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Sample records for choline pet based

  1. Usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base: comparison with FDG-PET

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    Ito Shin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choline is a new PET tracer that is useful for the detection of malignant tumor. Choline is a precursor of the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid in the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells. Malignant tumors have an elevated level of phosphatidylcholine in cell membrane. Thus, choline is a marker of tumor malignancy. Method The patient was a 51-year-old man with repeated recurrent hemangiopericytoma in the skull base. We performed Choline-PET in this patient after various treatments and compared findings with those of FDG-PET. Results Choline accumulated in this tumor, but FDG did not accumulate. We diagnosed this tumor as residual hemangiopericytoma and performed the resection of the residual tumor. FDG-PET is not appropriate for skull base tumor detection because uptake in the brain is very strong. Conclusion We emphasize the usefulness of Choline-PET for the detection of residual hemangiopericytoma in the skull base after various treatments, compared with FDG-PET.

  2. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

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    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  3. PET as a possible indicator of the prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Comparative analysis of FDG-PET and choline-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), which reflects glucose metabolism, has been reported to be useful for staging head and neck cancers and for investigating the primary lesion of unknown origin, double cancer, recurrence and residual cancer after treatment. It has also been reported that the degree of accumulation before treatment may be utilized as a prognostic factor. The usefulness of PET using 11C-choline, which reflects cell membrane phospholipid metabolism, for cancer diagnosis has been reported as well. In this study, we investigated differences in the prognosis based on the degree of 11C-choline-PET and FDG-PET accumulation. 11C-choline-PET and FDG-PET were taken before treatment in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. To indicate the degree of accumulation, the standard uptake value (SUV) was used. Choline and FDG were accumulated in the primary lesion in all patients. The SUVs in both choline and FDG were higher in patients who responded poorly to primary treatment than in those who responded well. The cumulative survival rate of patients with a high SUV of choline was significantly lower than that of patients with a low SUV of choline. SUV of choline-PET before treatment may be utilized as a prognostic factor. (author)

  4. Value of {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT in patients with suspected prostate cancer

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    Scher, Bernhard; Albinger, Wolfram; Tiling, Reinhold; Gildehaus, Franz-Josef; Dresel, Stefan [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Seitz, Michael [University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael; Becker, Hans-Christoph [University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Souvatzogluou, Michael; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The value and limitations of {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT for the detection of prostate cancer remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT in a large group of patients with suspected prostate cancer. Fifty-eight patients with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer underwent {sup 11}C-choline PET (25/58, Siemens ECAT Exact HR+) or PET/CT (33/58, Philips Gemini) scanning. On average, 500 MBq of {sup 11}C-choline was administered intravenously. Studies were interpreted by raters blinded to clinical information and other diagnostic procedures. Qualitative image analysis as well as semiquantitative SUV measurement was carried out. The reference standard was histopathological examination of resection specimens or biopsy. Prevalence of prostate cancer in this selected patient population was 63.8% (37/58). {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 86.5% (32/37) and a specificity of 61.9% (13/21) in the detection of the primary malignancy. With regard to metastatic spread, PET showed a per-patient sensitivity of 81.8% (9/11) and produced no false positive findings. Based on our findings, differentiation between benign prostatic changes, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostatitis, and prostate cancer is feasible in the majority of cases when image interpretation is primarily based on qualitative characteristics. SUV{sub max} may serve as guidance. False positive findings may occur due to an overlap of {sup 11}C-choline uptake between benign and malignant processes. By providing functional information regarding both the primary malignancy and its metastases, {sup 11}C-choline PET may prove to be a useful method for staging prostate cancer. (orig.)

  5. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/pathology image coregistration in primary localized prostate cancer

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    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Prokic, Vesna [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Wendl, Christina; Geinitz, Hans; Molls, Michael [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Kirste, Simon [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Gschwend, Juergen E.; Treiber, Uwe [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States); Krause, Bernd Joachim [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); University of Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for the comparison of pathology specimens after prostatectomy (post-S) with PET images obtained before surgery (pre-S). This method was used to evaluate the merit of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in prostate cancer (PC). In 28 PC patients, {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was performed before surgery. PET/CT data were coregistered with the pathology specimens. GTV on PET images (GTV-PET) was outlined automatically and corrected manually. Tumour volume in the prostate (TVP) was delineated manually on the pathology specimens. Based on the coregistered PET/pathology images, the following parameters were assessed: SUVmax and SUVmean in the tumoral and nontumoral prostate (NP), GTV-PET (millilitres) and TVP (millilitres). PET/pathology image coregistration was satisfactory. Mean SUVmax in the TVP was lower than in the NP: 5.0 and 5.5, respectively (p = 0.093). Considering the entire prostate, SUVmax was located in the TVP in two patients, in the TVP and NP in 12 patients and exclusively in NP in 14 patients. Partial overlap the TVP and GTV-PET was seen in 71 % of patients, and complete overlap in 4 %. PET/pathology image coregistration can be used for evaluation of different imaging modalities. {sup 11}C-Choline PET failed to distinguish tumour from nontumour tissue. (orig.)

  6. C-11 Choline and FDG PET/CT Imaging of Primary Cholangiocarcinoma – a Comparative Analysis

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    Chanisa Chotipanich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: This study aimed to compare the diagnostic values of 11C-choline and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 10 patients (6 males and 4 females, aged 42-69 years, suspected of having CCA based on CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results. 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT studies were performed in all patients over 1 week. PET/CT results were visually analyzed by 2 independent nuclear medicine physicians and quantitatively by calculating the tumor-to-background ratio (T/B. Results: No 11C-choline PET/CT uptake was observed in primary extrahepatic or intrahepatic CCA cases. Intense 18F-FDG avidity was detected in the tumors of 8 patients (%80. Two patients, who were 18F-FDG negative, had primary extrahepatic CCA. Ki-67 measurements were positive in all patients (range; 14.2%-39.9%. The average T/B values of 11C-choline and 18F-FDG were 0.4±0.2 and 2.0±1.0 in all cases of primary CCA, respectively; these values were significantly lower for 11C-choline (P

  7. 18F-Choline, 11C-choline and 11C-acetate PET/CT: comparative analysis for imaging prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogsitter, Claudia; Zöphel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Jörg

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the second most common tumour in men worldwide. Whereas prostate specific antigen (PSA) is an established biochemical marker, the optimal imaging method for all clinical scenarios has not yet been found. With the rising number of PET centres there is an increasing availability and use of (18)F-/(11)C-choline or (11)C-acetate for staging of PCA. However, to date no final conclusion has been reached as to whether acetate or choline tracers should be preferred. In this review we provide an overview of the performance of choline and acetate PET for staging the primary and recurrent disease and lymph nodes in PCA, based on the literature of the last 10 years. Although predominantly choline has been used rather than acetate, both tracers performed in a similar manner in published studies. Choline as well as acetate have insufficient diagnostic accuracy for the staging of the primary tumour, due to a minimum detectable tumour size of 5 mm and inability to differentiate PCA from benign prostate hyperplasia, chronic prostatitis and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. Regarding lymph node staging, choline tracers have demonstrated a high specificity. Unfortunately, the sensitivity is only moderate. For staging recurrent disease, sensitivity depends on the level of serum PSA (PSA should be >2 ng/ml). This applies to both choline and acetate. However, despite these limitations, a significant number of patients with recurrent disease can benefit from PET imaging by a change in treatment planning.

  8. {sup 18}F-Choline, {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT: comparative analysis for imaging prostate cancer patients

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    Brogsitter, Claudia; Zoephel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Joerg [Carl Gustav Carus Medical School, University of Dresden, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the second most common tumour in men worldwide. Whereas prostate specific antigen (PSA) is an established biochemical marker, the optimal imaging method for all clinical scenarios has not yet been found. With the rising number of PET centres there is an increasing availability and use of {sup 18}F-/{sup 11}C-choline or {sup 11}C-acetate for staging of PCA. However, to date no final conclusion has been reached as to whether acetate or choline tracers should be preferred. In this review we provide an overview of the performance of choline and acetate PET for staging the primary and recurrent disease and lymph nodes in PCA, based on the literature of the last 10 years. Although predominantly choline has been used rather than acetate, both tracers performed in a similar manner in published studies. Choline as well as acetate have insufficient diagnostic accuracy for the staging of the primary tumour, due to a minimum detectable tumour size of 5 mm and inability to differentiate PCA from benign prostate hyperplasia, chronic prostatitis and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia. Regarding lymph node staging, choline tracers have demonstrated a high specificity. Unfortunately, the sensitivity is only moderate. For staging recurrent disease, sensitivity depends on the level of serum PSA (PSA should be >2 ng/ml). This applies to both choline and acetate. However, despite these limitations, a significant number of patients with recurrent disease can benefit from PET imaging by a change in treatment planning. (orig.)

  9. Choline PET and PET/CT in Primary Diagnosis and Staging of Prostate Cancer

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    S. Schwarzenböck, M. Souvatzoglou, B. J. Krause

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PET and PET/CT using [11C]- and [18F]-labelled choline derivates is increasingly being used for imaging of primary and recurrent prostate cancer. While PET and PET/CT with [11C]- and [18F]-labelled choline derivates in patients suffering from biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies that demonstrate an increasing importance, its role in the primary staging of prostate cancer is still a matter of debate.Morphological and functional imaging techniques such as CT, MRI and TRUS have demonstrated only limited accuracy for the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer. Molecular imaging with PET and PET/CT could potentially increase accuracy to localize primary prostate cancer. A considerable number of studies have examined the value of PET/CT with [11C]- and [18F]- labelled choline derivates for the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer with mixed results. Primary prostate cancer can only be detected with moderate sensitivity using [11C]- and [18F]choline PET and PET/CT. The detection rate depends on the tumour configuration. Detection is also limited by a considerable number of microcarcinomas that cannot be detected due to partial volume effects. Therefore small and in part rind-like tumours can often not be visualized. Furthermore, the differentiation between benign changes like prostatitis, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN or prostatic hyperplasia is not always possible. Therefore, at the present time, the routine use of PET/CT with [11C]- and [18F]-labelled choline derivates cannot be recommended as a first-line screening procedure for primary prostate cancer in men at risk. A potential application of choline PET and PET/CT may be to increase the detection rate of clinically suspected prostate cancer with multiple negative prostate biopsies, for example in preparation of a focused re-biopsy and may play a role in patient stratification with respect to primary surgery and radiation therapy in the future.

  10. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer

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    Dost, Rutger J.; Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Jong, Igle J. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Urology, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Recurrent prostate cancer is usually treated by combining radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy. To stage the cancer, choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT can be performed. It is generally thought that androgen deprivation therapy does not influence choline PET/CT. In this article we focus on the molecular backgrounds of choline and androgens, and the results of preclinical and clinical studies performed using PET/CT. Using PubMed, we looked for the relevant articles about androgen deprivation therapy and choline PET/CT. During ADT, a tendency of decreased uptake of choline in prostate cancer was observed, in particular in hormone-naive patients. We conclude that in order to prevent false-negative choline PET/CT scans androgen deprivation should be withheld prior to scanning, especially in hormone-naive patients. (orig.)

  11. Influence of androgen deprivation therapy on choline PET/CT in recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent prostate cancer is usually treated by combining radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy. To stage the cancer, choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT can be performed. It is generally thought that androgen deprivation therapy does not influence choline PET/CT. In this article we focus on the molecular backgrounds of choline and androgens, and the results of preclinical and clinical studies performed using PET/CT. Using PubMed, we looked for the relevant articles about androgen deprivation therapy and choline PET/CT. During ADT, a tendency of decreased uptake of choline in prostate cancer was observed, in particular in hormone-naive patients. We conclude that in order to prevent false-negative choline PET/CT scans androgen deprivation should be withheld prior to scanning, especially in hormone-naive patients. (orig.)

  12. PSA doubling time for prediction of [11C]choline PET/CT findings in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that the positive detection rate of [11C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) depends on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) plasma levels. This study compared PSA levels and PSA doubling time (PSADT) to predict [11C]choline PET/CT findings. PSADT was retrospectively calculated in 170 prostate cancer (PCa) patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy who underwent [11C]choline PET/CT. PSADT was calculated as PSADT = ln2/m, where m is the slope of the linear regression line of the natural log of PSA values. At least three PSA measurements were used (median: 4; range: 3-16), separated by at least 3 months, each with a minimum increase of 0.20 ng/ml. PET/CT findings were validated using criteria based on histological analysis and clinical and imaging data. Statistical analysis was performed using the t test, chi-square test, analysis of variance and binary logistic regression. Regression-based coefficients were used to develop a nomogram predicting the probability of positive [11C]choline PET/CT and 200 bootstrap resamples were used for internal validation. The median PSA was 1.25 ng/ml (range: 0.23-48.6 ng/ml), and the median PSADT was 7.0 months (range: 0.97-45.3 months). [11C]choline PET/CT was positive in 75 of 170 patients (44%). PET/CT findings were validated using histological criteria (11%) and clinical and imaging criteria (89%). The overall accuracy of [11C]choline PET/CT was 88%. Multivariate logistic regression showed that high PSA and short PSADT were significant (p 11C]choline PET/CT [PSA: odds ratio (OR) = 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-1.78; PSADT: OR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.04-1.21]. The percentage of patients with positive [11C]choline PET/CT was 27% for PSADT >6 months, 61% for PSADT between 3 and 6 months and 81% for PSADT 11C]choline uptake in the skeleton significantly increased (p 6 months to 52% for PSADT 11C]choline uptake in the prostatectomy bed were 0% for PSADT 6

  13. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals.

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    Castellucci, P; Jadvar, H

    2012-08-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial experience with the radiolabeled synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer.

  14. PET imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma with {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine and {sup 11}C-choline

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    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Tenley, Nathan [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); Corn, David J.; Wu, Chunying; Tian, Haibin; Wang, Yanming [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lee, Zhenghong [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States); University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Choline-based radiotracers have been studied for PET imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using an {sup 18}F-labeled choline analog, instead of the {sup 11}C-labeled native choline, would facilitate its widespread use in the clinic. In this study, PET with {sup 18}F-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) and {sup 11}C-choline (CHOL) were compared using an animal model of HCC. The effects of fasting on the performance of choline-based tracers were also investigated. A woodchuck model of HCC was used to compare the two tracers, which were administered and imaged in sequence during the same imaging session. Dynamic PET images were generated spanning 50 min starting from tracer injection. Time-activity curves and tracer contrast were calculated in liver regions with tracer accumulation, and the contrast at a late time-point with the two tracers, and between fasted and nonfasted states, were compared. Foci of HCC with increased uptake ranged in size from 1.0 to 1.6 cm, with mean tumor-to-background contrast of 1.3 with FEC and 1.5 with CHOL at 50 min after injection. The tracers show similar patterns of uptake immediately following administration, and both activities plateaued at 10 min after injection. No significant differences in uptake dynamics or final contrast were observed between the fasted and nonfasted states. PET imaging of HCC is possible with both CHOL and FEC. Fasting was not found to affect accumulation of either tracer. These results encourage further investigation into the clinical utility of FEC for HCC imaging. (orig.)

  15. PSA doubling time for prediction of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT findings in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

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    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Garcia Parra, Rita [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milan (Italy); Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Scattoni, Vincenzo; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Urology, Milan (Italy); Messa, Cristina [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Previous studies have shown that the positive detection rate of [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) depends on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) plasma levels. This study compared PSA levels and PSA doubling time (PSADT) to predict [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT findings. PSADT was retrospectively calculated in 170 prostate cancer (PCa) patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy who underwent [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. PSADT was calculated as PSADT = ln2/m, where m is the slope of the linear regression line of the natural log of PSA values. At least three PSA measurements were used (median: 4; range: 3-16), separated by at least 3 months, each with a minimum increase of 0.20 ng/ml. PET/CT findings were validated using criteria based on histological analysis and clinical and imaging data. Statistical analysis was performed using the t test, chi-square test, analysis of variance and binary logistic regression. Regression-based coefficients were used to develop a nomogram predicting the probability of positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and 200 bootstrap resamples were used for internal validation. The median PSA was 1.25 ng/ml (range: 0.23-48.6 ng/ml), and the median PSADT was 7.0 months (range: 0.97-45.3 months). [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT was positive in 75 of 170 patients (44%). PET/CT findings were validated using histological criteria (11%) and clinical and imaging criteria (89%). The overall accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT was 88%. Multivariate logistic regression showed that high PSA and short PSADT were significant (p < 0.05) predictors of positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT [PSA: odds ratio (OR) = 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15-1.78; PSADT: OR = 1.12; 95% CI: 1.04-1.21]. The percentage of patients with positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT was 27% for PSADT >6 months, 61% for PSADT between 3 and 6 months and 81% for PSADT <3 months. The percentage of patients who displayed pathological [{sup 11}C]choline

  16. Diagnostic value of combining 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this prospective study, our goal was to emphasize the diagnostic value of combining 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic liver disease. Thirty-three consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients were suspected to have HCC based on CT and/or MRI imaging. A final diagnosis was obtained by histopathological examination or by imaging alone according to American Association for the Study of Liver Disease criteria. All patients underwent PET/CT with both tracers within a median of 5 days. All lesions showing higher tracer uptake than normal liver were considered positive for HCC. We examined how tracer uptake was related to biological (serum α-fetoprotein levels) and pathological (differentiation status, peritumoral capsule and vascular invasion) prognostic markers of HCC, as well as clinical observations at 6 months (recurrence and death). Twenty-eight HCC, four cholangiocarcinomas and one adenoma were diagnosed. In the HCC patients, the sensitivity of 11C-choline, 18F-FDG and combined 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of HCC was 75 %, 36 % and 93 %, respectively. Serum α-fetoprotein levels >200 ng/ml were more frequent among patients with 18F-FDG-positive lesions than those with 18F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). Early recurrence (n=2) or early death (n=5) occurred more frequently in patients with 18F-FDG-positive lesions than in those with 18F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). The combined use of 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT detected HCC with high sensitivity. This approach appears to be of potential prognostic value and may facilitate the selection of patients for surgical resection or liver transplantation. (orig.)

  17. [11C]choline uptake with PET/CT for the initial diagnosis of prostate cancer: relation to PSA levels, tumour stage and anti-androgenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with [11C]choline for the detection of prostate cancer is not well established. We assessed the dependence of [11C]choline maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) in the prostate gland on cell malignancy, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, Gleason score, tumour stage and anti-androgenic hormonal therapy. In this prospective study, PET/CT with [11C]choline was performed in 19 prostate cancer patients who subsequently underwent prostatectomy with histologic sextant analysis (group A) and in six prostate cancer patients before and after anti-androgenic hormonal therapy (bicalutamide 150 mg/day; median treatment of 4 months; group B). In group A, based on a sextant analysis with a [11C]choline SUVmax cutoff of 2.5 (as derived from a receiver-operating characteristic analysis), PET/CT showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of 72, 43, 64, 51 and 60%, respectively. In the patient-by-patient analysis, no significant correlation was detected between SUVmax and PSA levels, Gleason score or pathological stage. On the contrary, a significant (P max and anti-androgenic therapy both in univariate (r 2 = 0.24) and multivariate (r 2 = 0.48) analyses. Prostate [11C]choline uptake after bicalutamide therapy significantly (P 11C]choline is not suitable for the initial diagnosis and local staging of prostate cancer. PET/CT with [11C]choline could be used to monitor the response to anti-androgenic therapy. (orig.)

  18. Kinetics of [{sup 11}C]choline uptake in prostate cancer: a PET stydy

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    Sutinen, Eija; Minn, Heikki [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Central Hospital, PO Box 52, 20521, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti [Department of Surgery, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Roivainen, Anne; Tolvanen, Tuula; Lehikoinen, Pertti [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Varpula, Matti [Department of Radiology, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2004-03-01

    Carbon-11 choline has recently been introduced as a potential tracer for tumour imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). We evaluated the kinetics of the uptake of [{sup 11}C]choline in prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also evaluated the association between the uptake of [{sup 11}C]choline and the histological grade of malignancy, Gleason score, volume of the prostate and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Fourteen patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer and five patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were studied with [{sup 11}C]choline PET. A mean dose of 430{+-}31 MBq of [{sup 11}C]choline was injected intravenously and a dynamic emission acquisition of prostate was performed for 30 min. The uptake of [{sup 11}C]choline was measured as a standardised uptake value (SUV) and as a kinetic influx constant (K{sub i}) obtained from graphical analysis. Both cancerous and hyperplastic prostate were well visualised with [{sup 11}C]choline against low or moderate tracer accumulation in the bladder and rectal wall. The measured radioactivity in urine was invariably low. In the graphical analysis, linear plots were achieved. The mean K{sub i} of the untreated tumour was 0.205{+-}0.089 min{sup -1} (range 0.128-0.351; n=7) and the mean SUV was 5.6{+-}3.2 (range 1.9-15.5; n=15). K{sub i} values and SUVs correlated closely (r=0.964, P=0.0005), whereas no correlation could be demonstrated between the tumour uptake of [{sup 11}C]choline and the histological grade, Gleason score, volume of the prostate or PSA. The mean SUV and the mean K{sub i} of benign hyperplastic prostate were 3.5{+-}1.0 (range 2.0-4.5; n=4) and 0.119{+-}0.076 min{sup -1} (range 0.065-0.173; n=2). In conclusion, a high uptake of [{sup 11}C]choline characterises not only carcinomatous but also hyperplastic prostatic tissue. Dynamic imaging of the uptake of [{sup 11}C]choline in the prostate shows a good applicability of the graphical analysis model with an

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in comparison with CT and/or MRI in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta [Nuclear Medicine Department, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Torzilli, Guido; Donadon, Matteo; Palmisano, Angela [Hepatobiliary Surgery, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Poretti, Dario; Lanza, Ezio; Pedicini, Vittorio [Radiology Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Neto, Lauro J.S. de; Sabongi, Juliano Guerra [Medicina Nuclear, Centro Medico Imagem, Sorocaba (Brazil); Rimassa, Lorenza; Personeni, Nicola [Medical Oncology and Hematology Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Ceriani, Roberto [Hepatology Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Comito, Tiziana; Scorsetti, Marta [Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Nuclear Medicine Department, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Humanitas University, Chair of Diagnostic Imaging, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In recent decades, the use of radiopharmaceuticals in the assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has become established, and new findings indicate that radiolabelled choline has considerable potential in this setting. Therefore, in this study we aimed to assess the diagnostic role of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, compared with conventional imaging with CT/MRI, in patients with HCC. The study population comprised 45 patients (male to female ratio = 37:8, median age 70.5 years) referred to our institution owing to HCC: 27 at initial diagnosis and 18 for restaging after recurrence. In all cases we performed whole-body {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and compared its findings with contrast-enhanced CT (n = 35) or MRI (n = 29) or both (n = 15) for a total of 50 paired scans. The reference standard was either histological proof (21 patients) or a multidisciplinary consensus. Diagnostic accuracy was then determined in a scan-based (SBA) and a lesion-based analysis (LBA). On SBA the sensitivity and specificity for PET were 88 and 90 %, respectively, whereas for CT/MRI they were 90 and 73 %, respectively (p > 0.05). On LBA the overall sensitivity and specificity were 78 and 86 %, respectively, for PET vs 65 and 55 % for CT/MRI. Overall we investigated 168 disease sites, of which 100 were in the liver and 68 were extrahepatic. When considering only liver lesions, {sup 11}C-choline PET and CT/MRI showed an accuracy of 66 and 85 %, respectively, while for extrahepatic lesions PET showed an accuracy of 99 %, while the accuracy of CT/MRI was 32 %. In both cases, there was a statistically significant difference in accuracy between the two modalities (p < 0.01). Combination of the PET results with those of CT/MRI resulted in the highest diagnostic accuracy in both analyses, at 92 % for SBA and 96 % for LBA. In 11 patients (24 %) the PET findings modified the therapeutic strategy, the modification proving appropriate in 10 of them. {sup 11}C-Choline PET

  20. An Incidental Renal Oncocytoma: 18F-Choline PET/MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mallia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available PET/MRI is a new hybrid imaging modality and has the potential to become a powerful imaging tool. It is currently one of the most active areas of research in diagnostic imaging. The characterisation of an incidental renal lesion can be difficult. In particular, the differentiation of an oncocytoma from other solid renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents a diagnostic challenge. We describe the detection of an incidental renal oncocytoma in a 79-year gentleman who underwent a re-staging 18F-Choline PET/MRI following a rise in PSA values (4.07, nadir 1.3.

  1. [11C]choline PET/CT imaging in occult local relapse of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and clinical impact of [11C]choline PET/CT for localizing occult relapse of prostate adenocarcinoma after radical prostatectomy. Fourty-nine patients with prostate adenocarcinoma, radical prostatectomy, no evidence of metastatic disease, and occult relapse underwent [11C]choline PET/CT. Thirty-six of the patients had biochemical evidence and histological evaluation of local recurrence. Thirteen patients had PSA 11C]choline uptake in the prostatic fossa was visually assessed and graded on a five point scale. Maximum standardized radioactivity uptake value (SUVmax) and the lesion size were measured. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the clinical impact of the PET/CT study was determined. [11C]choline PET/CT was true positive in 23/33 patients and true negative in 12/13 controls. SUVmax of local recurrence was 3.0 (median, range 0.6-7.4) and 1.1 (0.4-1.6) in controls (p = 0.0002). Lesion size was 1.7 cm (range 0.9-3.7). Area under the ROC curve for detecting relapse was 0.90 ± 0.05 and 0.83 ± 0.06 for visual evaluation and SUVmax, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of [11C]choline PET/CT were 0.73 and 0.88, respectively. [11C]choline PET/CT identified 12/17 (71%) patients with a favourable biochemical response to local radiotherapy at 2 year (median, 0.8-3.2 range) follow-up. Focally increased [11C]choline uptake in the prostatic bed reliably predicted local low volume occult relapsing prostate adenocarcinoma after radical prostatectomy and identified 71% of patients with a favourable biochemical response to local radiotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for primary diagnosis and staging of urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassa, Naoto; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Gotoh, Momokazu [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Nagoya (Japan); Kato, Katsuhiko; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Shimamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Seiichi [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Abe, Shinji [Nagoya University Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Iwano, Shingo; Ito, Shinji; Naganawa, Shinji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    We conducted a pilot study to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of PET/CT with {sup 11}C-choline (choline PET/CT) for primary diagnosis and staging of urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract (UUT-UC). Enrolled in this study were 16 patients (9 men, 7 women; age range 51 - 83 years, mean ± SD 69 ± 10.8 years) with suspected UUT-UC. The patients were examined by choline PET/CT, and 13 underwent laparoscopic nephroureterectomy and partial cystectomy. Lymphadenectomy and chemotherapy were also performed as necessary in some of the patients. Of the 16 patients, 12 were confirmed to have UUT-UC (7 renal pelvis carcinoma and 5 ureteral carcinoma), 1 had malignant lymphoma (ureter), 1 had IgG4-related disease (ureter), and 2 had other benign diseases (ureter). Of the 16 study patients, 13 showed definite choline uptake in urothelial lesions, and of these, 11 had UUT-UC, 1 had malignant lymphoma, and 1 had IgG4-related disease. Three patients without choline uptake comprised one with UUT-UC and two with benign diseases. Of the 12 patients with UUT-UC, 3 had distant metastases, 2 had metastases only in the regional lymph nodes, and 7 had no metastases. Distant metastases and metastases in the regional lymph nodes showed definite choline uptake. The outcome in patients with UUT-UC, which was evaluated 592 - 1,530 days after surgery, corresponded to the patient classification based on the presence or absence of metastases and locoregional or distant metastases. Choline uptake determined as SUVmax 10 min after administration was significantly higher than at 20 min in metastatic tumours of UUT-UC (p < 0.05), whereas there was no statistically significant difference between the SUVmax values at 10 and those at 20 min in primary tumours of UUT-UC. This study suggests that choline PET/CT is a promising tool for the primary diagnosis and staging of UUT-UC. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic value of combining {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla-Lievre, Maria-Angela [University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hopital Antoine Beclere, Clamart (France); IMIV - UMR 1023 Inserm/CEA/Universite Paris Sud - ERL 9218 CNRS, Orsay (France); Franco, Dominique [Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Surgery, Hopital Antoine Beclere, University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Clamart (France); Gervais, Philippe; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Desarnaud, Serge; Helal, Badia-Ourkia [IMIV - UMR 1023 Inserm/CEA/Universite Paris Sud - ERL 9218 CNRS, Orsay (France); CEA, DSV, I2BM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Agostini, Helene [University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Clinical Research Unit of Hopitaux universitaires Paris-Sud, Hopital Kremlin Bicetre (France); Marthey, Lysiane [Universite Paris-Sud, Department of Gastroenterology, Hopital Antoine Beclere, University Department Hepatinov, Assistance-Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Clamart (France)

    2016-05-15

    In this prospective study, our goal was to emphasize the diagnostic value of combining {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic liver disease. Thirty-three consecutive patients were enrolled. All patients were suspected to have HCC based on CT and/or MRI imaging. A final diagnosis was obtained by histopathological examination or by imaging alone according to American Association for the Study of Liver Disease criteria. All patients underwent PET/CT with both tracers within a median of 5 days. All lesions showing higher tracer uptake than normal liver were considered positive for HCC. We examined how tracer uptake was related to biological (serum α-fetoprotein levels) and pathological (differentiation status, peritumoral capsule and vascular invasion) prognostic markers of HCC, as well as clinical observations at 6 months (recurrence and death). Twenty-eight HCC, four cholangiocarcinomas and one adenoma were diagnosed. In the HCC patients, the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-choline, {sup 18}F-FDG and combined {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of HCC was 75 %, 36 % and 93 %, respectively. Serum α-fetoprotein levels >200 ng/ml were more frequent among patients with {sup 18}F-FDG-positive lesions than those with {sup 18}F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). Early recurrence (n=2) or early death (n=5) occurred more frequently in patients with {sup 18}F-FDG-positive lesions than in those with {sup 18}F-FDG-negative lesions (p < 0.05). The combined use of {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT detected HCC with high sensitivity. This approach appears to be of potential prognostic value and may facilitate the selection of patients for surgical resection or liver transplantation. (orig.)

  4. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, UO Medicina Nucleare PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Renzi, Riccardo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Borghesi, Marco; Brunocilla, Eugenio [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Di Tullio, Piergiorgio; Ardizzoni, Andrea [University of Bologna, Department of Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the role of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for evaluating the response to treatment in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) treated with docetaxel in comparison with PSA response. Inclusion criteria were (a) proven mCRPC, (b) docetaxel as first line of chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m{sup 2} + prednisone 5 mg), and (c) {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and PSA values assessed before and after docetaxel administration. A total of 61 patients were retrospectively enrolled (mean age 68.9 years, range 57 - 84 years). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed at baseline before docetaxel treatment (PET1) and after the end of treatment (PET2). PSA values were measured before treatment (PSA1) and after treatment (PSA2). PET2 was reported as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD). Progressive disease (PD) was considered if a new lesion was seen. PSA trend was calculated from the change in absolute values between PSA1 and PSA2. A decrease of ≥50 % between PSA1 and PSA2 was considered a PSA response. Clinical, radiological and laboratory follow-up ranged from 6 to 53 months (mean 13.5 months). Of the 61 patients, 40 (65.5 %) showed PD on PET2, 13 (21.3 %) showed SD, 2 (3.4 %) showed PR, and 6 (9.8 %) showed CR. An increasing PSA trend was seen in 29 patients (47.5 %) and a decreasing PSA trend in 32 patients (52.5 %). A PSA response of ≥50 % was seen in 25 patients (41 %). Radiological PD was seen in 23 of the 29 patients (79.3 %) with an increasing PSA trend, in 16 of the 32 patients (50 %) with a decreasing PSA trend, and in 11 of the 25 patients (44 %) with a PSA response of ≥50 %. In the multivariate statistical analysis, the presence of more than ten bone lesions detected on PET1 was significantly associated with an increased probability of PD on PET2. No association was observed between PSA level and PD on PET2. Our results suggest that an increasing PSA trend measured after docetaxel treatment could be

  5. Initial prostate cancer diagnosis and disease staging--the role of choline-PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Paola; Picchio, Maria

    2015-09-01

    An early and correct diagnosis together with accurate staging of prostate cancer is necessary in order to plan the most appropriate treatment strategy. Morphological imaging modalities such as transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI can have some limitations regarding their accuracy for primary diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer; for instance, they have limited specificity in differentiating cancer from benign prostatic conditions and, by using size as the only criterion to characterize lymph node metastases, they might not be accurate enough for tumour characterization. In this scenario, PET-CT with (11)C-labelled or (18)F-labelled choline derivatives provides morphological and functional characterization and could overcome the limitations of the conventional imaging techniques. PET-CT is one of the most investigated molecular imaging modalities for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. Currently, the main investigations on the role of PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer have been performed on a retrospective basis and this type of analysis might be one of the main reasons why different results regarding its diagnostic accuracy have been reported.

  6. [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT predicts survival in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero [Stadtspital Triemli, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Incerti, Elena; Mapelli, Paola; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Kirienko, Margarita [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Montorsi, Francesco [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Department of Urology, Milano (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decade, PET/CT with radiolabelled choline has been shown to be useful for restaging patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who develop biochemical failure. The limitations of most clinical studies have been poor validation of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT-positive findings and lack of survival analysis. The aim of this study was to assess whether [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT can predict survival in hormone-naive PCa patients with biochemical failure. This retrospective study included 302 hormone-naive PCa patients treated with radical prostatectomy who underwent [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT from 1 December 2004 to 31 July 2007 because of biochemical failure (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, >0.2 ng/mL). Median PSA was 1.02 ng/mL. PCa-specific survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between clinicopathological variables and PCa-specific survival. The coefficients of the covariates included in the Cox regression analysis were used to develop a novel nomogram. Median follow-up was 7.2 years (1.4 - 18.9 years). [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT was positive in 101 of 302 patients (33 %). Median PCa-specific survival after prostatectomy was 14.9 years (95 % CI 9.7 - 20.1 years) in patients with positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. Median survival was not achieved in patients with negative [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. The 15-year PCa-specific survival probability was 42.4 % (95 % CI 31.7 - 53.1 %) in patients with positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and 95.5 % (95 % CI 93.5 - 97.5 %) in patients with negative [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT. In multivariate analysis, [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT (hazard ratio 6.36, 95 % CI 2.14 - 18.94, P < 0.001) and Gleason score >7 (hazard ratio 3.11, 95 % CI 1.11 - 8.66, P = 0.030) predicted PCa-specific survival. An internally validated nomogram predicted 15-year PCa-specific survival probability with an accuracy of 80 %. Positive [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT after biochemical failure

  7. [11C]Choline PET/CT predicts survival in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, PET/CT with radiolabelled choline has been shown to be useful for restaging patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who develop biochemical failure. The limitations of most clinical studies have been poor validation of [11C]choline PET/CT-positive findings and lack of survival analysis. The aim of this study was to assess whether [11C]choline PET/CT can predict survival in hormone-naive PCa patients with biochemical failure. This retrospective study included 302 hormone-naive PCa patients treated with radical prostatectomy who underwent [11C]choline PET/CT from 1 December 2004 to 31 July 2007 because of biochemical failure (prostate-specific antigen, PSA, >0.2 ng/mL). Median PSA was 1.02 ng/mL. PCa-specific survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between clinicopathological variables and PCa-specific survival. The coefficients of the covariates included in the Cox regression analysis were used to develop a novel nomogram. Median follow-up was 7.2 years (1.4 - 18.9 years). [11C]Choline PET/CT was positive in 101 of 302 patients (33 %). Median PCa-specific survival after prostatectomy was 14.9 years (95 % CI 9.7 - 20.1 years) in patients with positive [11C]choline PET/CT. Median survival was not achieved in patients with negative [11C]choline PET/CT. The 15-year PCa-specific survival probability was 42.4 % (95 % CI 31.7 - 53.1 %) in patients with positive [11C]choline PET/CT and 95.5 % (95 % CI 93.5 - 97.5 %) in patients with negative [11C]choline PET/CT. In multivariate analysis, [11C]choline PET/CT (hazard ratio 6.36, 95 % CI 2.14 - 18.94, P < 0.001) and Gleason score >7 (hazard ratio 3.11, 95 % CI 1.11 - 8.66, P = 0.030) predicted PCa-specific survival. An internally validated nomogram predicted 15-year PCa-specific survival probability with an accuracy of 80 %. Positive [11C]choline PET/CT after biochemical failure predicts PCa-specific survival in hormone-naive PCa patients

  8. Diffusion-weighted MRI, {sup 11}C-choline PET and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for predicting the Gleason score in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe H. [Austin Health, Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl; Wada, Morikatsu [Austin Health, Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting; Scott, Andrew M. [Austin Health, Centre for PET, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Hiew, Chee-Yan; Esler, Stephen [Austin Health, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J.; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Chan, J.G. [Austin Health, Centre for PET, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Clouston, David [Tissupath, Mt Waverley, VIC (Australia); O' Sullivan, Richard [Epworth Hospital, Healthcare Imaging, Richmond, VIC (Australia); Goh, Yin P. [Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Bolton, Damien [Austin Health, Department of Urology, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Khoo, Vincent [Austin Health, Radiation Oncology Centre, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Clinical Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Davis, Ian D. [Monash University Eastern Health Clinical School, Box Hill, VIC (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) biopsy, diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), {sup 11}C-choline (CHOL) positron emission tomography (PET), and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in predicting the prostatectomy Gleason risk (GR). The study included 21 patients who underwent TRUS biopsy and multi-technique imaging before radical prostatectomy. Values from five different tests (TRUS biopsy, DW MRI, CHOL PET, FDG PET, and combined DW MRI/CHOL PET) were correlated with the prostatectomy GR using Spearman's ρ. Tests that were found to have significant correlations were used to classify patients into GR groups. The following tests had significant correlations with prostatectomy GR: TRUS biopsy (ρ = 0.617, P = 0.003), DW MRI (ρ = -0.601, P = 0.004), and combined DW MRI/CHOL PET (ρ = -0.623, P = 0.003). CHOL PET alone and FDG PET only had weak correlations. The correct GR classification rates were 67 % with TRUS biopsy, 67 % with DW MRI, and 76 % with combined DW MRI/CHOL PET. DW MRI and combined DW MRI/CHOL PET have significant correlations and high rates of correct classification of the prostatectomy GR, the strength and accuracy of which are comparable with TRUS biopsy. (orig.)

  9. [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT detection of bone metastases in patients with PSA progression after primary treatment for prostate cancer: comparison with bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picchio, Maria [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); National Research Council (IBFM-CNR), Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); Spinapolice, Elena Giulia; Crivellaro, Cinzia [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milan (Italy); Fallanca, Federico; Gianolli, Luigi [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Giovacchini, Giampiero [University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milan (Italy); University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Messa, Cristina [National Research Council (IBFM-CNR), Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Center for Molecular Bioimaging, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy)

    2012-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in comparison with bone scintigraphy (BS) in detecting bone metastases (BM) of patients with biochemical progression after radical treatment for prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-eight consecutive patients with biochemical progression of PCa (mean prostate-specific antigen 21.1 ng/ml, range 0.2-500.0 ng/ml) referred for both [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and BS for restaging purposes were retrospectively analysed. The diagnostic accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and BS was assessed by using morphological imaging and/or follow-up as standards of reference. As equivocal findings were found, the accuracy analysis was performed twice, once including them as positive and once as negative. A separate analysis was also performed in hormone-resistant patients and data compared with those of patients who did not receive anti-androgenic treatment. Equivocal findings occurred in 1 of 78 (1%) cases in [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and in 21 of 78 (27%) cases in BS. Depending on their attribution as either positive or negative, the ranges of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were 89-89%, 98-100%, 96-100%, 94-96% and 95-96%, respectively. For BS they were 100-70%, 75-100%, 68-100%, 100-86% and 83-90%, respectively. Concordant findings between [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT and BS occurred in 55 of 78 (71%) cases. The accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT did not significantly (p = 0.30) differ between hormone-resistant patients (97%) and those who did not receive anti-androgenic treatment (95%). In clinical practice, [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT may not replace BS because of its lower sensitivity. However, for its high specificity, [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT positive findings may accurately predict the presence of BM. Equivocal findings are more frequent in BS than [{sup 11}C]choline PET

  10. 11C-choline vs. 18F-FDG PET/CT in assessing bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosini Valentina

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple Myeloma (MM is a B cell neoplasm causing lytic or osteopenic bone abnormalities. Whole body skeletal survey (WBSS, Magnetic resonance (MR and 18F-FDG PET/CT are imaging techniques routinely used for the evaluation of bone involvement in MM patients. Aim As MM bone lesions may present low 18F-FDG uptake; the aim of this study was to assess the possible added value and limitations of 11C-Choline to that of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients affected with MM. Methods Ten patients affected with MM underwent a standard 11C-Choline PET/CT and an 18F-FDG PET/CT within one week. The results of the two scans were compared in terms of number, sites and SUVmax of lesions. Results Four patients (40% had a negative concordant 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two patients (20% had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans that identified the same number and sites of bone lesions. The remaining four patients (40% had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, but the two exams identified different number of lesions. Choline showed a mean SUVmax of 5 while FDG showed a mean SUVmax of 3.8 (P = 0.042. Overall, 11C-Choline PET/CT scans detected 37 bone lesions and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans detected 22 bone lesions but the difference was not significant (P = 0.8. Conclusion According to these preliminary data, 11C-Choline PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of bony myelomatous lesions. If these data are confirmed in larger series of patients, 11C-Choline may be considered a more appropriate functional imaging in association with MRI for MM bone staging.

  11. Comparison of {sup 18}F-FACBC and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in patients with radically treated prostate cancer and biochemical relapse: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina; Boschi, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, OU Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Ambrosini, Valentina; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Martorana, Giuseppe; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, OU Urology, Bologna (Italy); Pettinato, Cinzia [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, OU Medical Physics, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    We assessed the rate of detection rate of recurrent prostate cancer by PET/CT using anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC, a new synthetic amino acid, in comparison to that using {sup 11}C-choline as part of an ongoing prospective single-centre study. Included in the study were 15 patients with biochemical relapse after initial radical treatment of prostate cancer. All the patients underwent anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC PET/CT and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT within a 7-day period. The detection rates using the two compounds were determined and the target-to-background ratios (TBR) of each lesion are reported. No adverse reactions to anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC PET/CT were noted. On a patient basis, {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was positive in 3 patients and negative in 12 (detection rate 20 %), and anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC PET/CT was positive in 6 patients and negative in 9 (detection rate 40 %). On a lesion basis, {sup 11}C-choline detected 6 lesions (4 bone, 1 lymph node, 1 local relapse), and anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC detected 11 lesions (5 bone, 5 lymph node, 1 local relapse). All {sup 11}C-choline-positive lesions were also identified by anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC PET/CT. The TBR of anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC was greater than that of {sup 11}C-choline in 8/11 lesions, as were image quality and contrast. Our preliminary results indicate that anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC may be superior to {sup 11}C-choline for the identification of disease recurrence in the setting of biochemical failure. Further studies are required to assess efficacy of anti-3-{sup 18}F-FACBC in a larger series of prostate cancer patients. (orig.)

  12. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer showing biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco; Ambrosini, Valentina; Boschi, Stefano; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Haematology Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Haematology Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Unversitaria di Bologna Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, UO di Medicina Nucleare, PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Mamede, Marcelo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Molecular Imaging Center, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Schiavina, Riccardo; Martorana, Giuseppe [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT Centre, Rovigo (Italy); Fuccio, Chiara [Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Pavia (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    To determine the diagnostic efficacy of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy who presented with increasing PSA levels during follow-up in spite of being on hormone treatment (HT), and therefore showing HT resistance. We evaluated a large series of 157 consecutive PC patients previously treated by radical prostatectomy who presented with biochemical recurrence with increasing PSA levels in spite of ongoing HT (HT-resistant patients). At the time of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, the mean value of trigger PSA level was 8.3 (range 0.2 - 60.6 ng/mL), the mean PSA doubling time (PSAdt) was 5.3 (range 0.4 - 35 months), and the mean PSA velocity (PSAvel) was 22.1 ng/mL/year (range 0.12 - 82 ng/mL/year). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed following a standard procedure at our centre to investigate increasing PSA levels, either as the first imaging procedure or in patients with negative conventional imaging. At the time of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT all patients were receiving HT (61 were receiving monotherapy and 96 multidrug therapy). PET-positive findings were validated by: (a) transrectal US-guided biopsy in patients with recurrence in the prostatic bed, (b) surgical pelvic lymphadenectomy, (c) other imaging modalities, including repeated {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, performed during a minimum follow-up of 12-months. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT showed positive findings in 104 of the 157 patients (66 %). {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT detected: a single lesion in 40 patients (7 in the prostate bed, 10 in lymph nodes, 22 in bone, 1 at another site); two lesions in 18 patients (7 in lymph nodes, 7 in bone, 4 in both lymph nodes and bone); three or four lesions in 7 patients (4 in lymph nodes, 2 in bone, 1 at another site); and more than four lesions in the remaining 39 patients (2 in the prostate bed, 12 in lymph nodes, 12 in bone, 11 in both lymph nodes and bone, 2 at other sites). In {sup 11}C-choline PET-negative patients, the mean

  13. Choline metabolism-based molecular diagnosis of cancer: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Glunde, Kristine; Penet, Marie-France; Jiang, Lu; Jacobs, Michael A.; Zaver M Bhujwalla

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal choline metabolism continues to be identified in multiple cancers. Molecular causes of abnormal choline metabolism are changes in choline kinase-α, ethanolamine kinase-α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C and -D and glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterases, as well as several choline transporters. The net outcome of these enzymatic changes is an increase in phosphocholine and total choline (tCho) and, in some cancers, a relative decrease of glycerophosphocholine. The incre...

  14. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the variability of gross tumor volume (GTV using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT images for nasopharyngeal carcinomas boundary definition. Assessment consisted of inter-observer and inter-modality variation analysis. Four radiation oncologists were invited to manually contour GTV by using PET/CT fusion obtained from a cohort of 12 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC and who underwent both 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG scans. Student's paired-sample t-test was performed for analyzing inter-observer and inter-modality variability. Semi-automatic segmentation methods, including thresholding and region growing, were also validated against the manual contouring of the two types of PET images. We observed no significant variation in the results obtained by different oncologists in terms of the same type of PET/CT volumes. Choline fusion volumes were significantly larger than the FDG volumes (p < 0.0001, mean ± SD = 18.21 ± 8.19. While significantly consistent results were obtained between the oncologists and the standard references in Choline volumes compared with those in FDG volumes (p = 0.0025. Simple semi-automatic delineation methods indicated that 11C-Choline PET images could provide better results than FDG volumes (p = 0.076, CI = [-0.29, 0.025]. 11C-Choline PET/CT may be more advantageous in GTV delineation for the radiotherapy of NPC than 18F-FDG. Phantom simulations and clinical trials should be conducted to prove the possible improvement of the treatment outcome.

  15. First case of 18F-FACBC PET/CT-guided salvage retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for disease relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and negative 11C-choline PET/CT: new imaging techniques may expand pioneering approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavina, Riccardo; Concetti, Sergio; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Nanni, Cristina; Borghesi, Marco; Gentile, Giorgio; Cevenini, Matteo; Bianchi, Lorenzo; Molinaroli, Enrico; Fanti, Stefano; Martorana, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We present the first case of salvage retroperitoneal lymph node dissection based on the results of (18)F-FACBC PET/CT performed for a prostate-specific antigen relapse after radical prostatectomy. The patients underwent (11)C-choline PET/CT, which turned out negative, while (18)F-FACBC PET/CT visualized two lymph node metastases confirmed at pathological examination. Preliminary clinical reports showed an improvement in the detection rate of 20-40% for (18)F-FACBC in comparison with (11)C-choline, rendering the (18)F-FACBC the potential radiotracer of the future. Salvage surgery for prostate cancer is a fascinating but controversial approach. New diagnostic tools may improve its potential by increasing the assessment and the selection of the patients.

  16. First case of 18F-FACBC PET/CT-guided salvage radiotherapy for local relapse after radical prostatectomy with negative 11C-Choline PET/CT and multiparametric MRI: New imaging techniques may improve patient selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Brunocilla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the first case of salvage radiotherapy based on the results of 18F-FACBC PET/CT performed for a PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy. The patients underwent 11CCholine PET/CT and multiparametric MRI that were negative while 18F-FACBC PET/CT visualized a suspected local relapse confirmed by transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. No distant relapse was detected. Thus the patient was submitted to salvage radiotherapy in the prostatic fossa. After 20 months of follow-up, the PSA was undetectable and 18F-FACBC PET/CT was negative. Salvage radiotherapy after surgery, provided that it is administered at the earliest evidence of the biochemical relapse, may improve cancer control and favourably influence the course of disease as well as the adjuvant approach. New imaging techniques may increase the efficacy of the salvage radiotherapy thus helping in the selection of the patients. Preliminary clinical reports showed an improvement in the detection rate of 20-40% of 18F-FACBC in comparison with 11C-Choline for the detection of disease relapse after radical prostatecomy, rendering the 18F-FACBC the potential radiotracer of the future for prostate cancer.

  17. First case of 18F-FACBC PET/CT-guided salvage radiotherapy for local relapse after radical prostatectomy with negative 11C-Choline PET/CT and multiparametric MRI: New imaging techniques may improve patient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunocilla, Eugenio; Schiavina, Riccardo; Nanni, Cristina; Borghesi, Marco; Cevenini, Matteo; Molinaroli, Enrico; Vagnoni, Valerio; Castellucci, Paolo; Ceci, Francesco; Fanti, Stefano; Gaudiano, Caterina; Golfieri, Rita; Martorana, Giuseppe

    2014-09-30

    We present the first case of salvage radiotherapy based on the results of 18F-FACBC PET/CT performed for a PSA relapse after radical prostatectomy. The patients underwent 11CCholine PET/CT and multiparametric MRI that were negative while 18F-FACBC PET/CT visualized a suspected local relapse confirmed by transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. No distant relapse was detected. Thus the patient was submitted to salvage radiotherapy in the prostatic fossa. After 20 months of follow-up, the PSA was undetectable and 18F-FACBC PET/CT was negative. Salvage radiotherapy after surgery, provided that it is administered at the earliest evidence of the biochemical relapse, may improve cancer control and favourably influence the course of disease as well as the adjuvant approach. New imaging techniques may increase the efficacy of the salvage radiotherapy thus helping in the selection of the patients. Preliminary clinical reports showed an improvement in the detection rate of 20-40% of 18F-FACBC in comparison with 11C-Choline for the detection of disease relapse after radical prostatecomy, rendering the 18F-FACBC the potential radiotracer of the future for prostate cancer.

  18. Comparison of choline-PET/CT, MRI, SPECT, and bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published data on the diagnosis of bone metastases of prostate cancer are conflicting and heterogeneous. We performed a comprehensive meta-analysis to compare the diagnostic performance of choline-PET/CT, MRI, bone SPECT, and bone scintigraphy (BS) in detecting bone metastases in parents with prostate cancer. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratios (DOR) were calculated both on a per-patient basis and on a per-lesion basis. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were also drawn to obtain the area under curve (AUC) and Q* value. Sixteen articles consisting of 27 studies were included in the analysis. On a per-patient basis, the pooled sensitivities by using choline PET/CT, MRI, and BS were 0.91 [95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.83-0.96], 0.97 (95 % CI: 0.91-0.99), 0.79 (95 % CI: 0.73-0.83), respectively. The pooled specificities for detection of bone metastases using choline PET/CT, MRI, and BS, were 0.99 (95 % CI: 0.93-1.00), 0.95 (95 % CI: 0.90-0.97), and 0.82 (95 % CI: 0.78-0.85), respectively. On a per-lesion basis, the pooled sensitivities of choline PET/CT, bone SPECT, and BS were 0.84 (95 % CI: 0.81-0.87), 0.90 (95 % CI: 0.86-0.93), 0.59 (95 % CI: 0.55-0.63), respectively. The pooled specificities were 0.93 (95 % CI: 0.89-0.96) for choline PET/CT, 0.85 (95 % CI: 0.80-0.90) for bone SPECT, and 0.75 (95 % CI: 0.71-0.79) for BS. This meta-analysis indicated that MRI was better than choline PET/CT and BS on a per-patient basis. On a per-lesion analysis, choline PET/CT with the highest DOR and Q* was better than bone SPECT and BS for detecting bone metastases from prostate cancer. (orig.)

  19. Is the detection rate of 18F-choline PET/CT influenced by androgen-deprivation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Grassetto, Gaia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rampin, Lucia; Rubello, Domenico [' ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' ' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy). PET/CT Centre; Ferretti, Alice [' ' San Giacomo Apostolo' ' Hospital, Castelfranco Veneto, Treviso (Italy). Service of Medical Physics; Fanti, Stefano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Univ. Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Giammarile, Francesco [Lyon 1 Univ. Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud Biophysique, Villeurbanne (Italy). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate if the detection rate (DR) of {sup 18}F-choline (18F-CH) PET/CT is influenced by androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with prostate cancer (PC) already treated with radical intent and presenting biochemical relapse. We have retrospectively evaluated {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT scans of 325 consecutive PC patients enrolled in the period November 2009 to December 2012 previously treated with radical intent and referred to our centre to perform {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT for biochemical relapse. Two different groups of patients were evaluated. group A included the whole sample of 325 patients (mean age 70 years, range: 49-86) who presented trigger PSA between 0.1 and 80 ng/ml (mean 5.5 ng/ml), and group B included 187 patients (mean age 70 years, range 49-86) with medium-low levels of trigger PSA ranging between 0.5 and 5 ng/ml (mean PSA 2.1 ng/ml); group B was chosen in order to obtain a more homogeneous group of patients in terms of PSA values also excluding both very low and very high PSA levels avoiding the ''a priori'' higher probability of negative or positive PET scan, respectively. At the time of examination, 139 patients from group A and 72 patients from group B were under ADT: these patients were considered to be hormone-resistant PC patients because from their oncologic history (>18 months) an increase of PSA levels emerged despite the ongoing ADT. The relationship between {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT findings and possible clinical predictors was investigated using both univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses, including trigger PSA and ADT. Considering the whole population, overall DR of {sup 18}F-CH PET was 58.2 % (189/325 patients). In the whole sample of patients (group A), both at the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis, trigger PSA and ADT were significantly correlated with the DR of {sup 18}F-CH PET (p < 0.05). Moreover, the DR in patients under ADT (mean PSA 7.8 ng/ml) was higher than in

  20. Role of {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT in suspicion of relapse following definitive radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rampin, Lucia; Grassetto, Gaia; Rubello, Domenico [Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Rovigo (Italy); Ferretti, Alice [Hospital, Medical Physics and Biostatistics Unit, Rovigo (Italy); Nanni, Cristina [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Bologna (Italy); Colletti, Patrick M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-09-15

    The aims of the study were (a) to evaluate the diagnostic role, by means of positive detection rate (PDR), of {sup 18}F-choline (CH) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with prostate cancer treated with radiotherapy, with curative intent, and suspicion of relapse during follow-up, (b) to correlate the PDR with trigger prostate-specific antigen (PSA), (c) to investigate the possible influence of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) at the time of scan on PDR and (d) to assess distribution of metastatic spread. {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT exams from 46 consecutive patients (mean age 71.3 years, range 51-84 years) with prostate cancer (mean Gleason score 6.4, range 5-8) previously treated by definitive radiotherapy and with suspicion of relapse with negative or inconclusive conventional imaging were retrospectively evaluated. Of the 46 patients, 12 were treated with brachytherapy and 34 with external beam radiation therapy. Twenty-three patients were under ADT at the time of the examination. Trigger PSA was measured within 1 month before the exam (mean value 6.5 ng/ml, range 1.1-49.4 ng/ml). Patients were subdivided into four groups according to their PSA level: 1.0 < PSA {<=} 2.0 ng/ml (11 patients), 2.0 < PSA {<=} 4.0 ng/ml (16 patients), 4.0 < PSA {<=} 6.0 ng/ml (9 patients) and PSA > 6.0 ng/ml (10 patients). Correlation between ADT and PDR was investigated as well as between PSA and distribution of metastatic spread. The overall PDR of {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT was 80.4 % (37/46 patients), increasing with the increase of trigger PSA. PDR of {sup 18}F-CH PET/CT is not influenced by ADT (p = 0.710) even if PET performed under ADT demonstrated an overall higher PDR (82.6 %). The majority of the patients (59 %, 22/37 patients) showed local relapse only, confined to the prostatic bed; 22 % of the PET/CT-positive patients (8/37 patients) showed distant relapse only (bone localizations in all of them), while the remaining 19 % (7/37 patients) showed both local and distant

  1. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT detects the site of relapse in the majority of prostate cancer patients showing biochemical recurrence after EBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco; Graziani, Tiziano; Lodi, Filippo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Unversitaria di Bologna Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, UO di Medicina Nucleare, PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Martorana, Giuseppe [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Mazzarotto, Renzo; Ntreta, Maria [University of Bologna, Service of Radiotherapy, Policlinico S. Orsola Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the usefulness and the detection rate of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in a population of patients with prostate cancer (PC), exclusively treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as primary treatment, who showed biochemical relapse. We enrolled 140 patients showing a serum PSA level >2 ng/mL (mean 8.6 ng/mL, median 5 ng/mL, range 2 - 60 ng/mL). All patients had been treated with EBRT to the prostate gland and prostatic fossa with doses ranging from 70 to 76 Gy in low-risk patients (T1/T2 and/or serum PSA <10 ng/mL) and escalating to >76 Gy (range 76 - 81 Gy) in high-risk patients (T3/T4 and/or serum PSA >10 ng/mL). Of the 140 patients, 53 were receiving androgen deprivation therapy at the time of the scan. All positive {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT findings were validated by transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy or at least 12 months of follow-up with contrast-enhanced CT, MR, bone scintigraphy or a repeated {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scan. The relationships between the detection rate of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT and the factors PSA level, PSA kinetics, Gleason score, age, time to relapse and SUVmax in patients with positive findings were analysed. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT detected the site of relapse in 123 of the 140 patients with a detection rate of 87.8 % (46 patients showed local relapse, 31 showed local and distant relapse, and 46 showed only distant relapse). In patients with relapse the mean serum PSA level was 9.08 ng/mL (median 5.1 ng/mL, range 2 - 60 ng/mL), the mean PSA doubling time was 5.6 months (median 3.5 months, range 0.4 - 48 months), and the mean PSA velocity was 15 ng/mL/year (median 8.8 ng/mL/year, range 0.4 - 87 ng/mL/year). Of the 123 patients with relapse, 77 (62.6 %) showed distant relapse with/without local relapse, and of these 77, 31 (40.2 %) showed oligometastatic disease (one or two distant lesions: lymph node lesions only in 16, bone lesions only in 14, and lymph node lesions and bone

  2. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer

  3. 11C Choline PET Guided Salvage Radiotherapy with Volumetric Modulation Arc Therapy and Hypofractionation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer after HIFU Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L. E.; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M.; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedul...

  4. Choline-based ionic liquids-enhanced biodegradation of azo dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Sudharshan; Surianarayanan, Mahadevan; Ranganathan, Vijayaraghavan; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-05-01

    Industrial wastewaters such as tannery and textile processing effluents are often characterized by a high content of dissolved organic dyes, resulting in large values of chemical and biological oxygen demand (COD and BOD) in the aquatic systems into which they are discharged. Such wastewater streams are of rapidly growing concern as a major environmental issue in developing countries. Hence there is a need to mitigate this challenge by effective approaches to degrade dye-contaminated wastewater. In this study, several choline-based salts originally developed for use as biocompatible hydrated ionic liquids (i.e., choline sacchrinate (CS), choline dihydrogen phosphate (CDP), choline lactate (CL), and choline tartarate (CT)) have been successfully employed as the cosubstrate with S. lentus in the biodegradation of an azo dye in aqueous solution. We also demonstrate that the azo dye has been degraded to less toxic components coupled with low biomass formation.

  5. PET/CT with {sup 11}C-choline for evaluation of prostate cancer patients with biochemical recurrence: meta-analysis and critical review of available data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanti, Stefano; Castellucci, Paolo [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Minozzi, Silvia [Lazio Regional Health Service, Cochrane Review Group on Drugs and Alcohol, Department of Epidemiology, Rome (Italy); Balduzzi, Sara [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Diagnostic Medicine, Clinical and Public Health, Modena (Italy); Herrmann, Ken [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Krause, Bernd Joachim [Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Oyen, Wim [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milano (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    For the last decade PET and PET/CT with {sup 11}C-choline have been proposed for the evaluation of prostate cancer (PC), but the diagnostic performance of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT is still a matter of debate. We performed a comprehensive review of the most important clinical application of {sup 11}C-choline PET, restaging of patients with biochemical relapse, following a rigorous methodological approach and including assessment of the risk of bias. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature assessing {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT for its accuracy in the diagnosis and ability to detect the site of recurrence of PC in the restaging of patients with biochemical recurrence after initial treatment with curative intent. We performed a comprehensive literature search of PubMed and the Cochrane Library to determine the accuracy for the detection of the site of recurrence (prostate bed recurrences, metastatic spread to locoregional pelvic lymph nodes or distant metastases). Only studies with a reference standard (for prostatic bed histopathology, for histopathology or biopsy of distant metastases or a composite reference standard with clinical follow-up of at least 12 months, correlative imaging and clinical data) were included. Overall 425 studies were retrieved, of which 43 were judged as potentially relevant and 29 with 2,686 participants were finally included. Of these 29 studies, 18 reported results for any relapse, All 18 studies, with a total of 2,126 participants, reported detection rates. The pooled rate was 62 % (95 % CI 53 - 71 %). Of the 18 studies, 12 with 1,270 participants reported useful data to derive sensitivity and specificity. The pooled sensitivity was 89 % (95 % CI 83 - 93 %) and the pooled specificity was 89 % (95 % CI 73 - 96 %). Of 11 studies reporting results for local relapse, 9 with 993 participants reported detection rates. The pooled rate was 27 % (95 % CI 16 - 38 %). Six studies with 491 participants reported sensitivity

  6. Polyesteramides based on PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Krista

    1999-01-01

    Engineering plastics have good mechanical, thermal and electrical properties, and can be easily processed. Typical engineering plastics include polyamides (PA6,6, PA6, PA4,6) and polyesters (PBT, PET). Compared to polyesters of a similar structure, polyamides have a high glass transition (Tg) and me

  7. Impact of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT on clinical decision making in recurrent prostate cancer: results from a retrospective two-centre trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Droll, Sabine; Buck, Andreas K. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Castellucci, Paolo; Graziani, Tiziano; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Brunocilla, Eugenio [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Vollmer, Christian [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Department of Urology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Mazzarotto, Renzo [University of Bologna, Service of Radiotherapy, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this retrospective two-centre study was to investigate the clinical impact of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT on treatment management decisions in patients with recurrent prostate cancer (rPCa) after radical therapy. Enrolled in this retrospective study were 150 patients (95 from Bologna, 55 from Wuerzburg) with rPCa and biochemical relapse (PSA mean ± SD 4.3 ± 5.5 ng/mL, range 0.2-39.4 ng/mL) after radical therapy. The intended treatment before PET/CT was salvage radiotherapy of the prostatic bed in 95 patients and palliative androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in 55 patients. The effective clinical impact of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was rated as major (change in therapeutic approach), minor (same treatment, but modified therapeutic strategy) or none. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis included PSA level, PSA kinetics, ongoing ADT, Gleason score, TNM, age and time to relapse. Changes in therapy after {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT were implemented in 70 of the 150 patients (46.7 %). A major clinical impact was observed in 27 patients (18 %) and a minor clinical impact in 43 (28.7 %). {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was positive in 109 patients (72.7 %) detecting local relapse (prostate bed and/or iliac lymph nodes and/or pararectal lymph nodes) in 64 patients (42.7 %). Distant relapse (paraaortic and/or retroperitoneal lymph nodes and/or bone lesions) was seen in 31 patients (20.7 %), and both local and distant relapse in 14 (9.3 %). A significant difference was observed in PSA level and PSA kinetics between PET-positive and PET-negative patients (p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, PSA level, PSA doubling time and ongoing ADT were significant predictors of a positive scan (p < 0.05). In statistical analysis no significant differences were observed between the Bologna and Wuerzburg patients (p > 0.05). In both centres the same criteria to validate PET-positive findings were used: in 17.3 % of patients by histology and in 82.7 % of patients by correlative

  8. Changes in skeletal tumor activity on {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT in patients receiving {sup 223}radium radionuclide therapy for metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Kyle S. [Oncology Research Dept. and Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu (United States); Kang, Yu; Kwee, Sandi A. [Dept. of Medical Physics, School of Allied Health Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Radium-223 dichloride is an alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical shown to prolong survival in patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic skeletal metastases. This report describes in two patients the acute changes in bone metastatic activity detected by F-18 choline PET/CT imaging midway during treatment with radium-223 dichloride. In addition to visual and standardized uptake value analysis, changes in the whole-body tumor burden were quantified by measuring the difference in net metabolically active tumor volume (MATV) and total lesion activity (TLA) between pre- and mid-treatment PET scans. After the third dose of radium-223 dichloride, near-total disappearance of abnormal skeletal activity was observed in one case (net MATV change from 260.7 to 0.8 cc; net TLA change from 510.7 to 2.1), while a heterogeneous tumor response was observed in the other (net MATV change from 272.2 to 241.3 cc; net TLA change from 987.1 to 779.4). Corresponding normalization and persistent elevation in serum alkaline phosphatase levels were observed in these cases, respectively. Further research is needed to determine the predictive value of serial F-18 choline PET/CT imaging in patients receiving radium-223 dichloride for CRPC.

  9. How polar are choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ashish; Rai, Rewa; Pal, Mahi; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-01-28

    Developing and characterizing green solvents with low toxicity and cost is one of the most important issues in chemistry. Deep Eutectic Solvents (DESs), in this regard, have shown tremendous promise. Compared to popular organic solvents, DESs possess negligible VOCs and are non-flammable. Compared to ionic liquids, which share many characteristics but are ionic compounds and not ionic mixtures, DESs are cheaper to make, much less toxic and mostly biodegradable. An estimate of the polarity associated with DESs is essential if they are to be used as green alternatives to common organic solvents in industries and academia. As no one physical parameter can satisfactorily represent solute-solvent interactions within a medium, polarity of DESs is assessed through solvatochromic optical spectroscopic responses of several UV-vis absorbance and molecular fluorescence probes. Information on the local microenvironment (i.e., the cybotactic region) that surrounds several solvatochromic probes [betaine dye, pyrene, pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), p-toluidinyl-6-naphthalene sulfonate (TNS), 6-propionyl-2-(dimethylaminonaphthalene) (PRODAN), coumarin-153, and Nile Red] for four common and popular DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, urea, and malonic acid, respectively, in 1 : 2 molar ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, reline, and maline is obtained and used to assess the effective polarity afforded by each of these DESs. The four DESs as indicated by these probe responses are found to be fairly dipolar in nature. Absorbance probe betaine dye and fluorescence probes ANS, TNS, PRODAN, coumarin-153, and Nile Red, whose solvatochromic responses are based on photoinduced charge-transfer, imply ethaline and glyceline, DESs formed using alcohol-based H-bond donors, to be relatively more dipolar in nature as compared to reline and maline. The pyrene polarity scale, which is based on polarity-induced changes in

  10. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Planning for Primary Prostate Cancer With Selective Intraprostatic Boost Determined by {sup 18}F-Choline PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Yu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Wu, Lili [Department of Medical Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Hirata, Emily; Miyazaki, Kyle; Sato, Miles [Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Oncology Research, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Kwee, Sandi A., E-mail: kwee@hawaii.edu [Hamamatsu/Queen' s PET Imaging Center and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Oncology Research, The Queen' s Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated expected tumor control and normal tissue toxicity for prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with and without radiation boosts to an intraprostatically dominant lesion (IDL), defined by {sup 18}F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with localized prostate cancer underwent {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT before treatment. Two VMAT plans, plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} and plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}, were compared for each patient. The whole-prostate planning target volume (PTV{sub prostate}) prescription was 79 Gy in both plans, but plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} added simultaneous boost doses of 100 Gy and 105 Gy to the IDL, defined by 60% and 70% of maximum prostatic uptake on {sup 18}F-choline PET (IDL{sub suv60%} and IDL{sub suv70%}, respectively, with IDL{sub suv70%} nested inside IDL{sub suv60%} to potentially enhance tumor specificity of the maximum point dose). Plan evaluations included histopathological correspondence, isodose distributions, dose-volume histograms, tumor control probability (TCP), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: Planning objectives and dose constraints proved feasible in 30 of 30 cases. Prostate sextant histopathology was available for 28 cases, confirming that IDL{sub suv60%} adequately covered all tumor-bearing prostate sextants in 27 cases and provided partial coverage in 1 case. Plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy} had significantly higher TCP than plan{sub 79} {sub Gy} across all prostate regions for α/β ratios ranging from 1.5 Gy to 10 Gy (P<.001 for each case). There were no significant differences in bladder and femoral head NTCP between plans and slightly lower rectal NTCP (endpoint: grade ≥ 2 late toxicity or rectal bleeding) was found for plan{sub 100-105} {sub Gy}. Conclusions: VMAT can potentially increase the likelihood of tumor control in primary prostate cancer while observing normal tissue tolerances through

  11. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based (CB) PET. CBPET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CBPET in operation than cPET in the USA. CBPET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  12. Quantitative evaluation of bone metastases from prostate cancer with simultaneous [18F] choline PET/MRI. Combined SUV and ADC analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To quantitatively analyze bone metastases from prostate cancer and correlate the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and standardized uptake values (SUVs). Fifty-five patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer or suspected recurrent prostate cancer were examined with simultaneous [18F] choline Positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI at 3 T. In 11 patients, thirty-two PET-positive bone lesions could be identified that were located in the field-of-view of the Diffusion weighted imaging-sequence. Region-of-interest and volume-of-interest analyses were performed to measure the mean and minimal ADCs and to assess maximum and mean SUVs of every bone lesion. Correlations between maximum and mean SUVs and mean and minimal ADCs were calculated. The SUVmax of all lesions was 5.5 ± 3.1 (mean ± SD). The SUVmean was 1.8 ± 0.9. The mean ADC (ADCmean) of all lesions was 0.67 ± 0.13 x 10-3 mm2/s. The minimal ADC (ADCmin) of all lesions was 0.56 ± 0.14 x 10-3 mm2/s. There was a moderate but significant inverse correlation of SUVmax vs. ADCmean with a correlation coefficient of -0.4 (p=0.02). There was also a significant inverse correlation of SUVmax vs. ADCmin with r=-0.41 (p=0.02). Our initial results demonstrate a moderate but significant inverse correlation between increased choline metabolism and ADC values of bone metastases from prostate cancer. Further research on a multimodality approach using simultaneous PET/MRI in bone metastasis of prostate cancer seems to be justified. (author)

  13. Is there a role for {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in the early detection of metastatic disease in surgically treated prostate cancer patients with a mild PSA increase <1.5 ng/ml?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellucci, Paolo [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Haematology-Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Unversitaria di Bologna Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, UO di Medicina Nucleare, PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Fuccio, Chiara; Santi, Ivan; Nanni, Cristina; Allegri, Vincenzo; Montini, Gian Carlo; Ambrosini, Valentina; Boschi, Stefano; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Haematology-Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico; Marzola, Maria Cristina [Sanata Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Radiology, Service of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Rovigo (Italy); Schiavina, Riccardo; Martorana, Giuseppe [University of Bologna, Service of Urology, Department of Specialist Surgery and Anaesthesiology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential usefulness of whole-body {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in the re-staging of prostate cancer (PC) patients previously treated with radical prostatectomy (RP), who presented a mild increase of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <1.5 ng/ml (early biochemical relapse) during follow-up (FU). We evaluated 102 consecutive patients (mean age = 68 years, range = 54-82 years) previously treated with RP and who presented during FU a mild increase of trigger PSA serum levels <1.5 ng/ml: mean 0.86 {+-} 0.40 ng/ml (range 0.2-1.5) and median 0.93 ng/ml (range 0.67-1.10). In this patient series {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT was used as the first imaging examination at the time of the detection of a mild serum PSA increase <1.5 ng/ml. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed following standard procedures in our centre. At the time of PET/CT, 86 patients were not receiving any pharmacologic treatment, while 16 were under anti-androgenic therapy. Positive PET findings were validated by: (a) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy in cases of local recurrence, (b) surgical lymphadenectomy, (c) other imaging procedures or (d) FU lasting for at least 12 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the following variables: age, TNM staging, Gleason score, time from RP to the biochemical relapse, anti-androgen therapy at the time of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scan, trigger PSA value and PSA kinetics, i.e. PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and PSA velocity (PSAvel), in order to assess the significant predictive factors related to the findings of a positive {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT scan. Overall, {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT showed positive findings in 29 of 102 patients (28% of cases). In detail, {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT detected: local relapse in 7 patients, bone metastases in 13 patients (4 single and 9 multiple) and lymph node metastases in 9 patients (6 single and 3 multiple). Positive PET findings were validated by: (a) TRUS

  14. 11C choline PET guided salvage radiotherapy with volumetric modulation arc therapy and hypofractionation for recurrent prostate cancer after HIFU failure: preliminary results of tolerability and acute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Filippo; Liardo, Rocco L E; Iftode, Cristina; Lopci, Egesta; Villa, Elisa; Comito, Tiziana; Tozzi, Angelo; Navarria, Pierina; Ascolese, Anna M; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Bellorofonte, Carlo; Arturo, Chiti; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate tolerance, feasibility and acute toxicity in patients undergoing salvage radiotherapy after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) failure. From 2005 to 2011 a total of 15 patients were treated with HIFU as primary radical treatment. Between July 2011 and February 2013, all 15 patients presented biochemical relapse after HIFU and 11C choline PET documenting intrapostatic-only failure. Salvage EBRT was performed with moderate hypofractionation schedule in 28 fractions with volumetric modulation arc therapy (VMAT). Genito-urinary (GU) and rectal and bowel toxicity were scored by common terminology criteria for adverse events version 4 (CTCAE V.4) scale. Biochemical response was assessed by ASTRO Phoenix criteria. Median age of patients was 67 years (range: 53-85). The median Gleason score was 7 (range: 6-9). The median prostate specific antigen (PSA) at the time of biochemical relapse after HIFU was 5.2 ng/mL (range: 2-64.2). Seven of the 15 patients received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started after HIFU failure, interrupted before 11C choline PET and radiotherapy. Median prescribed dose was 71.4 Gy (range: 71.4-74.2 Gy) in 28 fractions. No radiation related major upper gastrointestinal (GI), rectal and GU toxicity were experienced. GU, acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities were recorded in 7/15 and 4/15 respectively; bowel acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 4/15 and 1/15; rectal acute grade 1 and grade 2 toxicities in 3/15 and 2/15 respectively. No grade 3 or greater acute or late toxicities occurred. Biochemical control was assessed in 12/15 (80%) patients. With a median follow up of 12 months, three out of 15 patients, with biochemical relapse, showed lymph-nodal recurrence. Our early clinical results and biochemical data confirm the feasibility and show a good tolerance of the 11C choline PET guided salvage radiation therapy after HIFU failure. The findings of low acute toxicity is encouraging, but longer

  15. Target volume definition in high-risk prostate cancer patients using sentinel node SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vees Hansjörg

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the influence of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline (18 F-FCH PET/CT in radiotherapy (RT treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with a high-risk for lymph node (LN involvement. Methods Twenty high-risk prostate cancer patients underwent a pelvic SPECT acquisition following a transrectal ultrasound guided injection of 99mTc-Nanocoll into the prostate. In all patients but one an 18 F-FCH PET/CT for RT treatment planning was performed. SPECT studies were coregistered with the respective abdominal CTs. Pelvic SNs localized on SPECT/CT and LN metastases detected by 18 F-FCH PET/CT were compared to standard pelvic clinical target volumes (CTV. Results A total of 104 pelvic SNs were identified on SPECT/CT (mean 5.2 SNs/patient; range 1–10. Twenty-seven SNs were located outside the standard pelvic CTV, 17 in the proximal common iliac and retroperitoneal regions above S1, 9 in the pararectal fat and 1 in the inguinal region. SPECT/CT succeeded to optimize the definition of the CTV and treatment plans in 6/20 patients due to the presence of pararectal SNs located outside the standard treatment volume. 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified abnormal tracer uptake in the iliac LN region in 2/19 patients. These abnormal LNs were negative on SPECT/CT suggesting a potential blockade of lymphatic drainage by metastatic LNs with a high tumour burden. Conclusions Multimodality imaging which combines SPECT/CT prostate lymphoscintigraphy and 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified SNs outside standard pelvic CTVs or highly suspicious pelvic LNs in 40% of high-risk prostate cancer patients, highlighting the potential impact of this approach in RT treatment planning.

  16. Target volume definition in high-risk prostate cancer patients using sentinel node SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the influence of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs) SPECT/CT and 18 F-choline (18 F-FCH) PET/CT in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning for prostate cancer patients with a high-risk for lymph node (LN) involvement. Twenty high-risk prostate cancer patients underwent a pelvic SPECT acquisition following a transrectal ultrasound guided injection of 99mTc-Nanocoll into the prostate. In all patients but one an 18 F-FCH PET/CT for RT treatment planning was performed. SPECT studies were coregistered with the respective abdominal CTs. Pelvic SNs localized on SPECT/CT and LN metastases detected by 18 F-FCH PET/CT were compared to standard pelvic clinical target volumes (CTV). A total of 104 pelvic SNs were identified on SPECT/CT (mean 5.2 SNs/patient; range 1–10). Twenty-seven SNs were located outside the standard pelvic CTV, 17 in the proximal common iliac and retroperitoneal regions above S1, 9 in the pararectal fat and 1 in the inguinal region. SPECT/CT succeeded to optimize the definition of the CTV and treatment plans in 6/20 patients due to the presence of pararectal SNs located outside the standard treatment volume. 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified abnormal tracer uptake in the iliac LN region in 2/19 patients. These abnormal LNs were negative on SPECT/CT suggesting a potential blockade of lymphatic drainage by metastatic LNs with a high tumour burden. Multimodality imaging which combines SPECT/CT prostate lymphoscintigraphy and 18 F-FCH PET/CT identified SNs outside standard pelvic CTVs or highly suspicious pelvic LNs in 40% of high-risk prostate cancer patients, highlighting the potential impact of this approach in RT treatment planning

  17. Choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents as additives for optimizing chromatographic behavior of caffeic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guizhen; Zhu, Tao; Lei, Yingjie [Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin (China)

    2015-10-15

    A series of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared using glycerol and choline chloride (ChCl), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) was used to analyze the spectra of glycerol, choline chloride and DESs based on glycerol and choline chloride. Then DESs were used as the additives of mobile phase to optimize chromatographic behavior of caffeic acid in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A 17-run Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to evaluate effect of DESs as additives by analyzing the maximum theoretical plate number. Three factors, reaction temperature (60 .deg. C, 80 .deg. C, 100 .deg. C), molar ratio of glycerol and choline chloride (2 : 1, 3 : 1, 4 : 1, n/n), and volume percent of additives (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, v/v), were investigated in BBD. The optimum experiment condition was that of reaction temperature (80 .deg. C), molar ratio of glycerol and ChCl (3 : 1, n/n), and volume percent of additive (0.10%, v/v). The mean chromatographic theoretical plate number of the caffeic acid this condition was 1567.5, and DESs as additives shorten the retention time and modify the chromatogram shape, proving DESs as additives for effective theoretical plate number and column efficiency in HPLC.

  18. The unmediated choline sensor based on layered double hydroxides in hydrogen peroxide detection mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this work,we have developed a novel choline biosensor on the basis of immobilization of choline oxidase (ChOx) by the attractive materials layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Amperometric detection of choline was evaluated by holding the modified electrode at 0.5 V (vs. SCE). Due to the special properties of LDHs ([Zn3-Al-Cl]),such as chemical inertness,high porosity,and swelling property,the [Zn3-Al-Cl]/ChOx modified electrode exhibited an enhanced analytical performance. The biosensor provided a linear response to choline over a concentration range from 3.7 × 10-6 to 6.3 × 10-4 M with a low detection limit of 3 × 10-7 M based on S/N=3. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant was calculated to be 1.38 mM. In addition,the interaction between ChOx and LDHs has also been investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy.

  19. Comparable Stability of Hoogsteen and Watson–Crick Base Pairs in Ionic Liquid Choline Dihydrogen Phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Hisae Tateishi-Karimata; Miki Nakano; Naoki Sugimoto

    2014-01-01

    The instability of Hoogsteen base pairs relative to Watson–Crick base pairs has limited biological applications of triplex-forming oligonucleotides. Hydrated ionic liquids (ILs) provide favourable environments for a wide range of chemical reactions and are known to impact the stabilities of Watson–Crick base pairs. We found that DNA triplex formation was significantly stabilized in hydrated choline dihydrogen phosphate as compared with an aqueous buffer at neutral pH. Interestingly, the stabi...

  20. Influence of PSA, PSA velocity and PSA doubling time on contrast-enhanced 18F-choline PET/CT detection rate in patients with rising PSA after radical prostatectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced 18F-choline PET/CT in restaging patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in relation to PSA, PSA velocity (PSAve) and PSA doubling time (PSAdt). PET/CT was performed in 49 patients (age range 58-87 years) with rising PSA (mean 4.13 ng/ml) who were divided in four groups according to PSA level: ≤1 ng/ml, 1 to ≤2 ng/ml, 2 to ≤4 ng/ml, and >4 ng/ml. PSAve and PSAdt were measured. PET and CT scans were interpreted separately and then together. PET/CT diagnosed relapse in 33 of the 49 patients (67%). The detection rates were 20%, 55%, 80% and 87% in the PSA groups ≤1, 1 to ≤2, 2 to ≤4 and >4 ng/ml, respectively. PET/CT was positive in 7 of 18 patients (38.9%) with a PSA ≤2 ng/ml, and in 26 of 31 (83.9%) with a PSA >2 ng/ml. PET/CT was positive in 7 of 25 patients (84%) with PSAdt ≤6 months, and in 12 of 24 patients (50%) with PSAdt >6 months, and was positive in 26 of 30 patients (86%) with a PSAve >2 ng/ml per year, and in 7 of 19 patients (36.8%) with PSAve ≤2 ng/ml per year. PET alone was positive in 31 of 49 patients (63.3%), and of these 31 patients, CT was negative in 14 but diagnosed bone lesions in 2 patients in whom PET alone was negative. CT with the administration of intravenous contrast medium did not provide any further information. Detection rate of 18F-choline imaging is closely related to PSA and PSA kinetics. In particular, 18F-choline PET/CT is recommended in patients with PSA >2 ng/ml, PSAdt ≤6 months and PSAve >2 ng/ml per year. CT is useful for detecting bone metastases that are not 18F-choline-avid. The use of intravenous contrast agent seems unnecessary. (orig.)

  1. Influence of PSA, PSA velocity and PSA doubling time on contrast-enhanced {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT detection rate in patients with rising PSA after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, Orazio [University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, Interventional, Rome (Italy); IRCCS Neuromed, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Pozzilli (Italy); Calabria, Ferdinando [IRCCS Neuromed, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Pozzilli (Italy); Tavolozza, Mario; Caracciolo, Cristiana Ragano; Orlacchio, Antonio; Danieli, Roberta; Simonetti, Giovanni [University ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, Interventional, Rome (Italy); Agro, Enrico Finazzi; Miano, Roberto [University Hospital ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Department of Urology, Rome (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT in restaging patients with prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy in relation to PSA, PSA velocity (PSAve) and PSA doubling time (PSAdt). PET/CT was performed in 49 patients (age range 58-87 years) with rising PSA (mean 4.13 ng/ml) who were divided in four groups according to PSA level: {<=}1 ng/ml, 1 to {<=}2 ng/ml, 2 to {<=}4 ng/ml, and >4 ng/ml. PSAve and PSAdt were measured. PET and CT scans were interpreted separately and then together. PET/CT diagnosed relapse in 33 of the 49 patients (67%). The detection rates were 20%, 55%, 80% and 87% in the PSA groups {<=}1, 1 to {<=}2, 2 to {<=}4 and >4 ng/ml, respectively. PET/CT was positive in 7 of 18 patients (38.9%) with a PSA {<=}2 ng/ml, and in 26 of 31 (83.9%) with a PSA >2 ng/ml. PET/CT was positive in 7 of 25 patients (84%) with PSAdt {<=}6 months, and in 12 of 24 patients (50%) with PSAdt >6 months, and was positive in 26 of 30 patients (86%) with a PSAve >2 ng/ml per year, and in 7 of 19 patients (36.8%) with PSAve {<=}2 ng/ml per year. PET alone was positive in 31 of 49 patients (63.3%), and of these 31 patients, CT was negative in 14 but diagnosed bone lesions in 2 patients in whom PET alone was negative. CT with the administration of intravenous contrast medium did not provide any further information. Detection rate of {sup 18}F-choline imaging is closely related to PSA and PSA kinetics. In particular, {sup 18}F-choline PET/CT is recommended in patients with PSA >2 ng/ml, PSAdt {<=}6 months and PSAve >2 ng/ml per year. CT is useful for detecting bone metastases that are not {sup 18}F-choline-avid. The use of intravenous contrast agent seems unnecessary. (orig.)

  2. 放射性核素标记胆碱与18F-FDG PET肿瘤显像的对比研究%Comparison choline with 18F-FDG PET in various tumors imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚军; 张慧娟

    2010-01-01

    18F-FDG PET has become the preferred method of staging and restaging of many malignant neoplasms. Its application has increased diagnostic accuracy and exerted a considerable impact on the treatment of patients. 18F-FDG PET has also become extremely valuable in therapy efficacy monitoring of many malignant neoplasms. Choline is critical for cellular membrane structures and function. Choline metabolism increases in malignant neoplasms. 11C-/18F-choline PET has been used in diagnosis and detection of many malignant neoplasms and metastases. This paper reviews the value of 18F-FDG and 11C-/18F-choline PET in tumors imaging and compares their advantages and limitations.%18F-FDG PET是目前临床上许多恶性肿瘤分期和再分期的首选检查方法,可明显提高恶性肿瘤的诊断准确性,对患者的治疗方案的选择产生了很大影响,而且在恶性肿瘤的疗效监测中也有很大价值.胆碱是保持细胞膜结构和功能完整性的重要成分,恶性肿瘤的胆碱代谢增高.11C-/18F-胴碱PET在临床上已用于许多恶性肿瘤的诊断及转移瘤的检出.该文回顾了18F-FDG和11C-/18F-胆碱PET在肿瘤显像中的应用价值,并比较了其优势和限度.

  3. [18F]Choline PET/CT and stereotactic body radiotherapy on treatment decision making of oligometastatic prostate cancer patients: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new entity of patients with recurrent prostate cancer limited to a small number of active metastatic lesions is having growing interest: the oligometastatic patients. Patients with oligometastatic disease could eventually be managed by treating all the active lesions with local therapy, i.e. either surgery or ablative stereotactic body radiotherapy. This study aims to assess the impact of [18F]Choline ([18F]FMCH) PET/CT and the use stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients (pts) with oligometastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Twenty-nine pts with oligometastatic PCa (≤3 synchronous active lesions detected with [18F]FMCHPET/CT) were treated with repeated salvage SBRT until disease progression (development of > three active synchronous metastases). Primary endpoint was systemic therapy-free survival measured from the baseline [18F]FMCHPET/CT. A total of 45 lesions were treated with SBRT. After a median follow-up of 11.5 months (range 3–40 months), 20 pts were still in the study and did not receive any systemic therapy. Nine pts started systemic therapy, and the median time of the primary endpoint was 39.7 months (CI 12.20–62.14 months). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was recorded. Repeated salvage [18F]FMCHPET/CT-guided SBRT is well tolerated and could defer the beginning of systemic therapy in selected patients with oligometastatic PCa

  4. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials. PMID:26116384

  5. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtroma, Alex I. [Christopher Newport U.; Buhlera, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport U.; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport U.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  6. Electrochemical synthesis of nanosized TiO{sub 2} nanopowder involving choline chloride based ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anicai, Liana, E-mail: lanicai@itcnet.ro [POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Center of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest, 060042 (Romania); Petica, Aurora [Leather and Footwear Research Institute (ICPI), Ion Minulescu 93, Bucharest, 031215 (Romania); Patroi, Delia; Marinescu, Virgil; Prioteasa, Paula [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Splaiul Unirii 313, Bucharest (Romania); Costovici, Stefania [POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Center of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest, 060042 (Romania)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanopowder electrochemically prepared using choline chloride based ionic liquids. • The new proposed method allowed high anodic synthesis efficiencies of minimum 92%. • High surface area of the electrochemically synthesized titania nanopowders. • Enhanced photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: The paper presents some experimental results regarding the electrochemical synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanopowders through anodic dissolution of Ti metal in choline chloride based eutectic mixtures (DES). A detailed characterization of the obtained titania has been performed, using various techniques, including XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, SEM associated with EDX analysis, BET and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra. The anodic behavior of Ti electrode in DES has been also investigated. The photoreactivity of the synthesized materials was evaluated for the degradation of Orange II dye under UV (λ = 365 nm) and visible light irradiation. An anodic synthesis efficiency of minimum 92% has been determined. The as-synthesized TiO{sub 2} showed amorphous structure and a calcination post-treatment at temperatures between 400 and 600 °C yielded anatase. The anodically obtained nanocrystalline oxides have crystallite sizes of 8–18 nm, a high surface area and enhanced photocatalytic effect.

  7. Electrochemical Polishing Applications and EIS of a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtrom, Alex I. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Buhler, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Minimal surface roughness is a critical feature for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used to engineer particle accelerators. Current methods for polishing Niobium cavities typically utilize solutions containing a mixture of concentrated sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid. Polishing processes such as these are effective, yet there are many hazards and costs associated with the use (and safe disposal) of the concentrated acid solutions. An alternative method for electrochemical polishing of the cavities was explored using a novel ionic liquid solution containing choline chloride. Potentiostatic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to analyze the ionic polishing solution. Final surface roughness of the Nb was found to be comparable to that of the acid-polishing method, as assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This indicates that ionic liquid-based electrochemical polishing of Nb is a viable replacement for acid-based methods for preparation of SRF cavities.

  8. Comparing life cycle energy and GHG emissions of bio-based PET, recycled PET, PLA and man-made cellulosics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the environmental profiles of petrochemical PET, (partially) bio-based PET, recycled PET, and recycled (partially) bio-based PET, and compare them with other bio-based materials, namely PLA (polylactic acid, a bio-based polyester) and man-made cellulose fibers

  9. Dose-escalation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer - evaluation of quality of life with and without 18F-choline PET-CT detected simultaneous integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In comparison to the conventional whole-prostate dose escalation, an integrated boost to the macroscopic malignant lesion might potentially improve tumor control rates without increasing toxicity. Quality of life after radiotherapy (RT) with vs. without 18F-choline PET-CT detected simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) was prospectively evaluated in this study. Whole body image acquisition in supine patient position followed 1 h after injection of 178-355MBq 18F-choline. SIB was defined by a tumor-to-background uptake value ratio > 2 (GTVPET). A dose of 76Gy was prescribed to the prostate (PTVprostate) in 2Gy fractions, with or without SIB up to 80Gy. Patients treated with (n = 46) vs. without (n = 21) SIB were surveyed prospectively before (A), at the last day of RT (B) and a median time of two (C) and 19 month (D) after RT to compare QoL changes applying a validated questionnaire (EPIC - expanded prostate cancer index composite). With a median cut-off standard uptake value (SUV) of 3, a median GTVPET of 4.0 cm3 and PTVboost (GTVPET with margins) of 17.3 cm3 was defined. No significant differences were found for patients treated with vs. without SIB regarding urinary and bowel QoL changes at times B, C and D (mean differences ≤3 points for all comparisons). Significantly decreasing acute urinary and bowel score changes (mean changes > 5 points in comparison to baseline level at time A) were found for patients with and without SIB. However, long-term urinary and bowel QoL (time D) did not differ relative to baseline levels - with mean urinary and bowel function score changes < 3 points in both groups (median changes = 0 points). Only sexual function scores decreased significantly (> 5 points) at time D. Treatment planning with 18F-choline PET-CT allows a dose escalation to a macroscopic intraprostatic lesion without significantly increasing toxicity

  10. Quantum Chemical Insight into the Interactions and Thermodynamics Present in Choline Chloride Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Deakyne, Carol A; Baker, Gary A

    2016-07-14

    We report quantum chemical calculations performed on three popular deep eutectic solvents (DESs) in order to elucidate the molecular interactions, charge transfer interactions, and thermodynamics associated with these systems. The DESs studied comprise 1:2 choline chloride/urea (reline), 1:2 choline chloride/ethylene glycol (ethaline), and 1:1 choline chloride/malonic acid (maloline). The excellent correlation between calculated and experimental vibrational spectra allowed for identification of dominant interactions in the DES systems. The DESs were found to be stabilized by both conventional hydrogen bonds and C-H···O/C-H···π interactions between the components. The hydrogen-bonding network established in the DES is clearly distinct from that which exists within the neat hydrogen-bond donor dimer. Charge decomposition analysis indicates significant charge transfer from choline and chloride to the hydrogen-bond donor with a higher contribution from the cation, and a density of states analysis confirms the direction of the charge transfer. Consequently, the sum of the bond orders of the choline-Cl(-) interactions in the DESs correlates directly with the melting temperatures of the DESs, a correlation that offers insight into the effect of the tuning of the choline-Cl(-) interactions by the hydrogen-bond donors on the physical properties of the DESs. Finally, the differences in the vibrational entropy changes upon DES formation are consistent with the trend in the overall entropy changes upon DES formation. PMID:27268431

  11. PET-CT11C-胆碱和18F-FDG显像剂联合对肺占位病变鉴别诊断价值分析%Joint value analysis of 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET-CT in pulmonary occupying lesions diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕学鹏; 董伟; 刘立恒; 赵书强; 郑劲松; 杨国仁

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨18F-氟化脱氧葡萄糖(18F-FDG)与11C-胆碱PET-CT联合应用在肺部占位性病变鉴别诊断中的价值.方法:选取196例肺部占位性病变患者,注射造影剂18F-FDG和11C-胆碱后行PET-CT检查和诊断,观察2种造影剂PET-CT检查方法的标准摄取值(SUV)以及单独和联合应用的诊断灵敏度、特异性和准确率.结果:良性和恶性患者的18F-FDG(2.20±1.23 vs 5.29±2.75)及11C-胆碱(0.81±0.79 vs 3.28±1.76)的SUVmax差异有统计学意义,P<0.01;18F-FDG和11C-胆碱在良性及恶性患者中差异有统计学意义,P<0.01.18F-FDG和11C-胆碱PET-CT各自的灵敏度(58.16% vs 58.67%)、特异性(78.05%vs 84.00%)和准确率(80.61% vs 85.20%)差异无统计学意义,P>0.05.联合诊断的灵敏度、特异性和准确率分别为53.57%(105/196)、90.11% (82/91)和94.39% (185/196),与单独应用比较,灵敏度差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),特异性和准确率均提高,P<0.01.结论:将18 F-FDG和11C-胆碱PET-CT检查联合运用于同一患者进行综合诊断能明显提高肺部占位病变的诊断水平.%OBJECTIVE: To explore the diagnosis value of the combination of 18 F-f luorinated deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and 11C-choline PET-CT imaging in pulmonary occupying lesions. METHODS: Consecutive 196 patients with pulmonary occupying lesions from February 2009 to April 2011 in our hospital were performed 18F-FDG and 11C-choline PET -CT imaging, and the standardized uptake value (standard uptake value, SUV) of each tracer was measured for each lesion. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were compared for each single and the combination technique, respectively. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in 18F-FDG SUVmax(2.20+1.23 vs 5. 29 + 2.75, P0. 05). Combining 18F-FDG and 11C-choline PET-CT imaging significantly increased the diagnostic specificity (90.11%, 82/91) and accuracy (94. 39%, 185/196) than 18F-FDG or 11C-choline PET

  12. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  13. Interaction Mechanism Insights on the Solvation of Fullerene B(80)with Choline-based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gregorio; Atilhan, Mert; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-09-24

    Beyond carbon allotropes, other nanostructures such as fullerene B80 are attracting a growing interest due to their potential applications. The use of new materials based on fullerene B80 is still in a premature stage; however many of these applications would require the use of B80 in solution. This paper reports an unprecedented density functional theory (DFT) analysis on the interaction mechanism between B80 and two choline-based ionic liquids as a first insight for the fullerene B80 solvation by ionic liquids. The analysis of properties such as binding energies, charge distributions or intermolecular interactions shed light on the main features, which should govern interaction between ionic liquids and fullerene B80. In addition, the optimization of systems composed by six ionic pairs around a fullerene B80 has supplied some information about the first solvation shell at the molecular level. As a summary, this paper provides the first insights in the rational design of ionic liquids with suitable properties for the solvation of B80.

  14. PeneloPET, a Monte Carlo PET simulation tool based on PENELOPE: features and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, S; Herraiz, J L; Vicente, E; Udias, J M [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, as an essential tool for the research and development of new scanners and for advanced image reconstruction. PeneloPET, a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo tool, is presented and validated in this work. PeneloPET is based on PENELOPE, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the transport in matter of electrons, positrons and photons, with energies from a few hundred eV to 1 GeV. PENELOPE is robust, fast and very accurate, but it may be unfriendly to people not acquainted with the FORTRAN programming language. PeneloPET is an easy-to-use application which allows comprehensive simulations of PET systems within PENELOPE. Complex and realistic simulations can be set by modifying a few simple input text files. Different levels of output data are available for analysis, from sinogram and lines-of-response (LORs) histogramming to fully detailed list mode. These data can be further exploited with the preferred programming language, including ROOT. PeneloPET simulates PET systems based on crystal array blocks coupled to photodetectors and allows the user to define radioactive sources, detectors, shielding and other parts of the scanner. The acquisition chain is simulated in high level detail; for instance, the electronic processing can include pile-up rejection mechanisms and time stamping of events, if desired. This paper describes PeneloPET and shows the results of extensive validations and comparisons of simulations against real measurements from commercial acquisition systems. PeneloPET is being extensively employed to improve the image quality of commercial PET systems and for the development of new ones.

  15. Toxicity profile of choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents for fungi and Cyprinus carpio fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneidi, Ibrahim; Hayyan, Maan; Mohd Ali, Ozair

    2016-04-01

    An investigation on the toxicological assessment of 10 choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) towards four fungi strains and Cyprinus carpio fish was conducted. ChCl was combined with materials from different chemical groups such as alcohols, sugars, acids and others to form DESs. The study was carried out on the individual DES components, their aqueous mixture before DES formation and their formed DESs. The agar disc diffusion method was followed to investigate their toxicity on four fungi strains selected as a model of eukaryotic microorganisms (Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Aspergillus niger, Lentinus tigrinus and Candida cylindracea). Among these DESs, ChCl:ZnCl2 exhibited the highest inhibition zone diameter towards the tested fungi growth in vitro, followed by the acidic group (malonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid). Another study was conducted to test the acute toxicity and determine the lethal concentration at 50 % (LC50) of the same DESs on C. carpio fish. The inhibition range and LC50 of DESs were found to be different from their individual components. DESs were found to be less toxic than their mixture or individual components. The LC50 of ChCl:MADES is much higher than that of ChCl:MAMix. Moreover, the DESs acidic group showed a lower inhibition zone on fungi growth. Thus, DESs should be considered as new components with different physicochemical properties and toxicological profiles, and not merely compositions of compounds. PMID:26743645

  16. Solubilities and thermodynamic properties of CO2 in choline-chloride based deep eutectic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Solubilities of carbon dioxide in three deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been reported. • The experimental data were reduced to Henry’s law constants. • The Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes were calculated. • Relationship between solubility and structure of DESs was developed. - Abstract: The solubilities of CO2 in three kinds of deep eutectic solvents, (choline chloride + phenol), (choline chloride + diethylene glycol) and (choline chloride + triethylene glycol), were determined at temperatures ranging from 293.15 K to 323.15 K under pressures up to 600.0 kPa using isochoric saturation method. The mole ratios of choline chloride to phenol were selected as 1:2, 1:3 and 1:4, the others as 1:3 and 1:4. Henry’s constants and thermodynamic properties such as standard Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy changes of CO2 solvation were calculated from the correlation of solubility data. Results revealed that the solubility of CO2 increased with increasing pressure and decreased with increasing temperature. The enthalpies of solution were negative at all conditions

  17. MR-based Motion Correction for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Li, Quanzheng; Fakhri, Georges El

    2012-01-01

    PET image quality is limited by patient motion. Emission data are blurred due to cardiac and/or respiratory motion. Although spatial resolution is 4 mm for standard clinical whole-body PET scanners, the effective resolution can be a low as 1 cm due to motion. Additionally, the deformation of attenuation medium causes image artifacts. Previously, gating is used to “freeze” the motion, but leads to significantly increased noise level. Simultaneous PET-MR modality offers a new way to perform PET motion correction. MR can be used to measure 3D motion fields, which can then be incorporated into the iterative PET reconstruction to obtain motion corrected PET images. In this report, we present MR imaging techniques to acquire dynamic images, a non-rigid image registration algorithm to extract motion fields from acquired MR images, and a PET reconstruction algorithm with motion correction. We also present results from both phantom and in-vivo animal PET-MR studies. We demonstrate that MR-based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR improves image quality and lesion detectability compared to gating and to no motion correction. PMID:23178089

  18. Toxicity and quality of life after choline-PET/CT directed salvage lymph node dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy in nodal recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous study we demonstrated that, based on 11C/18 F-choline positron emission tomography-computerized-tomography as a diagnostic tool, salvage lymph node dissection (LND) plus adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) is feasible for treatment of pelvic/retroperitoneal nodal recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa). However, the toxicity of this combined treatment strategy has not been systematically investigated before. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the acute and late toxicity and quality of life of ART after LND in pelvic/retroperitoneal nodal recurrent PCa. 43 patients with nodal recurrent PCa were treated with 46 LND followed by ART (mean 49.6 Gy total dose) at the sites of nodal recurrence. Toxicity of ART was analysed by physically examination (31/43, 72.1%), by requesting 15 frequent items of adverse events from the Common-Terminology-Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0-catalogue and by review of medical records. QLQ-C30 (EORTC quality of life assessment) and PR25 (prostate cancer module) questionnaires were used to investigate quality of life. Toxicity was evaluated before starting of ART, during ART (acute toxicity), after ART (mean 2.3 months) and at end of follow up (mean 3.2 years after end of ART) reflecting late toxicity. 71.7% (33/46) of 46 ART were treatment of pelvic, 10.9% (5/46) of retroperitoneal only and 28.3% (13/46) of pelvic and retroperitoneal regions. Overall 52 symptoms representing toxicities were observed before ART, 107 during ART, 88 after end of ART and 52 at latest follow up. Leading toxicities during ART were diarrhoea (19%, 20/107), urinary incontinence (16%, 17/107) and fatigue (16%, 17/107). The spectrum of late toxicities was almost equal to those before beginning of ART. No grade 3 adverse events or chronic lymphedema at extremities were observed. We observed no clear correlation between localisation of treated regions, technique of ART and frequency or severity of toxicities. Mean quality of life at final evaluation

  19. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  20. Prospective comparison of computed tomography, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography for preoperative lymph node staging in prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, Matthias M.; Retz, Margitta; Nawroth, Roman; Kuebler, Hubert; Maurer, Tobias; Thalgott, Mark; Gschwend, Juergen E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Souvatzoglou, Michael; Schwaiger, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Gramer, Bettina M.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Eiber, Matthias [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Weirich, Gregor [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Pathology and Pathologic Anatomy, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rondak, Ina-Christine [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Krause, Bernd [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with computed tomography (CT) for preoperative lymph node (LN) staging in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Between June 2010 and May 2012, CT, DWI and [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were performed preoperatively in 33 intermediate- and high-risk PCa patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) and extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) including obturator fossa and internal, external and common iliac fields. Patient- and field-based performance characteristics for all three imaging techniques based on histopathological results are reported. Imaging techniques were compared by means of the area under the curve (AUC). LN metastases were detected in 92 of 1,012 (9 %) LNs from 14 of 33 (42 %) patients. On patient-based analysis, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for CT were 57, 68 and 64 %, respectively, for DWI were 57, 79 and 70 %, respectively, and for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were 57, 90 and 76 %, respectively. On field-based analysis, these numbers for CT were 47, 94 and 88 %, respectively, for DWI were 56, 97 and 92 %, respectively, and for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT were 62, 96 and 92 %, respectively. Neither DWI nor [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT performed significantly better than CT on pairwise comparison of patient- and field-based results. All three imaging techniques exhibit a rather low sensitivity with less than two thirds of LN metastases being detected on patient- and field-based analysis. Overall diagnostic efficacy did not differ significantly between imaging techniques, whereas distinct performance characteristics, esp. patient-based specificity, were best for [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT followed by DWI and CT. (orig.)

  1. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choline magnesium trisalicylate is used to relieve the pain, tenderness, inflammation (swelling), and stiffness caused by arthritis and painful ... used to relieve pain and lower fever. Choline magnesium trisalicylate is in a class of nonsteroidal anti- ...

  2. Novel choline-based ionic liquids as safe electrolytes for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Tianqiao; Zhang, Lingzhi; Wang, Jinglun; Mai, Yongjin; Yan, Xiaodan; Zhao, Xinyue

    2016-10-01

    Three choline-based ionic liquids functionalized with trimethylsilyl, allyl, and cynoethyl groups are synthesized in an inexpensive route as safe electrolytes for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries. The thermal stabilities, viscosities, conductivities, and electrochemical windows of these ILs are reported. Hybrid electrolytes were formulated by doping with 0.6 M LiPF6/0.4 M lithium oxalydifluoroborate (LiODFB) as salts and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) as co-solvent. By using 0.6 M LiPF6/0.4 M LiODFB trimethylsilylated choline-based IL (SN1IL-TFSI)/DMC as electrolyte, LiCoO2/graphite full cell showed excellent cycling performance with a capacity of 152 mAh g-1 and 99% capacity retention over 90 cycles at a cut-off voltage of 4.4 V. The propagation rate of SN1IL-TFSI)/DMC electrolyte is only one quarter of the commercial electrolyte (1 M LiPF6 EC/DEC/DMC, v/v/v = 1/1/1), suggesting a better safety feature.

  3. A novel biosensor array with a wheel-like pattern for glucose, lactate and choline based on electrochemiluminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenyu; Xu, Linru; Wu, Suozhu; Su, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging provides a superior approach to achieve array detection because of its ability for ultrasensitive multiplex analysis. In this paper, we reported a novel ECL imaging biosensor array modified with an enzyme/carbon nanotubes/chitosan composite film for the determination of glucose, choline and lactate. The biosensor array was constructed by integrating a patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) glass plate with six perforated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) covers. ECL is generated by the electrochemical reaction between luminol and hydrogen peroxide that is produced by the enzyme catalysed oxidation of different substrates with molecular oxygen, and ECL images were captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The separated electrochemical micro-cells enabled simultaneous assay of six samples at different concentrations. From the established calibration curves, the detection limits were 14 μM for glucose, 40 μM for lactate and 97 μM for choline, respectively. Moreover, multicomponent assays and cross reactivity were also studied, both of which were satisfied for the analysis. This biosensing platform based on ECL imaging shows many distinct advantages, including miniaturization, low cost, and multi-functionalization. We believe that this novel ECL imaging biosensor platform will have potential applications in clinical diagnostics, medicine and food inspection. PMID:25068822

  4. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy;

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  5. 11C-胆碱PET在前列腺癌中的临床应用探讨%Application of 11C-choline PET in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴书其; 黄钢

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignant tumor in elder male.But it is difficult to visualize using conventional techniques.11C-choline is one of newly developed positron tumor imaging agent,which is being used in the imaging of prostate cancer recently because of its metabolism characteristic.We reviewed the use of it in diagnosis of prostate cancer by comparing with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose,11C-acetate,11C-methionine.%前列腺癌是老年男性的常见恶性肿瘤,但是常规显像困难.11C-胆碱是新近研究较多的一种正电子肿瘤阳性显像剂,因它不通过泌尿系统排泄而被用于前列腺癌的临床诊断中.通过11C-胆碱、18F-氟脱氧葡萄糖、11C-乙酸和11C-甲硫氨酸在前列腺癌PET结果的比较,总结了11C-胆碱PET在前列腺癌的临床应用近况.

  6. Choline-containing bacteriophage receptors in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, R. (Rafael); Garcia, E.; Garcia, P.; Ronda, C; Tomasz, A.

    1982-01-01

    Choline-containing teichoic acid seems to be essential for the adsorption of bacteriophage Dp-1 to pneumococci. This conclusion is based on the following observations: In contrast to pneumococci grown in choline-containing medium, cells grown in medium containing ethanolamine or other submethylated aminoalcohols instead of choline were found to be resistant to infection by Dp-1. Live choline-grown bacteria and heat- or UV-inactivated cells and purified cell walls prepared from these cells wer...

  7. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A strategy for extraction of protein based on DES-coated magnetic graphene oxide. • The deep eutectic solvents were based on choline chloride. • Bovine serum albumin was used as the analyte. • The material prepared works for the acidic but not the basic or the neutral proteins. - Abstract: Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4@GO) to form Fe3O4@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe3O4@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4@GO-DES. The UV–vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe3O4@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe3O4@GO and Fe3O4@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe3O4@GO-DES performs better than Fe3O4@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L−1 Na2HPO4 contained 1 mol L−1 NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled

  8. Intrinsic Radiation in Lutetium Based PET Detector: Advantages and Disadvantages

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Qingyang

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium (Lu) based scintillators such as LSO and LYSO, are widely used in modern PET detectors due to their high stopping power for 511 keV gamma rays, high light yield and short decay time. However, 2.6% of naturally occurring Lu is 176Lu, a long-lived radioactive element including a beta decay and three major simultaneous gamma decays. This phenomenon introduces random events to PET systems that affects the system performance. On the other hand, the advantages of intrinsic radiation of 176Lu (IRL) continues to be exploited. In this paper, research literatures about IRL in PET detectors are reviewed. Details about the adverse effects of IRL to PET and their solutions, as well as the useful applications are presented and discussed.

  9. Dixon imaging-based partial volume correction improves quantification of choline detected by breast 3D-MRSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Gruber, Stephan; Bogner, Wolfgang; Trattnig, Siegfried; Chmelik, Marek [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, MR Center of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Baltzer, Pascal A.T.; Helbich, Thomas H. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-14

    Our aim was to develop a partial volume (PV) correction method of choline (Cho) signals detected by breast 3D-magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI), using information from water/fat-Dixon MRI. Following institutional review board approval, five breast cancer patients were measured at 3 T. 3D-MRSI (1 cm{sup 3} resolution, duration ∝11 min) and Dixon MRI (1 mm{sup 3}, ∝2 min) were measured in vivo and in phantoms. Glandular/lesion tissue was segmented from water/fat-Dixon MRI and transformed to match the resolution of 3D-MRSI. The resulting PV values were used to correct Cho signals. Our method was validated on a two-compartment phantom (choline/water and oil). PV values were correlated with the spectroscopic water signal. Cho signal variability, caused by partial-water/fat content, was tested in 3D-MRSI voxels located in/near malignant lesions. Phantom measurements showed good correlation (r = 0.99) with quantified 3D-MRSI water signals, and better homogeneity after correction. The dependence of the quantified Cho signal on the water/fat voxel composition was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced using Dixon MRI-based PV correction, compared to the original uncorrected data (1.60-fold to 3.12-fold) in patients. The proposed method allows quantification of the Cho signal in glandular/lesion tissue independent of water/fat composition in breast 3D-MRSI. This can improve the reproducibility of breast 3D-MRSI, particularly important for therapy monitoring. (orig.)

  10. Enzyme-Catalyzed Henry Reaction in Choline Chloride-Based Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xuemei; Zhang, Suoqin; Zheng, Liangyu

    2016-01-01

    The enzyme-catalyzed Henry reaction was realized using deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a reaction medium. The lipase from Aspergillus niger (lipase AS) showed excellent catalytic activity toward the substrates aromatic aldehydes and nitromethane in choline chloride:glycerol at a molar ratio of 1:2. Addition of 30 vol% water to DES further improved the lipase activity and inhibited DES-catalyzed transformation. A final yield of 92.2% for the lipase AS-catalyzed Henry reaction was achieved under optimized reaction conditions in only 4 h. In addition, the lipase AS activity was improved by approximately 3-fold in a DES-water mixture compared with that in pure water, which produced a final yield of only 33.4%. Structural studies with fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the established strong hydrogen bonds between DES and water may be the main driving force that affects the spatial conformation of the enzyme, leading to a change in lipase activity. The methodology was also extended to the aza-Henry reaction, which easily occurred in contrast to that in pure water. The enantioselectivity of both Henry and aza-Henry reactions was not found. However, the results are still remarkable, as we report the first use of DES as a reaction medium in a lipase-catalyzed Henry reaction. PMID:26437947

  11. A facile and practical biosensor for choline based on manganese dioxide nanoparticles synthesized in-situ at the surface of electrode by one-step electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guangxia; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Weixiang; Wei, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a facile and sensitive biocompatible biosensor based on Nafion/choline oxidase/manganese dioxide composite film was developed for the determination of choline chloride. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanoparticles, possessing the advantages of large specific surface areas, good hydrophilicity, great permeability as well as excellent biocompatibility, were synthesized in-situ at the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by one-step electrodeposition. And then, choline oxidase (ChOx) was immobilized on the MnO2 modified GCE with coating a Nafion film to hold the ChOx/MnO2 film on the electrode surface firmly. Upon optimized conditions, a linear range of 8.0-1.0 mM was obtained for the sensor in a cyclic voltammetry method, with a detection limit as low as 5.0 µM. Besides, the biosensor was successfully employed to detect choline in milk, milk powder and feedstuff samples, providing a promising alternative for the practical application. PMID:26695320

  12. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  13. LSO based dual slice helical CT and PET demonstrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valastyan, I., E-mail: vivan@atomki.hu [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Kerek, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Imrek, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-05-15

    Two demonstrators, a spiralCT and a miniPET, have been designed and constructed for educational purposes. Computed tomographs (CTs) and positron emission tomographs (PETs) are some of the most commonly used structural and functional imaging devices in medicine, respectively. There is a need for transparent demonstrators where the principles of the different modalities and their functions are presented. The aim of the developments of these systems was to present the major building blocks of CT and PET for undergraduate students. Photon detection in both systems is based on small pixelised scintillation crystals with position sensitive PMT readout. Similar analogue and digital data processing based on FPGA technique is applied for the demonstrators and common image reconstruction and presentation software components are used.

  14. LSO based dual slice helical CT and PET demonstrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valastyán, I.; Kerek, A.; Imrek, J.; Hegyesi, G.; Kalinka, G.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.

    2011-05-01

    Two demonstrators, a spiralCT and a miniPET, have been designed and constructed for educational purposes. Computed tomographs (CTs) and positron emission tomographs (PETs) are some of the most commonly used structural and functional imaging devices in medicine, respectively. There is a need for transparent demonstrators where the principles of the different modalities and their functions are presented. The aim of the developments of these systems was to present the major building blocks of CT and PET for undergraduate students. Photon detection in both systems is based on small pixelised scintillation crystals with position sensitive PMT readout. Similar analogue and digital data processing based on FPGA technique is applied for the demonstrators and common image reconstruction and presentation software components are used.

  15. Highly sensitive choline biosensor based on carbon nanotube-modified Pt electrode combined with sol-gel immobilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhao; ZHAO Zixia; QIN Xia; HUANG Jiadong; SHI Haibin; WU Baoyan; CHEN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    A novel amperometric choline biosensor has been fabricated with choline oxidase (ChOx) immobilized by the sol-gel method on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified platinum electrode to improve the sensitivity and the anti-interferential property of the sensor.By analyzing the electrocatalytic activity of the modified electrode by MWCNT,it was found that MWCNT could not only improve the current response to H2O2 but also decrease the electrocatalytic potential.The effects of experimental variables such as the buffer solutions,pH and the amount of loading enzyme were investigated for the optimum analytical performance.This sensor shows sensitive determination of choline with a linear range from 5.0×10-6 to 1.0×10-4 mol/L when the operating pH and potential are 7.2 and 0.15 V,respectively.The detection limit of choline was 5.0×10-7 mol/L.Selectivity for choline was 9.48 μA.(mmol/L)-1.The biosensor exhibits excellent anti-interferential property and good stability,retaining 85% of its original current value even after a month.It has been applied to the determination of choline in human serum.

  16. Magnetic graphene oxide modified with choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvent for the solid-phase extraction of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yanhua; Wang, Yuzhi, E-mail: wyzss@hnu.edu.cn; Pan, Qi; Wang, Ying; Ding, Xueqin; Xu, Kaijia; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2015-06-02

    Highlights: • A strategy for extraction of protein based on DES-coated magnetic graphene oxide. • The deep eutectic solvents were based on choline chloride. • Bovine serum albumin was used as the analyte. • The material prepared works for the acidic but not the basic or the neutral proteins. - Abstract: Four kinds of green deep eutectic solvents (DESs) based on choline chloride (ChCl) have been synthesized and coated on the surface of magnetic graphene oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO) to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein. X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were employed to characterize Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES, and the results indicated the successful preparation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES. The UV–vis spectrophotometer was used to measure the concentration of protein after extraction. Single factor experiments proved that the extraction amount was influenced by the types of DESs, solution temperature, solution ionic strength, extraction time, protein concentration and the amount of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES. Comparison of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES was carried out by extracting bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme. The experimental results showed that the proposed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO-DES performs better than Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@GO in the extraction of acidic protein. Desorption of protein was carried out by eluting the solid extractant with 0.005 mol L{sup −1} Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} contained 1 mol L{sup −1} NaCl. The obtained elution efficiency was about 90.9%. Attributed to the convenient magnetic separation, the solid extractant could be easily recycled.

  17. Intrinsic Radiation in Lutetium Based PET Detector: Advantages and Disadvantages

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Qingyang

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium (Lu) based scintillators such as LSO and LYSO, are widely used in modern PET detectors due to their high stopping power for 511 keV gamma rays, high light yield and short decay time. However, 2.6% of naturally occurring Lu is 176Lu, a long-lived radioactive element including a beta decay and three major simultaneous gamma decays. This phenomenon introduces random events to PET systems that affects the system performance. On the other hand, the advantages of intrinsic radiation of 176...

  18. PET and PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article provides an overview of the current literature data regarding the value of PET and PET/CT for imaging of prostate cancer. Most widely used PET tracers for prostate cancer imaging are 11C-acetate and 11C- or 18F-labeled choline. Available literature data on the performance of PET and PET/CT in the detection of the primary malignancy as well as local or distant metastases are presented and discussed. In addition, our own preliminary results regarding the diagnostic efficacy of 11C-choline PET and PET/CT in 43 patients with suspected prostate cancer are provided. The prevalence of prostate cancer in this patient sample was 55.8%. PET and PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 88% with a specificity of 63% in the detection of the primary prostate cancer. The sensitivity in the detection of metastatic spread was 77% and no false-positives were found. The possible value and limitations of combined PET/CT systems when compared to stand alone PET scanners are discussed. PET and PET/CT is at present the single imaging modality providing functional information not only regarding the primary malignancy but also its metastases. This unique feature distinguishes PET from MRI complemented with magnetic resonance spectroscopy - a competing procedure. Our own results as well as the still limited literature data suggest, that PET and PET/CT may prove to be useful methods for imaging of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  19. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  20. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  1. Electrochemical Behavior of Niobium Electrodeposited 316 Stainless Steel Bipolar Plate for PEMFC in Choline Chloride Based Ionic Liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Caihong; LIANG Chenghao; HUANG Naibao

    2015-01-01

    Niobium was electrodeposited on 316 stainless steel bipolar plates of a fuel cell in water and air-stable choline chloride based ionic liquids. The electrochemical corruption property of bipolar plates in simulated PEMFC environment was investigated. It was showed that the plating iflm was distributed on the surface of 316 stainless steel like isolated islands with height less than 50 nm. The XPS, XRD results showed that a smooth and strong chemical inert iflm of NbO and Nb2O5 was formed on the surface of 316 stainless steel. In simulated cathodic condition, the corrosion potential of Nb coated stainless steel was improved by 244 mV, whilst in an anodic condition, it was improved by 105 mV. The current densities for the coated 316 stainless steel were decreased to 2.479 4 µA•cm-2 from 14.810 µA•cm-2 at-0.1 V and to 0.576 µA•cm-2 from 13.417 µA/•cm-2 at 0.6 V, respectively. It was implied that the niobium coating effectively decreased the corrosion rate. The results of the electrochemical tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was greatly improved after coated with niobium.

  2. Plasticizing effect of choline chloride/urea eutectic-based ionic liquid on physicochemical properties of agarose films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Adlie Shamsuri

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Agarose films were formed with the addition of 30 to 70 wt% choline chloride/urea eutectic-based ionic liquid (ChCl/Urea. The ChCl/Urea was prepared through complexation at a 1:2 mole ratio. The films were prepared by dissolving ChCl/Urea in distilled water followed by dispersion of the agarose at 95 °C. The solution was gelled at room temperature, and the formed gel was dried in an oven overnight at 70 °C. Mechanical testing indicated that the agarose film containing 60 wt% ChCl/Urea had higher tensile extension and tensile strain at break compared to the pristine agarose film. The addition of ChCl/Urea also reduced the glass transition temperature (Tg of agarose films. Cross-section SEM images of the agarose films showed that surface roughness disappeared with the incorporation of ChCl/Urea. FTIR spectra confirmed the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between agarose and ChCl/Urea. XRD patterns demonstrated that an amorphous phase was obtained when ChCl/Urea was added. Agarose films containing more ChCl/Urea exhibited higher transparency, as measured by a UV-Vis spectrometer. In summary, the physicochemical properties of agarose films were evidently affected by the incorporation of the ChCl/Urea as a plasticizing agent.

  3. MRI and PET images fusion based on human retina model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by low spatial resolution.For solving this problem we propose a technique for the fusion of PET and MRI images. This fusion is a trade-off between the spectral information extracted from PET images and the spatial information extracted from high spatial resolution MRI. The proposed method can control this trade-off. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to build a multiscale fusion model, based on the retinal cell photoreceptors model. This paper introduces general prospects of this model, and its application in multispectral medical image fusion. Results showed that the proposed method preserves more spectral features with less spatial distortion.transform methods, the best spectral and spatial quality is only achieved simultaneously with the proposed feature-based data fusion method. This method does not require resampling images, which is an advantage over the other methods, and can perform in any aspect ratio between the pixels of MRI and PET images.

  4. Artificial Neural Network-Based System for PET Volume Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhd Saeed Sharif

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour detection, classification, and quantification in positron emission tomography (PET imaging at early stage of disease are important issues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment, and radiotherapy planning. Many techniques have been proposed for segmenting medical imaging data; however, some of the approaches have poor performance, large inaccuracy, and require substantial computation time for analysing large medical volumes. Artificial intelligence (AI approaches can provide improved accuracy and save decent amount of time. Artificial neural networks (ANNs, as one of the best AI techniques, have the capability to classify and quantify precisely lesions and model the clinical evaluation for a specific problem. This paper presents a novel application of ANNs in the wavelet domain for PET volume segmentation. ANN performance evaluation using different training algorithms in both spatial and wavelet domains with a different number of neurons in the hidden layer is also presented. The best number of neurons in the hidden layer is determined according to the experimental results, which is also stated Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation training algorithm as the best training approach for the proposed application. The proposed intelligent system results are compared with those obtained using conventional techniques including thresholding and clustering based approaches. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulated PET phantom data sets and clinical PET volumes of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients were utilised to validate the proposed algorithm which has demonstrated promising results.

  5. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E;

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  6. [Microeconomics of introduction of a PET system based on the revised Japanese National Insurance reimbursement system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Katsumi; Kosuda, Shigeru; Kusano, Shoichi; Nagata, Masayoshi

    2003-11-01

    It is crucial to evaluate an annual balance before-hand when an institution installs a PET system because the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system set the cost of a FDG PET study as 75,000 yen. A break-even point was calculated in an 8-hour or a 24-hour operation of a PET system, based on the total costs reported. The break-even points were as follows: 13.4, 17.7, 22.1 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The break-even points were 19.9, 25.5, 31.2 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in a full PET system operation of 24 hours. The results indicate no profit would accrue in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The annual profit and break-even point for the total cost including the initial investment would be respectively 530 million yen and 2.8 years in a 24-hour operation with 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system. PMID:14733110

  7. Microeconomics of introduction of a PET system based on the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is crucial to evaluate an annual balance beforehand when an institution installs a PET system because the revised Japanese national insurance reimbursement system set the cost of a FDG PET study as 75,000 yen. A break-even point was calculated in an 8-hour or a 24-hour operation of a PET system, based on the total costs reported. The break-even points were as follows: 13.4, 17.7, 22.1 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The break-even points were 19.9, 25.5, 31.2 studies per day for the 1 cyclotron-1 PET camera, 1 cyclotron-2 PET cameras, 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system, respectively, in a full PET system operation of 24 hours. The results indicate no profit would accrue in an ordinary PET system operation of 8 hours. The annual profit and break-even point for the total cost including the initial investment would be respectively 530 million yen and 2.8 years in a 24-hour operation with 1 cyclotron-3 PET cameras system. (author)

  8. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong, E-mail: ouyang.jinsong@mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Ackerman, Jerome L. [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  9. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic18F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R2 = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast

  10. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Dose Painting for Localized Prostate Cancer Using {sup 11}C-choline Positron Emission Tomography Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe H. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J. [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Anderson, Nigel J. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Davis, Ian D. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Clouston, David [Focus Pathology, Victoria (Australia); Bolton, Damien [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Urology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher S. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Department of Clinical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital and Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose painting using {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography PET scans in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was an RT planning study of 8 patients with prostate cancer who had {sup 11}C-choline PET scans prior to radical prostatectomy. Two contours were semiautomatically generated on the basis of the PET scans for each patient: 60% and 70% of the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub 60%} and SUV{sub 70%}). Three IMRT plans were generated for each patient: PLAN{sub 78}, which consisted of whole-prostate radiation therapy to 78 Gy; PLAN{sub 78-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 78 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy; and PLAN{sub 72-90}, which consisted of whole-prostate RT to 72 Gy, a boost to the SUV{sub 60%} to 84 Gy, and a further boost to the SUV{sub 70%} to 90 Gy. The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to reach prescription doses while adhering to published dose constraints. Tumor control probabilities based on PET scan-defined volumes (TCP{sub PET}) and on prostatectomy-defined volumes (TCP{sub path}), and rectal normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were compared between the plans. Results: All plans for all patients reached prescription doses while adhering to dose constraints. TCP{sub PET} values for PLAN{sub 78}, PLAN{sub 78-90}, and PLAN{sub 72-90} were 65%, 97%, and 96%, respectively. TCP{sub path} values were 71%, 97%, and 89%, respectively. Both PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} had significantly higher TCP{sub PET} (P=.002 and .001) and TCP{sub path} (P<.001 and .014) values than PLAN{sub 78}. PLAN{sub 78-90} and PLAN{sub 72-90} were not significantly different in terms of TCP{sub PET} or TCP{sub path}. There were no significant differences in rectal NTCPs between the 3 plans. Conclusions: IMRT dose painting for

  11. Synthesis, isolation and purification of [(11)C]-choline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydło, Marcin; Jadwiński, Michał; Chmura, Agnieszka; Gorczewski, Kamil; Sokół, Maria

    2016-01-01

    [(11)C]-choline is an effective PET tracer used for imaging of neoplastic lesions and metastases of the prostate cancer. However, its production can be a challenge for manufacturers, as it has not yet been described in Polish or European pharmacopoeia. In this study the technical aspects of [(11)C]-choline production are described and detailed process parameters are provided. The quality control procedures for releasing [(11)C]-choline as solutio iniectabilis are also presented. The purity and quality of the radiopharmaceutical obtained according to the proposed method were find to be high enough to safely administrate the radiopharmaceutical to patients. Application of an automated synthesizer makes it possible to carry out the entire process of [(11)C]-choline production, isolation and purification within 20 minutes. It is crucial to maintain all aspects of the process as short as possible, since the decay half-time of carbon-11 is 20.4 minutes. The resulting radiopharmaceutical is sterile and pyrogen-free and of a high chemical, radiochemical, and radionuclide purity proved by chromatographic techniques. The yield of the process is up to 20%. [(11)C]-choline PET scanning can be used as accurate and effective diagnostic tool in all centers equipped with [(11)C]-target containing cyclotron. PMID:27660552

  12. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  13. Experience with carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography in prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the potential of carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of lymph node and bone metastases in prostate cancer. A total of 23 patients were studied (known metastases: 8; suspicion of metastases: 3; primary staging: 12). Whole-body PET imaging was performed 5 min after injection of the tracer and completed within 1 h. Focally increased tracer uptake in bone or abdominal lymph node regions was interpreted as representing tumour involvement. All known bone and lymph node metastases could be recognized by [11C]choline PET. One out of ten negative scans for primary staging was false-negative (lymph node 11C]choline PET is a promising new tool for the primary staging of prostate cancer, with lymph node and bone metastases demonstrating high tracer uptake. Therapeutic management could be influenced by these results in that the technique may permit avoidance of surgical lymph node exploration. (orig.)

  14. In vivo uptake of [C-11]choline does not correlate with cell proliferation in human prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruim, J; Jongen, MM; Suurmeijer, AJ; Vaalburg, W; Nijman, RJ; de Jong, IJ; Breeuwsma, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among US men. Positron emission tomography (PET) with [C-11] choline has been shown to be useful in the staging and detection of prostate cancer. The background of the increased uptake of choline in human prostate cancer is no

  15. Performance simulation of a MRPC-based PET Imaging System

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, A

    2011-01-01

    The low cost and high resolution gas-based Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) opens a new possibility to find an efficient alternative detector for Time of Flight (TOF) based Positron Emission Tomography, where the sensitivity of the system depends largely on the time resolution of the detector. Suitable converters can be used to increase the efficiency of detection of photons from annihilation. In this work, we perform a detailed GEANT4 simulation to optimize the converter thickness thereby improving the efficiency of photon conversion. Also we have developed a Monte Carlo based simulation of MRPC response thereby obtaining the intrinsic time resolution of the detector, making it possible to simulate the final response of MRPC-based systems for PET imaging. The result of the cosmic ray test of a four-gap Bakelite-based MRPC operating in streamer mode is discussed.

  16. GPU based Monte Carlo for PET image reconstruction: parameter optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the optimization of a fully Monte Carlo (MC) based iterative image reconstruction of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) measurements. With our MC re- construction method all the physical effects in a PET system are taken into account thus superior image quality is achieved in exchange for increased computational effort. The method is feasible because we utilize the enormous processing power of Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) to solve the inherently parallel problem of photon transport. The MC approach regards the simulated positron decays as samples in mathematical sums required in the iterative reconstruction algorithm, so to complement the fast architecture, our work of optimization focuses on the number of simulated positron decays required to obtain sufficient image quality. We have achieved significant results in determining the optimal number of samples for arbitrary measurement data, this allows to achieve the best image quality with the least possible computational effort. Based on this research recommendations can be given for effective partitioning of computational effort into the iterations in limited time reconstructions. (author)

  17. Investigation of optimization-based reconstruction with an image-total-variation constraint in PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-08-01

    Interest remains in reconstruction-algorithm research and development for possible improvement of image quality in current PET imaging and for enabling innovative PET systems to enhance existing, and facilitate new, preclinical and clinical applications. Optimization-based image reconstruction has been demonstrated in recent years of potential utility for CT imaging applications. In this work, we investigate tailoring the optimization-based techniques to image reconstruction for PET systems with standard and non-standard scan configurations. Specifically, given an image-total-variation (TV) constraint, we investigated how the selection of different data divergences and associated parameters impacts the optimization-based reconstruction of PET images. The reconstruction robustness was explored also with respect to different data conditions and activity up-takes of practical relevance. A study was conducted particularly for image reconstruction from data collected by use of a PET configuration with sparsely populated detectors. Overall, the study demonstrates the robustness of the TV-constrained, optimization-based reconstruction for considerably different data conditions in PET imaging, as well as its potential to enable PET configurations with reduced numbers of detectors. Insights gained in the study may be exploited for developing algorithms for PET-image reconstruction and for enabling PET-configuration design of practical usefulness in preclinical and clinical applications.

  18. Voltammetric and impedance studies of the electropolishing of type 316 stainless steel in a choline chloride based ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the first practical alternative to the use of phosphoric and sulphuric acid mixtures for the electropolishing of stainless steel. In this paper, efficient electropolishing of type 316 stainless steel is demonstrated in an ionic liquid composed of ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH) and choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-). Linear sweep voltammetry, chronoamperometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and AC impedance methods were used to investigate the steel dissolution mechanism and the results are compared to polishing done in aqueous acidic solutions. It is shown that the quality of the polish is related to the breakdown of the oxide film and preliminary data suggest that the polishing process may be controlled by the diffusion of chloride ions. The dissolution is different from that found in aqueous acid solutions, and oxide breakdown is shown to be slower, which can lead to pitting at low current densities

  19. MR-based Motion Correction for PET Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Li, Quanzheng; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    PET image quality is limited by patient motion. Emission data are blurred due to cardiac and/or respiratory motion. Although spatial resolution is 4 mm for standard clinical whole-body PET scanners, the effective resolution can be a low as 1 cm due to motion. Additionally, the deformation of attenuation medium causes image artifacts. Previously, gating is used to “freeze” the motion, but leads to significantly increased noise level. Simultaneous PET-MR modality offers a new way to perform PET...

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on Starlinger IV+ ® technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials “Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic”

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2012-01-01

    This scientific opinion of EFSA deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic (EC register numbers RECYC012, RECYC042, RECYC054, RECYC068 and RECYC080 respectively) which are all based on the same STARLINGER IV+ ® technology. The decontamination efficiency of all these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge test. Through this technology, washed and dried post-consumer PET flakes are dried and crystallised in ...

  1. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET

  2. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdi, M. R.; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D.; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  3. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdi, M. R., E-mail: mrgaldi@unisa.it; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D., E-mail: dalbanese@unisa.it; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L., E-mail: ldimaio@unisa.it [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  4. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, P.; Wehner, J.; Weissler, B.; Botnar, R.; Marsden, P. K.; Schulz, V.

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II D PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field distribution

  5. FPGA-based RF interference reduction techniques for simultaneous PET-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, P; Wehner, J; Weissler, B; Botnar, R; Marsden, P K; Schulz, V

    2016-05-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a multi-modal imaging technique is considered very promising and powerful with regard to in vivo disease progression examination, therapy response monitoring and drug development. However, PET-MRI system design enabling simultaneous operation with unaffected intrinsic performance of both modalities is challenging. As one of the major issues, both the PET detectors and the MRI radio-frequency (RF) subsystem are exposed to electromagnetic (EM) interference, which may lead to PET and MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deteriorations. Early digitization of electronic PET signals within the MRI bore helps to preserve PET SNR, but occurs at the expense of increased amount of PET electronics inside the MRI and associated RF field emissions. This raises the likelihood of PET-related MRI interference by coupling into the MRI RF coil unwanted spurious signals considered as RF noise, as it degrades MRI SNR and results in MR image artefacts. RF shielding of PET detectors is a commonly used technique to reduce PET-related RF interferences, but can introduce eddy-current-related MRI disturbances and hinder the highest system integration. In this paper, we present RF interference reduction methods which rely on EM field coupling-decoupling principles of RF receive coils rather than suppressing emitted fields. By modifying clock frequencies and changing clock phase relations of digital circuits, the resulting RF field emission is optimised with regard to a lower field coupling into the MRI RF coil, thereby increasing the RF silence of PET detectors. Our methods are demonstrated by performing FPGA-based clock frequency and phase shifting of digital silicon photo-multipliers (dSiPMs) used in the PET modules of our MR-compatible Hyperion II (D) PET insert. We present simulations and magnetic-field map scans visualising the impact of altered clock phase pattern on the spatial RF field

  6. Contourlet-based active contour model for PET image segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, M.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided radiation therapy treatment planning, clinical diagnosis, assessment of tumor growth, and therapy response rely on the accurate delineation of the tumor volume and quantification of tracer uptake. Most PET image segmentation techniques proposed thus far are suboptimal in the pres

  7. Wobbling and LSF-based maximum likelihood expectation maximization reconstruction for wobbling PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hang-Keun; Son, Young-Don; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Joo, Yohan; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used imaging modality; however, the PET spatial resolution is not yet satisfactory for precise anatomical localization of molecular activities. Detector size is the most important factor because it determines the intrinsic resolution, which is approximately half of the detector size and determines the ultimate PET resolution. Detector size, however, cannot be made too small because both the decreased detection efficiency and the increased septal penetration effect degrade the image quality. A wobbling and line spread function (LSF)-based maximum likelihood expectation maximization (WL-MLEM) algorithm, which combined the MLEM iterative reconstruction algorithm with wobbled sampling and LSF-based deconvolution using the system matrix, was proposed for improving the spatial resolution of PET without reducing the scintillator or detector size. The new algorithm was evaluated using a simulation, and its performance was compared with that of the existing algorithms, such as conventional MLEM and LSF-based MLEM. Simulations demonstrated that the WL-MLEM algorithm yielded higher spatial resolution and image quality than the existing algorithms. The WL-MLEM algorithm with wobbling PET yielded substantially improved resolution compared with conventional algorithms with stationary PET. The algorithm can be easily extended to other iterative reconstruction algorithms, such as maximum a priori (MAP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM). The WL-MLEM algorithm with wobbling PET may offer improvements in both sensitivity and resolution, the two most sought-after features in PET design.

  8. Predicting standard-dose PET image from low-dose PET and multimodal MR images using mapping-based sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Pei; An, Le; Ma, Guangkai; Kang, Jiayin; Shi, Feng; Wu, Xi; Zhou, Jiliu; Lalush, David S.; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used in clinical diagnosis for diseases and disorders. To obtain high-quality PET images requires a standard-dose radionuclide (tracer) injection into the human body, which inevitably increases risk of radiation exposure. One possible solution to this problem is to predict the standard-dose PET image from its low-dose counterpart and its corresponding multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Inspired by the success of patch-based sparse representation (SR) in super-resolution image reconstruction, we propose a mapping-based SR (m-SR) framework for standard-dose PET image prediction. Compared with the conventional patch-based SR, our method uses a mapping strategy to ensure that the sparse coefficients, estimated from the multimodal MR images and low-dose PET image, can be applied directly to the prediction of standard-dose PET image. As the mapping between multimodal MR images (or low-dose PET image) and standard-dose PET images can be particularly complex, one step of mapping is often insufficient. To this end, an incremental refinement framework is therefore proposed. Specifically, the predicted standard-dose PET image is further mapped to the target standard-dose PET image, and then the SR is performed again to predict a new standard-dose PET image. This procedure can be repeated for prediction refinement of the iterations. Also, a patch selection based dictionary construction method is further used to speed up the prediction process. The proposed method is validated on a human brain dataset. The experimental results show that our method can outperform benchmark methods in both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  9. Electroless deposition of metallic silver from a choline chloride-based ionic liquid: a study using acoustic impedance spectroscopy, SEM and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Andrew P; Nandhra, Satvinder; Postlethwaite, Stella; Smith, Emma L; Ryder, Karl S

    2007-07-28

    In this paper, we describe the first example of a sustained galvanic coating deposited on a surface from a non-aqueous liquid. We present the surface characterization of electroless silver deposits on copper substrates from a solution of Ag(+) ions in an ionic liquid based on a choline chloride (ChCl) eutectic. Through a study of these deposits and the mechanism of formation using acoustic impedance spectroscopy (QCM), probe microscopy (AFM) and electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), we demonstrate that sustained growth of the silver deposit is facilitated by the porous nature of the silver. This is in contrast to the dip-coating reaction of silver ions in aqueous media, where the reaction stops when surface coverage is reached. Electroless silver deposits of up to several microns have been obtained by dip coating in ionic liquids without the use of catalysts of strong inorganic acids. PMID:17622408

  10. (18)F-FET-PET in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Bennedbæk, Finn N

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative localisation of the diseased parathyroid gland(s) in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is a prerequisite for subsequent minimally invasive surgery. Recently, as alternatives to conventional sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy, the (11)C-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracers...... methionine and choline have shown promise for this purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of using the (18)F-based PET tracer fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET), as the longer half-life of (18)F makes it logistically more favourable. As a proof-of-concept study, we included two patients with PHP in which dual...... under study was achieved approximately 30 min after the injection of the tracer and was 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. This ratio was too small to allow for confident visualisation of the adenomas. FET PET/CT seems not feasible as a preoperative imaging modality in PHP....

  11. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  12. A New Method of Detecting Pulmonary Nodules with PET/CT Based on an Improved Watershed Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Ji, Guohua; Qiang, Yan; Han, Xiaohong; Pei, Bo; Shi, Zhenghao

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is widely performed for staging solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). However, the diagnostic efficacy of SPNs based on PET/CT is not optimal. Here, we propose a method of detection based on PET/CT that can differentiate malignant and benign SPNs with few false-positives. Method Our proposed method combines the features of positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT)....

  13. Voltammetric and impedance studies of the electropolishing of type 316 stainless steel in a choline chloride based ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Andrew P. [Chemistry Department, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Andrew.abbott@le.ac.uk; Capper, Glen [Chemistry Department, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); McKenzie, Katy J. [Chemistry Department, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ryder, Karl S. [Chemistry Department, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    We demonstrate the first practical alternative to the use of phosphoric and sulphuric acid mixtures for the electropolishing of stainless steel. In this paper, efficient electropolishing of type 316 stainless steel is demonstrated in an ionic liquid composed of ethylene glycol (HOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH) and choline chloride (HOC{sub 2}H{sub 4}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} {sup +}Cl{sup -}). Linear sweep voltammetry, chronoamperometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and AC impedance methods were used to investigate the steel dissolution mechanism and the results are compared to polishing done in aqueous acidic solutions. It is shown that the quality of the polish is related to the breakdown of the oxide film and preliminary data suggest that the polishing process may be controlled by the diffusion of chloride ions. The dissolution is different from that found in aqueous acid solutions, and oxide breakdown is shown to be slower, which can lead to pitting at low current densities.

  14. Comparison of [{sup 11}C]choline Positron Emission Tomography With T2- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Delineating Malignant Intraprostatic Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Joe H. [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lim Joon, Daryl [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Davis, Ian D. [Monash University Eastern Health Clinical School, Victoria (Australia); Lee, Sze Ting [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Hiew, Chee-Yan; Esler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Gong, Sylvia J. [Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Wada, Morikatsu [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Clouston, David [Tissupath, Mt Waverley, Victoria (Australia); O' Sullivan, Richard [Healthcare Imaging, Epworth Hospital, Victoria (Australia); Goh, Yin P. [Diagnostic Imaging, Monash Health, Victoria (Australia); Bolton, Damien [Department of Urology, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Scott, Andrew M. [University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Centre for PET, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Victoria (Australia); Khoo, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.khoo@rmh.nhs.uk [Radiation Oncology Centre, Austin Health, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Royal Marsden Hospital, National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography (CHOL-PET) with that of the combination of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (T2W/DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for delineating malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPLs) for guiding focal therapies and to investigate factors predicting the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Methods and Materials: This study included 21 patients who underwent CHOL-PET and T2W/DW MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. Two observers manually delineated IPL contours for each scan, and automatic IPL contours were generated on CHOL-PET based on varying proportions of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). IPLs identified on prostatectomy specimens defined reference standard contours. The imaging-based contours were compared with the reference standard contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and sensitivity and specificity values. Factors that could potentially predict the DSC of the best contouring method were analyzed using linear models. Results: The best automatic contouring method, 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV{sub 60}) , had similar correlations (DSC: 0.59) with the manual PET contours (DSC: 0.52, P=.127) and significantly better correlations than the manual MRI contours (DSC: 0.37, P<.001). The sensitivity and specificity values were 72% and 71% for SUV{sub 60}; 53% and 86% for PET manual contouring; and 28% and 92% for MRI manual contouring. The tumor volume and transition zone pattern could independently predict the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Conclusions: CHOL-PET is superior to the combination of T2W/DW MRI for delineating IPLs. The accuracy of CHOL-PET is insufficient for gland-sparing focal therapies but may be accurate enough for focal boost therapies. The transition zone pattern is a new classification that may predict how well CHOL-PET delineates IPLs.

  15. Comparison of [11C]choline Positron Emission Tomography With T2- and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Delineating Malignant Intraprostatic Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of [11C]choline positron emission tomography (CHOL-PET) with that of the combination of T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted (T2W/DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for delineating malignant intraprostatic lesions (IPLs) for guiding focal therapies and to investigate factors predicting the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Methods and Materials: This study included 21 patients who underwent CHOL-PET and T2W/DW MRI prior to radical prostatectomy. Two observers manually delineated IPL contours for each scan, and automatic IPL contours were generated on CHOL-PET based on varying proportions of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV). IPLs identified on prostatectomy specimens defined reference standard contours. The imaging-based contours were compared with the reference standard contours using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and sensitivity and specificity values. Factors that could potentially predict the DSC of the best contouring method were analyzed using linear models. Results: The best automatic contouring method, 60% of the maximum SUV (SUV60) , had similar correlations (DSC: 0.59) with the manual PET contours (DSC: 0.52, P=.127) and significantly better correlations than the manual MRI contours (DSC: 0.37, P<.001). The sensitivity and specificity values were 72% and 71% for SUV60; 53% and 86% for PET manual contouring; and 28% and 92% for MRI manual contouring. The tumor volume and transition zone pattern could independently predict the accuracy of CHOL-PET. Conclusions: CHOL-PET is superior to the combination of T2W/DW MRI for delineating IPLs. The accuracy of CHOL-PET is insufficient for gland-sparing focal therapies but may be accurate enough for focal boost therapies. The transition zone pattern is a new classification that may predict how well CHOL-PET delineates IPLs

  16. Bioelectrochemical response of a choline biosensor fabricated by using polyaniline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the isoelectric point of an enzyme and the doping principle of conducting polymers,choline oxidase was doped in a polyaniline film to form a biosensor. The amperometric detection of choline is based on the oxidation of the H2O2 enzymatically produced on the choline biosensor. The response current of the biosensor as a function of temperature was determined from 3 to 40℃. An apparent activation energy of 22.8 kJ·mol-1 was obtained. The biosensor had a wide linear response range from 5 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-4 M choline with a correlation coefficient of 0.9999 and a detection limit of 0.2 μM,and had a high sensitivity of 61.9 mA·M-1·cm-2 at 0.50 V and at pH 8.0. The apparent Michaelis constant and the optimum pH for the immobilized enzyme are 1.4 mM choline and 8.4,respectively,which are very close to those of choline oxidase in solution. The effect of selected organic compounds on the response of the choline biosensor was studied.

  17. MRI-based motion correction of thoracic PET: initial comparison of acquisition protocols and correction strategies suitable for simultaneous PET/MRI systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikaios, Nikolaos; Fryer, Tim D. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Imaging Science Laboratories, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Graves, Martin J. [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquired on equipment capable of simultaneous MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) could potentially provide the gold standard method for motion correction of PET. To assess the latter, in this study we compared fast 2D and 3D MRI of the torso and used deformation parameters from real MRI data to correct simulated PET data for respiratory motion. PET sinogram data were simulated using SimSET from a 4D pseudo-PET image series created by segmenting MR images acquired over a respiratory cycle. Motion-corrected PET images were produced using post-reconstruction registration (PRR) and motion-compensated image reconstruction (MCIR). MRI-based motion correction improved PET image quality at the lung-liver and lung-spleen boundaries and in the heart but little improvement was obtained where MRI contrast was low. The root mean square error in SUV units per voxel compared to a motion-free image was reduced from 0.0271 (no motion correction) to 0.0264 (PRR) and 0.0250 (MCIR). Motion correction using MRI can improve thoracic PET images but there are limitations due to the quality of fast MRI. (orig.)

  18. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanye [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Kun, E-mail: yangkun9999@hotmail.com [Department of Control Technology and Instrumentation, College of Quality and Technical Supervision, Hebei University, Baoding, 071000 (China); Zhou, Kedi; Zhang, Qiushi; Pang, Bo [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-11

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development.

  19. Development of a SiPM-based PET imaging system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging have been accelerated by many new technologies such as the successful incorporation of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). In this paper, we have developed a compact, lightweight PET imaging system that is based on SiPM detectors for small animals imaging, which could be integrated into a multi-modality imaging system. This PET imaging system consists of a stationary detector gantry, a motor-controlled animal bed module, electronics modules, and power supply modules. The PET detector, which was designed as a multi-slice circular ring geometry of 27 discrete block detectors, is composed of a cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal and SiPM arrays. The system has a 60 mm transaxial field of view (FOV) and a 26 mm axial FOV. Performance tests (e.g. spatial resolution, energy resolution, and sensitivity) and phantom and animal imaging studies were performed to evaluate the imaging performance of the PET imaging system. The performance tests and animal imaging results demonstrate the feasibility of an animal PET system based on SiPM detectors and indicate that SiPM detectors can be promising photodetectors in animal PET instrumentation development

  20. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis.

  1. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis. PMID

  2. Towards continualized task-based resolution modeling in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Karakatsanis, Nicolas; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Rahmim, Arman

    2014-03-01

    We propose a generalized resolution modeling (RM) framework, including extensive task-based optimization, wherein we continualize the conventionally discrete framework of RM vs. no RM, to include varying degrees of RM. The proposed framework has the advantage of providing a trade-off between the enhanced contrast recovery by RM and the reduced inter-voxel correlations in the absence of RM, and to enable improved task performance. The investigated context was that of oncologic lung FDG PET imaging. Given a realistic blurring kernel of FWHM h (`true PSF'), we performed iterative EM including RM using a wide range of `modeled PSF' kernels with varying widths h. In our simulations, h = 6mm, while h varied from 0 (no RM) to 12mm, thus considering both underestimation and overestimation of the true PSF. Detection task performance was performed using prewhitened (PWMF) and nonprewhitened matched filter (NPWMF) observers. It was demonstrated that an underestimated resolution blur (h = 4mm) enhanced task performance, while slight over-estimation (h = 7mm) also achieved enhanced performance. The latter is ironically attributed to the presence of ringing artifacts. Nonetheless, in the case of the NPWMF, the increasing intervoxel correlations with increasing values of h degrade detection task performance, and underestimation of the true PSF provides the optimal task performance. The proposed framework also achieves significant improvement of reproducibility, which is critical in quantitative imaging tasks such as treatment response monitoring.

  3. Automatic co-segmentation of lung tumor based on random forest in PET-CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xueqing; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Weifang; Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method is proposed to segment the lung tumor in clinical 3D PET-CT images. The proposed method effectively combines PET and CT information to make full use of the high contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) initial segmentation, in which spines are removed in CT images and initial connected regions achieved by thresholding based segmentation in PET images; (2) coarse segmentation, in which monotonic downhill function is applied to rule out structures which have similar standardized uptake values (SUV) to the lung tumor but do not satisfy a monotonic property in PET images; (3) fine segmentation, random forests method is applied to accurately segment the lung tumor by extracting effective features from PET and CT images simultaneously. We validated our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 24 3D PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The average TPVF, FPVF and accuracy rate (ACC) were 83.65%, 0.05% and 99.93%, respectively. The correlation analysis shows our segmented lung tumor volumes has strong correlation ( average 0.985) with the ground truth 1 and ground truth 2 labeled by a clinical expert.

  4. Influence of expanded graphite (EG and graphene oxide (GO on physical properties of PET based nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paszkiewicz Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is the continuation and refinement of already published communications based on PET/EG nanocomposites prepared by in situ polymerization1, 2. In this study, nanocomposites based on poly(ethylene terephthalate with expanded graphite were compared to those with functionalized graphite sheets (GO. The results suggest that the degree of dispersion of nanoparticles in the PET matrix has important effect on the structure and physical properties of the nanocomposites. The existence of graphene sheets nanoparticles enhances the crystallization rate of PET. It has been confirmed that in situ polymerization is the effective method for preparation nanocomposites which can avoid the agglomeration of nanoparticles in polymer matrices and improve the interfacial interaction between nanofiller and polymer matrix. The obtained results have shown also that due to the presence of functional groups on GO surface the interactions with PET matrix can be stronger than in the case of exfoliated graphene (EG and matrix.

  5. Distribution of prostate nodes: a PET/CT-derived anatomic atlas of prostate cancer patients before and after surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to define adequate radiation portals in nodal positive prostate cancer a detailed knowledge of the anatomic lymph-node distribution is mandatory. We therefore systematically analyzed the localization of Choline PET/CT positive lymph nodes and compared it to the RTOG recommendation of pelvic CTV, as well as to previous work, the SPECT sentinel lymph node atlas. Thirty-two patients being mostly high risk patients with a PSA of 12.5 ng/ml (median) received PET/CT before any treatment. Eighty-seven patients received PET/CT for staging due to biochemical failure with a median PSA of 3.12 ng/ml. Each single PET-positive lymph node was manually contoured in a “virtual” patient dataset to achieve a 3-D visualization, resulting in an atlas of the cumulative PET positive lymph node distribution. Further the PET-positive lymph node location in each patient was assessed with regard to the existence of a potential geographic miss (i.e. PET-positive lymph nodes that would not have been treated adequately by the RTOG consensus on CTV definition of pelvic lymph nodes). Seventy-eight and 209 PET positive lymph nodes were detected in patients with no prior treatment and in postoperative patients, respectively. The most common sites of PET positive lymph nodes in patients with no prior treatment were external iliac (32.1 %), followed by common iliac (23.1 %) and para-aortic (19.2 %). In postoperative patients the most common sites of PET positive lymph nodes were common iliac (24.9 %), followed by external iliac (23.0 %) and para-aortic (20.1 %). In patients with no prior treatment there were 34 (43.6 %) and in postoperative patients there were 77 (36.8 %) of all detected lymph nodes that would not have been treated adequately using the RTOG CTV. We compared the distribution of lymph nodes gained by Choline PET/CT to the preexisting SPECT sentinel lymph node atlas and saw an overall good congruence. Choline PET/CT and SPECT sentinel lymph node atlas are comparable to

  6. Radiosynthesis and pre-clinical evaluation of [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]choline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Graham [Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Zhao Yongjun [MDx Discovery (part of GE Healthcare) at Hammersmith Imanet, Ltd., Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Leyton, Julius [Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Shan Bo [MDx Discovery (part of GE Healthcare) at Hammersmith Imanet, Ltd., Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Nguyen, Quang-de; Perumal, Meg [Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Turton, David [GE-Imanet, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Arstad, Erik; Luthra, Sajinder K.; Robins, Edward G. [MDx Discovery (part of GE Healthcare) at Hammersmith Imanet, Ltd., Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Aboagye, Eric O., E-mail: eric.aboagye@imperial.ac.u [Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Introduction: Choline radiotracers are widely used for clinical PET diagnosis in oncology. [{sup 11}C]Choline finds particular utility in the imaging of brain and prostate tumor metabolic status, where 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ('FDG') shows high background uptake. More recently we have extended the clinical utility of [{sup 11}C]choline to breast cancer where radiotracer uptake correlates with tumor aggressiveness (grade). In the present study, a new choline analog, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]choline, was synthesized and evaluated as a potential PET imaging probe. Methods: [{sup 18}F]Fluorocholine, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]choline and [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]choline were synthesized by alkylation of the relevant precursor with [{sup 18}F]fluorobromomethane or [{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl tosylate. Radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl tosylate required extensive modification of the existing method. [{sup 18}F]Fluorocholine and [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]choline were then subjected to in vitro oxidative stability analysis in a chemical oxidation model using potassium permanganate and an enzymatic model using choline oxidase. The two radiotracers, together with the corresponding di-deuterated compound, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]choline, were then evaluated in vivo in a time-course biodistribution study in HCT-116 tumor-bearing mice. Results: Alkylation with [{sup 18}F]fluoromethyl tosylate proved to be the most reliable radiosynthetic route. Stability models indicate that [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]choline possesses increased chemical and enzymatic (choline oxidase) oxidative stability relative to [{sup 18}F]fluorocholine. The distribution of the three radiotracers, [{sup 18}F]fluorocholine, [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]choline and [{sup 18}F]fluoro-[1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 4}]choline, showed a similar uptake profile in most organs. Crucially, tumor uptake of [{sup 18}F

  7. SBML-PET: a Systems Biology Markup Language-based parameter estimation tool

    OpenAIRE

    Zi, Z.; Klipp, E.

    2006-01-01

    The estimation of model parameters from experimental data remains a bottleneck for a major breakthrough in systems biology. We present a Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) based Parameter Estimation Tool (SBML-PET). The tool is designed to enable parameter estimation for biological models including signaling pathways, gene regulation networks and metabolic pathways. SBML-PET supports import and export of the models in the SBML format. It can estimate the parameters by fitting a variety of...

  8. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride–oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibi, Emadaldin [Department of Marine Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Science, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 669, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanemi, Kamal, E-mail: Kamal.ghanemi@kmsu.ac.ir [Department of Marine Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Science, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 669, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marine Science Research Institute, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi [Department of Marine Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Science, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 669, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marine Science Research Institute, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali [Department of Marine Environment, Faculty of marine natural resources, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-31

    Highlights: ► A novel digestion method: lack of concentrated acids or oxidizing reagents. ► First report of using choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) for digestion. ► Complete dissolution of biological samples in ChCl–Ox for solubilization metals. ► Extraction recoveries greater than 95%: validated by the fish protein CRM. ► Successfully applied in different fish tissues (Muscle, Liver, and Gills). -- Abstract: A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl–Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100 °C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO{sub 3} (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P = 0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the

  9. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride–oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A novel digestion method: lack of concentrated acids or oxidizing reagents. ► First report of using choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) for digestion. ► Complete dissolution of biological samples in ChCl–Ox for solubilization metals. ► Extraction recoveries greater than 95%: validated by the fish protein CRM. ► Successfully applied in different fish tissues (Muscle, Liver, and Gills). -- Abstract: A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl–Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100 °C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO3 (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P = 0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the use of safe

  10. Evaluation of the choline status in mink fed different levels and sources of choline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Damgaard, Birthe Marie; Clausen, T.N.;

    2012-01-01

    plasma samples were extracted to analyze the content of free choline and betaine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma choline was only increased in mink kits fed the highest level of choline whereas plasma choline dit not change in full-grown mink irrespectively of choline level in the feed....... Plasma betaine increased when the level of choline in the diet increased. The changes in plasma betaine were most prominent in mink kits. The present study shows that plasma betaine may be a more reliable marker of choline status than plasma choline, especially in mink kits....

  11. Alkyd-amino resins based on waste PET for coating applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torlakoğlu, A; Güçlü, G

    2009-01-01

    Waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) flakes were depolymerized by using propylene glycol (PG) in the presence of zinc acetate as catalyst. Glycolysis reaction products of waste PET obtained by using PET/glycol molar ratio 1/2. Two short oil alkyd resins of high acid values (30-40mgKOH/g) were prepared from phthalic anhydride (PA), glycerin (G), coconut oil fatty acids (COFA) and glycolyzed products of waste PET (PET-based alkyd resins) or glycols (PG) (reference alkyd resins). These alkyd resins were blended with 30%, 40%, and 50% of a commercial urea-formaldehyde, melamine-formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde/melamine-formaldehyde mixture (1/1 weight ratio) and heated at 140 degrees C. The physical and chemical properties such as drying time, hardness, abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, water resistance, alkaline resistance, acid resistance, gelation time, and thermal oxidative degradation resistance (with thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) of these alkyd-amino resins were investigated. The properties of the waste PET-based resins were found to be compatible with the properties of the reference resins.

  12. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); Bailly, Pascal [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); CHU d' Amiens, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, unite TEP, Hopital Sud, Amiens cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV{sub MAX} and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV{sub MAX} (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  13. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUVMAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUVMAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  14. A Choline Oxidase Amperometric Bioassay for the Detection of Mustard Agents Based on Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with Prussian Blue Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Arduini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work a novel bioassay for mustard agent detection was proposed. The bioassay is based on the capability of these compounds to inhibit the enzyme choline oxidase. The enzymatic activity, which is correlated to the mustard agents, was electrochemically monitored measuring the enzymatic product, hydrogen peroxide, by means of a screen-printed electrode modified with Prussian Blue nanoparticles. Prussian Blue nanoparticles are able to electrocatalyse the hydrogen peroxide concentration reduction at low applied potential (−50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, thus allowing the detection of the mustard agents with no electrochemical interferences. The suitability of this novel bioassay was tested with the nitrogen mustard simulant bis(2-chloroethylamine and the sulfur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide. The bioassay proposed in this work allowed the detection of mustard agent simulants with good sensitivity and fast response, which are excellent premises for the development of a miniaturised sensor well suited for an alarm system in case of terrorist attacks.

  15. Simultaneous PET/MRI with 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Henriksen, Sarah T.;

    2016-01-01

    -MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [18F]-FDG phantom, 13C-acetate and 13C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or 13C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET......Background: Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented...... for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous 1 H-MRI and PET but never for 13C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and 13C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized 13C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Methods: Combined PET and 13C...

  16. Development of a flexible optical fiber based high resolution integrated PET/MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Tadashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 565-0871 Osaka (Japan); Neomax Engineering, Takasaki 370-2115 (Japan); Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The simultaneous measurement of PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an emerging field for molecular imaging research. Although optical fiber based PET/MRI systems have advantages on less interference between PET and MRI, there is a drawback in reducing the scintillation light due to the fiber. To reduce the problem, the authors newly developed flexible optical fiber bundle based block detectors and employed them for a high resolution integrated PET/MRI system. Methods: The flexible optical fiber bundle used 0.5 mm diameter, 80 cm long double clad fibers which have dual 12 mm Multiplication-Sign 24 mm rectangular inputs and a single 24 mm Multiplication-Sign 24 mm rectangular output. In the input surface, LGSO scintillators of 0.025 mol.% (decay time: {approx}31 ns: 0.9 mm Multiplication-Sign 1.3 mm Multiplication-Sign 5 mm) and 0.75 mol.% (decay time: {approx}46 ns: 0.9 mm Multiplication-Sign 1.3 mm Multiplication-Sign 6 mm) were optically coupled in depth direction to form depth-of-interaction detector, arranged in 11 Multiplication-Sign 13 matrix and optically coupled to the fiber bundle. The two inputs of the bundle are bent for 90 Degree-Sign , bound to one, and are optically coupled to a Hamamatsu 1-in. square position sensitive photomultiplier tube. Results: Light loss due to the fiber bundle could be reduced and the performance of the block detectors was improved. Eight optical fiber based block detectors (16 LGSO blocks) were arranged in a 56 mm diameter ring to form a PET system. Spatial resolution and sensitivity were 1.2 mm full-width at half-maximum and 1.2% at the central field-of-view, respectively. Sensitivity change was less than 1% for 2 Degree-Sign C temperature changes. This PET system was integrated with a 0.3 T permanent magnet MRI system which has 17 cm diameter hole at the yoke area for insertion of the PET detector ring. There was no observable interference between PET and MRI. Simultaneous imaging of PET and MRI was

  17. The Role of 18F-FDG-PET and PET/CT in Patients with Colorectal Liver Metastases Undergoing Selective Internal Radiation Therapy with Yttrium-90: A First Evidence-Based Review

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Annunziata; Giorgio Treglia; Carmelo Caldarella; Federica Galiandro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To provide a first evidence-based review of the literature on the role of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET and PET/CT) in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) undergoing selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres. Methods. A comprehensive computer literature search was conducted to find relevant published articles on whole-body FDG-PET or PET/CT in ...

  18. Dixon sequence with superimposed model-based bone compartment provides highly accurate PET/MR attenuation correction of the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Koesters, Thomas; Friedman, Kent P.; Fenchel, Matthias; Zhan, Yiqiang; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Babb, James; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Faul, David; Boada, Fernando E.; Shepherd, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous PET/MR of the brain is a promising new technology for characterizing patients with suspected cognitive impairment or epilepsy. Unlike CT though, MR signal intensities do not provide a direct correlate to PET photon attenuation correction (AC) and inaccurate radiotracer standard uptake value (SUV) estimation could limit future PET/MR clinical applications. We tested a novel AC method that supplements standard Dixon-based tissue segmentation with a superimposed model-based bone com...

  19. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, R. R.; Stolin, A.; Majewski, S.; Proffitt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26×58 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41×91 mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ~45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (~2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  20. FDG-PET/CT based response-adapted treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Vriens, Dennis; Arens, Anne I J;

    2012-01-01

    chemotherapy and the risk of toxic death. The trials provide a model for designing response-guided treatment algorithms in other malignancies. PET-guided treatment algorithms are the promise of the near future; the choice of therapy, its intensity, and its duration will become better adjusted to the biology...... of the individual patient. Today's major challenge is to investigate the impact on patient outcome of personalized response-adapted treatment concepts....

  1. PET image reconstruction with rotationally symmetric polygonal pixel grid based highly compressible system matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To achieve a maximum compression of system matrix in positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction, we proposed a polygonal image pixel division strategy in accordance with rotationally symmetric PET geometry. Geometrical definition and indexing rule for polygonal pixels were established. Image conversion from polygonal pixel structure to conventional rectangular pixel structure was implemented using a conversion matrix. A set of test images were analytically defined in polygonal pixel structure, converted to conventional rectangular pixel based images, and correctly displayed which verified the correctness of the image definition, conversion description and conversion of polygonal pixel structure. A compressed system matrix for PET image recon was generated by tap model and tested by forward-projecting three different distributions of radioactive sources to the sinogram domain and comparing them with theoretical predictions. On a practical small animal PET scanner, a compress ratio of 12.6:1 of the system matrix size was achieved with the polygonal pixel structure, comparing with the conventional rectangular pixel based tap-mode one. OS-EM iterative image reconstruction algorithms with the polygonal and conventional Cartesian pixel grid were developed. A hot rod phantom was detected and reconstructed based on these two grids with reasonable time cost. Image resolution of reconstructed images was both 1.35 mm. We conclude that it is feasible to reconstruct and display images in a polygonal image pixel structure based on a compressed system matrix in PET image reconstruction. (authors)

  2. The MINDView brain PET detector, feasibility study based on SiPM arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Antonio J.; Majewski, Stan; Sánchez, Filomeno; Aussenhofer, Sebastian; Aguilar, Albert; Conde, Pablo; Hernández, Liczandro; Vidal, Luis F.; Pani, Roberto; Bettiol, Marco; Fabbri, Andrea; Bert, Julien; Visvikis, Dimitris; Jackson, Carl; Murphy, John; O'Neill, Kevin; Benlloch, Jose M.

    2016-05-01

    The Multimodal Imaging of Neurological Disorders (MINDView) project aims to develop a dedicated brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanner with sufficient resolution and sensitivity to visualize neurotransmitter pathways and their disruptions in mental disorders for diagnosis and follow-up treatment. The PET system should be compact and fully compatible with a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) device in order to allow its operation as a PET brain insert in a hybrid imaging setup with most MRI scanners. The proposed design will enable the currently-installed MRI base to be easily upgraded to PET/MRI systems. The current design for the PET insert consists of a 3-ring configuration with 20 modules per ring and an axial field of view of ~15 cm and a geometrical aperture of ~33 cm in diameter. When coupled to the new head Radio Frequency (RF) coil, the inner usable diameter of the complete PET-RF coil insert is reduced to 26 cm. Two scintillator configurations have been tested, namely a 3-layer staggered array of LYSO with 1.5 mm pixel size, with 35×35 elements (6 mm thickness each) and a black-painted monolithic LYSO block also covering about 50×50 mm2 active area with 20 mm thickness. Laboratory test results associated with the current MINDView PET module concept are presented in terms of key parameters' optimization, such as spatial and energy resolution, sensitivity and Depth of Interaction (DOI) capability. It was possible to resolve all pixel elements from the three scintillator layers with energy resolutions as good as 10%. The monolithic scintillator showed average detector resolutions varying from 3.5 mm in the entrance layer to better than 1.5 mm near the photosensor, with average energy resolutions of about 17%.

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on Starlinger IV+ ® technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials “Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available

    This scientific opinion of EFSA deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic (EC register numbers RECYC012, RECYC042, RECYC054, RECYC068 and RECYC080 respectively which are all based on the same STARLINGER IV+ ® technology. The decontamination efficiency of all these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge test. Through this technology, washed and dried post-consumer PET flakes are dried and crystallised in a reactor, then extruded under vacuum to provide pellets which are further crystallised in a second reactor. Crystallised pellets are then pre-heated in a third reactor and fed to the Solid State Polymerisation (SSP reactor. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, drying and crystallisation, extrusion and crystallisation and SSP are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the processes. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are the temperature, the gas flow and the residence time for the drying and crystallisation step, the temperature, the pressure and the residence time for extrusion and crystallisation and SSP steps. It was demonstrated by means of the challenge test that the recycling processes under evaluation using a Starlinger IV+ ® technology are able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore  the Panel considered that the recycling processes Preformia, STF, MPTS, PET to PET and Eco Plastic are able to reduce any foreseeable accidental contamination of the post-consumer food contact PET to a concentration that does not give rise to concern for a risk to human health  if:

    1. they are operated under conditions that are at least as severe as those obtained from  the challenge test used to measure the

    2. Design and implementation of a web-based PET-CT reporting assessment and e-portfolio tool

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Highlights: • We describe a simple internet-based reporting tool to enhance PET-CT training. • Automatically created competency based metrics are valuable in monitoring progress. • This tool provides robust evidence of competency in PET-CT reporting

    3. Whole-body PET/MRI: The effect of bone attenuation during MR-based attenuation correction in oncology imaging

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Aznar, M.C.; Sersar, Rachida; Saabye, J.;

      2014-01-01

      .3%) and lowest for spongCT (–2.2%, range: 0.0% to –13.7%). Conclusions: In PET/MR imaging using standard MR-AC PET uptake values in soft lesions and bone lesions are underestimated by about 10%. In individual patients this bias can be as high as 22%, which is significant during clinical follow-up exams. If bone...... segmentation is available, then assigning a fixed attenuation value of spongious bone to all bone structures appears reasonable and results in only a minor bias of 5%, or less in uptake values of soft tissue and bone lesions.......Purpose: In combined PET/MRI standard PET attenuation correction (AC) is based on tissue segmentation following dedicated MR sequencing and, typically, bone tissue is not represented. We evaluate PET quantification in whole-body (WB)-PET/MRI following MR-AC without considering bone attenuation...

    4. Folate-Based Radiotracers for PET Imaging—Update and Perspectives

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Cristina Müller

      2013-04-01

      Full Text Available The folate receptor (FR is expressed in many tumor types, among those ovarian and lung cancer. Due to the high FR affinity of folic acid, it has been used for targeting of FR-positive tumors, allowing specific delivery of attached probes to the malignant tissue. Therefore, nuclear imaging of FR-positive cancer is of clinical interest for selecting patients who could benefit from innovative therapy concepts based on FR-targeting. Positron emission computed tomography (PET has become an established technique in clinical routine because it provides an increased spatial resolution and higher sensitivity compared to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. Therefore, it is of critical importance to develop folate radiotracers suitable for PET imaging. This review article updates on the design, preparation and pre-clinical investigation of folate derivatives for radiolabeling with radioisotopes for PET. Among those the most relevant radionuclides so far are fluorine-18 (t1/2: 110 min, Eavβ+: 250 keV and gallium-68 (t1/2: 68 min, Eav β+: 830 keV. Recent results obtained with new PET isotopes such as terbium-152 (t1/2: 17.5 h, Eβ+: 470 keV or scandium-44 (t1/2: 3.97 h, Eav β+: 632 keV are also presented and discussed. Current endeavors for clinical implementation of PET agents open new perspectives for identification of FR-positive malignancies in patients.

    5. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process FPR based on Starlinger Recostar PET IV+technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

      OpenAIRE

      EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

      2014-01-01

      This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process FPR, EU register No RECYC039, which is based on the Starlinger Recostar PET IV+ technology. The input to the process is hot caustic washed PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles and containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed post-consumer PET flakes a...

    6. PET/MR brain imaging: evaluation of clinical UTE-based attenuation correction

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Aasheim, Lars Birger [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Karlberg, Anna [St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Goa, Paal Erik [St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Department of Physics, Trondheim (Norway); Haaberg, Asta [NTNU, Department of Neuroscience, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway); Soerhaug, Sveinung [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Fagerli, Unn-Merete [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Eikenes, Live [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway)

      2015-08-15

      One of the greatest challenges in PET/MR imaging is that of accurate MR-based attenuation correction (AC) of the acquired PET data, which must be solved if the PET/MR modality is to reach its full potential. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of Siemens' most recent version (VB20P) of MR-based AC of head PET data, by comparing it to CT-based AC. Methods:{sup 18}F-FDG PET data from seven lymphoma and twelve lung cancer patients examined with a Biograph mMR PET/MR system were reconstructed with both CT-based and MR-based AC, avoiding sources of error arising when comparing PET data from different systems. The resulting images were compared quantitatively by measuring changes in mean SUV in ten different brain regions in both hemispheres, as well as the brainstem. In addition, the attenuation maps (μ maps) were compared regarding volume and localization of cranial bone. The UTE μ maps clearly overestimate the amount of bone in the neck, while slightly underestimating the amount of bone in the cranium, and the localization of bone in the cranial region also differ from the CT μ maps. In air/tissue interfaces in the sinuses and ears, the MRAC method struggles to correctly classify the different tissues. The misclassification of tissue is most likely caused by a combination of artefacts and the insufficiency of the UTE method to accurately separate bone. Quantitatively, this results in a combination of overestimation (0.5-3.6 %) and underestimation (2.7-5.2 %) of PET activity throughout the brain, depending on the proximity to the inaccurate regions. Our results indicate that the performance of the UTE method as implemented in VB20P is close to the theoretical maximum of such an MRAC method in the brain, while it does not perform satisfactorily in the neck or face/nasal area. Further improvement of the UTE MRAC or other available methods for more accurate segmentation of bone should be incorporated. (orig.)

    7. Influence of pore size distribution on the adsorption of phenol on PET-based activated carbons.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Diez, María A; Gryglewicz, Grazyna

      2016-05-01

      The role of pore size distribution in the adsorption of phenol in aqueous solutions on polyethylene terephthalate (PET)-based activated carbons (ACs) has been analyzed. The ACs were prepared from PET and mixtures of PET with coal-tar pitch (CTP) by means of carbonization and subsequent steam and carbon dioxide activation at 850 and 950 °C, respectively. The resultant ACs were characterized on the basis of similarities in their surface chemical features and differences in their micropore size distributions. The adsorption of phenol was carried out in static conditions at ambient temperature. The pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir model were found to fit the experimental data very well. The different adsorption capacities of the ACs towards phenol were attributed to differences in their micropore size distributions. Adsorption capacity was favoured by the volume of pores with a size smaller than 1.4 nm; but restricted by pores smaller than 0.8 nm.

    8. Calibration and stability of a SiPM-based simultaneous PET/MR insert

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      On behalf of the HYPER Image project, a Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based preclinical PET insert for a commercial human 3 T MRI scanner was built. In this contribution we report on the stability of imaging performance of the PET scanner and MR hardness and compatibility. From data sets that were acquired during the last 7 months we extracted SiPM gain values and their annual drift, the mean energy resolution and the energy resolution drift, spatial resolution and spatial resolution drift, and photo peak position and their annual drift. Further, a point source and a hot rod phantom was imaged fully simultaneously with the MRI scanner and the PET scanner. No interference between either modality was observed

    9. Calibration and stability of a SiPM-based simultaneous PET/MR insert

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Lerche, Christoph W., E-mail: christoph.lerche@philips.com [Philips Research, Europe, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mackewn, Jane [Kings College London (United Kingdom); Goldschmidt, Benjamin [Philips Research, Europe, Eindhoven (Netherlands); RWTH University Aachen (Germany); Salomon, Andre; Gebbhardt, Pierre; Weissler, Bjoern; Ayres, Richard [Philips Research, Europe Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kings College London (United Kingdom); Marsden, Paul [Kings College London (United Kingdom); Schulz, Volkmar [Philips Research, Europe, Eindhoven (Netherlands); RWTH University Aachen (Germany)

      2013-02-21

      On behalf of the HYPER Image project, a Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based preclinical PET insert for a commercial human 3 T MRI scanner was built. In this contribution we report on the stability of imaging performance of the PET scanner and MR hardness and compatibility. From data sets that were acquired during the last 7 months we extracted SiPM gain values and their annual drift, the mean energy resolution and the energy resolution drift, spatial resolution and spatial resolution drift, and photo peak position and their annual drift. Further, a point source and a hot rod phantom was imaged fully simultaneously with the MRI scanner and the PET scanner. No interference between either modality was observed.

    10. Cortical surface-based analysis reduces bias and variance in kinetic modeling of brain PET data

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Greve, Douglas N; Svarer, Claus; Fisher, Patrick M;

      2014-01-01

      in a ROI making noise management critical to successful exploratory analysis. This work explores how preprocessing choices affect the bias and variability of voxelwise kinetic modeling analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET) data. These choices include the use of volume- or cortical surface...... radioligand ([(11)C]SB2307145) were collected on sixteen healthy subjects using a Siemens HRRT PET scanner. Kinetic modeling was used to compute maps of non-displaceable binding potential (BPND) after preprocessing. The results showed a complicated interaction between smoothing, PVC, and masking on BPND...... intersubject variance than when volume smoothing was used. This translates into more than 4 times fewer subjects needed in a group analysis to achieve similarly powered statistical tests. Surface-based smoothing has less bias and variance because it respects cortical geometry by smoothing the PET data only...

    11. Honey-based PET or PET/chitosan fibrous wound dressings: effect of honey on electrospinning process.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Arslan, Aysu; Simşek, Murat; Aldemir, Sevcan Dalkıranoğlu; Kazaroğlu, Nur Merve; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

      2014-07-01

      In this study, fibrous mats were fabricated via electrospinning from solutions of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), PET/chitosan, and PET/honey at different concentrations. The effect of honey and chitosan on electrospinning process was investigated and compared. Fibers containing chitosan had a beaded or ribbon-like/branched morphology, but this morphology improved in the presence of honey. The diameter of electrospun fibers decreased with an increased ratio of honey in PET solution. In addition, fiber deposition area in the collector increased by increasing the honey content. PET/chitosan and PET/honey fibrous mats reached an equilibrium water content in 15 min and their water uptake capacities, which are important for exudating wounds, were found in the range of 280-430% on dry basis. Cytotoxicity evaluation demonstrated that fibers exhibited no cytotoxic activity. This study discloses that PET fibrous mats especially electrospun in the presence of honey could be proposed as potential wound dressing materials owing to their improved processing abilities besides their suitable structural properties. PMID:24842308

    12. Honey-based PET or PET/chitosan fibrous wound dressings: effect of honey on electrospinning process.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Arslan, Aysu; Simşek, Murat; Aldemir, Sevcan Dalkıranoğlu; Kazaroğlu, Nur Merve; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

      2014-07-01

      In this study, fibrous mats were fabricated via electrospinning from solutions of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), PET/chitosan, and PET/honey at different concentrations. The effect of honey and chitosan on electrospinning process was investigated and compared. Fibers containing chitosan had a beaded or ribbon-like/branched morphology, but this morphology improved in the presence of honey. The diameter of electrospun fibers decreased with an increased ratio of honey in PET solution. In addition, fiber deposition area in the collector increased by increasing the honey content. PET/chitosan and PET/honey fibrous mats reached an equilibrium water content in 15 min and their water uptake capacities, which are important for exudating wounds, were found in the range of 280-430% on dry basis. Cytotoxicity evaluation demonstrated that fibers exhibited no cytotoxic activity. This study discloses that PET fibrous mats especially electrospun in the presence of honey could be proposed as potential wound dressing materials owing to their improved processing abilities besides their suitable structural properties.

    13. Polyesteramides based on PET and nylon 2,T Part 3. Properties

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Bouma, K.; Wit, de G.; Lohmeijer, J.H.G.M.; Gaymans, R.J.

      2000-01-01

      The properties of polyesteramides based on PET and nylon 2,T (PETA) using DMT, the bis(esterdiamide) T2T-dimethyl (N,N′-bis(p-carbo-methoxybenzoyl)ethanediamine) and 1,2-ethanediol as starting materials has been studied. A PETA series with an increasing T2T content (0.1–30 mol%) has been synthesised

    14. A novel energy mapping approach for CT-based attenuation correction in PET

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Teimourian, B.; Ay, M. R.; Zafarghandi, M. Shamsaie; Ghafarian, P.; Ghadiri, H.; Zaidi, H.

      2012-01-01

      Purpose: Dual-energy CT (DECT) is arguably the most accurate energy mapping technique in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) implemented on hybrid PET/CT systems. However, this approach is not attractive for clinical use owing to increased patient dose. The authors propose a novel energy mapping

    15. Dietary choline and betaine intake, choline-metabolising genetic polymorphisms and breast cancer risk: a case-control study in China.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Du, Yu-Feng; Luo, Wei-Ping; Lin, Fang-Yu; Lian, Zhen-Qiang; Mo, Xiong-Fei; Yan, Bo; Xu, Ming; Huang, Wu-Qing; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Cai-Xia

      2016-09-01

      Choline and betaine are essential nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism and have been hypothesised to affect breast cancer risk. Functional polymorphisms in genes encoding choline-related one-carbon metabolism enzymes, including phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT), choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), have important roles in choline metabolism and may thus interact with dietary choline and betaine intake to modify breast cancer risk. This study aimed to investigate the interactive effect of polymorphisms in PEMT, BHMT and CHDH genes with choline/betaine intake on breast cancer risk among Chinese women. This hospital-based case-control study consecutively recruited 570 cases with histologically confirmed breast cancer and 576 age-matched (5-year interval) controls. Choline and betaine intakes were assessed by a validated FFQ, and genotyping was conducted for PEMT rs7946, CHDH rs9001 and BHMT rs3733890. OR and 95 % CI were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Compared with the highest quartile of choline intake, the lowest intake quartile showed a significant increased risk of breast cancer. The SNP PEMT rs7946, CHDH rs9001 and BHMT rs3733890 had no overall association with breast cancer, but a significant risk reduction was observed among postmenopausal women with AA genotype of BHMT rs3733890 (OR 0·49; 95 % CI 0·25, 0·98). Significant interactions were observed between choline intake and SNP PEMT rs7946 (P interaction=0·029) and BHMT rs3733890 (P interaction=0·006) in relation to breast cancer risk. Our results suggest that SNP PEMT rs7946 and BHMT rs3733890 may interact with choline intake on breast cancer risk.

    16. FDG PET/CT in cancer: comparison of actual use with literature-based recommendations

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD), covering 1.2 of Denmark's 5.6 million inhabitants, established a task force to (1) retrieve literature evidence for the clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and provide consequent recommendations and further to (2) compare the actual use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012. Rapid Evidence Assessment was applied, using the methodology of systematic reviews with predefined limitations to search PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English/Danish/Swedish/Norwegian since 2002. PICO questions were defined, data recorded and quality appraised and rated with regard to strength and evidence level. Consequent recommendations for applications of PET/CT were established. The actual use of PET/CT was compared with these, where grades A and B indicated ''established'' and ''useful'' and grades C and D ''potentially useful'' and ''non-recommendable'' indications, respectively. Of 11,729 citations, 1,729 were considered for review, and 204 were included. The evidence suggested usefulness of PET/CT in lung, lymphoma, melanoma, head and neck, and colorectal cancers, whereas evidence was sparse in gynaecological cancers. The agreement between actual use of PET/CT and literature-based recommendations was high in the first five mentioned cancers in that 96.2 % of scans were made for grade A or B indications versus only 22.2 % in gynaecological cancers. Evidence-based usefulness was reported in five of six selected cancers; evidence was sparse in the sixth, gynaecological cancers. Actual use of PET/CT agreed well with recommendations. (orig.)

    17. FDG PET/CT in cancer: comparison of actual use with literature-based recommendations

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Petersen, Henrik; Johansen, Allan; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense C (Denmark); Holdgaard, Paw Christian [Vejle Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Madsen, Poul Henning [Vejle Hospital, Department of Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Knudsen, Lene Meldgaard [Odense University Hospital, Department of Haematological, Odense (Denmark); Gad, Dorte; Gravergaard, Anders Eggert [Odense University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Rohde, Max; Godballe, Christian [Odense University Hospital, Department of ORL Head and Neck Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth [Naestved Sygehus, Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Naestved (Denmark); Bech, Karsten [Aabenraa Sygehus, Organ Centre, Aabenraa (Denmark); Teilmann-Joergensen, Dorte [Aabenraa Sygehus, Department of Gynaecoligcal and Obstetrics, Aabenraa (Denmark); Mogensen, Ole [Odense University Hospital, Department of Gynaecoligcal and Obstetrics, Odense (Denmark); Karstoft, Jens [Odense University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Odense (Denmark); Johansen, Joergen [Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense (Denmark); Christensen, Janne Buck [Odense University Hospital, Department of Quality and Research/HTA, Odense (Denmark); Collaboration: on behalf of the PET/CT Task Force of the Region of Southern Denmark

      2016-04-15

      The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD), covering 1.2 of Denmark's 5.6 million inhabitants, established a task force to (1) retrieve literature evidence for the clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and provide consequent recommendations and further to (2) compare the actual use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012. Rapid Evidence Assessment was applied, using the methodology of systematic reviews with predefined limitations to search PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for articles published in English/Danish/Swedish/Norwegian since 2002. PICO questions were defined, data recorded and quality appraised and rated with regard to strength and evidence level. Consequent recommendations for applications of PET/CT were established. The actual use of PET/CT was compared with these, where grades A and B indicated ''established'' and ''useful'' and grades C and D ''potentially useful'' and ''non-recommendable'' indications, respectively. Of 11,729 citations, 1,729 were considered for review, and 204 were included. The evidence suggested usefulness of PET/CT in lung, lymphoma, melanoma, head and neck, and colorectal cancers, whereas evidence was sparse in gynaecological cancers. The agreement between actual use of PET/CT and literature-based recommendations was high in the first five mentioned cancers in that 96.2 % of scans were made for grade A or B indications versus only 22.2 % in gynaecological cancers. Evidence-based usefulness was reported in five of six selected cancers; evidence was sparse in the sixth, gynaecological cancers. Actual use of PET/CT agreed well with recommendations. (orig.)

    18. Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of [{sup 11}C]choline: a comparison between rat and human data

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Tolvanen, Tuula; Ujula, Tiina; Autio, Anu [Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Yli-Kerttula, Timo [Turku University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Turku (Finland); Lehikoinen, Pertti [Turku University Hospital, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Minn, Heikki [Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku (Finland); Roivainen, Anne [Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); University of Turku, Turku Centre for Disease Modelling, Turku (Finland)

      2010-05-15

      Methyl-{sup 11}C-choline ([{sup 11}C]choline) is a radiopharmaceutical used for oncological PET studies. We investigated the biodistribution and biokinetics of [{sup 11}C]choline and provide estimates of radiation doses in humans. The distribution of [{sup 11}C]choline was evaluated ex vivo in healthy rats (n=9) by measuring the radioactivity of excised organs, and in vivo in tumour-bearing rats (n=4) by PET. In addition to estimates of human radiation doses extrapolated from rat data, more accurate human radiation doses were calculated on the basis of PET imaging of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n=6) primarily participating in a synovitis imaging project with [{sup 11}C]choline. Dynamic data were acquired from the thorax and abdomen after injection of 423{+-}11 MBq (mean{+-}SD) of tracer. Following PET imaging, the radioactivity in voided urine was measured. The experimental human data were used for residence time estimations. Radiation doses were calculated with OLINDA/EXM. In rats, the radioactivity distributed mainly to the kidneys, lungs, liver and adrenal gland. The effective dose in a human adult of about 70 kg was 0.0044 mSv/MBq, which is equivalent to 2.0 mSv from 460 MBq of [{sup 11}C]choline PET. The highest absorbed doses in humans were 0.021 mGy/MBq in the kidneys, 0.020 mGy/MBq in the liver and 0.029 mGy/MBq in the pancreas. Only 2.0% of injected radioactivity was excreted in the urine during the 1.5 h after injection. The absorbed radiation doses after administration of 460 MBq of [{sup 11}C]choline were low. Except for the pancreas, biodistribution in the rat was in accordance with that in humans, but rat data may underestimate the effective dose, suggesting that clinical measurements are needed for a more detailed estimation. The observed effective doses suggest the feasibility of [{sup 11}C]choline PET for human studies. (orig.)

  1. Henry’s constant of carbon dioxide-aqueous deep eutectic solvent (choline chloride/ethylene glycol, choline chloride/glycerol, choline chloride/malonic acid) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new set of Henry’s constant for the system carbon dioxide-aqueous deep eutectic solvents were measured. • The DESs used were: ethaline, glyceline, and maline. • The measured data were reported as functions of temperature and composition. • The measured data were represented satisfactorily by the applied correlations. -- Abstract: In this study, we present a new set of Henry’s constant data for the system carbon dioxide-aqueous deep eutectic solvent (DES) (20 to 80 wt% DES) at T = (303.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K. The DESs used were choline chloride-based: ethaline (choline chloride/ethylene glycol), glyceline (choline chloride/glycerol), and maline (choline chloride/malonic acid). A differential Henry’s coefficient model was used to describe the behaviour of Henry’s constant, and correlate it with temperature and concentration of DES in the aqueous DES solution. The correlation was found satisfactory such that the proposed model can be used in engineering calculations with reasonable accuracy

  2. Evaluation of resistive-plate-chamber-based TOF-PET applied to in-beam particle therapy monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Espallardo, I.; Diblen, F.; Rohling, H.; Solevi, P.; Gillam, J.; Watts, D.; España, S.; Vandenberghe, S.; Fiedler, F.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-05-01

    Particle therapy is a highly conformal radiotherapy technique which reduces the dose deposited to the surrounding normal tissues. In order to fully exploit its advantages, treatment monitoring is necessary to minimize uncertainties related to the dose delivery. Up to now, the only clinically feasible technique for the monitoring of therapeutic irradiation with particle beams is Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this work we have compared a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based PET scanner with a scintillation-crystal-based PET scanner for this application. In general, the main advantages of the RPC-PET system are its excellent timing resolution, low cost, and the possibility of building large area systems. We simulated a partial-ring scanner based on an RPC prototype under construction within the Fondazione per Adroterapia Oncologica (TERA). For comparison with the crystal-based PET scanner we have chosen the geometry of a commercially available PET scanner, the Philips Gemini TF. The coincidence time resolution used in the simulations takes into account the current achievable values as well as expected improvements of both technologies. Several scenarios (including patient data) have been simulated to evaluate the performance of different scanners. Initial results have shown that the low sensitivity of the RPC hampers its application to hadron-beam monitoring, which has an intrinsically low positron yield compared to diagnostic PET. In addition, for in-beam PET there is a further data loss due to the partial ring configuration. In order to improve the performance of the RPC-based scanner, an improved version of the RPC detector (modifying the thickness of the gas and glass layers), providing a larger sensitivity, has been simulated and compared with an axially extended version of the crystal-based device. The improved version of the RPC shows better performance than the prototype, but the extended version of the crystal-based PET outperforms all other options.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes/Gold Nanoparticles Composite Film for the Construction of a Novel Amperometric Choline Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a facile method to fabricate a novel choline biosensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Chitosan, a natural biocompatible polymer, was used to solubilize MWCNTs for constructing the aqueous Chit-MWCNTs solution. Then Chit-MWCNTs were first dropped on the surface of a cleaned platinum electrode. Finally, a thiolated silica sol containing AuNPs and choline oxidase (ChOx was immobilized on the surface of the Chit-MWCNTs-modified electrode. The MWCNTs/AuNPs/Pt electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for choline. The resulting choline biosensor showed high sensitivity of choline (3.56 μA/mM, and wide linear range from 0.05 to 0.8 mM with the detection limit of 15 μM. In addition, good reproducibility and stability were obtained.

  4. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Swarnendu, E-mail: Swarna.bag@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Banerjee, Deb Ranjan, E-mail: debranjan2@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Basak, Amit, E-mail: absk@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Das, Amit Kumar, E-mail: amitk@hijli.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India); Pal, Mousumi, E-mail: drmpal62@gmail.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Guru Nanak Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Banerjee, Rita, E-mail: ritabanerjee@outlook.com [Department of Science and Technology, New Mehrauli Road, New Delhi 110016 (India); Paul, Ranjan Rashmi, E-mail: dr_rsspaul@yahoo.co.in [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Guru Nanak Institute of Dental Sciences and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy, E-mail: jchatterjee.iitkgp@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology-Kharagpur, 721302 West Bengal (India)

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  5. Errors in MR-based attenuation correction for brain imaging with PET/MR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota Kops, Elena; Herzog, Hans

    2013-02-01

    AimAttenuation correction of PET data acquired by hybrid MR/PET scanners remains a challenge, even if several methods for brain and whole-body measurements have been developed recently. A template-based attenuation correction for brain imaging proposed by our group is easy to handle and delivers reliable attenuation maps in a short time. However, some potential error sources are analyzed in this study. We investigated the choice of template reference head among all the available data (error A), and possible skull anomalies of the specific patient, such as discontinuities due to surgery (error B). Materials and methodsAn anatomical MR measurement and a 2-bed-position transmission scan covering the whole head and neck region were performed in eight normal subjects (4 females, 4 males). Error A: Taking alternatively one of the eight heads as reference, eight different templates were created by nonlinearly registering the images to the reference and calculating the average. Eight patients (4 females, 4 males; 4 with brain lesions, 4 w/o brain lesions) were measured in the Siemens BrainPET/MR scanner. The eight templates were used to generate the patients' attenuation maps required for reconstruction. ROI and VOI atlas-based comparisons were performed employing all the reconstructed images. Error B: CT-based attenuation maps of two volunteers were manipulated by manually inserting several skull lesions and filling a nasal cavity. The corresponding attenuation coefficients were substituted with the water's coefficient (0.096/cm). ResultsError A: The mean SUVs over the eight templates pairs for all eight patients and all VOIs did not differ significantly one from each other. Standard deviations up to 1.24% were found. Error B: After reconstruction of the volunteers' BrainPET data with the CT-based attenuation maps without and with skull anomalies, a VOI-atlas analysis was performed revealing very little influence of the skull lesions (less than 3%), while the filled nasal

  6. An internet-based "kinetic imaging system" (KIS) for MicroPET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sung-Cheng; Truong, David; Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Shao, Weber; Wu, Anna M; Phelps, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Many considerations, involving understanding and selection of multiple experimental parameters, are required to perform MicroPET studies properly. The large number of these parameters/variables and their complicated interdependence make their optimal choice nontrivial. We have a developed kinetic imaging system (KIS), an integrated software system, to assist the planning, design, and data analysis of MicroPET studies. The system serves multiple functions-education, virtual experimentation, experimental design, and image analysis of simulated/experimental data-and consists of four main functional modules--"Dictionary," "Virtual Experimentation," "Image Analysis," and "Model Fitting." The "Dictionary" module provides didactic information on tracer kinetics, pharmacokinetic, MicroPET imaging, and relevant biological/pharmacological information. The "Virtual Experimentation" module allows users to examine via computer simulations the effect of biochemical/pharmacokinetic parameters on tissue tracer kinetics. It generates dynamic MicroPET images based on the user's assignment of kinetics or kinetic parameters to different tissue organs in a 3-D digital mouse phantom. Experimental parameters can be adjusted to investigate the design options of a MicroPET experiment. The "Image Analysis" module is a full-fledged image display/manipulation program. The "Model Fitting" module provides model-fitting capability for measured/simulated tissue kinetics. The system can be run either through the Web or as a stand-alone process. With KIS, radiotracer characteristics, administration method, dose level, imaging sequence, and image resolution-to-noise tradeoff can be evaluated using virtual experimentation. KIS is designed for biology/pharmaceutical scientists to make learning and applying tracer kinetics fun and easy. PMID:16132473

  7. Improving the Spatial Alignment in PET/CT Using Amplitude-Based Respiration-Gated PET and Respiration-Triggered CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, C.S. van der; Grootjans, W.; Osborne, D.R.; Meeuwis, A.P.; Hamill, J.J.; Acuff, S.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Visser, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET can cause inaccuracies in the quantification of radiotracer uptake, which negatively affects PET-guided radiotherapy planning. Quantitative accuracy can be improved by respiratory gating. However, additional miscalculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) in PET image

  8. MIKE's PET: A participant-based experiment tracking tool for HCI practitioners using mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamedally, Dean; Edlich, Stefan; Klaus, Enrico; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2006-02-01

    Knowledge Elicitation (KE) methods are an integral part of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) practices. They are a key aspect to the synthesis of psychology empirical methods with requirements engineering, User Centred Design (UCD) and user evaluations. Examples of these methods include prototyping, focus groups, interviews, surveys and direct video observation. The MIKE project (Mobile Interactive Knowledge Elicitation) at the Centre for HCI Design, City University London, UK provides mobile cyberscience capabilities for HCI practitioners conducting such research while at stakeholder locations. This paper reports on the design and development of a new MIKE based tool, named PET, a Participant-based Experiment Tracking tool for HCI practitioners using Java-based (J2ME) mobile devices. PET integrates its user tracking techniques with the development of the second generation implementation of the CONKER (COllaborative Non-linear Knowledge Elicitation Repository) Web Service. We thus report further on CONKER v2.0's new capabilities developed to enable tighter collaboration and empirical data management between HCI practitioners, considering their UCD needs. The visualisation, tracking and recording of HCI participant-based datasets via PET is explored with close connectivity with the CONKER v2.0 Web Service, in order to provide mobile-web cyberscience for remote and local HCI practitioners.

  9. Non FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, C., E-mail: cristina.nanni@aosp.bo.i [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Fantini, L.; Nicolini, S.; Fanti, S. [Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S.Orsola, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    2- [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is the radiopharmaceutical most frequently used for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). However, FDG cannot be used for many oncological, cardiological, or neurological conditions, either because the abnormal tissue does not concentrate it, or because the tissues under investigation demonstrate high physiological glucose uptake. Consequently, alternative PET tracers have been produced and introduced into clinical practice. The most important compounds in routine practice are {sup 11}C-choline and {sup 18}F-choline, mainly for the evaluation of prostate cancer; {sup 1}C-methionine for brain tumours; {sup 118}F-DOPA ({sup 18}F- deoxiphenilalanine) for neuroendocrine tumours and movement disorders; {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC (tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid-[1-Nal3]-octreotide) and other somatostatin analogues for neuroendocrine tumours; 11C-acetate for prostate cancer and hepatic masses and 18F-FLT (3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine) for a number of malignant tumours. Another impetus for the development of new tracers is to enable the investigation of biological processes in tumours other than glucose metabolism. This is especially important in the field of response assessment, where there are new agents that are targeted more specifically at angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis and other processes.

  10. Rise of the machines : cyclotrons and radiopharmaceuticals in the PET-CT-MR golden age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One particularly inspiring narrative in the evolution of medical imaging over 35 years begins with the introduction of quassi-routine production of 18F, enabled by advances in reliability of (medical) cyclotrons; invention of the 'molecule of the century' [18F]FOG and its robust synthesis; comprehending betrayal of major tumour-cell types by their glucose avidity; astounding advances in PET scanners (recently, time-of-flight); and marriage of anatomic with functional 3-D imaging as PET/CT or (recently) PET/MR. Though the explosion in PET is identified historically with diagnostic oncology plus quantitation of nuclear medicine, plus the collateral leverage of advances in CT and MR, other potentially transformative opportunities (pre-diagnosis or quantifying treatment response) are emerging in dementia and diabetes-as exemplars of PET-addressable mass afflictions-driven by advances in specificity/sensitivity of targeting molecules. PET delivers femto-M functional sensitivity (e.g.; receptor-targeting)-several magnitude-orders of narrow-context superiority over MR or CT-exemplified by the rapid rise of solid-targetry metallo-PET (64Cu, 89Zr), and concomitantly, preclinical radioimmuno micro-PET/CT/SPECT imaging. Though [11C] PET has elucidated brain, prostate and other cell +/- tumour mechanisms, realistic clinical rollout demands longer halflife [18F]-labelling. [18F] innovations beyond [18F]FDG elucidate numerous metabolisms, including choline, hypoxia, apoptosis and amino-acid, and notably will soon provide a routine-clinical [18F]-alternative to [11 C] based beta-amyloid dementia diagnosis. Frontier PET is constrained by cost/dose, shackled to 'twentieth century' technologies-cyclotron, hotcell and synthesis unit. Example is [18F] bone scintigraphy; acknowledged as clinically superior to [99mTc]MOP, its widespread implementation awaits cheaper isotope, accessible PET/CT scanners, and maybe 'true' shortage of [99mTc]. Generator-sourced 68 Ga-PET is

  11. Application of WLS strips for position determination in Strip PET tomograph based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Smyrski, J; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Strzelecki, A; Wiślicki, W; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2013-01-01

    A method of determination of a gamma quantum absorption point in a plastic scintillator block using a matrix of wavelength-shifting (WLS) strips is proposed. Application of this method for improvement of position resolution in newly proposed PET detectors based on plastic scintillators is presented. The method enables to reduce parallax errors in reconstruction of images which occurs in the presently used Positron Emission Tomography scanners.

  12. Study of oxygen scavenging PET-based films activated by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Gabriella; Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana

    2016-05-01

    In this work an active barrier system consisting of a thin and transparent film based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was studied. Dynamic oxygen absorption measurements were performed at different values of relative humidity and temperature, pointing out that humidity is a key factor in activating the oxidation of the polymer sample. Moreover, the thermal and optical properties of the films were investigated and a good correlation was found between the crystallinity increase and the consequent transparency reduction occurring after the oxygen absorption.

  13. Construction and evaluation of F-18 FDG PET probabilistic MAP for voxel based analysis of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, K. C.; Kim, J. S.; Na, Y. S.; Moon, D. H.; Ryu, J. S. [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop F-18 FDG PET and MRI template for normal rat brain. Also, feasibility of SPM in detailed regional analysis of molecular changes in the rat brain was explored for F-18 FDG PET imaging of a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Ten normal rats were scanned with PET and MRI. The PET images were acquired with 3D mode using microPET focus 120 scanner after injection of 37 MBq F-18 FDG. T2-weighted MR images were acquired using 4.7T MRI system. A MRI-based spatial normalization was used. The PET images were coregistered to T2-weighted MR images. Maximum mutual information (MMI) registrations and affine spatial normalizations were performed using SPM2. The spatial normalization of the MRI to the standard MRI was applied to the integral images. The normalized PET images were averaged voxel wise to create PET template. Eight TBI model rats were subjected to a moderate lateral fluid percussion injury. At 2 days, 1 week, 3 weeks and 5 weeks post FPI, PET images of 8 TBI rats were acquired 4 times. TBI PET images were realigned, spatially normalized to a created PET-template and smoothed (8 mm FWHM). To assess the extent and severity of significant hypo metabolic lesions in TBI compared to normal controls were obtained by a two-sided t-test of SPM (uncorrected p < 0.001, 50 voxels). Visually acceptable PET and MRI templates were created. Registration errors were negligible when MMI procedure was used to register a translated or rotated image volume. Thirty-two PET studies of 8 TBI model subjects were obtained. SPM analysis showed injured distribution of decrease F-18 FDG uptake in TBI rats compared with normal rats. In SPM analysis, the extent and severity of significant hypo metabolic lesions were decreased according to a significant effect of time. At 5 weeks injured animals showed F-18 FDG uptake recovery using SPM analysis. These results indicate that voxel-based method will be useful for future longitudinal studies of rat brain.

  14. PET/CT成像呼吸运动B样条校正%Respiratory motion correction of PET/CT imaging based on B-spline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘李鹏; 贺建峰; 封硕; 崔锐; 马磊; 相艳; 易三莉; 张俊

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of image quality of PET/CT caused by respiratory motion will affect the physician’s diagnosis. The common developed technology of respiratory motion correction is gating, but it still has some limitations. This paper proposes a new method that using CT images extract the features of respiratory motion based on B-Spline to correct respi-ration. Firstly, it obtains the sequence of CT images corresponding with PET images within same respiratory motion cycle, and extracts the features of the motion of CT sequences within respiratory cycle by B-Spline. Next it transforms the feature parameters of CT sequences into the corresponding PET image sequences for the motion correction. The geometric defor-mation phantom and voxelised phantom tests show that the proposed method can obviously improve the quality of image of PET/CT for respiratory motion, and has a value of study further.%PET/CT成像中的人体呼吸运动会造成图像运动模糊,会严重影响图像质量,对医生的诊断造成影响。目前常用的呼吸门控技术能够在一定程度上改善图像质量,但是均存在其局限性。提出了一种基于CT图像提取呼吸运动特征的B样条方法,对呼吸运动图像进行校正。在PET/CT上获取与PET图像周期匹配的CT图像序列,通过B样条配准方式对在呼吸周期内的CT图序列像提取运动信息;对CT图像所匹配的PET图像做基于运动特征信息的校正变换进行运动校正。几何位移形变和像素人体模实验结果表明,提出的方法对PET/CT呼吸运动图像质量改进明显,具有研究价值。

  15. Brazilian experience in characterization of solitary pulmonary nodules using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose on camera-based PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), showing increased 18F-FDG uptake and retention in malignant cells, has proved useful to differentiate malignant from benign pulmonary nodules. An accurate diagnosis of pulmonary cancer represents a clinical challenge. This could be even more significant in Latin America, where the incidence of infectious granulomas is high. However, the high cost of dedicated- PET studies has prevented widespread application of this technique. Hybrid PET is a new approach to tumor imaging using 18F-FDG. In our country, such a system was introduced in 1998. These systems offer the possibility to produce diagnostic quality images of 18F-FDG body distribution, making metabolic scans potentially available. Objective : The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of F-18-FDG scan using a hybrid PET in characterizing pulmonary nodules as benign or malignant. Methods: We evaluated 62 patients (50 male, 38-79y) with indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodules after computed tomography (CT) screening. 18F-FDG scans were performed on a camera-based PET (MCD Vertex-plus Adac) after injection of 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose intravenously. Image acquisition began after 1 hour. Qualitative analysis of the images was performed by visual identification of areas of increase (positive) or absence (negative)of FDG uptake. All results were assessed on basis of histology or clinical/radiological follow-up. Results : Twenty-one patients (33.9%) showed a marked increase in FDG uptake and underwent invasive intervention (biopsy or thoracotomy). Histopathological evaluation revealed malignant disease in eighteen of these patients and benign disease in three of them (positive predictive value = 85.7%). Forty-one patients (66.1%) showed absence of FDG uptake. Fourteen of them underwent surgical procedure. Malignancy was found in only one. Twenty-seven patients with negative FDG studies are being followed up with a

  16. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumhagen, Jan O., E-mail: janole.blumhagen@siemens.com; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias [Magnetic Resonance, Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Faul, David [Siemens Medical Solutions, New York, New York 10015 (United States); Scheffler, Klaus [MRC Department, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen 72076, Germany and Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  17. Internet2-based 3D PET image reconstruction using a PC cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, D W; Rapela, J; Asma, E; Chatzioannou, A; Qi, J; Leahy, R M

    2002-08-01

    We describe an approach to fast iterative reconstruction from fully three-dimensional (3D) PET data using a network of PentiumIII PCs configured as a Beowulf cluster. To facilitate the use of this system, we have developed a browser-based interface using Java. The system compresses PET data on the user's machine, sends these data over a network, and instructs the PC cluster to reconstruct the image. The cluster implements a parallelized version of our preconditioned conjugate gradient method for fully 3D MAP image reconstruction. We report on the speed-up factors using the Beowulf approach and the impacts of communication latencies in the local cluster network and the network connection between the user's machine and our PC cluster.

  18. A contextual based double watermarking of PET images by patient ID and ECG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambakhsh, Mohammad-Saleh; Ahmadian, Alireza; Zaidi, Habib

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel digital watermarking framework using electrocardiograph (ECG) and demographic text data as double watermarks. It protects patient medical information and prevents mismatching diagnostic information. The watermarks are embedded in selected texture regions of a PET image using multi-resolution wavelet decomposition. Experimental results show that modifications in these locations are visually imperceptible. The robustness of the watermarks is verified through measurement of peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), cross-correlation (CC%), structural similarity measure (SSIM) and universal image quality index (UIQI). Their robustness is also computed using pixel-based metrics and human visual system metrics. Additionally, beta factor (β) as an edge preservation measure is used for degradation evaluation of the image boundaries throughout the watermarked PET image. Assessment of the extracted watermarks shows watermarking robustness to common attacks such as embedded zero-tree wavelet (EZW) compression and median filtering.

  19. Development of a prototype of time-over-threshold based small animal PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazoe, K., E-mail: shimazoe@it-club.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kumagai, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kataoka, J. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, S.; Sato, H.; Usuki, Y. [Furukawa Corporation, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    A time-over-threshold (ToT)-based positron emission tomography (TODPET) scanner was designed and fabricated. The PET scanner consisted of eight block detectors, each of which is composed of a 12×12 array of 2×2×10 mm{sup 3} Pr:LuAG crystals individually coupled with a 12×12 UV-enhanced avalanche photodiode (APD) array. The APDs were individually read out using a custom-designed time-over-threshold application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) readout system. The PET scanner has an energy resolution of 10% and a time resolution of 4.2 ns. A spatial resolution of 1.17 mm (FWHM) was demonstrated in the initial results.

  20. Kinetic parametric estimation in animal PET molecular imaging based on artificial immune network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To develop an accurate,reliable method without the need of initialization in animal PET modeling for estimation of the tracer kinetic parameters based on the artificial immune network. Methods: The hepatic and left ventricular time activity curves (TACs) were obtained by drawing ROIs of liver tissue and left ventricle on dynamic 18F-FDG PET imaging of small mice. Meanwhile, the blood TAC was analyzed by sampling the tail vein blood at different time points after injection. The artificial immune network for parametric optimization of pharmacokinetics (PKAIN) was adapted to estimate the model parameters and the metabolic rate of glucose (Ki) was calculated. Results: TACs of liver,left ventricle and tail vein blood were obtained.Based on the artificial immune network, Ki in 3 mice was estimated as 0.0024, 0.0417 and 0.0047, respectively. The average weighted residual sum of squares of the output model generated by PKAIN was less than 0.0745 with a maximum standard deviation of 0.0084, which indicated that the proposed PKAIN method can provide accurate and reliable parametric estimation. Conclusion: The PKAIN method could provide accurate and reliable tracer kinetic modeling in animal PET imaging without the need of initialization of model parameters. (authors)

  1. Chemische contaminanten in diervoeder additief Choline Chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traag, W.A.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Jong, de J.; Egmond, van H.J.; Dam, ten G.

    2010-01-01

    Dit briefrapport beschrijft de resultaten van een onderzoek naar chemische contaminanten in Choline Chloride. De doelstellingen waren: 1) Inzicht te verkrijgen in het voorkomen van (gebromeerde) vlamvertragers en broomdioxines in het diervoederadditief Choline Chloride en het, op basis van de result

  2. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β+-emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  3. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Christopher

    2014-06-12

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β{sup +}-emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  4. PET and PET-CT. State of the art and future prospects; PET e PET- TC. Stato dell'arte e prospettive future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanti, Stefano; Franchi, Roberto [Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy). U.O. di medicina legale; Battista, Giuseppe; Monetti, Nino; Canini, Romeo [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipartimento clinico di scienze radiologiche e istocitopatologiche

    2005-07-15

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) enables the in vivo study of tissue metabolism, and thus is able to identify malignant tumours as hypermetabolic lesions by an increase in tracer uptake. Many papers have demonstrated both the relevant impact of FDG PET on staging of many cancers and the superior accuracy of the technique compared with conventional diagnostic methods for pre-treatment evaluation, therapy response evaluation and relapse identification. In particular PET was found useful in identifying lymph nodal and metastatic spread. thus altering patient management in more than 30% of cases. PET images, however, provide limited anatomical data, which in regions such as the head and neck, mediastinum and pelvic cavity is a significant drawback. The exact localization of lesions may also be difficult in some cases, on the basis of PET images alone. The introduction of combined PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners enables the almost simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission images, thus obtaining optimal fusion images in a very short time. PET-CT fusion images enable lesions to be located, reducing false positive studies and increasing accuracy; the overall duration of examination may also be reduced. On the basis of both literature data and our experience we established the clinical indications when PET-CT may be particularly useful, in comparison with PET alone. It should also be underlined that the use of PET-CT is almost mandatory for new traces such as C-choline and C-methionine; these new tracers may be applied for studying tumours not assessable with FDG, such as prostate cancer. In conclusion PET-CT is at present the most advanced method for metabolic imaging, and is capable of precisely localizing and assessing tumours; fusion images reduce false positive and inconclusive studies, thus increasing diagnostic accuracy. [Italian] La PET con FDG F-18 ha consentito di studiare il metabolismo dei tessuti in vivo e di

  5. Higher Dietary Choline and Betaine Intakes Are Associated with Better Body Composition in the Adult Population of Newfoundland, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Choline is an essential nutrient and betaine is an osmolyte and methyl donor. Both are important to maintain health including adequate lipid metabolism. Supplementation of dietary choline and betaine increase muscle mass and reduce body fat in animals. However, little data is available regarding the role of dietary choline and betaine on body composition in humans.To investigate the association between dietary choline and betaine intakes with body composition in a large population based cross-sectional study.A total of 3214 subjects from the CODING (Complex Disease in Newfoundland population: Environment and Genetics study were assessed. Dietary choline and betaine intakes were computed from the Willett Food Frequency questionnaire. Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry following a 12-hour fast. Major confounding factors including age, sex, total calorie intake and physical activity level were controlled in all analyses.Significantly inverse correlations were found between dietary choline and betaine intakes, with all obesity measurements: total percent body fat (%BF, percent trunk fat (%TF, percent android fat (%AF, percent gynoid fat (%GF and anthropometrics: weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio in both women and men (r range from -0.13 to -0.47 for choline and -0.09 to -0.26 for betaine, p<0.001 for all. Dietary choline intake had stronger association than betaine. Moreover, obese subjects had the lowest dietary choline and betaine intakes, with overweight subjects in the middle, and normal weight subjects consumed the highest dietary choline and betaine (p<0.001. Vice versa, when subjects were ranked according to dietary choline and betaine intakes, subjects with the highest intake of both had the lowest %TF, %AF, %GF, %BF and highest %LM among the groups in both sexes.Our findings indicate that high dietary choline and betaine intakes are significantly associated with favorable body

  6. Composites based on PET and red mud residues as catalyst for organic removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Natálya I; Santos, Patrícia S C; de Souza, Talita E; Oliveira, Luiz C A; Castro, Cínthia S

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we obtained a composite based on carbon/iron oxide from red mud and PET (poly(ethylene terephthalate)) wastes by mechanical mixture (10, 15 and 20wt.% of PET powder/red mud) followed by a controlled thermal treatment at 400°C under air. XRD analyses revealed that the α-Fe2O3 is the main phase formed from red mud. TPR analyses showed that the iron oxide present in the composites undergoes reduction at lower temperature to form Fe(2+) species present in Fe3O4, indicating that the iron oxide in the composite can exhibit greater reactivity in the catalytic processes compared to the original red mud. In fact, catalytic tests showed that the composites presented higher capacity to remove methylene blue dye (MB), presenting about 90% of removal after 24h of reaction. The MB removal was also monitored by mass spectrometer with ionization via electrospray (ESI-MS), which demonstrated the occurrence of the oxidation process, showing the formation of MB oxidation products. The stability of the composites was confirmed after four reuse cycles. The results seem to indicate that PET carbon deposited over the iron oxide from red mud promotes adsorption of the contaminant allowing its contact with the iron atoms and their consequent reaction.

  7. Composites based on PET and red mud residues as catalyst for organic removal from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Natálya I; Santos, Patrícia S C; de Souza, Talita E; Oliveira, Luiz C A; Castro, Cínthia S

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we obtained a composite based on carbon/iron oxide from red mud and PET (poly(ethylene terephthalate)) wastes by mechanical mixture (10, 15 and 20wt.% of PET powder/red mud) followed by a controlled thermal treatment at 400°C under air. XRD analyses revealed that the α-Fe2O3 is the main phase formed from red mud. TPR analyses showed that the iron oxide present in the composites undergoes reduction at lower temperature to form Fe(2+) species present in Fe3O4, indicating that the iron oxide in the composite can exhibit greater reactivity in the catalytic processes compared to the original red mud. In fact, catalytic tests showed that the composites presented higher capacity to remove methylene blue dye (MB), presenting about 90% of removal after 24h of reaction. The MB removal was also monitored by mass spectrometer with ionization via electrospray (ESI-MS), which demonstrated the occurrence of the oxidation process, showing the formation of MB oxidation products. The stability of the composites was confirmed after four reuse cycles. The results seem to indicate that PET carbon deposited over the iron oxide from red mud promotes adsorption of the contaminant allowing its contact with the iron atoms and their consequent reaction. PMID:27149399

  8. Integrated modeling of PET and DTI information based on conformal brain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Guangyu; Xi, Yongjian; Heckenburg, Greg; Duan, Ye; Hua, Jing; Gu, Xiangfeng

    2006-03-01

    Recent advances in imaging technologies, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) have accelerated brain research in many aspects. In order to better understand the synergy of the many processes involved in normal brain function, integrated modeling and analysis of MRI, PET, and DTI is highly desirable. Unfortunately, the current state-of-art computational tools fall short in offering a comprehensive computational framework that is accurate and mathematically rigorous. In this paper we present a framework which is based on conformal parameterization of a brain from high-resolution structural MRI data to a canonical spherical domain. This model allows natural integration of information from co-registered PET as well as DTI data and lays the foundation for a quantitative analysis of the relationship between diverse data sets. Consequently, the system can be designed to provide a software environment able to facilitate statistical detection of abnormal functional brain patterns in patients with a large number of neurological disorders.

  9. Metabolic patterns in prion diseases: an FDG PET voxel-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical diagnosis of human prion diseases can be challenging since symptoms are common to other disorders associated with rapidly progressive dementia. In this context, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a useful complementary tool. The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic pattern in human prion diseases, particularly sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). We retrospectively studied 17 patients with a definitive, probable or possible prion disease who underwent FDG PET in our institution. Of these patients, 12 were diagnosed as sCJD (9 definitive, 2 probable and 1 possible), 1 was diagnosed as definitive vCJD and 4 were diagnosed as definitive FFI. The hypometabolic pattern of each individual and comparisons across the groups of subjects (control subjects, sCJD and FFI) were evaluated using a voxel-based analysis. The sCJD group exhibited a pattern of hypometabolism that affected both subcortical (bilateral caudate, thalamus) and cortical (frontal cortex) structures, while the FFI group only presented a slight hypometabolism in the thalamus. Individual analysis demonstrated a considerable variability of metabolic patterns among patients, with the thalamus and basal ganglia the most frequently affected areas, combined in some cases with frontal and temporal hypometabolism. Patients with a prion disease exhibit a characteristic pattern of brain metabolism presentation in FDG PET imaging. Consequently, in patients with rapidly progressive cognitive impairment, the detection of these patterns in the FDG PET study could orient the diagnosis to a prion disease. (orig.)

  10. Metabolic patterns in prion diseases: an FDG PET voxel-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, Elena; Dominguez-Prado, Ines; Jesus Ribelles, Maria; Arbizu, Javier [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Riverol, Mario; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Rosario Luquin, Maria; Castro, Purificacion de [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Neurology Department, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Clinical diagnosis of human prion diseases can be challenging since symptoms are common to other disorders associated with rapidly progressive dementia. In this context, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a useful complementary tool. The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic pattern in human prion diseases, particularly sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). We retrospectively studied 17 patients with a definitive, probable or possible prion disease who underwent FDG PET in our institution. Of these patients, 12 were diagnosed as sCJD (9 definitive, 2 probable and 1 possible), 1 was diagnosed as definitive vCJD and 4 were diagnosed as definitive FFI. The hypometabolic pattern of each individual and comparisons across the groups of subjects (control subjects, sCJD and FFI) were evaluated using a voxel-based analysis. The sCJD group exhibited a pattern of hypometabolism that affected both subcortical (bilateral caudate, thalamus) and cortical (frontal cortex) structures, while the FFI group only presented a slight hypometabolism in the thalamus. Individual analysis demonstrated a considerable variability of metabolic patterns among patients, with the thalamus and basal ganglia the most frequently affected areas, combined in some cases with frontal and temporal hypometabolism. Patients with a prion disease exhibit a characteristic pattern of brain metabolism presentation in FDG PET imaging. Consequently, in patients with rapidly progressive cognitive impairment, the detection of these patterns in the FDG PET study could orient the diagnosis to a prion disease. (orig.)

  11. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schinagl, Dominic A.X. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology (874), P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hoogen, Frank J.A. van den [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A.W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Slootweg, Piet J. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (Node{sub CT}) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PET{sub VIS}), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PET{sub SUV}), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both Node{sub CT} and PET{sub VIS} showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PET{sub VIS}. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PET{sub SUV} was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  12. Validation of a small-animal PET simulation using GAMOS: a GEANT4-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, M; Arce, P; Rato Mendes, P

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo-based modelling is a powerful tool to help in the design and optimization of positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The performance of these systems depends on several parameters, such as detector physical characteristics, shielding or electronics, whose effects can be studied on the basis of realistic simulated data. The aim of this paper is to validate a comprehensive study of the Raytest ClearPET small-animal PET scanner using a new Monte Carlo simulation platform which has been developed at CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain), called GAMOS (GEANT4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations). This toolkit, based on the GEANT4 code, was originally designed to cover multiple applications in the field of medical physics from radiotherapy to nuclear medicine, but has since been applied by some of its users in other fields of physics, such as neutron shielding, space physics, high energy physics, etc. Our simulation model includes the relevant characteristics of the ClearPET system, namely, the double layer of scintillator crystals in phoswich configuration, the rotating gantry, the presence of intrinsic radioactivity in the crystals or the storage of single events for an off-line coincidence sorting. Simulated results are contrasted with experimental acquisitions including studies of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rates in accordance with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4-2008 protocol. Spatial resolution results showed a discrepancy between simulated and measured values equal to 8.4% (with a maximum FWHM difference over all measurement directions of 0.5 mm). Sensitivity results differ less than 1% for a 250-750 keV energy window. Simulated and measured count rates agree well within a wide range of activities, including under electronic saturation of the system (the measured peak of total coincidences, for the mouse-sized phantom, was 250.8 kcps reached at 0.95 MBq mL(-1) and the simulated peak

  13. Validation of a small-animal PET simulation using GAMOS: a GEANT4-based framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas, M.; Arce, P.; Rato Mendes, P.

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo-based modelling is a powerful tool to help in the design and optimization of positron emission tomography (PET) systems. The performance of these systems depends on several parameters, such as detector physical characteristics, shielding or electronics, whose effects can be studied on the basis of realistic simulated data. The aim of this paper is to validate a comprehensive study of the Raytest ClearPET small-animal PET scanner using a new Monte Carlo simulation platform which has been developed at CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain), called GAMOS (GEANT4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations). This toolkit, based on the GEANT4 code, was originally designed to cover multiple applications in the field of medical physics from radiotherapy to nuclear medicine, but has since been applied by some of its users in other fields of physics, such as neutron shielding, space physics, high energy physics, etc. Our simulation model includes the relevant characteristics of the ClearPET system, namely, the double layer of scintillator crystals in phoswich configuration, the rotating gantry, the presence of intrinsic radioactivity in the crystals or the storage of single events for an off-line coincidence sorting. Simulated results are contrasted with experimental acquisitions including studies of spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rates in accordance with the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 4-2008 protocol. Spatial resolution results showed a discrepancy between simulated and measured values equal to 8.4% (with a maximum FWHM difference over all measurement directions of 0.5 mm). Sensitivity results differ less than 1% for a 250-750 keV energy window. Simulated and measured count rates agree well within a wide range of activities, including under electronic saturation of the system (the measured peak of total coincidences, for the mouse-sized phantom, was 250.8 kcps reached at 0.95 MBq mL-1 and the simulated peak was

  14. Dietary Intake and Plasma Levels of Choline and Betaine in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C. Hamlin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in folate-dependent one-carbon metabolism have been reported in many children with autism. Because inadequate choline and betaine can negatively affect folate metabolism and in turn downstream methylation and antioxidant capacity, we sought to determine whether dietary intake of choline and betaine in children with autism was adequate to meet nutritional needs based on national recommendations. Three-day food records were analyzed for 288 children with autism (ASDs who participated in the national Autism Intervention Research Network for Physical Health (AIR-P Study on Diet and Nutrition in children with autism. Plasma concentrations of choline and betaine were measured in a subgroup of 35 children with ASDs and 32 age-matched control children. The results indicated that 60–93% of children with ASDs were consuming less than the recommended Adequate Intake (AI for choline. Strong positive correlations were found between dietary intake and plasma concentrations of choline and betaine in autistic children as well as lower plasma concentrations compared to the control group. We conclude that choline and betaine intake is inadequate in a significant subgroup of children with ASDs and is reflected in lower plasma levels. Inadequate intake of choline and betaine may contribute to the metabolic abnormalities observed in many children with autism and warrants attention in nutritional counseling.

  15. Effects on Mechanical Properties of Recycled PET in Cement-Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ávila Córdoba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Concretes consisting of portland cement (OPC, silica sand, gravel, water, and recycled PET particles were developed. Specimens without PET particles were prepared for comparison. Curing times, PET particle sizes, and aggregate concentrations were varied. The compressive strength, compressive strain at yield point, and Young modulus were determined. Morphological and chemical compositions of recycled PET particles were seen in a scanning electron microscopy. Results show that smaller PET particle sizes in lower concentrations generate improvements on compressive strength and strain, and Young’s modulus decreases when the size of PET particles used was increased.

  16. Accuracy assessment of an automatic image-based PET/CT registration for ultrasound-guided biopsies and ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Wood, Bradford J.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Dalal, Sandeep; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The multimodal fusion of spatially tracked real-time ultrasound (US) with a prior CT scan has demonstrated clinical utility, accuracy, and positive impact upon clinical outcomes when used for guidance during biopsy and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, the combination of CT-guided procedures with positron emission tomography (PET) may not only enhance navigation, but add valuable information regarding the specific location and volume of the targeted masses which may be invisible on CT and US. The accuracy of this fusion depends on reliable, reproducible registration methods between PET and CT. This can avoid extensive manual efforts to correct registration which can be long and tedious in an interventional setting. In this paper, we present a registration workflow for PET/CT/US fusion by analyzing various image metrics based on normalized mutual information and cross-correlation, using both rigid and affine transformations to automatically align PET and CT. Registration is performed between the CT component of the prior PET-CT and the intra-procedural CT scan used for navigation to maximize image congruence. We evaluate the accuracy of the PET/CT registration by computing fiducial and target registration errors using anatomical landmarks and lesion locations respectively. We also report differences to gold-standard manual alignment as well as the root mean square errors for CT/US fusion. Ten patients with prior PET/CT who underwent ablation or biopsy procedures were selected for this study. Studies show that optimal results were obtained using a crosscorrelation based rigid registration with a landmark localization error of 1.1 +/- 0.7 mm using a discrete graphminimizing scheme. We demonstrate the feasibility of automated fusion of PET/CT and its suitability for multi-modality ultrasound guided navigation procedures.

  17. Performance tests for ray-scan 64 PET/CT based on NEMA NU-2 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of the Ray-Scan 64 PET/CT system, a newly developed PET/CT in China. It combines a 64 slice helical CT scanner with a high resolution PET scanner based on BGO crystals assembled in 36 rings. The energy window is 350∼ 650 keV, and the coincidence window is set at 12 ns in both 2D and 3D mode. The transaxial field of view (FOV) is 600 mm in diameter, and the axial FOV is 163 mm. Method: Performance measurements were conducted focusing on PET scanners based on NEMA NU-2 2007 standard. We reported the full characterization (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, scatter fraction, accuracy of correction, and image quality) in both 2D and 3D mode. In addition, the clinical images from two patients of different types of tumor were presented to further demonstrate this PET/CT system performance in clinical application. Results: using the NEMA NU-2 2007 standard, the main results: (1) the transaxial resolution at 1cm from the gantry center for 2D and 3D was both 4.5mm (FWHM), and at 10cm from the gantry center, the radial (tangential) resolution were 5.6mm (5.3mm) and 5.4mm (5.2mm) in 2D and 3D mode respectively. The axial resolution at 1cm and 10cm off axis was 3.4mm (4.8mm) and 5.5mm (5.8mm) in 2D (3D) mode respectively; (2) the sensitivity for the radial position R0(r=0mm) and R100(r=100mm) were 1.741 kcps/MBq and 1.767 kcps/MBq respectively in 2D mode and 7.157 kcps/MBq and 7.513 kcps/MBq in 3D mode; (3) the scatter fraction was calculated as 18.36% and 42.92% in 2D and 3D mode, respectively; (4) contrast of hot spheres in the image quality phantom in 2D mode was 50.33% (52.87%), 33.34% (40.86%), 20.64% (26.36%), and 10.99% (15.82%), respectively, in N=4 (N=8). Besides, in clinical study, the diameter of lymph tumor was about 2.4 cm, and the diameter of lung cancer was 4.2 cm. This PET/CT system can distinguish the position of cancer easily. Conclusion: The results show that the performance of the

  18. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by reacting approximately equimolecular quantities of ferric hydroxide, choline,...

  19. Penalized likelihood PET image reconstruction using patch-based edge-preserving regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guobao; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET) can improve image quality by using spatial regularization that penalizes image intensity difference between neighboring pixels. The most commonly used quadratic penalty often oversmoothes edges and fine features in reconstructed images. Nonquadratic penalties can preserve edges but often introduce piece-wise constant blocky artifacts and the results are also sensitive to the hyper-parameter that controls the shape of the penalty function. This paper presents a patch-based regularization for iterative image reconstruction that uses neighborhood patches instead of individual pixels in computing the nonquadratic penalty. The new regularization is more robust than the conventional pixel-based regularization in differentiating sharp edges from random fluctuations due to noise. An optimization transfer algorithm is developed for the penalized maximum likelihood estimation. Each iteration of the algorithm can be implemented in three simple steps: an EM-like image update, an image smoothing and a pixel-by-pixel image fusion. Computer simulations show that the proposed patch-based regularization can achieve higher contrast recovery for small objects without increasing background variation compared with the quadratic regularization. The reconstruction is also more robust to the hyper-parameter than conventional pixel-based nonquadratic regularizations. The proposed regularization method has been applied to real 3-D PET data.

  20. Anatomically guided voxel-based partial volume effect correction in brain PET : Impact of MRI segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Assal, Frederic; Allaoua, Mohamed; Ratib, Osman; Loevblad, Karl-Olof; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Partial volume effect is still considered one of the main limitations in brain PET imaging given the limited spatial resolution of current generation PET scanners. The accuracy of anatomically guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) algorithms in brain PET is largely dependent on the performan

  1. Accuracy and Radiation Dose of CT-Based Attenuation Correction for Small Animal PET: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -Small animal PET allows qualitative assessment and quantitative measurement of biochemical processes in vivo, but the accuracy and reproducibility of imaging results can be affected by several parameters. The first aim of this study was to investigate the performance of different CT-based attenuation correction strategies and assess the resulting impact on PET images. The absorbed dose in different tissues caused by scanning procedures was also discussed to minimize biologic damage generated by radiation exposure due to PET/CT scanning. A small animal PET/CT system was modeled based on Monte Carlo simulation to generate imaging results and dose distribution. Three energy mapping methods, including the bilinear scaling method, the dual-energy method and the hybrid method which combines the kVp conversion and the dual-energy method, were investigated comparatively through assessing the accuracy of estimating linear attenuation coefficient at 511 keV and the bias introduced into PET quantification results due to CT-based attenuation correction. Our results showed that the hybrid method outperformed the bilinear scaling method, while the dual-energy method achieved the highest accuracy among the three energy mapping methods. Overall, the accuracy of PET quantification results have similar trend as that for the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients, whereas the differences between the three methods are more obvious in the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients than in the PET quantification results. With regards to radiation exposure from CT, the absorbed dose ranged between 7.29-45.58 mGy for 50-kVp scan and between 6.61-39.28 mGy for 80-kVp scan. For 18F radioactivity concentration of 1.86x105 Bq/ml, the PET absorbed dose was around 24 cGy for tumor with a target-to-background ratio of 8. The radiation levels for CT scans are not lethal to the animal, but concurrent use of PET in longitudinal study can increase the risk of biological effects. The

  2. Multi-ray-based system matrix generation for 3D PET reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrs, Sascha; Defrise, Michel; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Bartoli, Antonietta; Fabbri, Serena; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2008-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms for positron emission tomography (PET) require a sophisticated system matrix (model) of the scanner. Our aim is to set up such a model offline for the YAP-(S)PET II small animal imaging tomograph in order to use it subsequently with standard ML-EM (maximum-likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximization) for fully three-dimensional image reconstruction. In general, the system model can be obtained analytically, via measurements or via Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we present the multi-ray method, which can be considered as a hybrid method to set up the system model offline. It incorporates accurate analytical (geometric) considerations as well as crystal depth and crystal scatter effects. At the same time, it has the potential to model seamlessly other physical aspects such as the positron range. The proposed method is based on multiple rays which are traced from/to the detector crystals through the image volume. Such a ray-tracing approach itself is not new; however, we derive a novel mathematical formulation of the approach and investigate the positioning of the integration (ray-end) points. First, we study single system matrix entries and show that the positioning and weighting of the ray-end points according to Gaussian integration give better results compared to equally spaced integration points (trapezoidal integration), especially if only a small number of integration points (rays) are used. Additionally, we show that, for a given variance of the single matrix entries, the number of rays (events) required to calculate the whole matrix is a factor of 20 larger when using a pure Monte-Carlo-based method. Finally, we analyse the quality of the model by reconstructing phantom data from the YAP-(S)PET II scanner. PMID:19001696

  3. A Time-Based Front End Readout System for PET & CT

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, T C; Anghinolfi, F; Auffray, E; Dosanjh, M; Hillemanns, H; Hoffmann, H -F; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Kronberger, M; Lecoq, P; Moraes, D; Trummer, J

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the European FP6's BioCare project, we develop a novel, time-based, photo-detector readout technique to increase sensitivity and timing precision for molecular imaging in PET and CT. The project aims to employ Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) arrays with state of the art, high speed, front end amplifiers and discrimination circuits developed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics program at CERN, suitable to detect and process photons in a combined one-unit PET/CT detection head. In the so-called time-based approach our efforts focus on the system's timing performance with sub-nanosecond time-jitter and -walk, and yet also provide information on photon energy without resorting to analog to digital conversion. The bandwidth of the electronic circuitry is compatible with the scintillator's intrinsic light response (e.g. les40ns in LSO) and hence allows high rate CT operation in single-photon counting mode. Based on commercial LSO crystals and Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays, we show the system pe...

  4. The Semi-automatic Synthesis of 18F-fluoroethyl-choline by Domestic FDG Synthesizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Ming

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As an important complementary imaging agent for 18F-FDG, 18F-fluoroethyl-choline (18F-FECH has been demonstrated to be promising in brain and prostate cancer imaging. By using domestic PET-FDG-TI-I CPCU synthesizer, 18F-FECH was synthesized by different reagents and consumable supplies. The C18 column was added before the product collection bottle to remove K2.2.2. The 18F-FECH was synthesized by PET-FDG-IT-I synthesizer efficiently about 30 minutes by radiochemical yield of 42.0% (no decay corrected, n=5, and the radiochemical purity was still more than 99.0% after 6 hours. The results showed the domestic PET-FDG-IT-I synthesizer could semi-automatically synthesize injectable 18F-FECH in high efficiency and radiochemical purity

  5. Does litomosoides sigmodontis synthesize dimethylethanolamine from choline?

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, K.M.; Babayan, S.; Allen, J. E.; Harnett, W

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile female Litomosoides sigmodontis secrete a protein (Juv-p120) highly modified with dimethylethanolamine (DMAE). In an attempt to establish the source of this decoration worms were pulsed with [3H]-choline and [3H]-ethanolamine and the radio-isotope labelled products analysed. Both isotope labels were successfully taken up by the worms, as demonstrated by labelling of phospholipids with [3H]-choline, being predominantly incorporated into phosphatidylcholine and [3H]-ethanolamine into p...

  6. Does Litomosoides sigmodontis synthesize dimethylethanolamine from choline?

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, K.M.; Babayan, S. A.; Allen, J. E.; Harnett, W; Allen, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile female Litomosoides sigmodontis secrete a protein (Juv-p120) highly modified with dimethylethanolamine (DMAE). In an attempt to establish the source of this decoration worms were pulsed with [3H]-choline and [3H]-ethanolamine and the radio-isotope labelled products analysed. Both isotope labels were successfully taken up by the worms, as demonstrated by labelling of phospholipids with [3H]-choline, being predominantly incorporated into phosphatidylcholine and [3H]-ethanolamine into p...

  7. Yeast mutants auxotrophic for choline or ethanolamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, K D; Jensen, B.; Kolat, A I; Storm, E M; Henry, S. A.; Fogel, S

    1980-01-01

    Three mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which require exogenous ethanolamine or choline were isolated. The mutants map to a single locus (cho1) on chromosome V. The lipid composition suggests that cho1 mutants do not synthesize phosphatidylserine under any growth conditions. If phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine, which are usually derived from phosphatidylserine, were synthesized from exogenous ethanolamine or choline, the mutants grew and divided relatively normally....

  8. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  PET), the application of monolithic scintillators has so far been hampered by the lengthy and complex procedures needed for position- and time-of-interaction estimation. Here, the algorithms previously developed in our group are revised to make the calibration and operation of a large number of monolithic scintillator detectors in a TOF-PET system practical. In particular, the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small deterioration of the detector performance.

  9. Effect of hypoxia on the uptake of [methyl-3H]choline, [1-14C] acetate and [18F]FDG in cultured prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Choline, acetate and glucose ([2-18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose, [18F]FDG) analogs are under investigation as positron emission tomography (PET) tracers for the imaging of prostate cancer; however, their response to tumor hypoxia has not been clarified. Methods: The uptake of [methyl-3H]choline, [1-14C]acetate and [18F]FDG was monitored in androgen-independent PC-3 cells and androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells under aerobic or anoxic conditions. The effect of androgen depletion was also examined. Results: PC-3 cells exhibited aerobic choline and acetate uptake five to six times higher than FDG uptake, whereas LNCaP cells showed choline uptake 2.2-fold higher than acetate uptake and 10-fold higher than FDG uptake. After 4 h of anoxia, PC-3 cells showed an 85% increase in FDG uptake, a 15% decrease in choline uptake and a 36% increase in acetate uptake, whereas LNCaP cells showed a 212% increase in FDG uptake, a 28% decrease in choline uptake and no change in acetate uptake. Androgen depletion resulted in a marked decrease in the uptake of all tracers in LNCaP cells but no changes in PC-3 cells. Conclusion: In aerobic conditions, both PC-3 and LNCaP cells exhibited an order of uptake preference as follows: choline>acetate>FDG. In hypoxic cells, the order is reversed, reflecting diverse biochemical responses to hypoxia. These findings may help to explain PET imaging findings of the diverse responses of these tracers in different stages and locations of prostate cancer. Androgen depletion markedly suppressed the uptake of all three tracers in LNCaP cells, which suggests the potential for underestimation of the disease state when PET imaging is performed subsequent to antiandrogen therapy

  10. TDC-based readout electronics for real-time acquisition of high resolution PET bio-images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, N.; Saponara, S.; Ambrosi, G.; Baronti, F.; Bisogni, M. G.; Cerello, P.,; Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; Fanucci, L.; Ionica, M.; Licciulli, F.; Marzocca, C.; Morrocchi, M.; Pennazio, F.; Roncella, R.; Santoni, C.; Wheadon, R.; Del Guerra, A.

    2013-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a clinical and research tool for in vivo metabolic imaging. The demand for better image quality entails continuous research to improve PET instrumentation. In clinical applications, PET image quality benefits from the time of flight (TOF) feature. Indeed, by measuring the photons arrival time on the detectors with a resolution less than 100 ps, the annihilation point can be estimated with centimeter resolution. This leads to better noise level, contrast and clarity of detail in the images either using analytical or iterative reconstruction algorithms. This work discusses a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based magnetic-field compatible TOF-PET module with depth of interaction (DOI) correction. The detector features a 3D architecture with two tiles of SiPMs coupled to a single LYSO scintillator on both its faces. The real-time front-end electronics is based on a current-mode ASIC where a low input impedance, fast current buffer allows achieving the required time resolution. A pipelined time to digital converter (TDC) measures and digitizes the arrival time and the energy of the events with a timestamp of 100 ps and 400 ps, respectively. An FPGA clusters the data and evaluates the DOI, with a simulated z resolution of the PET image of 1.4 mm FWHM.

  11. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwiński, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Dulski, K.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Jasińska, B.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Silarski, M.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the { o-Ps }→ 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ (θ ) ≈ {0.4°} and σ (E) ≈ 4.1 {keV}, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities.

  12. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Kamińska, D; Czerwiński, E; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Curceanu, C; Dulski, K; Głowacz, B; Gupta-Sharma, N; Gorgol, M; Hiesmayr, B C; Jasińska, B; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Krzemień, W; Krawczyk, N; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Silarski, M; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian Positron Emission Tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps$\\to3\\gamma$ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to $\\sigma(\\theta) \\approx 0.4^{\\circ}$ and $\\sigma(E) \\approx 4.1$ keV, respect...

  13. Whole-body PET/MRI: The effect of bone attenuation during MR-based attenuation correction in oncology imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aznar, M.C., E-mail: marianne.aznar@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy 3994, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Sersar, R., E-mail: rachidadk@hotmail.com [DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Saabye, J., E-mail: julie_saa@hotmail.com [DTU Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Ladefoged, C.N., E-mail: claesnl@gmail.com [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Andersen, F.L., E-mail: Flemming.Andersen@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Rasmussen, J.H., E-mail: jacobrasmu@gmail.com [Department of Oncology, Section of Radiotherapy 3994, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Löfgren, J., E-mail: Johan.Loefgren@regionh.dk [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Beyer, T., E-mail: thomas.beyer@meduniwien.ac.at [Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In combined PET/MRI standard PET attenuation correction (AC) is based on tissue segmentation following dedicated MR sequencing and, typically, bone tissue is not represented. We evaluate PET quantification in whole-body (WB)-PET/MRI following MR-AC without considering bone attenuation and then investigate different strategies to account for bone tissue in clinical PET/MR imaging. To this purpose, bone tissue representation was extracted from separate CT images, and different bone representations were simulated from hypothetically derived MR-based bone classifications. Methods: Twenty oncology patients referred for a PET/CT were injected with either [18F]-FDG or [18F]-NaF and imaged on PET/CT (Biograph TruePoint/mCT, Siemens) and PET/MRI (mMR, Siemens) following a standard single-injection, dual-imaging clinical WB-protocol. Routine MR-AC was based on in-/opposed-phase MR imaging (orgMR-AC). PET(/MRI) images were reconstructed (AW-OSEM, 3 iterations, 21 subsets, 4 mm Gaussian) following routine MR-AC and MR-AC based on four modified attenuation maps. These modified attenuation maps were created for each patient by non-linear co-registration of the CT images to the orgMR-AC images, and adding CT bone mask values representing cortical bone: 1200 HU (cortCT), spongiosa bone: 350 HU (spongCT), average CT value (meanCT) and original CT values (orgCT). Relative difference images of the PET following AC using the modified attenuation maps were compared. SUVmean was calculated in anatomical reference regions and for PET-positive lesions. Results: The relative differences in SUVmean across patients following orgMR-AC and orgCT in soft tissue lesions and in bone lesions were similar (range: 0.0% to −22.5%), with an average underestimation of SUVmean of 7.2% and 10.0%, respectively when using orgMR-AC. In bone lesions, spongCT values were closest to orgCT (median bias of 1.3%, range: –9.0% to 13.5%) while the overestimation of SUVmean with respect to orgCT was

  14. Effects of irradiation on the [methyl-{sup 3}H]choline uptake in the human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, K.; Mueller, S.A.; Seidl, C.; Schwaiger, M.; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Grosu, A.L. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Background and purpose: choline positron emission tomography (PET) can help to optimize radiation treatment strategy of prostate cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of ionizing radiation on the choline uptake in an androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and an androgen-independent (PC3) prostate cancer cell line. Material and methods: uptake of [methyl-{sup 3}H]choline chloride was investigated between 4 and 96 h after irradiation with 6 Gy. Dose dependence of choline uptake was examined following irradiation with 2-12 Gy, and cell survival was analyzed via the clonogenic assay. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was determined 24 h (PC3) and 48 h (LNCaP) after irradiation with 6 Gy. Results: PC3 cells showed a significant transitory increase of [methyl-{sup 3}H]choline uptake with a maximum at 24 h after irradiation. In LNCaP cells irradiation induced a significant decrease with a minimum at 48 h. Changes in choline uptake in both cell lines were almost dose-independent up to 12 Gy. Following irradiation with 6 Gy, transport capacity (v{sub max}) increased and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub M}) decreased in PC3 cells, while in LNCaP cells the two parameters behaved vice versa. Conclusion: changes in choline uptake following irradiation might be due to metabolic changes associated with initiation of processes that finally cause cell death. Thus, changes in tumor choline uptake monitored by PET after radiotherapy might not exclusively reflect therapeutic success but also altered tracer uptake as a consequence of irradiation. (orig.)

  15. Choline incorporation by Schistosoma mansoni: distribution of choline metabolites during development and after sexual differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancelin, M.L.; Torpier, G.; Vial, H.J.; Capron, A.

    1987-06-01

    Choline metabolism was investigated in Schistosoma mansoni during the main phases of its development, namely, schistosomula, 11- and 15-day-old worms, and adults. At the physiological choline concentration used in the assay (20 microM), betaine was, along with phosphatidylcholine, one of the most abundant choline metabolites, revealing considerable choline oxidation activity. Very little radioactivity was associated with CDP-choline, whereas a sustained incorporation into phosphocholine occurred. These results provide good evidence that CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase plays a regulatory role in the de novo pathway of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. During development, the incorporation of choline into its various metabolites was maximal in 11-day-old worms. At this stage, the oxidative pathway predominated over the Kennedy pathway, whereas at all other stages the de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis was predominant. Furthermore, choline incorporation into betaine was much more important in the adult female worm than in the male, indicating a major difference in choline incorporation and distribution between the 2 sexes of the adult worms.

  16. Daunorubicin and doxorubicin inhibit the [{sup 11}C]choline accumulation in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikecz, Pal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Centre, 4012 Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary)], E-mail: pal@pet.dote.hu; Marian, Terez; Miklovicz, Tuende; Galuska, Laszlo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Centre, 4012 Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary); Krasznai, Zoltan; Toth, Agnes; Goda, Katalin [Department of Biophysics and Cell Biology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Centre, 4012 Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary); Tron, Lajos [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Centre, 4012 Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary); Hernadi, Zoltan; Krasznai, Zoard T. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Science Centre, 4012 Debrecen, Nagyerdei krt. 98 (Hungary)

    2009-10-15

    We studied how very short (10-40 min) incubation with anthracycline derivatives modifies the accumulation of PET tumor-diagnostic radiotracers in cancer cells. The human ovarian A2780 and A2780AD, human B lymphoid JY, human epidermoid KB-3-1 and KB-V-1, and smooth muscle DDT1 MF-2 cells were pre-incubated with daunorubicin and doxorubicin, and the uptake of [{sup 18}F]FDG and [{sup 11}C]choline was measured. Anthracycline treatment decreased remarkably the [{sup 11}C]choline accumulation in a concentration dependent manner, while it did not modify significantly the [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake of the cells.

  17. Preparation and characterization of polymer blends based on recycled PET and polyester derived by terephthalic acid; Preparacao e caracterizacao de blendas polimericas a base de PET reciclado e poliester derivado do acido tereftalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, L.; Miranda, C.S.; Fiuza, R.P.; Luporini, S.; Carvalho, R.F.; Jose, N.M., E-mail: leandro.ohara@gmail.co [Universidade Federal da Bahia (GECIM/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Grupo de Energia e Ciencias dos Materiais

    2010-07-01

    Environmentally friendly materials, made from industrial waste, are being increasingly used as a solution to the growing amount of waste generated by society, but also as a cheaper alternative to replace conventional materials for use in construction. In this work were investigated the properties of polymer blends based on recycled PET and a polyester derived from terephthalic acid and glycerin, a co-product of biodiesel. The samples were characterized by XRD, TGA, DSC, FTIR and SEM. The polyester synthesized showed a degradation event near 300 deg C. The blends with higher ratio of PET showed thermal behavior similar to pure PET. The X-ray diffraction showed that the polymer blends are semicrystalline materials. The micrographs presents the presence of a smooth surface, indicating the possibility of miscibility between the arrays. Therefore, the blending makes possible the fabrication of low-cost materials with applications in several areas. (author)

  18. ICA based automatic segmentation of dynamic H(2)(15)O cardiac PET images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margadán-Méndez, Margarita; Juslin, Anu; Nesterov, Sergey V; Kalliokoski, Kari; Knuuti, Juhani; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we applied an iterative independent component analysis (ICA) method for the separation of cardiac tissue components (myocardium, right, and left ventricle) from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. Previous phantom and animal studies have shown that ICA separation extracts the cardiac structures accurately. Our goal in this study was to investigate the methodology with human studies. The ICA separated cardiac structures were used to calculate the myocardial perfusion in two different cases: 1) the regions of interest were drawn manually on the ICA separated component images and 2) the volumes of interest (VOI) were automatically segmented from the component images. For the whole myocardium, the perfusion values of 25 rest and six drug-induced stress studies obtained with these methods were compared to the values from the manually drawn regions of interest on differential images. The separation of the rest and stress studies using ICA-based methods was successful in all cases. The visualization of the cardiac structures from H (2) (15) O PET studies was improved with the ICA separation. Also, the automatic segmentation of the VOI seemed to be feasible. PMID:19273031

  19. Optimized dynamic framing for PET-based myocardial blood flow estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolthammer, Jeffrey A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2013-08-01

    An optimal experiment design methodology was developed to select the framing schedule to be used in dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) for estimation of myocardial blood flow using 82Rb. A compartment model and an arterial input function based on measured data were used to calculate a D-optimality criterion for a wide range of candidate framing schedules. To validate the optimality calculation, noisy time-activity curves were simulated, from which parameter values were estimated using an efficient and robust decomposition of the estimation problem. D-optimized schedules improved estimate precision compared to non-optimized schedules, including previously published schedules. To assess robustness, a range of physiologic conditions were simulated. Schedules that were optimal for one condition were nearly-optimal for others. The effect of infusion duration was investigated. Optimality was better for shorter than for longer tracer infusion durations, with the optimal schedule for the shortest infusion duration being nearly optimal for other durations. Together this suggests that a framing schedule optimized for one set of conditions will also work well for others and it is not necessary to use different schedules for different infusion durations or for rest and stress studies. The method for optimizing schedules is general and could be applied in other dynamic PET imaging studies.

  20. SiliPET: Design of an ultra-high resolution small animal PET scanner based on stacks of semi-conductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesca, N.; Auricchio, N.; Di Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.; Malaguti, R.; Andritschke, R.; Kanbach, G.; Schopper, F.

    2007-03-01

    We studied with Monte Carlo simulations, using the EGSnrc code, a new scanner for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), based on stacks of double-sided semiconductor detectors. Each stack is composed of planar detectors with dimension 70×60×1 mm 3 and orthogonal strips on both sides with 500 μm pitch to read the two interaction coordinates, the third being the detector number in the stack. Multiple interactions in a stack are discarded. In this way, we achieve a precise determination of the first interaction point of the two 511 keV photons. The reduced dimensions of the scanner also improve the solid angle coverage resulting in a high sensitivity. Preliminary results of scanners based on Si planar detectors are presented and the initial tomographic reconstructions demonstrate very good spatial resolution limited only by the positron range. This suggests that, this is a promising new approach for small animal PET imaging. We are testing some double-sided silicon detectors, equipped with 128 orthogonal p and n strips on opposite sides using VATAGP3 ASIC by IDEAS.

  1. SiliPET: Design of an ultra-high resolution small animal PET scanner based on stacks of semi-conductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied with Monte Carlo simulations, using the EGSnrc code, a new scanner for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), based on stacks of double-sided semiconductor detectors. Each stack is composed of planar detectors with dimension 70x60x1 mm3 and orthogonal strips on both sides with 500 μm pitch to read the two interaction coordinates, the third being the detector number in the stack. Multiple interactions in a stack are discarded. In this way, we achieve a precise determination of the first interaction point of the two 511 keV photons. The reduced dimensions of the scanner also improve the solid angle coverage resulting in a high sensitivity. Preliminary results of scanners based on Si planar detectors are presented and the initial tomographic reconstructions demonstrate very good spatial resolution limited only by the positron range. This suggests that, this is a promising new approach for small animal PET imaging. We are testing some double-sided silicon detectors, equipped with 128 orthogonal p and n strips on opposite sides using VATAGP3 ASIC by IDEAS

  2. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on Starlinger IV+ ® technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials“Visy” and “SIA EkoPET

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF)

    2013-01-01

    This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes Visy and SIA EkoPET (EU register numbers RECYC101 and RECYC102 respectively) which are based on the same Starlinger IV+ ® technology. The decontamination efficiency of these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge test. The input of the processes is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collecte...

  3. Sensitivity study of voxel-based PET image comparison to image registration algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aerts, Hugo J. W. L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable registration is essential for voxel-based comparison of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images for proper adaptation of treatment plan and treatment response assessment. The comparison may be sensitive to the method of deformable registration as the optimal algorithm is unknown. This study investigated the impact of registration algorithm choice on therapy response evaluation. Methods: Sixteen patients with 20 lung tumors underwent a pre- and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) and 4D FDG-PET scans before and after chemoradiotherapy. All CT images were coregistered using a rigid and ten deformable registration algorithms. The resulting transformations were then applied to the respective PET images. Moreover, the tumor region defined by a physician on the registered PET images was classified into progressor, stable-disease, and responder subvolumes. Particularly, voxels with standardized uptake value (SUV) decreases >30% were classified as responder, while voxels with SUV increases >30% were progressor. All other voxels were considered stable-disease. The agreement of the subvolumes resulting from difference registration algorithms was assessed by Dice similarity index (DSI). Coefficient of variation (CV) was computed to assess variability of DSI between individual tumors. Root mean square difference (RMS{sub rigid}) of the rigidly registered CT images was used to measure the degree of tumor deformation. RMS{sub rigid} and DSI were correlated by Spearman correlation coefficient (R) to investigate the effect of tumor deformation on DSI. Results: Median DSI{sub rigid} was found to be 72%, 66%, and 80%, for progressor, stable-disease, and responder, respectively. Median DSI{sub deformable} was 63%–84%, 65%–81%, and 82%–89%. Variability of DSI was substantial and similar for both rigid and deformable algorithms with CV > 10% for all subvolumes. Tumor deformation had moderate to significant impact on DSI for progressor

  4. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [18F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R2* values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers.

  5. SPECT- and PET-Based Approaches for Noninvasive Diagnosis of Acute Renal Allograft Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Pawelski

    2014-01-01

    photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography are promising tools for noninvasive diagnosis of acute allograft rejection (AR. Given the importance of renal transplantation and the limitation of available donors, detailed analysis of factors that affect transplant survival is important. Episodes of acute allograft rejection are a negative prognostic factor for long-term graft survival. Invasive core needle biopsies are still the “goldstandard” in rejection diagnostics. Nevertheless, they are cumbersome to the patient and carry the risk of significant graft injury. Notably, they cannot be performed on patients taking anticoagulant drugs. Therefore, a noninvasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review SPECT- and PET-based approaches for noninvasive molecular imaging-based diagnostics of acute transplant rejection.

  6. Emission-based estimation of lung attenuation coefficients for attenuation correction in time-of-flight PET/MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In standard segmentation-based MRI-guided attenuation correction (MRAC) of PET data on hybrid PET/MRI systems, the inter/intra-patient variability of linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) is ignored owing to the assignment of a constant LAC to each tissue class. This can lead to PET quantification errors, especially in the lung regions. In this work, we aim to derive continuous and patient-specific lung LACs from time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data using the maximum likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation (MLAA) algorithm. The MLAA algorithm was constrained for estimation of lung LACs only in the standard 4-class MR attenuation map using Gaussian lung tissue preference and Markov random field smoothness priors. MRAC maps were derived from segmentation of CT images of 19 TOF-PET/CT clinical studies into background air, lung, soft tissue and fat tissue classes, followed by assignment of predefined LACs of 0, 0.0224, 0.0864 and 0.0975 cm−1, respectively. The lung LACs of the resulting attenuation maps were then estimated from emission data using the proposed MLAA algorithm. PET quantification accuracy of MRAC and MLAA methods was evaluated against the reference CT-based AC method in the lungs, lesions located in/near the lungs and neighbouring tissues. The results show that the proposed MLAA algorithm is capable of retrieving lung density gradients and compensate fairly for respiratory-phase mismatch between PET and corresponding attenuation maps. It was found that the mean of the estimated lung LACs generally follow the trend of the reference CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) method. Quantitative analysis revealed that the MRAC method resulted in average relative errors of  −5.2   ±   7.1% and  −6.1   ±   6.7% in the lungs and lesions, respectively. These were reduced by the MLAA algorithm to  −0.8   ±   6.3% and  −3.3   ±   4.7%, respectively. In conclusion, we

  7. 18F-FET-PET in Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakauer, Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Bennedbæk, Finn N.

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative localisation of the diseased parathyroid gland(s) in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is a prerequisite for subsequent minimally invasive surgery. Recently, as alternatives to conventional sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy, the 11C-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracers methionine and choline have shown promise for this purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of using the 18F-based PET tracer fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET), as the longer half-life of 18F makes it logistically more favourable. As a proof-of-concept study, we included two patients with PHP in which dual-isotope parathyroid subtraction single photon emission computed tomography had determined the exact location of the parathyroid adenoma. A dynamic FET PET/CT scan was performed with subsequent visual evaluation and calculation of target-to-background (TBR; parathyroid vs. thyroid). The maximum TBR in the two patients under study was achieved approximately 30 min after the injection of the tracer and was 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. This ratio was too small to allow for confident visualisation of the adenomas. FET PET/CT seems not feasible as a preoperative imaging modality in PHP. PMID:27548229

  8. 18F-FET-PET in Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Krakauer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Preoperative localisation of the diseased parathyroid gland(s in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP is a prerequisite for subsequent minimally invasive surgery. Recently, as alternatives to conventional sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy, the 11C-based positron emission tomography (PET tracers methionine and choline have shown promise for this purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of using the 18F-based PET tracer fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET, as the longer half-life of 18F makes it logistically more favourable. As a proof-of-concept study, we included two patients with PHP in which dual-isotope parathyroid subtraction single photon emission computed tomography had determined the exact location of the parathyroid adenoma. A dynamic FET PET/CT scan was performed with subsequent visual evaluation and calculation of target-to-background (TBR; parathyroid vs. thyroid. The maximum TBR in the two patients under study was achieved approximately 30 min after the injection of the tracer and was 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. This ratio was too small to allow for confident visualisation of the adenomas. FET PET/CT seems not feasible as a preoperative imaging modality in PHP.

  9. (18)F-FET-PET in Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakauer, Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Bennedbæk, Finn N

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative localisation of the diseased parathyroid gland(s) in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) is a prerequisite for subsequent minimally invasive surgery. Recently, as alternatives to conventional sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy, the (11)C-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracers methionine and choline have shown promise for this purpose. We evaluated the feasibility of using the (18)F-based PET tracer fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine (FET), as the longer half-life of (18)F makes it logistically more favourable. As a proof-of-concept study, we included two patients with PHP in which dual-isotope parathyroid subtraction single photon emission computed tomography had determined the exact location of the parathyroid adenoma. A dynamic FET PET/CT scan was performed with subsequent visual evaluation and calculation of target-to-background (TBR; parathyroid vs. thyroid). The maximum TBR in the two patients under study was achieved approximately 30 min after the injection of the tracer and was 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. This ratio was too small to allow for confident visualisation of the adenomas. FET PET/CT seems not feasible as a preoperative imaging modality in PHP. PMID:27548229

  10. PET Motion Compensation for Radiation Therapy Using a CT-Based Mid-Position Motion Model: Methodology and Clinical Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruis, Matthijs F.; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, José S.A.; Herk, Marcel van, E-mail: m.v.herk@nki.nl

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional positron emission tomography (4D PET) imaging of the thorax produces sharper images with reduced motion artifacts. Current radiation therapy planning systems, however, do not facilitate 4D plan optimization. When images are acquired in a 2-minute time slot, the signal-to-noise ratio of each 4D frame is low, compromising image quality. The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the construction of mid-position 3D PET scans, with motion compensated using a 4D computed tomography (CT)-derived motion model. Methods and Materials: All voxels of 4D PET were registered to the time-averaged position by using a motion model derived from the 4D CT frames. After the registration the scans were summed, resulting in a motion-compensated 3D mid-position PET scan. The method was tested with a phantom dataset as well as data from 27 lung cancer patients. Results: PET motion compensation using a CT-based motion model improved image quality of both phantoms and patients in terms of increased maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) values and decreased apparent volumes. In homogenous phantom data, a strong relationship was found between the amplitude-to-diameter ratio and the effects of the method. In heterogeneous patient data, the effect correlated better with the motion amplitude. In case of large amplitudes, motion compensation may increase SUV{sub max} up to 25% and reduce the diameter of the 50% SUV{sub max} volume by 10%. Conclusions: 4D CT-based motion-compensated mid-position PET scans provide improved quantitative data in terms of uptake values and volumes at the time-averaged position, thereby facilitating more accurate radiation therapy treatment planning of pulmonary lesions.

  11. Temporal subtraction system on torso FDG-PET scans based on statistical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Hara, Takeshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Muramatsu, Chisako; Ito, Satoshi; Hakozaki, Kenta; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Ishihara, Kei-ichi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging on FDG-PET scans was often used to evaluate chemotherapy results of cancer patients. Radiologists compare the changes of lesions' activities between previous and current examinations for the evaluation. The purpose of this study was to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) system with temporal subtraction technique for FDGPET scans and to show the fundamental usefulness based on an observer performance study. Z-score mapping based on statistical image analysis was newly applied to the temporal subtraction technique. The subtraction images can be obtained based on the anatomical standardization results because all of the patients' scans were deformed into standard body shape. An observer study was performed without and with computer outputs to evaluate the usefulness of the scheme by ROC (receiver operating characteristics) analysis. Readers responded as confidence levels on a continuous scale from absolutely no change to definitely change between two examinations. The recognition performance of the computer outputs for the 43 pairs was 96% sensitivity with 31.1 false-positive marks per scan. The average of area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) from 4 readers in the observer performance study was increased from 0.85 without computer outputs to 0.90 with computer outputs (p=0.0389, DBM-MRMC). The average of interpretation time was slightly decreased from 42.11 to 40.04 seconds per case (p=0.625, Wilcoxon test). We concluded that the CAD system for torso FDG-PET scans with temporal subtraction technique might improve the diagnostic accuracy of radiologist in cancer therapy evaluation.

  12. Structure and stability of hexadentate complexes of ligands based on AAZTA for efficient PET labelling with gallium-68.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Bradley P; Parker, David; Burchardt, Carsten; Yufit, Dmitry S; Zimny, Melanie; Roesch, Frank

    2013-01-21

    Pre-organised tricarboxylate ligands based on 6-amino-perhydro-1,4-diazepine bind (68)Ga rapidly and selectively in acetate buffer at pH 4 to 7, forming kinetically stable complexes suitable for use in PET imaging. PMID:23212712

  13. GATE Monte Carlo simulations for variations of an integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging system based on the Biograph mMR model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulation toolkit, GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission), was used to develop an accurate Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of a fully integrated 3T PET/MR hybrid imaging system (Siemens Biograph mMR). The PET/MR components of the Biograph mMR were simulated in order to allow a detailed study of variations of the system design on the PET performance, which are not easy to access and measure on a real PET/MR system. The 3T static magnetic field of the MR system was taken into account in all Monte Carlo simulations. The validation of the MC model was carried out against actual measurements performed on the PET/MR system by following the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) NU 2-2007 standard. The comparison of simulated and experimental performance measurements included spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and count rate capability. The validated system model was then used for two different applications. The first application focused on investigating the effect of an extension of the PET field-of-view on the PET performance of the PET/MR system. The second application deals with simulating a modified system timing resolution and coincidence time window of the PET detector electronics in order to simulate time-of-flight (TOF) PET detection. A dedicated phantom was modeled to investigate the impact of TOF on overall PET image quality. Simulation results showed that the overall divergence between simulated and measured data was found to be less than 10%. Varying the detector geometry showed that the system sensitivity and noise equivalent count rate of the PET/MR system increased progressively with an increasing number of axial detector block rings, as to be expected. TOF-based PET reconstructions of the modeled phantom showed an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and image contrast to the conventional non-TOF PET reconstructions. In conclusion, the validated MC simulation model of an integrated PET/MR system with an overall

  14. Fast and accurate generation method of PSF-based system matrix for PET reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiao-Li; Yun, Ming-Kai; Li, Dao-Wu; Gao, Juan; Li, Mo-Han; Chai, Pei; Tang, Hao-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Wei, Long

    2016-01-01

    Positional single photon incidence response (P-SPIR) theory is researched in this paper to generate more accurate PSF-contained system matrix simply and quickly. The method has been proved highly effective to improve the spatial resolution by applying to the Eplus-260 primate PET designed by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences(IHEP). Simultaneously, to meet the clinical needs, GPU acceleration is put to use. Basically, P-SPIR theory takes both incidence angle and incidence position by crystal subdivision instead of only incidence angle into consideration based on Geant4 Application for Emission Tomography (GATE). The simulation conforms to the actual response distribution and can be completed rapidly within less than 1s. Furthermore,two-block penetration and normalization of the response probability are raised to fit the reality. With PSF obtained, the homogenization model is analyzed to calculate the spread distribution of bins within a few minutes for system matrix genera...

  15. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on different nano-oxides on plastic PET substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikula, Milan; Gemeiner, Pavol; Beková, Zuzana; Dvonka, Vladimír; Búc, Dalibor

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) foils and glass slides coated with thin conductive layers were used as substrates for TiO2 or ZnO based photoactive electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) with organo-metallic Ru-dye, standard iodine electrolyte and Pt coated FTO/glass counterelectrode (CE). Different compositions of nanoparticle oxides in forms of alcohol pastes as well as the CE paste were applied onto the substrates by screen printing or by doctor blade techniques. Photocurrents and I-V loading characteristics were measured depending on the solar cell structure and preparation, including the oxide composition, electrode conductivity and the dye type. The influence of thin TiO2 blocking layer prepared by sol-gel technique is also discussed.

  16. New semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images based on elastic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanizaki, Naoaki; Okamura, Tetsuya (Sumitomo Heavy Industries Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan). Research and Development Center); Senda, Michio; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji

    1994-10-01

    We have developed a semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images. It is based on the elastic network model that fits the standard ROI atlas into individual brain image. The standard ROI atlas is a set of segments that represent each anatomical region. For transformation, the operator needs to set only three kinds of district anatomical features: manually determined midsagittal line, brain contour line determined with SNAKES algorithm semi-automatically, a few manually determined specific ROIs to be used for exact transformation. Improvement of the operation time and the inter-operator variance were demonstrated in the experiment by comparing with the conventional manual ROI setting. The operation time was reduced to 50% in almost all cases. And the inter-operator variance was reduced to one seventh in the maximum case. (author).

  17. Reduction of dental filling metallic artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of PET data using weighted virtual sinograms optimized by a genetic algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadian, Alireza; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The presence of metallic dental fillings is prevalent in head and neck PET/CT imaging and generates bright and dark streaking artifacts in reconstructed CT images. The resulting artifacts would propagate to the corresponding PET images following CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC). This

  18. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pets can add fun, companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which animal is best for ... is each family member looking for in a pet? Who will take care of it? Does anyone ...

  19. Simulation-based partial volume correction for dopaminergic PET imaging. Impact of segmentation accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial volume correction (PVC) is an essential step for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, PVELab, a freely available software, is evaluated for PVC in 18F-FDOPA brain-PET, with a special focus on the accuracy degradation introduced by various MR-based segmentation approaches. Methods Four PVC algorithms (M-PVC; MG-PVC; mMG-PVC; and R-PVC) were analyzed on simulated 18F-FDOPA brain-PET images. MR image segmentation was carried out using FSL (FMRIB Software Library) and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) packages, including additional adaptation for subcortical regions (SPML). Different PVC and segmentation combinations were compared with respect to deviations in regional activity values and time-activity curves (TACs) of the occipital cortex (OCC), caudate nucleus (CN), and putamen (PUT). Additionally, the PVC impact on the determination of the influx constant (Ki) was assessed. Results Main differences between tissue-maps returned by three segmentation algorithms were found in the subcortical region, especially at PUT. Average misclassification errors in combination with volume reduction was found to be lowest for SPML (PUT < 30%) and highest for FSL (PUT > 70%). Accurate recovery of activity data at OCC is achieved by M-PVC (apparent recovery coefficient varies between 0.99 and 1.10). The other three evaluated PVC algorithms have demonstrated to be more suitable for subcortical regions with MG-PVC and mMG-PVC being less prone to the largest tissue misclassification error simulated in this study. Except for M-PVC, quantification accuracy of Ki for CN and PUT was clearly improved by PVC. Conclusions The regional activity value of PUT was appreciably overcorrected by most of the PVC approaches employing FSL or SPM segmentation, revealing the importance of accurate MR image segmentation for the presented PVC framework. The selection of a PVC approach should be adapted to the anatomical structure of interest. Caution is

  20. Simulation-based partial volume correction for dopaminergic PET imaging. Impact of segmentation accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Ye; Winz, Oliver H. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vernaleken, Ingo [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics; Goedicke, Andreas [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; High Tech Campus, Philips Research Lab., Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rota Kops, Elena [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine-4

    2015-07-01

    Partial volume correction (PVC) is an essential step for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, PVELab, a freely available software, is evaluated for PVC in {sup 18}F-FDOPA brain-PET, with a special focus on the accuracy degradation introduced by various MR-based segmentation approaches. Methods Four PVC algorithms (M-PVC; MG-PVC; mMG-PVC; and R-PVC) were analyzed on simulated {sup 18}F-FDOPA brain-PET images. MR image segmentation was carried out using FSL (FMRIB Software Library) and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) packages, including additional adaptation for subcortical regions (SPM{sub L}). Different PVC and segmentation combinations were compared with respect to deviations in regional activity values and time-activity curves (TACs) of the occipital cortex (OCC), caudate nucleus (CN), and putamen (PUT). Additionally, the PVC impact on the determination of the influx constant (K{sub i}) was assessed. Results Main differences between tissue-maps returned by three segmentation algorithms were found in the subcortical region, especially at PUT. Average misclassification errors in combination with volume reduction was found to be lowest for SPM{sub L} (PUT < 30%) and highest for FSL (PUT > 70%). Accurate recovery of activity data at OCC is achieved by M-PVC (apparent recovery coefficient varies between 0.99 and 1.10). The other three evaluated PVC algorithms have demonstrated to be more suitable for subcortical regions with MG-PVC and mMG-PVC being less prone to the largest tissue misclassification error simulated in this study. Except for M-PVC, quantification accuracy of K{sub i} for CN and PUT was clearly improved by PVC. Conclusions The regional activity value of PUT was appreciably overcorrected by most of the PVC approaches employing FSL or SPM segmentation, revealing the importance of accurate MR image segmentation for the presented PVC framework. The selection of a PVC approach should be adapted to the anatomical

  1. Preparation, storage stability and palatability of spent hen meal based pet food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, P; Kulkarni, V V; Sivakumar, K

    2010-06-01

    Extruded pet foods were prepared by extrusion process incorporating dry rendered spent hen meal (SHM) at 10 and 20% levels, and packed in LDPE bags before storage at room temperature (35 ± 2°C) up to 45 days. The colour of the pet foods was uniformly brown with pleasant meaty odour. The thiobarbituric acid, tyrosine values, free fatty acid content and acid value and total bacterial counts increased gradually during storage but E.coli, Salmonella spp, Clostridium spp, Staphylococci spp and fungi were not detected during storage. The pet owners rated the pet foods as good. The body weight of the adult pet dogs did not decrease during the feeding trial of one month and the health condition of pets was good. The cost of production per kg of pet food containing 10 and 20% SHM was Rs 18.00 and Rs 22.75, respectively. It was concluded that a pet food (whole meal) with good nutritive quality and palatability to dogs can be prepared by incorporating 10-20% of spent hen meal which can be safely stored up to 45 days at room temperature. PMID:23572647

  2. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction and CT-based attenuation correction of whole-body PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, New York, NY (United States); Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Sawiak, Stephen J. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Knesaurek, Karin; Machac, Joseph [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Narula, Jagat [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Fayad, Zahi A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the performance of CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) as the gold standard. Included in the study were 26 patients who underwent clinical whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging and subsequently PET/MR imaging (mean delay 100 min). Patients were separated into two groups: the alpha group (14 patients) without MR coils during PET/MR imaging and the beta group (12 patients) with MR coils present (neurovascular, spine, cardiac and torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). The two PET images from PET/MR reconstructed using MRAC and CTAC were compared by voxel-based and region-based methods (with ten regions of interest, ROIs). Lesions were also compared by an experienced clinician. Body mass index and lung density showed significant differences between the alpha and beta groups. Right and left lung densities were also significantly different within each group. The percentage differences in uptake values using MRAC in relation to those using CTAC were greater in the beta group than in the alpha group (alpha group -0.2 ± 33.6 %, R{sup 2} = 0.98, p < 0.001; beta group 10.31 ± 69.86 %, R{sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.001). In comparison to CTAC, MRAC led to underestimation of the PET values by less than 10 % on average, although some ROIs and lesions did differ by more (including the spine, lung and heart). The beta group (imaged with coils present) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability compared to the alpha group (imaged without coils). PET data reconstructed with MRAC and CTAC showed some differences, mostly in relation to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in large bone areas (such as the pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of MR-based attenuation correction and CT-based attenuation correction of whole-body PET/MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the built-in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC) included in the combined whole-body Ingenuity TF PET/MR scanner and compare it to the performance of CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) as the gold standard. Included in the study were 26 patients who underwent clinical whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging and subsequently PET/MR imaging (mean delay 100 min). Patients were separated into two groups: the alpha group (14 patients) without MR coils during PET/MR imaging and the beta group (12 patients) with MR coils present (neurovascular, spine, cardiac and torso coils). All images were coregistered to the same space (PET/MR). The two PET images from PET/MR reconstructed using MRAC and CTAC were compared by voxel-based and region-based methods (with ten regions of interest, ROIs). Lesions were also compared by an experienced clinician. Body mass index and lung density showed significant differences between the alpha and beta groups. Right and left lung densities were also significantly different within each group. The percentage differences in uptake values using MRAC in relation to those using CTAC were greater in the beta group than in the alpha group (alpha group -0.2 ± 33.6 %, R2 = 0.98, p 2 = 0.97, p < 0.001). In comparison to CTAC, MRAC led to underestimation of the PET values by less than 10 % on average, although some ROIs and lesions did differ by more (including the spine, lung and heart). The beta group (imaged with coils present) showed increased overall PET quantification as well as increased variability compared to the alpha group (imaged without coils). PET data reconstructed with MRAC and CTAC showed some differences, mostly in relation to air pockets, metallic implants and attenuation differences in large bone areas (such as the pelvis and spine) due to the segmentation limitation of the MRAC method. (orig.)

  4. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  5. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based assessment of gray matter loss in medial temporal lobe epilepsy; comparison with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hye Jin; Lee, Ho Young; Lee, Jae Sung; Kang, Eun Joo; Lee, Sang Gun; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Dong Soo [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    The aims of this study were to find brain regions in which gray matter volume was reduced and to show the capability of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis for lateralizing epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). The findings were compared with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). MR T1-weighted images of 12 left mTLE and 11 right mTLE patients were compared with those of 37 normal controls. Images were transformed to standard MNI space and averaged in order to create study-specific brain template. Each image was normalized to this local template and brain tissues were segmented. Modulation VBM analysis was performed in order to observe gray matter volume change. Gray matter was smoothed with a Gaussian kernel. After these preprocessing, statistical analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). FDG PET images were compared with those of 22 normal controls using SPM. Gray matter volume was significantly reduced in the left amygdala and hippocampus in left mTLE. In addition, volume of cerebellum, anterior cingulate, and fusiform gyrus in both sides and left insula was reduced. In right mTLE, volume was reduced significantly in right hippocampus. In contrast, FDG uptake was decreased in broad areas of left or right temporal lobes in left TLE and right TLE, respectively. Gray matter loss was found in the ipsilateral hippocampus by modulation VBM analysis in medial temporal lobe epilepsy. This VBM analysis might be useful in lateralizing the epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy, while SPM analysis of FDG PET disclosed hypometabolic epileptogenic zones.

  6. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) based assessment of gray matter loss in medial temporal lobe epilepsy; comparison with FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this study were to find brain regions in which gray matter volume was reduced and to show the capability of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis for lateralizing epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). The findings were compared with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). MR T1-weighted images of 12 left mTLE and 11 right mTLE patients were compared with those of 37 normal controls. Images were transformed to standard MNI space and averaged in order to create study-specific brain template. Each image was normalized to this local template and brain tissues were segmented. Modulation VBM analysis was performed in order to observe gray matter volume change. Gray matter was smoothed with a Gaussian kernel. After these preprocessing, statistical analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99). FDG PET images were compared with those of 22 normal controls using SPM. Gray matter volume was significantly reduced in the left amygdala and hippocampus in left mTLE. In addition, volume of cerebellum, anterior cingulate, and fusiform gyrus in both sides and left insula was reduced. In right mTLE, volume was reduced significantly in right hippocampus. In contrast, FDG uptake was decreased in broad areas of left or right temporal lobes in left TLE and right TLE, respectively. Gray matter loss was found in the ipsilateral hippocampus by modulation VBM analysis in medial temporal lobe epilepsy. This VBM analysis might be useful in lateralizing the epileptogenic zones in medial temporal lobe epilepsy, while SPM analysis of FDG PET disclosed hypometabolic epileptogenic zones

  7. PETs: A Stable and Accurate Predictor of Protein-Protein Interacting Sites Based on Extremely-Randomized Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Li, Qianmu; Li, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays crucial roles in the performance of various biological processes. A variety of methods are dedicated to identify whether proteins have interaction residues, but it is often more crucial to recognize each amino acid. In practical applications, the stability of a prediction model is as important as its accuracy. However, random sampling, which is widely used in previous prediction models, often brings large difference between each training model. In this paper, a Predictor of protein-protein interaction sites based on Extremely-randomized Trees (PETs) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy while maintaining the prediction stability. In PETs, a cluster-based sampling strategy is proposed to ensure the model stability: first, the training dataset is divided into subsets using specific features; second, the subsets are clustered using K-means; and finally the samples are selected from each cluster. Using the proposed sampling strategy, samples which have different types of significant features could be selected independently from different clusters. The evaluation shows that PETs is able to achieve better accuracy while maintaining a good stability. The source code and toolkit are available at https://github.com/BinXia/PETs.

  8. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573.580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made...

  9. Free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method for brain PET using GAPD arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wei [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Key Jo [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jihoon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Ho [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Youn Suk [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyun Keong; Kim, Sang Su [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yonghyun [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Health Science, 234 Meaji, Heungup Wonju, Kangwon-Do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Currently, for most photomultiplier tube (PMT)-based PET systems, constant fraction discriminators (CFD) and time to digital converters (TDC) have been employed to detect gamma ray signal arrival time, whereas anger logic circuits and peak detection analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) have been implemented to acquire position and energy information of detected events. As compared to PMT the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) have a variety of advantages, such as compactness, low bias voltage requirement and MRI compatibility. Furthermore, the individual read-out method using a GAPD array coupled 1:1 with an array scintillator can provide better image uniformity than can be achieved using PMT and anger logic circuits. Recently, a brain PET using 72 GAPD arrays (4 Multiplication-Sign 4 array, pixel size: 3 mm Multiplication-Sign 3 mm) coupled 1:1 with LYSO scintillators (4 Multiplication-Sign 4 array, pixel size: 3 mm Multiplication-Sign 3 mm Multiplication-Sign 20 mm) has been developed for simultaneous PET/MRI imaging in our laboratory. Eighteen 64:1 position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to reduce GAPD channel number and three off-the-shelf free-running ADC and field programmable gate array (FPGA) combined data acquisition (DAQ) cards were used for data acquisition and processing. In this study, a free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method was developed for the detection of gamma ray signal arrival time, energy and position information all together for each GAPD channel. For the method developed herein, three DAQ cards continuously acquired 18 channels of pre-amplified analog gamma ray signals and 108-bit digital addresses from 18 PDCs. In the FPGA, the digitized gamma ray pulses and digital addresses were processed to generate data packages containing pulse arrival time, baseline value, energy value and GAPD channel ID. Finally, these data packages were saved to a 128 Mbyte on-board synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) and

  10. Free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method for brain PET using GAPD arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Choi, Yong; Hong, Key Jo; Kang, Jihoon; Jung, Jin Ho; Huh, Youn Suk; Lim, Hyun Keong; Kim, Sang Su; Kim, Byung-Tae; Chung, Yonghyun

    2012-02-01

    Currently, for most photomultiplier tube (PMT)-based PET systems, constant fraction discriminators (CFD) and time to digital converters (TDC) have been employed to detect gamma ray signal arrival time, whereas anger logic circuits and peak detection analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) have been implemented to acquire position and energy information of detected events. As compared to PMT the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) have a variety of advantages, such as compactness, low bias voltage requirement and MRI compatibility. Furthermore, the individual read-out method using a GAPD array coupled 1:1 with an array scintillator can provide better image uniformity than can be achieved using PMT and anger logic circuits. Recently, a brain PET using 72 GAPD arrays (4×4 array, pixel size: 3 mm×3 mm) coupled 1:1 with LYSO scintillators (4×4 array, pixel size: 3 mm×3 mm×20 mm) has been developed for simultaneous PET/MRI imaging in our laboratory. Eighteen 64:1 position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to reduce GAPD channel number and three off-the-shelf free-running ADC and field programmable gate array (FPGA) combined data acquisition (DAQ) cards were used for data acquisition and processing. In this study, a free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method was developed for the detection of gamma ray signal arrival time, energy and position information all together for each GAPD channel. For the method developed herein, three DAQ cards continuously acquired 18 channels of pre-amplified analog gamma ray signals and 108-bit digital addresses from 18 PDCs. In the FPGA, the digitized gamma ray pulses and digital addresses were processed to generate data packages containing pulse arrival time, baseline value, energy value and GAPD channel ID. Finally, these data packages were saved to a 128 Mbyte on-board synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) and then transferred to a host computer for coincidence sorting and image reconstruction. In order to

  11. Free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method for brain PET using GAPD arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, for most photomultiplier tube (PMT)-based PET systems, constant fraction discriminators (CFD) and time to digital converters (TDC) have been employed to detect gamma ray signal arrival time, whereas anger logic circuits and peak detection analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) have been implemented to acquire position and energy information of detected events. As compared to PMT the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GAPDs) have a variety of advantages, such as compactness, low bias voltage requirement and MRI compatibility. Furthermore, the individual read-out method using a GAPD array coupled 1:1 with an array scintillator can provide better image uniformity than can be achieved using PMT and anger logic circuits. Recently, a brain PET using 72 GAPD arrays (4×4 array, pixel size: 3 mm×3 mm) coupled 1:1 with LYSO scintillators (4×4 array, pixel size: 3 mm×3 mm×20 mm) has been developed for simultaneous PET/MRI imaging in our laboratory. Eighteen 64:1 position decoder circuits (PDCs) were used to reduce GAPD channel number and three off-the-shelf free-running ADC and field programmable gate array (FPGA) combined data acquisition (DAQ) cards were used for data acquisition and processing. In this study, a free-running ADC- and FPGA-based signal processing method was developed for the detection of gamma ray signal arrival time, energy and position information all together for each GAPD channel. For the method developed herein, three DAQ cards continuously acquired 18 channels of pre-amplified analog gamma ray signals and 108-bit digital addresses from 18 PDCs. In the FPGA, the digitized gamma ray pulses and digital addresses were processed to generate data packages containing pulse arrival time, baseline value, energy value and GAPD channel ID. Finally, these data packages were saved to a 128 Mbyte on-board synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM) and then transferred to a host computer for coincidence sorting and image reconstruction. In order to

  12. Recyclability of PET/WPI/PE Multilayer Films by Removal of Whey Protein Isolate-Based Coatings with Enzymatic Detergents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Cinelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer plastic films provide a range of properties, which cannot be obtained from monolayer films but, at present, their recyclability is an open issue and should be improved. Research to date has shown the possibility of using whey protein as a layer material with the property of acting as an excellent barrier against oxygen and moisture, replacing petrochemical non-recyclable materials. The innovative approach of the present research was to achieve the recyclability of the substrate films by separating them, with a simple process compatible with industrial procedures, in order to promote recycling processes leading to obtain high value products that will beneficially impact the packaging and food industries. Hence, polyethyleneterephthalate (PET/polyethylene (PE multi-layer film was prepared based on PET coated with a whey protein layer, and then the previous structure was laminated with PE. Whey proteins, constituting the coating, can be degraded by enzymes so that the coating films can be washed off from the plastic substrate layer. Enzyme types, dosage, time, and temperature optima, which are compatible with procedures adopted in industrial waste recycling, were determined for a highly-efficient process. The washing of samples based on PET/whey and PET/whey/PE were efficient when performed with enzymatic detergent containing protease enzymes, as an alternative to conventional detergents used in recycling facilities. Different types of enzymatic detergents tested presented positive results in removing the protein layer from the PET substrate and from the PET/whey/PE multilayer films at room temperature. These results attested to the possibility of organizing the pre-treatment of the whey-based multilayer film by washing with different available commercial enzymatic detergents in order to separate PET and PE, thus allowing a better recycling of the two different polymers. Mechanical properties of the plastic substrate, such as stress at

  13. Chronic Liver Disease and the Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by [18F]fluorocholine PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi A. Kwee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET using the radiopharmaceutical tracer fluorine-18 fluorocholine (FCh can elucidate tumors based on differences in choline phospholipid metabolism between tumor and surrounding tissue. The feasibility of detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC using FCh PET has been shown despite constitutively high parenchymal choline metabolism in the liver. Since HCC frequently develops in the setting of chronic liver disease, we comparatively evaluated FCh PET/CT between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients with HCC to investigate the effects of hepatic dysfunction on tumor detection and the tumor-to-background ratio (TBR of FCh uptake. FCh PET/CT was performed prospectively in 22 consecutive patients with HCC (7 newly diagnosed, 15 previously treated. Of these 22 patients, 14 were cirrhotic and 8 non-cirrhotic. Standardized uptake value (SUV measurements were obtained by region of interest analysis of the PET images. Tumor FCh uptake and the TBR were compared between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients. Liver lesions were confirmed to be HCC by biopsy in 10 patients and by Barcelona criteria in 4 patients. There was correspondingly increased liver tumor FCh uptake in 13/14 of those patients, and iso-intense tumor FCh uptake (TBR 0.94 in one non-cirrhotic patient with newly diagnosed HCC. FCh PET/CT also showed metastatic disease without local tumor recurrence in 2 previously treated patients, and was negative in 6 treated patients without tumor recurrence by radiographic and clinical follow-up. Tumor maximum SUV ranged from 6.4 to 15.3 (mean 12.1 and liver TBR ranged from 0.94 to 2.1 (mean 1.6, with no significant differences between cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic patients (SUVmax 11.9 vs. 12.2, p = 0.83; TBR 1.71 vs. 1.51, p = 0.29. Liver parenchyma mean SUV was significantly lower in cirrhotic patients (6.4 vs. 8.7, p < 0.05. This pilot study supports the general feasibility of HCC detection by FCh PET/CT. However, a broad

  14. Mercado para produtos reciclados à base de PET/HDPE/Ionômero Market for PET/HDPE/Ionomer recycled products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen B. Pacheco

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available A expansão do mercado de poli(tereftalato de etileno (PET, considerada um fenômeno mundial, está acontecendo no Brasil. Hoje, o principal mercado para o PET é o de bebidas carbonatadas. O uso de PET em lugar do vidro vem trazendo inúmeras vantagens, incluindo menor peso, maior resistência ao impacto e menores custos de transporte. Foram estudados possíveis mercados para a mistura PET/HDPE, na proporção de 75/25, acrescida de uma pequena quantidade de compatibilizante. Os resultados do estudo indicam que possíveis mercados para o mistura poderá incluir o de embalagens para usos especiais e partes de automóvel.The expansion of the market for polyethylene terephthalate (pet, considered a world phenomenon, is happening in brazil. The main market for pet is the soft drink bottles. The use of pet instead of glass brings several advantages, including lighter weight, better impact resistance, and lower transportation costs. Possible markets were studied for pet/hdpe blends in proportion 75/25 with small amounts of a compatibilizer. The results of the study indicate that possible markets would be containers for special uses and car parts.

  15. Patch-based image reconstruction for PET using prior-image derived dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahaei, Marzieh S.; Reader, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    In PET image reconstruction, regularization is often needed to reduce the noise in the resulting images. Patch-based image processing techniques have recently been successfully used for regularization in medical image reconstruction through a penalized likelihood framework. Re-parameterization within reconstruction is another powerful regularization technique in which the object in the scanner is re-parameterized using coefficients for spatially-extensive basis vectors. In this work, a method for extracting patch-based basis vectors from the subject’s MR image is proposed. The coefficients for these basis vectors are then estimated using the conventional MLEM algorithm. Furthermore, using the alternating direction method of multipliers, an algorithm for optimizing the Poisson log-likelihood while imposing sparsity on the parameters is also proposed. This novel method is then utilized to find sparse coefficients for the patch-based basis vectors extracted from the MR image. The results indicate the superiority of the proposed methods to patch-based regularization using the penalized likelihood framework.

  16. Evaluation of two population-based input functions for quantitative neurological FDG PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conventional measurement of the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlc) with fluorodexoyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) requires arterial or arterialised-venous (a-v) blood sampling at frequent intervals to obtain the plasma input function (IF). We evaluated the accuracy of rCMRGlc measurements using population-based IFs that were calibrated with two a-v blood samples. Population-based IFs were derived from: (1) the average of a-v IFs from 26 patients (Standard IF) and (2) a published model of FDG plasma concentration (Feng IF). Values for rCMRGlc calculated from the population-based IFs were compared with values obtained with IFs derived from frequent a-v blood sampling in 20 non-diabetic and six diabetic patients. Values for rCMRGlc calculated with the different IFs were highly correlated for both patient groups (r≥0.992) and root mean square residuals about the regression line were less than 0.24 mg/min/100 g. The Feng IF tended to underestimate high rCMRGlc. Both population-based IFs simplify the measurement of rCMRGlc with minimal loss in accuracy and require only two a-v blood samples for calibration. The reduced blood sampling requirements markedly reduce radiation exposure to the blood sampler. (orig.)

  17. Gebromeerde vlamvertragers en broomdioxines in Choline Chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egmond, van H.J.; Traag, W.A.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Sinds begin 2008 worden in het Nationaal Plan Diervoeder Choline Chloride monsters (= diervoeder additief) gevonden waarbij de DR CALUX screenings-assay een sterk verdacht signaal geeft, maar bij de GC-HRMS geen dioxines en dl-PCB's worden gevonden. Dit rapport beschrijft de resultaten van nader ond

  18. Detection of Primary Malignancy and Metastases with FDG PET/CT in Patients with Cholangiocarcinomas: Lesion-based Comparison with Contrast Enhanced CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Youssef; Mariano, Aladin T; Lu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    The current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines consider the role of 2-deoxy-2-(18)F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the evaluation of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) as "uncertain," and have recommended contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) but not FDG PET/CT as a routine imaging test for CCA workup. We set out to compare the diagnostic performance of FDG PET/CT and CECT in patients with CCA. The retrospective study included patients with CCA who underwent FDG PET/CT and CECT within 2-month interval between 2011 and 2013 in our hospital. Lesion-based comparison was conducted. Final diagnoses were made based on the composite clinical and imaging data with minimal 6-month follow-up. A total of 18 patients with 28-paired tests were included. There is a total of 142 true malignant lesions as revealed by the 6-paired pre-treatment and 22-paired post-treatment tests. On a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and accuracies of PET/CT and CECT for detection of CCA were 96.5%, 55.5%, 97.2%, 50.0%, 94.1% and 62.2%, 66.7%, 96.7%, 10.0%, 62.5%, respectively. FDG PET/CT detected more intrahepatic malignant and extrahepatic metastases; and had significant higher sensitivity, NPV, and accuracy than CECT, while similar in specificity and PPV. No true positive lesion detected on CECT that was missed on PET/CT, and none of the false negative lesions on PET/CT were detected on CECT. Six patients had paired pretreatment tests, and FDG PET/CT results changed planned management in three patients. Our data suggest that FDG PET/CT detect more primary and metastatic lesions and lead to considerable changes in treatment plan in comparison with CECT. PMID:27651736

  19. Choline and choline metabolite patterns and associations in blood and milk during lactation in dairy cows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia M Artegoitia

    Full Text Available Milk and dairy products are an important source of choline, a nutrient essential for human health. Infant formula derived from bovine milk contains a number of metabolic forms of choline, all contribute to the growth and development of the newborn. At present, little is known about the factors that influence the concentrations of choline metabolites in milk. The objectives of this study were to characterize and then evaluate associations for choline and its metabolites in blood and milk through the first 37 weeks of lactation in the dairy cow. Milk and blood samples from twelve Holstein cows were collected in early, mid and late lactation and analyzed for acetylcholine, free choline, betaine, glycerophosphocholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphocholine and sphingomyelin using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and quantified using stable isotope-labeled internal standards. Total choline concentration in plasma, which was almost entirely phosphatidylcholine, increased 10-times from early to late lactation (1305 to 13,535 µmol/L. In milk, phosphocholine was the main metabolite in early lactation (492 µmol/L, which is a similar concentration to that found in human milk, however, phosphocholine concentration decreased exponentially through lactation to 43 µmol/L in late lactation. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine was the main metabolite in mid and late lactation (188 µmol/L and 659 µmol/L, respectively, with the increase through lactation positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine in plasma (R2 = 0.78. Unlike previously reported with human milk we found no correlation between plasma free choline concentration and milk choline metabolites. The changes in pattern of phosphocholine and phosphatidylcholine in milk through lactation observed in the bovine suggests that it is possible to manufacture infant formula that more closely matches these metabolites profile in human milk.

  20. The Comparative effects of synthetic choline and herbal choline on hepatic lipid metabolism in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R.Gangane1

    Full Text Available An experiment of 0-42 days in day old 150 Vencobb broiler chickens was conducted to determine comparative effects of synthetic choline and herbal sources of choline on hepatic lipid metabolism in broilers. Birds were randomly distributed into three groups (T0- T2, one untreated control and two treatments. Chicks in Group T0 were given feed without any additional source choline chloride. Chicks of Group T1 were fed with feed mixed with herbal product (Repchol supplied by Ayurvet Ltd., Baddi, India @ 500gm/tonne of feed and T2 was given combination of synthetic choline chloride@1kg/tonne (60% and biotin @ 150 mg/ton of feed. To study the effect of inclusion of herbal sources of choline and synthetic choline on hepatic lipid metabolism, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were estimated on day 21st and 42nd of experimental study. Gross pathological changes in liver were recorded on representative birds per group at the end of the study. It was recorded that inclusion of either synthetic choline or herbal source of choline exerted a hypocholesterolemic effect and also decreased the level of triglycerides as compared to untreated control thus minimizing the incidence of fatty liver, however the two treatment do not differ significantly. Gross pathological study also revealed no significant changes in the architecture of liver as compared to control. It can be concluded that the herbal supplements can successfully replace their synthetic analogues from broiler ration. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(7.000: 318-320

  1. A knowledge-based method for reducing attenuation artefacts caused by cardiac appliances in myocardial PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamill, James J [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging, 810 Innovation Dr., Knoxville, TN (United States); Brunken, Richard C [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); Bybel, Bohdan [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); DiFilippo, Frank P [Department of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH (United States); Faul, David D [Siemens Medical Solutions, Molecular Imaging, 810 Innovation Dr., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2006-06-07

    Attenuation artefacts due to implanted cardiac defibrillator leads have previously been shown to adversely impact cardiac PET/CT imaging. In this study, the severity of the problem is characterized, and an image-based method is described which reduces the resulting artefact in PET. Automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) leads cause a moving-metal artefact in the CT sections from which the PET attenuation correction factors (ACFs) are derived. Fluoroscopic cine images were measured to demonstrate that the defibrillator's highly attenuating distal shocking coil moves rhythmically across distances on the order of 1 cm. Rhythmic motion of this magnitude was created in a phantom with a moving defibrillator lead. A CT study of the phantom showed that the artefact contained regions of incorrect, very high CT values and adjacent regions of incorrect, very low CT values. The study also showed that motion made the artefact more severe. A knowledge-based metal artefact reduction method (MAR) is described that reduces the magnitude of the error in the CT images, without use of the corrupted sinograms. The method modifies the corrupted image through a sequence of artefact detection procedures, morphological operations, adjustments of CT values and three-dimensional filtering. The method treats bone the same as metal. The artefact reduction method is shown to run in a few seconds, and is validated by applying it to a series of phantom studies in which reconstructed PET tracer distribution values are wrong by as much as 60% in regions near the CT artefact when MAR is not applied, but the errors are reduced to about 10% of expected values when MAR is applied. MAR changes PET image values by a few per cent in regions not close to the artefact. The changes can be larger in the vicinity of bone. In patient studies, the PET reconstruction without MAR sometimes results in anomalously high values in the infero-septal wall. Clinical performance of MAR is assessed by

  2. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei;

    2016-01-01

    PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy.......Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to...... quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically...

  3. Pathology-based validation of FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG PET is increasingly incorporated into radiation treatment planning of head and neck cancer. However, there are only limited data on the accuracy of radiotherapy target volume delineation by FDG PET. The purpose of this study was to validate FDG PET segmentation tools for volume assessment of lymph node metastases from head and neck cancer against the pathological method as the standard. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer and 28 metastatic lymph nodes eligible for therapeutic neck dissection underwent preoperative FDG PET/CT. The metastatic lymph nodes were delineated on CT (NodeCT) and ten PET segmentation tools were used to assess FDG PET-based nodal volumes: interpreting FDG PET visually (PETVIS), applying an isocontour at a standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5 (PETSUV), two segmentation tools with a fixed threshold of 40 % and 50 %, and two adaptive threshold based methods. The latter four tools were applied with the primary tumour as reference and also with the lymph node itself as reference. Nodal volumes were compared with the true volume as determined by pathological examination. Both NodeCT and PETVIS showed good correlations with the pathological volume. PET segmentation tools using the metastatic node as reference all performed well but not better than PETVIS. The tools using the primary tumour as reference correlated poorly with pathology. PETSUV was unsatisfactory in 35 % of the patients due to merging of the contours of adjacent nodes. FDG PET accurately estimates metastatic lymph node volume, but beyond the detection of lymph node metastases (staging), it has no added value over CT alone for the delineation of routine radiotherapy target volumes. If FDG PET is used in radiotherapy planning, treatment adaptation or response assessment, we recommend an automated segmentation method for purposes of reproducibility and interinstitutional comparison. (orig.)

  4. CHERENCUBE: Concept definition and implementation challenges of a Cherenkov-based detector block for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A new concept for a depth-of-interaction (DOI) capable time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector is defined, based only on the detection of Cherenkov photons. The proposed “CHERENCUBE” consists of a cubic Cherenkov radiator with position-sensitive photodetectors covering each crystal face. By means of the spatial distribution of the detected photons and their time of arrival, the point of interaction of the gamma-ray in the crystal can be determined. This study analyzes through theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations the potential advantages of the concept toward reaching a Cherenkov-only detector for TOF-PET with DOI capability. Furthermore, an algorithm for the DOI estimation is presented and the requirements for a practical implementation of the proposed concept are defined. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulations consisted of a cubic crystal with one photodetector coupled to each one of the faces of the cube. The sensitive area of the detector matched exactly the crystal size, which was varied in 1 mm steps between 1 × 1 × 1 mm3 and 10 × 10 × 10 mm3. For each size, five independent simulations of ten thousand 511 keV gamma-rays were triggered at a fixed distance of 10 mm. The crystal chosen was PbWO4. Its scintillation properties were simulated, but only Cherenkov photons were analyzed. Photodetectors were simulated having perfect photodetection efficiency and infinite time resolution. For every generated particle, the analysis considered its creation process, parent and daughter particles, energy, origin coordinates, trajectory, and time and position of detection. The DOI determination is based on the distribution of the emission time of all photons per event. These values are calculated as a function of the coordinates of detection and origin for every photon. The common origin is estimated by finding the distribution with the most similar emission time-points. Results: Detection efficiency increases with crystal size from 8.2% (1 × 1 × 1

  5. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process FPR based on Starlinger Recostar PET IV+technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process FPR, EU register No RECYC039, which is based on the Starlinger Recostar PET IV+ technology. The input to the process is hot caustic washed PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET bottles and containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed post-consumer PET flakes are dried with desiccant air at high temperature before being extruded at high temperature and vacuum into pellets. The amorphous pellets are crystallised and solid state polymerised. Having examined the results of the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, pre-drying and drying, extrusion and crystallisation and SSP are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control the performance of these critical steps are temperature, gas flow and residence time for the pre-drying and drying step 2, temperature, pressure and residence time for extrusion step 3 and crystallisation and SSP step 4. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below the conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. The Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from the process FPR intended to be used at up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern. The trays made of recycled PET are not intended to be used and should not be used in microwaves and ovens.

  6. Development of a SiPM-based PET detector using a digital positioning algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Lee, Seung-Jae; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2016-05-01

    A decreased number of readout method is investigated here to provide precise pixel information for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Small-animal PET consists of eight modules, each being composed of a 3 × 3 array of 2 mm × 2 mm × 20 mm lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals optically coupled to a 2 × 2 array of 3 mm × 3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The number of readout channels is reduced by one-quarter that of the conventional method by applying a simplified pixel-determination algorithm. The performances of the PET system and detector module were evaluated with experimental verifications. In the results, all pixels of the 3 × 3 LYSO array were decoded well, and the performances of the PET detector module were measured.

  7. Control of PET Based On Fuzzy Logic for Power Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sravanthi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, fuzzy control has emerged as one of the most active and fruitful areas for research in the applications of fuzzy set theory, especially in the realm of industrial process, which do not lend of quantities data regarding the input-output relations. This paper presents a power electronic transformer with fuzzy controller. In the design process converters and high frequency transformers have been used. One matrix converter operates as AC/AC converter in power electronic transformer. The proposed AC/AC converter can generate desired output voltage from square input voltage. The main point of proposed PET is reduction of the stage and components of the three-part PETs. The reliability and power quality of distribution system can be significantly improved by using proposed PET. To verify the performance of the proposed PET, computer-aided simulations are carried out using MATLAB/SIMULINK

  8. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  9. An Internet-Based “Kinetic Imaging System” (KIS) for MicroPET

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Sung-Cheng; Truong, David; Wu, Hsiao-Ming; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Shao, Weber; Wu, Anna M.; Phelps, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    Many considerations, involving understanding and selection of multiple experimental parameters, are required to perform MicroPET studies properly. The large number of these parameters/variables and their complicated interdependence make their optimal choice nontrivial. We have a developed kinetic imaging system (KIS), an integrated software system, to assist the planning, design, and data analysis of MicroPET studies. The system serves multiple functions–education, virtual experimentation, ex...

  10. 68Ga-PET radiopharmacy: A generator-based alternative to 18F-radiopharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maecke, H R; André, J P

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a dominating method in the field of molecular imaging. Most commonly used radionuclides are accelerator produced 11C and 18F. An alternative method to label biomolecules is the use of metallic positron emitters; among them 68Ga is the most promising as it can be produced from a generator system consisting of an inorganic or organic matrix immobilizing the parent radionuclide 68Ge. Germanium-68 has a long half-life of 271 days which allows the production of long-lived, potentially very cost-effective generator systems. A commercial generator from Obninsk, Russia, is available which uses TiO2 as an inorganic matrix to immobilize 68Ge in the oxidation state IV+. 68Ge(IV) is chemically sufficiently different to allow efficient separation from 68Ga(III). Ga3+ is redox-inert; its coordination chemistry is dominated by its hard acid character. A variety of mono- and bifunctional chelators were developed which allow immobilization of 68Ga3+ and convenient coupling to biomolecules. Especially peptides targeting G-protein coupled receptors overexpressed on human tumour cells have been studied preclinically and in patient studies showing high and specific tumour uptake and specific localization. 68Ga-radiopharmacy may indeed be an alternative to 18F-based radiopharmacy. Freeze-dried, kit-formulated precursors along with the generator may be provided, similar to the 99Mo/99mTc-based radiopharmacy, still the mainstay of nuclear medicine. PMID:17172157

  11. Physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto different porous solid supports: Adsorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Marieta L C; Ribeiro, David S M; Santos, João L M; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2016-08-01

    This work carries out for the first time the comparison between the physical and chemical immobilization of choline oxidase onto aminated silica-based porous supports. The influence on the immobilization efficiency of concentration, pH, temperature and contact time between the support and choline oxidase, was evaluated. The immobilization efficiency was estimated taking into consideration the choline oxidase activity, which was assessed by using cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs), obtained by hydrothermal synthesis, as photoluminescent probes. Hydrogen peroxide produced by enzyme activity was capable of quenching CdTe QDs photoluminescence. The magnitude of the PL quenching process was directly related with the enzyme activity. By comparing the chemical process with the physical adsorption, it was observed that the latter provided the highest choline oxidase immobilization. The equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. Thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy and entropy were also calculated. These results will certainly contribute to the development of new sensing schemes for choline, taking into account the growing demand for its quantification in biological samples. PMID:27241295

  12. Amperometric Choline Biosensor Fabricated through Electrostatic Assembly of Bienzyme/Polyelectrolyte Hybrid Layers on Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-03-01

    We report a flow injection amperometric choline biosensors based on the electrostatic assembly of an enzyme of choline oxidase (ChO) and a bi-enzyme of ChO and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) onto multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These choline biosensors were fabricated by immobilization of enzymes on the negatively charged MWCNT surface through alternatively assembling a cationic polydiallydiimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) layer and an enzyme layer. Using this layer-by-layer assembling approach, bioactive nanocomposite film of a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/HRP/PDDA/CNT (ChO/HRP/CNT) and a PDDA/ChO/PDDA/ CNT (ChO/ CNT) were fabricated on GC surface, respectively. Owning to the electrocatalytic effect of carbon nanotubes, the measurement of faradic responses resulting from enzymatic reactions has been realized at low potential with acceptable sensitivity. It is found the ChO/HRP/CNT biosensor is more sensitive than the ChO/CNT one. Experimental parameters affecting the sensitivity of biosensors, e.g. applied potential, flow rate, etc. were optimized and potential interference was examined. The response time for this choline biosensor is fast (less than a few seconds). The linear range of detection for the choline biosensor is from 5 x 10-5 to 5 x 10-3 M and the detection limit is determined to be about 1.0 x 10-5 M.

  13. A novel, integrated PET-guided MRS technique resulting in more accurate initial diagnosis of high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ellen S; Satter, Martin; Reed, Marilyn; Fadell, Ronald; Kardan, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal malignant glioma in adults. Currently, the modality of choice for diagnosing brain tumor is high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast, which provides anatomic detail and localization. Studies have demonstrated, however, that MRI may have limited utility in delineating the full tumor extent precisely. Studies suggest that MR spectroscopy (MRS) can also be used to distinguish high-grade from low-grade gliomas. However, due to operator dependent variables and the heterogeneous nature of gliomas, the potential for error in diagnostic accuracy with MRS is a concern. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been shown to add additional information with respect to tumor grade, extent, and prognosis based on the premise of biochemical changes preceding anatomic changes. Combined PET/MRS is a technique that integrates information from PET in guiding the location for the most accurate metabolic characterization of a lesion via MRS. We describe a case of glioblastoma multiforme in which MRS was initially non-diagnostic for malignancy, but when MRS was repeated with PET guidance, demonstrated elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratio in the right parietal mass consistent with a high-grade malignancy. Stereotactic biopsy, followed by PET image-guided resection, confirmed the diagnosis of grade IV GBM. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an integrated PET/MRS technique for the voxel placement of MRS. Our findings suggest that integrated PET/MRS may potentially improve diagnostic accuracy in high-grade gliomas.

  14. Evaluation of a BGO-Based PET System for Single-Cell Tracking Performance by Simulation and Phantom Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yu; Kim, Tae Jin; Pratx, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    A recent method based on positron emission was reported for tracking moving point sources using the Inveon PET system. However, the effect of scanner background noise was not further explored. Here, we evaluate tracking with the Genisys4, a bismuth germanate-based PET system, which has no significant intrinsic background and may be better suited to tracking lower and/or faster activity sources. Position-dependent sensitivity of the Genisys4 was simulated in Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) using a static (18)F point source. Trajectories of helically moving point sources with varying activity and rotation speed were reconstructed from list-mode data as described previously. Simulations showed that the Inveon's ability to track sources within 2 mm of localization error is limited to objects with a velocity-to-activity ratio like objects with this system. PMID:27175009

  15. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei;

    2016-01-01

    predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant...... silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed......Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform...

  16. A filtering approach based on Gaussian-powerlaw convolutions for local PET verification of proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because proton beams activate positron emitters in patients, positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to play a unique role in the in vivo verification of proton radiotherapy. Unfortunately, the PET image is not directly proportional to the delivered radiation dose distribution. Current treatment verification strategies using PET therefore compare the actual PET image with full-blown Monte Carlo simulations of the PET signal. In this paper, we describe a simpler and more direct way to reconstruct the expected PET signal from the local radiation dose distribution near the distal fall-off region, which is calculated by the treatment planning programme. Under reasonable assumptions, the PET image can be described as a convolution of the dose distribution with a filter function. We develop a formalism to derive the filter function analytically. The main concept is the introduction of 'Q-tilde' functions defined as the convolution of a Gaussian with a powerlaw function. Special Q-tilde functions are the Gaussian itself and the error function. The convolution of two Q-tilde functions is another Q-tilde function. By fitting elementary dose distributions and their corresponding PET signals with Q-tilde functions, we derive the Q-tilde function approximation of the filter. The new filtering method has been validated through comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations and, in one case, with measured data. While the basic concept is developed under idealized conditions assuming that the absorbing medium is homogeneous near the distal fall-off region, a generalization to inhomogeneous situations is also described. As a result, the method can determine the distal fall-off region of the PET signal, and consequently the range of the proton beam, with millimetre accuracy. Quantification of the produced activity is possible. In conclusion, the PET activity resulting from a proton beam treatment can be determined by locally filtering the dose distribution as obtained from

  17. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Thiophene-Based Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Radiotracers for PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Haider

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, our understanding of the endocannabinoid system has greatly improved due to the wealth of results obtained from exploratory studies. Currently, two cannabinoid receptor subtypes have been well characterized. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 is widely expressed in the central nervous system, while the levels of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2 in the brain and spinal cord of healthy individuals are relatively low. However, recent studies demonstrated a CB2 upregulation on activated microglia upon neuroinflammation, an indicator of neurodegeneration. Our research group aims to develop a suitable positron emission tomography (PET tracer to visualize the CB2 receptor in patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we report two novel thiophene-based 11C-labeled PET ligands designated [11C]AAT-015 and [11C]AAT-778. The reference compounds were synthesized using Gewald reaction conditions to obtain the aminothiophene intermediates, followed by amide formation. Saponification of the esters provided their corresponding precursors. Binding affinity studies revealed Ki values of 3.3 ± 0.5 nM (CB2 and 1.0 ± 0.2 µM (CB1 for AAT-015. AAT-778 showed similar Ki values of 4.3 ± 0.7 nM (CB2 and 1.1 ± 0.1 µM (CB1. Radiosynthesis was carried out under basic conditions using [11C]iodomethane as methylating agent. After semi-preparative HPLC purification both radiolabeled compounds were obtained in 99% radiochemical purity and the radiochemical yields ranged from 12 to 37%. Specific activity was between 96 - 449 GBq/µmol for both tracers. In order to demonstrate CB2 specificity of [11C]AAT-015 and [11C]AAT-778, we carried out autoradiography studies using CB2-positive mouse/rat spleen tissues. The obtained results revealed unspecific binding in spleen tissue that was not blocked by an excess of CB2-specific ligand GW402833. For in vivo analysis, [11C]AAT-015 was administered to healthy rats via tail

  18. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Thiophene-Based Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Radiotracers for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ahmed; Müller Herde, Adrienne; Slavik, Roger; Weber, Markus; Mugnaini, Claudia; Ligresti, Alessia; Schibli, Roger; Mu, Linjing; Mensah Ametamey, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, our understanding of the endocannabinoid system has greatly improved due to the wealth of results obtained from exploratory studies. Currently, two cannabinoid receptor subtypes have been well-characterized. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) is widely expressed in the central nervous system, while the levels of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) in the brain and spinal cord of healthy individuals are relatively low. However, recent studies demonstrated a CB2 upregulation on activated microglia upon neuroinflammation, an indicator of neurodegeneration. Our research group aims to develop a suitable positron emission tomography (PET) tracer to visualize the CB2 receptor in patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we report two novel thiophene-based 11C-labeled PET ligands designated [11C]AAT-015 and [11C]AAT-778. The reference compounds were synthesized using Gewald reaction conditions to obtain the aminothiophene intermediates, followed by amide formation. Saponification of the esters provided their corresponding precursors. Binding affinity studies revealed Ki-values of 3.3 ± 0.5 nM (CB2) and 1.0 ± 0.2 μM (CB1) for AAT-015. AAT-778 showed similar Ki-values of 4.3 ± 0.7 nM (CB2) and 1.1 ± 0.1 μM (CB1). Radiosynthesis was carried out under basic conditions using [11C]iodomethane as methylating agent. After semi-preparative HPLC purification both radiolabeled compounds were obtained in 99% radiochemical purity and the radiochemical yields ranged from 12 to 37%. Specific activity was between 96 and 449 GBq/μmol for both tracers. In order to demonstrate CB2 specificity of [11C]AAT-015 and [11C]AAT-778, we carried out autoradiography studies using CB2-positive mouse/rat spleen tissues. The obtained results revealed unspecific binding in spleen tissue that was not blocked by an excess of CB2-specific ligand GW402833. For in vivo analysis, [11C]AAT-015 was administered to healthy rats via tail-vein injection

  19. Short-course PET based simultaneous integrated boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with large, locally advanced cervical cancers (LACC) are challenging to treat. The purpose of this work is to use 18F-FDG PET as planning basis for a short-course simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in external beam radiotherapy of LACC in order to increase tumour shrinkage and likelihood of local control. Ten previously treated patients with LACC were included, all with pre-treatment FDG PET/CT images available. The FDG avid tumour volume, MTV50, was dose escalated in silico by intensity modulated radiotherapy from the standard 1.8 Gy to 2.8 Gy per fraction for the 10 first fractions; a short-course SIB. For the 18 remaining external fractions, standard pelvic treatment followed to total PTV and MTV50 doses of 50.4 Gy and 60.4 Gy, respectively. Photon and proton treatment were considered using volumetric modulated arc treatment (VMAT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), respectively. All treatment plans were generated using the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS). The impact of tumour shrinkage on doses to organs at risk (OARs) was simulated in the TPS for the SIB plans. Dose escalation could be implemented using both VMAT and IMPT, with a D98 ≥ 95 % for MTV50 being achieved in all cases. The sum of the 10 fraction short-course SIB and subsequent 18 standard fractions was compared to the standard non-SIB approach by dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Only marginal increase of dose to OARs was found for both modalities and a small further increase estimated from tumour shrinkage. Most DVH parameters showed a mean difference below 2 %. IMPT had, compared to VMAT, reduced OAR doses in the low to intermediate dose range, but showed no additional advantage in dose escalation. Planning of dose escalation based on a FDG avid boost volume was here demonstrated feasible. The concept may allow time for enhanced tumour shrinkage before brachytherapy. Thus, this strategy may prove clinically valuable, in particular for patients with large tumours

  20. Rapid Amplification of 5′ cDNA End of S. Liaotungensis Choline Monooxygenase Using Inverse PCR RACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on part of a known cDNA sequence of Suaeda Liaotungensis choline monooxygenase, the authors successfully cloned the 5′ cDNA end of Suaeda Lianotungensis choline monooxygenase using Inverse PCR RACE with a specially designed 5′-phosphated RT primer and two pairs of specific inverse PCR primers. Compared with the anchored PCR RACE, inverse PCR RACE has better specificity and higher amplification.

  1. Detection of Local, Regional, and Distant Recurrence in Patients With PSA Relapse After External-Beam Radiotherapy Using 11C-Choline Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence (local or distant). In this study, the potential of 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) to identify site of recurrence was investigated in patients with rising PSA after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy patients with histologically proven prostate cancer treated with EBRT and showing biochemical recurrence as defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus statement and 10 patients without recurrence underwent a PET scan using 400 MBq 11C-choline intravenously. Biopsy-proven histology from the site of suspicion, findings with other imaging modalities, clinical follow-up and/or response to adjuvant therapy were used as comparative references. Results: None of the 10 patients without biochemical recurrence had a positive PET scan. Fifty-seven of 70 patients with biochemical recurrence (median PSA 9.1 ng/mL; mean PSA 12.3 ng/mL) showed an abnormal uptake pattern (sensitivity 81%). The site of recurrence was only local in 41 of 57 patients (mean PSA 11.1 ng/mL at scan), locoregionally and/or distant in 16 of 57 patients (mean PSA 17.7 ng/mL). Overall the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for 11C-choline PET scan were 1.0 and 0.44 respectively. Accuracy was 84%. Conclusions: 11C-choline PET scan is a sensitive technique to identify the site of recurrence in patients with PSA relapse after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  2. Test of a single module of the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Bednarski, T; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kubicz, E; Moskal, I; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N; Białas, P; Gajos, A; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W

    2014-01-01

    Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography scanner based on plastic scintillators is being developed at the Jagiellonian University by the J-PET collaboration. The main challenge of the conducted research lies in the elaboration of a method allowing application of plastic scintillators for the detection of low energy gamma quanta. In this article we report on tests of a single detection module built out from BC-420 plastic scintillator strip (with dimensions of 5x19x300mm^3) read out at two ends by Hamamatsu R5320 photomultipliers. The measurements were performed using collimated beam of annihilation quanta from the 68Ge isotope and applying the Serial Data Analyzer (Lecroy SDA6000A) which enabled sampling of signals with 50ps intervals. The time resolution of the prototype module was established to be better than 80ps (sigma) for a single level discrimination. The spatial resolution of the determination of the hit position along the strip was determined to be about 0.93cm (sigma) for the annihilation quanta...

  3. Effect of Nitrate Ester on the Combustion Characteristics of PET/HMX -based Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlan Sun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrate ester NG/TEGDN on the combustion characteristics of PET/HMX-based propellants has been experimentally investigated using of high-speed photography technique and scanning electron microscopy. It is indicated that the increase of NG/TEGDN content has little impact on the propellant burning rates at the same pressure. Furthermore, propellant can not be self-sustaining combustion at low pressure (£1 MPa. The increase of NG/TEGDN content does not affect the flame structure of propellant, but it plays an important role in condensed phase reaction zone. The flame structure of propellant is estimated. The thermal decomposition products in different combustion zones are also discussed. Scanning electron microscopy examination of quenched sample indicates that a liquified layer forms during combustion of these propellants. Numerous gas bubbles are present. Especially, the burning surface of propellant with low NG/TEGDN content shows signs of crystallization. The thickness of condensed phase reaction zone, by cross-section examination of propellant burning surface, has also been investigated. The results show that the thickness of condensed phase reaction zone increases with NG/TEGDN content increasing. These observations suggest that the condensed phase zone plays significant role in propellant combustion.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.206-213, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.567

  4. A Novel Time-Based Readout Scheme for a Combined PET-CT Detector Using APDs

    CERN Document Server

    Powolny, F; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Lecoq, P; Meyer, T C; Moraes, D

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes CERN R&D work done in the framework of the European Commission's FP6 BioCare Project. The objective was to develop a novel "time-based" signal processing technique to read out LSO-APD photodetectors for medical imaging. An important aspect was to employ the technique in a combined scenario for both computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) with effectively no tradeoffs in efficiency and resolution compared to traditional single mode machines. This made the use of low noise and yet very high-speed monolithic front-end electronics essential so as to assure the required timing characteristics together with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Using APDs for photon detection, two chips, traditionally employed for particle physics, could be identified to meet the above criteria. Although both were not optimized for their intended new medical application, excellent performance in conjunction with LSO-APD sensors could be derived. Whereas a measured energy resolution of 16% (...

  5. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small deterioration of the detector performance.

  6. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27481537

  7. Recycled-PET fibre based panels for building thermal insulation: environmental impact and improvement potential assessment for a greener production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrao, Carlo; Lo Giudice, Agata; Tricase, Caterina; Rana, Roberto; Mbohwa, Charles; Siracusa, Valentina

    2014-09-15

    A screening of Life Cycle Assessment for the evaluation of the damage arising from the production of 1 kg of recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (RPET) fibre-based panel for building heat insulation was carried out according to the ISO 14040:2006 and 14044:2006. All data used were collected on site based on observations during site visits, review of documents and interviews with technical personnel and management. These data were processed by using SimaPro 7.3.3, accessing the Ecoinvent v.2.2 database and using the Impact 2002+ method. The study showed damage to be equal to 0.000299 points mostly due to the: 1) PET thermo-bonding fibre supply from China by means of a freight-equipped intercontinental aircraft; 2) production of bottle-grade granulate PET; 3) medium voltage electricity consumption during the manufacturing of RPET fibre panel. It was also highlighted that there were environmental benefits due to recycling through mainly avoiding significant emissions and reduced resource consumption. An improvement assessment was carried out to find solutions aimed at reducing the damage coming from the most impacting phases. Furthermore, the environmental impacts due to the production of the analysed RPET fibre-based panel were compared to other materials with the same insulating function, such as polystyrene foam, rock wool and cork slab. Finally, the environmental benefits of the recycling of PET bottles for flake production were highlighted compared to other treatment scenarios such as landfill and municipal incineration.

  8. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy. PMID:27481537

  9. Single Particle and PET-based Platform for Identifying Optimal Plasmonic Nano-Heaters for Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Norregaard, Kamilla; Tian, Pengfei; Bendix, Poul Martin; Kjaer, Andreas; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticle-based photothermal cancer therapy is a promising new tool to inflict localized and irreversible damage to tumor tissue by hyperthermia, without harming surrounding healthy tissue. We developed a single particle and positron emission tomography (PET)-based platform to quantitatively correlate the heat generation of plasmonic nanoparticles with their potential as cancer killing agents. In vitro, the heat generation and absorption cross-section of single irradiated nanoparticles were quantified using a temperature sensitive lipid-based assay and compared to their theoretically predicted photo-absorption. In vivo, the heat generation of irradiated nanoparticles was evaluated in human tumor xenografts in mice using 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging. To validate the use of this platform, we quantified the photothermal efficiency of near infrared resonant silica-gold nanoshells (AuNSs) and benchmarked this against the heating of colloidal spherical, solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As expected, both in vitro and in vivo the heat generation of the resonant AuNSs performed superior compared to the non-resonant AuNPs. Furthermore, the results showed that PET imaging could be reliably used to monitor early treatment response of photothermal treatment. This multidisciplinary approach provides a much needed platform to benchmark the emerging plethora of novel plasmonic nanoparticles for their potential for photothermal cancer therapy.

  10. The findings of F-18 FDG camera-based coincidence PET in acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S. N.; Joh, C. W.; Lee, M. H. [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of F-18 FDG coincidence PET (CoDe-PET) using a dual-head gamma camera in the assessment of patients with acute leukemia. F-18 FDG CoDE-PET studies were performed in 5 patients with acute leukemia (6 ALL and 2 AML) before or after treatment. CoDe-PET was performed utilizing a dual-head gamma camera equipped with 5/8 inch NaI(Tl) crystal. Image acquisition began 60 minutes after the injection of F-18 FDG in the fasting state. A whole trunk from cervical to inguinal regions or selected region were scanned. No attenuation correction was made and image reconstruction was done using filtered back-projection. CoDe-PET studies were evaluated visually. F-18 FDG image performed in 5 patients with ALL before therapy depicted multiple lymph node involvement and diffuse increased uptake involving axial skeleton, pelvis and femurs. F-18 FDG image done in 2 AML after chemotherapy showed only diffuse increased uptake in sternum, ribs, spine, pelvis and proximal femur and these may be due to G-CSF stimulation effect in view of drug history. But bone marrow histology showed scattered blast cell suggesting incomplete remission in one and completer remission in another. F-18 image done in 1 ALL after therapy showed no abnormal uptake. CoDe-PET with F-18 FDG in acute lymphoblastic lymphoma showed multiple lymphnode and bone marrow involvement in whole body. Therefore we conclude that CoDe-PET with F-18 FDG usefulness for evaluation of extent in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. But there was a limitation to assess therapy effectiveness during therapy due to reactive bone marrow.

  11. MRI-Based Attenuation Correction for PET/MRI: A Novel Approach Combining Pattern Recognition and Atlas Registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, M.; Steinke, F.; Scheel, V.; Charpiat, G.; Farquhar, J.D.R.; Aschoff, P.; Brady, M.; Schölkopf, B.; Pichler, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Generally in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating radionuclide source, or from the CT scan in a combined PET/CT scanner. In the case of PET/MRI scanner

  12. Prognostic significance of volume based metabolic parameters by 18F FDG PET/CT in gallbladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the prognostic values of volume based metabolic parameters by 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG)positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT)in gallbladder carcinoma patients and compared them with other prognostic parameters. We enrolled 44 patients, who were initially diagnosed with gallbladder carcinoma and under going 18F FDG PET/CT. Various metabolic volume based PET parameters of primary tumors, including maximum and average standardized uptake values (SUVmax, SUVavg), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), were measured in gallbladder carcinoma patients using mediastinal blood pool activity as a threshold SUV for determining the tumor boundaries. Overall survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan Meier method with PET parameters and other clinical variables. For determining independent prognostic factors, Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed. Of the 44 enrolled patients, cancer- or treatment related death occurred in 30 (68.2%). The mean clinical follow up period was 22.2±10.4m (range, 0.6-35.9m). Univariate analysis demonstrated that clinical or pathologic TNM stage (P3, P=0.001), and TLG (cutoff=7.090, P<0.05)were significant prognostic factors. In multivariate analysis, both clinical or pathologic TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR)=2.019 (I vs II), 21.287 (I vs III), and 24.354 (I vs IV); P=0.001)and TLG (HR=2.930; P<0.05)were independent prognostic factors for predicting overall survival. In gallbladder cancer, TLG of the primary tumor, a volume based metabolic parameter, is a significant independent prognostic factor for overall survival in conjunction with the clinical or pathological TNM stage

  13. PET imaging of HSV1-tk mutants with acquired specificity toward pyrimidine- and acycloguanosine-based radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likar, Yury; Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shenker, Larissa; Hricak, Hedvig; Ponomarev, Vladimir [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Cai, Shangde [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to create an alternative mutant of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene with reduced phosphorylation capacity for acycloguanosine derivatives, but not pyrimidine-based compounds that will allow for successful PET imaging. A new mutant of HSV1-tk reporter gene, suitable for PET imaging using pyrimidine-based radiotracers, was developed. The HSV1-tk mutant contains an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at position 176 (HSV1-R176Qtk) of the nucleoside binding region of the enzyme. The mutant-gene product showed favorable enzymatic characteristics toward pyrimidine-based nucleosides, while exhibiting reduced activity with acycloguanosine derivatives. In order to enhance HSV1-R176Qtk reporter activity with pyrimidine-based radiotracers, we introduced the R176Q substitution into the more active HSV1-sr39tk mutant. U87 human glioma cells transduced with the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk double mutant reporter gene showed high {sup 3}H-FEAU pyrimidine nucleoside and low {sup 3}H-penciclovir acycloguanosine analog uptake in vitro. PET imaging also demonstrated high {sup 18}F-FEAU and low {sup 18}F-FHBG accumulation in HSV1-R176Qsr39tk+ xenografts. The feasibility of imaging two independent nucleoside-specific HSV1-tk mutants in the same animal with PET was demonstrated. Two opposite xenografts expressing the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk reporter gene and the previously described acycloguanosine-specific mutant of HSV1-tk, HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, were imaged using a short-lived pyrimidine-based {sup 18}F-FEAU and an acycloguanosine-based {sup 18}F-FHBG radiotracer, respectively, administered on 2 consecutive days. We conclude that in combination with acycloguanosine-specific HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, a HSV1-tk mutant containing the R176Q substitution could be used for PET imaging of two different cell populations or concurrent molecular biological processes in the same living subject. (orig.)

  14. PET imaging of HSV1-tk mutants with acquired specificity toward pyrimidine- and acycloguanosine-based radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to create an alternative mutant of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene with reduced phosphorylation capacity for acycloguanosine derivatives, but not pyrimidine-based compounds that will allow for successful PET imaging. A new mutant of HSV1-tk reporter gene, suitable for PET imaging using pyrimidine-based radiotracers, was developed. The HSV1-tk mutant contains an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at position 176 (HSV1-R176Qtk) of the nucleoside binding region of the enzyme. The mutant-gene product showed favorable enzymatic characteristics toward pyrimidine-based nucleosides, while exhibiting reduced activity with acycloguanosine derivatives. In order to enhance HSV1-R176Qtk reporter activity with pyrimidine-based radiotracers, we introduced the R176Q substitution into the more active HSV1-sr39tk mutant. U87 human glioma cells transduced with the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk double mutant reporter gene showed high 3H-FEAU pyrimidine nucleoside and low 3H-penciclovir acycloguanosine analog uptake in vitro. PET imaging also demonstrated high 18F-FEAU and low 18F-FHBG accumulation in HSV1-R176Qsr39tk+ xenografts. The feasibility of imaging two independent nucleoside-specific HSV1-tk mutants in the same animal with PET was demonstrated. Two opposite xenografts expressing the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk reporter gene and the previously described acycloguanosine-specific mutant of HSV1-tk, HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, were imaged using a short-lived pyrimidine-based 18F-FEAU and an acycloguanosine-based 18F-FHBG radiotracer, respectively, administered on 2 consecutive days. We conclude that in combination with acycloguanosine-specific HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, a HSV1-tk mutant containing the R176Q substitution could be used for PET imaging of two different cell populations or concurrent molecular biological processes in the same living subject. (orig.)

  15. MR-based automatic delineation of volumes of interest in human brain PET images using probability maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karina; Hasselbalch, Steen G.;

    2005-01-01

    delineation of the VOI set. The approach was also shown to work equally well in individuals with pronounced cerebral atrophy. Probability-map-based automatic delineation of VOIs is a fast, objective, reproducible, and safe way to assess regional brain values from PET or SPECT scans. In addition, the method......The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observer-independent approach for automatic generation of volume-of-interest (VOI) brain templates to be used in emission tomography studies of the brain. The method utilizes a VOI probability map created on the basis of a database of several...... subjects' MR-images, where VOI sets have been defined manually. High-resolution structural MR-images and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding PET-images (in terms of (18)F-altanserin binding) from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment were included for the analysis. A template including...

  16. MR-based automatic delineation of volumes of interest in human brain PET images using probability maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karina; Hasselbalch, Steen G.;

    2005-01-01

    delineation of the VOI set. The approach was also shown to work equally well in individuals with pronounced cerebral atrophy. Probability-map-based automatic delineation of VOIs is a fast, objective, reproducible, and safe way to assess regional brain values from PET or SPECT scans. In addition, the method...... applies well in elderly subjects, even in the presence of pronounced cerebral atrophy...... subjects' MR-images, where VOI sets have been defined manually. High-resolution structural MR-images and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding PET-images (in terms of (18)F-altanserin binding) from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment were included for the analysis. A template including...

  17. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-03-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment.

  18. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, C; Fotopoulou, K N; Karapanagioti, H K; Geraga, M; Zeri, C; Papathanassiou, E; Galgani, F; Papatheodorou, G

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea-E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment.

  19. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on Starlinger IV+ ® technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials“Visy” and “SIA EkoPET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes Visy and SIA EkoPET (EU register numbers RECYC101 and RECYC102 respectively which are based on the same Starlinger IV+ ® technology. The decontamination efficiency of these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge test. The input of the processes is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this technology, washed and dried PET flakes are dried and crystallised in a reactor, then extruded into pellets which are further crystallised in a second reactor. Crystallised pellets are then pre-heated in a third reactor and fed to the Solid State Polymerisation (SSP reactor. After having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the three steps, drying and crystallisation, extrusion and crystallisation and SSP are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the processes. The operating parameters to control their performance are the temperature, the gas flow and the residence time for the drying and crystallisation step, the temperature, the pressure and the residence time for extrusion and crystallisation and SSP steps. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling processes are able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore the Panel concluded the recycled PET obtained from these processes intended to be used up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the following processes based on Starlinger Decon technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials: "Baltija Eco PET", "Eurocast", "Fernholz", "Formas y Envases" and "Klöckner Pentaplast"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety evaluation of the recycling processes "Baltija Eco PET", "Eurocast", "Fernholz", "Formas y Envases", and "Klöckner Pentaplast" (EU register numbers RECYC0118, RECYC0111, RECYC0113, RECYC0115 and RECYC0121 respectively, which are all based on the same Starlinger Decon technology. The decontamination efficiency of all these processes was demonstrated using the same challenge test. The input of all the processes is washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this technology washed and dried PET flakes are pre-heated before being solid state polymerised (SSP in a continuous reactor at high temperature under vacuum and gas flow. Having examined the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the pre-heating (step 2 and the decontamination in the continuous SSP reactor (step 3 are the critical steps that determine the decontamination efficiency of the processes. The operating parameters to control their performance are well defined and are temperature, pressure, residence time and gas flow for step 2 and 3. Under these conditions it was demonstrated that the recycling processes under evaluation, using a Starlinger Decon technology, are able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below a conservatively modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food. Therefore, the Panel concluded that the recycled PET obtained from these processes intended to be used at up to 100 % for the manufacture of materials and articles for contact with all types of foodstuffs for long term storage at room temperature, with or without hotfill is not considered of safety concern.

  1. SU-C-BRA-02: Gradient Based Method of Target Delineation On PET/MR Image of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dance, M; Chera, B; Falchook, A; Das, S; Lian, J [Univ North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Validate the consistency of a gradient-based segmentation tool to facilitate accurate delineation of PET/CT-based GTVs in head and neck cancers by comparing against hybrid PET/MR-derived GTV contours. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 head and neck target volumes (10 primary and 8 nodal) were retrospectively contoured using a gradient-based segmentation tool by two observers. Each observer independently contoured each target five times. Inter-observer variability was evaluated via absolute percent differences. Intra-observer variability was examined by percentage uncertainty. All target volumes were also contoured using the SUV percent threshold method. The thresholds were explored case by case so its derived volume matched with the gradient-based volume. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) were calculated to determine overlap of PET/CT GTVs and PET/MR GTVs. Results: The Levene’s test showed there was no statistically significant difference of the variances between the observer’s gradient-derived contours. However, the absolute difference between the observer’s volumes was 10.83%, with a range from 0.39% up to 42.89%. PET-avid regions with qualitatively non-uniform shapes and intensity levels had a higher absolute percent difference near 25%, while regions with uniform shapes and intensity levels had an absolute percent difference of 2% between observers. The average percentage uncertainty between observers was 4.83% and 7%. As the volume of the gradient-derived contours increased, the SUV threshold percent needed to match the volume decreased. Dice coefficients showed good agreement of the PET/CT and PET/MR GTVs with an average DSC value across all volumes at 0.69. Conclusion: Gradient-based segmentation of PET volume showed good consistency in general but can vary considerably for non-uniform target shapes and intensity levels. PET/CT-derived GTV contours stemming from the gradient-based tool show good agreement with the anatomically and

  2. SU-C-BRA-02: Gradient Based Method of Target Delineation On PET/MR Image of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Validate the consistency of a gradient-based segmentation tool to facilitate accurate delineation of PET/CT-based GTVs in head and neck cancers by comparing against hybrid PET/MR-derived GTV contours. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 head and neck target volumes (10 primary and 8 nodal) were retrospectively contoured using a gradient-based segmentation tool by two observers. Each observer independently contoured each target five times. Inter-observer variability was evaluated via absolute percent differences. Intra-observer variability was examined by percentage uncertainty. All target volumes were also contoured using the SUV percent threshold method. The thresholds were explored case by case so its derived volume matched with the gradient-based volume. Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) were calculated to determine overlap of PET/CT GTVs and PET/MR GTVs. Results: The Levene’s test showed there was no statistically significant difference of the variances between the observer’s gradient-derived contours. However, the absolute difference between the observer’s volumes was 10.83%, with a range from 0.39% up to 42.89%. PET-avid regions with qualitatively non-uniform shapes and intensity levels had a higher absolute percent difference near 25%, while regions with uniform shapes and intensity levels had an absolute percent difference of 2% between observers. The average percentage uncertainty between observers was 4.83% and 7%. As the volume of the gradient-derived contours increased, the SUV threshold percent needed to match the volume decreased. Dice coefficients showed good agreement of the PET/CT and PET/MR GTVs with an average DSC value across all volumes at 0.69. Conclusion: Gradient-based segmentation of PET volume showed good consistency in general but can vary considerably for non-uniform target shapes and intensity levels. PET/CT-derived GTV contours stemming from the gradient-based tool show good agreement with the anatomically and

  3. A Support Method with Changeable Training Strategies Based on Mutual Adaptation between a Ubiquitous Pet and a Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xianzhi; Jing, Lei; Kansen, Mizuo; Wang, Junbo; Ota, Kaoru; Cheng, Zixue

    . We create a ubiquitous pet (u-pet) as a metaphor of our system. A u-pet is always with the learner and encourage the leaner to start training at proper time and to do training smoothly. The u-pet can perform actions with the learner in training, change its own attributes based on the learner's attributes, and adjust its own learning rate by a learning function. The u-pet grasps the state of the learner and adopts different training support strategies to the learner's training based on the learner's short and long term states.

  4. Synthesis and in Silico Evaluation of Novel Compounds for PET-Based Investigations of the Norepinephrine Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Neudorfer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the norepinephrine transporter (NET is involved in a variety of diseases, the investigation of underlying dysregulation-mechanisms of the norepinephrine (NE system is of major interest. Based on the previously described highly potent and selective NET ligand 1-(3-(methylamino-1-phenylpropyl-3-phenyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidaz- ol-2-one (Me@APPI, this paper aims at the development of several fluorinated methylamine-based analogs of this compound. The newly synthesized compounds were computationally evaluated for their interactions with the monoamine transporters and represent reference compounds for PET-based investigation of the NET.

  5. Preparation, storage stability and palatability of spent hen meal based pet food

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, P.; V. V. Kulkarni; K.sivakumar

    2010-01-01

    Extruded pet foods were prepared by extrusion process incorporating dry rendered spent hen meal (SHM) at 10 and 20% levels, and packed in LDPE bags before storage at room temperature (35 ± 2°C) up to 45 days. The colour of the pet foods was uniformly brown with pleasant meaty odour. The thiobarbituric acid, tyrosine values, free fatty acid content and acid value and total bacterial counts increased gradually during storage but E.coli, Salmonella spp, Clostridium spp, Staphylococci spp and fun...

  6. 3D quantification of soil structure and functioning based on PET and CT scanning techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garbout, Amin

    This thesis explores the potential of PET and CT scanning techniques to quantify and visualize soil structure, root development, and soil/plant interactions. At the investigated scale, these non-invasive and nondestructive techniques have some obvious advantages compared with most other techniques....... The processed measurements show some expected and a few unexpected effects (or lack of effects) on different characteristics of soil structure. The combination of CT and PET scanning in an air plant soil controller system revealed some very interesting research possibilities. Interactions between soil...

  7. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  8. Investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner based in liquid xenon: A Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Ferrario, P; Monrabal, F; Rodríguez, J; Toledo, J F

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the time of flight of the two 511 keV gammas recorded in coincidence in a PET scanner provides an effective way of reducing the random background and therefore increases the scanner sensitivity, provided that the coincidence resolving time (CRT) of the gammas is sufficiently good. Existing commercial systems based in LYSO crystals, such as the GEMINIS of Philips, reach CRT values of ~ 600 ps (FWHM). In this paper we present a Monte Carlo investigation of the CRT performance of a PET scanner exploiting the scintillating properties of liquid xenon. We find that an excellent CRT of 60-70 ps (depending on the PDE of the sensor) can be obtained if the scanner is instrumented with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) sensitive to the ultraviolet light emitted by xenon. Alternatively, a CRT of 120 ps can be obtained instrumenting the scanner with (much cheaper) blue-sensitive SiPMs coated with a suitable wavelength shifter. These results show the excellent time of flight capabilities of a PET device b...

  9. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hao, E-mail: penghao@mcmaster.ca [Department of Medical Physics, McMaster University, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McMaster University, Canada L8S 4K1 (Canada)

    2015-10-21

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., “block effect”) in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  10. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., "block effect") in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  11. Development of new folate-based PET radiotracers: preclinical evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-folate conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); University Hospital Freiburg, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Wang, Xuejuan [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Nicolas, Guillaume [University Hospital Basel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Medina, Christelle; Raynal, Isabelle; Port, Marc [Guerbet, Research Department, Aulnay-sous-Bois (France)

    2011-01-15

    A number of {sup 111}In- and {sup 99m}Tc-folate-based tracers have been evaluated as diagnostic agents for imaging folate receptor (FR)-positive tumours. A {sup 68}Ga-folate-based radiopharmaceutical would be of great interest, combining the advantages of PET technology and the availability of {sup 68}Ga from a generator. The aim of the study was to develop a new {sup 68}Ga-folate-based PET radiotracer. Two new DOTA-folate conjugates, named P3026 and P1254, were synthesized using the 1,2-diaminoethane and 3-{l_brace}2-[2-(3-amino-propoxy)-ethoxy]-ethoxy{r_brace}-propylamine as a spacer, respectively. Both conjugates were labelled with {sup 67/68}Ga. Binding affinity, internalization and externalization studies were performed using the FR-positive KB cell line. Biodistribution and PET/CT imaging studies were performed in nude mice, on a folate-deficient diet, bearing KB and HT1080 (FR-negative) tumours, concurrently. The new radiotracers were evaluated comparatively to the reference molecule {sup 111}In-DTPA-folate ({sup 111}In-P3139). The K{sub d} values of {sup 67/68}Ga-P3026 (4.65 {+-} 0.82 nM) and {sup 67/68}Ga-P1254 (4.27 {+-} 0.42 nM) showed high affinity for the FR. The internalization rate followed the order {sup 67/68}Ga-P3026 >{sup 67/68}Ga-P1254 >{sup 111}In-P3139, while almost double cellular retention was found for {sup 67/68}Ga-P3026 and {sup 67/68}Ga-P1254, compared to {sup 111}In-P3139. The biodistribution data of {sup 67/68}Ga-DOTA-folates showed high and receptor-mediated uptake on the FR-positive tumours and kidneys, with no significant differences compared to {sup 111}In-P3139. PET/CT images, performed with {sup 68}Ga-P3026, showed high uptake in the kidneys and clear visualization of the FR-positive tumours. The DOTA-folate conjugates can be efficiently labelled with {sup 68}Ga in labelling yields and specific activities which allow clinical application. The characteristics of the {sup 67/68}Ga-DOTA-folates are comparable to {sup 111}In

  12. Correction of oral contrast artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of PET images using an automated segmentation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadian, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R.; Sarkar, Saeed [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Bidgoli, Javad H. [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); East Tehran Azad University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tehran (Iran); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    Oral contrast is usually administered in most X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations of the abdomen and the pelvis as it allows more accurate identification of the bowel and facilitates the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT studies. However, the misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) is known to generate artifacts in the attenuation map ({mu}map), thus resulting in overcorrection for attenuation of positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this study, we developed an automated algorithm for segmentation and classification of regions containing oral contrast medium to correct for artifacts in CT-attenuation-corrected PET images using the segmented contrast correction (SCC) algorithm. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: first, high CT number object segmentation using combined region- and boundary-based segmentation and second, object classification to bone and contrast agent using a knowledge-based nonlinear fuzzy classifier. Thereafter, the CT numbers of pixels belonging to the region classified as contrast medium are substituted with their equivalent effective bone CT numbers using the SCC algorithm. The generated CT images are then down-sampled followed by Gaussian smoothing to match the resolution of PET images. A piecewise calibration curve was then used to convert CT pixel values to linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. The visual assessment of segmented regions performed by an experienced radiologist confirmed the accuracy of the segmentation and classification algorithms for delineation of contrast-enhanced regions in clinical CT images. The quantitative analysis of generated {mu}maps of 21 clinical CT colonoscopy datasets showed an overestimation ranging between 24.4% and 37.3% in the 3D-classified regions depending on their volume and the concentration of contrast medium. Two PET/CT studies known to be problematic demonstrated the applicability of the technique

  13. Voxel based statistical analysis method for microPET studies to assess the cerebral glucose metabolism in cat deafness model: comparison to ROI based method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Min Hyun; Lee, Jong Jin; Kang, Hye Jin; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Chong Sun; Jung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Imaging research on the brain of sensory-deprived cats using small animal PET scanner has gained interest since the abundant information about the sensory system of ths animal is available and close examination of the brain is possible due to larger size of its brain than mouse or rat. In this study, we have established the procedures for 3D voxel-based statistical analysis (SPM) of FDG PET image of cat brain, and confirmed using ROI based-method. FDG PET scans of 4 normal and 4 deaf cats were acquired for 30 minutes using microPET R4 scanner. Only the brain cortices were extracted using a masking and threshold method to facilitate spatial normalization. After spatial normalization and smoothing, 3D voxel-wise and ROI based t-test were performed to identify the regions with significant different FDG uptake between the normal and deaf cats. In ROI analysis, 26 ROIs were drawn on both hemispheres, and regional mean pixel value in each ROI was normalized to the global mean of the brain. Cat brains were spatially normalized well onto the target brain due to the removal of background activity. When cerebral glucose metabolism of deaf cats were compared to the normal controls after removing the effects of the global count, the glucose metabolism in the auditory cortex, head of caudate nucleus, and thalamus in both hemispheres of the deaf cats was significantly lower than that of the controls (P<0.01). No area showed a significantly increased metabolism in the deaf cats even in higher significance level (P<0.05). ROI analysis also showed significant reduction of glucose metabolism in the same region. This study established and confirmed a method for voxel-based analysis of animal PET data of cat brain, which showed high localization accuracy and specificity and was useful for examining the cerebral glucose metabolism in a cat cortical deafness model.

  14. Plasma based markers of [11C] PiB-PET brain amyloid burden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven John Kiddle

    Full Text Available Changes in brain amyloid burden have been shown to relate to Alzheimer's disease pathology, and are believed to precede the development of cognitive decline. There is thus a need for inexpensive and non-invasive screening methods that are able to accurately estimate brain amyloid burden as a marker of Alzheimer's disease. One potential method would involve using demographic information and measurements on plasma samples to establish biomarkers of brain amyloid burden; in this study data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative was used to explore this possibility. Sixteen of the analytes on the Rules Based Medicine Human Discovery Multi-Analyte Profile 1.0 panel were found to associate with [(11C]-PiB PET measurements. Some of these markers of brain amyloid burden were also found to associate with other AD related phenotypes. Thirteen of these markers of brain amyloid burden--c-peptide, fibrinogen, alpha-1-antitrypsin, pancreatic polypeptide, complement C3, vitronectin, cortisol, AXL receptor kinase, interleukin-3, interleukin-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9 total, apolipoprotein E and immunoglobulin E--were used along with co-variates in multiple linear regression, and were shown by cross-validation to explain >30% of the variance of brain amyloid burden. When a threshold was used to classify subjects as PiB positive, the regression model was found to predict actual PiB positive individuals with a sensitivity of 0.918 and a specificity of 0.545. The number of APOE [Symbol: see text] 4 alleles and plasma apolipoprotein E level were found to contribute most to this model, and the relationship between these variables and brain amyloid burden was explored.

  15. CHERENCUBE: Concept definition and implementation challenges of a Cherenkov-based detector block for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somlai-Schweiger, I., E-mail: ian.somlai@tum.de; Ziegler, S. I. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Strasse 22, München 81675 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: A new concept for a depth-of-interaction (DOI) capable time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector is defined, based only on the detection of Cherenkov photons. The proposed “CHERENCUBE” consists of a cubic Cherenkov radiator with position-sensitive photodetectors covering each crystal face. By means of the spatial distribution of the detected photons and their time of arrival, the point of interaction of the gamma-ray in the crystal can be determined. This study analyzes through theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations the potential advantages of the concept toward reaching a Cherenkov-only detector for TOF-PET with DOI capability. Furthermore, an algorithm for the DOI estimation is presented and the requirements for a practical implementation of the proposed concept are defined. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulations consisted of a cubic crystal with one photodetector coupled to each one of the faces of the cube. The sensitive area of the detector matched exactly the crystal size, which was varied in 1 mm steps between 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} and 10 × 10 × 10 mm{sup 3}. For each size, five independent simulations of ten thousand 511 keV gamma-rays were triggered at a fixed distance of 10 mm. The crystal chosen was PbWO{sub 4}. Its scintillation properties were simulated, but only Cherenkov photons were analyzed. Photodetectors were simulated having perfect photodetection efficiency and infinite time resolution. For every generated particle, the analysis considered its creation process, parent and daughter particles, energy, origin coordinates, trajectory, and time and position of detection. The DOI determination is based on the distribution of the emission time of all photons per event. These values are calculated as a function of the coordinates of detection and origin for every photon. The common origin is estimated by finding the distribution with the most similar emission time-points. Results: Detection efficiency increases with crystal size from

  16. Choline Transporters in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma: Expression and Functional Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient for cell survival and proliferation, however, the expression and function of choline transporters have not been well identified in cancer. In this study, we detected the mRNA and protein expression of organic cation transporter OCT3, carnitine/cation transporters OCTN 1 and OCTN2,and choline transporter-like protein CTL1 in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549, H1299 and SPC-A-1.Their expression pattern was further confirmed in 25 human primary adenocarcinoma tissues. The choline uptake in these cell lines was significantly blocked by CTL1 inhibitor, but only partially inhibited by OCT or OCTN inhibitors. The efficacy of these inhibitors on cell proliferation is closely correlated with their abilities to block choline transport. Under the native expression of these transporters, the total choline uptake was notably blocked by specific PI3K/AKT inhibitors. These results describe the expression of choline transporters and their relevant function in cell proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma, thus providing a potential"choline-starvation" strategy of cancer interference through targeting choline transporters, especially CTL1.

  17. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  18. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailovic, Jasna [Novi Sad Univ. (Serbia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Goldsmith, Stanley J. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imging; Killeen, Ronan P. [St. Vincents Univ. Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-07-01

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  19. Parental atopy and exposure to pets on asthma: A hospital-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil C Mathew

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that both parental history and parental atopy increase the risk of asthma among adults whereas pet keeping inside and outside the house during the previous 12-month period were not significantly associated with asthma among adults.

  20. Segmentation of rodent whole-body dynamic PET images: an unsupervised method based on voxel dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroy, Renaud; Boisgard, Raphaël; Comtat, Claude;

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a useful tool for pharmacokinetics studies in rodents during the preclinical phase of drug and tracer development. However, rodent organs are small as compared to the scanner's intrinsic resolution and are affected by physiological movements. We present a new...

  1. 3D PET image reconstruction based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method (MLEM) algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Słomski, Artur; Bednarski, Tomasz; Białas, Piotr; Czerwiński, Eryk; Kapłon, Łukasz; Kochanowski, Andrzej; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Paweł; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemień, Wojciech; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Paweł; Niedźwiecki, Szymon; Pałka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczyński, Lech; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Michał; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wiślicki, Wojciech; Zieliński, Marcin; Zoń, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomographs (PET) do not measure an image directly. Instead, they measure at the boundary of the field-of-view (FOV) of PET tomograph a sinogram that consists of measurements of the sums of all the counts along the lines connecting two detectors. As there is a multitude of detectors build-in typical PET tomograph structure, there are many possible detector pairs that pertain to the measurement. The problem is how to turn this measurement into an image (this is called imaging). Decisive improvement in PET image quality was reached with the introduction of iterative reconstruction techniques. This stage was reached already twenty years ago (with the advent of new powerful computing processors). However, three dimensional (3D) imaging remains still a challenge. The purpose of the image reconstruction algorithm is to process this imperfect count data for a large number (many millions) of lines-of-responce (LOR) and millions of detected photons to produce an image showing the distribution of the l...

  2. RPC PET: Status and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couceiro, M.; Blanco, A.; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Ferreira Marques, R.; Fonte, P.; Lopes, L.

    2007-10-01

    The status of the resistive plate chamber (RPC)-PET technology for small animals is briefly reviewed and its sensitivity performance for human PET studied through Monte-Carlo simulations. The cost-effectiveness of these detectors and their very good timing characteristics open the possibility to build affordable Time of Flight (TOF)-PET systems with very large fields of view. Simulations suggest that the sensitivity of such systems for human whole-body screening, under reasonable assumptions, may exceed the present crystal-based PET technology by a factor up to 20.

  3. PetClaw: Parallelization and Performance Optimization of a Python-Based Nonlinear Wave Propagation Solver Using PETSc

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Amal Mohammed

    2012-04-01

    Clawpack, a conservation laws package implemented in Fortran, and its Python-based version, PyClaw, are existing tools providing nonlinear wave propagation solvers that use state of the art finite volume methods. Simulations using those tools can have extensive computational requirements to provide accurate results. Therefore, a number of tools, such as BearClaw and MPIClaw, have been developed based on Clawpack to achieve significant speedup by exploiting parallel architectures. However, none of them has been shown to scale on a large number of cores. Furthermore, these tools, implemented in Fortran, achieve parallelization by inserting parallelization logic and MPI standard routines throughout the serial code in a non modular manner. Our contribution in this thesis research is three-fold. First, we demonstrate an advantageous use case of Python in implementing easy-to-use modular extensible scalable scientific software tools by developing an implementation of a parallelization framework, PetClaw, for PyClaw using the well-known Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation, PETSc, through its Python wrapper petsc4py. Second, we demonstrate the possibility of getting acceptable Python code performance when compared to Fortran performance after introducing a number of serial optimizations to the Python code including integrating Clawpack Fortran kernels into PyClaw for low-level computationally intensive parts of the code. As a result of those optimizations, the Python overhead in PetClaw for a shallow water application is only 12 percent when compared to the corresponding Fortran Clawpack application. Third, we provide a demonstration of PetClaw scalability on up to the entirety of Shaheen; a 16-rack Blue Gene/P IBM supercomputer that comprises 65,536 cores and located at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The PetClaw solver achieved above 0.98 weak scaling efficiency for an Euler application on the whole machine excluding the

  4. Diabetic Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health or management, contact your veterinarian. In addition, diabetic pets should be monitored for long-term complications such as cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur ...

  5. Senior Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Future AVMA Meeting Dates Meetings & CE Calendar Symposiums & Summits Pet Health Awareness Events About AVMA Who We ... and small dogs are generally considered “senior” at seven years of age. Larger breed dogs tend to ...

  6. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M. A.; Reader, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  7. Choline alphoscerate (alpha-glyceryl-phosphoryl-choline) an old choline- containing phospholipid with a still interesting profile as cognition enhancing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Enea; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic precursors have represented the first approach to counter cognitive impairment occurring in adultonset dementia disorders. These compounds were early leaved because their clinical efficacy was not clearly demonstrated. This is probably not true for some choline-containing phospholipids including choline alphoscerate. Choline alphoscerate increases the release of acetylcholine in rat hippocampus, facilitates learning and memory in experimental animals, improves brain transduction mechanisms and decreases age-dependent structural changes occurring in rat brain areas involved in learning and memory. The compound exerts neuroprotective effects in models of altered cholinergic neurotransmission and of brain vascular injury. In clinical studies choline alphoscerate improved memory and attention impairment, as well as affective and somatic symptoms in dementia disorders. An ongoing trial indicates that association between the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and choline alphoscerate is accompanied by an improvement in several cognitive tests superior to that induced by donepezil alone. It is suggested that this association may represent a therapeutic option to prolong beneficial effects of cholinergic therapies in Alzheimer's disease patients with concomitant ischemic cerebrovascular disorders. In summary, choline alphoscerate has significant effects on cognitive function with a good safety profile and tolerability. Although limited both in terms of size of the samples investigated and of the length of treatment, preclinical and clinical results presented suggest that cognitive enhancing capabilities of choline alphoscerate merit of being further investigated in appropriate trials.

  8. Time over threshold readout method of SiPM based small animal PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The aim of the work was to design a readout concept for silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) sensor array used in small animal PET scanner. The detector module consist of LYSO 35x35 scintillation crystals, 324 SiPM sensors (arranged in 2x2 blocks and those quads in a 9x9 configuration) and FPGA based readout electronics. The dimensions of the SiPM matrix are area: 48x48 mm2 and the size of one SiPM sensor is 1.95x2.2 mm2. Due to the high dark current of the SiPM, conventional Anger based readout method does not provide sufficient crystal position maps. Digitizing the 324 SiPM channels is a straightforward way to obtain proper crystal position maps. However handling hundreds of analogue input channels and the required DSP resources cause large racks of data acquisition electronics. Therefore coding of the readout channels is required. Proposed readout method: The coding of the 324 SiPMs consists two steps: Step 1) Reduction of the channels from 324 to 36: Row column readout, SiPMs are connected to each other in column by column and row-by row, thus the required channels are 36. The dark current of 18 connected SiPMs is small in off for identifying pulses coming from scintillating events. Step 2) Reduction of the 18 rows and columns to 4 channels: Comparators were connected to each rows and columns, and the level was set above the level of dark noise. Therefore only few comparators are active when scintillation light enters in the tile. The output of the comparator rows and columns are divided to two parts using resistor chains. Then the outputs of the resistor chains are digitized by a 4 channel ADC. However instead of the Anger method, time over threshold (ToT) was used. Figure 1 shows the readout concept of the SiPM matrix. In order to validate the new method and optimize the front-end electronics of the detector, the analogue signals were digitized before the comparators using a CAEN DT5740 32 channel digitizer, then the

  9. Prognostic Value of FDG-PET, Based on the Revised Response Criteria, in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma: A Comparison with CT/MRI Evaluations, Based on the International Working Group/ Cotswolds Meeting Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayako Isohashi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Post-treatment evaluations by CT/MRI (based on the International Working Group/ Cotswolds meeting guidelines and PET (based on Revised Response Criteria, were examined in terms of progression-free survival (PFS in patients with malignant lymphoma (ML. Methods: 79 patients, undergoing CT/MRI for the examination of suspected lesions and whole-body PET/CT before and after therapy, were included in the study during April 2007-January 2013. The relationship between post-treatment evaluations (CT/MRI and PET and PFS during the follow-up period was examined, using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The patients were grouped according to the histological type into Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, and other histological types. The association between post-treatment evaluations (PET or PET combined with CT/ MRI and PFS was examined separately. Moreover, the relationship between disease recurrence and serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor, lactic dehydrogenase, and C-reactive protein levels was evaluated before and after the treatment. Results: Patients with incomplete remission on both CT/MRI and PET had a significantly shorter PFS, compared to patients with complete remission on both CT/MRI and PET and those exhibiting incomplete remission on CT/MRI and complete remission on PET (P

  10. Therapy region monitoring based on PET using 478 keV single prompt gamma ray during BNCT: A Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joo-Young; Lu, Bo; Yoon, Do-Kun; Hong, Key Jo; Jang, HongSeok; Liu, Chihray; Suh, Tae Suk

    2016-04-01

    We confirmed the feasibility of using our proposed system to extract two different kinds of functional images from a positron emission tomography (PET) module by using an insertable collimator during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Coincidence events from a tumor region that included boron particles were identified by a PET scanner before BNCT; subsequently, the prompt gamma ray events from the same tumor region were collected after exposure to an external neutron beam through an insertable collimator on the PET detector. Five tumor regions that contained boron particles and were located in the water phantom and in the BNCT system with the PET module were simulated with Monte Carlo simulation code. The acquired images were quantitatively analyzed. Based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in the five boron regions, A, B, C, D, and E, the PET and single-photon images were 10.2%, 11.7%, 8.2% (center region), 12.6%, and 10.5%, respectively. We were able to acquire simultaneously PET and single prompt photon images for tumor regions monitoring by using an insertable collimator without any additional isotopes. PMID:26970679

  11. High production of CH4 and H2 by reducing PET waste water using a non-diaphragm-based electrochemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Gyu; Yim, Kwang-Jin; Kim, Chan-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Okuyama, Kikuo; Han, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Tae-Oh

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the worldwide use of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has increased exponentially. PET wastewater contains ethylene glycol (EG) and terephthalic acid (TPA). In this study, we present a unique method for producing combustible gases like CH4 and H2 from PET wastewater by electrochemical reaction of EG and TPA. The non-diaphragm-based electrochemical (NDE) method was used to treat PET wastewater. The electrochemical removal of EG and TPA from PET wastewater was examined and the optimal conditions for their reduction to CH4 and H2 were determined. Using the proposed system, 99.9% of the EG and TPA present in the PET wastewater samples were degraded to produce CH4 and H2, at applied voltages lower than 5 V. The highest Faradaic efficiency achieved for EG and TPA reduction was 62.2% (CH4, 25.6%; H2, 36.6%), at an applied voltage of 0.8 V. Remarkably, CH4 was produced from EG decomposition and H2 from TPA decomposition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of CH4 and H2 production from EG and TPA, respectively. The electrochemical reductive treatment will be an important discovery for reducing water contamination and replacing fossil fuels with respect to generating green energy.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  13. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  15. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on th

  16. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E;

    2014-01-01

    be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...

  17. 72/74As-labeling of HPMA based polymers for long-term in vivo PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias M; Barz, Matthias; Jahn, Markus;

    2010-01-01

    In the context of molecular imaging, various polymers based on the clinically approved N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-methacrylamide (HPMA) have been radio-labeled using longer-living positron emitters 72As t1/2=26 h or 74As t1/2=17.8 d. This approach may lead to non-invasive determination of the long......-term in vivo fate of polymers by PET (positron emission tomography). Presumably, the radio label itself will not strongly influence the polymer structure due to the fact that the used nuclide binds to already existing thiol moieties within the polymer structure. Thus, the use of additional charges or bulky...

  18. Correlation of breast cancer subtypes, based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2, with functional imaging parameters from {sup 68}Ga-RGD PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook; Jeong, Jae Min; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, In Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-Do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sunjoo [Dankook University, Department of Molecular Biology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging biomarkers from functional imaging modalities were assessed as potential surrogate markers of disease status. Specifically, in this prospective study, we investigated the relationships between functional imaging parameters and histological prognostic factors and breast cancer subtypes. In total, 43 patients with large or locally advanced invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) were analyzed (47.6 ± 7.5 years old). {sup 68}Ga-Labeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The maximum and average standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}) from RGD PET/CT and SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg} from FDG PET/CT were the imaging parameters used. For histological prognostic factors, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Four breast cancer subtypes, based on ER/PR and HER2 expression (ER/PR+,Her2-, ER/PR+,Her2+, ER/PR-,Her2+, and ER/PR-,Her2-), were considered. Quantitative FDG PET parameters were significantly higher in the ER-negative group (15.88 ± 8.73 vs 10.48 ± 6.01, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub max}; 9.40 ± 5.19 vs 5.92 ± 4.09, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub avg}) and the PR-negative group (8.37 ± 4.94 vs 4.79 ± 3.93, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub avg}). Quantitative RGD PET parameters were significantly higher in the HER2-positive group (2.42 ± 0.59 vs 2.90 ± 0.75, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub max}; 1.60 ± 0.38 vs 1.95 ± 0.53, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub avg}) and showed a significant positive correlation with the HER2/CEP17 ratio (r = 0.38, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub max} and r = 0.46, p < 0.01 for SUV{sub avg}). FDG PET parameters showed significantly higher values in the ER/PR-,Her2- subgroup versus the ER/PR+,Her2- or ER/PR+,Her2+ subgroups, while RGD PET parameters showed significantly lower values in the ER

  19. A COMPARISON OF MRI AND PET IMAGES FUSION BASED ON YCBCR AND IHS COLOR SPACES

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Jalili; Sabalan Daneshvar

    2014-01-01

    Image fusion is a process in which two or more images from different sources or of various states are merged to create a single image in order to increase desired information of the images, decrease ambiguity, and eliminate repeated information. Fusion of high spatial resolution images such as MRI image with high spectral resolution images such as PET image is a case in point. A proper fusion technique adds spatial information to the final image without obliterating spectral information. Amon...

  20. Psycological and physiological responses to stress: a review based on results from PET and MRI studies

    OpenAIRE

    Célia Martins Cortez; Frederico Alan de Oliveira Cruz; Dilson Silva

    2008-01-01

    A new application for the nuclear imaging techniques is the study of organic responses to stress. Neuroimaging techniques allow the assessment of brain activation changes in association with the metabolic responses to stress. In this paper, a review of general effects of the stress on organic activity is made, emphasizing important advances introduced by studies using PET and fMRI. The importance of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to onset the adequate psychical and organic responses ...

  1. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  2. A three-dimensional model-based partial volume correction strategy for gated cardiac mouse PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Tyler; Thorn, Stephanie; Kordos, Myra; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; deKemp, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    Quantification in cardiac mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by the imaging spatial resolution. Spillover of left ventricle (LV) myocardial activity into adjacent organs results in partial volume (PV) losses leading to underestimation of myocardial activity. A PV correction method was developed to restore accuracy of the activity distribution for FDG mouse imaging. The PV correction model was based on convolving an LV image estimate with a 3D point spread function. The LV model was described regionally by a five-parameter profile including myocardial, background and blood activities which were separated into three compartments by the endocardial radius and myocardium wall thickness. The PV correction was tested with digital simulations and a physical 3D mouse LV phantom. In vivo cardiac FDG mouse PET imaging was also performed. Following imaging, the mice were sacrificed and the tracer biodistribution in the LV and liver tissue was measured using a gamma-counter. The PV correction algorithm improved recovery from 50% to within 5% of the truth for the simulated and measured phantom data and image uniformity by 5-13%. The PV correction algorithm improved the mean myocardial LV recovery from 0.56 (0.54) to 1.13 (1.10) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections. The mean image uniformity was improved from 26% (26%) to 17% (16%) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections applied. Scatter and attenuation corrections were not observed to significantly impact PV-corrected myocardial recovery or image uniformity. Image-based PV correction algorithm can increase the accuracy of PET image activity and improve the uniformity of the activity distribution in normal mice. The algorithm may be applied using different tracers, in transgenic models that affect myocardial uptake, or in different species provided there is sufficient image quality and similar contrast between the myocardium and surrounding structures.

  3. WE-E-17A-03: FDG-PET-Based Radiomics to Predict Local Control and Survival Following Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J; Apte, A; Folkerts, M; Kohutek, Z; Wu, A; Rimmer, A; Lee, N; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: An exploding field in cancer research is “radiomics,” based on the hypothesis that there is statistical (hidden) information in medical images that is prognostic or predictive of outcomes. Our group has developed an efficient pipeline to extract and analyze quantitative image features from medical images as related to outcomes or diagnosis. In this work, we summarize our previous studies with positron emission tomography (PET) images and show the potential of the use of radiomics for outcomes research. Methods: We analyzed two cancer datasets, each consisting of pre-radiotherapy-treatment PET scans: 163 T1-2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and 174 head and neck (H and N) cancer patients with stage III–IV. The PET scans were converted to Computational Environment for Radiological Research (CERR) format, and CERR was used to generate 24 shape, texture, and intensity-histogram based image features. Data-mining and logistic regression methods were then used to model local failure (LF) and overall survival (OS). Unbiased estimates of performance were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV). Results: For predicting LF, the models with biologically equivalent dose (BED) and TLG (metabolic tumor volume (MTV) x SUVmean) in NSCLC, and skewness and MTV in H and N, achieved the best performance with AUC=0.818 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.826 (p=0.0002), respectively. For predicting OS, the models with kurtosis and volume in NSCLC and SUVmax and homogeneity in H and N achieved the best performance with AUC=0.706 (p<0.0001) and AUC=0.656 (p=0.0003), respectively. On LOOCV, all these models retained significant predictive power. Interestingly, MTV was highly correlated with LF in both sites. Conclusion: PET-based imaged features are promising tools for improving treatment management decision making. Much more research is needed to identify optimal radiomics metrics and to correlate imaging phenotype with other clinical or genomic information.

  4. Legionella bozemanae synthesizes phosphatidylcholine from exogenous choline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Janczarek, Monika; Kalitynski, Rafal; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Russa, Ryszard

    2011-02-20

    The phospholipid class and fatty acid composition of Legionella bozemanae were determined using thin-layer chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and diphosphatidylglycerol were the predominant phospholipids, while phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidyl-N,N-dimethylethanolamine were present at low concentrations. With the use of the LC/MS technique, PC16:0/15:0, PC17:/15:0, and PE16:1/15:0 were shown to be the dominant phospholipid constituents, which may be taxonomically significant. Two independent phosphatidylcholine synthesis pathways (the three-step methylation and the one-step CDP-choline pathway) were present and functional in L. bozemanae. In the genome of L. bozemanae, genes encoding two potential phosphatidylcholine forming enzymes, phospholipid N-methyl transferase (PmtA) and phosphatidylcholine synthase (Pcs), homologous to L. longbeachae, L. drancourtii, and L. pneumophila pmtA and pcs genes were identified. Genes pmtA and pcs from L. bozemanae were sequenced and analyzed on nucleotide and amino acid levels. Bacteria grown on an artificial medium with labelled choline synthesized phosphatidylcholine predominantly via the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway, which indicates that L. bozemanae phosphatidylcholine, similarly as in other bacteria associated with eukaryotes, is an important determinant of host-microbe interactions. PMID:20338739

  5. Choline associated hypersexuality in a 79-year-old man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore; Cordici, Francesco; Genovese, Carmelo; Bramanti, Placido

    2014-01-01

    Hypersexuality, also referred to as sexually inappropriate behavior and sexual disinhibition, involves persistent, uninhibited sexual behaviors directed at oneself or at others, sometimes associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Choline is a water-soluble essential nutrient, used as a dietary supplement in different diseases. This report was aimed at considering choline intake as a possible cause of iatrogenic hypersexuality. After an evaluation, a 79-year-old man affected by memory loss was diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and treated with oral choline. After 6 weeks of regular choline assumption, the patient showed a pathological increase in libido with sexual urges. As choline was withdrawn, the hypersexuality disappeared within 5 days. Since hypersexuality may be an underreported and overlooked adverse effect of drugs and dietary supplements acting on the cholinergic pathway, this should be considered when treating and counselling patients with inappropriate sexual behavior. PMID:23733158

  6. Targeting MT1-MMP as an ImmunoPET-Based Strategy for Imaging Gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A G de Lucas

    Full Text Available A critical challenge in the management of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM tumors is the accurate diagnosis and assessment of tumor progression in a noninvasive manner. We have identified Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP as an attractive biomarker for GBM imaging since this protein is actively involved in tumor growth and progression, correlates with tumor grade and is closely associated with poor prognosis in GBM patients. Here, we report the development of an immunoPET tracer for effective detection of MT1-MMP in GBM models.An anti-human MT1-MMP monoclonal antibody (mAb, LEM2/15, was conjugated to p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-desferrioxamine (DFO-NCS for 89Zr labeling. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed in xenograft mice bearing human GBM cells (U251 expressing MT1-MMP and non-expressing breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7 as negative control. Two orthotopic brain GBM models, patient-derived neurospheres (TS543 and U251 cells, with different degrees of blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption were also used for PET imaging experiments.89Zr labeling of DFO-LEM2/15 was achieved with high yield (>90% and specific activity (78.5 MBq/mg. Biodistribution experiments indicated that 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15 showed excellent potential as a radiotracer for detection of MT1-MMP positive GBM tumors. PET imaging also indicated a specific and prominent 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15 uptake in MT1-MMP+ U251 GBM tumors compared to MT1-MMP- MCF-7 breast tumors. Results obtained in orthotopic brain GBM models revealed a high dependence of a disrupted BBB for tracer penetrance into tumors. 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15 showed much higher accumulation in TS543 tumors with a highly disrupted BBB than in U251 orthotopic model in which the BBB permeability was only partially increased. Histological analysis confirmed the specificity of the immunoconjugate in all GBM models.A new anti MT1-MMP-mAb tracer, 89Zr-DFO-LEM2/15, was synthesized efficiently. In vivo validation showed high

  7. Lesion-based detection of early chemosensitivity using serial static FDG PET/CT in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buvat, Irene; Necib, Hatem [IMNC UMR 8165 CNRS - Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay cedex (France); Garcia, Camilo; Wagner, Antoine; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Flamen, Patrick [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Nuclear Medicine Department, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Emonts, Patrick [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Radiology Department, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium); Hendlisz, Alain [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Digestive Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Medical oncology needs early identification of patients that are not responding to systemic therapy. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) performed before and early during treatment has been proposed for this purpose. However, the best way to assess the change in FDG uptake between two scans has not been identified. We studied cutoff thresholds to identify responding tumours as a function of the method used to measure tumour uptake. The study included 28 metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients who underwent 2 FDG PET/CT scans (baseline and at day 14 of the first course of polychemotherapy). For 78 tumour lesions, 4 standardized uptake value (SUV) indices were measured: maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) and mean SUV in a region obtained using an isocontour (SUV{sub 40} {sub %}), with each of these SUV normalized either by the patient body weight (BW) or body surface area (BSA). The per cent change and absolute change in tumour uptake between the baseline and the early PET scans were measured based on these four indices. These changes were correlated to the RECIST 1.0-based response using contrast-enhanced CT at baseline and at 6-8 weeks on treatment. The 78 tumours were classified as non-responding (NRL, n = 58) and responding lesions (RL, n = 20). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves characterizing the performance in NRL/RL classification using early FDG PET uptake had areas under the curve between 0.75 and 0.84, without significant difference between the indices. The cutoff threshold in FDG uptake per cent change to get a 95 % sensitivity of RL detection depended on the way uptake was measured: -14 % (specificity of 53 %) and -22 % (specificity of 64 %) for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub 40} {sub %}, respectively. Thresholds expressed as absolute SUV decrease instead of per cent change were less sensitive to the SUV definition: an SUV decline by 1.2 yielded a sensitivity of RL detection of 95 % for SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub 40

  8. Trilateration-based reconstruction of ortho-positronium decays into three photons with the J-PET detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gajos, A; Czerwiński, E; Alfs, D; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Głowacz, B; Gorgol, M; Jasińska, B; Kapłon, Ł; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Mohammed, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Zgardzińska, B; Zieliński, M; Moskal, P

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on a new reconstruction algorithm allowing to reconstruct the decays of ortho-positronium atoms into three photons using the places and times of photons recorded in the detector. The method is based on trilateration and allows for a simultaneous reconstruction of both location and time of the decay. Results of resolution tests of the new reconstruction in the J-PET detector based on Monte Carlo simulations are presented, which yield a spatial resolution at the level of 2 cm (FWHM) for X and Y and at the level of 1 cm (FWHM) for Z available with the present resolution of J-PET after application of a kinematic fit. Prospects of employment of this method for studying angular correlations of photons in decays of polarized ortho-positronia for the needs of tests of CP and CPT discrete symmetries are also discussed. The new reconstruction method allows for discrimination of background from random three-photon coincidences as well as for application of a novel method for determination of the linear...

  9. Cost-effectiveness of FDG-PET for the management of solitary pulmonary nodules: a decision analysis based on cost reimbursement in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) of up to 3 cm was modelled on decision analysis comparing ''wait and watch'', transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB), exploratory surgery and full-ring dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated for the main risk group, a cohort of 62-year-old men, using first ''wait and watch'' and second exploratory surgery as the baseline strategy. Based on published data, the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET were estimated at 0.95 and 0.80 for detecting malignancy in SPNs and at 0.74 and 0.96 for detecting metastasis in normal-sized mediastinal lymph nodes. The costs quoted correspond to reimbursement in 1999 by the public health provider in Germany. Decision analysis modelling indicates the potential cost-effectiveness of the FDG-PET strategy for management of SPNs. Taking watchful waiting as the low-cost baseline strategy, the ICER of PET [3218 euros (EUR) per life year saved] was more favourable than that of exploratory surgery (4210 EUR/year) or that of TNB (6120 EUR/year). Changing the baseline strategy to exploratory surgery, the use of PET led to cost savings and additional life expectancy. This constellation was described by a negative ICER of -6912 EUR/year. The PET algorithm was cost-effective for risk and non-risk patients. However, the ICER of PET as the preferred strategy was sensitive to a hypothetical deterioration of any PET parameters by more than 0.07. To transfer the diagnostic efficacy from controlled studies to the routine user and to maintain the cost-effectiveness of this technology, obligatory protocols for data acquisitions would need to be defined. If the prevalence of SPNs is estimated at the USA level (52 per 100,000 individuals) and assuming that multiple strategies without PET are the norm, the overall costs of a newly implemented PET algorithm would be limited to far less than one EUR

  10. Role of hydrogen-bonding and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) on the interaction of resorcinol based acridinedione dyes with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss, Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600106, Tamil Nadu (India); Vanjinathan, Mahalingam [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss, Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600106, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramamurthy, Perumal [National Centre for Ultrafast Processes, University of Madras, Taramani Campus Chennai 600113, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-08-15

    Resorcinol based acridinedione (ADDR) dyes are a class of laser dyes and have structural similarity with purine derivatives, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) analogs. These dyes are classified into photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and non-photoinduced electron transfer dyes, and the photophysical properties of family of these dyes exhibiting PET behavior are entirely different from that of non-PET dyes. The PET process in ADDR dyes is governed by the solvent polarity such that an ADDR dye exhibits PET process through space in an aprotic solvent like acetonitrile and does not exhibit the same in protic solvents like water and methanol. A comparison on the fluorescence emission, lifetime and nature of interaction of various ADDR dyes with a large globular protein like Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was carried out in aqueous solution. The interaction of PET based ADDR dyes with BSA in water is found to be largely hydrophobic, but hydrogen-bonding interaction of BSA with dye molecule influences the fluorescence emission of the dye and shifts the emission towards red region. Fluorescence spectral studies reveal that the excited state properties of PET based ADDR dyes are largely influenced by the addition of BSA. The microenvironment around the dye results in significant change in the fluorescence lifetime and emission. Fluorescence enhancement with a red shift in the emission results after the addition of BSA to ADDR dyes containing free amino hydrogen in the 10th position of basic acridinedione dye. The amino hydrogen (N–H) in the 10th position of ADDR dye is replaced by methyl group (N–CH{sub 3}), a significant decrease in the fluorescence intensity with no apparent shift in the emission maximum was observed after the addition of BSA. The nature of interaction between ADDR dyes with BSA is hydrogen-bonding and the dye remains unbound even at the highest concentration of BSA. Circular Dichroism (CD) studies show that the addition of dye to BSA results in

  11. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert - ask your colleague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Nestle, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Duncker-Rohr, V. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Ortenau Clinical Center Offenburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Offenburg (Germany); Ruecker, G. [University of Freiburg, Institute of Medical Biometry und Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany); Mix, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); MacManus, M. [University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Ruysscher, D. de [University Hospital Leuven/KU Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Vogel, W. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eriksen, J.G. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense (Denmark); Oyen, W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Weber, W. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology/Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were ''experts'' (E; n = 3), ''experienced interdisciplinary pairs'' (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), ''single field specialists'' (SFS; n = 13), and ''students'' (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field. (orig.) [German] Die Daten aus der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) werden in vielen Kliniken routinemaessig zur

  12. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O' Sullivan, Andrew W. [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Catherall, David [Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States); Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tai, Yuan-Chuan, E-mail: taiy@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm{sup 3} with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm{sup 2}. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with {sup 68}Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  13. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC’s active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module’s mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/−0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules. PMID:26085702

  14. Methionine- and choline-deficient diet induces hepatic changes characteristic of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éder Marcolin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is a disease with a high incidence, difficult diagnosis, and as yet no effective treatment. So, the use of experimental models for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis induction and the study of its routes of development have been studied. OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to develop an experimental model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis based on a methionine- and choline-deficient diet that is manufactured in Brazil so as to evaluate the liver alterations resulting from the disorder. METHODS: Thirty male C57BL6 mice divided in two groups (n = 15 were used: the experimental group fed a methionine- and choline-deficient diet manufactured by Brazilian company PragSoluções®, and the control group fed a normal diet, for a period of 2 weeks. The animals were then killed by exsanguination to sample blood for systemic biochemical analyses, and subsequently submitted to laparotomy with total hepatectomy and preparation of the material for histological analysis. The statistical analysis was done using the Student's t-test for independent samples, with significance level of 5%. RESULTS: The mice that received the methionine- and choline-deficient diet showed weight loss and significant increase in hepatic damage enzymes, as well as decreased systemic levels of glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL and VLDL. The diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis was performed in 100% of the mice that were fed the methionine- and choline-deficient diet. All non-alcoholic steatohepatitis animals showed some degree of macrovesicular steatosis, ballooning, and inflammatory process. None of the animals which were fed the control diet presented histological alterations. All non-alcoholic steatohepatitis animals showed significantly increased lipoperoxidation and antioxidant enzyme GSH activity. CONCLUSION: The low cost and easily accessible methionine- and choline-deficient diet explored in this study is highly effective in

  15. Improved UTE-based attenuation correction for cranial PET-MR using dynamic magnetic field monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, A. P.; Giese, D.; Tsoumpas, C.; Schleyer, P.; Kozerke, S.; Prieto, C.; Schaeffter, T., E-mail: Tobias.Schaeffter@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, St. Thomas Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI has been proposed as a way to produce segmented attenuation maps for PET, as it provides contrast between bone, air, and soft tissue. However, UTE sequences require samples to be acquired during rapidly changing gradient fields, which makes the resulting images prone to eddy current artifacts. In this work it is demonstrated that this can lead to misclassification of tissues in segmented attenuation maps (AC maps) and that these effects can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories using a magnetic field camera. Methods: The k-space trajectories during a dual echo UTE sequence were measured using a dynamic magnetic field camera. UTE images were reconstructed using nominal trajectories and again using the measured trajectories. A numerical phantom was used to demonstrate the effect of reconstructing with incorrect trajectories. Images of an ovine leg phantom were reconstructed and segmented and the resulting attenuation maps were compared to a segmented map derived from a CT scan of the same phantom, using the Dice similarity measure. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated inin vivo cranial imaging in five healthy volunteers. Simulated PET data were generated for one volunteer to show the impact of misclassifications on the PET reconstruction. Results: Images of the numerical phantom exhibited blurring and edge artifacts on the bone–tissue and air–tissue interfaces when nominal k-space trajectories were used, leading to misclassification of soft tissue as bone and misclassification of bone as air. Images of the tissue phantom and thein vivo cranial images exhibited the same artifacts. The artifacts were greatly reduced when the measured trajectories were used. For the tissue phantom, the Dice coefficient for bone in MR relative to CT was 0.616 using the nominal trajectories and 0.814 using the measured trajectories. The Dice coefficients for soft tissue were 0.933 and 0.934 for the

  16. Psychological and physiological responses to stress: a review based on results from PET and MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Cruz, Frederico Alan de Oliveira; Silva, Dilson [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas]. E-mail: ccortez@uerj.br

    2008-12-15

    A new application for the nuclear imaging techniques is the study of organic responses to stress. Neuroimaging techniques allow the assessment of brain activation changes in association with the metabolic responses to stress. In this paper, a review of general effects of the stress on organic activity is made, emphasizing important advances introduced by studies using PET and fMRI. The importance of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis to onset the adequate psychical and organic responses to sustain the homeostasis during the stress is discussed, as well as the possibility of traumatic stressing experiences have negative effects on the brain. (author)

  17. A SiPM-based TOF-PET detector with high speed digital DRS4 readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzhin, A.; Albrow, M.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E.; Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Kao, C.-M.; Niessen, K.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Piana, A.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G.; Ritt, S.

    2013-03-01

    We have developed γ-ray detectors with good time resolution, to supplement positron emission tomography (PET) with time of flight (TOF) for better localization of the positron annihilation. This will improve the quality of medical images and reduce exposure times. We report results of LYSO scintillating crystals (3×3×15 mm3) irradiated with a 22Na source and coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) readout with a waveform digitizer. Improved time resolution, 188 ps FWHM, was obtained with the signal trimmed by a clipping capacitance.

  18. A SiPM-based TOF-PET detector with high speed digital DRS4 readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A., E-mail: ronzhin@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Albrow, M.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Murat, P.; Ramberg, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Kao, C.-M. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Niessen, K. [SUNY Buffalo, NY (United States); Zatserklyaniy, A. [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Piana, A.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G. [STMicroelectronics, Catania 95121 (Italy); Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-03-01

    We have developed γ-ray detectors with good time resolution, to supplement positron emission tomography (PET) with time of flight (TOF) for better localization of the positron annihilation. This will improve the quality of medical images and reduce exposure times. We report results of LYSO scintillating crystals (3×3×15 mm{sup 3}) irradiated with a {sup 22}Na source and coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) readout with a waveform digitizer. Improved time resolution, 188 ps FWHM, was obtained with the signal trimmed by a clipping capacitance.

  19. Development of Electrochemiluminescent Biosensor for Choline Based on Carbon Nanotubes Modified Electrode%基于碳纳米管修饰电极的胆碱电化学发光生物传感器研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵金金; 吴梅笙; 屠一锋

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemiluminescent (ECL) choline biosensor was developed by drop- coating of choline oxidase (ChOx) onto a carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/potassium ferricyanide modified platinum electrode with ECL of luminol as readout signal. Due to the improvement of biocompatibility and electron transfer of electrode surface from CNTs, meanwhile the activation for enzyme and the ECL emission from K3Fe (CN)6 , the developed biosensor possesses excellent analytical properties. The biosensor gives optimal results while the Pt electrode was modified with 4 μL of 0.33 g/L CNTs dispersoid, 2 μL of 0.1 mol/L K3Fe(CN)6 and 1. 5 U of ChOx. In the PBS buffer (pH 7. 4) containing 8 × l0-6 mol/L luminol, the ECL signal linearly responded the concentration of choline from 1 ×10-7mol/L to 4 × 10-3 mol/L (r= 0. 994) with detection limit of 1. 21 × l0-8 mol/L under 30 ℃ of detection temperature. The developed biosensor was applied to assay the concentration of choline in rat blood sample. The result of 0. 268 mg/100 mL was obtained with average recovery of 101. 1%. It shows a fast response to choline with good reproducibility.%在碳纳米管(CNTs)和K3Fe(CN)6修饰的铂电极上吸附固定胆碱氧化酶,以鲁米诺为发光试剂,研制了胆碱电化学发光(ECL)生物传感器.CNTs可有效提高电极表面的电荷传输能力、提高电极表面的生物相容性和对酶分子的固载能力;K3Fe(CN)6对酶活性具有激活作用,同时对H2O2增敏的鲁米诺ECL有增强作用,均有利于提高传感器的检测灵敏度.研究表明,将CNTs分散液与K3Fe(CN)6混合,滴涂修饰在Pt电极上,吸附固定胆碱氧化酶,制备传感器.此传感器在含有8×10(-6)mol/L鲁米诺的磷酸盐缓冲液(pH7.4)、30℃条件下产生的ECL强度与胆碱浓度在1×10(-7)~4×10(-3)mol/L范围内呈线性关系,相关系数为0.994,检出限为1.2×10(-6)mol/L.此生物传感器应用于鼠血样中胆碱的测定,测得结果为2.68 mg/L,平均回收率为 101.1%.

  20. Characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and monolithic, 64-pixel silicon photomultiplier matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays as photodetectors has been carried out for its use in the development of a small animal PET prototype. The detector heads are composed of a continuous crystal and a SiPM matrix with 64 pixels in a common substrate, fabricated specifically for this project. Three crystals of 12 mm x 12 mm x 5 mm size with different types of painting have been tested: white, black and black on the sides but white on the back of the crystal. The best energy resolution, obtained with the white crystal, is 16% FWHM. The detector response is linear up to 1275 keV. Tests with different position determination algorithms have been carried out with the three crystals. The spatial resolution obtained with the center of gravity algorithm is around 0.9 mm FWHM for the three crystals. As expected, the use of this algorithm results in the displacement of the reconstructed position toward the center of the crystal, more pronounced in the case of the white crystal. A maximum likelihood algorithm has been tested that can reconstruct correctly the interaction position of the photons also in the case of the white crystal.

  1. An effective scatter correction method based on single scatter simulation for a 3D whole-body PET scanner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Fei; Yamada Ryoko; Watanabe Mitsuo; Liu Hua-Feng

    2009-01-01

    Hamamatsu SHR74000 is a newly designed full three-dimensional(3D)whole body positron emission tomography (PET)scanner with small crystal size and large field of view(FOV).With the improvement of sensitivity,the scatter events increase significantly at the same time,especially for large objects.Monte Carlo simulations help US to understand the scatter phenomena and provide good references for scatter correction.In this paper,we introduce an effective scatter correction method based on single scatter simulation for the new PET scanner,which accounts for the full 3D scatter correction.With the results from Monte Carlo simulations,we implement a new scale method with special concentration on scatter events from outside the axial FOV and multiple scatter events.The effects of scatter correction are investigated and evaluated by phantom experiments;the results show good improvements in quantitative accuracy and contrast of the images,even for large objects.

  2. A detector insert based on continuous scintillators for hybrid MR–PET imaging of the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rato Mendes, P., E-mail: pedro.rato@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cuerdo, R.; Sarasola, I.; García de Acilu, P.; Navarrete, J.; Vela, O.; Oller, J.C.; Cela, J.M. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Núñez, L.; Pastrana, M. [Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Manuel de Falla 1, 28222 Majadahonda (Spain); Romero, L.; Willmott, C. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-02-21

    We are developing a positron emission tomography (PET) insert for existing magnetic resonance (MR) equipment, aiming at hybrid MR–PET imaging. Our detector block design is based on trapezoid-shaped LYSO:Ce monolithic scintillators coupled to magnetically compatible Hamamatsu S8550-02 silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) matrices with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout from GammaMedica-Ideas (Fornebu, Norway). The detectors are position sensitive, capable of determining the incidence point of 511 keV gammas with an intrinsic spatial resolution on the order of 2 mm by means of supervised learning neural-network (NN) algorithms. These algorithms, apart from providing continuous coordinates, are also intrinsically corrected for depth of interaction effects and thus parallax-free. Recently we have implemented an advanced prototype featuring two heads with four detector blocks each and final front-end and readout electronics, improving the spatial resolution of reconstructed point source images down to 1.7 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM). Presently we are carrying out operational tests of components and systems under magnetic fields using a 3 T MR scanner. In this paper we present a description of our project, a summary of the results obtained with laboratory prototypes, and the strategy to build and install the complete system at the nuclear medicine department of a collaborating hospital.

  3. Pet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kim

    1994-01-01

    This resource guide presents information on a variety of ways that animals can be used as a therapeutic modality with people having disabilities. Aspects addressed include: pet ownership and selection criteria; dogs (including service dogs, hearing/signal dogs, seeing leader dogs, and social/specialty dogs); horseriding for both therapy and fun;…

  4. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process SOREPET GR based on EREMA Basic technology used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process SOREPET GR (EU register No RECYC073 which is based on the EREMA Basic technology. The input to the process is hot caustic washed and dried poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles and containing no more than 5 % PET from non-food consumer applications. In this process, washed and dried PET flakes are heated in a continuous reactor under vacuum before being extruded. Having examined the results of the challenge test provided, the Panel concluded that the continuous reactor is the critical step that determines the decontamination efficiency of the process. The operating parameters to control its performance are well defined and are temperature, pressure and residence time. Under these conditions, it was demonstrated that the recycling process is able to ensure that the level of migration of potential unknown contaminants into food is below the modelled migration of 0.1 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for infants and 0.15 μg/kg food derived from the exposure scenario for toddlers. The Panel concluded that recycled PET obtained from the process is not of safety concern when used to manufacture articles intended for food contact materials applications in compliance with the conditions as specified in the conclusion of the opinion.

  5. Pet game-based intelligent tutoring system%基于宠物游戏的智能教学系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜红燕; 曾真; 田兴彦

    2009-01-01

    By artificial pets playing educational roles to extend the student module in intelligent tutoring system (ITS), games have in-corporated with ITS. A new design structure of artificial pet game-based ITS is proposed which makes use of the design experie-nces of both traditional ITS and artificial pet games. The pet module in the structure is flexibly designed, which does track the learner' s activities and analysis their learning progress. Based on this structure, an artificial pet game-based ITS, called space-travel-with-my-pet, is de-veloped bringing educational advantages to the process of learning the elementary fraction knowledge. The testing results show that the pupils pay more attention to the learning environment, can understand and even apply more knowledge in a much shorter time.%通过利用游戏宠物扮演各种教育角色,扩展智能教学系统(intelligent tutoring system,ITS)中的学生模型,从而完成宠物游戏与ITS的有机结合.设计了一个基于宠物游戏的游戏化智能教学系统架构,架构中的宠物模块能记录学习者的学习活动、分析学习者的学习进程.基于该软件架构,实现了一款游戏化智能教学系统--宠物星际旅行,将宠物游戏的游戏化特性引入到了小学分数知识的学习过程中.测试结果表明,学生对该游戏越专注,就能越快地理解和运用所学知识.

  6. Structural studies on choline-carboxylate bio-ionic liquids by x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanzi, Luana; Ramondo, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.ramondo@univaq.it [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio, L’Aquila I-67100 (Italy); Caminiti, Ruggero; Campetella, Marco; Di Luca, Andrea; Gontrani, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.gontrani@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemistry, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-09-21

    We report a X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics study on three choline-based bio-ionic liquids, choline formate, [Ch] [For], choline propanoate, [Ch][Pro], and choline butanoate, [Ch][But]. For the first time, this class of ionic liquids has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. Experimental and theoretical structure factors have been compared for each term of the series. Local structural organization has been obtained from ab initio calculations through static models of isolated ion pairs and dynamic simulations of small portions of liquids through twelve, ten, and nine ion pairs for [Ch][For], [Ch][Pro], and [Ch][But], respectively. All the theoretical models indicate that cations and anions are connected by strong hydrogen bonding and form stable ion pairs in the liquid that are reminiscent of the static ab initio ion pairs. Different structural aspects may affect the radial distribution function, like the local structure of ion pairs and the conformation of choline. When small portions of liquids have been simulated by dynamic quantum chemical methods, some key structural features of the X-ray radial distribution function were well reproduced whereas the classical force fields here applied did not entirely reproduce all the observed structural features.

  7. Principles of PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselhorst, Jonathan A; Bezrukov, Ilja; Kolb, Armin; Parl, Christoph; Pichler, Bernd J

    2014-05-12

    Hybrid PET/MR systems have rapidly progressed from the prototype stage to systems that are increasingly being used in the clinics. This review provides an overview of developments in hybrid PET/MR systems and summarizes the current state of the art in PET/MR instrumentation, correction techniques, and data analysis. The strong magnetic field requires considerable changes in the manner by which PET images are acquired and has led, among others, to the development of new PET detectors, such as silicon photomultipliers. During more than a decade of active PET/MR development, several system designs have been described. The technical background of combined PET/MR systems is explained and related challenges are discussed. The necessity for PET attenuation correction required new methods based on MR data. Therefore, an overview of recent developments in this field is provided. Furthermore, MR-based motion correction techniques for PET are discussed, as integrated PET/MR systems provide a platform for measuring motion with high temporal resolution without additional instrumentation. The MR component in PET/MR systems can provide functional information about disease processes or brain function alongside anatomic images. Against this background, we point out new opportunities for data analysis in this new field of multimodal molecular imaging. PMID:24819419

  8. PET and MR three-dimensional image registration based on second-order mutual information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Mutual information has currently been one of the most intensively researched measures. Despite the general promising results, it sometimes might lead to mis-registration because of neglecting spatial information and treating intensity variations with undue sensitivity. In order to avoid mis- registration and improve the robustness of algorithm, an extension of mutual information framework was proposed in which spatial information regarding higher-order image structures was incorporated into the registration processing of PET and MR. Fusion software of higher-order mutual information algorithm was developed and applied to PET and MR images of seven patients. Visual inspection and accuracy evaluation were also performed. Materials and Methods: The raw data of seven patients were provided by Vanderbilt University. Second-order entropy and normalized second-order mutual information were applied as similarity measures which integrate spatial information and avoid most local optima. PET image was treated as reference image while MR image as float image. Second-order entropy was calculated with 2D histogram measuring the frequency of co-occurrence of intensities between neighboring voxel pairs in a single image. The joint probability and second-order mutual information was estimated with the 4D histogram of the intensity of neighboring voxels between images. In order to avoid the occurrence of sparse histogram and simplify the computation, 16 bins per dimension were chosen in this project to calculate 4D joint histogram and the neighborhood was defined by the six nearest neighbors of each voxel. Optimization strategy was Powell's method, combined with Brent's algorithm. The interpolation method was PV method. Evaluation was carried out in a blinded fashion by Vanderbilt. Results: The mean of errors was 3.54mm and SE of which was 0.34. The registration accuracy was sub-voxel. Visual inspection showed that the image registrations of all the seven patients were good and

  9. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with pet allergy do better with a dog that has short hair or sheds less. Question 2 Pet allergies are triggered by the hair on a pet. True False False: Pet allergies are caused by an allergen found on the pet’s skin (dander), saliva or urine. Question 3 Symptoms of pet allergy ...

  10. Planning of External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Guided by PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eyben, Finn Edler; Kairemo, Kalevi; Kiljunen, Timo; Joensuu, Timo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we give an overview of articles on non-choline tracers for PET/CT for patients with prostate cancer and planning of radiotherapy guided by PET/CT. Nineteen articles described (11)C-Acetate PET/CT. Of 629 patients 483 (77%, 95% CI 74% - 80%) had positive (11)C-Acetate PET/CT scans. Five articles described (18)F-FACBC PET/CT. Of 174 patients, 127 (73%, 95% CI 68% - 78%) had positive scans. Both tracers detected local lesions, lesions in regional lymph nodes, and distant organs. Ten articles described (18)F-NaF PET/CT and found that 1289 of 3918 patients (33%) had positive reactive lesions in bones. PET/CT scan can guide external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) planning for patients with loco-regional prostate cancer. In six studies with 178 patients with localized prostate cancer, PET/CT pointed out dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIL). Oncologists gave EBRT to the whole prostate and a simultaneously integrated boost to the DIL. Four studies with 254 patients described planning of EBRT for patients with PETpositive lymph nodes. After the EBRT, 15 of 29 node-positive patients remained in remission for median 28 months (range 14 to 50 months). Most articles describe (11)C- and (18)F-Choline PET/CT. However, (11)C-Acetate and (18)F-FACBC may also be useful tracers for PET/CT. Planning of radiotherapy guided by MRI or PET/CT is an investigational method for localized prostate cancer. Current clinical controlled trials evaluate whether the method improves overall survival.

  11. Whole-body MRI for initial staging of paediatric lymphoma: prospective comparison to an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littooij, Annemieke S. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Kwee, Thomas C.; Vermoolen, Malou A.; Keizer, Bart de; Beek, Frederik J.A.; Hobbelink, Monique G.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barber, Ignasi; Enriquez, Goya [Hospital Materno-Infantil Vall d' Hebron, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Giannina Gaslini Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Zsiros, Jozsef [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soh, Shui Yen [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Haematology and Oncology service, Department of Paediatric Subspecialities, Singapore (Singapore); Bierings, Marc B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Haematology-Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    To compare whole-body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (whole-body MRI-DWI), with FDG-PET/CT for staging newly diagnosed paediatric lymphoma. A total of 36 children with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent both whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT. Whole-body MRI-DWI was successfully performed in 33 patients (mean age 13.9 years). Whole-body MRI-DWI was independently evaluated by two blinded observers. After consensus reading, an unblinded expert panel evaluated the discrepant findings between whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT and used bone marrow biopsy, other imaging data and clinical information to derive an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard. Interobserver agreement of whole-body MRI-DWI was good [all nodal sites together (κ = 0.79); all extranodal sites together (κ = 0.69)]. There was very good agreement between the consensus whole-body MRI-DWI- and FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard for nodal (κ = 0.91) and extranodal (κ = 0.94) staging. The sensitivity and specificity of consensus whole-body MRI-DWI were 93 % and 98 % for nodal staging and 89 % and 100 % for extranodal staging, respectively. Following removal of MRI reader errors, the disease stage according to whole-body MRI-DWI agreed with the reference standard in 28 of 33 patients. Our results indicate that whole-body MRI-DWI is feasible for staging paediatric lymphoma and could potentially serve as a good radiation-free alternative to FDG-PET/CT. (orig.)

  12. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  13. Value of PET/CT and MR lymphography in treatment of prostate cancer patients with lymph node metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuin, A.S.; Deserno, W.M.L.L.G.; Meijer, H.J.M.; Jager, G.J.; Takahashi, S.; Debats, O.A.; Reske, S.N.; Schick, C.; Krause, B.J.; Oort, I.M. van; Witjes, A.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Lin, E.N. van; Barentsz, J.O.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: (11)C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cance

  14. PET image reconstruction with system matrix based on point spread function derived from single photon incidence response

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Fan; Ming-Kai, Yun; Xiao-Li, Sun; Xue-Xiang, Cao; Shuang-Quanm, Liu; Pei, Chai; Dao-Wu, Li; Long, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques appear particularly promising since they can provide accurate physical model and geometric system description. The reconstructed image quality mainly depends on the system matrix model which describes the relationship between image space and projection space for the IR method. The system matrix can contain some physics factors of detection such as geometrical component and blurring component. Point spread function (PSF) is generally used to describe the blurring component. This paper proposes an IR method based on the PSF system matrix, which is derived from the single photon incidence response function. More specifically, the gamma photon incidence on a crystal array is simulated by the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and then the single photon incidence response functions are obtained. Subsequently, using the single photon incidence response functions, the coincidence blurring factor is acquired according to the...

  15. Bioimpedance-based respiratory gating method for oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with first clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, T.; Vauhkonen, M.; Teuho, J.; Teräs, M.; Hakulinen, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory motion may cause significant image artefacts in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. This study introduces a new bioimpedance-based gating method for minimizing respiratory artefacts. The method was studied in 12 oncologic patients by evaluating the following three parameters: maximum metabolic activity of radiopharmaceutical accumulations, the size of these targets as well as their target-to-background ratio. The bioimpedance-gated images were compared with non-gated images and images that were gated with a reference method, chest wall motion monitoring by infrared camera. The bioimpedance method showed clear improvement as increased metabolic activity and decreased target volume compared to non-gated images and produced consistent results with the reference method. Thus, the method may have great potential in the future of respiratory gating in nuclear medicine imaging.

  16. Bioimpedance-based respiratory gating method for oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with first clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion may cause significant image artefacts in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. This study introduces a new bioimpedance-based gating method for minimizing respiratory artefacts. The method was studied in 12 oncologic patients by evaluating the following three parameters: maximum metabolic activity of radiopharmaceutical accumulations, the size of these targets as well as their target-to-background ratio. The bioimpedance-gated images were compared with non-gated images and images that were gated with a reference method, chest wall motion monitoring by infrared camera. The bioimpedance method showed clear improvement as increased metabolic activity and decreased target volume compared to non-gated images and produced consistent results with the reference method. Thus, the method may have great potential in the future of respiratory gating in nuclear medicine imaging.

  17. Integrating respiratory-gated PET-based target volume delineation in liver SBRT planning, a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the feasibility and benefit of integrating four-dimensional (4D) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) – computed tomography (CT) for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning. 8 patients with 14 metastases were accrued in the study. They all underwent a non-gated PET and a 4D PET centered on the liver. The same CT scan was used for attenuation correction, registration, and considered the planning CT for SBRT planning. Six PET phases were reconstructed for each 4D PET. By applying an individualized threshold to the 4D PET, a Biological Internal Target Volume (BITV) was generated for each lesion. A gated Planning Target Volume (PTVg) was created by adding 3 mm to account for set-up margins. This volume was compared to a manual Planning Target Volume (PTV) delineated with the help of a semi-automatic Biological Target Volume (BTV) obtained from the non-gated exam. A 5 mm radial and a 10 mm craniocaudal margins were applied to account for tumor motion and set-up margins to create the PTV. One undiagnosed liver metastasis was discovered thanks to the 4D PET. The semi-automatic BTV were significantly smaller than the BITV (p = 0.0031). However, after applying adapted margins, 4D PET allowed a statistically significant decrease in the PTVg as compared to the PTV (p = 0.0052). In comparison to non-gated PET, 4D PET may better define the respiratory movements of liver targets and improve SBRT planning for liver metastases. Furthermore, non respiratory-gated PET exams can both misdiagnose liver metastases and underestimate the real internal target volumes

  18. SU-E-J-270: Repeated 18F-FDG PET/CTs Based Feature Analysis for the Predication of Anal Cancer Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Chuong, M; Choi, W; Lu, W [University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Latifi, K; Saeed, N; Hoffe, S; Shridhar, R; Moros, E [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Tan, S [University of Maryland Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huazhong University of Science& Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify PET/CT based imaging predictors of anal cancer recurrence and evaluate baseline vs. mid-treatment vs. post-treatment PET/CT scans in the tumor recurrence prediction. Methods: FDG-PET/CT scans were obtained at baseline, during chemoradiotherapy (CRT, midtreatment), and after CRT (post-treatment) in 17 patients of anal cancer. Four patients had tumor recurrence. For each patient, the mid-treatment and post-treatment scans were respectively aligned to the baseline scan by a rigid registration followed by a deformable registration. PET/CT image features were computed within the manually delineated tumor volume of each scan to characterize the intensity histogram, spatial patterns (texture), and shape of the tumors, as well as the changes of these features resulting from CRT. A total of 335 image features were extracted. An Exact Logistic Regression model was employed to analyze these PET/CT image features in order to identify potential predictors for tumor recurrence. Results: Eleven potential predictors of cancer recurrence were identified with p < 0.10, including five shape features, five statistical texture features, and one CT intensity histogram feature. Six features were indentified from posttreatment scans, 3 from mid-treatment scans, and 2 from baseline scans. These features indicated that there were differences in shape, intensity, and spatial pattern between tumors with and without recurrence. Recurrent tumors tended to have more compact shape (higher roundness and lower elongation) and larger intensity difference between baseline and follow-up scans, compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion: PET/CT based anal cancer recurrence predictors were identified. The post-CRT PET/CT is the most important scan for the prediction of cancer recurrence. The baseline and mid-CRT PET/CT also showed value in the prediction and would be more useful for the predication of tumor recurrence in early stage of CRT. This work was supported in part by the

  19. SU-E-J-270: Repeated 18F-FDG PET/CTs Based Feature Analysis for the Predication of Anal Cancer Recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify PET/CT based imaging predictors of anal cancer recurrence and evaluate baseline vs. mid-treatment vs. post-treatment PET/CT scans in the tumor recurrence prediction. Methods: FDG-PET/CT scans were obtained at baseline, during chemoradiotherapy (CRT, midtreatment), and after CRT (post-treatment) in 17 patients of anal cancer. Four patients had tumor recurrence. For each patient, the mid-treatment and post-treatment scans were respectively aligned to the baseline scan by a rigid registration followed by a deformable registration. PET/CT image features were computed within the manually delineated tumor volume of each scan to characterize the intensity histogram, spatial patterns (texture), and shape of the tumors, as well as the changes of these features resulting from CRT. A total of 335 image features were extracted. An Exact Logistic Regression model was employed to analyze these PET/CT image features in order to identify potential predictors for tumor recurrence. Results: Eleven potential predictors of cancer recurrence were identified with p < 0.10, including five shape features, five statistical texture features, and one CT intensity histogram feature. Six features were indentified from posttreatment scans, 3 from mid-treatment scans, and 2 from baseline scans. These features indicated that there were differences in shape, intensity, and spatial pattern between tumors with and without recurrence. Recurrent tumors tended to have more compact shape (higher roundness and lower elongation) and larger intensity difference between baseline and follow-up scans, compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion: PET/CT based anal cancer recurrence predictors were identified. The post-CRT PET/CT is the most important scan for the prediction of cancer recurrence. The baseline and mid-CRT PET/CT also showed value in the prediction and would be more useful for the predication of tumor recurrence in early stage of CRT. This work was supported in part by the

  20. Implementation and Analysis of a Wireless Sensor Network-Based Pet Location Monitoring System for Domestic Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Aguirre

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The flexibility of new age wireless networks and the variety of sensors to measure a high number of variables, lead to new scenarios where anything can be monitored by small electronic devices, thereby implementing Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN. Thanks to ZigBee, RFID or WiFi networks the precise location of humans or animals as well as some biological parameters can be known in real-time. However, since wireless sensors must be attached to biological tissues and they are highly dispersive, propagation of electromagnetic waves must be studied to deploy an efficient and well-working network. The main goal of this work is to study the influence of wireless channel limitations in the operation of a specific pet monitoring system, validated at physical channel as well as at functional level. In this sense, radio wave propagation produced by ZigBee devices operating at the ISM 2.4 GHz band is studied through an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching simulation tool, in order to analyze coverage/capacity relations for the optimal system selection as well as deployment strategy in terms of number of transceivers and location. Furthermore, a simplified dog model is developed for simulation code, considering not only its morphology but also its dielectric properties. Relevant wireless channel information such as power distribution, power delay profile and delay spread graphs are obtained providing an extensive wireless channel analysis. A functional dog monitoring system is presented, operating over the implemented ZigBee network and providing real time information to Android based devices. The proposed system can be scaled in order to consider different types of domestic pets as well as new user based functionalities.

  1. Implementation and Analysis of a Wireless Sensor Network-Based Pet Location Monitoring System for Domestic Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leyre; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Santesteban, Daniel; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The flexibility of new age wireless networks and the variety of sensors to measure a high number of variables, lead to new scenarios where anything can be monitored by small electronic devices, thereby implementing Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). Thanks to ZigBee, RFID or WiFi networks the precise location of humans or animals as well as some biological parameters can be known in real-time. However, since wireless sensors must be attached to biological tissues and they are highly dispersive, propagation of electromagnetic waves must be studied to deploy an efficient and well-working network. The main goal of this work is to study the influence of wireless channel limitations in the operation of a specific pet monitoring system, validated at physical channel as well as at functional level. In this sense, radio wave propagation produced by ZigBee devices operating at the ISM 2.4 GHz band is studied through an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching simulation tool, in order to analyze coverage/capacity relations for the optimal system selection as well as deployment strategy in terms of number of transceivers and location. Furthermore, a simplified dog model is developed for simulation code, considering not only its morphology but also its dielectric properties. Relevant wireless channel information such as power distribution, power delay profile and delay spread graphs are obtained providing an extensive wireless channel analysis. A functional dog monitoring system is presented, operating over the implemented ZigBee network and providing real time information to Android based devices. The proposed system can be scaled in order to consider different types of domestic pets as well as new user based functionalities. PMID:27589751

  2. Implementation and Analysis of a Wireless Sensor Network-Based Pet Location Monitoring System for Domestic Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Erik; Lopez-Iturri, Peio; Azpilicueta, Leyre; Astrain, José Javier; Villadangos, Jesús; Santesteban, Daniel; Falcone, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The flexibility of new age wireless networks and the variety of sensors to measure a high number of variables, lead to new scenarios where anything can be monitored by small electronic devices, thereby implementing Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). Thanks to ZigBee, RFID or WiFi networks the precise location of humans or animals as well as some biological parameters can be known in real-time. However, since wireless sensors must be attached to biological tissues and they are highly dispersive, propagation of electromagnetic waves must be studied to deploy an efficient and well-working network. The main goal of this work is to study the influence of wireless channel limitations in the operation of a specific pet monitoring system, validated at physical channel as well as at functional level. In this sense, radio wave propagation produced by ZigBee devices operating at the ISM 2.4 GHz band is studied through an in-house developed 3D Ray Launching simulation tool, in order to analyze coverage/capacity relations for the optimal system selection as well as deployment strategy in terms of number of transceivers and location. Furthermore, a simplified dog model is developed for simulation code, considering not only its morphology but also its dielectric properties. Relevant wireless channel information such as power distribution, power delay profile and delay spread graphs are obtained providing an extensive wireless channel analysis. A functional dog monitoring system is presented, operating over the implemented ZigBee network and providing real time information to Android based devices. The proposed system can be scaled in order to consider different types of domestic pets as well as new user based functionalities. PMID:27589751

  3. Comparison of the cellular and biochemical properties of Plasmodium falciparum choline and ethanolamine kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Alberge, Blandine; Gannoun-Zaki, Leila; Bascunana, Céline; Tran Van Ba, Christophe; Vial, Henri; Cerdan, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The proliferation of the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium falciparum within the erythrocyte is concomitant with massive phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Based on pharmacological and genetic data, de novo biosynthesis pathways of both phospholipids appear essential for parasite survival. The present study characterizes P. falciparum choline kinase (PfCK) and ethanolamine kinase (PfEK), which catalyse the first enzymatic steps of these essent...

  4. First steps towards ultrasound-based motion compensation for imaging and therapy: calibration with an optical system and 4D PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eSchwaab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking.The goal of this project is to develop an ultrasound based motion tracking for real time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET. In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of ultrasound tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system – even if the ultrasound probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the ultrasound tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the ultrasound probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for ultrasound tracking based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an ultrasound based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US-transducer is feasible.

  5. CHOLINE METABOLISM ALTERATION: A FOCUS ON OVARIAN CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina eBagnoli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared to normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprogramming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes like choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a cholinic phenotype that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC, a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that cholinic phenotype is a peculiar feature of transformed cells, and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments.

  6. American Pet Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    海焰

    2007-01-01

    In America you can find dogs,cats, horses,monkeys, snakes and even pigs in almost every family.They are their pets.Americans love pets and look on them as a part of the family.Sometimes pet owners dress their pets in fashionable clothes.They even buy toys for their pets.Americans love their pets as their children, sometimes even better.

  7. Comparison between PET template-based method and MRI-based method for cortical quantification of florbetapir (AV-45) uptake in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Aubert, L.; Nemmi, F.; Peran, P. [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Toulouse (France); Barbeau, E.J. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, France, CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France); Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Payoux, P. [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Toulouse (France); Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Pole Imagerie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Chollet, F.; Pariente, J. [Inserm, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps neurologiques UMR 825, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques UMR 825, Toulouse (France); Service de Neurologie, Pole Neurosciences, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2014-05-15

    Florbetapir (AV-45) has been shown to be a reliable tool for assessing in vivo amyloid load in patients with Alzheimer's disease from the early stages. However, nonspecific white matter binding has been reported in healthy subjects as well as in patients with Alzheimer's disease. To avoid this issue, cortical quantification might increase the reliability of AV-45 PET analyses. In this study, we compared two quantification methods for AV-45 binding, a classical method relying on PET template registration (route 1), and a MRI-based method (route 2) for cortical quantification. We recruited 22 patients at the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease and 17 matched controls. AV-45 binding was assessed using both methods, and target-to-cerebellum mean global standard uptake values (SUVr) were obtained for each of them, together with SUVr in specific regions of interest. Quantification using the two routes was compared between the clinical groups (intragroup comparison), and between groups for each route (intergroup comparison). Discriminant analysis was performed. In the intragroup comparison, differences in uptake values were observed between route 1 and route 2 in both groups. In the intergroup comparison, AV-45 uptake was higher in patients than controls in all regions of interest using both methods, but the effect size of this difference was larger using route 2. In the discriminant analysis, route 2 showed a higher specificity (94.1 % versus 70.6 %), despite a lower sensitivity (77.3 % versus 86.4 %), and D-prime values were higher for route 2. These findings suggest that, although both quantification methods enabled patients at early stages of Alzheimer's disease to be well discriminated from controls, PET template-based quantification seems adequate for clinical use, while the MRI-based cortical quantification method led to greater intergroup differences and may be more suitable for use in current clinical research. (orig.)

  8. Investigation of time-of-flight benefits in an LYSO-based PET/CT scanner: A Monte Carlo study using GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of fast scintillators yielding great light yield and/or stopping power, along with advances in photomultiplier tubes and electronics, have rekindled interest in time-of-flight (TOF) PET. Because the potential performance improvements offered by TOF PET are substantial, efforts to improve PET timing should prove very fruitful. In this study, we performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore what gains in PET performance could be achieved if the coincidence resolving time (CRT) in the LYSO-based PET component of Discovery RX PET/CT scanner were improved. For this purpose, the GATE Monte Carlo package was utilized, providing the ability to model and characterize various physical phenomena in PET imaging. For the present investigation, count rate performance and signal to noise ratio (SNR) values in different activity concentrations were simulated for different coincidence timing windows of 4, 5.85, 6, 6.5, 8, 10 and 12 ns and with different CRTs of 100-900 ps FWHM involving 50 ps FWHM increments using the NEMA scatter phantom. Strong evidence supporting robustness of the simulations was found as observed in the good agreement between measured and simulated data for the cases of estimating axial sensitivity, axial and transaxial detection position, gamma non-collinearity angle distribution and positron annihilation distance. In the non-TOF context, the results show that the random event rate can be reduced by using narrower coincidence timing window widths, demonstrating considerable enhancements in the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) performance. The peak NECR had increased by ∼50% when utilizing the coincidence window width of 4 ns. At the same time, utilization of TOF information resulted in improved NECR and SNR with the dramatic reduction of random coincidences as a function of CRT. For example, with CRT of 500 ps FWHM, a factor of 2.3 reduction in random rates, factor of 1.5 increase in NECR and factor of 2.1 improvement in SNR is achievable

  9. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  10. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  11. The welfare consequences and efficacy of training pet dogs with remote electronic training collars in comparison to reward based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jonathan J; Cracknell, Nina; Hardiman, Jessica; Wright, Hannah; Mills, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the welfare consequences of training dogs in the field with manually operated electronic devices (e-collars). Following a preliminary study on 9 dogs, 63 pet dogs referred for recall related problems were assigned to one of three Groups: Treatment Group A were trained by industry approved trainers using e-collars; Control Group B trained by the same trainers but without use of e-collars; and Group C trained by members of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, UK again without e-collar stimulation (n = 21 for each Group). Dogs received two 15 minute training sessions per day for 4-5 days. Training sessions were recorded on video for behavioural analysis. Saliva and urine were collected to assay for cortisol over the training period. During preliminary studies there were negative changes in dogs' behaviour on application of electric stimuli, and elevated cortisol post-stimulation. These dogs had generally experienced high intensity stimuli without pre-warning cues during training. In contrast, in the subsequent larger, controlled study, trainers used lower settings with a pre-warning function and behavioural responses were less marked. Nevertheless, Group A dogs spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than Group C dogs. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. Salivary cortisol in Group A dogs was not significantly different from that in Group B or Group C, though Group C dogs showed higher measures than Group B throughout sampling. Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog's referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy across Groups. Owners of dogs trained using e-collars were less confident of applying the training approach demonstrated. These findings suggest that there is no consistent benefit to be gained from e-collar training but greater welfare concerns compared with positive reward based

  12. The welfare consequences and efficacy of training pet dogs with remote electronic training collars in comparison to reward based training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Cooper

    Full Text Available This study investigated the welfare consequences of training dogs in the field with manually operated electronic devices (e-collars. Following a preliminary study on 9 dogs, 63 pet dogs referred for recall related problems were assigned to one of three Groups: Treatment Group A were trained by industry approved trainers using e-collars; Control Group B trained by the same trainers but without use of e-collars; and Group C trained by members of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, UK again without e-collar stimulation (n = 21 for each Group. Dogs received two 15 minute training sessions per day for 4-5 days. Training sessions were recorded on video for behavioural analysis. Saliva and urine were collected to assay for cortisol over the training period. During preliminary studies there were negative changes in dogs' behaviour on application of electric stimuli, and elevated cortisol post-stimulation. These dogs had generally experienced high intensity stimuli without pre-warning cues during training. In contrast, in the subsequent larger, controlled study, trainers used lower settings with a pre-warning function and behavioural responses were less marked. Nevertheless, Group A dogs spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than Group C dogs. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. Salivary cortisol in Group A dogs was not significantly different from that in Group B or Group C, though Group C dogs showed higher measures than Group B throughout sampling. Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog's referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy across Groups. Owners of dogs trained using e-collars were less confident of applying the training approach demonstrated. These findings suggest that there is no consistent benefit to be gained from e-collar training but greater welfare concerns compared with

  13. Strategies for improving the Voxel-based statistical analysis for animal PET studies: assessment of cerebral glucose metabolism in cat deafness model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Park, Min Hyun; Kang, Hye Jin; Im, Ki Chun; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lim, Sang Moo; Oh, Seung Ha; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In imaging studies of the human brain, voxel-based statistical analysis method was widely used, since these methods were originally developed for the analysis of the human brain data, they are not optimal for the animal brain data. The aim of this study is to optimize the procedures for the 3D voxel-based statistical analysis of cat FDG PET brain images. A microPET Focus 120 scanner was used. Eight cats underwent FDG PET scans twice before and after inducing the deafness. Only the brain and adjacent regions were extracted from each data set by manual masking. Individual PET image at normal and deaf state was realigned to each other to remove the confounding effects by the different spatial normalization parameters on the results of statistical analyses. Distance between the sampling points on the reference image and kernel size of Gaussian filter applied to the images before estimating the realignment parameters were adjusted to 0.5 mm and 2 mm. Both data was then spatial normalized onto study-specific cat brain template. Spatially normalized PET data were smoothed and voxel-based paired t-test was performed. Cerebral glucose metabolism decreased significantly after the loss of hearing capability in parietal lobes, postcentral gyri, STG, MTG, lTG, and IC at both hemisphere and left SC (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). Cerebral glucose metabolism in deaf cats was found to be significantly higher than in controls in the right cingulate (FDR corrected P < 0.05, k=50). The ROI analysis also showed significant reduction of glucose metabolism in the same areas as in the SPM analysis, except for some regions (P < 0.05). Method for the voxel-based analysis of cat brain PET data was optimized for analysis of cat brain PET. This result was also confirmed by ROI analysis. The results obtained demonstrated the high localization accuracy and specificity of the developed method, and were found to be useful for examining cerebral glucose metabolism in a cat cortical deafness model.

  14. Assessment of errors caused by X-ray scatter and use of contrast medium when using CT-based attenuation correction in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ay, Mohammad R. [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib

    2006-11-15

    Quantitative image reconstruction in positron emission tomography (PET) requires an accurate attenuation map of the object under study for the purpose of attenuation correction. Current dual-modality PET/CT systems offer significant advantages over stand-alone PET, including decreased overall scanning time and increased accuracy in lesion localisation and detectability. However, the contamination of CT data with scattered radiation and misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) are known to generate artefacts in the attenuation map and thus the resulting PET images. The purpose of this work was to quantitatively measure the impact of scattered radiation and contrast medium on the accuracy of CTAC. Our recently developed MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo X-ray CT simulator for modelling both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners and the Eidolon dedicated 3D PET Monte Carlo simulator were used to generate realigned PET/CT data sets. The impact of X-ray scattered radiation on the accuracy of CTAC was investigated through simulation of a uniform cylindrical water phantom for both a commercial fan-beam multi-slice and a prototype cone-beam flat panel detector-based CT scanner. The influence of contrast medium was studied by simulation of a cylindrical phantom containing different concentrations of contrast medium. Moreover, an experimental study using an anthropomorphic striatal phantom was conducted for quantitative evaluation of errors arising from the presence of contrast medium by calculating the apparent recovery coefficient (ARC) in the presence of different concentrations of contrast medium. The analysis of attenuation correction factors (ACFs) for the simulated cylindrical water phantom in both fan- and cone-beam CT scanners showed that the contamination of CT data with scattered radiation in the absence of scatter removal causes underestimation of the true ACFs, namely by 7.3% and 28.2% in the centre for the two

  15. Seminar | Development of a PET Cyclotron Based Irradiation Setup for Proton Radiobiology | 25 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Sharif Hasan Mahmoud Ghithan, a Palestinian postdoctoral researcher at the Laboratory of Instrumentation and Experimental Particle Physics (Portugal), will discuss the development of an out-of-yoke irradiation setup using the proton beam from a cyclotron that ordinarily produces radioisotopes for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The speaker will also discuss possible future use of the results of this research for CERN’s new LEIR biomedical facility. The seminar will be proposed in the framework of a meeting of the CERN Medical Applications Study Group.   25 June, 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Room 13-2-005 ABSTRACT: In this new irradiation setup, the current from a 20 mm thick aluminum transmission foil is read out by homemade transimpedance electronics, providing online dose information. The main monitoring variables, delivered in real-time, include beam current, integrated charge and dose rate. Hence the dose and integrated current delivered at a given instant to an experimental setu...

  16. Reduction of artefacts caused by hip implants in CT-based attenuation-corrected PET images using 2-D interpolation of a virtual sinogram on an irregular grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Jong, Johan R. de; Pruim, Jan; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zaidi, Habib [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    Metallic prosthetic replacements, such as hip or knee implants, are known to cause strong streaking artefacts in CT images. These artefacts likely induce over- or underestimation of the activity concentration near the metallic implants when applying CT-based attenuation correction of positron emission tomography (PET) images. Since this degrades the diagnostic quality of the images, metal artefact reduction (MAR) prior to attenuation correction is required. The proposed MAR method, referred to as virtual sinogram-based technique, replaces the projection bins of the sinogram that are influenced by metallic implants by a 2-D Clough-Tocher cubic interpolation scheme performed in an irregular grid, called Delaunay triangulated grid. To assess the performance of the proposed method, a physical phantom and 30 clinical PET/CT studies including hip prostheses were used. The results were compared to the method implemented on the Siemens Biograph mCT PET/CT scanner. Both phantom and clinical studies revealed that the proposed method performs equally well as the Siemens MAR method in the regions corresponding to bright streaking artefacts and the artefact-free regions. However, in regions corresponding to dark streaking artefacts, the Siemens method does not seem to appropriately correct the tracer uptake while the proposed method consistently increased the uptake in the underestimated regions, thus bringing it to the expected level. This observation is corroborated by the experimental phantom study which demonstrates that the proposed method approaches the true activity concentration more closely. The proposed MAR method allows more accurate CT-based attenuation correction of PET images and prevents misinterpretation of tracer uptake, which might be biased owing to the propagation of bright and dark streaking artefacts from CT images to the PET data following the attenuation correction procedure. (orig.)

  17. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  18. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  19. Choline on the Move: Perspectives on the Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology of the Presynaptic Choline Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, E A; Blakely, R D

    2016-01-01

    Genetic, biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological approaches have advanced our understanding of cholinergic biology for over 100 years. High-affinity choline uptake (HACU) was one of the last features of cholinergic signaling to be defined at a molecular level, achieved through the cloning of the choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7). In retrospect, the molecular era of CHT studies initiated with the identification of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a potent, competitive CHT antagonist, though it would take another 30 years before HC-3, in radiolabeled form, was used by Joseph Coyle's laboratory to identify and monitor the dynamics of CHT proteins. Though HC-3 studies provided important insights into CHT distribution and regulation, another 15 years would pass before the structure of CHT genes and proteins were identified, a full decade after the cloning of most other neurotransmitter-associated transporters. The availability of CHT gene and protein probes propelled the development of cell and animal models as well as efforts to gain insights into how human CHT gene variation affects the risk for brain and neuromuscular disorders. Most recently, our group has pursued a broadening of CHT pharmacology, elucidating novel chemical structures that may serve to advance cholinergic diagnostics and medication development. Here we provide a short review of the transformation that has occurred in HACU research and how such advances may promote the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:27288078

  20. PET with a dual-head coincidence gamma camera in head and neck cancer: A comparison with computed tomography and dedicated PET; Stellenwert der PET mit Koinzidenz-Gammakameras bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren: Vergleich mit Computertomographie und dedizierter PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimny, M. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG PET) is a promising imaging tool for detecting and staging of primary or recurrent head and neck cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate a dual-head gamma camera modified for coincidence detection (KGK-PET) in comparison to computed tomography (CT) and dedicated PET (dPET). 50 patients with known or suspected primary or recurrent head and neck cancer were enrolled. 32 patients underwent KGK-PET and dPET using a one-day protocol. The sensitivity for the detection of primary/ recurrent head and neck cancer for KGK-PET and CT was 80% and 54%, respectively, specificity was 73% and 82%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lymph node metastases based on neck sides with KGK-PET was 71% (CT: 65%) and 88% (CT: 89%) respectively. In comparison to dPET, KGK-PET revealed concordant results in 32/32 patients with respect to primary tumor/recurrent disease and in 55/60 evaluated neck sides. All involved neck sides that were missed by KGK-PET were also negative with dPET. These results indicate that in patients with head and neck cancer KGK-PET reveals information, that are similar to dPET and complementary to CT. (orig.) [German] Die Positronenemissionstomographie mit {sup 18}F-Fluor-Deoxyglukose (FDG-PET) ist ein viel versprechendes Verfahren zur Detektion und zum Staging von primaeren und rezidivierenden Malignomen der Kopf-Hals-Region. Ziel der Studie war die Evaluation einer koinzidenzfaehigen Doppelkopf-Gammakamera (KGK-PET) im Vergleich zur Computertomographie (CT) und dedizierten Ring-PET (dPET). Untersucht wurden 50 Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Vergleichsuntersuchungen mit dPET erfolgten bei 32 Patienten. Die Sensitivitaet von KGK-PET zur Erkennung von Primaertumoren/Rezidiven betrug 80% bei einer Spezifitaet von 73%. Fuer CT berechnete sich eine Sensitivitaet von 54% und eine Spezifitaet von 82%. Bezueglich einer zervikalen Lymphknotenmetastasierung errechnete

  1. MR-based field-of-view extension in MR/PET: B0 homogenization using gradient enhancement (HUGE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumhagen, Jan O; Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Scheffler, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    In whole-body MR/PET, the human attenuation correction can be based on the MR data. However, an MR-based field-of-view (FoV) is limited due to physical restrictions such as B0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, for large patients, the MR image and the attenuation map might be truncated and the attenuation correction might be biased. The aim of this work is to explore extending the MR FoV through B0 homogenization using gradient enhancement in which an optimal readout gradient field is determined to locally compensate B0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. A spin-echo-based sequence was developed that computes an optimal gradient for certain regions of interest, for example, the patient's arms. A significant distortion reduction was achieved outside the normal MR-based FoV. This FoV extension was achieved without any hardware modifications. In-plane distortions in a transaxially extended FoV of up to 600 mm were analyzed in phantom studies. In vivo measurements of the patient's arms lying outside the normal specified FoV were compared with and without the use of B0 homogenization using gradient enhancement. In summary, we designed a sequence that provides data for reducing the image distortions due to B0 inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities and used the data to extend the MR FoV. PMID:23203976

  2. Innovations in PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin Klausen, T; Høgild Keller, S; Vinter Olesen, O;

    2012-01-01

    impressive anatomical details. PET/CT designs are facing many challenges such as the conversion of CT numbers to attenuation coefficients, giving rise to artefacts due to the presence of high Zeff material. Patient motion during scans degrades image quality and subsequent analysis, and is a challenge......There has been a longstanding interest in positron emission tomography (PET) in combination with computed tomography (CT). Mostly because of the lack of structural information in PET which makes it difficult to assess the precise location of tissue with metabolic uptake, whereas CT can provide...... especially as spatial resolution improves. Software based image fusion remains a complex issue outside the brain. State of the art image quality in a modern PET/CT system includes incorporation of point spread function (PSF) and time-of-flight (TOF) information into the reconstruction leading to the high...

  3. Business administration of PET facilities. A nationwide survey for prices of PET screening and a cost analysis of three facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the business administration of positron emission tomography (PET) facilities based on the survey of the price of PET cancer screening and cost analysis of PET examination. The questionnaire survey of the price of PET cancer screening was implemented for all PET facilities in Japan. Cost data of PET examination, including fixed costs and variable costs, were obtained from three different medical institutions. The marked price of the PET cancer screening was yen111,499 in average, and the most popular range of prices was between yen80,000 and yen90,000. Costs of PET per examination were accounted for yen110,675, yen79,158 and yen111,644 in facility A, B and C, respectively. The results suggested that facilities with two or more PET/CT per a cyclotron could only secure profits. In Japan, the boom in PET facility construction could not continue in accordance with increasing number of PET facilities. It would become more essential to analyze the appropriate distribution of PET facilities and the adequate amount of PET procedures from the perspective of efficient utilization of the PET equipments and supply of PET-related healthcare. (author)

  4. Processing and characterization of extruded PET and its r-PET and MWCNT nanocomposite thin films by spin coating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arvind R Singh; Vineeta D Deshpande

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was basic understanding of the formation of thin film morphology by spin coating using reorganized polyethylene terephthalate (r-PET) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as fillers in PET. A study of the correlation between physical properties of the PET films and its surface morphology was carried out using atomic force microscopy-based power spectral density (PSD) analysis. No significant work of surface analysis, using PSD of thin films of PET has been reported till date. Dilute solution of PET, PET with 3 wt% (r-PET) and PET with 3 wt% (2 wt% r-PET + 1 wt% MWCNT) filler were prepared using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as a solvent and thin films were fabricated on glass substrate by the optimized spin coating technique. Preparation of r-PET and r-PET+ MWCNT fillers was obtained by the precipitation method using TFA as a solvent and acetone as an antisolvent. The samples before spin coating were extruded and for comparison, a film of non-extruded PET was also prepared. Structural studies by Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction show higher degree of crystallinity in r-PET and decrease in chain entanglements. Owing to the crystallizing behaviour of r-PET, it allows better dispersion of MWCNT in the polymer matrix as compared with PET. The samples with fillers of MWCNT show more compact and unique mesh-like globular structure, indicating application for electromagnetic shielding foams and fibres.

  5. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  6. Development of a modular system for the synthesis of PET [{sup 11}C]labelled radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Stefano [PET Radiopharmacy, Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: stefano.boschi@aosp.bo.it; Lodi, Filippo [PET Radiopharmacy, Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Cicoria, Gianfranco [Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi (Italy); Raul Ledesma, Jorge [Fundacion Escuela de Medicina Nuclear, Mendoza (Argentina); Knopp, Roger [Eckert Ziegler-Eurotope, Berlin (Germany); Rizzello, Anna; Di Pierro, Donato; Trespidi, Silvia [PET Radiopharmacy, Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Marengo, Mario [Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    [{sup 11}C]labelled radiopharmaceuticals as N-[{sup 11}C]methyl-choline ([{sup 11}C]choline), L-(S-methyl-[{sup 11}C])methionine ([{sup 11}C]methionine) and [{sup 11}C]acetate have gained increasing importance in clinical PET and for the routine production of these radiopharmaceuticals, simple and reliable modules are needed to produce clinically relevant radioactivity. On the other hand, flexible devices are needed not only for the routine synthesis but also for more complex applications as the development of new tracers. The aim of this work was the adaptation of an Eckert Ziegler modular system for easy routine synthesis of [{sup 11}C]choline, [{sup 11}C]methionine and [{sup 11}C]acetate using components that account for straightforward scaling up and upgrades.

  7. Brain reserve capacity in frontotemporal dementia: a voxel-based 18F-FDG PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association of the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose utilisation (rCMRglc) and years of schooling has been extensively studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The results suggest that brain reserve capacity (BRC) allows patients with more years of schooling to cope better with AD pathology. The objective of this study was to provide initial evidence for BRC in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Twenty-nine patients with FTD and 16 healthy age- and education-matched controls underwent PET imaging of the brain with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose. A group comparison of rCMRglc was conducted between patients and controls and the output was saved as region of interest (ROI). A linear regression analysis with education as the independent and rCMRglc as the dependent variable, adjusted for age, gender and total score on the CERAD neuropsychological battery, was conducted in SPM2 over the pre-assigned ROI. Patients showed a reduced rCMRglc in almost the entire prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex as compared with controls (p < 0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). The regression analysis revealed a significant negative association between years of schooling and rCMRglc in the bilateral inferior frontal cortex (p < 0.001, uncorrected for multiple comparisons), which was independent of demographic variables and cognitive performance level. There was a strong negative correlation of rCMRglc and education (r = -0.45). The study provides initial evidence for BRC in FTD. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in educational level affect BRC by partially mediating the relationship between neurodegeneration and the clinical manifestation of FTD. (orig.)

  8. A Study on Pet Owners' Intention to Purchase Pet Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Chiehwei Hung; Yen-Shan Chuang

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impacts of consumers¡¦ characteristics, pet feeding habits, pet spending and insurance conditions of pet owners on the intention to purchase a pet insurance policy. Our results reveal that family income, average monthly spending on pets, and experience of purchasing medical insurance are the significant determinants of a pet owner¡¦s intention to purchase pet insurance. Pet owners who have higher family income, higher pet spending, and who have previously purchased...

  9. An SPM8-Based Approach for Attenuation Correction Combining Segmentation and Nonrigid Template Formation: Application to Simultaneous PET/MR Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Hansen, Adam E; Förster, Stefan;

    2014-01-01

    . The method was validated on 16 new subjects with brain tumors (n = 12) or mild cognitive impairment (n = 4) who underwent CT and PET/MR scans. The μ maps and corresponding reconstructed PET images were compared with those obtained using the gold standard CT-based approach and the Dixon-based method available...... on the Biograph mMR scanner. Relative change (RC) images were generated in each case, and voxel- and region-of-interest-based analyses were performed. RESULTS: The leave-one-out cross-validation analysis of the data from the 15 atlas-generation subjects showed small errors in brain linear attenuation coefficients....../MR scanners. METHODS: Coregistered anatomic MR and CT images of 15 glioblastoma subjects were used to generate the templates. The MR images from these subjects were first segmented into 6 tissue classes (gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, bone, soft tissue, and air), which were then nonrigidly...

  10. Self-Adaption Fusion Algorithm of PET/CT Based on Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform%基于双树复小波变换的PET/CT自适应融合算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏兴瑜; 周涛; 陆惠玲; 王文文

    2015-01-01

    PET/CT医学图像融合对于图像分析及临床诊断具有重要的应用价值,通过融合PET/CT图像,可以丰富图像的信息量,提高信息准确度。针对PET/CT融合问题,提出了一个基于双树复小波的PET/CT自适应融合算法。对已配准的PET和CT图像进行双树复小波变换(dual-tree complex wavelet transform,DTCWT),得到低频分量和高频分量;根据低频图像集中了大部分源图像能量及决定了图像轮廓的特点,采用了自适应高斯隶属度函数的融合规则;在高频图像部分,考虑了图像相邻像素之间的相关性和模糊性问题,在第一层的高频分量上采用了高斯隶属度函数和3×3领域窗口相结合的融合规则,在第二层高频分量上采用了区域方差的融合规则。最后,为了验证算法的有效性和可行性,做了3个方面的实验,分别是该算法和其他像素级融合算法的比较实验,利用信息熵、均值、标准方差和互信息的融合效果评价实验,双树复小波变换中不同融合规则的比较实验。实验结果表明,该算法信息熵提高了7.23%,互信息提高了17.98%,说明该算法是一种有效的多模态医学影像融合方法。%PET/CT medical image fusion has very important application value for medical image analysis and diseases diagnosis. It is useful to improve the image content and accuracy by fusing PET/CT images. Aiming at PET/CT fusion problem, this paper proposes a self-adaption fusion algorithm of PET/CT based on dual-tree complex wavelet trans-form. Firstly, source PET and CT images after registration are decomposed low and high frequency sub-images using dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT). Secondly, according to the characteristics of low frequency sub-images concentrating the majority energy of the source image and determining the image contour, a fusion rule based on self-adaption Gaussian membership function is adopted in low

  11. Simultaneous scanning of two mice in a small-animal PET scanner: a simulation-based assessment of the signal degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilhac, Anthonin; Boisson, Frédéric; Wimberley, Catriona; Parmar, Arvind; Zahra, David; Hamze, Hasar; Davis, Emma; Arthur, Andrew; Bouillot, Caroline; Charil, Arnaud; Grégoire, Marie-Claude

    2016-02-01

    In PET imaging, research groups have recently proposed different experimental set ups allowing multiple animals to be simultaneously imaged in a scanner in order to reduce the costs and increase the throughput. In those studies, the technical feasibility was demonstrated and the signal degradation caused by additional mice in the FOV characterized, however, the impact of the signal degradation on the outcome of a PET study has not yet been studied. Here we thoroughly investigated, using Monte Carlo simulated [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride PET studies, different experimental designs for whole-body and brain acquisitions of two mice and assessed the actual impact on the detection of biological variations as compared to a single-mouse setting. First, we extended the validation of the PET-SORTEO Monte Carlo simulation platform for the simultaneous simulation of two animals. Then, we designed [18F]FDG and [11C]Raclopride input mouse models for the simulation of realistic whole-body and brain PET studies. Simulated studies allowed us to accurately estimate the differences in detection between single- and dual-mode acquisition settings that are purely the result of having two animals in the FOV. Validation results showed that PET-SORTEO accurately reproduced the spatial resolution and noise degradations that were observed with actual dual phantom experiments. The simulated [18F]FDG whole-body study showed that the resolution loss due to the off-center positioning of the mice was the biggest contributing factor in signal degradation at the pixel level and a minimal inter-animal distance as well as the use of reconstruction methods with resolution modeling should be preferred. Dual mode acquisition did not have a major impact on ROI-based analysis except in situations where uptake values in organs from the same subject were compared. The simulated [11C]Raclopride study however showed that dual-mice imaging strongly reduced the sensitivity to variations when mice were

  12. Multi-GPU based acceleration of a list-mode DRAMA toward real-time OpenPET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinouchi, Shoko [Chiba Univ. (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kudo, Hiroyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); Suga, Mikio [Chiba Univ. (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    OpenPET, which has a physical gap between two detector rings, is our new PET geometry. In order to realize future radiation therapy guided by OpenPET, real-time imaging is required. Therefore we developed a list-mode image reconstruction method using general purpose graphic processing units (GPUs). For GPU implementation, the efficiency of acceleration depends on the implementation method which is required to avoid conditional statements. Therefore, in our previous study, we developed a new system model which was suited for the GPU implementation. In this paper, we implemented our image reconstruction method using 4 GPUs to get further acceleration. We applied the developed reconstruction method to a small OpenPET prototype. We obtained calculation times of total iteration using 4 GPUs that were 3.4 times faster than using a single GPU. Compared to using a single CPU, we achieved the reconstruction time speed-up of 142 times using 4 GPUs. (orig.)

  13. Scientific Opinion on the safety assessment of the process “ILPA”, based on Starlinger Decon technology, used to recycle post-consumer PET into food contact materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This scientific opinion of the EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids deals with the safety assessment of the recycling process ILPA (EU register No RECYC105 which is based on the Starlinger Decon technology. The input of the process is hot caustic washed and dried PET flakes originating from collected post-consumer PET containers, mainly bottles and trays, containing no more than 5 % of PET from non-food consumer applications. Through this technology washed and dried PET flakes are pre-heated before being solid state polymerised (SSP in a continuous reactor at hig