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Sample records for chordoma

  1. Cranial chordomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survey radiographs of the skull as well as spot-film radiography and tomography of sella and clivus reveal destructions of bone structures of the base, necrotic tumor calcifications and soft-tissue-dense clouding of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Angiography reveals reduced vascularization and sometimes a stretched or constricted carotid artery. Cranial CT or NMR are best suited for imaging the tumour's extent and destructive growth. Clinical symptoms and signs are determined by the location and growth direction of the chordomas. The prognosis continues to be determined by their poor treatability. Chordomas hardly respond to chemotherapy; hence, surgery is the method of choice. Palliative radiotherapy may also be chosen as an alternative or additional therapy subsequent to tumour reduction. Modern methods involving megavolt, helium, ion or proton radiation should be preferred both to lower CNS radiation load and to achieve a possibly curative treatment. However, optimistic reports should be taken with some caveat since chordoma recurrences have been described to occur after as much as 25 years. (orig./MG)

  2. Primary chordoma of the nose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟忠林; 刘兆华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Chordoma as a rare malignant tumor arising from remnants of the notochord, accounts for 4% of malignant bone tumors. It occurs twice as frequently in men compared with women and is uncommon in individuals less than 40 years of age.1-3 Topographic distribution is spheno-occipital (35% to 44%), vertebral (15%), and sacrococcygeal (42% to 50%).4 Unusual locations include the mandible and the maxilla, and lesions in these locations have been called ectopic or dental chordomas. Some chordomas with nasal and paranasal presentations have been reported, but primary chordoma of the nose occurs rarely. To our knowlege only two cases have been reported so far according to the literature.4,5 In this paper, we present primary chordoma of the nose, its characteristics and our experiences with it.

  3. Vaccine Therapy for Unresectable Chordoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this phase II clinical trial, adult patients with inoperable chordoma who are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to receive a yeast-based vaccine that targets a protein called brachyury or a placebo injection.

  4. Atlantoaxial Chordoma in Two Patients with Occipital Neuralgia and Cervicalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Won Seop; Park, Jong Taek; Lee, Young Bok; Park, Woo Young

    2014-01-01

    Chordoma arises from cellular remnants of the notochord. It is the most common primary malignancy of the spine in adults. Approximately 50% of chordomas arise from the sacrococcygeal area with other areas of the spine giving rise to another 15% of chordomas. Following complete resection, patients can expect a 5-year survival rate of 85%. Chordoma has a recurrence rate of 40%, which leads to a less favorable prognosis. Here, we report two cases of chordoma presenting with occipital neuralgia a...

  5. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Conzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms.

  6. Multifocal thoracic chordoma mimicking a paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzo, Giovanni; Gambardella, Claudio; Pasquali, Daniela; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Avenia, Nicola; Pietra, Cristina Della; Napolitano, Salvatore; Palazzo, Antonietta; Mauriello, Claudio; Parmeggiani, Domenico; Pettinato, Guido; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Santini, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Chordoma of thoracic vertebras is a very rare locally invasive neoplasm with low grade malignancy arising from embryonic notochordal remnants. Radical surgery remains the cornerstone of the treatment. We describe a case of multifocal T1-T2 chordoma, without bone and disc involvement, incidentally misdiagnosed as a paraganglioma, occurring in a 47-year-old male asymptomatic patient. Neoplasm was radically removed by an endocrine surgeon through a right extended cervicotomy. A preoperative reliable diagnosis of chordoma, as in the reported case, is often difficult. Radical surgery can provide a favorable outcome but, given the high rates of local recurrence of this neoplasm, a strict and careful follow-up is recommended. Although very rare, chordoma should be suggested in the differential diagnosis of the paravertebral cervical masses of unknown origin. Spine surgeon consultation and a FNB should be routinely included in the multidisciplinary preoperative work-up of these neoplasms. PMID:24125991

  7. Sacral Chordoma and Single Stage Combined Anteroposterior High Sacrectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Challa, VR; Krishnamurthy, S.; Goud, BYG

    2013-01-01

    Chordomas are locally aggressive tumors, most commonly seen in sacrum. We present a case of sacral chordoma who presented with urinary retention and treated with single stage combined anteroposterior high sacrectomy

  8. Cervical chordoma with retropharyngeal extension presenting with impaired voice

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoucar, Keyvan; Rausch, Thierry; Becker, Minerva; Dulguerov, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: We report an extremely rare case of cervical chordoma presenting with impaired voice. METHOD: Case report and a review of the literature concerning the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of a cervical chordoma. RESULTS: A singing teacher complaining of dysphonia was examined and surgically treated for a retropharyngeal extension of a cervical chordoma. A local recurrence was treated with proton beam therapy. Among primary malignant tumors of bone, chordomas account fo...

  9. Intracranial metastasis from a sacrococcygeal chordoma. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamel, Mahmoud Hamdy

    2012-02-03

    Chordoma is a locally invasive tumor of low metastatic potential. Only six cases of chordoma that metastasized to the brain are found in the English literature. Most of these lesions were clinically silent and all were associated with extraneural metastases. The authors report a case of symptomatic brain metastasis from a sacrococcygeal chordoma in the absence of other metastases. The incidence, sites, and factors predictive of chordoma metastasis are discussed.

  10. Metastatic Chordoma: A Diagnostic Challenge on Fine Needle Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan Tranesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordomas are primary low grade malignant tumors of bone that usually arise within both ends of axial skeleton. The Notochord is a midline, ectoderm-derived structure that defines the phylum of chordates. Chordomas may pose difficult diagnostic challenges when encountered in secondary locations, such as lungs or other parenchymatous organs. We report the cytologic findings of a metastatic chordoma sampled through CT-scan guided fine needle aspiration (FNA of lower lobe lung nodule in a 54-year-old man diagnosed with recurrent chordoma involving the lumber spine and paraspinal region.

  11. Novel targeted therapies in chordoma: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Maio S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Di Maio,1 Stephen Yip,2 Gmaan A Al Zhrani,3,4 Fahad E Alotaibi,3,4 Abdulrahman Al Turki,3,4 Esther Kong,2 Robert C Rostomily5 1Division of Neurosurgery, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3National Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada; 5Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Chordomas are rare, locally aggressive skull base neoplasms known for local recurrence and not-infrequent treatment failure. Current evidence supports the role of maximal safe surgical resection. In addition to open skull-base approaches, the endoscopic endonasal approach to clival chordomas has been reported with favorable albeit early results. Adjuvant radiation is prescribed following complete resection, alternatively for gross residual disease or at the time of recurrence. The modalities of adjuvant radiation therapy reported vary widely and include proton-beam, carbon-ion, fractionated photon radiotherapy, and photon and gamma-knife radiosurgery. As of now, no direct comparison is available, and high-level evidence demonstrating superiority of one modality over another is lacking. While systemic therapies have yet to form part of any first-line therapy for chordomas, a number of targeted agents have been evaluated to date that inhibit specific molecules and their respective pathways known to be implicated in chordomas. These include EGFR (erlotinib, gefitinib, lapatinib, PDGFR (imatinib, mTOR (rapamycin, and VEGF (bevacizumab. This article provides an update of the current multimodality treatment of cranial base

  12. High-resolution Whole-Genome Analysis of Skull Base Chordomas Implicates FHIT Loss in Chordoma Pathogenesis12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; Guduk, Mustafa; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Smith, Christian A; Northcott, Paul; Shih, David; Berisha, Fitim; Flanagan, Adrienne; Munoz, David G; Cusimano, Michael D; Pamir, M Necmettin; Rutka, James T

    2012-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22%) than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%), we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm. PMID:23019410

  13. High-resolution Whole-Genome Analysis of Skull Base Chordomas Implicates FHIT Loss in Chordoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Jose Diaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22% than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%, we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm.

  14. High-resolution whole-genome analysis of skull base chordomas implicates FHIT loss in chordoma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; Guduk, Mustafa; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Smith, Christian A; Northcott, Paul; Shih, David; Berisha, Fitim; Flanagan, Adrienne; Munoz, David G; Cusimano, Michael D; Pamir, M Necmettin; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising in the sacrum, clivus, or vertebrae. It is often not completely resectable and shows a high incidence of recurrence and progression with shortened patient survival and impaired quality of life. Chemotherapeutic options are limited to investigational therapies at present. Therefore, adjuvant therapy for control of tumor recurrence and progression is of great interest, especially in skull base lesions where complete tumor resection is often not possible because of the proximity of cranial nerves. To understand the extent of genetic instability and associated chromosomal and gene losses or gains in skull base chordoma, we undertook whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis of flash frozen surgical chordoma specimens, 21 from the clivus and 1 from C1 to C2 vertebrae. We confirm the presence of a deletion at 9p involving CDKN2A, CDKN2B, and MTAP but at a much lower rate (22%) than previously reported for sacral chordoma. At a similar frequency (21%), we found aneuploidy of chromosome 3. Tissue microarray immunohistochemistry demonstrated absent or reduced fragile histidine triad (FHIT) protein expression in 98% of sacral chordomas and 67%of skull base chordomas. Our data suggest that chromosome 3 aneuploidy and epigenetic regulation of FHIT contribute to loss of the FHIT tumor suppressor in chordoma. The finding that FHIT is lost in a majority of chordomas provides new insight into chordoma pathogenesis and points to a potential new therapeutic target for this challenging neoplasm. PMID:23019410

  15. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author)

  16. Sacrococcygeal chordoma: MR imaging in 30 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook; Chung, Myung Hee [Catholic University of Korea, Holy Family Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pucheon (Korea); Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taejun (Korea); Park, Jin Gyoon [Chunnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kwangju (Korea); Suh, Jin Suk [Yonsei University, Severans Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Cho, Gil Ho [Yeungnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taegu (Korea); Lee, Sung Moon [Kaemyung University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taeku (Korea); Resnick, Donald [VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate MR imaging of sacrococcygeal chordoma. Thirty patients (age range 22-80 years) underwent MR imaging for the diagnosis and preoperative evaluation of sacrococcygeal chordomas. Eight patients had follow-up MR examination after treatment. The MR images were performed with T1- and T2-weighted imaging, and gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced imaging. The MR images were analyzed for the signal intensity, enhancing pattern, tumor size, growth pattern of the soft tissue component, and tumor extension. T1-weighted images showed low signal masses with foci of high signal intensity in 73% of cases. Tumors enhanced in a variety of patterns after the administration of Gd. Soft tissue masses extending anteriorly were seen in all cases with posterior extension in 77% of cases. The posterior masses involved the surrounding muscles and extended toward the greater sciatic notch, appearing with pseudopodia (87%). Sacroiliac joints were involved in 23% of cases. Four lesions showed intraspinal extension and involvement of the posterior spinal muscles above the level of bony involvement. In 6 patients recurrent tumors were found at or around the surgical margin of the tumor 6 months to 5 years after resection of the sacral tumor. In two of the patients, nodular metastases to the pelvic bones and femur were found 1-4 years after initial examination. In conclusion, MR imaging is useful in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of sacrococcygeal chordoma. Characteristic findings included sacral mass with heterogeneously high signal intensity with crisscrossing septa on long-repetition-time imaging, well-encapsulated pseudopodia-like or lobulated appearance, and gluteal muscle infiltration. Follow-up MR imaging is helpful to assess for recurrent or metastatic lesions of chordomas. (orig.)

  17. Spinal cerebrospinal fluid seeding of a clival chordoma; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Hwan; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Ki Seok; Son, Hyun Jin [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Chordomas originate from remnants of the embryonic notochord and account for < 2% of all malignant bone tumors. Chordomas have a high rate of local recurrence. However, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) seeding of a chordoma is extremely rare. Here, we present a very rare case of clival chordoma with spinal seeding. Radiologists should consider spinal CSF seeding of a clival chordoma, particularly when accompanied by signs of dural perforation or caudal extension.

  18. Diagnosis of chordoma by cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marigil, M A; Pardo-Mindan, F J; Joly, M

    1983-09-01

    This is a case report of a 44-year-old man with a chordoma of the clivus that caused dysphonia, low back pain, and urinary and fecal incontinence. The diagnosis was made by cytologic study of the CSF, which demonstrated vacuolated malignant cells. The patient was treated with intrathecal methotrexate, dexamethasone, and radiotherapy. At autopsy extensive dissemination of chordoma was found at the base of the brain, in the ventricles, and in the leptomeninges of the spinal cord. This is the sixth reported case of intrathecal dissemination of a chordoma and the first diagnosed by cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6881106

  19. Genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zehir, Ahmet; Nafa, Khedoudja; Zhou, Nengyi; Berger, Michael F; Casanova, Jacklyn; Sadowska, Justyna; Lu, Chao; Allis, C David; Gounder, Mrinal; Chandhanayingyong, Chandhanarat; Ladanyi, Marc; Boland, Patrick J; Hameed, Meera

    2016-07-01

    Chordoma is a rare primary bone neoplasm that is resistant to standard chemotherapies. Despite aggressive surgical management, local recurrence and metastasis is not uncommon. To identify the specific genetic aberrations that play key roles in chordoma pathogenesis, we utilized a genome-wide high-resolution SNP-array and next generation sequencing (NGS)-based molecular profiling platform to study 24 patient samples with typical histopathologic features of chordoma. Matching normal tissues were available for 16 samples. SNP-array analysis revealed nonrandom copy number losses across the genome, frequently involving 3, 9p, 1p, 14, 10, and 13. In contrast, copy number gain is uncommon in chordomas. Two minimum deleted regions were observed on 3p within a ∼8 Mb segment at 3p21.1-p21.31, which overlaps SETD2, BAP1 and PBRM1. The minimum deleted region on 9p was mapped to CDKN2A locus at 9p21.3, and homozygous deletion of CDKN2A was detected in 5/22 chordomas (∼23%). NGS-based molecular profiling demonstrated an extremely low level of mutation rate in chordomas, with an average of 0.5 mutations per sample for the 16 cases with matched normal. When the mutated genes were grouped based on molecular functions, many of the mutation events (∼40%) were found in chromatin regulatory genes. The combined copy number and mutation profiling revealed that SETD2 is the single gene affected most frequently in chordomas, either by deletion or by mutations. Our study demonstrated that chordoma belongs to the C-class (copy number changes) tumors whose oncogenic signature is non-random multiple copy number losses across the genome and genomic aberrations frequently alter chromatin regulatory genes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072194

  20. Chordomas: Is It Possible to Predict Recurrence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu SARSIK

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chordoma is a rare tumor with an unpredictable behaviour, and can display malignant behavior because of its tendency to local invasion and recurrence. We searched the prognostic value of histologic features, growth pattern, localization and Ki-67 proliferation index to predict disease-free survival.Material and Method: Twenty-nine cases diagnosed in a single center were included in the study and evaluated with their 81 surgical specimens, (29 primary tumors, 47 recurrent lesions and five metastatic foci regarding their matrix formation (myxoid, chondroid, cellular features, (pleomorphism, necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, patterns of proliferation (solid, trabecular, mixed and Ki-67 proliferation indices.Results: Eleven of the cases were females (37.9% while 18 of them were males (62.1% with a mean age of 54.1±14.6 (ranged between age 23-78 years. Thirty-eight percent of tumors were located in sacrococcigeal region followed by skull base and vertebrae (31% for both. Skull base chordomas which occured in younger patients (p=0.048 showed more trabecular pattern (p=0.04, chondroid matrix (p=0.063, lower Ki-67 (p=0.146 and longer disease-free survival (p=0.021. In contrast, tumors located in vertebrae, showed more “atypical” morphology with solid pattern, nuclear pleomorphism and dedifferentiation, higher Ki-67 indices and shorter disease-free survivals (p=0.021. Sacral tumors were the “intermediate group” which occurred in older patients, and demonstrated average Ki-67 proliferation indices and disease-free survivals.Conclusion: Vertebral localization, probably in relation with both histologic features and failure of surgery, appeared as a significant risk factor for recurrence and Ki-67 proliferation index retained its potential to predict disease-free survival.

  1. Intrasellar chordoma associated with a primitive persistent trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Marta; Martinez, Pedro; Shakur, Sophia F; Barbosa, Antonio; Barcena, Eduardo; Gordillo, Carlos; Fraga, Javier; Blanco, Concepcion; Sola, Rafael G

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas located primarily in the sellar region are uncommon, and may be misdiagnosed non-functioning pituitary adenoma. Furthermore, the association of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) with an intrasellar chordoma is extremely rare, and no similar cases have been reported in the literature to date. The coexistence of intrasellar chordoma (ISC) and PPTA makes safe and complete tumor resection challenging, and preoperative endovascular occlusion of this artery may be helpful. We report a case of a 32-year-old man who developed right hemifacial paresthesias and a cranial nerve six palsy. MRI study demonstrated the presence of a primary ISC associated with a PPTA. Angiographic balloon test occlusion of the PPTA revealed no neurological changes, so this vessel was endovascularly occluded by coiling. The lesion was subtotally removed through a sublabial transsphenoidal approach, without intraoperative bleeding complications. Histological examination of the lesion was consistent with the diagnosis of chordoma. Detailed preoperative neurovascular evaluation may be useful to detect vascular anomalies associated with intracranial chordomas, such as PPTA. In this report we emphasize the importance of appropriate treatment of vascular anomalies prior intrasellar lesions resection that may facilitate surgery and avoid potential hazardous intraoperative bleeding complications. PMID:25640561

  2. Genomic and epigenetic instability in chordoma: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yong Feng,1,2 Jacson K Shen,1,3 Francis J Hornicek,1,3 Zhenfeng Duan1,3 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 3Sarcoma Biology Laboratory, Center for Sarcoma and Connective Tissue Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Chordoma is a malignant bone tumor, which currently can only be defined by histologic and immunohistochemical criteria. There are no prognostic biomarkers to predict the clinical outcome or response to treatment yet. Currently, chordoma pathogenesis is very poorly understood; however, recent large-scale genetic and epigenetic studies have identified some of the underlying mechanisms and pathways that may contribute to the disease. In this review, we summarize the most recent findings in the field of chordoma genomics and epigenomics, from comparative genomic hybridization to evaluate chromosomal alteration, large-scale deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing to determine the gene mutation, microarray to access messenger ribonucleic acid (RNA and microRNA gene expression, and DNA-methylation profiling. These studies may also hold valuable clinical potential in the management of chordoma. Keywords: chordoma, chromosomal alterations, sequencing, miRNA, DNA methylation

  3. Thoracic intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement: a rare clinical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Mohd; Zeeshan, Qazi; Ojha, Balkrishna; Agrawal, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy presented with a 1-year history of low backache, followed by paraparesis and urinary incontinence. MRI of the thoracic spine revealed an intramedullary, intensely contrast-enhancing lesion extending from T11 to L1 vertebral level, consistent with astrocytoma, ependymoma or haemangioblastoma. A diagnosis of intramedullary chordoma was made on tissue biopsy and immunohistochemical study. This is the second report of an intramedullary chordoma without bone involvement in English literature. After 6 months of follow-up, patient showed good clinical outcome in terms of improvement in power in lower limbs and backache. PMID:27469385

  4. Sacral chordoma: a diagnosis not to be sat on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbins, Ruth; Evans, Guy; Grimer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Sacral chordomas are rare, slow-growing tumours that are amenable to surgery, but unfortunately often diagnosed late. The aim of the study was to identify presenting symptoms, which may aid diagnosis and reduce the treatment time. Forty-four patients were identified with sacral chordoma between 1989 and 2006. Clinical and pathological records were reviewed retrospectively to elicit the symptoms recorded prior to diagnosis, duration of symptoms, surgical treatment, size of tumour and survival. Eleven patients were excluded, leaving 33 patients in the study group. Thirty-one patients had chordomas arising from the sacrum and two patients from the coccyx. The mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 120 weeks (2.3 years), with a median of length of 104 weeks (two years) and range of 26 to 416 weeks (0.5 to eight years). The mean maximum tumour size at resection was 8.3 cm, with a mean volume of 614 cm3 (range 9–2,113 cm3). Pain, typically dull and worse with sitting, was the most common presenting symptom in 85% of patients. The classic symptoms of cauda equina (saddle anaesthesia, bladder or bowel dysfunction) occurred in 70% patients (23 patients). Sacral chordoma should be considered in cases of back pain with coccydynia, especially with neurological symptoms. PMID:17205349

  5. The role of epidermal growth factor receptor in chordoma pathogenesis: a potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Asem; Presneau, Nadège; Ye, Hongtao; Halai, Dina; Berisha, Fitim; Idowu, Bernadine; Leithner, Andreas; Liegl, Bernadette; Briggs, Timothy R W; Bacsi, Krisztian; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Athanasou, Nicholas; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2011-02-01

    Chordoma, the molecular hallmark of which is T (brachyury), is a rare malignant bone tumour with a high risk of local recurrence and a tumour from which metastatic disease is a common late event. Currently, there is no effective drug therapy for treating chordomas, although there is evidence that some patients respond to the empirical use of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonists. The aim of this study was to determine the role of EGFR in the pathogenesis of chordoma. Paraffin-embedded material from 173 chordomas from 160 patients [sacro-coccygeal (n = 94), skull-based (n = 50), and mobile spine (n = 16)] was analysed by immunohistochemistry and revealed total EGFR expression in 69% of cases analysed. Of 147 informative chordomas analysed by FISH, 38% revealed high-level EGFR polysomy, 4% high-level polysomy with focal amplification, 18% low-level polysomy, and 39% disomy. Phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array membranes showed EGFR activation in the chordoma cell line U-CH1 and all of the three chordomas analysed. Direct sequencing of EGFR (exons 18-21), KRAS, NRAS, HRAS (exons 2, 3), and BRAF (exons 11, 15) using DNA from 62 chordomas failed to reveal mutations. PTEN expression was absent by immunohistochemistry in 19 of 147 (13%) analysed chordomas, only one of which revealed high-level polysomy of EGFR. The EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin (AG 1478) markedly inhibited proliferation of the chordoma cell line U-CH1 in vitro and diminished EGFR phosphorylation in a dose-dependant manner, a finding supported by inhibition of phosphorylated Erk1/2. p-Akt was suppressed to a much lesser degree in these experiments. There was no reduction of T as assessed by western blotting. These data implicate aberrant EGFR signalling in the pathogenesis of chordoma. This study provides a strategy for patient stratification for treatment with EGFR antagonists. PMID:21171079

  6. Proton radiation therapy for clivus chordoma; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Tsunoda, Takashi; Hyodo, Akio; Nose, Tadao (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine); Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Inada, Tetsuo; Maruhashi, Akira; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    1993-03-01

    A 57-year-old male with clival chordoma developed severe hoarseness, dysphagia, and dysphonia 1 month after a second removal of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass 10 cm in diameter in the region of the middle clivus enhanced inhomogeneously by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, and a defect in the skull base. There was evidence of compression of the anterior surface of the pons. He received proton irradiation employing a pair of parallel opposed lateral proton beams. The dose aimed at the tumor mass was 75.5 Gy, to the pharyngeal wall less than 38 Gy, and to the anterior portion of the pons less than 30 Gy. Time dose and fractionation factor was calculated at 148. Thirty-one months following treatment, he was free of clinical neurological sequelae. Proton therapy should be considered in treatment planning following initial surgical removal or for inoperable clivus chordoma. (author).

  7. Immunotherapy as a Potential Treatment for Chordoma: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalin S; Schwab, Joseph H

    2016-09-01

    Chordoma is a locally aggressive primary malignancy of the axial skeleton. The gold standard for treatment is en bloc resection, with some centers now advocating for the use of radiation to help mitigate the risk of recurrence. Local recurrence is common, and salvaging local failures is quite difficult. Chemotherapy has been ineffective and small molecule targeted therapy has had only marginal benefits in small subsets of patients with rare tumor phenotypes or refractory disease. Recent successes utilizing immunotherapy in a variety of cancers has led to a resurgence of interest in modifying the host immune system to develop new ways to treat tumors. This review will discuss these studies and will highlight the early studies employing immune strategies for the treatment of chordoma. PMID:27475804

  8. Computer Navigation-aided Resection of Sacral Chordomas

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    Yong-Kun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resection of sacral chordomas is challenging. The anatomy is complex, and there are often no bony landmarks to guide the resection. Achieving adequate surgical margins is, therefore, difficult, and the recurrence rate is high. Use of computer navigation may allow optimal preoperative planning and improve precision in tumor resection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of computer navigation-aided resection of sacral chordomas. Methods: Between 2007 and 2013, a total of 26 patients with sacral chordoma underwent computer navigation-aided surgery were included and followed for a minimum of 18 months. There were 21 primary cases and 5 recurrent cases, with a mean age of 55.8 years old (range: 35-84 years old. Tumors were located above the level of the S3 neural foramen in 23 patients and below the level of the S3 neural foramen in 3 patients. Three-dimensional images were reconstructed with a computed tomography-based navigation system combined with the magnetic resonance images using the navigation software. Tumors were resected via a posterior approach assisted by the computer navigation. Mean follow-up was 38.6 months (range: 18-84 months. Results: Mean operative time was 307 min. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 3065 ml. For computer navigation, the mean registration deviation during surgery was 1.7 mm. There were 18 wide resections, 4 marginal resections, and 4 intralesional resections. All patients were alive at the final follow-up, with 2 (7.7% exhibiting tumor recurrence. The other 24 patients were tumor-free. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Score was 27.3 (range: 19-30. Conclusions: Computer-assisted navigation can be safely applied to the resection of the sacral chordomas, allowing execution of preoperative plans, and achieving good oncological outcomes. Nevertheless, this needs to be accomplished by surgeons with adequate experience and skill.

  9. Characteristics and Patterns of Metastatic Disease from Chordoma

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    Victoria A. Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare, slow-growing malignant tumor arising from notochordal remnants. A retrospective review of patient records at two major referral centers was undertaken to assess the incidence, location, and prognostic factors of metastatic disease from chordoma. 219 patients with chordoma (1962–2009 were identified. 39 patients (17.8% developed metastatic disease, most frequently to lung (>50%. Median survival from the time of initial diagnosis was 130.4 months for patients who developed metastatic disease and 159.3 months for those who did not (P=0.05. Metastatic disease was most common in the youngest patients (P=0.07, and it was 2.5 times more frequent among patients with local recurrence (26.3% than in those without (10.8% (P=0.003. Patient survival with metastatic disease was highly variable, and it was dependent on both the location of the tumor primary and the site of metastasis. Metastasis to distal bone was the most rapid to develop and had the worst prognosis.

  10. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical results of proton beam therapy for patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and materials: Thirteen patients with skull base chordoma who were treated with proton beams with or without X-rays at the University of Tsukuba between 1989 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. A median total tumor dose of 72.0 Gy (range, 63.0-95.0 Gy) was delivered. The patients were followed for a median period of 69.3 months (range, 14.6-123.4 months). Results: The 5-year local control rate was 46.0%. Cause-specific, overall, and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 72.2%, 66.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The local control rate was higher, without statistical significance, for those with preoperative tumors <30 mL. Partial or subtotal tumor removal did not yield better local control rates than for patients who underwent biopsy only as the latest surgery. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy is effective for patients with skull base chordoma, especially for those with small tumors. For a patient with a tumor of <30 mL with no prior treatment, biopsy without tumor removal seems to be appropriate before proton beam therapy

  11. Expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and prevalence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in chordoma

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    Feng, Yong; Shen, Jacson; Gao, Yan; Liao, Yunfei; Cote, Gregory; Choy, Edwin; Chebib, Ivan; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas are primary malignant tumors of the notochord that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1), prevalence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), and their clinical relevance in chordoma remain unknown. We evaluated PD-L1 expression in three chordoma cell lines and nine chordoma tissue samples by western blot. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on a chordoma tissue microarray (TMA) that contained 78 tissue specimens. We...

  12. Chordoma: 6 years' experience at a tertiary centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients with a histologically proven diagnosis of chordoma seen at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Maulana Azad Medical College and Lok Nayak Hospital between January 1999 and December 2004 were retrospectively reviewed with respect to age, sex, presentation, location of tumour, treatment, response, recurrence, metastasis and follow up. Chordoma constituted 0.07% of total cancer cases registered over 6 years. Out of nine patients, eight were males and one was female with median age at time of diagnosis 52 years (range 34-68 years). All had sacrococcygeal lesions except one who had a spheno-occipital lesion. Seven patients had undergone either subtotal or gross total resection whereas only biopsy had been carried out in two of them. All patients received radiation therapy, seven in a postoperative setting and two for palliation. Follow-up period ranged from 2 to 50 months. Four patients died - the first after fourth fraction of radiation, second after 10 days of treatment, third of progressive lesion in sphenoidal region despite resection and radiation and fourth of local recurrence in the sacrococcyx. One patient developed distant metastases in the lungs and subcutaneous tissue over the scalp along with local recurrence; he is still alive. Two patients are locally free of disease whereas the other two were lost to follow up. The present analysis was undertaken to review our institutional experience with an aim to provide a practical approach to these tumours. In this report, these cases are discussed and the published works have been reviewed for the optimal management of patients with chordoma Copyright (2006) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  13. Cervical chordoma with vertebral artery encasement mimicking neurofibroma: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of cervical chordoma in a 36-year-old white man with hypoesthesia in the neck and right shoulder, neck pain, and restricted neck mobility is presented. Plain radiographs of the cervical spine showed radiolucency of the body of C2 on the right side and enlargement of the right intervertebral foramen at C2-C3 level. Tumor encasement of the vertebral artery was demonstrated by MR imaging and confirmed by conventional arteriography. This proved to be particularly important for preoperative assessment. (orig.)

  14. Intradural spinal seeding and fatal progression of a sacrococcygeal chordoma:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Tao; GUO Wei; SHEN Dan-hua; YANG Yi; TANG Shun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chordoma as a rare malignant tumor arising from remnants of the fetal notochord accounts for 1%-4% of primary bone tumors.It is usually predominant in males.Local recurrences are common (44%-78%)1-3 and distant metastases may occur years after the initial presentation.The reposed rates of metastases range from 10% to 48%,4-6 which are usually accompanied by a sacrococcygeal chordoma.Cases of surgical seeding and intradural spinal seeding also have been reported clinically.7-9 To our knowledge,the present case is the first one concerning cerebrospinal fluid metastases and fatal progression of a sacrococcygeal chordoma.

  15. Cranial chordomas in infancy and childhood. A report of two cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial chordomas are uncommon, accounting for less than 1% of all intracranial neoplasms. Although they are presumed to arise from congenital notochordal remnants, it is rare for these tumors to present in childhood. Only 35 cases of cranial chordomas have been reported in children 16 years of age or younger. We report 2 additional cases of pediatric cranial chordomas. One occurred in a 4 month old infant and to our knowledge represents the earliest age of presentation yet reported. The second case documents the value of MR imaging in delineating the extent of the tumor and defining its relationship to adjacent structures. (orig.)

  16. Chordoma of the Lumbar Spine Presenting as Sciatica and Treated with Vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lumbar spine is a less common location for chordoma. Here we describe a 44-year-old woman presenting with pain due to a L4 vertebral expansile lesion that caused significant canal stenosis and neural foraminal compromise. Vertebroplasty was performed and resulted in immediate pain relief. For patients with painful lumbar chordoma who are unwilling to undergo surgery, vertebroplasty can play a palliative role as in patients with other vertebral lesions. Treating pain and stabilizing vertebra by way of vertebroplasty in a case of chordoma has not yet been reported.

  17. A common single-nucleotide variant in T is strongly associated with chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Nischalan; Plagnol, Vincent; Tarpey, Patrick S; Lobo, Samira B; Presneau, Nadège; Szuhai, Karoly; Halai, Dina; Berisha, Fitim; Cannon, Stephen R; Mead, Simon; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Palmen, Jutta; Talmud, Philippa J; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Amary, M Fernanda; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2012-11-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant bone tumor that expresses the transcription factor T. We conducted an association study of 40 individuals with chordoma and 358 ancestry-matched controls, with replication in an independent cohort. Whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of T exons showed strong association of the common nonsynonymous SNP rs2305089 with chordoma risk (allelic odds ratio (OR) = 6.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.1-12.1; P = 4.4 × 10(-9)), a finding that is exceptional in cancers with a non-Mendelian mode of inheritance. PMID:23064415

  18. Cervical chondroid chordoma in a standard dachshund: a case report

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    Stigen Øyvind

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A ten-year-old male standard dachshund was presented with a history of neck pain and progressive gait disturbances. Following a neurological examination and diagnostic imaging, including CT, a neoplastic lesion involving the third and fourth cervical vertebrae was suspected. The lesion included an extradural mass on the right side of the spinal canal causing a local compression of the cervical cord. Surgery, using a modified dorsal laminectomy procedure, was performed in order to decompress the cervical spinal cord. Histopathological examination of the extradural mass indicated that the tumour was a chondroid chordoma. Following discharge, the quality of life for the dog was very good for a sustained period, but clinical signs recurred at 22 months. The dog was euthanased 25 months post-surgery. On post-mortem examination, a regrowth of neoplastic tissue was found to have infiltrated the bone and spinal cord at C3-C4. This is the first report to show that palliative surgery can offer successful long-lasting treatment of chondroid chordoma of the cervical spine in the dog.

  19. The Brachyury Gly177Asp SNP Is not Associated with a Risk of Skull Base Chordoma in the Chinese Population

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    Zhen Wu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A recent chordoma cancer genotyping study reveals that the rs2305089, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located in brachyury gene and a key gene in the development of notochord, is significantly associated with chordoma risk. The brachyury gene is believed to be one of the key genes involved in the pathogenesis of chordoma, a rare primary bone tumor originating along the spinal column or at the base of the skull. The association between the brachyury Gly177Asp single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and the risk of skull base chordoma in Chinese populations is currently unknown. We investigated the genotype distribution of this SNP in 65 skull-base chordoma cases and 120 healthy subjects. Comparisons of the genotype distributions and allele frequencies did not reveal any significant difference between the groups. Our data suggest that the brachyury Gly177Asp SNP is not involved in the risks of skull-base chordoma, at least in the Chinese population.

  20. External r[iotherapy plus intracavitary brachytherapy for recurrent chordoma of the nasopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of recurrent nasopharyngeal chordoma treated by external beam r[iotherapy plus brachytherapy, and discuss this technique in relation to treatment modalities reported in the literature. (orig.)

  1. Giant Chordoma of the Upper Thoracic Spine with Mediastinal Involvement: A Surgical Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Rena, Ottavio; Davoli, Fabio; Allegra, Giuliano; Casadio, Caterina; Turello, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic chordomas are very rare malignant tumours originating from notochordal remnants. These tumours develop within a vertebral body and enlarge involving the mediastinal compartment. Because of their slow-growing attitude, they become symptomatic only when they invade or compress the spinal cord and/or mediastinal organs. We present a rare case of a thoracic spine chordoma presenting with increasing paraparesis with a huge mediastinal component which was surgically debulked to decompress ...

  2. Giant chordoma of the upper thoracic spine with mediastinal involvement: a surgical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rena, Ottavio; Davoli, Fabio; Allegra, Giuliano; Casadio, Caterina; Turello, Davide

    2014-06-01

    Thoracic chordomas are very rare malignant tumours originating from notochordal remnants. These tumours develop within a vertebral body and enlarge involving the mediastinal compartment. Because of their slow-growing attitude, they become symptomatic only when they invade or compress the spinal cord and/or mediastinal organs. We present a rare case of a thoracic spine chordoma presenting with increasing paraparesis with a huge mediastinal component which was surgically debulked to decompress the spinal cord and medistinal organs. PMID:24967050

  3. A zebrafish model of chordoma initiated by notochord-driven expression of HRASV12

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    Alexa Burger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a malignant tumor thought to arise from remnants of the embryonic notochord, with its origin in the bones of the axial skeleton. Surgical resection is the standard treatment, usually in combination with radiation therapy, but neither chemotherapeutic nor targeted therapeutic approaches have demonstrated success. No animal model and only few chordoma cell lines are available for preclinical drug testing, and, although no druggable genetic drivers have been identified, activation of EGFR and downstream AKT-PI3K pathways have been described. Here, we report a zebrafish model of chordoma, based on stable transgene-driven expression of HRASV12 in notochord cells during development. Extensive intra-notochordal tumor formation is evident within days of transgene expression, ultimately leading to larval death. The zebrafish tumors share characteristics of human chordoma as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, which has some demonstrated activity in a chordoma cell line, delays the onset of tumor formation in our zebrafish model, and improves survival of tumor-bearing fish. Consequently, the HRASV12-driven zebrafish model of chordoma could enable high-throughput screening of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of this refractory cancer.

  4. Proton Therapy for Reirradiation of Progressive or Recurrent Chordoma

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    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mmcdona2@iuhealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechuckwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Shah, Mitesh V. [Department of Neurosurgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report the results in patients reirradiated with proton therapy for recurrent or progressive chordoma, with or without salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 16 consecutive patients treated from 2005 to 2012 was performed. All patients had received at least 1 prior course of radiation therapy to the same area, and all but 1 patient had at least 1 surgical resection for disease before receiving reirradiation. At the time of recurrence or progression, half of the patients underwent additional salvage surgery before receiving reirradiation. The median prior dose of radiation was 75.2 Gy (range, 40-79.2 Gy). Six patients had received prior proton therapy, and the remainder had received photon radiation. The median gross tumor volume at the time of reirradiation was 71 cm{sup 3} (range, 0-701 cm{sup 3}). Reirradiation occurred at a median interval of 37 months after prior radiation (range, 12-129 months), and the median dose of reirradiation was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) (range. 71.2-79.2 Gy [RBE]), given in standard daily fractionation (n=14) or hyperfractionation (n=2). Results: The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 6-63 months); it was 26 months in patients alive at the last follow-up visit (range, 12-63 months). The 2-year estimate for local control was 85%, overall survival 80%, chordoma-specific survival 88%, and development of distant metastases 20%. Four patients have had local progression: 3 in-field and 1 marginal. Late toxicity included grade 3 bitemporal lobe radionecrosis in 1 patient that improved with hyperbaric oxygen, a grade 4 cerebrospinal fluid leak with meningitis in 1 patient, and a grade 4 ischemic brainstem stroke (out of radiation field) in 1 patient, with subsequent neurologic recovery. Conclusions: Full-dose proton reirradiation provided encouraging initial disease control and overall survival for patients with recurrent or progressive chordoma, although additional

  5. Skull base chordomas: analysis of dose-response characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To extract dose-response characteristics from dose-volume histograms and corresponding actuarial survival statistics for 115 patients with skull base chordomas. Materials and Methods: We analyzed data for 115 patients with skull base chordoma treated with combined photon and proton conformal radiotherapy to doses in the range 66.6Gy - 79.2Gy. Data set for each patient included gender, histology, age, tumor volume, prescribed dose, overall treatment time, time to recurrence or time to last observation, target dose-volume histogram, and several dosimetric parameters (minimum/mean/median/maximum target dose, percent of the target volume receiving the prescribed dose, dose to 90% of the target volume, and the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). Data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier survivor function estimate, the proportional hazards (Cox) model, and parametric modeling of the actuarial probability of recurrence. Parameters of dose-response characteristics were obtained using the maximum likelihood method. Results: Local failure developed in 42 (36%) of patients, with actuarial local control rates at 5 years of 59.2%. The proportional hazards model revealed significant dependence of gender on the probability of recurrence, with female patients having significantly poorer prognosis (hazard ratio of 2.3 with the p value of 0.008). The Wilcoxon and the log-rank tests of the corresponding Kaplan-Meier recurrence-free survival curves confirmed statistical significance of this effect. The Cox model with stratification by gender showed significance of tumor volume (p=0.01), the minimum target dose (p=0.02), and the EUD (p=0.02). Other parameters were not significant at the α level of significance of 0.05, including the prescribed dose (p=0.21). Parametric analysis using a combined model of tumor control probability (to account for non-uniformity of target dose distribution) and the Weibull failure time model (to account for censoring) allowed us to estimate

  6. Spot-Scanning-Based Proton Therapy for Extracranial Chordoma

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    Staab, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.staab@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Rutz, Hans Peter; Ares, Carmen; Timmermann, Beate; Schneider, Ralf; Bolsi, Alessandra; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate effectiveness and safety of spot-scanning-based proton-radiotherapy (PT) for extracranial chordomas (ECC). Methods and Material: Between 1999-2006, 40 patients with chordoma of C-, T-, and L-spine and sacrum were treated at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with PT using spot-scanning. Median patient age was 58 years (range, 10-81 years); 63% were male, and 36% were female. Nineteen patients (47%) had gross residual disease (mean 69 cc; range, 13-495 cc) before PT, and 21 patients (53%) had undergone prior titanium-based surgical stabilization (SS) and reconstruction of the axial skeleton. Proton doses were expressed as Gy(RBE). A conversion factor of 1.1 was used to account for higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons compared with photons. Mean total dose was 72.5 Gy(RBE) [range, 59.4-75.2 Gy(RBE)] delivered at 1.8-2.0 Gy(RBE) dose per fraction. Median follow-up time was 43 months. Results: In 19 patients without surgical stabilization, actuarial local control (LC) rate at 5 years was 100%. LC for patients with gross residual disease but without surgical stabilization was also 100% at 5 years. In contrast, 12 failures occurred in 21 patients with SS, yielding a significantly decreased 5-year LC rate of 30% (p = 0.0003). For the entire cohort, 5-year LC rates were 62%, disease-free survival rates were 57%, and overall survival rates were 80%. Rates were 100% for patients without SS. No other factor, including dosimetric parameters (V95, V80) were predictive for tumor control on univariate analysis. Conclusion: Spot-scanning-based PT at PSI delivered subsequently to function-preserving surgery for tumor debulking, decompression of spinal cord, or biopsy only is safe and highly effective in patients with ECC without major surgical instrumentation even in view of large, unresectable disease.

  7. Durable Response of Spinal Chordoma to Combined Inhibition of IGF-1R and EGFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksic, Tamara; Browning, Lisa; Woodward, Martha; Phillips, Rachel; Page, Suzanne; Henderson, Shirley; Athanasou, Nicholas; Ansorge, Olaf; Whitwell, Duncan; Pratap, Sarah; Hassan, A. Bassim; Middleton, Mark R.; Macaulay, Valentine M.

    2016-01-01

    Chordomas are rare primary malignant bone tumors arising from embryonal notochord remnants of the axial skeleton. Chordomas commonly recur following surgery and radiotherapy, and there is no effective systemic therapy. Previous studies implicated receptor tyrosine kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), in chordoma biology. We report an adult female patient who presented in 2003 with spinal chordoma, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. She underwent further surgery for recurrent chordoma in 2008, with subsequent progression in pelvic deposits. In June 2009, she was recruited onto the Phase I OSI-906-103 trial of EGFR inhibitor erlotinib with linsitinib, a novel inhibitor of IGF-1R/insulin receptor (INSR). Treatment with 100 mg QD erlotinib and 50 mg QD linsitinib was well-tolerated, and after 18 months a partial response was achieved by RECIST criteria. From 43 months, a protocol modification allowed intra-patient linsitinib dose escalation to 50 mg BID. The patient remained stable on trial treatment for a total of 5 years, discontinuing treatment in August 2014. She subsequently experienced further disease progression for which she underwent pelvic surgery in April 2015. Analysis of DNA extracted from 2008 (pre-trial) tissue showed that the tumor harbored wild-type EGFR, and a PIK3CA mutation was detected in plasma, but not tumor DNA. The 2015 (post-trial) tumor harbored a mutation of uncertain significance in ATM, with no detectable mutations in other components of a 50 gene panel, including EGFR, PIK3CA, and TP53. By immunohistochemistry, the tumor was positive for brachyury, the molecular hallmark of chordoma, and showed weak–moderate membrane and cytoplasmic EGFR. IGF-1R was detected in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm and was expressed more strongly in recurrent tumor than the primary. We also noted heterogeneous nuclear IGF-1R, which has been linked with sensitivity

  8. DURABLE RESPONSE OF SPINAL CHORDOMA TO COMBINED INHIBITION OF IGF-1R AND EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eAleksic

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chordomas are rare primary malignant bone tumors arising from embryonal notochord remnants of the axial skeleton. Chordomas commonly recur following surgery and radiotherapy, and there is no effective systemic therapy. Previous studies implicated receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R in chordoma biology. We report an adult female patient who presented in 2003 with spinal chordoma, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. She underwent further surgery for recurrent chordoma in 2008, with subsequent progression in pelvic deposits. In June 2009 she was recruited onto the Phase I OSI-906-103 trial of EGFR inhibitor erlotinib with linsitinib, a novel inhibitor of IGF-1R/insulin receptor (INSR. Treatment with 100mg QD erlotinib and 50mg QD linsitinib was well-tolerated, and after 18 months a partial response was achieved by RECIST criteria. From 43 months a protocol modification allowed intra-patient linsitinib dose-escalation to 50mg BID. The patient remained stable on trial treatment for a total of five years, discontinuing treatment in August 2014. She subsequently experienced further disease progression for which she underwent pelvic surgery in April 2015. Analysis of DNA extracted from 2008 (pre-trial tissue showed that the tumor harbored wild-type EGFR, and a PIK3CA mutation was detected in plasma but not tumor DNA. The 2015 (post-trial tumor harbored a mutation of uncertain significance in ATM, with no detectable mutations in other components of a 50 gene panel including EGFR, PIK3CA and TP53. By immunohistochemistry the tumor was positive for brachyury, the molecular hallmark of chordoma, and showed weak-moderate membrane and cytoplasmic EGFR. IGF-1R was detected in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm and was expressed more strongly in recurrent tumor than the primary. We also noted heterogeneous nuclear IGF-1R, which has been linked with sensitivity to IGF

  9. Transrectal EUS-guided FNA biopsy of a presacral chordoma-report of a case and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Klaus Gottlieb; Paul H Lin; David M Liu; Karl Anders

    2008-01-01

    Chordomas are rare tumors which originate from the remnants of the notochord.These tumors are locally aggressive and have a predilection for the ends of the axial skeleton.An important prerequisite for optimal management of these tumors is a correct preoperative diagnosis.The present case is the first report of the use of endoscopic ultrasound to obtain transrectal fine needle aspiration biopsy of a presacral chordoma.A review of the prior computer tomography (CT) scans allowed us to calculate the tumor volume doubling time (18.3 mo).Transrectal biopsy of chordomas is controversial,however we believe that such concerns are not justified.

  10. Chordoma of the thoracic and lumbosacralis spine with recurrence and locally invasive process - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chordomas are uncommon tumours, accounting for 2-4% of all primary malignant bone tumours. The location of the tumours in decreasing frequency is: the sacrococcygeal region, 50%; spheno-occipital region, 30-40%; and other spinal segments, 15%. Most patients are aged from 40 to 70 years. The standard therapy is radical resection. Local recurrence rate of sacrococcygeal chordomas after surgery is about 46-70% and prevalence of metastasis is 10-43%. The median times to recurrence after surgery are 3.4 years for radical resection and 8 months for subtotal excision. High-dose radiation is increasingly used in combination with surgery for non-resectable lesions. Chordoma has a low sensitivity to chemotherapy. The purpose of our work is to show a very rare case of chordoma of the thoracic and lumbosacral spine with recurrence and locally invasive process in a 59-year-old woman and demonstrate our experience from adjusted diagnostic workup and approach of treatment. (authors)

  11. Endoscopic laser ablation of clival chordoma with magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy

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    James Barrese

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The endoscopic endonasal approach to MRI-guided laser ablation is both technically feasible and safe. As a result, this therapy may be a useful alternative in hard-to-reach chordomas, or in recurrent cases that have failed other conventional treatment modalities.

  12. Distribution of Age and Location of Chordoma in 39 Cases and Review of Treatment Options

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    Alireza Khoshnevisan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Skull base chordomas are rare neoplasms arising from the notochord.Although histologically benign, these tumors are locally aggressive and present significant management challenges. There are some studies on chordoma cases but there was no study about Iranian cases.In this study we evaluated the location, age and gender of the patients with Chordoma in two referral centers in Tehran. Methods: A database of patients with chordoma tumors referred to two centers (Shariati and Imam Hospitals, Tehran from 2001 to 2011 was retrospectively reviewed. Results: In our subjects tumors affect men nearly twice as frequently as women, and they are most commonly diagnosed in middle-aged (mean age was 50.6. Tumors typically occur in the axial skeleton and have a tendency for the spheno-occipital region of the skull base and sacral region. In adults 33.3% of chordomas involve the sacrococcygeal region, 53% occured at the base of the skull near the spheno-occipital area, and near 14% were found in the vertebral column. The cranial nerves mostly affected were abducens, oculomotor and trochlear, with some overlaps. All patients were treated with surgery and some cases referred for gamma-knife radiosurgery (GKS.Discussion:Findings of this study showed more involvement of males compare to females; that is different from other studies, however, few studies reported more male to female ratio. Despite the progress in current surgical techniques and some encouraging results with the use of targeted therapy, disease control and long-term prognosis of patients are still poor.

  13. Zoledronic acid in metastatic chondrosarcoma and advanced sacrum chordoma: two case reports

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    Capasso Elena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chondrosarcomas and chordomas are usually chemoresistant bone tumors and may have a poor prognosis when advanced. They are usually associated with worsening pain difficult to control. Patients and Methods Zoledronic acid was used in a 63-year-old man with metastatic chondrosarcoma and in a 66-year-old woman with a diagnosis of sacrum chordoma both reporting severe pain related to tumor. Results In the first case, zoledronic acid was able to maintain pain control despite disease progression following chemotherapy, in the other case, zoledronic acid only produced significant clinical benefit. Conclusion Control of pain associated with bone tumors such as chondrosarcoma and chondroma may significantly improve from use of zoledronic acid, independently from tumor response to other treatments. Evaluation on larger series are needed to confirm the clinical effect of this bisphosphonate on such tumors.

  14. A Parapharyngeal Soft Tissue Chordoma Presenting with Synchronous Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis: An Unusual Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurram, S A; Biswas, D; Fernando, M

    2016-09-01

    A 63 year old male presented with a three month history of dysphagia, neck swelling and an oropharyngeal swelling on examination. Initial fine needle aspiration cytology and magnetic resonance imaging (done at a peripheral hospital) suggested a salivary gland neoplasm with lymph node metastasis. An infra-temporal approach was employed to excise the tumour mass and a modified radical neck dissection undertaken to remove the cervical metastasis. Histopathological examination with immunohistochemistry confirmed this to be a soft tissue chordoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented report of an extra-axial soft tissue chordoma presenting with synchronous metastatic disease. Though rare, this adds to the list of differential diagnoses for complex parapharyngeal lesions. A multidisciplinary approach between head and neck surgery, histopathology, radiology and sarcoma teams is paramount for arriving at the correct diagnosis and to deliver optimal treatment. PMID:26984125

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic chordoma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)

    OpenAIRE

    Iseri, Toshie; Shimizu, Junichiro; AKIYOSHI, Hideo; KUSUDA, Kayo; HAYASHI, Akiyoshi; MIE, Keiichiro; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji; Fujimoto, Yuka; OHASHI, Fumihito

    2015-01-01

    A Bengal tiger was presented for evaluation of weakness, ataxia and inappetance. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass extending from the T7-8 vertebral body to the left rib and compressing the spinal cord. On CT, the bone destruction and sequestrum were shown. On MRI, the multilobulated mass appeared hypo- to isointense in T1-weighted and hyperintense in T2-weighted images. The tiger died after imaging, most likely from renal failure. Chordoma without ...

  16. Clival Ectopic Pituitary Adenoma Mimicking a Chordoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantine L. Karras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Purely ectopic pituitary adenomas are exceedingly rare. Here we report on a patient that presented with an incidental clival mass thought to be a chordoma. Endonasal resection, tumor pathology, and endocrinology workup revealed a prolactinoma. Case Presentation. A 41-year-old male presented with an incidental clival lesion presumed to be a chordoma. On MRI it involved the entire clivus, extended laterally to the petroclival junction, and invaded the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, encasing both internal carotid arteries, without direct extension into the sella. Intraoperatively, it was clear that the tumor originated from the clivus and that the sellar dura was completely intact. Frozen-section pathology was consistent with a pituitary adenoma. Immunostaining was positive for synaptophysin and prolactin with a low Ki-67 index, suggestive of a prolactinoma. Additional immunohistochemical stains seen in chordomas (EMA, S100, and Brachyury and other metastatic tumors were negative. A postoperative endocrine workup revealed an elevated serum prolactin of 881.3 ng/mL (normal < 20. Conclusions. In conclusion, it is crucial to maintain an extensive differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with a clival lesion. Ectopic clival pituitary adenomas, although rare, may warrant an endocrinological workup preoperatively as the majority may respond to medical treatment.

  17. Clival Ectopic Pituitary Adenoma Mimicking a Chordoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, Constantine L; Abecassis, Isaac Josh; Abecassis, Zachary A; Adel, Joseph G; Bit-Ivan, Esther N; Chandra, Rakesh K; Bendok, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Purely ectopic pituitary adenomas are exceedingly rare. Here we report on a patient that presented with an incidental clival mass thought to be a chordoma. Endonasal resection, tumor pathology, and endocrinology workup revealed a prolactinoma. Case Presentation. A 41-year-old male presented with an incidental clival lesion presumed to be a chordoma. On MRI it involved the entire clivus, extended laterally to the petroclival junction, and invaded the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, encasing both internal carotid arteries, without direct extension into the sella. Intraoperatively, it was clear that the tumor originated from the clivus and that the sellar dura was completely intact. Frozen-section pathology was consistent with a pituitary adenoma. Immunostaining was positive for synaptophysin and prolactin with a low Ki-67 index, suggestive of a prolactinoma. Additional immunohistochemical stains seen in chordomas (EMA, S100, and Brachyury) and other metastatic tumors were negative. A postoperative endocrine workup revealed an elevated serum prolactin of 881.3 ng/mL (normal < 20). Conclusions. In conclusion, it is crucial to maintain an extensive differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with a clival lesion. Ectopic clival pituitary adenomas, although rare, may warrant an endocrinological workup preoperatively as the majority may respond to medical treatment. PMID:26885420

  18. En bloc resection of a C2-C3 upper cervical chordoma: Technical note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G Weil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, en bloc spondylectomy for upper cervical chordomas has been reported. Most authors utilize the combined approaches (e.g., transoral tumor resection with anterior column reconstruction and primary pharyngeal closure without up-front flap repair. However, the 60% incidence of posterior pharyngeal wall dehiscence delays oral intake, typically requires an additional surgery (e.g. free-flap, and delays radiation therapy. Methods: Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of en bloc C2-C3 spondylectomy for the treatment of upper cervical chordomas utilizing a combined transoral followed by posterior approach. We used a novel anterior de-epithelialized submental island flap (SIF as an underlay graft between the pharyngeal wall and cage/hardware to prevent pharyngeal wound dehiscence. Results: Despite a small pharyngeal fistula, the construct healed and the patient was disease-free 40 months later. Conclusion: En bloc C2-C3 spondylectomy for the treatment of an upper cervical chordoma typically requires a combined transoral and posterior approaches. This required utilization of an anterior SIF to promote adequate wound healing. This maneuver avoided incurring the typical complications of combined approaches (e.g. transoral tumor resection with anterior column reconstruction and primary pharyngeal closure without up-front flap repair.

  19. An integrated functional genomics approach identifies the regulatory network directed by brachyury (T) in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew C; Pillay, Nischalan; Henderson, Stephen; Presneau, Nadège; Tirabosco, Roberto; Halai, Dina; Berisha, Fitim; Flicek, Paul; Stemple, Derek L; Stern, Claudio D; Wardle, Fiona C; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2012-11-01

    Chordoma is a rare malignant tumour of bone, the molecular marker of which is the expression of the transcription factor, brachyury. Having recently demonstrated that silencing brachyury induces growth arrest in a chordoma cell line, we now seek to identify its downstream target genes. Here we use an integrated functional genomics approach involving shRNA-mediated brachyury knockdown, gene expression microarray, ChIP-seq experiments, and bioinformatics analysis to achieve this goal. We confirm that the T-box binding motif of human brachyury is identical to that found in mouse, Xenopus, and zebrafish development, and that brachyury acts primarily as an activator of transcription. Using human chordoma samples for validation purposes, we show that brachyury binds 99 direct targets and indirectly influences the expression of 64 other genes, thereby acting as a master regulator of an elaborate oncogenic transcriptional network encompassing diverse signalling pathways including components of the cell cycle, and extracellular matrix components. Given the wide repertoire of its active binding and the relative specific localization of brachyury to the tumour cells, we propose that an RNA interference-based gene therapy approach is a plausible therapeutic avenue worthy of investigation. PMID:22847733

  20. Chordomas of the upper cervical spine: clinical characteristics and surgical management of a series of 21 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Hua; Jiang Liang; Wei Feng; Yu Miao; Wu Fengliang; Liu Xiaoguang; Liu Zhongjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Chordomas of the upper cervical spine are rare and present unique surgical challenge.This study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and surgical management of patients with chordomas of the upper cervical spine.Methods Twenty-one patients with chordomas of the upper cervical spine who were treated in Peking University Third Hospital from January 1999 to October 2012 were retrospectively analyzed.Survival was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and was compared between groups using the log-rank test.Results The postoperative diagnosis was classical chordoma in 20 cases and chondroid chordoma in one case.The mean operative time was 9.5 hours (range 6-17 hours),and the mean blood loss was 2 812 ml (range 700-4 800 ml).There were two postoperative deaths.Unilateral vertebral artery ligation was performed in six patients,cervical nerve roots were cut in six patients,and the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve was repaired after being cut in one case.Two patients developed postoperative velopharyngeal incompetence,and loosening of the occipitocervical screws was observed in one patient.The recurrence rate was 66.7% (10/15) after a mean follow-up period of 46.8 months (range 14-150 months).The 5-and 10-year overall survival rates were (39.8±13.1)% and (31.9±12.7)%,respectively.There was a significant difference in survival rate between patients who underwent surgery and those who did not.Conclusion In spite of the high rates of recurrence and complications after surgical treatment of chordomas of the upper cervical spine,intralesional resection combined with adjuvant radiotherapy remains the optimal treatment to prolong survival.

  1. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauptman, Jason S., E-mail: jhauptman@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Barkhoudarian, Garni; Safaee, Michael; Gorgulho, Alessandra [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tenn, Steven; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Selch, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); De Salles, Antonio A.F. [Division of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  2. A small prospective study of chordomas treated with radiotherapy and razoxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhomberg, W.; Boehler, F.K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, General Hospital, Feldkirch (Austria); Novak, H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, General Hospital, Feldkirch (Austria); Dertinger, S.; Breitfellner, G. [Dept. of Pathology, General Hospital, Feldkirch (Austria)

    2003-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local effect of conventional photon irradiation in chordomas if the radiosensitizing agent razoxane is added. The rationale for this procedure were improved results previously seen in soft tissue and chondrosarcomas with this combination. Patients and Methods: Between 1988 and 1996, five patients with histologically confirmed chordomas of the skull base or the spine (three females, two males) were irradiated with 6- and 25-MeV photons under razoxane medication, one patient was treated with a telecobalt unit. Single doses of 180-200 cGy were given five times a week. The median total tumor dose was 63 Gy (range 54-67 Gy). Concomitantly, the radiosensitizer razoxane was administered at a dose of 125 mg twice daily p.o., median total dose 7.6 g. The drug was started 3-5 days before the first irradiation, and continued until the end of radiotherapy. Results: After a potential median follow-up time of 10 years, three of the five patients are alive and show neither symptoms nor signs of recurrence in CT or MR images. One patient with persistent sacral chordoma died after 8 years from cardiac insufficiency, and another patient died after 6.5 years from a bleeding complication following surgery for recurrence. The patients remained locally controlled for 5, 5.5+, 6.4, 11+, and 13+ years, respectively. Objective tumor regressions were noted in three of four patients with measurable disease. Acute side effects included mucosal reactions, two of five patients developed a leukopenia WHO grade 3 due to razoxane. Serious long-term complications were not observed. Conclusions: Although the patient series is small, there is an interesting trend in local control and survival. The cases are unselected, and the follow-up time is of considerable duration. The treatment can easily be performed at any institution and is tolerated fairly well. (orig.)

  3. Adjuvant Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Intracranial Chordomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Winward; Terterov, Sergei; Ung, Nolan; Kaprealian, Tania; Trang, Andy; DeSalles, Antonio; Chung, Lawrance K; Martin, Neil; Selch, Michael; Bergsneider, Marvin; Yong, William; Yang, Isaac

    2016-02-01

    Objective Chordomas are locally aggressive, highly recurrent tumors requiring adjuvant radiotherapy following resection for successful management. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for intracranial chordomas with adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT). Methods A total of 57 patients underwent 83 treatments at the UCLA Medical Center between February 1990 and August 2011. Mean follow-up was 57.8 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.36 cm. Overall, 8 and 34 patients received adjuvant SRS and SRT, and the mean maximal dose of radiation therapy was 1783.3 cGy and 6339 cGy, respectively. Results Overall rate of recurrence was 51.8%, and 1- and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 88.2% and 35.2%, respectively. Gross total resection was achieved in 30.9% of patients. Adjuvant radiotherapy improved outcomes following subtotal resection (5-year PFS 62.5% versus 20.1%; p = 0.036). SRS and SRT produced comparable rates of tumor control (p = 0.28). Higher dose SRT (> 6,000 cGy) (p = 0.013) and younger age (< 45 years) (p = 0.03) was associated with improved rates of tumor control. Conclusion Adjuvant radiotherapy is critical following subtotal resection of intracranial chordomas. Adjuvant SRT and SRS were safe and improved PFS following subtotal resection. Higher total doses of SRT and younger patient age were associated with improved rates of tumor control. PMID:26949587

  4. Challenges in Linear Accelerator Radiotherapy for Chordomas and Chondrosarcomas of the Skull Base: Focus on Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Intracranial chordomas and chondrosarcomas are histologically low-grade, locally invasive tumors that infiltrate the skull base. Currently, consensus therapy includes surgical resection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Radiation delivery is typically limited by the proximity of these tumors to critical skull base structures. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 13 cases of chordomas and 2 cases of chondroid chondrosarcomas of the skull based treated with linear accelerator stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT, n = 10) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, n = 5). The average time to the most recent follow-up visit was 4.5 years. The tumor characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes were recorded. Each radiation plan was reviewed, and the dosage received by the brainstem, optic apparatus, and pituitary was calculated. Results: Of the 10 patients treated with SRT, 6 were found to have unchanged or decreased tumor size as determined from radiographic follow-up. Of the 5 patients treated with SRS, 3 were found to have stable or unchanged tumors at follow-up. The complications included 1 SRT patient who developed endocrinopathy, 2 patients (1 treated with SRS and the other with SRT), who developed cranial neuropathy, and 1 SRS patient who developed visual deficits. Additionally, 1 patient who received both SRS and SRT within 2 years for recurrence experienced transient medial temporal lobe radiation changes that resolved. Conclusions: Where proton beam therapy is unavailable, linear accelerator-based SRT or radiosurgery remains a safe option for adjuvant therapy of chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base. The exposure of the optic apparatus, pituitary stalk, and brainstem must be considered during planning to minimize complications. If the optic apparatus is included in the 80% isodose line, it might be best to fractionate therapy. Exposure of the pituitary stalk should be kept to <30 Gy to minimize endocrine dysfunction. Brainstem exposure should be

  5. Endovascular occlusion of a lacerated primitive trigeminal artery during surgical resection of clival chordoma. a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltsavias, G; Valavanis, A

    2010-06-01

    We describe a case of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) coexistent with a clival chordoma. During surgery of the tumor, the partially incorporated PPTA was inadvertently traumatized and ruptured. The operation was discontinued and the PPTA was endovascularly occluded permitting further safe resection of the tumor. PMID:20642897

  6. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  7. Proton radiation therapy for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the skull base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E B; Slater, J D

    2000-10-01

    Most patients with conventional radiotherapy after surgery die with local disease progression. The superior local tumor control and overall survival achieved with fractionated proton RT can be attributed to improved dose localization characteristics of protons, resulting in higher doses delivered. Patients with base of skull neoplasms are increasingly considered for stereotactic radiosurgery. Recently, Muthukumar et al reported for the University of Pittsburgh group on cobalt-60 Gamma Knife (Elekta Instruments, Atlanta, GA) therapy for 15 patients with chordomas or chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. With tumor volumes ranging between 0.98 and 10.3 mL (mean, 4.6 mL), doses to the tumor margin varying from 12 to 20 Gy (median, 18 Gy) were delivered. Two patients were treated without histologic tumor confirmation. After a median follow-up time of 40 months, 2 patients had died of disease, 2 patients had succumbed to intercurrent disease, and 1 patient surviving at the time of analysis had developed tumor progression. Neither actuarial local control nor actuarial survival data were presented. In the LLUMC series, most tumors exceeded sizes reportedly suitable for radiosurgery or were of a highly irregular configuration. Nevertheless, in 11 patients, tumors less than 15 mL in size remained locally controlled as did tumors sized between 15 and 25 mL in 11 additional patients; these patients were thus potential candidates for stereotactic radiosurgery. At present, too few reports on radiosurgery contain sufficient patient numbers and statistical analyses to permit one to draw conclusions about the feasibility of radiosurgery for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. A principal difference between proton RT and radiosurgery as currently practiced in most centers concerns target definition. In proton RT, the GTV is treated. In addition, a clinical volume is defined, which is distinctly different from the GTV in size and shape, to include the

  8. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  9. Carbon ion beam treatment in patients with primary and recurrent sacrococcygeal chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Matthias; Jensen, Alexandra; Herfarth, Klaus [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Welzel, Thomas [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the results of high-dose radiation treatment using carbon ion therapy, alone or combined with intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), in patients with sacral chordoma. Between 2009 and 2012, 56 patients with sacral chordoma were treated in our center. The tumor was located above S3 in 33 patients and in S3 or below in 23 patients. In all, 41 patients received radiation therapy for the primary tumor, while 15 patients were treated for the recurrent tumor. Toxicity was measured using NCI CTCAE v.4.03. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 23 patients were irradiated with carbon ions in combination with photon IMRT, while 33 received carbon ion therapy only. Forty-three patients had a macroscopic tumor at treatment start with a median tumor size (GTV) of 244 ml (range 5-1188 ml). The median total dose was 66 Gy (range 60-74 Gy; RBE). After a median follow-up time of 25 months, the 2- and 3-year local control probability was 76 % and 53 %, respectively. The overall survival rate was 100 %. Treatment for primary tumor and male patients resulted in significant better local control. No higher toxicity occurred within the follow-up time. High-dose photon/carbon ion beam radiation therapy is safe and, especially for primary sacral chordomas, highly effective. A randomized trial is required to evaluate the role of primary definitive hypofractionated particle therapy compared with surgery with or without adjuvant radiotherapy. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Ergebnisse nach hochdosierter Kohlenstoffionentherapie, allein oder in Kombination mit einer intensitaetsmodulierten Photonenbestrahlung (IMRT), bei Patienten mit einem sakralen Chordom. Zwischen 2009 und 2012 wurden 56 Patienten mit sakralen Chordomen in unserem Zentrum behandelt. Der Tumor war bei 33 Patienten oberhalb von S3 und bei 23 Patienten auf Hoehe von S3 oder unterhalb davon lokalisiert. Insgesamt

  10. Active raster scanning with carbon ions. Reirradiation in patients with recurrent skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Matthias; Welzel, Thomas; Oelmann, Jan; Habl, Gregor; Hauswald, Henrik; Jensen, Alexandra; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of reirradiation with carbon ions in patients with relapse of skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Reirradiation with carbon ions was performed on 25 patients with locally recurrent skull base chordoma (n = 20) or chondrosarcoma (n = 5). The median time between the last radiation exposure and the reirradiation with carbon ions was 7 years. In the past, 23 patients had been irradiated once, two patients twice. Reirradiation was delivered using the active raster scanning method. The total median dose was 51.0 GyE carbon ions in a weekly regimen of five to six fractions of 3 GyE. Local progression-free survival (LPFS) was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method; toxicity was evaluated using the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE v.4.03). The treatment could be finished in all patients without interruption. In 80 % of patients, symptom control was achieved after therapy. The 2-year-LPFS probability was 79.3 %. A PTV volume of < 100 ml or a total dose of > 51 GyE was associated with a superior local control rate. The therapy was associated with low acute toxicity. One patient developed grade 2 mucositis during therapy. Furthermore, 12 % of patients had tympanic effusion with mild hypacusis (grade 2), while 20 % developed an asymptomatic temporal lobe reaction after treatment (grade 1). Only one patient showed a grade 3 osteoradionecrosis. Reirradiation with carbon ions is a safe and effective method in patients with relapsed chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Sicherheit und Wirksamkeit einer Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen bei Patienten mit Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms und Chondrosarkoms der Schaedelbasis. Bei 25 Patienten mit einem Lokalrezidiv eines Chordoms (n = 20) oder Chondrosarkoms (n = 5) der Schaedelbasis erfolgte eine Re-Bestrahlung mittels Kohlenstoffionen. Die mediane Zeit zwischen letzter Bestrahlung und Re-Bestrahlung mit Kohlenstoffionen

  11. Dosimetric effects of residual uncertainties in carbon ion treatment of head chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate dose distribution variations due to setup errors and range uncertainties in image-guided carbon ion radiotherapy of head chordoma. Materials and methods: Ten treatment plans were retrospectively tested with TRiP98 against ±1.0 mm and ±1.0° setup errors, as observed in clinical routine, and 2.6% range uncertainty when 2 mm CTV-to-PTV margins were applied. Single-fraction simulations were compared with the total treatment dose in terms of DVH bands, conformity and inhomogeneity. The contribution of image processing artifacts on reported results was also discussed, as a function of the imaging dataset resolution. Results: Results showed that safety margins grant the conformal target coverage in presence of setup errors with D95CTV variations below 10% in 7 patients out of 10. Instead, the inclusion of range uncertainty yielded to appreciable dose degradation, reporting larger effects for CTV and dose conformity, whereas reduced impact is found on the organ-at-risk. The fractionation scheme positively affects dose conformity and inhomogeneity; conversely its influence on DVH bands is strongly related to the patient anatomy. Conclusion: Besides safety margins, setup and range uncertainties lead to non-negligible combined contribution. Systematical treatment plan robustness assessment against expected uncertainties is thus encouraged, selecting beam settings and fractionation schemes where homogeneity is preserved

  12. Differentiation of primary chordoma, giant cell tumor and schwannoma of the sacrum by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Ming-Jue, E-mail: smjsh@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng-Sheng [Department of Radiology, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China); Ding, Xiao-Yi, E-mail: dingxiaoyi1965@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Yuan, Fei, E-mail: yuanfeirj@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Du, Lian-Jun; Lu, Yong [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Wei-Bin [Department of Orthopedics, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate criteria to differentiate sacral chordoma (SC), sacral giant cell tumor (SGCT) and giant sacral schwannoma (GSS) with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: CT and MR images of 22 SCs, 19 SGCTs and 8 GSSs were reviewed. The clinical and imaging features of each tumor were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of SC, SGCT and GSS were 55.1 ± 10.7, 34.3 ± 10.7 and 42.4 ± 15.7 years old. SCs (77.3%) were predominantly located in the midline of lower sacrum, while most SGCTs (73.7%) and GSSs (87.5%) were eccentrically located in upper sacrum. There were significant differences in age, location, eccentricity, morphology of bone residues, intratumoral bleeding and septations. Multiple small cysts were mainly observed in SGCTs (73.7%) with large central cysts in GSSs (87.5%). SGCTs expanded mainly inside sacrum while SCs and GSSs often extended into pelvic cavity (P = 0.0022). Involvement of sacroiliac joints and muscles were also different. Ascending extension within sacral canal was only displayed in SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs showed difference between large and small tumors (P = 0.0002), regardless of tumor type (P = 0.095). No significant difference was displayed in gender (P = 0.234) or tumor size (P = 0.0832) among three groups. Conclusion: Age, epicenter of the lesion (midline vs. eccentric and upper vs. lower sacral vertebra), bone residues, cysts, bleeding, septation, expanding pattern, muscles and sacroiliac joint involvement can be criteria for diagnosis. Fluid–fluid level is specific for SGCTs and ascending extension within the sacral canal for SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs is related to tumor size rather than tumor type.

  13. Differentiation of primary chordoma, giant cell tumor and schwannoma of the sacrum by CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate criteria to differentiate sacral chordoma (SC), sacral giant cell tumor (SGCT) and giant sacral schwannoma (GSS) with CT and MRI. Materials and methods: CT and MR images of 22 SCs, 19 SGCTs and 8 GSSs were reviewed. The clinical and imaging features of each tumor were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of SC, SGCT and GSS were 55.1 ± 10.7, 34.3 ± 10.7 and 42.4 ± 15.7 years old. SCs (77.3%) were predominantly located in the midline of lower sacrum, while most SGCTs (73.7%) and GSSs (87.5%) were eccentrically located in upper sacrum. There were significant differences in age, location, eccentricity, morphology of bone residues, intratumoral bleeding and septations. Multiple small cysts were mainly observed in SGCTs (73.7%) with large central cysts in GSSs (87.5%). SGCTs expanded mainly inside sacrum while SCs and GSSs often extended into pelvic cavity (P = 0.0022). Involvement of sacroiliac joints and muscles were also different. Ascending extension within sacral canal was only displayed in SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs showed difference between large and small tumors (P = 0.0002), regardless of tumor type (P = 0.095). No significant difference was displayed in gender (P = 0.234) or tumor size (P = 0.0832) among three groups. Conclusion: Age, epicenter of the lesion (midline vs. eccentric and upper vs. lower sacral vertebra), bone residues, cysts, bleeding, septation, expanding pattern, muscles and sacroiliac joint involvement can be criteria for diagnosis. Fluid–fluid level is specific for SGCTs and ascending extension within the sacral canal for SCs. The preservation of intervertebral discs is related to tumor size rather than tumor type

  14. Occlusion of the abdominal aorta by balloon dilation catheter assisting surgical excision of a sacrum chordoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgiray, Erkin; Cağli, Sedat; Zileli, Mehmet; Cinar, Celal; Oran, Ismail

    2009-07-01

    Chordoma is known to be the most common primary tumor of the sacrum. Its surgery is challenging from many aspects. A large amount of bleeding is one of the biggest issues. A 52-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with a huge mass at sacrum. The mass was diagnosed as chordoma after a needle biopsy. Prior to the surgery, a balloon dilation catheter (BDC) was placed in the distal abdominal aorta via the femoral artery. Just after the skin incision, the BDC was inflated with contrast medium and total occlusion of the aorta was achieved. At the end of the operation we observed that total hemorrhage had decreased dramatically. No complications were recorded except hypertension during the occlusion of the aorta which was expected. The patient was discharged after two weeks of hospitalization post-operatively without any neurological deficit. Our report is the second in the neurosurgical literature to our knowledge. Although this result is preliminary and needs to be replicated and expanded upon, our first experience with this method is effective for decreasing the amount of bleeding. We believe that our method prevents hemo-dynamical problems caused by massive bleeding and complications secondary to massive transfusion. PMID:19621292

  15. In vitro characterization of cells derived from chordoma cell line U-CH1 following treatment with X-rays, heavy ions and chemotherapeutic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chordoma, a rare cancer, is usually treated with surgery and/or radiation. However, very limited characterizations of chordoma cells are available due to a minimal availability (only two lines validated by now) and the extremely long doubling time. In order to overcome this situation, we successfully derived a cell line with a shorter doubling time from the first validated chordoma line U-CH1 and obtained invaluable cell biological data. After isolating a subpopulation of U-CH1 cells with a short doubling time (U-CH1-N), cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA content, chromosome number, p53 status, and cell survival were examined after exposure to X-rays, heavy ions, camptothecin, mitomycin C, cisplatin and bleocin. These data were compared with those of HeLa (cervical cancer) and U87-MG (glioblastoma) cells. The cell doubling times for HeLa, U87-MG and U-CH1-N were approximately 18 h, 24 h and 3 days respectively. Heavy ion irradiation resulted in more efficient cell killing than x-rays in all three cell lines. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at 10% survival for U-CH1-N was about 2.45 for 70 keV/μm carbon and 3.86 for 200 keV/μm iron ions. Of the four chemicals, bleocin showed the most marked cytotoxic effect on U-CH1-N. Our data provide the first comprehensive cellular characterization using cells of chordoma origin and furnish the biological basis for successful clinical results of chordoma treatment by heavy ions

  16. Analysis of the relationship between tumor dose inhomogeneity and local control in patients with skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: When irradiating a tumor that abuts or displaces any normal structures, the dose constraints to those structures (if lower than the prescribed dose) may cause dose inhomogeneity in the tumor volume at the tumor-critical structure interface. The low-dose region in the tumor volume may be one of the reasons for local failure. The aim of this study is to quantitate the effect of tumor dose inhomogeneity on local control and recurrence-free survival in patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and Materials: 132 patients with skull base chordoma were treated with combined photon and proton irradiation between 1978 and 1993. This study reviews 115 patients whose dose-volume data and follow-up data are available. The prescribed doses ranged from 66.6 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) to 79.2 CGE (median of 68.9 CGE). The dose to the optic structures (optic nerves and chiasma), the brain stem surface, and the brain stem center was limited to 60, 64, and 53 CGE, respectively. We used the dose-volume histogram data derived with the three-dimensional treatment planning system to evaluate several dose-volume parameters including the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD). We also analyzed several other patient and treatment factors in relation to local control and recurrence-free survival. Results: Local failure developed in 42 of 115 patients, with the actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years being 59% and 44%. Gender was a significant predictor for local control with the prognosis in males being significantly better than that in females (P 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.3). In a Cox univariate analysis, with stratification by gender, the significant predictors for local control (at the probability level of 0.05) were EUD, the target volume, the minimum dose, and the D5cc dose. The prescribed dose, histology, age, the maximum dose, the mean dose, the median dose, the D90% dose, and the overall treatment time were not significant factors. In a Cox multivariate analysis, the

  17. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging of Residual Skull Base Chordoma Before Radiotherapy Using Fluoromisonidazole and Fluorodeoxyglucose: Potential Consequences for Dose Painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammar, Hamid, E-mail: hamid.mammar@unice.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Antoine Lacassagne Center, Nice (France); CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valerie [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Pontvert, Dominique [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Clemenceau, Stephane [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Lot, Guillaume [Department of Neurosurgery, Adolph De Rothschild Foundation, Paris (France); George, Bernard [Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Polivka, Marc [Department of Pathology, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Mokhtari, Karima [Department of Pathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Ferrand, Regis; Feuvret, Loiec; Habrand, Jean-louis [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Pouyssegur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie [CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Talbot, Jean-Noeel [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To detect the presence of hypoxic tissue, which is known to increase the radioresistant phenotype, by its uptake of fluoromisonidazole (18F) (FMISO) using hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, and to compare it with the glucose-avid tumor tissue imaged with fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) (FDG), in residual postsurgical skull base chordoma scheduled for radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with incompletely resected skull base chordomas were planned for high-dose radiotherapy (dose {>=}70 Gy). All 7 patients underwent FDG and FMISO PET/CT. Images were analyzed qualitatively by visual examination and semiquantitatively by computing the ratio of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumor and cerebellum (T/C R), with delineation of lesions on conventional imaging. Results: Of the eight lesion sites imaged with FDG PET/CT, only one was visible, whereas seven of nine lesions were visible on FMISO PET/CT. The median SUVmax in the tumor area was 2.8 g/mL (minimum 2.1; maximum 3.5) for FDG and 0.83 g/mL (minimum 0.3; maximum 1.2) for FMISO. The T/C R values ranged between 0.30 and 0.63 for FDG (median, 0.41) and between 0.75 and 2.20 for FMISO (median,1.59). FMISO T/C R >1 in six lesions suggested the presence of hypoxic tissue. There was no correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake in individual chordomas (r = 0.18, p = 0.7). Conclusion: FMISO PET/CT enables imaging of the hypoxic component in residual chordomas. In the future, it could help to better define boosted volumes for irradiation and to overcome the radioresistance of these lesions. No relationship was founded between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in these tumors after initial surgery.

  18. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with chordoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study HIT-1-Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chordomas of the skull base are relative rare lesions of the bones. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard, though complete resection is nearly impossible due to close proximity to critical and hence also dose limiting organs for radiation therapy. Level of recurrence after surgery alone is comparatively high, so adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chordomas. However, high-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumors. This clinical study is a prospective randomised phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie centre (HIT) and is a monocentric study. Patients with skull base chordoma will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV in carbon ion treatment (accelerated dose) will be 63 Gy E ± 5% and 72 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. Local-progression free survival (LPFS) will be analysed as primary end point. Toxicity and overall survival are the secondary end points. Additional examined parameters are patterns of recurrence, prognostic factors and plan quality analysis. Up until now it was impossible to compare two different particle therapies, i.e. protons and carbon ions directly at the same facility. The aim of this study is to find out, whether the biological advantages of carbon ion therapy can also be clinically confirmed and translated into the better local control rates in the treatment of skull base chordomas. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01182779

  19. Postoperative Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Initial Experience at Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate postoperative spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) and intensity-modulated PT (IMPT) for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 10 patients (six male patients, four female patients; six chordomas, four chondrosarcomas), aged 10-20 years (median, 16 years), were treated at our institute. Tumor sites were in the brain (one case), skull base (five cases), cervical (three cases), and lumbar spine (one case). Three children had complete resections. In seven children, resection was incomplete, leaving residual tumor behind (range, 2.3-46.3 mL). PT was delivered using spot scanning, with (three patients) or without (seven patients) IMPT. Total dose was 74.0 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) for chordoma, and 63.2-68.0 CGE for chondrosarcoma (median, 66.0), depending on histopathological grading and whether the patient had concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 8-77 months). Radiation treatment was well tolerated. All patients remained failure-free at their last follow-up. Late adverse events were reported in three patients and were mild (neurosensory in one patient; alopecia and hypoaccusis in one patient) to moderate (one patient, Grade 2 pituitary insufficiency). Conclusions: Postoperative spot-scanning PT, delivered in combination with and without IMPT, for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in children and adolescents was tolerated without unacceptable adverse event and initial outcome is perfectly satisfactory in this small cohort. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to more fully assess tumor control, adverse events, as well as functional and cosmetic outcome

  20. Randomized phase II trial of hypofractionated proton versus carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with sacrococcygeal chordoma-the ISAC trial protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chordomas are relatively rare lesions of the bones. About 30% occur in the sacrococcygeal region. Surgical resection is still the standard treatment. Due to the size, proximity to neurovascular structures and the complex anatomy of the pelvis, a complete resection with adequate safety margin is difficult to perform. A radical resection with safety margins often leads to the loss of bladder and rectal function as well as motoric/sensoric dysfunction. The recurrence rate after surgery alone is comparatively high, such that adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for improving local control rates. Proton therapy is still the international standard in the treatment of chordomas. High-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages in slow-growing tumors. Data of a Japanese study of patients with unresectable sacral chordoma showed comparable high control rates after hypofractionated carbon ion therapy only. This clinical study is a prospective randomized, monocentric phase II trial. Patients with histologically confirmed sacrococcygeal chordoma will be randomized to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy stratified regarding the clinical target volume. Target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. In each arm the PTV will receive 64 GyE in 16 fractions. The primary objective of this trial is safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation in patients with sacrococygeal chordoma using protons or carbon ions in raster scan technique for primary or additive treatment after R2 resection. The evaluation is therefore based on the proportion of treatments without Grade 3–5 toxicity (CTCAE, version 4.0) up to 12 months after treatment and/or discontinuation of the treatment for any reason as primary endpoint. Local-progression free survival, overall survival and quality of life will be analyzed as secondary end points. The aim of this study is to confirm the toxicity results of the Japanese data in raster

  1. Comparison of human chordoma cell-kill for 290 MeV/n carbon ions versus 70 MeV protons in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the pace of commissioning of new charged particle radiation therapy facilities is accelerating worldwide, biological data pertaining to chordomas, theoretically and clinically optimally suited targets for particle radiotherapy, are still lacking. In spite of the numerous clinical reports of successful treatment of these malignancies with this modality, the characterization of this malignancy remains hampered by its characteristic slow cell growth, particularly in vitro. Cellular lethality of U-CH1-N cells in response to different qualities of radiation was compared with immediate plating after radiation or as previously reported using the multilayered OptiCell™ system. The OptiCell™ system was used to evaluate cellular lethality over a broad dose-depth deposition range of particle radiation to anatomically mimic the clinical setting. Cells were irradiated with either 290 MeV/n accelerated carbon ions or 70 MeV accelerated protons and photons and evaluated through colony formation assays at a single position or at each depth, depending on the system. There was a cell killing of approximately 20–40% for all radiation qualities in the OptiCell™ system in which chordoma cells are herein described as more radiation sensitive than regular colony formation assay. The relative biological effectiveness values were, however, similar in both in vitro systems for any given radiation quality. Relative biological effectiveness values of proton was 0.89, of 13–20 keV/μm carbon ions was 0.85, of 20–30 keV/μm carbon ions was 1.27, and >30 keV/μm carbon ions was 1.69. Carbon-ions killed cells depending on both the dose and the LET, while protons depended on the dose alone in the condition of our study. This is the first report and characterization of a direct comparison between the effects of charged particle carbon ions versus protons for a chordoma cell line in vitro. Our results support a potentially superior therapeutic value of carbon particle irradiation

  2. Adaptation of proton total dose with respect to dosimetric parameters within the frame of treatment of skull base or upper cervical spine chordomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a photon-proton irradiation protocol with a dose adaptation with respect to dosimetric factors for patients suffering form a skull base and upper cervical spine chordoma. Sixty patients have been treated between May 2006 and June 2008 with a combination of high energy photons and protons. As five tumours have locally relapsed and one at distance, the authors comment the local control rates, the number of attained cranial nerves, the value of the macroscopic tumour volume, the survival rate without relapse in terms of multifactorial of uni-factorial analysis. Short communication

  3. [18F]-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Visualization of Tumor Hypoxia in Patients With Chordoma of the Mobile and Sacrococcygeal Spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate [18F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FMISO-PET/CT) detection of targetable hypoxic subvolumes (HSVs) in chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine. Methods and Materials: A prospective, pilot study of 20 patients with primary or locally recurrent chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine treated with proton or combined proton/photon radiation therapy (RT) with or without surgery was completed. The FMISO-PET/CT was performed before RT and after 19.8-34.2 GyRBE (relative biologic effectiveness). Gross tumor volumes were delineated and HSVs defined including voxels with standardized uptake values ≥1.4 times the muscle mean. Clinical characteristics and treatments received were compared between patients with and without HSVs. Results: The FMISO-PET/CT detected HSVs in 12 of 20 patients (60%). Baseline and interval HSV spatial concordance varied (0%-94%). Eight HSVs were sufficiently large (≥5 cm3) to potentially allow an intensity modulated proton therapy boost. Patients with HSVs had significantly larger gross tumor volumes (median 410.0 cm3 vs 63.4 cm3; P=.02) and were significantly more likely to have stage T2 tumors (5 of 12 vs 0 of 8; P=.04). After a median follow-up of 1.8 years (range, 0.2-4.4 years), a local recurrence has yet to be observed. Three patients developed metastatic disease, 2 with HSVs. Conclusions: Detection of targetable HSVs by FMISO-PET/CT within patients undergoing RT with or without surgery for treatment of chordoma of the mobile and sacrococcygeal spine is feasible. The study's inability to attribute interval HSV changes to treatment, rapidly changing hypoxic physiology, or imaging inconsistencies is a limitation. Further study of double-baseline FMISO-PET/CT and hypoxia-directed RT dose escalation, particularly in patients at high risk for local recurrence, is warranted

  4. [18F]-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Visualization of Tumor Hypoxia in Patients With Chordoma of the Mobile and Sacrococcygeal Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheney, Matthew D., E-mail: mcheney@lroc.harvard.edu [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lim, Ruth [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Winrich, Barbara K.; Grosu, Anca L.; Trofimov, Alexei V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre of Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Schwab, Joseph H.; Hornicek, Francis J. [Department of Orthopedic Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate [18F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FMISO-PET/CT) detection of targetable hypoxic subvolumes (HSVs) in chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine. Methods and Materials: A prospective, pilot study of 20 patients with primary or locally recurrent chordoma of the mobile or sacrococcygeal spine treated with proton or combined proton/photon radiation therapy (RT) with or without surgery was completed. The FMISO-PET/CT was performed before RT and after 19.8-34.2 GyRBE (relative biologic effectiveness). Gross tumor volumes were delineated and HSVs defined including voxels with standardized uptake values ≥1.4 times the muscle mean. Clinical characteristics and treatments received were compared between patients with and without HSVs. Results: The FMISO-PET/CT detected HSVs in 12 of 20 patients (60%). Baseline and interval HSV spatial concordance varied (0%-94%). Eight HSVs were sufficiently large (≥5 cm{sup 3}) to potentially allow an intensity modulated proton therapy boost. Patients with HSVs had significantly larger gross tumor volumes (median 410.0 cm{sup 3} vs 63.4 cm{sup 3}; P=.02) and were significantly more likely to have stage T2 tumors (5 of 12 vs 0 of 8; P=.04). After a median follow-up of 1.8 years (range, 0.2-4.4 years), a local recurrence has yet to be observed. Three patients developed metastatic disease, 2 with HSVs. Conclusions: Detection of targetable HSVs by FMISO-PET/CT within patients undergoing RT with or without surgery for treatment of chordoma of the mobile and sacrococcygeal spine is feasible. The study's inability to attribute interval HSV changes to treatment, rapidly changing hypoxic physiology, or imaging inconsistencies is a limitation. Further study of double-baseline FMISO-PET/CT and hypoxia-directed RT dose escalation, particularly in patients at high risk for local recurrence, is warranted.

  5. Temporal lobe (TL) damage following surgery and high-dose photon and proton irradiation in 96 patients affected by chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the temporal lobe (TL) damage rate in 96 patients treated with high-dose proton and photon irradiation for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 consecutive patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (HCL) between June 1984 and 1993, for chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of the skull were reviewed. All the patients had undergone some degree of resection of the tumor prior to radiation therapy. Seventy-five patients were classified as 'primary tumors' and 21 as recurrent or regrowing tumors after one or more surgical procedures. All the patients were randomized to receive 66.6 or 72 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) on a prospective dose-searching study by proton and photon irradiation (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group no. 85-26) with conventional fractionation (1.8 CGE/day, 5 fractions/week). All treatments were planned using the three-dimensional (3D) planning system developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and the dose was delivered using opposed lateral fields for the photon component and a noncoplanar isocentric technique for the proton component. Clinical symptoms of TL damage were classified into 4 grades. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated for white matter changes. Abnormalities associated with persistent or recurrent tumor were distinguished from radiation-induced changes. TLs were delineated on the original scans of the 10 patients with damage and those of a group of 33 patients with no clinical or MRI evidence of injury. Dose distributions were calculated and dose-volume histograms were obtained for these patients. Results: Of the patients, 10 developed TL damage, with bilateral injury in 2 and unilateral injury in 8. The cumulative TL damage incidence at 2 and 5 years was 7.6 and 13.2%, respectively. The MRI areas suggestive of TL damage were always separated from

  6. Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma: Clinical Outcome of 26 Patients Treated at Paul Scherrer Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rombi, Barbara [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ATreP (Provincial Agency for Proton Therapy), Trento (Italy); Ares, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.ares@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Schneider, Ralf; Goitein, Gudrun; Staab, Adrian; Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Timmermann, Beate [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); WestGerman Proton Therapy Center Essen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical results of fractionated spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) in 26 pediatric patients treated at Paul Scherrer Institute for chordoma (CH) or chondrosarcoma (CS) of the skull base or axial skeleton. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and June 2010, 19 CH and 7 CS patients with tumors originating from the skull base (17) and the axial skeleton (9) were treated with PT. Mean age at the time of PT was 13.2 years. The mean prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) for CH and 66 Gy (RBE) for CS, at a dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy (RBE) per fraction. Results: Mean follow-up was 46 months. Actuarial 5-year local control (LC) rates were 81% for CH and 80% for CS. Actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS) was 89% for CH and 75% for CS. Two CH patients had local failures: one is alive with evidence of disease, while the other patient succumbed to local recurrence in the surgical pathway. One CS patient died of local progression of the disease. No high-grade late toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Spot-scanning PT for pediatric CH and CS patients resulted in excellent clinical outcomes with acceptable rates of late toxicity. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to fully assess tumor control and late effects of treatment.

  7. A diagnostic trap potentially lethal: chordomas uncovered by C3 large osseous destruction inconspicuous on bis-phosphonates-({sup 99}Tc) bone scintigraphy; Un piege diagnostique potentiellement letal: chordome revele par une vaste lesion lytique de C3 normofixante a la scintigraphie osseuse aux bisphosphonates-({sup 99}Tc)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paycha, F.; Ramadan, A.; Akrout, L. [Hopital Louis Mourier, Unite de Medecine Nucleaire, 92 - Colombes (France); Dion, E. [Hopital Louis Mourier, Service de Radiologie, 92 - Colombes (France); Grossin, M. [Hopital Louis Mourier, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, 92 - Colombes (France); Gazals-Hatem, D. [Hopital Beaujon, Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, 92 - Clichy (France)

    2006-07-15

    The authors describe a case report of a brachialgy uncovering a solitary bone destruction of C3 associated with epidural involvement. CT and MRI properly depicted the lesion and the loco-regional extension but failed to entertain the diagnosis of the causative tumor, a chordoma. Bis-phosphonates-({sup 99m}Tc) bone scintigraphy proved unconspicuous. Diagnosis was eventually established from the resection specimen, after decision of C3 spondyl-ectomy, C4 hemi-superior spondyl-ectomy and epidural extension excision. Immunohistochemistry study of the material was decisive in identifying the tumor. Cervical chordoma is a tricky diagnosis. Discussion underscores that the crux of diagnostic process is the double discrepancy firstly between extra-osseous and intra-osseous tumoral expansion, secondly between large tumoral mass obvious on multi-slice morphological imaging and negativity of bone scintigraphy, SPECT study included. Among the armamentarium of conventional scintigraphies and PET studies, methionine-({sup 11}C) PET emerges as the most promising anatomo-metabolic procedure to assess loco-regional tumoral expansion, tumoral viability, therapy efficiency, and, potentially, to search for metastases in chordoma. (author)

  8. CT and MRI findings of the chordoma in the mobile spine%脊柱活动节段脊索瘤的 CT、MRI 征象分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞超楠; 刘晓光; 袁慧书

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the CT and MRI features of the chordoma in the mobile spine.Methods The CT and MRI fea-tures were retrospectively analyzed in twenty-four cases of chordoma in the mobile spine.Results In all the twenty-four cases,bone lesions were solitary in eight cases and multiple in sixteen cases,mostly occurred in cervical,occasionally occurred in thoracic or lum-bar vertebra.Both vertebral body and part appendix were involved in all cases.CT imaging showed that all the lesions mainly mani-fested as osteolytic bone destruction,peripheral osteosclerosis and the cortical bone were incomplete.Soft-tissue mass involved para-vertebral and intraspinal.Five lesions appeared vertebrae compression.Eight lesions appeared intervertebral foramen expansion.Le-sions appeared honeycomb or annular enhancement after contrast media injection.Lesions were presented as heterogeneous slightly hypo-isointensity on T1 WI,hyperintensity on T2 WI.Low signal fibrous septa within the tumors were seen.Lesions appeared hon-eycomb enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection.Conclusion CT and MRI findings of chordoma in the mobile spine can be regarded as characteristic,which are helpful for clinical diagnosis.%目的:探讨脊柱活动节段脊索瘤的 CT 和 MRI 表现。方法回顾分析24例经病理证实的脊柱活动节段脊索瘤的 CT、MRI 表现。结果24例病例中单发病变8例,多发病变16例,病变多发生在颈椎,也可发生在胸椎或腰椎;全部病例均同时累及椎体及部分附件结构。CT 显示全部病例均表现为不同程度的溶骨性骨质破坏,周围可见骨质硬化,骨皮质不完整,可见软组织肿块侵犯椎管内外;5例可见病变椎体压缩,8例可见椎间孔扩大;增强扫描病变呈蜂窝状或环形强化。MR 显示病变表现为不均匀等或稍长 T1长 T2信号,病灶内可见低信号间隔;增强扫描病变呈蜂窝状强化。结论脊柱活动节段脊索瘤的 CT、MRI 表现具有一定特征性,是临床诊断的重要依据。

  9. Adaptation of proton total dose with respect to dosimetric parameters within the frame of treatment of skull base or upper cervical spine chordomas; Adaptation de la dose totale de protons en fonction des parametres dosimetriques dans le cadre du traitement des chordomes de la base du crane et du rachis cervical haut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, C.G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L. [Groupe hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere (AP-HP), 75 - Paris (France); Calugaru, V.; Bolle, S.; Habrand, J.L.; Datcharty, J.; Alapetite, C.; Dendale, R.; Feuvret, L. [Institut Curie-Centre de protontherapie d' Orsay, 91 (France); Habrand, J.L.; Datcharty, J. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Noel, G. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a photon-proton irradiation protocol with a dose adaptation with respect to dosimetric factors for patients suffering form a skull base and upper cervical spine chordoma. Sixty patients have been treated between May 2006 and June 2008 with a combination of high energy photons and protons. As five tumours have locally relapsed and one at distance, the authors comment the local control rates, the number of attained cranial nerves, the value of the macroscopic tumour volume, the survival rate without relapse in terms of multifactorial of uni-factorial analysis. Short communication

  10. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Skull Base Chordoma

    OpenAIRE

    Mizoe, Jun–etsu; Hasegawa, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Bessho, Hiroki; Onda, Takeshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the results of the clinical study of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for skull base and paracervical spine tumors at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba, Japan. Methods: The study is comprised of three protocols: a pilot study, a phase I/II dose escalation study, and a phase II study. All the patients were treated by 16 fractions for 4 weeks with total doses of 48.0, 52.8, 57.6, and 60.8 Gy equivalents (GyE). Results: As a result of the dose escalatio...

  11. Distinguishing benign notochordal cell tumors from vertebral chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Takehiko [Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Department of Surgical Pathology, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Iwata, Jun [Kochi Health Science Center, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kochi, Kochi (Japan); Sugihara, Shinsuke [Kochi Health Science Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kochi, Kochi (Japan); McCarthy, Edward F. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Pathology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Karita, Michiaki; Murakami, Hideki; Kawahara, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Katsuro [Kanazawa University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    The objective was to characterize imaging findings of benign notochordal cell tumors (BNCTs). Clinical and imaging data for 9 benign notochordal cell tumors in 7 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Conventional radiographs (n = 9), bone scintigrams (n = 2), computed tomographic images (n = 7), and magnetic resonance images (n = 8) were reviewed. Eight of the 9 lesions were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and microscopically examined. There were 3 male and 4 female patients with an age range of 22 to 55 years (average age, 44 years). Two patients had two lesions at different sites. The lesions involved the cervical spine in 4 patients, the lumbar spine in 2, the sacrum in 2, and the coccyx in 1. The most common symptom was mild pain. The lesions of 2 patients were found incidentally during imaging studies for unrelated conditions. Five patients underwent surgical procedures. One patient died of surgical complications. All other patients have been well without recurrent or progressive disease for 13 to 84 months. Radiographs usually did not reveal significant abnormality. Five lesions exhibited subtle sclerosis and 1 showed intense sclerosis. Technetium bone scan did not reveal any abnormal uptake. Computed tomography images had increased density within the vertebral bodies. The lesions had a homogeneous low signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and a high intensity on T2-weighted images without soft-tissue mass. Microscopically, lesions contained sheets of adipocyte-like vacuolated chordoid cells without a myxoid matrix. Benign notochordal cell tumors may be found during routine clinical examinations and do not require surgical management unless they show extraosseous disease. These tumors should be recognized by radiologists, pathologists, and orthopedic surgeons to prevent operations, which usually are extensive. (orig.)

  12. CT and MRI of the skull base, including the cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some considerations about nuclear magnetic resonance and computerized tomography, essential for examining skull base lesions are treated here, including the cranial nerves. Neoplasms such as meningiomas, adenomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas and others tumors are also cited, mentioning some commentaries. (author)

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery - Gamma Knife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that connects the ear to the brain ( acoustic neuroma ) Pituitary tumors Tumors that are not cancer (chordoma, ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Acoustic Neuroma Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  14. One case report of chordoma in thoraco-lumbar spine which manifested with subtle signs of both cauda equine and spinal cord compression%表现为轻微马尾和脊髓压迫症状的胸腰椎脊索瘤:1例病例报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Su; Marika Hess; Dominic Foo

    2013-01-01

    1例表现为轻微马尾和脊髓压迫症状的65岁男性患者诊断为T12~L1脊索瘤,行T12~L1椎体切除融合手术后复健顺利、恢复良好(需拄拐行走),未行放、化疗处理;8个月后肿瘤复发,再次行T12肿瘤切除及T9~L3后路椎体切除融合分期手术,术后并发症包括切口感染、深静脉栓塞、心房纤颤、尿脓毒症、继发于椎旁脓肿、脑室炎的耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌菌血症,经积极对症处理于3个月后恢复出院,继续行放射治疗。本文报告此例脊索瘤的病灶位置、临床表现和复杂病程,希望为临床医师提供关于此类肿瘤病例的诊疗思路。

  15. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  16. Chondrosarcoma of the temporal bone: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Man Soo; Lee, Sang Youl; Chung, Jae Gul; Lee, Deok Hee; Jung, Seung Mun; Ryu, Dae Sik [Kang Nung Hospital, Ulsan Univ. Kangnung (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the temporal bone is a rare lesion. Clinically it has been confused with chordoma, glomus jugulare tumor and meningioma, among other conditions, and due to its anatomic location, cranial nerve palsy is frequently observed. We report a case involving a 50-year-old woman with chondrosarcoma of the temporal bone.

  17. Studying Genes in Tissue Samples From Younger and Adolescent Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Alveolar Soft-part Sarcoma; Childhood Angiosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Childhood Epithelioid Sarcoma; Childhood Fibrosarcoma; Childhood Leiomyosarcoma; Childhood Liposarcoma; Childhood Malignant Mesenchymoma; Childhood Neurofibrosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  18. CT and MR findings of chordoid meningioma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 25-year-old woman with focal seizure, intermittent morning headache and vomiting for 2 years showed microcytic hypochromic anemia on peripheral blood smear and a 6 x 6 x 7.5 cm sized intracranial mass with cystic and solid portions at the right temporoparietal convexity on brain CT and MRI which was hypervascular on cerebral angiography. Histopathologic findings on light microscopy suggested chordoma, but it was confirmed as a chordoid meningioma by immunohistochemical study. The present case suggests that the diagnosis of chordoid meningioma should be considered in a juvenile or young adult who is presented with an extra-axial mass with typical location of meningiomas, findings of chordomas on light microscopy, and clinical findings of Castleman syndrome

  19. The radiological and histopathological differential diagnosis of chordoid neoplasms in skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Bin-cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chordoid neoplasms refer to tumors appearing to have histological features of embryonic notochord, which is characterized by cords and lobules of neoplastic cells arranged within myxoid matrix. Because of radiological and histological similarities with myxoid matrix and overlapping immunohistochemical profile, chordoma, chordoid meningioma, chordoid glioma, and rare extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma enter in the radiological and histological differential diagnosis at the site of skull base. However, there is always a great challenge for histopathologists to make an accurate diagnosis when encountering a chordoid neoplasm within or near the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to investigate and summarize the radiological, histological features and immunohistochemical profiles of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, and to find a judicious panel of immunostains to unquestionably help in diagnostically challenging cases. Methods A total of 23 cases of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, including 10 chordomas, 5 chordoid meningiomas, 3 chordoid gliomas and 5 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Guangdong Tongjiang Hospital. MRI examination was performed on the patients before surgical treatment. Microscopical examination and immunohistochemical staining study using vimentin (Vim, pan-cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, S?100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, D2-40, Galectin-3, CD3, CD20, Ki-67 were performed on the samples of cases. The clinicopathological data of the patients was also analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of chordomas were localized in the clivus with heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2WI scanning. The breakage of clivus was observed in most cases. Histologically, the tumor cells of chordoma exhibited bland nuclear features and some contained abundant vacuolated cytoplasm (the so

  20. Clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy for bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First choice of treatment for bone and soft tissue tumors is surgical tumor resection, but some cases have difficulties to resect radically because of tumor size, location, or their reduction in QOL after surgery. Carbon ion radiotherapy has been reported that have both good local tumor control and high QOL for patients with bone and soft tissue tumors, especially sacral chordoma and unresectable osteosarcoma of the tract. Some articles of the results with carbon ion radiotherapy for sacral chordoma show better local control and QOL than that of surgery. Moreover, several reports show good local control and preservation of QOL for patients with unresectable osteosarcoma of the tract, retroperitoneal sarcoma, and other situations of sarcomas. Now carbon ion radiotherapy can offer a promising alternative to surgery for patients with unresectable sarcomas. We will discuss about the results of carbon ion radiotherapy for bone and soft tissue tumors in this issue. (author)

  1. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-18

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  2. Sellar tumors; Tumoren der Sellaregion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.A.; Essig, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie; Zoubaa, S. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt, Neuherberg, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. Neuropathologie; Politi, M.; Grunwald, I. [Universitaetsklinikum Saarland, Homburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie

    2007-06-15

    Because of the complex anatomy, examination of the sella turcica and hypophysis needs a dedicated MR sequence protocol. Not every sellar lesion is a pituitary adenoma. Thus, this review article summarizes the most frequently encountered intra-, supra-, and parasellar tumors and lesions. Differential diagnoses comprise besides adenoma among others craniopharyngioma, meningioma, glioma, germinoma, hamartoma, aneurysm, trigeminal schwannoma, pituitary carcinoma, chordoma, metastasis, infection, and empty sella. Characteristic imaging findings are presented and correlated to micro- and macro-pathology. (orig.)

  3. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions

  4. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors; Radiologische Diagnostik von Knochentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Kinderradiologie; Herget, G.W. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Dept. Orthopaedie und Traumatologie

    2008-07-01

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions.

  5. The Petro-Occipital Trans-Sigmoid Approach for Lesions of the Jugular Foramen

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzoni, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This study's goals were twofold: (1) to analyze the author's experience with the petro-occipital trans-sigmoid (POTS) approach for the resection of tumors arising in or adjacent to the jugular foramen, and (2) to define the anatomical sites exposed by this approach. A retrospective review was conducted of 61 patients with jugular fossa tumors that included lower cranial nerve schwannomas, paragangliomas, meningiomas, chordomas, cholesteatomas, and other benign or low-grade malignant tumors. O...

  6. Chondromyxoid Fibroma of Sphenoid Sinus with Unusual Calcifications: Case Report with Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Luc G. T.; Rihani, Jordan; Lebowitz, Richard A.; Wang, Beverly Y.

    2009-01-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign primary tumor which usually affects the metaphyses of the long bone of the lower extremities in childhood and young adults. Rarely, CMF occurs in the skull base and parasinuses, which may be difficult to distinguish from chondrosarcoma or chordoma and other tumors in the head. It is composed of chondroid, myxoid, and fibrous tissue growth in a lobular pattern, infrequently with calcifications. We report one case of CMF involving the sphenoid sinus ...

  7. Treatment with charged particles beams: hadron therapy part 1: physical basis and clinical experience of treatment with protons; Le traitement par faisceaux de particules: hadrontherapie 1: bases physiques et experience clinique de la protontherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, G.; Feuvret, L.; Ferrand, R.; Mazeron, J.J. [Centre de Protontherapie d' Orsay, 91 (France); Mazeron, J.J. [Centre des Tumeurs, Groupe Hospitalier Universitaire Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-10-01

    Protons have physical characteristics, which differ from those of photons used in conventional radiotherapy. Better shielding of critical organs is obtained by using their particular ballistic (Bragg peak and lateral narrow penumbra). Some indications as ocular melanoma, chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull are now strongly accepted by the radiation oncologist community. Others are still in evaluation: meningioma, locally advanced nasopharynx tumor and paediatric tumors. The aim of this review is to present the clinical results of a technic which seems 'confidential' because of the rarity and the cost of equipments. (authors)

  8. Chondromyxoid fibroma of sphenoid sinus with unusual calcifications: case report with literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Luc G T; Rihani, Jordan; Lebowitz, Richard A; Wang, Beverly Y

    2009-06-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign primary tumor which usually affects the metaphyses of the long bone of the lower extremities in childhood and young adults. Rarely, CMF occurs in the skull base and parasinuses, which may be difficult to distinguish from chondrosarcoma or chordoma and other tumors in the head. It is composed of chondroid, myxoid, and fibrous tissue growth in a lobular pattern, infrequently with calcifications. We report one case of CMF involving the sphenoid sinus mimicking a chondrosarcoma. The tumor mass showed calcifications on images and histology. PMID:19644549

  9. Intracranial pathology of the visual pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Forell, W. E-mail: mueller-forell@neuroradio.klinik.uni-mainz.de

    2004-02-01

    Intracranial pathologies involving the visual pathway are manifold. Aligning to anatomy, the most frequent and/or most important extrinsic and intrinsic intracranial lesions are presented. Clinical symptoms and imaging characteristics of lesions of the sellar region are demonstrated in different imaging modalities. The extrinsic lesions mainly consist of pituitary adenomas, meningeomas, craniopharyngeomas and chordomas. In (asymptomatic and symptomatic) aneurysms, different neurological symptoms depend on the location of aneurysms of the circle of Willis. Intrinsic tumors as astrocytoma of any grade, ependymoma and primary CNS-lymphoma require the main pathology in the course of the visual pathway. Vascular and demyelinating diseases complete this overview of intracranial lesions.

  10. Brain Metastasis in Bone and Soft Tissue Cancers: A Review of Incidence, Interventions, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Shweikeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone and soft tissue malignancies account for a small portion of brain metastases. In this review, we characterize their incidence, treatments, and prognosis. Most of the data in the literature is based on case reports and small case series. Less than 5% of brain metastases are from bone and soft tissue sarcomas, occurring most commonly in Ewing’s sarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, and osteosarcoma. Mean interval from initial cancer diagnosis to brain metastasis is in the range of 20–30 months, with most being detected before 24 months (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, chordoma, angiosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, some at 24–36 months (malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and alveolar soft part sarcoma, and a few after 36 months (chondrosarcoma and liposarcoma. Overall mean survival ranges between 7 and 16 months, with the majority surviving < 12 months (Ewing’s sarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant fibrous tumors, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, angiosarcoma and chordomas. Management is heterogeneous involving surgery, radiosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. While a survival advantage may exist for those given aggressive treatment involving surgical resection, such patients tended to have a favorable preoperative performance status and minimal systemic disease.

  11. Nasopharyngeal Masses Arising from Embryologic Remnants of the Clivus: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajisevi, Mirabelle; Hoang, Jenny K; Eapen, Rose; Jang, David W

    2015-11-01

    Objectives This study aims to (1) discuss rare nasopharyngeal masses originating from embryologic remnants of the clivus, and (2) discuss the embryology of the clivus and understand its importance in the diagnosis and treatment of these masses. Design and Participants This is a case series of three patients. We discuss the clinical and imaging characteristics of infrasellar craniopharyngioma, intranasal extraosseous chordoma, and canalis basilaris medianus. Results Case 1: A 16-year-old male patient with a history of craniopharyngioma resection, who presented with nasal obstruction. A nasopharyngeal cystic mass was noted to be communicating with a patent craniopharyngeal canal. Histology revealed adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. Case 2: A 43-year-old male patient who presented with nasal obstruction and headache. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing polypoid mass in the posterior nasal cavity abutting the clivus. Histopathology revealed chondroid chordoma. Case 3: A 4-year-old female patient with a recurrent nasopharyngeal polyp. CT cisternogram showed that this mass may have risen from a bony defect of the middle clivus suggestive of canalis basilaris medianus. Conclusions Understanding the embryology of the clivus is crucial when considering the differential diagnosis of a nasopharyngeal mass. Identification of characteristic findings on imaging is critical in the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. PMID:26623237

  12. The presence and absence of lymphatic vessels in the adult human intervertebral disc: relation to disc pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the normal adult human intervertebral disc is considered to be avascular, vascularised cellular fibrous tissue can be found in pathological conditions involving the disc such as disc herniation. Whether lymphatics vessels form a component of this reparative tissue is not known as the presence or absence of lymphatics in herniated and normal disc tissue is not known. We examined spinal tissues and discectomy specimens for the presence of lymphatics. The examination used immunohistochemistry to identify the specific lymphatic endothelial cell markers, podoplanin and LYVE1. Lymphatic vessels were not found in the nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus of intact, non-herniated lumbar and thoracic discs but were present in the surrounding ligaments. Ingrowth of fibrous tissue was seen in 73% of herniated disc specimens of which 36% contained LYVE1+/podoplanin + lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels were not seen in the sacrum and coccyx or biopsies of four sacrococcygeal chordomas, but they were noted in surrounding extra-osseous fat and fibrous tissue at the edge of the infiltrating tumour. Our findings indicate that lymphatic vessels are not present in the normal adult intervertebral disc but that, when there is extrusion of disc material into surrounding soft tissue, there is ingrowth of reparative fibrous tissue containing lymphatic vessels. Our findings also indicate that chordoma, a tumour of notochordal origin, spreads to regional lymph nodes via lymphatics in para-spinal soft tissues. (orig.)

  13. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT. PMID:26352616

  14. The presence and absence of lymphatic vessels in the adult human intervertebral disc: relation to disc pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliskey, Karolina; Williams, Kelly; Yu, J.; Urban, Jill; Athanasou, Nick [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); Jackson, David [Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Human Immunology Unit, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Although the normal adult human intervertebral disc is considered to be avascular, vascularised cellular fibrous tissue can be found in pathological conditions involving the disc such as disc herniation. Whether lymphatics vessels form a component of this reparative tissue is not known as the presence or absence of lymphatics in herniated and normal disc tissue is not known. We examined spinal tissues and discectomy specimens for the presence of lymphatics. The examination used immunohistochemistry to identify the specific lymphatic endothelial cell markers, podoplanin and LYVE1. Lymphatic vessels were not found in the nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosus of intact, non-herniated lumbar and thoracic discs but were present in the surrounding ligaments. Ingrowth of fibrous tissue was seen in 73% of herniated disc specimens of which 36% contained LYVE1+/podoplanin + lymphatic vessels. Lymphatic vessels were not seen in the sacrum and coccyx or biopsies of four sacrococcygeal chordomas, but they were noted in surrounding extra-osseous fat and fibrous tissue at the edge of the infiltrating tumour. Our findings indicate that lymphatic vessels are not present in the normal adult intervertebral disc but that, when there is extrusion of disc material into surrounding soft tissue, there is ingrowth of reparative fibrous tissue containing lymphatic vessels. Our findings also indicate that chordoma, a tumour of notochordal origin, spreads to regional lymph nodes via lymphatics in para-spinal soft tissues. (orig.)

  15. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-09-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described. The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods. It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan. When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  16. Treatment planning of paraspinal tumors with CT-myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and aim: Artifacts due to metal implants are an important problem in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy planning in tumors such as chordoma of the spine. A strict differentiation between target and radiosensitive structures e.g. spinal cord is absolutely essential for high-dose radiotherapy. Up to now CT and MRI techniques have provided only limited image quality in such situations. We introduce an approach to facilitate segmentation by using the technique of CT-myelography for radiation treatment. Patient and method: A 48-year-old woman with multiple inoperable relapses of a chordoma in the lumbar spine and extensive metal instrumentation in this area was given to radiotherapy using IMRT-technique (intensity modulated). MRI- and CT-planning images did not allow differentiation between myelon, cauda equina, dural sac and tumor. In this situation we performed a CT-myelography with the patient in treatment position. Result: CT-myelographic images enabled precise differentiation between myelon, cauda equina and intraspinal tumor. A substantial improvement of the segmentation of the spinal cord was obtained. There was no compression of the dural sac along the spine. This information provided the basis for a precise radiotherapy planning in IMRT-technique. Conclusion: In situations where CT- and MRI-techniques are not able to generate precise images which allow differentiation between tumor, myelon and cauda equina because of metal artifacts, CT-myelography is a promising technique which may help the diagnostic radiologist and radiation oncologist in planning radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Spot Scanning Proton Therapy for Malignancies of the Base of Skull: Treatment Planning, Acute Toxicities, and Preliminary Clinical Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald; Melancon, Adam [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McAleer, Mary Frances; McGovern, Susan L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); DeMonte, Franco [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Eric L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To describe treatment planning techniques and early clinical outcomes in patients treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma or chondrosarcoma of the skull base. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 through August 2011, 15 patients were treated with spot scanning proton therapy for chordoma (n=10) or chondrosarcoma (n=5) at a single institution. Toxicity was prospectively evaluated and scored weekly and at all follow-up visits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Treatment planning techniques and dosimetric data were recorded and compared with those of passive scattering plans created with clinically applicable dose constraints. Results: Ten patients were treated with single-field-optimized scanning beam plans and 5 with multifield-optimized intensity modulated proton therapy. All but 2 patients received a simultaneous integrated boost as well. The mean prescribed radiation doses were 69.8 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range, 68-70 Gy [RBE]) for chordoma and 68.4 Gy (RBE) (range, 66-70) for chondrosarcoma. In comparison with passive scattering plans, spot scanning plans demonstrated improved high-dose conformality and sparing of temporal lobes and brainstem. Clinically, the most common acute toxicities included fatigue (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 8 patients) and nausea (grade 2 for 2 patients, grade 1 for 6 patients). No toxicities of grades 3 to 5 were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 27 months (range, 13-42 months), 1 patient had experienced local recurrence and a second developed distant metastatic disease. Two patients had magnetic resonance imaging-documented temporal lobe changes, and a third patient developed facial numbness. No other subacute or late effects were recorded. Conclusions: In comparison to passive scattering, treatment plans for spot scanning proton therapy displayed improved high-dose conformality. Clinically, the treatment was well tolerated, and

  18. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  19. Delayed complications of radiotherapy treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: king2015@cuhk.edu.hk; Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Yeung, D.K. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Wong, J.K.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Lee, Y.Y.P. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Lam, W.W.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Ho, S.S.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Yu, S.C.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China); Leung, S.-F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-03-15

    Radiotherapy is used to treat a wide variety of head and neck tumours that arise in and around the skull base. The delayed effects of radiation damages a range of structures, including the nervous system, bone, major vessels, mucus membranes, pituitary and salivary glands, as well as increasing the risk of radiation-induced neoplasms. In this review the complications resulting from radiation treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a cancer treated with a high dose of radiation to a fairly large region, are illustrated. Many patients with NPC have a long-term survival, so are at risk of developing delayed radiation effects, and hence may demonstrate a wide range of complications on imaging. Other tumours around the skull base treated with radiotherapy include meningiomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas, pituitary adenomas, paranasal sinus and nasal cavity tumours. In these cases similar complications may be encountered on imaging, although the severity, incidence and location will vary.

  20. Parachordoma of Soft Tissues of the Arm: A Very Rare Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Estrems Díaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parachordoma is an infrequent neoplasm that bears some histologic resemblance to chordoma. It affects both sexes, occurs typically during the fourth decade of life, and tends to present as a slow-growing painless mass at the level of the soft tissues of the extremities. Diagnosis should be based on immunohistochemical and cytogenetic studies, as the findings of imaging techniques are often unspecific. Although it is considered a benign lesion, its behavior tends to be locally aggressive, with reports of a recurrence rate of up to 20% and of several cases of metastasis. Fewer than 60 cases have been published in the English-speaking literature. In this paper we present the case of a 32-year-old male with a two-year history of parachordoma in the right wrist.

  1. Emisacrectomy, experience in 11 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solini, Antonio; Fronda, Gianruggero; De Paolis, Paolo; Ruggieri, Nicola; Garino, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Emisacrectomy is a challenging surgery in the treatment of tumours that affect the sacrum. Authors report their experience in 11 cases affected by tumours of the sacrum (9 chordomas, 1 ependymoma, 1 monostotic bladder metastasis) operated on at the Orthopaedic Department of A.S.O S. Giovanni Battista Molinette in Turin, Italy, from 1998 through 2005 discussing planning surgery, level of osteotomy, functional and oncological results and complications of the treatment at a median follow-up of 5 years (range 2–9), describing the surgical and medical teaching learned from the treatment of these patients. Despite the potential complications, emisacrectomy can be performed successfully and is an important procedure in the treatment of sacral tumours. PMID:19468760

  2. Emisacrectomy, experience in 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solini, Antonio; Gargiulo, Giosuè; Fronda, Gianruggero; De Paolis, Paolo; Ruggieri, Nicola; Garino, Mauro

    2009-06-01

    Emisacrectomy is a challenging surgery in the treatment of tumours that affect the sacrum. Authors report their experience in 11 cases affected by tumours of the sacrum (9 chordomas, 1 ependymoma, 1 monostotic bladder metastasis) operated on at the Orthopaedic Department of A.S.O S. Giovanni Battista Molinette in Turin, Italy, from 1998 through 2005 discussing planning surgery, level of osteotomy, functional and oncological results and complications of the treatment at a median follow-up of 5 years (range 2-9), describing the surgical and medical teaching learned from the treatment of these patients. Despite the potential complications, emisacrectomy can be performed successfully and is an important procedure in the treatment of sacral tumours. PMID:19468760

  3. Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus mimicking intraosseous lesions of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, Elnaz; Tadinada, Aditya [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a developmental variant that is not always well recognized and is often confused with other pathologies associated with the skull base. This report describes the case of a patient referred for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging for dental implant therapy. CBCT demonstrated a well-defined incidental lesion in the left sphenoid sinus with soft tissue-like density and sclerotic borders with internal curvilinear opacifications. The differential diagnoses included intraosseous lipoma, arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, chondrosarcoma, chondroid chordoma, and ossifying fibroma. The radiographic diagnosis of arrested pneumatization was based on the location of the lesion, its well-defined nature, the presence of internal opacifications, and lack of expansion. Gray-scale CBCT imaging of the area demonstrated values similar to fatty tissue. This case highlighted the fact that benign developmental variants associated with the skull base share similar radiographic features with more serious pathological entities.

  4. MR imaging of the pelvis: a guide to incidental musculoskeletal findings for abdominal radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Girish, Gandikota; Kaza, Ravi K; Jacobson, Jon; Fessell, David; Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David

    2014-08-01

    Occasionally patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging for presumed pelvic disease demonstrate unexpected musculoskeletal imaging findings in the imaged field. Such incidental findings can be challenging to the abdominal radiologist, who may not be familiar with their appearance or know the appropriate diagnostic considerations. Findings can include both normal and abnormal bone marrow, osseous abnormalities such as Paget's disease, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, stress and insufficiency fractures, and athletic pubalgia, benign neoplasms such as enchondroma and bone island, malignant processes such as metastasis and chondrosarcoma, soft tissue processes such as abscess, nerve-related tumors, and chordoma, joint- and bursal-related processes such as sacroiliitis, iliopsoas bursitis, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and labral tears, and iatrogenic processes such as bone graft or bone biopsy. Though not all-encompassing, this essay will help abdominal radiologists to identify and describe this variety of pelvic musculoskeletal conditions, understand key radiologic findings, and synthesize a differential diagnosis when appropriate. PMID:24682526

  5. Differential diagnosis of dumbbell lesions associated with spinal neural foraminal widening: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reliably demonstrate typical features of schwannomas or neurofibromas in the vast majority of dumbbell lesions responsible for neural foraminal widening. However, a large variety of unusual lesions which are causes of neural foraminal widening can also be encountered in the spinal neural foramen. Radiologic findings can be helpful in differential diagnosis of lesions of spinal neural foramen including neoplastic lesions such as benign/malign peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs), solitary bone plasmacytoma (SBP), chondroid chordoma, superior sulcus tumor, metastasis and non-neoplastic lesions such as infectious process (tuberculosis, hydatid cyst), aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), synovial cyst, traumatic pseudomeningocele, arachnoid cyst, vertebral artery tortuosity. In this article, we discuss CT and MRI findings of dumbbell lesions which are causes of neural foraminal widening.

  6. The Radiation Response of Sarcomas by Histologic Subtypes: A Review With Special Emphasis Given to Results Achieved With Razoxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Relatively few results are available in the literature about the radiation response of unresectable sarcomas in relation to their histology. Therefore, an attempt was made to summarize the present situation. Materials and methods. This report is based on a review of the literature and the author's own experience. Adult-type soft tissue sarcomas, chondrosarcomas, and chordomas were analyzed. Radioresponse was mainly associated with the degree of tumor shrinkage, that is, objective responses. Histopathologic responses, that is, the degree of necrosis, are only discussed in relation to radiation treatment reports of soft tissue sarcomas as a group. Results. Radiation therapy alone leads to major responses in about 50% of lipo-, fibro-, leiomyo-, or chondrosarcomas. The response rate is less than 50% in malignant fibrous histiocytomas, synovial, neurogenic, and other rare soft tissue sarcomas. The response rates may increase up to 75% through the addition of radiosensitizers such as halogenated pyrimidines or razoxane, or by the use of high-LET irradiation. Angiosarcomas become clearly more responsive if biologicals, angiomodulating, and/or tubulin affinic substances are given together with radiation therapy. Razoxane is able to increase the duration and quality of responses even in difficult-to-treat tumors like chondrosarcomas or chordomas. Conclusions. The available data demonstrate that the radioresponsiveness of sarcomas is very variable and dependent on histology, kind of radiation, and various concomitantly given drugs. The rate of complete sustained remissions by radiation therapy alone or in combination with drugs is still far from satisfactory although progress has been made through the use of sensitizing agents.

  7. Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiotherapy for benign spinal tumors: theUniversity of California San Francisco preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, A; Chou, D; Ames, C; Ma, L; Lamborn, K; Huang, K; Chuang, C; Aiken, A; Petti, P; Weinstein, P; Larson, D

    2007-12-01

    We evaluate our preliminary experience using the Cyberknife Radiosurgery System in treating benign spinal tumors. A retrospective review of 16 consecutively treated patients, comprising 19 benign spinal tumors, was performed. Histologic types included neurofibroma [11], chordoma [4], hemangioma [2], and meningioma [2]. Three patients had Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Only one tumor, recurrent chordoma, had been previously irradiated, and as such not considered in the local failure analysis. Local failure, for the remaining 18 tumors, was based clinically on symptom progression and/or tumor enlargement based on imaging. Indications for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) consisted of either adjuvant to subtotal resection (5/19), primary treatment alone (12/19), boost following external beam radiotherapy (1/19), and salvage following previous radiation (1/19). Median tumor follow-up is 25 months (2-37), and one patient (with NF1) died at 12 months from a stroke. The median total dose, number of fractions, and prescription isodose was 21 Gy (10-30 Gy), 3 fx (1-5 fx), 80% (42-87%). The median tumor volume was 7.6 cc (0.2-274.1 cc). The median V100 (volume V receiving 100% of the prescribed dose) and maximum tumor dose was 95% (77-100%) and 26.7 Gy (15.4-59.7 Gy), respectively. Three tumors progressed at 2, 4, and 36 months post-SR (n=18). Two tumors were neurofibromas (both in NF1 patients), and the third was an intramedullary hemangioblastoma. Based on imaging, two tumors had MRI documented progression, three had regressed, and 13 were unchanged (n=18). With short follow-up, local control following Cyberknife spine SBRT for benign spinal tumors appear acceptable. PMID:17994789

  8. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): Initial clinical experience in the first 80 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) started clinical operation in November 2009. In this report we present the first 80 patients treated with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and describe patient selection, treatment planning and daily treatment for different indications. Patients and methods. Between November 15, 2009 and April 15, 2010, 80 patients were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) with carbon ion and proton radiotherapy. Main treated indications consisted of skull base chordoma (n = 9) and chondrosarcoma (n = 18), malignant salivary gland tumors (n=29), chordomas of the sacrum (n = 5), low grade glioma (n=3), primary and recurrent malignant astrocytoma and glioblastoma (n=7) and well as osteosarcoma (n = 3). Of these patients, four pediatric patients aged under 18 years were treated. Results. All patients were treated using the intensity-modulated rasterscanning technique. Seventy-six patients were treated with carbon ions (95%), and four patients were treated with protons. In all patients x-ray imaging was performed prior to each fraction. Treatment concepts were based on the initial experiences with carbon ion therapy at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) including carbon-only treatments and carbon-boost treatments with photon-IMRT. The average time per fraction in the treatment room per patient was 29 minutes; for irradiation only, the mean time including all patients was 16 minutes. Position verification was performed prior to every treatment fraction with orthogonal x-ray imaging. Conclusion. Particle therapy could be included successfully into the clinical routine at the Dept. of Radiation Oncology in Heidelberg. Numerous clinical trials will subsequently be initiated to precisely define the role of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy in radiation oncology.

  9. Initial clinical experience with scanned proton beams at the Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the initial toxicity data with scanned proton beams at the Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO). In September 2011, CNAO commenced patient treatment with scanned proton beams within two prospective Phase II protocols approved by the Italian Health Ministry. Patients with chondrosarcoma or chordoma of the skull base or spine were eligible. By October 2012, 21 patients had completed treatment. Immobilization was performed using rigid non-perforated thermoplastic-masks and customized headrests or body-pillows as indicated. Non-contrast CT scans with immobilization devices in place and MRI scans in supine position were performed for treatment-planning. For chordoma, the prescribed doses were 74 cobalt grey equivalent (CGE) and 54 CGE to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2, respectively. For chondrosarcoma, the prescribed doses were 70 CGE and 54 CGE to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Treatment was delivered five days a week in 35-37 fractions. Prior to treatment, the patients' positions were verified using an optical tracking system and orthogonal X-ray images. Proton beams were delivered using fixed-horizontal portals on a robotic couch. Weekly MRI incorporating diffusion-weighted-imaging was performed during the course of proton therapy. Patients were reviewed once weekly and acute toxicities were graded with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). Median age of patients =50 years (range, 21-74). All 21 patients completed the proton therapy without major toxicities and without treatment interruption. Median dose delivered was 74 CGE (range, 70-74). The maximum toxicity recorded was CTCAE Grade 2 in four patients. Our preliminary data demonstrates the clinical feasibility of scanned proton beams in Italy. (author)

  10. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): Initial clinical experience in the first 80 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, Stephanie E. (Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany)), E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Ellerbrock, Malte; Haberer, Thomas (Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)) (and others)

    2010-10-15

    The Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) started clinical operation in November 2009. In this report we present the first 80 patients treated with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and describe patient selection, treatment planning and daily treatment for different indications. Patients and methods. Between November 15, 2009 and April 15, 2010, 80 patients were treated at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT) with carbon ion and proton radiotherapy. Main treated indications consisted of skull base chordoma (n = 9) and chondrosarcoma (n = 18), malignant salivary gland tumors (n=29), chordomas of the sacrum (n = 5), low grade glioma (n=3), primary and recurrent malignant astrocytoma and glioblastoma (n=7) and well as osteosarcoma (n = 3). Of these patients, four pediatric patients aged under 18 years were treated. Results. All patients were treated using the intensity-modulated rasterscanning technique. Seventy-six patients were treated with carbon ions (95%), and four patients were treated with protons. In all patients x-ray imaging was performed prior to each fraction. Treatment concepts were based on the initial experiences with carbon ion therapy at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) including carbon-only treatments and carbon-boost treatments with photon-IMRT. The average time per fraction in the treatment room per patient was 29 minutes; for irradiation only, the mean time including all patients was 16 minutes. Position verification was performed prior to every treatment fraction with orthogonal x-ray imaging. Conclusion. Particle therapy could be included successfully into the clinical routine at the Dept. of Radiation Oncology in Heidelberg. Numerous clinical trials will subsequently be initiated to precisely define the role of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy in radiation oncology.

  11. The progress in radiotherapy techniques and it's clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three modem radiotherapy techniques were introduced into clinical practice at the onset of the 21st century - stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), proton therapy and carbon-ion radiotherapy. Our paper summarizes the basic principles of physics, as well as the technical reqirements and clinical indications for those techniques. SRT is applied for intracranial diseases (arteriovenous malformations, acoustic nerve neuromas, brain metastases, skull base tumors) and in such cases it is referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Techniques used during SRS include GammaKnife, CyberKnife and dedicated linacs. SRT can also be applied for extracranial disease (non-small cell lung cancer, lung metastases, spinal and perispinal tumors, primary liver tumors, breast cancer, pancreatic tumors, prostate cancer, head and neck tumors) and in such cases it is referred to as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Eye melanomas, skull base and cervical spine chordomas and chordosarcomas, as well as childhood neoplasms, are considered to be the classic indications for proton therapy. Clinical trials are currently conducted to investigate the usefulness of proton beam in therapy of non-small cell lung cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck tumors, primary liver and oesophageal cancer Carbon-ion radiotherapy is presumed to be more advantageous than proton therapy because of its higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and possibility of real-time control of the irradiated volume under PET visualization. The basic indications for carbon-ion therapy are salivary glands neoplasms, selected types of soft tissue and bone sarcomas, skull base chordomas and chordosarcomas, paranasal sinus neoplasms, primary liver cancers and inoperable rectal adenocarcinoma recurrences. (authors)

  12. Secondary EWSR1 gene abnormalities in SMARCB1-deficient tumors with 22q11-12 regional deletions: Potential pitfalls in interpreting EWSR1 FISH results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-10-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218413

  13. Treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): establishment of workflow and initial clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report on establishment of workflow and clinical results of particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. We treated 36 pediatric patients (aged 21 or younger) with particle therapy at HIT. Median age was 12 years (range 2-21 years), five patients (14%) were younger than 5 years of age. Indications included pilocytic astrocytoma, parameningeal and orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, skull base and cervical chordoma, osteosarcoma and adenoid-cystic carcinoma (ACC), as well as one patient with an angiofibroma of the nasopharynx. For the treatment of small children, an anesthesia unit at HIT was established in cooperation with the Department of Anesthesiology. Treatment concepts depended on tumor type, staging, age of the patient, as well as availability of specific study protocols. In all patients, particle radiotherapy was well tolerated and no interruptions due to toxicity had to be undertaken. During follow-up, only mild toxicites were observed. Only one patient died of tumor progression: Carbon ion radiotherapy was performed as an individual treatment approach in a child with a skull base recurrence of the previously irradiated rhabdomyosarcoma. Besides this patient, tumor recurrence was observed in two additional patients. Clinical protocols have been generated to evaluate the real potential of particle therapy, also with respect to carbon ions in distinct pediatric patient populations. The strong cooperation between the pediatric department and the department of radiation oncology enable an interdisciplinary treatment and stream-lined workflow and acceptance of the treatment for the patients and their parents

  14. 软骨样副脊索瘤(附病例报告)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚庆端; 王敏; 李培峰; 曲美婷

    2004-01-01

    To study the clinical pathological characteristics and differentiation diagnosis of the chondroid parachordoma from primary tumors or metastatic to ulna, femur and radius. Methods Three cases of primary chondroid parachordoma of the ulma, femur and radius were studied by histopathological observation and immunohisto chemical staining and by pathological consultation. Results The histological features of tumor were composed of two the chordoma ceils subtotal and the chondrosareoma ceils of small - portio. The tumor was arranged vary in sizes of lobular and brink of lobular were seplum small girder of chondroid, or the tissue fiber. The tumor cells were distributed sheet, trabecula with or island -like in the intralobular, and the tumor ceils were vary in size and the karyon heterotypic were no patent and the cytoplasm of rich shows large vacuole. The chondroidosarcomas intra - lobular were viewed ceils both nucleus and uninuclear of chondrolacunae and the stroma were hyaling cartilage with or blennoid in the mesenchyma, and that picture of typical chondrosarcoma. EMA, CK, Vimentin, S - 100 protein, NSE with immunohistochemical method (ABC) staining were positive and Desmin, CD34 negative in the all of tumor cells. The chondroid parachodoma was diagnosed in the pathological read- section- conference and consulation. Conclusion Primary ulna, femur and radius chondroid parachordoma is a rare in rate of neoplasm and is diagnosed diflqculdy. Immunohistochemical method would be helpful to diagnosis.

  15. Is proton beam therapy the future of radiotherapy? Part I: Clinical aspects; La protontherapie: avenir de la radiotherapie? Premiere partie: aspects cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouyon-Monteau, A.; Habrand, J.L.; Datchary, J.; Alapetite, C.; Bolle, S.; Dendale, R.; Feuvret, L.; Helfre, S.; Calugaru, V. [Centre de protontherapie d' Orsay, institut Curie, campus universitaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Bouyon-Monteau, A.; Alapetite, C.; Bolle, S.; Dendale, R.; Helfre, S.; Calugaru, V.; Cosset, J.M.; Bey, P. [Departement d' oncologie-radiotherapie, institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Habrand, J.L.; Datchary, J. [Departement d' oncologie-radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France); Feuvret, L. [Departement d' oncologie-radiotherapie, hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-12-15

    Proton beam therapy uses positively charged particles, protons, whose physical properties improve dose-distribution (Bragg peak characterized by a sharp distal and lateral penumbra) compared with conventional photon-based radiation therapy (X-ray). These ballistic advantages apply to the treatment of deep-sited tumours located close to critical structures and requiring high-dose levels. [60-250 MeV] proton-beam therapy is now widely accepted as the 'gold standard' in specific indications in adults - ocular melanoma, chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull - and is regarded as a highly promising treatment modality in the treatment of paediatric malignancies (brain tumours, sarcomas..). This includes the relative sparing of surrounding normal organs from low and mid-doses that can cause deleterious side-effects such as radiation-induced secondary malignancies. Other clinical studies are currently testing proton beam in dose-escalation evaluations, in prostate, lung, hepatocellular cancers, etc. Clinical validation of these new indications appears necessary. To date, over 60, 000 patients worldwide have received part or all of their radiation therapy program by proton beams, in approximately 30 treatment facilities. (authors)

  16. Bottom line in the treatment of bone tumors%浅谈骨肿瘤诊治中的底线

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦兴

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is the science of human diseases and health. The principles of all the treatment methods and techniques should be in consistent with what has been recognized in the treatment of bone and soft tumors. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bone Cancer ( NCCN Guidelines ) printed by National Comprehensive Cancer Network is well known, in which the treatment of chondrosarcoma, chordoma, ewing’s sarcoma, giant cell tumor of bone and osteosarcoma were discussed in detail. Most important, principles of bone cancer management were emphasized in this guideline, including: ( 1 ) Biopsy diagnosis is necessary prior to any surgical procedures. ( 2 ) Wide excision should achieve histologically negative surgical margins. ( 3 ) Lab studies such as CBC, LDH, and ALP may have relevance in the diagnosis. ( 4 ) Care for bone cancer patients should be delivered directly by physicians of a multidisciplinary team. ( 5 ) Patients should have a survivorship prescription to schedule follow-up with a multidisciplinary team. Respect on the spirits of science is the bottom line of medicine, and we should regard the principle and guideline mentioned above as the bottom line in the treatment of bone and soft tumors.

  17. RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SELLAR FLOOR FOLLOWING TRANSSPHE-NOIDAL SURGERY USING GELATIN FOAM AND FIBRIN GLUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yin; Chang-bao Su; Zhi-qin Xu; Xue-wei Xia; Fei Song

    2005-01-01

    Objective To introduce a new principle of sellar reconstruction and to evaluate the effectiveness of absorbable gelatin foam and fibrin glue for sellar reconstruction. Methods A total of 176 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for pituitary adenomas, cysts, chordomas, or subdiaphragmatic craniopharyngiomas in the sella turcica between January 2001 and April 2003 at Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled. Different techniques of sellar closure and indications for each specific condition were retrospectively reviewed. Results Seventy-seven (43.7%) patients developed a visible cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during surgery. Intra operative CSF leakage were repaired simply with gelatin foam and fibrin glue in 62 (35.2%) patients, and with autologous fat graft and sellar floor reconstruction in 15 (8.5%) patients. Postoperative CSF rhinorrhea occurred only in 1 case. There were no visual deterioration, allergic rhinitis, meningitis, pneumocranium, granulomas, or other complications associated with the reconstruction procedure. Conclusion The procedure of using gelatin foam and fibrin glue and principle of cranial base reconstruction is safe and effective in preventing postoperative complications following transsphenoidal surgery.

  18. [An operative case of cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saino, M; Kayama, T; Kuroki, A; Siraisi, Y; Sato, K; Nakai, O

    1996-11-01

    A 59-year-old man presented with a rare cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex manifesting as headache, left facial dysesthesia, diplopia, left hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Neurological examination revealed dysesthesia of territory in all divisions of the left trigeminal nerve, left incomplete abducens nerve palsy, left mixed hearing impairment, and left tinnitus. Plain CT scan showed a smoothly marginated mass involving the left petrous apex. The mass was isodense with the brain parenchyma and not enhanced by contrast medium. The mass appeared heterogeneously slightly hyperintense on the T1-weighted MR image and homogeneously hyperintense on the T2-weighted MR image except for the peripheral portion. The mass was not enhanced after intravenous gadolinium DTPA administration. Surgery via a petrosal approach totally removed the mass in the intracranial, extradural space. Histological examination showed typical features of cholesterol granuloma, with cholesterin clefts, hemosiderin deposits, and erythrocytes in non-specific granulation tissue. Cholesterol granuloma most commonly occurs in the middle ear cavity, and rarely in the petrous apex. The characteristic hyperintense appearance of cholesterol granuloma on T1- and T2-weighted MR images is very useful for differentiation from other lesions of the petrous apex and the cerebellopontine angle such as cholesteatoma, mucocele, chordoma, and meningioma. Solid cholesterol granuloma of the petrous apex should be treated by total removal via craniotomy, not by drainage which is commonly performed by otorhinologists. PMID:8934474

  19. Sphenoid masses in children: radiologic differential diagnosis with pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Y W; Dasari, S B; Young, R J

    2011-04-01

    Childhood central skull base masses are rare, often difficult to diagnose, and have overlapping imaging findings. In this review, we provide an overview of the epidemiology, clinical findings, and management of pediatric sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus masses with an emphasis on imaging findings that may help to differentiate lesions. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is provided. Finally, an imaging-based algorithm is presented as a guide to help radiologists narrow their differential diagnoses. Some of the entities discussed are virtually unique to the pediatric population; others occur rarely in this age group but should be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. Entities included in the discussion are grouped into 2 categories: those that cause nonaggressive osseous remodeling and those that are more commonly associated with aggressive bone changes. Mucocele, aneurysmal bone cyst, giant cell lesions, meningioma, and fibrous dysplasia tend to remodel bone, while entities such as chordoma, craniopharyngioma, rhabdomyosarcoma, sinonasal carcinoma, and neuroblastoma may cause more aggressive local bone changes. PMID:20595365

  20. Review of spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma without primary origin in the vertebral bone were evaluated in 54 patients including our new case. The 36 male and 18 female patients were aged 5 to 78 years (mean 47 years). Most lesions were in the thoracic spine (80%) and on the dorsal side of the spinal cord (93%). The clinical course was mostly slowly progressive, with myelopathy in 33% at onset and 83% at admission. The lesion appeared isointense to the spinal cord on T1-weighted imaging, and isointense or slightly hypointense to the cerebrospinal fluid on T2-weighted imaging. Lesion without hemorrhage showed prominent homogeneous enhancement after administration of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid because of the sinusoidal channel structure. Heterogeneous enhancement was caused by hematoma and/or post-hemorrhagic degeneration. The differential diagnosis of this disease includes metastatic tumor, Ewing's sarcoma, chordoma, eosinophilic granuloma, sarcoidosis, lipoma, hypertrophy of the posterior longitudinal ligament or the ligamentum flavum, meningioma, and neurinoma. The relationships between clinical course and surgery or outcome suggest that early diagnosis and total removal of the lesion before massive lesional bleeding occurs are necessary for a good outcome. (author)

  1. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the sacrum: A case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minasian, Tanya; Claus, Chad; Hariri, Omid R.; Piao, Zhe; Quadri, Syed A.; Yuhan, Robert; Leong, Darren; Tashjian, Vartan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is an extremely rare, benign cartilaginous tumor that makes up <0.5% of all bone tumors, typically presenting in the second or third decade of life. CMF of the sacrum is exceedingly rare, with only seven documented cases reported in the neurosurgical literature. Case Description: We report a case of a 35-year-old female with a 3 month history of lower back pain after sustaining a fall on her sacrum/coccyx presenting with a progressive complaint of localized lower back pain, occasional urinary retention without incontinence, gluteal hypesthesia, and pressure below the gluteal crease. Imaging demonstrated a large, expansile enhancing soft-tissue lesion involving the sacrum, distal to the S2-3 disc space. The tumor was removed with partial sacrectomy for open en bloc resection with partial nerve sparing. The patient was found at 1.5-year follow-up with the improvement of symptoms, no recurrence, and no residual neurologic dysfunction. Conclusion: Sacral CMF is a rare clinical entity that may mirror more aggressive sacral pathology, including chordoma, in both clinical presentation and imaging characteristics. A review of the available literature regarding diagnosis, surgical management options, and prognosis for sacral CMF is provided. PMID:27274412

  2. CT and MRI of intrinsic space-occupying lesions of the bony skull base; CT und MRT bei intrinsischen raumfordernden Laesionen der knoechernen Schaedelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S.; Brandt, S. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Halle (Germany); Neumann, K. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen-, Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Halle (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Intrinsic bony lesions of the skull base are diseases which arise within the bones forming the skull base. Mainly they are bone tumours and tumour-like lesions. With the exception of osteomas of the paranasal sinuses and exostoses of the external auditory canal, these lesions occur rarely. This article gives an overview of the appearance of the most common primary bony skull base masses in CT and MRI. From the authors' point of view these are fibrous dysplasia, chordomas, chondrosarcomas, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and multiple myelomas, which must be differentiated from pseudolesions. The possibilities of CT and MRI in making a specific diagnosis, differential diagnosis and the kind of making the final diagnosis are described. (orig.) [German] Unter intrinsischen Laesionen der knoechernen Schaedelbasis versteht man Erkrankungen, die von den die Schaedelbasis bildenden Knochen ausgehen. In erster Linie handelt es sich um Knochentumoren und tumoraehnliche Laesionen. Mit wenigen Ausnahmen (Nasennebenhoehlenosteome, Exostosen des aeusseren Gehoergangs) sind sie selten. Dieser Beitrag gibt einen Ueberblick ueber das CT- und MRT-Erscheinungsbild der aus Sicht der Autoren unter diesem Aspekt noch am haeufigsten anzutreffenden raumfordernden Laesionen. Dazu zaehlen die fibroese Dysplasie, Chordome, Chondrosarkome, die Langerhans-Zell-Histiozytose und das multiple Myelom. Abgrenzt werden muessen Pseudotumoren. Artdiagnostische Zuordnungsmoeglichkeiten durch CT und/oder MRT, Differenzialdiagnosen und Diagnosesicherung werden dargelegt. (orig.)

  3. An evidence based review of proton beam therapy: The report of ASTRO’s emerging technology committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a novel method for treating malignant disease with radiotherapy. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the state of the science of PBT and arrive at a recommendation for the use of PBT. The emerging technology committee of the American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) routinely evaluates new modalities in radiotherapy and assesses the published evidence to determine recommendations for the society as a whole. In 2007, a Proton Task Force was assembled to evaluate the state of the art of PBT. This report reflects evidence collected up to November 2009. Data was reviewed for PBT in central nervous system tumors, gastrointestinal malignancies, lung, head and neck, prostate, and pediatric tumors. Current data do not provide sufficient evidence to recommend PBT in lung cancer, head and neck cancer, GI malignancies, and pediatric non-CNS malignancies. In hepatocellular carcinoma and prostate cancer and there is evidence for the efficacy of PBT but no suggestion that it is superior to photon based approaches. In pediatric CNS malignancies PBT appears superior to photon approaches but more data is needed. In large ocular melanomas and chordomas, we believe that there is evidence for a benefit of PBT over photon approaches. PBT is an important new technology in radiotherapy. Current evidence provides a limited indication for PBT. More robust prospective clinical trials are needed to determine the appropriate clinical setting for PBT.

  4. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  5. CT diagnosis of sellar and juxtasellar lesions, 2. Tumors other than pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-06-01

    A study is done of the usefulness and limitation of the CT diagnosis of sellar and juxtasellar tumors other than pituitary adenomas based on 96 verified cases experienced at Nagoya University Hospital from October, 1976, to December, 1981. The tumors in this study included craniopharyngiomas, meningiomas, gliomas, paranasal and nasopharyngeal tumors, germinomas, chordomas, chondromas, osteomas, teratomas and teratoid tumors, and metastatic tumors. It is found that rather characteristic CT findings are demonstrated in some tumors: a suprasellar lesion with a mixed density demonstrated by craniopharyngiomas, the radiosensitivity of germinoma, the irregularity of the low-density area and the peritumoral entrapment of metrizamide demonstrated by epidermoid tumors, bony sclerosis demonstrated by meningiomas, growth along optic pathway in optic gliomas, the mode of enhancement in hypothalamic glioma, and a high-density mass upon plain CT demonstrated by colloid cysts. However, these characteristic findings are not definitely specific to each pathological aspect of a tumor. It will be possible, however, to diagnose these tumors more specifically by a combination of clinical signs, CT, and other neuroradiological findings.

  6. Heavy charged particle radiotherapy trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through mid-1985, a total of 49 patients received heavy-charged-particle irradiation for chordoma, chondrosarcoma, meningioma, or neurilemmoma of the base of skull or juxtaspinal area. The mean tumor dose was 68 Gray-equivalent, ranging from 26 to 80. Control within the irradiated area was obtained in 35 of 49. The median follow up in all 49 patients is 21 months, with a range from 3-90 months. Serious complications were seen in a small number of patients, with cranial nerve injury in two, transverse myelitis in one, and brain necrosis in three patients. In 42 patients with tumors of other histologies and/or sites, including tumors of paranasal sinuses, retroperitoneum, soft tissue and miscellaneous other sites, heavy charged particles were also used to deliver a higher tumor dose than possible with standard irradiation techniques. In the group, 21/42 (50%) have had local tumor control, also a good result considering the extent and the range of tumor types treated. The authors believe that there are a number of sites in addition to the juxtaspinal/base of skull tumors that will show long term benefit from treatment with heavy charged particles

  7. Imaging of cerebellopontine angle lesions: an update. Part 2: intra-axial lesions, skull base lesions that may invade the CPA region, and non-enhancing extra-axial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, Fabrice; Chiras, Jacques [Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Savatovsky, Julien [Adolphe de Rothschild Foundation, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2007-11-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging reliably demonstrate typical features of vestibular schwannomas or meningiomas in the vast majority of mass lesions responsible for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) syndrome. However, a large variety of unusual lesions can also be encountered in the CPA. Covering the entire spectrum of lesions potentially found in the CPA, these articles explain the pertinent neuroimaging features that radiologists need to know to make clinically relevant diagnoses in these cases, including data from diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging or MR spectroscopy, when available. A diagnostic algorithm based on the lesion's site of origin, shape and margins, density, signal intensity and contrast material uptake is also proposed. Non-enhancing extra-axial CPA masses are cystic (epidermoid cyst, arachnoid cyst, neurenteric cyst) or contain fat (dermoid cyst, lipoma). Tumours can also extend into the CPA by extension from the skull base (paraganglioma, chondromatous tumours, chordoma, cholesterol granuloma, endolymphatic sac tumour). Finally, brain stem or ventricular tumours can present with a significant exophytic component in the CPA that may be difficult to differentiate from an extra-axial lesion (lymphoma, hemangioblastoma, choroid plexus papilloma, ependymoma, glioma, medulloblastoma, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour). (orig.)

  8. Proton beam therapy (PT) in the management of CNS tumors in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habrand, J.L. [Centre de Protontherapie, Orsay (France)]|[Dept. d`Oncologie Pediatrique, Inst. Gustav Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mammar, H.; Pontvert, D. [Centre de Protontherapie, Orsay (France)]|[Dept. d`Oncologie Pediatrique, Inst. Curie, Paris (France); Ferrand, R.; Bondiau, P.Y. [Centre de Protontherapie, Orsay (France); Kalifa, C. [Dept. d`Oncologie Pediatrique, Inst. Gustav Roussy, Villejuif (France); Zucker, J.M. [Dept. d`Oncologie Pediatrique, Inst. Curie, Paris (France)

    1999-06-01

    At the Centre de Protontherapie d`Orsay, nine children with intra-cranial malignancies were treated between July 1994 and January 1998. Immediate and late tolerances were excellent in all cases (follow-up 2 to 50 months). Two patients recurred locally (marginal failures), seven are alive and doing well. At Loma Linda, 28 children were treated between 1991 and 1994, 16 for a benign tumor of the brain and twelve for a malignant one. With a follow-up of seven to 49 months, three patients died (grade 2 to 4 gliomas), one is living with a persistant disease. Four children had treatment - related toxicity (one cataract, two hormonal failures and two seizures). The other children are doing well. At MGH Boston, 18 children with skull base-cervical spine chordomas have been reported. At five years, actuarial survival and disease-free survival have been 68 and 63%, respectively. Children with cervical sites had a worse prognosis (p=0.008). Four children had radiation-related morbidity: two pituitary failures, one temporal lobe necrosis, one temporal muscle fibrosis. In this experience, such rare tumors seemed to behave in children like in adults. (orig.)

  9. Proton radiotherapy in management of pediatric base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Primary skull base tumors of the developing child are rare and present a formidable challenge to both surgeons and radiation oncologists. Gross total resection with negative margins is rarely achieved, and the risks of functional, structural, and cosmetic deficits limit the radiation dose using conventional radiation techniques. Twenty-nine children and adolescents treated with conformal proton radiotherapy (proton RT) were analyzed to assess treatment efficacy and safety. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and April 1999, 29 patients with mesenchymal tumors underwent fractionated proton (13 patients) or fractionated combined proton and photon (16 patients) irradiation. The age at treatment ranged from 1 to 19 years (median 12); 14 patients were male and 15 female. Tumors were grouped as malignant or benign. Twenty patients had malignant histologic findings, including chordoma (n=10), chondrosarcoma (n=3), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=4), and other sarcomas (n=3). Target doses ranged between 50.4 and 78.6 Gy/cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE), delivered at doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy/CGE per fraction. The benign histologic findings included giant cell tumors (n=6), angiofibromas (n=2), and chondroblastoma (n=1). RT doses for this group ranged from 45.0 to 71.8 Gy/CGE. Despite maximal surgical resection, 28 (97%) of 29 patients had gross disease at the time of proton RT. Follow-up after proton RT ranged from 13 to 92 months (mean 40). Results: Of the 20 patients with malignant tumors, 5 (25%) had local failure; 1 patient had failure in the surgical access route and 3 patients developed distant metastases. Seven patients had died of progressive disease at the time of analysis. Local tumor control was maintained in 6 (60%) of 10 patients with chordoma, 3 (100%) of 3 with chondrosarcoma, 4 (100%) of 4 with rhabdomyosarcoma, and 2 (66%) of 3 with other sarcomas. The actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival rate was 72% and 56%, respectively, and the overall survival

  10. Morphometric Analysis of Bone Resection in Anterior Petrosectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama; Walther, Jonathan; Theriot, Krystle; Manuel, Morganne; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The anterior petrosectomy is a well-defined skull base approach to lesions such as petroclival meningiomas, posterior circulation aneurysms, petrous apex lesions (chondrosarcomas, cholesteatomas), ventrolateral brainstem lesions, clival chordomas, trigeminal neurinomas, and access to cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VII. Methods and Materials Fourteen anterior petrosectomies on eight cadaveric heads were performed in a skull base dissection laboratory. Predissection and postdissection thin-cut computed tomography scans were obtained to compare the bone resection. A computer program was used (InVivo5, Anatomage, San Jose, California, United States) to measure the bone resection and the improved viewing angle. Results The average bone removed in each plane was as follows: anterior to posterior plane was 10.57 mm ± 2.00 mm, superior to inferior was 9.39 mm ± 1.67 mm, and lateral to medial was 17.46 mm ± 4.64 mm. The average increased angle of view was 13.01 ± 2.35 degrees (Table 1). The average volume was 1786.94 ± 827.40 mm(3). Conclusions Anterior petrosectomy is a useful approach to access the ventrolateral brainstem region. We present a cadaveric study quantitating the volume of bone resection and improvement in the viewing angle. These data provide useful preoperative information on the utility of this skull base approach and the gain in the viewing angle after bony removal. PMID:27175319

  11. Primary sarcomas of the central nervous system: UCSF experience (1985-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarık TİHAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomas constitute less than 2% of all cancers, and are a highly diverse group of neoplasms. Primary sarcomas of the central nervous system (CNS are even less common, and our experience is limited by lack of studies with sufficient size that can address the challenges in predicting behavior or management. It is critical to recognize the characteristics of these uncommon neoplasms and to develop better predictors for prognosis and behavior.We have conducted a search of the UCSF Department of Pathology and UCSF Cancer Center Registry databases for all primary CNS sarcomas that were diagnosed and treated between 1985 and 2005. Hemangiopericytomas were included, so were the solitary fibrous tumors due to their close association with the former. We excluded all cases of metastatic sarcomas, chordomas, sarcomatoid variants of all neuroepithelial neoplasms, Ewing’s sarcomas and other embryonal tumors. In addition, we have identified all soft tissue sarcomas diagnosed and treated during the same period. There were 43 primary CNS neoplasms that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. At the same time, we identified 1706 sarcomas primary to the soft tissue. Primary CNS sarcomas included 16 hemangiopericytomas, 15 chondrosarcomas, 3 solitary fibrous tumors, 3 osteosarcomas, 2 leiomyosarcomas, 2 undifferentiated sarcomas, 1 histiocytic sarcoma, and 1 fibrosarcoma. There was a distinctly higher frequency of hemangiopericytoma in the CNS compared to soft tissue. In addition, a group of low grade, parasagittal chondrosarcomas were noted for their highly indolent biological behavior. Unlike some previous series, our cohort was devoid of angiosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. This study underscores the limitations of single institutional series, and highlights the value of multi-institutional studies to understand and better treat primary CNS sarcomas.

  12. Typical tumors of the petrous bone; Typische Tumoren des Felsenbeins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Mueller, U. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Institut fuer Radiologie, Baden (Switzerland); Ulmer, S. [Medizinisch-Radiologisches Institut, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2014-04-15

    In the region of the petrous bone, inner acoustic canal and cerebellopontine angle, a variety of different tissues can be found, such as bony, epithelial, neural and vascular structures. Tumorous or tumor-like lesions, vascular or bony malformations or other pathologies can therefore be found in all of these areas. We discuss various frequently occurring tumorous or tumor-like pathologies including congential lesions, such as mucoceles, inflammatory disorders including osteomyelitis, pseudotumors and Wegener's granulomatosis. Benign non-neoplastic lesions, such as cholesteatoma, cholesterol granuloma, epidermoid and benign neoplastic tumors, such as the most commonly found vestibular schwannoma, meningeoma, paraganglioma, vascular pathologies and finally malignant lesions, such as metastasis, chordoma or chondrosarcoma and endolymphatic sac tumor (ELST) are also discussed. The emphasis of this article is on the appearance of these entities in computed tomography (CT) and more so magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it provides key facts and typical images and discusses possibilities how to distinguish these pathologies. (orig.) [German] In der Region des Felsenbein, inneren Gehoerkanals und Kleinhirnbrueckenwinkels findet sich eine Vielzahl an unterschiedlichen Gewebearten inklusive knoechernes, epitheliales, nervales und vaskulaeres Gewebe. Tumoren oder tumoraehnliche Laesionen, ossaere oder vaskulaere Pathologien koennen entsprechend dort gefunden werden. Wir diskutieren verschiedene Tumoren oder tumoraehnliche Pathologien inklusive angeborene Laesionen wie Muko- und Meningozelen, entzuendliche Veraenderungen wie die Osteomyelitis, Pseudotumoren, die Wegener-Granulomatose, nichtneoplastische Tumoren wie das Epidermoid, Cholesteatom oder Cholesterolgranulom und gutartige neoplastische Tumoren wie das am haeufigsten zu findende Vestibularisschwannom, das Paragangliom und das Meningeom, Gefaessprozesse/-pathologien und schliesslich maligne Laesionen wie Metastasen

  13. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)—also called mini-ridge filter—is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25–30% and 45–49%, respectively.

  14. Imaging appearances and clinical outcome following sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction for sacral neoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Marianna; Davies, A.M.; James, Steven L.J. [Department of Radiology, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Stirling, A.J.; Grainger, M. [Department of Spinal Surgery, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Grimer, R.J. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction is an uncommonly performed complex surgical procedure for the treatment of sacral neoplasia. There are many challenges in the post-operative period including the potential for tumor recurrence, infection, and construct failure. We present our experience of this patient cohort and describe the complications and imaging appearances that can be encountered during the follow-up period. Retrospective review of our Orthopaedic Oncology database was undertaken which has been collected over a 30-year period to identify patients that had undergone sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction. Pre and post-operative imaging including radiographs, CT, and MRI was reviewed. These were viewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with consensus opinion if there was disagreement over the imaging findings. Data regarding patient demographics, tumor type, and dimensions was collected. Serial review of radiographs, CT, and MRI was performed to assess implant position and integrity, strut graft position and union, and for the presence of recurrence within the surgical bed. Five male and two female patients (mean age 36 years, age range 15-54 years) were treated with this procedure. Histological diagnoses included chordoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and spindle cell sarcoma. Mean maximal tumor size on pre-operative imaging was 10.7 cm (range, 6-16 cm). Post-operative follow-up ranged from 10-46 months. A total of 76 imaging studies were reviewed. Commonly identified complications included vertical rod and cross-connector fracture and screw loosening. Fibula strut graft non-union and fracture was also evident on imaging review. Two patients demonstrated disease recurrence during the follow-up period. This study demonstrates the spectrum and frequency of complications that can occur following sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction for sacral neoplasia. (orig.)

  15. Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Rare Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Anal Canal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Anal Canal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Appendix Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cholangiocarcinoma; Chordoma; Colorectal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fibromyxoid Tumor; Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Giant Cell Carcinoma; Intestinal Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Sarcomatoid Carcinoma; Major Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Malignant Odontogenic Neoplasm; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Malignant Skin Neoplasm; Malignant Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm of Unknown Primary Origin; Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Adenocarcinoma; Nasal Cavity Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Oral Cavity Carcinoma; Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Paraganglioma; Paranasal Sinus Adenocarcinoma; Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma; Parathyroid Gland Carcinoma; Pituitary Gland Carcinoma; Placental Choriocarcinoma; Placental-Site Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Primary Peritoneal High Grade Serous Adenocarcinoma; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Scrotal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Seminal Vesicle Adenocarcinoma; Seminoma; Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestinal Squamous

  16. The future and progress of proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of proton therapy is reduction of treatment volumes relative to those feasible with conventional photon therapy. The consequence is that the radiation dose to the target can be raised, with a resultant increase in tumor control probability. Proton beams, however, yield no biological gains because their biological properties are similar to conventional low LET radiations. As more sophisticated technologies are needed, there have been many advances which are applicable to photon therapy; 3-D treatment planning, DVH analysis, and systems for positioning, etc. As of January 1994, a total of about 13,000 cases were reported as having had treatments with proton beams in 16 centers world wide. The tumor sites for those include uveal melanoma (30-40%), intra-cranial small targets (40%), and others. Uveal melanomas had been most extensively treated with 70 Gy/5 fx or 60 Gy/4 fx which resulted in local control and survival rates of >96% and 80%, respectively. For chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the skull base and cervical spine, the 5 year local control rates were 65% and 91%, respectively. Promising results are also being obtained for head and neck and pelvic tumors. Deeper-seated tumors have been treated only at Tsukuba University with successful results in some anatomic sites. Among these, inoperable primary hepatocellular carcinomas were effectively treated with a total dose of 75-85 Gy (3.0-4.5 Gy/fx). The 3 year survival rates for all patients, Child A+B patient, and Child A patients were 38%, 47%, and 60%, respectively, which compare favorably to other modalities. These successful results of world wide proton therapy have led us to the conclusion that a hospital-based proton facility will provide opportunities for additional patients to be treated with protons. Thus, new plans are proposed from more than 10 institutions to build a new treatment center or upgrade the energy of currently available proton beams. (author)

  17. Metrizamide cisternography and metrizamide CT cisternography in suprasellar masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety patients with suprasellar masses were evaluated by metrizamide cisternography (MC) with or without metrizamide CT cisternography (MCTC). Included were 54 cases with pituitary tumors, 12 with meningiomas arising from the tuberculum sellae, 10 with craniopharyngiomas, and 14 with other rare suprasellar masses. The author established a ''Height x Length Index (HLI)'' as a parameter of size of suprasellar masses on MC, in the mid sagittal plane. Non-functioning pituitary adenomas were larger than hormoneproducing pituitary adenomas. Most meningiomas were of moderate size, and most craniopharyngiomas were larger than other suprasellar masses. Some of the large masses were poorly visualized on MC; however, nearly all masses were well visualized on MCTC. Pituitary tumors and craniopharyngiomas had smooth surfaces, but, the surfaces of meningiomas were rough. Eleven per cent of pituitary tumors, 25 % of meningiomas, and 50 % of craniopharyngiomas were lobulated and were relatively large. Most pituitary tumors were hemispherical or spherical; meningiomas were relatively flat; and craniopharyngiomas were relatively tall. The centers of the pituitary tumors were just above the diaphragma sellae. The centers of meningiomas were located anterior to and the centers of craniopharyngiomas were slightly posterior to the centers of pituitary tumors. The above characteristics facilitated the differential diagnosis of pituitary tumors, meningiomas, and craniopharyngiomas using MC or MCTC. However, a Rathke's cleft cyst and a granuloma mimicked small pituitary tumors. Another Rathke's cleft cyst and granuloma simulated craniopharyngiomas. Chordomas and a mucocele of the sphenoid sinus mimicked pituitary tumors having inferior extensions. It was concluded that MC with or without MCTC is useful not only for detecting, but also for differentiating suprasellar masses. When a mass is poorly visualized on MC, MCTC is indicated. (author)

  18. Skull base tumors; Tumoren der Schaedelbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Naumann, N.; Grunwald, I.; Reith, W. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Nabhan, A.; Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgische Klinik des Universitaetsklinikums des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Modern imaging techniques have great importance in the diagnosis and therapy of skull-base pathologies. Many of these lesions, especially in relation to their specific location, can be evaluated using CT and MR imaging. Tumors commonly found in the anterior skull base include carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, esthesioneuroblastoma and meningioma. In the central cranial fossa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, metastases, meningioma, pituitary adenoma and neurinoma have to be considered. The most common neoplasms of the posterior skull base, including the CP angle, are neurinoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, chordoma and paraganglioma. One major task of imaging is the evaluation of the exact tumor extent as well as its relationship to the neighboring neurovascular structures. The purpose of this review is to recapitulate the most important anatomical landmarks of the skull base. The typical imaging findings of the most common tumors involving the skull base are also presented. (orig.) [German] Die moderne Bildgebung hat einen besonderen Stellenwert bei der Diagnostik und Therapie von Schaedelbasispathologien. Zahlreiche Laesionen koennen anhand ihrer CT- und MRT-Befunde, insbesondere unter Beruecksichtigung ihrer genauen Lokalisation, artdiagnostisch eingeordnet werden. Im Bereich der vorderen Schaedelbasis sind v. a. Karzinome, Rhabdomyosarkome, Aesthesioneuroblastome und Meningeome vorzufinden. Im Bereich der mittleren Schaedelbasis ist in erster Linie an nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Meningeome, Hypophysenadenome und Neurinome zu denken. Zu den haeufigsten Tumoren der hinteren Schaedelgrube, unter Einschluss des Kleinhirnbrueckenwinkels, gehoeren Neurinome, Meningeome, nasopharyngeale Karzinome, Karzinommetastasen, Chordome und Paragangliome. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der Schnittbildgebung liegt in der Bestimmung der exakten Tumorausdehnung und in der Beurteilung der Lagebeziehung des Tumors zu den komplexen anatomischen Strukturen wie Hirnnerven und

  19. Endoscopic endonasal skull base approach for parasellar lesions: Initial experiences, results, efficacy, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigetoshi Yano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endoscopic surgery is suitable for the transsphenoidal approach; it is minimally invasive and provides a well-lit operative field. The endoscopic skull base approach through the large opening of the sphenoid sinus through both nostrils has extended the surgical indication for various skull base lesions. In this study, we describe the efficacy and complications associated with the endoscopic skull base approach for extra- or intradural parasellar lesions based on our experiences. Methods: Seventy-four cases were treated by an endoscopic skull base approach. The indications for these procedures included 55 anterior extended approaches, 10 clival approaches, and 9 cavernous approaches. The operations were performed through both the nostrils using a rigid endoscope. After tumor removal, the skull base was reconstructed by a multilayered method using a polyglactin acid (PGA sheet. Results: Gross total resection was achieved in 82% of pituitary adenomas, 68.8% of meningiomas, and 60% of craniopharyngiomas in anterior extended approach and in 83.3% of chordomas in clival approach, but only in 50% of the tumors in cavernous approach. Tumor consistency, adhesion, and/or extension were significant limitations. Visual function improvements were achieved in 37 of 41 (90.2% cases. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage (9.5%, infections (5.4%, neural injuries (4.1%, and vascular injuries (2.7% were the major complications. Conclusions: Our experiences show that the endoscopic skull base approach is a safe and effective procedure for various parasellar lesions. Selection of patients who are unlikely to develop complications seems to be an important factor for procedure efficacy and good outcome.

  20. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  1. Treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT: establishment of workflow and initial clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report on establishment of workflow and clinical results of particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Materials and methods We treated 36 pediatric patients (aged 21 or younger with particle therapy at HIT. Median age was 12 years (range 2-21 years, five patients (14% were younger than 5 years of age. Indications included pilocytic astrocytoma, parameningeal and orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, skull base and cervical chordoma, osteosarcoma and adenoid-cystic carcinoma (ACC, as well as one patient with an angiofibroma of the nasopharynx. For the treatment of small children, an anesthesia unit at HIT was established in cooperation with the Department of Anesthesiology. Results Treatment concepts depended on tumor type, staging, age of the patient, as well as availability of specific study protocols. In all patients, particle radiotherapy was well tolerated and no interruptions due to toxicity had to be undertaken. During follow-up, only mild toxicites were observed. Only one patient died of tumor progression: Carbon ion radiotherapy was performed as an individual treatment approach in a child with a skull base recurrence of the previously irradiated rhabdomyosarcoma. Besides this patient, tumor recurrence was observed in two additional patients. Conclusion Clinical protocols have been generated to evaluate the real potential of particle therapy, also with respect to carbon ions in distinct pediatric patient populations. The strong cooperation between the pediatric department and the department of radiation oncology enable an interdisciplinary treatment and stream-lined workflow and acceptance of the treatment for the patients and their parents.

  2. Perioperative fractionated high-dose rate brachytherapy for malignant bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the viability of perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy for malignant bone and soft tissue tumors, analyzing the influence of surgical margin. Methods and Materials: From July 1992 through May 1996, 16 lesions of 14 patients with malignant bone and soft tissue tumors (3 liposarcomas, 3 MFHs, 2 malignant schwannomas, 2 chordomas, 1 osteosarcoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, 1 epithelioid sarcoma, and 1 synovial sarcoma) were treated at the Osaka University Hospital. The patients' ages ranged from 14 to 72 years (median: 39 years). Treatment sites were the pelvis in 6 lesions, the upper limbs in 5, the neck in 4, and a lower limb in 1. The resection margins were classified as intracapsular in 5 lesions, marginal in 5, and wide in 6. Postoperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy was started on the 4th-13th day after surgery (median: 6th day). The total dose was 40-50 Gy/7-10 fr/ 4-7 day (bid) at 5 or 10 mm from the source. Follow-up periods were between 19 and 46 months (median: 30 months). Results: Local control rates were 75% at 1 year and 48% in 2 years, and ultimate local control was achieved in 8 (50%) of 16 lesions. Of the 8 uncontrolled lesions, 5 (63%) had intracapsular (macroscopically positive) resection margins, and all the 8 controlled lesions (100%) had marginal (microscopically positive) or wide (negative) margins. Of the total, 3 patients died of both tumor and metastasis, 3 of metastasis alone, 1 of tumor alone, and 7 showed no evidence of disease. Peripheral nerve palsy was seen in one case after this procedure, but no infection or delayed wound healing caused by tubing or irradiation has occurred. Conclusion: Perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy is safe, well tolerated, and applicable to marginal or wide surgical margin cases

  3. Endocrine function following high dose proton therapy for tumors of the upper clivus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, J.D.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Munzenrider, J.; Birnbaum, S.; Carroll, R.; Klibanski, A.; Riskind, P.; Urie, M.; Verhey, L.; Goitein, M.

    1988-09-01

    The endocrine status of patients receiving proton radiation for tumors of the upper clivus was reviewed to evaluate the effect of high dose treatment on the pituitary gland. The fourteen patients had chordomas or low grade chondrosarcomas and were all treated by the same techniques. The median tumor dose was 69.7 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) with a range from 66.6 to 74.4 CGE. (CGE is used because modulated protons have an RBE of 1.1 compared to 60Co). The daily fraction size was 1.8-2.1 CGE. The median follow-up time is 48 months, ranging from 30 to 68 months. All treatments were planned using a computerized multi-dimensional system with the position of the pituitary outlined on the planning CT scan. Review of the dose distribution indicated that the dose to the pituitary ranged from 60.5 to 72.3 CGE, with a median of 67.6 CGE. One female patient had decreased thyroid and gonadotropin function at the time of diagnosis and has been on hormone replacement since that time. The other three females were all pre-menopausal at the time of radiotherapy. At this time four patients (3 males and 1 female) have developed endocrine abnormalities 14 to 45 months after irradiation. All four had evidence of hypothyroidism and two have also developed corticotropin deficiency. The three males had decreased testosterone levels; the female patient developed amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. All four are asymptomatic with ongoing hormone replacement.

  4. Endocrine function following high dose proton therapy for tumors of the upper clivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The endocrine status of patients receiving proton radiation for tumors of the upper clivus was reviewed to evaluate the effect of high dose treatment on the pituitary gland. The fourteen patients had chordomas or low grade chondrosarcomas and were all treated by the same techniques. The median tumor dose was 69.7 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) with a range from 66.6 to 74.4 CGE. (CGE is used because modulated protons have an RBE of 1.1 compared to 60Co). The daily fraction size was 1.8-2.1 CGE. The median follow-up time is 48 months, ranging from 30 to 68 months. All treatments were planned using a computerized multi-dimensional system with the position of the pituitary outlined on the planning CT scan. Review of the dose distribution indicated that the dose to the pituitary ranged from 60.5 to 72.3 CGE, with a median of 67.6 CGE. One female patient had decreased thyroid and gonadotropin function at the time of diagnosis and has been on hormone replacement since that time. The other three females were all pre-menopausal at the time of radiotherapy. At this time four patients (3 males and 1 female) have developed endocrine abnormalities 14 to 45 months after irradiation. All four had evidence of hypothyroidism and two have also developed corticotropin deficiency. The three males had decreased testosterone levels; the female patient developed amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. All four are asymptomatic with ongoing hormone replacement

  5. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbæk, Toke Printz; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)-also called mini-ridge filter-is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25-30% and 45-49%, respectively. PMID:27203127

  6. Importance of precise positioning for proton beam therapy in the base of skull and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuzaki, H; Urie, M M

    1991-08-01

    Using proton beam therapy, high doses have been delivered to chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of skull and cervical spine. Dose inhomogeneity to the tumors has been accepted in order to maintain normal tissue tolerances, and detailed attention to patient immobilization and to precise positioning has minimized the margins necessary to ensure these dose constraints. This study examined the contribution of precise positioning to the better dose localization achieved in these treatments. Three patients whose tumors represented different anatomic geometries were studied. Treatment plans were developed which treated as much of the tumor as possible to 74 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) while maintaining the central brain stem and central spinal cord at less than or equal to 48 CGE, the surface of the brain stem, surface of the spinal cord, and optic structures at less than or equal to 60 CGE, and the temporal lobes at less than or equal to 5% likelihood of complication using a biophysical model of normal tissue complication probability. Two positioning accuracies were assumed: 3 mm and 10 mm. Both proton beam plans and 10 MV X ray beam plans were developed with these assumptions and dose constraints. In all cases with the same positioning uncertainties, the proton beam plans delivered more dose to a larger percentage of the tumor volume and the estimated tumor control probability was higher than with the X ray plans. However, without precise positioning both the proton plans and the X ray plans deteriorated, with a 12% to 25% decrease in estimated tumor control probability. In all but one case, the difference between protons with good positioning and poor positioning was greater than the difference between protons and X rays, both with good positioning. Hence in treating these tumors, which are in close proximity to critical normal tissues, attention to immobilization and precise positioning is essential. With good positioning, proton beam therapy permits higher

  7. A panoramic view of the skull base: systematic review of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffeo, Christopher S; Dietrich, August R; Grobelny, Bartosz; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith D; Golfinos, John G; Lebowitz, Richard; Kleinberg, David; Placantonakis, Dimitris G

    2014-08-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery has been established as the safest approach to pituitary tumors, yet its role in other common skull base lesions has not been established. To answer this question, we carried out a systematic review of reported series of open and endoscopic endonasal approaches to four major skull base tumors: olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM), tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSM), craniopharyngiomas (CRA), and clival chordomas (CHO). Data from 162 studies containing 5,701 patients were combined and compared for differences in perioperative mortality, gross total resection (GTR), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, neurological morbidity, post-operative visual function, post-operative anosmia, post-operative diabetes insipidus (DI), and post-operative obesity/hyperphagia. Weighted average rates for each outcome were calculated using relative study size. Our findings indicate similar rates of GTR and perioperative mortality between open and endoscopic approaches for all tumor types. CSF leak was increased after endoscopic surgery. Visual function symptoms were more likely to improve after endoscopic surgery for TSM, CRA, and CHO. Post-operative DI and obesity/hyperphagia were significantly increased after open resection in CRA. Recurrence rates per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up were higher in endoscopy for OGM, TSM, and CHO. Trends for open and endoscopic surgery suggested modest improvement in all outcomes over time. Our observations suggest that endonasal endoscopy is a safe alternative to craniotomy and may be preferred for certain tumor types. However, endoscopic surgery is associated with higher rates of CSF leak, and possibly increased recurrence rates. Prospective study with long-term follow-up is required to verify these preliminary observations. PMID:24014055

  8. 斜坡异位泌乳素垂体腺瘤 1 例临床分析并文献复习%Clinical analysis of one patient with ectopic prolactinoma in clivus and review of literatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    穆林森; 张红波; 陈谦学; 桂松柏; 曾小君; 白吉伟; 李储忠; 赵鹏; 孙彦辉

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the diagnosis , differential diagnosis and treatment of ectopic prolactinoma in clivus .Methods The clinical data of one patient with ectopic pituitary adenoma ( EPA) in clivus underwent surgery and pathology results was retrospectively analyzed ,and the clinical features with literature review were summarized .Results The cases was diagnosed as hyperprolactinemia ,MRI showed clivus mass and preoperative diagnosis was chordoma .The tumors were totally resected through transendoscopic single nostril transsphenoidal approach .Pathological immunohistochemical test showed prolactin positive , the hyperprolactinemia not returned to normal after surgery , oral bromocriptine treatment to control it , follow-up of 1 year without recurrence . Conclusions Ectopic clivus pituitary adenoma was rarely in clinic and easily be misdiagnosed .We should continue to adopt a comprehensive treatment based on surgery .%目的 探讨斜坡异位泌乳素垂体腺瘤的诊断与鉴别诊断及治疗方法. 方法 回顾性分析1例经手术及术后病理检查确诊的斜坡异位垂体腺瘤患者的临床资料,并结合文献总结其临床特点. 结果 该例患者表现为高泌乳素血症,MRI检查发现斜坡病变,术前诊断为脊索瘤. 采用内镜下单鼻孔经鼻蝶入路显微手术全切除肿瘤. 肿瘤病理免疫组化检查泌乳素阳性,术后未完全降至正常,口服溴隐亭治疗,随访1年无复发. 结论 斜坡异位垂体腺瘤临床罕见,误诊率高;仍应采用以手术为主的综合治疗.

  9. The 100 most-cited articles in spinal oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; Caro-Osorio, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' objective was to identify the 100 most-cited research articles in the field of spinal oncology. METHODS The Thomson Reuters Web of Science service was queried for the years 1864-2015 without language restrictions. Articles were sorted in descending order of the number of times they were cited by other studies, and all titles and abstracts were screened to identify the research areas of the top 100 articles. Levels of evidence were assigned on the basis of the North American Spine Society criteria. RESULTS The authors identified the 100 most-cited articles in spinal oncology, which collectively had been cited 20,771 times at the time of this writing. The oldest article on this top 100 list had been published in 1931, and the most recent in 2008; the most prolific decade was the 1990s, with 34 articles on this list having been published during that period. There were 4 studies with Level I evidence, 3 with Level II evidence, 9 with Level III evidence, 70 with Level IV evidence, and 2 with Level V evidence; levels of evidence were not assigned to 12 studies because they were not on therapeutic, prognostic, or diagnostic topics. Thirty-one unique journals contributed to the 100 articles, with the Journal of Neurosurgery contributing most of the articles (n = 25). The specialties covered included neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, neurology, radiation oncology, and pathology. Sixty-seven articles reported clinical outcomes. The most common country of article origin was the United States (n = 62), followed by Canada (n = 8) and France (n = 7). The most common topics were spinal metastases (n = 35), intramedullary tumors (n = 18), chordoma (n = 17), intradural tumors (n = 7), vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty (n = 7), primary bone tumors (n = 6), and others (n = 10). One researcher had authored 6 studies on the top 100 list, and 7 authors had 3 studies each on this list. CONCLUSIONS This study identified the 100 most-cited research articles in the area of

  10. Use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 as an adjunct for instrumented posterior arthrodesis in the occipital cervical region: An analysis of safety, efficacy, and dosing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Kojo Hamilton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There have been few reports on the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2 in posterior spine. However, no study has investigated the dosing, safety, and efficacy of its use in the posterior atlantoaxial, and/or craniovertebral junction. Recent case report of the cytokine-mediated inflammatory reaction, following off label use of rhBMP-2 as an adjunct for cervical fusion, particularly in complex cases, has increased concern about complications associated with the product. Objective: To assess the safety, efficacy, and dosing of rhBMP-2 as an adjunct for instrumented posterior atlantoaxial and/or craniovertebral junction arthrodesis. Materials and Methods: We included all patients treated by the senior author that included posterior atlantoaxial and/or craniovertebral junction instrumented fusion using rhBMP-2 from 2003 to 2008 with a minimum two year follow-up. Diagnosis, levels fused, rhBMP-2 dose, complications, and fusion were assessed. Results: Twenty three patients with a mean age of 60.9 years (range 4 - 89 years and an average follow-up of 45 months (range 27 to 84 months met inclusion criteria. The indications for surgery included, atlantoaxial instability (n = 16, basilar invagination (n = 6, and kyphoscoliosis (n = 1. The specific pathologic diagnosis included type 2 dens fracture (n = 7, complex C1 and C2 ring fracture (n = 2, chordoma (n = 2, degenerative/osteoporosis (n = 3, rheumatoid disease (n = 8, and pseudogout (n = 1. The average rhBMP-2 dose was 2.38 mg/level, with a total of 76 levels treated (average 3.3 levels, SD= 1.4 levels. There were no complications. During the most recent follow-up, all patients had achieved fusion. Conclusions: In a series of patients with complex pathology and/or rheumatoid arthritis, 100% fusion rate was achieved with adjunct use of rhBMP-2, with a safe and effective average rhBMP-2 dose of 2.38 mg per level.

  11. SU-E-P-06: A Novel Hybrid Planning Approach to Allow More Patients Benefited by the Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Instit, Houston, TX (United States); Liao, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Li, Y [Varian Medical Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Wang, X; Sahoo, N; Liao, Z; Grosshans, D; Frank, S [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Li, H [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, X; Chang, J; Zhang, X [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gillin, M [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States); Hojo, Y [UT MD Anderson cancer center, Houston, TX (United States); Sun, J [UT MD Anderson cancer center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute a, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We report a hybrid scattering and scanning beam delivery approach, termed as (HimpsPT), which demonstrated that majority IMPT delivery can be potentially replaced with hybrid IMPT and PSPT delivery with similar or better plan quality. Methods: Three representative clinical cases, including head and neck (HN), skull base chordoma (CNS) and lung cancer, treated in MDACC Proton Therapy Center with IMPT were retrospectively redesigned using HimpsPT. The PSPT plans are designed with the same prescriptions as those of IMPT plans. The whole treatment can be delivered by either alternating or sequential PSPT and IMPT delivery. The dosimetric data and dose distributions of HimpsPT plans are compared with those of IMPT plans. We also performed a worst-case robust analysis for all plans. Results: The target coverages for all cases are comparable. For the HN case, the mean dose of esophagus larynx, left parotid and right submandibular, oral cavity V20, the max dose of cord is 18.0, 36.1, 23.6, 47.2, 0.1, 31.7 Gy in HimpsPT plan, and 25.5, 33.8, 24.9, 49.1, 0.2, 33.8 Gy in IMPT plan. For the lung case, the lung V5, V20, V30, mean lung dose, heart V40, esophagus V70, cord maximum dose are 50.5%, 37.0%, 31.7%, 21.3 Gy, 7.2%, 4.9%, 35.5 Gy in HimpsPT plan, and 55.4%, 36.7%, 30.1%, 21.3 Gy, 7.7%, 8.4%, 36.8Gy in IMPT plans. For the CNS case, brainstem maximum dose is 50.5 Gy in HimpsPT plan and 55.4 Gy in IMPT plan due to sharp penumbra offered by the aperture of the PSPT plan in HimpsPT technique. Conclusion: For majority disease sites, the dosimetric advantage of IMPT technique can be achieved by the hybrid PSPT and IMPT technique, which enables the centers equipped with both scattering and scanning beam facilities to treat more patients which can be benefited by the scanning beam.

  12. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Calley, Cynthia S.J. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3}, or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3} or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving

  13. Perioperative fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy in bone and soft-tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy was applied for treatment of bone and soft-tissue tumors. We investigate the local control and side effect, and consider possibility to reduce surgical margin. Materials and Methods: The 13 lesions of 11 patients with bone and soft-tissue tumors (four primary and nine recurrent lesions) were treated at Osaka University Hospital between Aug. 1992 and Feb. 1995. Follow-up terms are between a year and 30 months (median; 15 months). They consisted of 8 males and 3 females. The age ranged from 14 to 75 (median; 38). The histology contained 3 MFH's, 2 liposarcomas, 1 chordoma, osteosarcoma, malignant schwanoma, synovial sarcoma, and epithelioid sarcoma. The sites of lesion are 4 pelvis, 4 neck or supraclavicle, 3 upper limbs, and 2 lower limbs. The surgical margins including intraoperative catheterizing are 3 wide, 6 marginal, and 4 intralesional resection. Postoperative fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy started on 4-7th day after surgery. A total dose was 40-50 Gy/7-10 fr/6-7 d (bid) at 5 mm from the sources. Results: One case was dead of tumor, 4 cases were dead of metastasis, 1 case is alive with tumor, 2 cases are alive with distant metastasis, and 4 cases are no evidence of disease. Local control was achieved in eight of 13 lesions (62%). Four of the five uncontrolled lesions had macroscopic residual tumor after the surgery. In five of the six marginal resection, lesions were controlled. Local control rates with Kaplan-Mayer methods were 69% in 1 year and 58% in 2 years. Survival rates were 82% in 1 year and 66% in 2 years. There was one peripheral nerve palsy as a side effect. There was no infection or delayed heal of surgical scar, affected by tubing and interstitial radiation. Conclusion: This study indicates that the use of perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy is easy, safe, and well tolerated. Some cases with frequent recurrence previously, can also be controlled. A safe

  14. [Operative neurosurgery: personal view and historical backgrounds (8) suboccipital craniotomy-sitting position-linear incision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonekawa, Yasuhiro

    2011-08-01

    Suboccipital craniotomy (SOC) can be classified into three types: midline, paramedian and lateral according to the site of linear incision. They are subdivided horizontally into cranial, intermediate and caudal, while the latter of the lateral SOC should be included into the paramedian caudal one (Fig. 1, 19). Sitting position for the craniotomy has several advantages over other positionings in spite of several known drawbacks especially air embolism: cleanliness of the operative field, good anatomical orientation, wider operative spaces obtained by gravitational downward displacement of the cerebellar hemisphere above all. Linear incision is considered to have no definite drawbacks as compared with other incisions such as the horse shoe or the hockey-stick incision and rather have advantages such as enabling effective access to the surgical target by the use of navigation, simpleness of craniotomy in the opening and the closure, and less pseudomeningocele complication. Although cranial and intermediate lateral SOCs are mainly for lesions in the upper and middle CP angle such as acoustic neurinomas or meningioma besides MVD for trigeminal neuralgia, these are applied also for cavernomas of the tectal and cerebellar peduncle, and meningiomas or chordomas of the upper and middle 1/3 of the petroclival region (Fig. 2-5). Importance of the SCTTA by cranial paramedian SOC for the management of lesions in the temporoposteromedial region including the tentorium and its incisura was emphasized and peduncular lesions at the lamina tecti and pons as well. Caudal paramedian SOC is appropriate for lesions in the lower CP angle along with MVD for hemifacial spasm and is furthermore applicable for foramen magnum meningiomas or lower clivus meningiomas by TVDRA (Fig. 6-13). Cranial midline SOC (paraculminar approach) is applicable for tumors of pineal regions and for lesions at the midbrain, thalamus, posterior part of the IIIrd ventricle. The TFUTA by lower midline SOC enables

  15. Small bowel toxicity after high dose spot scanning-based proton beam therapy for paraspinal/retroperitoneal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, R.A.; Albertini, F.; Koch, T.; Ares, C.; Lomax, A.; Goitein, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; Vitolo, V. [Fondazione CNAO, Pavia (Italy); Hug, E.B. [Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy; ProCure Proton Therapy Centers, New York, NY (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Mesenchymal tumours require high-dose radiation therapy (RT). Small bowel (SB) dose constraints have historically limited dose delivery to paraspinal and retroperitoneal targets. This retrospective study correlated SB dose-volume histograms with side-effects after proton radiation therapy (PT). Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2008, 31 patients (mean age 52.1 years) underwent spot scanning-based PT for paraspinal/retroperitoneal chordomas (81 %), sarcomas (16 %) and meningiom (3 %). Mean total prescribed dose was 72.3 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness, RBE) delivered in 1.8-2 Gy (RBE) fractions. Mean follow-up was 3.8 years. Based on the pretreatment planning CT, SB dose distributions were reanalysed. Results: Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as gross tumour volume (GTV) plus 5-7 mm margins. Mean PTV was 560.22 cm{sup 3}. A mean of 93.2 % of the PTV was covered by at least 90 % of the prescribed dose. SB volumes (cm{sup 3}) receiving doses of 5, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 75 and 80 Gy (RBE) were calculated to give V5, V20, V30, V40, V50, V60, V70, V75 and V80 respectively. In 7/31 patients, PT was accomplished without any significant SB irradiation (V5 = 0). In 24/31 patients, mean maximum dose (Dmax) to SB was 64.1 Gy (RBE). Despite target doses of > 70 Gy (RBE), SB received > 50 and > 60 Gy (RBE) in only 61 and 54 % of patients, respectively. Mean SB volumes (cm{sup 3}) covered by different dose levels (Gy, RBE) were: V20 (n = 24): 45.1, V50 (n = 19): 17.7, V60 (n = 17): 7.6 and V70 (n = 12): 2.4. No acute toxicity {>=} grade 2 or late SB sequelae were observed. Conclusion: Small noncircumferential volumes of SB tolerated doses in excess of 60 Gy (RBE) without any clinically-significant late adverse effects. This small retrospective study has limited statistical power but encourages further efforts with higher patient numbers to define and establish high-dose threshold models for SB toxicity in modern radiation oncology. (orig.)

  16. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD5) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a comparable

  17. Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häring Peter

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT for setup correction in radiotherapy. Patients and methods For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI, was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. Results and discussion Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point

  18. Brain Tumors and Brain Tumor Research Progress in Image Classification%脑肿瘤及脑肿瘤图像分类的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞海平; 邬立保

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of brain tumor classification,there is no uniform classification^! A variety of tumors and pathological features of the different tissue, the study of benign and malignant, and things are not the same characteristics. Usually can be classified as histological.-(l) Originated in glial tumors: astrocytoma, less support glial cell tumors, medulloblastoma, etc.(2) Originated in meningeal tumors: meningioma, meningeal sarcoma, arachnoid cyst.(3) Originated in the pituitary tumors: tired color cell adenoma, acidophilic, basophilic cell adenoma.(4) Originated in cranial nerve tumors: acoustic neuroma, trigeminal nerve sheath tumors and other tumors.(S) Originated from residual embryonic tissue: craniopharyngioma, chordoma, dermoid cyst (6) Originated in vascular cells: vascular tumors and vascular reticular cell tumor, etc.(7) Transfer or by other parts of the tumor invasion: a variety of metastatic tumors, and nasopharyn-geal carcinoma, etc.%脑肿瘤分类的方法很多,目前尚无统一的分类方法,并且各种肿瘤的组织发生与病理特征不同,其良性与恶性以及物学特性也不一样.通常按组织学可分类如下:(1)发源于神经胶质的肿瘤:星形细胞瘤、少支胶质细胞瘤、髓母细胞瘤等.(2)发源于脑膜的肿瘤:脑膜瘤、脑膜内瘤、蛛网膜囊肿等.(3)发源于垂体的肿瘤:厌色细胞腺瘤,嗜酸、嗜碱性细胞腺瘤.(4)发源于颅神经的肿瘤:听神经瘤、三叉神经瘤等各种神经鞘瘤.(5)发源于胚胎残余组织:颅咽管瘤、脊索瘤、皮样囊肿等.(6)发源于血管细胞:血管瘤及血管网织细胞瘤等.(7)由其它部位转移或侵入的肿瘤:各种转移瘤及鼻咽癌等.

  19. Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT) for setup correction in radiotherapy. For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients) were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI), was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK) algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point correction was carried out in 4 cases. The additional workload of the described

  20. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm3, or aV70 > 1.7 cm3. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm3 or aV70 > 1.7 cm3. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving higher dose. The EC50

  1. Impact of tissue specific parameters on the predition of the biological effectiveness for treatment planning in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment planning in ion beam therapy requires a reliable estimation of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the irradiated tissue. For the pilot project at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH and at other European ion beam therapy centers RBE prediction is based on a biophysical model, the Local Effect Model (LEM). The model version in use, LEM I, is optimized to give a reliable estimation of RBE in the target volume for carbon ion irradiation. However, systematic deviations are observed for the entrance channel of carbon ions and in general for lighter ions. Thus, the LEM has been continuously developed to improve accuracy. The recent version LEM IV has proven to better describe in-vitro cell experiments. Thus, for the clinical application of LEM IV it is of interest to analyze potential differences compared to LEM I under treatment-like conditions. The systematic analysis presented in this work is aiming at the comparison of RBE-weighted doses resulting from different approaches and model versions for protons and carbon ions. This will facilitate the assessment of consequences for clinical application and the interpretation of clinical results from different institutions. In the course of this thesis it has been shown that the RBE-weighted doses predicted on the basis of LEM IV for typical situations representing chordoma treatments differ on average by less than 10 % to those based on LEM I and thus also allow a consistent interpretation of the clinical results. At Japanese ion beam therapy centers the RBE is estimated using their clinical experience from neutron therapy in combination with in-vitro measurements for carbon ions (HIMAC approach). The methods presented in this work allow direct comparison of the HIMAC approach and the LEM and thus of the clinical results obtained at Japanese and European ion beam therapy centers. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the RBE on the model parameters was evaluated. Among all parameters the

  2. Helical tomotherapy. Experiences of the first 150 patients in Heidelberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzing, F.; Schubert, K.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Kalz, J.; Debus, J.; Herfarth, K. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: helical tomotherapy was introduced into clinical routine at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Germany, in July 2006. This report is intended to describe the experience with the first 150 patients treated with helical tomotherapy. Patient selection, time effort, handling of daily image guidance with megavoltage (MV) CT, and quality of radiation plans shall be assessed. Patients and methods: between July 2006 and May 2007, 150 patients were treated with helical tomotherapy in the University Hospital of Heidelberg. Mean age was 60 years with a minimum of 30 years and a maximum of 85 years. 79 of these patients received radiotherapy as a part of multimodal treatment pre- or postoperatively, 17 patients received treatment as a combined radiochemotherapy. 76% were treated with curative intent. Radiotherapy sites were central nervous system (n = 7), head and neck (n = 28), thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 58) and skeletal system (n = 20). Most common tumor entities were prostate cancer (n = 28), breast cancer (n = 17), gastrointestinal tumors (n = 19), pharyngeal carcinoma (n = 14), lymphoma (n = 13), metastatic disease (bone n = 14, liver n = 6, lung n = 4, lymph node n = 2), sarcoma (n = 8), malignant pleural mesothelioma (n = 5), ovarian cancer treated with whole abdominal irradiation (n = 4), lung cancer (n = 3), skin malignancies (n = 3), chordoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 2), one ependymoma and one medulloblastoma treated with craniospinal axis irradiation (n = 2), and others (n = 4). Nine patients were treated with single-fraction radiosurgery, nine with image-guided spinal reirradiation, and twelve patients were treated at multiple targets simultaneously. A pretreatment MV-CT scan was performed in 98.2% of the 3,026 fractions applied. After matching with the kilovoltage planning CT, corrections for translations and rotation around longitudinal axis (roll) were done. Results: mean time on table was 24

  3. 骨外黏液样软骨肉瘤的临床病理分析%Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma:a clinicopathological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方三高; 李昱; 马强; 杜娟; 林俐; 肖华亮

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is a malignancy of uncertain differentiation tumor characterized by a multinodular structure and abundant myxoid matrix. Its preferred sites were the deep soft tissues of the extremities. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic characteristics, diagnosis and differential diagnosis of EMC. Methods: Seven cases of EMC were analyzed for clinicopathological and immunohistochemical features with review of the related literature. Results: It occurred predominantly in females (male/female=2︰5). Five cases were located in low extremities and two in upper limb girdles, more commonly near the joint. Grossly, the masses showed as grey, lobular and somewhat transparent with a relatively well-deifned margin. Microscopically, the small ovary or plump spindle-shaped cells arranged in strand and cord patterns and lobular architecture which separated by delicate fibrous networks with an abundant myxoid but hypovascular background. And the tumors were immunoreactive for vimentin, and partly for S-100 and EMA, meanwhile, negative for CK. Conclusion:EMC is a rare soft tissue sarcoma with distinctive histopathological features. It should be distinguished from some mimics especially those tumors with a myxoid stroma or chondroid differentiation, such as chordoma and chondrosarcoma.%背景与目的:骨外黏液样软骨肉瘤(extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma,EMC)是一种好发于四肢深部软组织分化不定的恶性肿瘤,以形成多结节样结构、富含黏液为特点。本研究旨在探讨EMC的临床病理特征、诊断及鉴别诊断。方法:对7例EMC进行病理形态学及免疫组化观察,并复习相关文献。结果:7例EMC患者病理巨检显示,灰白色多结节状半透明肿物,边界清楚。镜下卵圆形或短梭形细胞排列成条索,由纤细的纤维组织分隔,呈分叶状,富含黏液样基质但血管稀少。免疫组化肿瘤

  4. Assessment of potential advantages of relevant ions for particle therapy: A model based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grün, Rebecca, E-mail: r.gruen@gsi.de [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Different ion types offer different physical and biological advantages for therapeutic applications. The purpose of this work is to assess the advantages of the most commonly used ions in particle therapy, i.e., carbon ({sup 12}C), helium ({sup 4}He), and protons ({sup 1}H) for different treatment scenarios. Methods: A treatment planning analysis based on idealized target geometries was performed using the treatment planning software TRiP98. For the prediction of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) that is required for biological optimization in treatment planning the local effect model (LEM IV) was used. To compare the three ion types, the peak-to-entrance ratio (PER) was determined for the physical dose (PER{sub PHY} {sub S}), the RBE (PER{sub RBE}), and the RBE-weighted dose (PER{sub BIO}) resulting for different dose-levels, field configurations, and tissue types. Further, the dose contribution to artificial organs at risk (OAR) was assessed and a comparison of the dose distribution for the different ion types was performed for a patient with chordoma of the skull base. Results: The study showed that the advantages of the ions depend on the physical and biological properties and the interplay of both. In the case of protons, the consideration of a variable RBE instead of the clinically applied generic RBE of 1.1 indicates an advantage in terms of an increased PER{sub RBE} for the analyzed configurations. Due to the fact that protons show a somewhat better PER{sub PHY} {sub S} compared to helium and carbon ions whereas helium shows a higher PER{sub RBE} compared to protons, both protons and helium ions show a similar RBE-weighted dose distribution. Carbon ions show the largest variation of the PER{sub RBE} with tissue type and a benefit for radioresistant tumor types due to their higher LET. Furthermore, in the case of a two-field irradiation, an additional gain in terms of PER{sub BIO} is observed when using an orthogonal field configuration

  5. Intensity modulation with the 'step and shoot' technique using a commercial MLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: For complex planning situations where organs at risk surrounding the target volume place stringent constraints, intensity-modulated treatments with photons provide a promising solution to improve tumor control and/or to reduce side effects. In order to evaluate the feasibility to implement intensity-modulated treatment techniques in clinical practice, a phantom experiment is performed to investigate the whole chain from the treatment design by the inverse-planning method to the delivery of the intensity-modulated beams using a commercial, computer-controlled MLC. Materials and Methods: A typical, clinically relevant case of a patient with a head and neck tumor (clivus chordoma) is selected. Using the inverse planning technique, optimized treatment plans are generated for 5 and 9 evenly distributed coplanar beams. An iterative gradient method is used to optimize a physical objective function that is based on the specified target dose and individual dose constraints assigned to each organ at risk (brain stem, eyes, optic nerves) by the radiation oncologist. The resulting intensity distributions of each beam are converted into MLC leaf position sequences using the discrete 'step and shoot' method and the dynamic sweep method followed by a discretization of the trajectories. Regions of underdosage due to the stairstep or wave shape design of the leaves ('tongue and groove') are avoided through synchronization of neighboring leaf pairs. The algorithm at the same time eliminates collision problems due to the special hardware restriction of MLCs that forbid adjacent opposing leaves to pass each other. The MLC leaf position files are transferred via computer link from the planning system to the linac console. The intensity-modulated fields are delivered using the Siemens MLC integrated in a Mevatron KD2 accelerator. The sequences are executed in the discrete 'step and shoot' technique using the autosequence mode of the linac that allows to step through

  6. Translocación del tercio medio facial en un paciente en edad infantil: Fijación con un nuevo sistema de placas y pines reabsorbibles Mid-facial translocation in children using a new system of absorbable plates and pins: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Coll-Anglada

    2010-12-01

    morbidity of the procedure. Absorbable osteosynthesis material has been marketed since the 1980s as a solution to this problem. We report the case of a 13-year-old female patient diagnosed of chordoma of the clivus. A bilateral mid-facial approach was used with a new system of absorbable plates and pins affixed ultrasonically (SonicWeld®. KLS Martin, LP, Jacksonville, Florida, USA. The primary approaches to tumors located in the deep facial regions and skull base, the main variations of the mid-facial translocation technique, application of the new SonicWeld® absorbable system, and the main differences compared to traditional absorbable plates and screws are reviewed.

  7. Organogenesis of the digestive system in Brachymystax lenok during early development%细鳞鲑早期发育过程中的消化系统发生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    -scribed the development of the digestive tract in B. lenok larvae reared under culture conditions based on histo-logical observation. The larvae were held in one of three 0.3 m3circular tanks (12–16.2℃)for 185 d and fed an artificial diet. Based on the structural changes in the digestive system, we identified three distinct stages during embryonic development: (1) 0–201 h post-fertilization; (2) 202–480 h post-fertilization, and (3) 481–552 h post-fertilization. During the first stage, the embryo initiated the intestinal phase of development, the original base cells of the digestive tract were localized below the chordoma, in a single layer of flat cells. During the second stage, the original base cells of the digestive tract began to differentiate into a straight tube. During the third stage, the inner layer cells of the digestive tube proliferate, and the outer layer forms as two layers of cells. At the end of the embryonic period, the hatched larvae have an oil-rich yolk sac, a simple digestive system that resembles a blind tube, and lack of external connection in the anus. Between 2–7 days after hatch (DAH), the digestive system begins to rapidly differentiate but larvae remain entirely dependent on endogenous nutrition from the yolk sac. At 7 DAH, the digestive tract was fully differentiated into the buccopharynx, esophagus, non-glandular and glandular stomach, and anterior and posterior intestine. By 14 DAH, larvae were transitioning from being dependent on en-dogenous nutrition to being exotrophic. The yolk sac was completely absorbed. At 49 DAH, the pyloric caeca was completely differentiated, and the liver and pancreas were functional. Between 64–105 DAH, the oropharyngeal cavity and stomach developed to the adult form with 28–36 pyloric caeca finger branches. The optimization of formulated feeding during larval culture of B. lenok is most critical between 10–14 DAH. Feeding during this pe-riod could be enhanced by continuous feeding of palatable