yohei; Sedohara, Ayako [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Okabayashi, Koji [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Ohnuma, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kohnuma@vos.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Asashima, Makoto, E-mail: asashi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); ICORP Organ Regeneration Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Organ Development Research Laboratory, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} An in vitro reconstitution system was established with isolated nuclei and cytoplasm. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were measured in the system using FRAP. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the cytoplasm of earlier-stage embryos. {yields} Chromatin fluidities were higher in the earlier-stage nuclei with egg-extract. {yields} Chromatin fluidity may decrease during embryonic development. -- Abstract: Chromatin fluidity, which is one of the indicators of higher-order structures in chromatin, is associated with cell differentiation. However, little is known about the relationships between chromatin fluidity and cell differentiation status in embryonic development. We established an in vitro reconstitution system that uses isolated nuclei and cytoplasmic extracts of Xenopus embryos and a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay to measure the fluidities of heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) and histone H1 during development. The HP1 and H1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from the tailbuds of early tadpole stage (stage 32) embryos in the cytoplasmic extracts of eggs and of late blastula stage (stage 9) embryos were higher than those in the cytoplasmic extracts of mid-neurula stage (stage 15) embryos. The HP1 fluidities of nuclei isolated from animal cap cells of early gastrula stage (stage 10) embryos and from the neural plates of neural stage (stage 20) embryos were higher than those isolated from the tailbuds of stage 32 embryos in egg extracts, whereas the HP1 fluidities of these nuclei were the same in the cytoplasmic extracts of stage 15 embryos. These results suggest that chromatin fluidity is dependent upon both cytoplasmic and nuclear factors and decreases during development.

  13. Chromatin Adaptor Brd4 Modulates E2 Transcription Activity and Protein Stability*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, A-Young; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Brd4 is a chromatin adaptor containing tandem bromodomains binding to acetylated histone H3 and H4. Although Brd4 has been implicated in the transcriptional control of papillomavirus-encoded E2 protein, it is unclear how Brd4 regulates E2 function and whether the involvement of Brd4 in transactivation and transrepression is common to different types of E2 proteins. Using DNase I footprinting performed with in vitro reconstituted human papillomavirus (HPV) chromatin and...

  14. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Will, William Ryan; Petrini, Edoardo; Theodorou, Delphine; Harris, Rachael R.; Crawford, Margaret R.; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Krueger, Felix; Correra, Rosa Maria; Vetter, Anna T.; Miller, J. Ross; Kent, Nicholas A.; Varga-Weisz, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Centromeres are essential to chromatin structures, providing a binding platform for the mitotic spindle. Defects in centromere structure or function can lead to chromosome missegregation or chromosome breakage. This, in turn, can cause cancer in metazoans. Centromeres are defined by specialized chromatin that contains the histone H3 variant CENP-A (also called CenH3, or Cse4 in budding yeast), and transcription over centromeres is tightly controlled. Budding yeast centromeres a...

  15. Premitotic Assembly of Human CENPs -T and -W Switches Centromeric Chromatin to a Mitotic State

    OpenAIRE

    Prendergast, Lisa; van Vuuren, Chelly; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Doering, Volker; Hellwig, Daniela; Quinn, Nadine; Hoischen, Christian; Diekmann, Stephan; Sullivan, Kevin F.

    2011-01-01

    Centromeres are differentiated chromatin domains, present once per chromosome, that direct segregation of the genome in mitosis and meiosis by specifying assembly of the kinetochore. They are distinct genetic loci in that their identity in most organisms is determined not by the DNA sequences they are associated with, but through specific chromatin composition and context. The core nucleosomal protein CENP-A/cenH3 plays a primary role in centromere determination in all species and directs ass...

  16. Structure of chromatin, protein transitions, and post-translational histone modifications in several sperm models

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Katryn Lucille

    2008-01-01

    [eng] The study of chromatin structure in several simple sperm models of increasing complexity was performed. Species demonstrating different types of sperm nuclear protein transitions and structural changes in spermatic chromatin during spermiogenesis were selected as models for comparison: "H" (non-histone proteins are removed), "H->P" (protamine displaces histones), and "H->Pp->P" (precursor protamine displaces histones, and subsequently is converted into the mature protamine). This study ...

  17. Extensive Promoter-centered Chromatin Interactions Provide a Topological Basis for Transcription Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guoliang; Ruan, Xiaoan; Auerbach, Raymond K.; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Zheng, Meizhen; Wang, Ping; Poh, Huay Mei; Goh, Yufen; Lim, Joanne; Zhang, Jingyao; Sim, Hui Shan; Peh, Su Qin; Mulawadi, Fabianus Hendriyan; Ong, Chin Thing; Orlov, Yuriy L.

    2012-01-01

    Higher-order chromosomal organization for transcription regulation is poorly understood in eukaryotes. Using genome-wide Chromatin Interaction Analysis with Paired-End-Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET), we mapped long-range chromatin interactions associated with RNA polymerase II in human cells and uncovered widespread promoter-centered intra-genic, extra-genic and inter-genic interactions. These interactions further aggregated into higher-order clusters, wherein proximal and distal genes were engage...

  18. Correlation among DNA Linker Length, Linker Histone Concentration, and Histone Tails in Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Antoni; Ozer, Gungor; Schlick, Tamar

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic cells condense their genetic material in the nucleus in the form of chromatin, a macromolecular complex made of DNA and multiple proteins. The structure of chromatin is intimately connected to the regulation of all eukaryotic organisms, from amoebas to humans, but its organization remains largely unknown. The nucleosome repeat length (NRL) and the concentration of linker histones (ρLH) are two structural parameters that vary among cell types and cell cycles; the NRL is the number of DNA basepairs wound around each nucleosome core plus the number of basepairs linking successive nucleosomes. Recent studies have found a linear empirical relationship between the variation of these two properties for different cells, but its underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we apply our established mesoscale chromatin model to explore the mechanisms responsible for this relationship, by investigating chromatin fibers as a function of NRL and ρLH combinations. We find that a threshold of linker histone concentration triggers the compaction of chromatin into well-formed 30-nm fibers; this critical value increases linearly with NRL, except for long NRLs, where the fibers remain disorganized. Remarkably, the interaction patterns between core histone tails and chromatin elements are highly sensitive to the NRL and ρLH combination, suggesting a molecular mechanism that could have a key role in regulating the structural state of the fibers in the cell. An estimate of the minimized work and volume associated with storage of chromatin fibers in the nucleus further suggests factors that could spontaneously regulate the NRL as a function of linker histone concentration. Both the tail interaction map and DNA packing considerations support the empirical NRL/ρLH relationship and offer a framework to interpret experiments for different chromatin conditions in the cell. PMID:27276249

  19. Generation and Purification of Human INO80 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes and Subcomplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lu; Ooi, Soon-Keat; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W

    2014-01-01

    INO80 chromatin remodeling complexes regulate nucleosome dynamics and DNA accessibility by catalyzing ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling. Human INO80 complexes consist of 14 protein subunits including Ino80, a SNF2-like ATPase, which serves both as the catalytic subunit and the scaffold for assembly of the complexes. Functions of the other subunits and the mechanisms by which they contribute to the INO80 complex's chromatin remodeling activity remain poorly understood, in part due to the cha...

  20. Body punk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kevin

    BODYPUNK - A Treatise on male body builders and the meaning of the body in the shadow of an Anti Doping Campaign Based on a qualitative study, the thesis investigates the visual representation of the male bodybuilder found in the national anti doping campaign: ‗ "The hunt has begun" along with an...... analysis of the embodied meaning of men‘s bodybuilding....