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Sample records for chlorite minerals

  1. Sorption of selenite onto chlorite considering mineral dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we investigated the sorption of selenite (SeO32-) onto chlorite as a function of Se(IV) concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The sorption isotherm of Se(IV) onto chlorite was successfully presented by both the Langmuir isotherm and Tempkin equation although the Langmuir isotherm is somewhat better than the Tempkin equation. The sorption of Se(IV) onto chlorite was maintained to be constant at an acidic pH region, while the sorption decreased with an increasing pH at neutral and alkaline pH regions. However, the Se(IV) sorption onto chlorite was independent of the ionic strength of NaClO4 solution. The amount of Se(IV) sorbed onto chlorite was significantly low compared to those of iron oxides such as apatite, goethite, hematite, and magnetite because of the lower content of Fe. We also investigated the effect of Fe(II) ions dissolved from chlorite on the Se(IV) sorption as a function of contact time. The chemical oxidation states of selenium sorbed onto chlorite surface were identified using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Pohang synchrotron light source. The amount of Fe(II) dissolved was increased by the contact time of 28 days but decreased after 28-56 days although the amount of dissolved Fe(II) ions was significantly small. This decrease of the dissolved Fe(II) may be due to the formation of Fe-oxyhydroxides such as ferrihydrite. The results of XANES measurements also showed that the Se(IV) sorbed onto chlorite was not reduced into Se(0) or Se(-II) even in the presence of Fe(II) ions in the solution because of the low Fe content of the chlorite although the mechanism was not clearly understood. (author)

  2. A chlorite mineral surface actively drives the deposition of DNA molecules in stretched conformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscovite mica is commonly used to immobilize DNA molecules onto a flat surface. This method, however, requires either the use of divalent cations in the buffer solution or the chemical modification of the surface. Here we show that DNA molecules have different binding affinities and assume different conformations when adsorbed to different layered minerals. In particular, the effect of biotite, muscovite, talc, brucite and chlorite upon DNA binding is investigated. Using atomic force microscopy it is possible to quantify the amount of DNA deposited onto a flat surface and it is experimentally confirmed that biotite, talc and brucite have a much higher affinity than muscovite (7-, 20- and 25-fold more volume of DNA deposited, respectively). The deposition of DNA onto chlorite presents areas (brucite-like) with high DNA coverage and areas (mica-like) where DNA molecules are absent. We regularly observed isolated DNA molecules that became stretched across these regions of low affinity. The stretching is not induced by the deposition procedure but is driven by the surface potential gradient between brucite-like and mica-like regions in chlorite. The active stretching of DNA on chlorite is a clear indication of the technological potential carried by these materials when used as substrates for biomolecules

  3. Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballantyne, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

  4. Diagenetic Chlorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afsoon Moatari; Friis, Henrik; Hansen, Jens Peter Vind

    different diffraction pattern. It fills the porosity and reduced permeability in the upper marginal part of the reservoir which had preserved porosity and permeability due to microquartz cementation. The pore-filling chlorite acts as an impermeable seal to hydrocarbon migration and prevents the topmost part...... and relates its possible formation to high-porosity/high-permeability zones of the reservoir. The study suggests that the formation of an intra-sandstone seal of diagenetic chlorite relates to the distribution of early diagenetic microquartz (which preserve porosity and permeability), and early......-coating berthierine. It also preserves porosity and permeability in marginal and isolated parts of the sandstone.In other parts of the sandstone grain coating berthierine precipitated. It was transformed to chlorite with increased depth. A second phase chlorite is distinguished by its morphology and slightly...

  5. Moessbauer study of some Argentinian chlorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three chlorite samples obtained from mining areas in Mendoza, Argentina, have been studied by wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The total Fe contents and the Fe2+/Fe3+ atomic ratio are used to characterize the samples and are discussed in connection to the likely genesis of the minerals. (orig.)

  6. Moessbauer study of some Argentinian chlorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, D.A. (Dept. de Geologia, Univ. Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)); Mercader, R.C. (Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina))

    1994-02-01

    Three chlorite samples obtained from mining areas in Mendoza, Argentina, have been studied by wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and [sup 57]Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The total Fe contents and the Fe[sup 2+]/Fe[sup 3+] atomic ratio are used to characterize the samples and are discussed in connection to the likely genesis of the minerals. (orig.)

  7. Experimental determination of chlorite dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current concepts of the geological disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK envisage the construction of a mined facility (incorporating cementitious engineered barriers) in chlorite-bearing rocks. To model accurately the fluid-rock reactions within the disturbed zone surrounding a repository requires functions that describe mineral dissolution kinetics under pH conditions that vary from near neutral to highly alkaline. Therefore, an experimental study to determine the dissolution rates of Fe-rich chlorite has been undertaken as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Program. Four experiments have been carried out at 25 C and four at 70 C, both sets using a range of NaCl/NaOH solutions of differing pH (of nominal pH 9.0, 10.3, 11.6 and 13.0 [at 25 C]). Dissolution rates have been calculated and were found to increase with increasing pH and temperature. However, increased pH resulted in non-stoichiometric dissolution possibly due to preferential dissolution of part of the chlorite structure relative to another, or reprecipitation of some elements as thin hydroxide or oxyhydroxide surface coatings on the chlorite. These results also show that chlorite dissolution is appreciably slower than that of albite and quartz at both 25 and 70 C, but slightly faster than that of muscovite at 70 C

  8. Approaches to the Low Grade Metamorphic History of the Karakaya Complex by Chlorite Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Tetiker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chlorite is used to investigate the diagenetic-metamorphic evolution and accurate geological history of the different units belonging to the Karakaya complex, Turkey. Primary and secondary chlorite minerals in the very low-grade metamorphic rocks display interference colors of blue and brown and an appearance of optical isotropy. Chlorites are present in the matrix, pores, and/or rocks units as platy/flaky and partly radial forms. X-ray diffraction (XRD data indicate that Mg-Fe chlorites with entirely IIb polytype (trioctahedral exhibit a variety of compositions, such as brunsvigite-diabantite-chamosite. The major element contents and structural formulas of chlorite also suggest these were derived from both felsic and metabasic source rocks. Trace and rare earth element (REE concentrations of chlorites increase with increasing grade of metamorphism, and these geochemical changes can be related to the tectonic structures, formational mechanics, and environments present during their generation.

  9. Sedimentary and diagenetic processes at the origin of chlorites formation inside silico-clastic reservoirs; Processus sedimentaires et diagenetiques a l'origine de la formation des chlorites dans les reservoirs silicoclastiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinseau, E.

    2002-06-01

    Diagenetic chlorite in deeply buried petroleum reservoirs give to the formations relatively good reservoir properties. The purpose of this study is, by a multidisciplinary approach, to better understand how chlorites form and to put into evidence the factors which influence their formation. Four case studies have been chosen: the silici-clastic Mulichinco (Valanginian) and Tordillo (Kimmeridgian) formations of the Neuquen basin, Argentina, the Springhill Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Austral basin, Argentina, and the Mashirah Bay formation (Precambrian) from the Huqf-Haushi area, Oman. Sedimentological analyses have been combined to petrographical observations (optical microscope, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, Cathodoluminescence), to chemical analyses, to chlorite polytypicism study, and by fluid inclusions micro-thermometry in silicifications. These studies have allowed to precise the diagenetic sequence for each of these formations and to approach the conditions for the formation of diagenetic chlorites for each case, and to conclude the following points: (1) ferro-magnesian chlorites require precursor material such as volcano-clasts. Their presence is associated with continental environments. Their destabilization into chlorite, via smectite, is favoured at the water/sediment interface during marine transgression. (2) ferriferous chlorites formation can happen from glauconitic minerals which contain a 7 angstroms phase like berthierite, and 10-12 angstroms phase as smectite phase, under anoxic conditions. (3) polytypicism variations traduce two different mechanisms for the chlorite formation: ferro-magnesian chlorites form by dissolution-recrystallization process and re-equilibrate with burial, whereas ferriferous chlorite form from berthierite. (author)

  10. Approaches to the Low Grade Metamorphic History of the Karakaya Complex by Chlorite Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Tetiker; Hüseyin Yalçın; Ömer Bozkaya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, chlorite is used to investigate the diagenetic-metamorphic evolution and accurate geological history of the different units belonging to the Karakaya complex, Turkey. Primary and secondary chlorite minerals in the very low-grade metamorphic rocks display interference colors of blue and brown and an appearance of optical isotropy. Chlorites are present in the matrix, pores, and/or rocks units as platy/flaky and partly radial forms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data indicate that Mg-F...

  11. Investigation of chloritization of smectite. Document prepared by other institute, based on the trust contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of smectite under the bulk composition of high iron content is as follows: (1) and (2). (1) In early burial diagenesis, the chemical variations of chlorite and dioctahedral smectite in Tertiary formations of Niigata prefecture. (2) The experiment of the stability of smectite in iron - rich bulk composition under oxygen fugacity. In the present study, the results are as follows: (1) Samples were taken from the cores and cuttings of exploratory test well of Oguni. The trioctahedral smectite in tertiary formation decreases with a depth. Below 3800m, Si content of chlorite increases with a depth. In the study, corrensite at 2700m depth has higher Si content, as compared to chlorite at 3800m. Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of chlorite/smectite interstratified mineral increase with increasing Si content regardless of the depth. (2) Chlorite/smectite interstratified mineral forms at 250degC on the compositions of the starting material of Mont:Mt=5:5. Chlorite did not crystallize by using of the starting material of Sap:Mt 5:5 at 250degC. At 400degC, montomorillonite did not decompose on the starting material composition with low iron content. The iron density is very important for the stability of smectite. (author)

  12. Low-temperature magnetic anisotropy in micas and chlorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Bender Koch, Christian; Lorenz, Wolfram E A;

    2014-01-01

    use the magnetic anisotropy to understand a rock fabric, it is necessary to identify the minerals responsible for the magnetic anisotropy. Techniques have been developed to separate contributions of the ferrimagnetic, antiferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and diamagnetic susceptibilities to the anisotropy......Phyllosilicates, such as micas and chlorite, are common rock-forming minerals and often show preferred orientation in deformed rocks. In combination with single-crystal anisotropy, this leads to anisotropy of physical properties in the rock, such as magnetic susceptibility. In order to effectively...... of magnetic susceptibility. Because diamagnetic and paramagnetic susceptibility are both linearly dependent on field, separation of the anisotropic contributions requires understanding how the degree of anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility changes as a function of temperature. Note that...

  13. Nanoscale surface properties and interaction with fundamental biomolecules of chlorite and phlogopite

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The surface properties of minerals have important implications in geology, environment, industry and biotechnology and for certain aspects in the research on the origin of life. This research project aims to widen the knowledge on the nanoscale surface properties of chlorite and phlogopite by means of advanced methodologies, and also to investigate the interaction of fundamental biomolecules, such as nucleotides, RNA, DNA and amino acid glycine with the surface of the selected phyllosilica...

  14. Water incorporation in NAMs after antigorite and chlorite dehydration reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Hermann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Subduction zones play a fundamental role in the deep water cycle making the Earth unique among other terrestrial planets. Water is incorporated into hydrous minerals during seafloor alteration of the oceanic lithosphere. During subduction of the oceanic lithosphere, dehydration of these hydrous minerals produces a fluid phase. A part of this fluid phase will be recycled back to the Earth's surface through hydrothermal aqueous fluids or through hydrous arc magmas, whereas another part of the water will be transported to the deep mantle by Nominally Anhydrous Minerals (NAMs) such as olivine, pyroxene and garnet. The partitioning of water between these two processes is crucial for our understanding of the mantle-scale water recycling in the Earth. This can be investigated experimentally under water-saturated conditions because this situation is met during dehydration reactions. However relatively low temperature conditions for such reactions make challenging these experiments. An alternative can be found in the natural record. The Alpine Betic-Rif orogen together with Central and Western Alps offer an invaluable diversity of ultramafic lenses that record a significant range of pressure-temperature and cooling rates. Hence these samples portray an excellent data set of 24 samples to survey the transfer of fluids from hydrous phases (brucite, antigorite and chlorite) to NAMs (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and garnet). Well-studied samples from these localities have been selected for water measurement using FTIR spectroscopy. The selected suite comprises the following high-pressure peridotite outcrops: Malenco serpentinite, Cerro del Almirez (1.6-1.9 GPa and 680-710ºC), Alpe Arami (3.2 GPa and 840ºC), Cima di Gagnone (3.0 GPa and 750-800ºC) and Alpe Albion (0.6 GPa and 730ºC). The infrared signature of olivine in all localities contains water (hydroxyl groups) associated to intrinsic defects (mostly point defects related to Ti4+) and extrinsic submicroscopic

  15. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    OpenAIRE

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a ...

  16. Chemical classification and geotermometry of chlorites from the cretaceous Santa Rosa and Lutitas de Macanal formations, eastern emerald belt, eastern cordillera, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the chemical composition of chlorites from the Santa Rosa and Lutitas de Macanal formations in the eastern emerald belt (eastern cordillera), are used to estimate the formation temperature of these minerals and the associated hydrothermal fluids. The chlorites were analyzed using the classification proposed by hey (1954), foster (1962), and Bailey (1980); and the formation temperature is calculated from empirical geothermometers from kranidiotis and Maclean (1987), Cathelineau (1988), Jowett (1991) and Xie et al. (1997). Chlorites in hydrothermally altered rocks associated with emerald mineralization of the Santa Rosa formation is classified as clinochlore and formed at temperatures of 354 Celsius degrade; this temperature is consistent with the fluid inclusions in emeralds of the same formation. Chlorites in veins from Lutitas de Macanal Formation are classified as chamosites and formed at lower temperatures between 210 to 225 Celsius degrade

  17. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence G. Miller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate or via chlorite (ClO2- dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO2- amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO2-. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO2- and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO4- or ClO3- was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  18. Removal of chlorite by reaction with ferrous iron

    OpenAIRE

    Iatrou, Angela

    1991-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as an oxidant and/or disinfectant for drinking water treatment has been an alternative considered when utilities seek to control trihalomethane concentrations. However, concern regarding residual concentrations of chlorite and chlorate have resulted in limitations on applied chlorine dioxide dosages. This study describes the use of ferrous iron as a possible reducing agent for the elimination of residual chlorite from drinking water.

  19. Ideonella dechloratans: Investigation of the chlorite dismutase promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Goetelen, Thijs

    2015-01-01

    Chlorate and perchlorate pollutions have become a problem in the environment in the last decades. Studies have shown that some bacteria can degrade these substances into unharmful substances such as chloride and molecular oxygen. One of these chlorate degrading bacteria is Ideonella dechloratans that uses chlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase to process chlorate. In the promoter gene sequence of chlorite dismutase there might be regulator sequences such as fumarate and nitrate reductase r...

  20. Study of adsorption behaviors of Cs+ and Yb3+ on calcite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, chlorite and glauconite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption behaviors of Cs+ and Yb3+ on five minerals including calcite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, chlorite and glauconite are simultaneously investigated by the static equilibrium batch experiments with radioactive tracer technique. The experimental results indicate that under same experimental conditions (initial solution acidity, initial ion concentration and liquid-solid phase ratio), the adsorption capacity (Q) in unit of mmol/g of montmorillonite towards Cs+ and/or Yb3+ are stronger than other 4 minerals, which display no evident difference of Q values. The Rd of Cs+ and Yb3+ on the five minerals decrease with increasing of their initial concentrations in solution. The uptakes of Cs+ are ordinary lower than Ya3+ except for the high c0. The adsorption isotherms of Cs+ and Yb3+ are all in fairly agreement with the Freundlich's equation. The adsorption mechanism of Cs+ and Yb3+ in the systems of kaolinite, montmorillonite and chlorite at the experimental pH range is likely attributed to the process of ion exchange

  1. Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaquero, M. P.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible changes in the mineral composition of food during frying could be the consequence of losses by leaching, or changes in concentrations caused by exchanges between the food and culinary fat of other compounds. The net result depends on the type of food, the frying fat used and the frying process. Moreover, the modifications that frying produces in other nutrients could indirectly affect the availability of dietary minerals. The most outstanding ones are those that can take place in the fat or in the protein. With respect to the interactions between frying oils and minerals, we have recent knowledge concerning the effects of consuming vegetable oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without turnover, on the nutritive utilization of dietary minerals. The experiments have been carried out in pregnant and growing rats, which consumed diets containing, as a sole source of fat, the testing frying oils or unused oils. It seems that the consumption of various frying oils, with a polar compound content lower or close to the maximum limit of 25% accepted for human consumption, does not alter the absorption and metabolism of calcium, phosphorous, iron or copper. Magnesium absorption from diets containing frying oils tends to increase but the urinary excretion of this element increases, resulting imperceptible the variations in the magnesium balance. The urinary excretion of Zn also increased although its balance remained unchanged. Different studies referring to the effects of consuming fried fatty fish on mineral bioavailability will also be presented. On one hand, frying can cause structural changes in fish protein, which are associated with an increase in iron absorption and a decrease in body zinc retention. The nutritive utilization of other elements such as magnesium, calcium and copper seems to be unaffected. On the other hand; it has been described that an excess of fish fatty acids in the diet produces iron depletion, but when fatty

  2. Paragenesis of Cr-rich muscovite and chlorite in green-mica quartzites of Saigaon–Palasgaon area, Western Bastar Craton, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K R Randive; M M Korakoppa; S V Muley; A M Varade; H W Khandare; S G Lanjewar; R R Tiwari; K K Aradhi

    2015-02-01

    Green mica (fuchsite or chromian-muscovite) is reported worldwide in the Archaean metasedimentary rocks, especially quartzites. They are generally associated with a suite of heavy minerals and a range of phyllosilicates. We report the occurrence of green-mica quartzites in the Saigaon–Palasgaon area within Bastar Craton in central India. Mineralogical study has shown that there are two types of muscovites; the chromium-containing muscovite (Cr2O3 0.84–1.84%) and muscovite (Cr2O3 0.00–0.22%). Chlorites are chromium-containing chlorites (Cr2O3 3.66–5.39%) and low-chromium-containing chlorites (Cr2O3 0.56–2.62%), and as such represent ripidolite–brunsvigite varieties. Back scattered electron images and EPMA data has revealed that chlorite occurs in two forms, viz., parallel to subparallel stacks in the form of intergrowth with muscovite and independent crystals within the matrix. The present study indicates that the replacement of chromium-containing chlorite by chromium-containing muscovite is found to be due to increasing grade of metamorphism of chromium-rich sediments. However, the absence of significant compositional gap between aforementioned varieties indicates disparate substitution of cations, especially chromium, within matrix chlorites. The chromium-containing muscovite and muscovite are two separate varieties having distinct paragenesis.

  3. Mineralogy and geochemistry of laterites developed on chlorite schists in Tchollire region, North Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banakeng, L. A.; Zame, P. Zo'o.; Tchameni, R.; Mamdem, L.; Bitom, D.

    2016-07-01

    Laterites developed from the weathering of chlorite schists have been studied in Tchollire region, North Cameroon. They include two profiles: a 5.5 m depth profile in Doudja site and a 12.3 m profile in Fimbe site. The chlorite schists have a lepidoblastic to lepidogranoblastic texture and are mainly composed of chlorite, muscovite, biotite, feldspars and quartz but that of Fimbe is marked by the presence of amphibole. It is felsic with a high SiO2 content (67%) and low Fe2O3 (5.8%) and MgO (2.4%) contents in Doudja site but has a lower content of SiO2 (46%) in the Fimbe site where it is mafic with higher contents in Fe2O3 (12.4%) and MgO (6.3%). The chlorite schists of Doudja show high contents in Zr, Sr, Ta, with moderate contents in Cr, V, U and Zn. That of Fimbe is particularly rich in Cr, V, Ni, Sr and Zn with a moderate Zr content. All chlorite schists have high barium contents (270-393 ppm) with LREE-enrichment. The soils are yellowish and, from bottom to top, are composed of a coarse saprolite, fine saprolite, loose clayey horizon and an organo mineral horizon. The main minerals are chlorite, muscovite, biotite, feldspars, quartz, smectites, vermiculite, kaolinite, hematite and goethite. In Doudja, SiO2 mainly decreases from the bottom to the top of the profile while, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 generally increase; in Fimbe, SiO2 and Al2O3 increase up the profile but Fe2O3 decreases; the general high Fe and corresponding decrease in Mg contents in the soils show that the smectite formed is nontronite. Chromium, V, Cu, Ba and Sr show high contents in the two studied profiles but Zr, U and Ta is higher in Doudja than in Fimbe. Copper generally has high contents in the loose clayey and organo mineral horizons. Nickel is higher in the Fimbe profile and probably issued from the Ni-rich mafic protolith. SiO2 has positive correlations with K2O, Zr, Li and Rb. Correlations of SiO2 with CaO, TiO2 and Cr are negative. Al2O3 and Fe2O3 have a positive correlation with Pb. Doudja

  4. Redox Interactions of Tc(VII), U(VI), and Np(V) with Microbially Reduced Biotite and Chlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookshaw, Diana R; Pattrick, Richard A D; Bots, Pieter; Law, Gareth T W; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Mosselmans, J Fredrick W; Vaughan, David J; Dardenne, Kathy; Morris, Katherine

    2015-11-17

    Technetium, uranium, and neptunium are contaminants that cause concern at nuclear facilities due to their long half-life, environmental mobility, and radiotoxicity. Here we investigate the impact of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in biotite and chlorite and the role that this has in enhancing mineral reactivity toward soluble TcO4(-), UO2(2+), and NpO2(+). When reacted with unaltered biotite and chlorite, significant sorption of U(VI) occurred in low carbonate (0.2 mM) buffer, while U(VI), Tc(VII), and Np(V) showed low reactivity in high carbonate (30 mM) buffer. On reaction with the microbially reduced minerals, all radionuclides were removed from solution with U(VI) reactivity influenced by carbonate. Analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed reductive precipitation to poorly soluble U(IV) in low carbonate conditions and both Tc(VII) and Np(V) in high carbonate buffer were also fully reduced to poorly soluble Tc(IV) and Np(IV) phases. U(VI) reduction was inhibited under high carbonate conditions. Furthermore, EXAFS analysis suggested that in the reaction products, Tc(IV) was associated with Fe, Np(IV) formed nanoparticulate NpO2, and U(IV) formed nanoparticulate UO2 in chlorite and was associated with silica in biotite. Overall, microbial reduction of the Fe(III) associated with biotite and chlorite primed the minerals for reductive scavenging of radionuclides: this has clear implications for the fate of radionuclides in the environment. PMID:26488884

  5. Uranium deposits of the Grants, New Mexico mineral belt (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part of a study of the genesis of the U deposits of the Grants mineral belt. Enrichment of Mg in ore zones is frequently observed, with chlorite being a common product. Clay mineralogic studies argue for chlorite-illite-montmorillonite associations with ores. The methods include scanning electron microscopy, Eh-pH diagrams, activation analysis, and rare earth element studies

  6. Scales of equilibrium and disequilibrium during cleavage formation in chlorite and biotite-grade phyllites, SE Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, C.K.; Wintsch, R.P.; Kunk, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed electron microprobe analyses of phyllosilicates in crenulated phyllites from south-eastern Vermont show that grain-scale zoning is common, and sympathetic zoning in adjacent minerals is nearly universal. We interpret this to reflect a pressure-solution mechanism for cleavage development, where precipitation from a very small fluid reservoir fractionated that fluid. Multiple analyses along single muscovite, biotite and chlorite grains (30-200 ??m in length) show zoning patterns indicating Tschermakitic substitutions in muscovite and both Tschermakitic and di/trioctahedral substitutions in biotite and chlorite. Using cross-cutting relationships and mineral chemistry it is shown that these patterns persist in cleavages produced at metamorphic conditions of chlorite-grade, chlorite-grade overprinted by biotite-grade and biotite-grade. Zoning patterns are comparable in all three settings, requiring a similar cleavage-forming mechanism independent of metamorphic grade. Moreover, the use of 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology demonstrates this is true regardless of age. Furthermore, samples with chlorite-grade cleavages overprinted by biotite porphyroblasts suggest the closure temperatures for the diffusion of Al, Si, Mg and Fe ions are greater than the temperature of the biotite isograd (>???400 ??C). Parallel and smoothly fanning tie lines produced by coexisting muscovite-chlorite, and muscovite-biotite pairs on compositional diagrams demonstrate effectively instantaneous chemical equilibrium and probably indicate simultaneous crystallization. These results do not support theories suggesting cleavages form in fluid-dominated systems. If crenulation cleavages formed in systems in which the chemical potentials of all major components are fixed by an external reservoir, then the compositions of individual grains defining these cleavages would be uniform. On the contrary, the fine-scale chemical zoning observed probably reflects a grain-scale process consistent with a

  7. Characterization of Zn-bearing chlorite by Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy - occurrence associated to the Pb-Zn-Ag deposits of Canoas, PR, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide new insights on mineralogical aspects of geochemical mapping/natural processes related to the chlorite formation (e.g. crystallochemistry and mechanisms of formation of these materials, which has been applied in different studies of environmental profiles), we investigated chlorite samples associated to the Pb-Zn-Ag sulfide ore from Canoas 1 deposit (Vale do Ribeira, state of Parana, Brazil). By means of Moessbauer (MS) and infrared (IV) spectroscopy, we addressed some issues as those related to the chloritization processes, as well as how Zn would be incorporated into its crystalline structure. Results carried out by ME and IV spectroscopy clearly pointed out for a chlorite occurrence, which in fact incorporates Zn into its structure and also alters the structural patterns for this mineral. Moreover, ME data sets indicated the presence of Fe which is located only in octahedral sites, in trans-configuration, and the Zn emplacement by the chloritization process also occurs in the brucite layer. (author)

  8. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  9. 57Fe Moessbauer investigation of naturally oxidised chlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The green chlorite, occurring as monomineralic mass in the Sukinda (India) area has been investigated by 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy together with IR, XRD and XRF analysis. The Moessbauer spectra (at RT and 100 K), split into four symmetric doublets, show hyperfine parameters suggesting Fe2+ at cis and brucite sites and Fe3+ at trans and cis sites. The results show that susceptibility to oxidation (Fe2+ → Fe3+) is highest in the trans site, moderate in the cis site, and least in the brucite site. (orig.)

  10. Ligand Binding to Chlorite Dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schutter, Amy; Correia, Hugo D; Freire, Diana M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto; Santos-Silva, Teresa; González, Pablo J; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2015-10-29

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyzes the reduction of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. Here, the ligand binding to Cld of Magnetospirillum sp. (MaCld) is investigated with X-ray crystallography and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR reveals a large heterogeneity in the structure of wild-type MaCld, showing a variety of low- and high-spin ferric heme forms. Addition of an axial ligand, such as azide or imidazole, removes this heterogeneity almost entirely. This is in line with the two high resolution crystal structures of MaCld obtained in the presence of azide and thiocyanate that show the coordination of the ligands to the heme iron. The crystal structure of the MaCld-azide complex reveals a single well-defined orientation of the azide molecule in the heme pocket. EPR shows, however, a pH-dependent heme structure, probably due to acid-base transitions of the surrounding amino-acid residues stabilizing azide. For the azide and imidazole complex of MaCld, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions with the close-by (14)N and (1)H nuclei are determined using pulsed EPR. These values are compared to the corresponding data for the low-spin forms observed in the ferric wild-type MaCld and to existing EPR data on azide and imidazole complexes of other heme proteins. PMID:26287794

  11. Uranium deposits of the Grants, New Mexico mineral belt (II). [Genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1979-07-01

    This is part of a study of the genesis of the U deposits of the Grants mineral belt. Enrichment of Mg in ore zones is frequently observed, with chlorite being a common product. Clay mineralogic studies argue for chlorite-illite-montmorillonite associations with ores. The methods include scanning electron microscopy, Eh-pH diagrams, activation analysis, and rare earth element studies. (DLC)

  12. Single Molecule Investigation of Glycine-Chlorite Interaction by Cross-Correlated Scanning Probe Microscopy and Quantum Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Daniele; Ulian, Gianfranco; Valdrè, Giovanni

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we studied the interaction of glycine with the (001) surface of chlorite mineral at a single molecule level by cross-correlating scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) investigations. Chlorite mineral is particularly interesting and peculiar for the interaction with organic molecules because it presents an alternated stacking of brucite-like (hydrophobic) and talc-like (hydrophilic) layers of different polarities. Brucite-like is positive, whereas talc-like is negative. The experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations show that glycine is stably and selectively adsorbed on the brucite-like layer, organized in monolayers with different patterns. The sizes of single molecules of glycine measured by AFM are in agreement with those calculated by QM. Glycine molecules were found to align both at the edges and on the terraces of the brucitic surface. QM simulations confirmed the AFM observations that glycine molecule is adsorbed with high adsorption energy preferentially with its plane parallel to the (001) brucite-like surface. QM also provided the geometry conformation of the molecule and the bonding scheme between glycine and brucite surface. This kind of data can be very helpful both to biotechnological applications of this substrate and to depict some important processes that might have been occurred in prebiotic environments. PMID:25830864

  13. Kinetics and Mechanism of Oxidation of Methimazole by Chlorite in Slightly Acidic Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipiso, Kudzanai; Simoyi, Reuben H

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of methimazole (1-methyl-3H-imidazole), MMI, by chlorite in mildly acidic environments were studied. It is a complex reaction that gives oligo-oscillations in chlorine dioxide concentrations in excess chlorite conditions. The stoichiometry is strictly 2:1, with the sulfur center being oxidized to sulfate and the organic moiety being hydrolyzed to several indeterminate species. In excess MMI conditions over chlorite, the sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid were observed as major intermediates. The sulfenic acid, which was observed in the electrochemical oxidation of MMI, was not observed with chlorite oxidations. Initial reduction of chlorite produced HOCl, an autocatalytic species in chlorite oxidations. HOCl rapidly reacts with chlorite to produce chlorine dioxide, which, in turn, reacts rapidly with MMI to produce more chlorite. The reaction of chlorine dioxide with MMI is competitive, in rate, with the chlorite-MMI and HOCl-ClO2(-) reactions. This explains the oligo-oscillations in ClO2 concentrations. PMID:27126471

  14. Diagenetic alteration process of chlorite in Tyr Member sandstone, Siri Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afsoon Moatari; Friis, Henrik; Hansen, Jens Peter Vind

    zone and deeper, porous samples were later cemented by macro quartz, with larger amounts in the water zone. Chlorite is found in varying amounts in Rau 1A samples. It can be recognized in SEM as a platy or bladed precipitate, which is mostly rich in iron. Chlorite is present in most samples, although...... only in traceable amounts in the samples which are dominated by microquartz cement. There seem to be two chlorite phases: The first phase occurs as rosettes in a grain coating growth pattern. It is partially intergrown with microquartz or forms a dense mixture of small chlorite rosettes and scattered...... cement is more abundant and better developed in the lower parts of reservoir units, whereas it may be scarce and poorly developed in upper parts, especially within the oil zone. Below the oil-water contact, the growth of chlorite may have continued for a longer period, resulting in more dense coatings...

  15. Clay mineral distribution in the continental shelf and slope off Saurashtra, West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.

    with relatively low values on the outer shelf. Illite and chlorite contents are high on the outer shelf. These variations are attributed to the influence of depositional environment and individual property of the clay minerals. Distinct differences in the nature...

  16. Succession of Permian and Mesozoic metasomatic events in the eastern Pyrenees with emphasis on the Trimouns talc-chlorite deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Alexandre; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Poujol, Marc; Boulvais, Philippe; de Parseval, Philippe; Rouleau, Caroline; Robert, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies proposing pre-orogenic mantle exhumation models have helped renew the interest of the geosciences community in the Pyrenees, which should be now interpreted as a hyper-extended passive margin before the convergence between Iberia and Eurasia occurred. Unresolved questions of the Pyrenean geology, as well as the understanding of the formation of hyper-extended passive margins, are how the crust was thinned, and when, where and how the crustal breakoff occurred. The study of the Variscan and pre-Variscan Pyrenean basement is thus critical to document and understand this Cretaceous crustal thinning. In order to specify the timing of Mesozoic metasomatism and the associated deformation in the pre-Mesozoic basement of the Pyrenees, we carried out a U-Th-Pb laser ablation ICP-MS study on a large panel of REE and titanium-rich minerals (titanite and rutile) from talc-chlorite ores from the eastern Pyrenees, with a special emphasis on the Trimouns deposit, the world's largest talc quarry. Our results suggest that the Trimouns talc formation was restricted to the upper Aptian-Cenomanian time, while the talc and chlorite formation in the eastern Pyrenees occurred during several distinct Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous episodes. These results give strong constraints on the tectonic setting of the Pyrenean domain during the transition between the Variscan and Alpine orogenic cycles, and particularly on when and how the upper crust was thinned before the crustal breakoff and the final mantle exhumation.

  17. Manipulating Conserved Heme Cavity Residues of Chlorite Dismutase: Effect on Structure, Redox Chemistry, and Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Gysel, Kira; Bellei, Marzia; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Kostan, Julius; Pirker, Katharina F.; Daims, Holger; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Obinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. In order to elucidate the role of conserved heme cavity residues in the catalysis of this reaction comprehensive mutational and biochemical analyses of Cld from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were performed. Particularly, point mutations of the cavity-forming residues R173, K141, W145, W146, and E210 were performed. The effect of manipulation in 12 single and doub...

  18. Characteristics of chlorites in seismogenic fault zones: the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sone

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The iron content and the asymmetry of iron and magnesium ions in chlorites are examined for the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan, which is a seismogenic fault. The samples are collected from the cores drilled for the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP, borehole B. Three fault zones are recognized as candidates for the source of seismogenic materials. The fault zones are composed of fractured-damaged rocks, breccia, gray gouge, black gouge, and black material. Chlorite from each type of rock was analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD. The iron content and asymmetry of the iron and magnesium ions in the chlorites were estimated from the XRD peak ratios. The hydroxide and silicate layers of chlorite in the black gouge and black material have low iron contents. Many studies have suggested that a temperature rise occurred at the fault zones. In addition, the temperature rise can result in the production of iron oxides such as magnetite or maghemite, as reported by other studies. However, the temperature rise cannot explain the low value of iron content in the chlorites. Another reason for the low value of iron content is the variation in the pH of the fluid, which can be controlled by radical reactions. Therefore, on the basis of chlorite characteristics, the reactions at the seismogenic fault are due not only to the thermal decomposition resulting from the temperature rise and but also to rock-fluid interactions.

  19. Provenance and distribution of clay minerals in the sediments of the western continental shelf and slope of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Rao, B.R.

    The distribution of clay minerals from 156 surficial sediments of the western continental margin of India, ranging from 17 to 2000 m water depth, indicate that there are three principal sources of sediments. The illite and chlorite-rich assemblage...

  20. Characteristics of chlorites in seismogenic fault zones: the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hashimoto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The iron content and the asymmetry of iron and magnesium ions in chlorites are examined for the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan, which is a seismogenic fault. The samples are collected from the cores drilled for the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP. Three fault zones are recognized as candidates for the source of seismogenic materials. The fault zones are composed of fractured-damaged rocks, breccia, gray gouge, black gouge, and black material. Chlorite from each type of rock was analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD. The iron content and asymmetry of the iron and magnesium ions in the chlorites were estimated from the XRD peak ratios. The hydroxide and silicate layers in the black gouge and black material have low iron contents. Many studies have suggested that a temperature rise occurred at the fault zones. In addition, the temperature rise can result in the production of iron oxides such as magnetite or maghemite, as reported by other studies. However, the temperature rise cannot explain the low value of iron content in the chlorites. Another reason for the low value of iron content is the variation in the pH of the fluid, which can be controlled by radical reactions. Therefore, the reactions at the seismogenic fault are due to not only the thermal decomposition resulting from the temperature rise and but also rock-fluid interactions based on the chlorite characteristics.

  1. Coupled Petrological and Geodynamic Models of Mantle Flow in Subduction Zones; the Importance of Chlorite in the Emergence of a Low-Viscosity Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. M.; Baker, L. J.; Asimow, P. D.; Gurnis, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation studies have shown that 5-20 km thick low velocity layers exist above seismically fast slabs and are associated with broad zones of high attenuation in many subduction zones. These observations are generally interpreted as formation of hydrous phases by dehydration of the slab, although the impact of water in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) on seismic wave propagation is largely unknown. Recent petrological experiments on hydrous peridotite at subduction zone conditions suggest that chlorite will be stable adjacent to the subducting slab in sufficient quantities to be a significant water sink. We use a scheme that couples a petrological model (pHMELTS) with a 2-D thermal and variable viscosity flow model (ConMan) to model energy and mass transfer within a subduction zone. By varying input parameters including the convergence rate and slab dip we have developed models for cases in the Costa-Rica and Izu- Bonin-Marianas arc systems and are able to predict major and trace element compositions of primary melts, as well as geophysical observables, such as the topography and geoid. We find that the emergence of a slab- adjacent low-viscosity channel (LVC) is a natural consequence of the thermal and chemical controls on mantle dynamics and feedback between them. In our earlier models, as the LVC is dragged downwards by the subducting slab, hornblende breaks down at about 2.5 GPa and other hydrous phases such as serpentine are secondary in importance to the NAM water reservoir. The spatial limit of the LVC is the water-saturated solidus of the hydrated peridotite; the LVC thickens as the peridotite is progressively depleted by melting and the solidus migrates into the warmer wedge, despite water replenishment at depth. pHMELTS is a hybrid of the pMELTS model of Ghiorso and co-workers and includes amphiboles, serpentines and micas. Chlorite was lacking but we have recently rectified this omission. Following De Capitani and co- workers, we

  2. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary X-ray data collection and analysis for crystals of chlorite dismutase, a haem-based enzyme that very effectively reduces chlorite to chloride while producing molecular oxygen, is reported to 2.1 Å resolution. Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (< 2 kU mg−1) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P21212 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available

  3. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%. PMID:24534637

  4. THE REACTIVITY OF PREHYDROLYZED SOFTWOOD KRAFT PULPS AFTER PROLONGED COOKING FOLLOWED BY CHLORITE DELIGNIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Germgard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In a laboratory study high-quality spruce chips were prehydrolyzed to remove hemicelluloses and then kraft cooked to different kappa numbers by varying the cooking time. Each pulp sample was then chlorite delignified to selectively remove the remaining lignin. The reactivities of the pulp samples before and after chlorite delignification were determined by Fock’s test, which is supposed to measure the pulp’s reactivity in the conventional viscose process. A number of analyses were carried out to determine which parameters affected pulp reactivity, as, for example: intrinsic viscosity, kappa number, pulp yield, carbohydrate composition, levelling-off degree of polymerization (LODP, and alkali solubility. The results of the study showed that the pulp reactivity increased with decreasing kappa number, and the highest reactivity was obtained after total lignin removal using chlorite delignification. It was also found that the carbohydrate composition had no influence on the pulp reactivity, but lower intrinsic viscosity either obtained by prolonged cooking or chlorite delignification correlated with higher pulp reactivity. Finally, lower alkali solubility, i.e. higher R18, reduced the reactivity.

  5. Characterization of Zn-bearing chlorite by Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy - occurrence associated to the Pb-Zn-Ag deposits of Canoas, PR, Brazil; Caracterizacao de clorita portadora de Zn por espectroscopia Moessbauer e espectroscopia infravermelho - uma ocorrencia associada ao deposito de Pb-Zn-Ag de Canoas, PR, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbernon, Rosely Aparecida Liguori [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EACH/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades; Blot, Alain [Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD), Paris (France); Pereira, Vitor Paulo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias; Franco, Daniel Ribeiro, E-mail: imbernon@usp.br, E-mail: brotalain@free.fr, E-mail: vitor.pereira@ufrgs.br, E-mail: drfranco@on.br [Observatorio Nacional do Brasil (COGE/ON), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Geofisica

    2011-06-15

    In order to provide new insights on mineralogical aspects of geochemical mapping/natural processes related to the chlorite formation (e.g. crystallochemistry and mechanisms of formation of these materials, which has been applied in different studies of environmental profiles), we investigated chlorite samples associated to the Pb-Zn-Ag sulfide ore from Canoas 1 deposit (Vale do Ribeira, state of Parana, Brazil). By means of Moessbauer (MS) and infrared (IV) spectroscopy, we addressed some issues as those related to the chloritization processes, as well as how Zn would be incorporated into its crystalline structure. Results carried out by ME and IV spectroscopy clearly pointed out for a chlorite occurrence, which in fact incorporates Zn into its structure and also alters the structural patterns for this mineral. Moreover, ME data sets indicated the presence of Fe which is located only in octahedral sites, in trans-configuration, and the Zn emplacement by the chloritization process also occurs in the brucite layer. (author)

  6. COMPOSITION OF MINERAL PHASES OF THE GHIDIRIM DIATOMITE

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile Rusu; Aliona Vrînceanu; Igor Polevoi

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the mineralogical composition of diatomite from the Ghidirim location of RM, as well as of the extracted clay phase are presented. The mineral phase of the diatomite contains a number of clay minerals, like montmorillonite (in a mixture with insignificant quantities of slightly chloritized montmorillonite), illite and kaolinite. Diatomite contains also non-clay components as fine-dispersed quartz and amorphous material, the more probable sources of which are opal, amorphous alumosi...

  7. Surface energy of talc and chlorite: Comparison between electronegativity calculation and immersion results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, Jean-Marc; Salles, Fabrice; Henry, Marc; Malandrini, Harold; Clauss, Frédéric

    2007-01-15

    The surface energies of talc and chlorite is computed using a simple model, which uses the calculation of the electrostatic energy of the crystal. It is necessary to calculate the atomic charges. We have chosen to follow Henry's model of determination of partial charges using scales of electronegativity and hardness. The results are in correct agreement with a determination of the surface energy obtained from an analysis of the heat of immersion data. Both results indicate that the surface energy of talc is lower than the surface energy of chlorite, in agreement with observed behavior of wettability. The influence of Al and Fe on this phenomenon is discussed. Surface energy of this type of solids seems to depend more strongly on the geometry of the crystal than on the type of atoms pointing out of the surface; i.e., the surface energy depends more on the physics of the system than on its chemistry. PMID:17081554

  8. Redox Thermodynamics of High-Spin and Low-Spin Forms of Chlorite Dismutases with Diverse Subunit and Oligomeric Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Bellei, Marzia; Sündermann, Axel; Pirker, Katharina F.; Hagmüller, Andreas; Mlynek, Georg; Kostan, Julius; Daims, Holger; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Oostenbrink, Chris; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Obinger, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b-containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. In this work, the thermodynamics of the one-electron reduction of the ferric high-spin forms and of the six-coordinate low-spin cyanide adducts of the enzymes from Nitrobacter winogradskyi (NwCld) and Candidatus “Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments. These proteins belong to two phylogenetically separated lineages that differ in su...

  9. High resolution characterization of ectomycorrhizal fungal-mineral interactions in axenic microcosm experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Saccone, Loredana; Gazzè, Salvatore A.; Duran, Adele L.; Leake, Jonathan R; Banwart, Steven A.; Ragnarsdóttir, Kristín Vala; Smits, Mark M; McMaster, Terence J.

    2012-01-01

    Microcosms with Pinus sylvestris seedlings in symbiosis with the fungus mycorrhizal Paxillus involutus were established, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterise plant photosynthate-driven fungal interactions with mineral surfaces. Comparison of images of the same area of the minerals before and after mycorrhizal fungal colonization showed extensive growth of hyphae on three different mineral surfaces - hornblende, biotite and chlorite. A layer of biological exudate, or biol...

  10. Evaluation of experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid by excised teat assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A L; Oliver, S P; Fydenkevez, M E

    1984-12-01

    An experimental teat dip containing sodium chlorite and lactic acid, diluted in water, was evaluated by excised teat protocol. The teat dip was tested against 21 microorganisms. Included were: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Numerous strains were tested for strain differences. Environmental bacteria were included because of their increasing importance as a cause of bovine mastitis. All excised teats were dipped in a bacterial suspension containing about 1 X 10(8) cfu/ml. Negative control teats were not dipped in a germicidal compound. Positive controls were dipped in 1% iodophor. Effectiveness of the experimental teat dip was expressed as the percent reduction in mean log of bacteria recovered from dipped teats as compared to numbers recovered from control teats. The sodium chlorite - lactic acid dip caused a greater percent log reduction than iodophor for 14 of 21 strains tested. However, differences were generally slight. The experimental teat dip appeared effective against Gram-negative bacteria. Some differences in percent log reduction were observed between strains of the same species. Lowest effectiveness and greatest strain variation were observed with Staphylococcus aureus for both dips tested. PMID:6530497

  11. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  12. Clay mineral stratigraphy of Miocene to recent marine sediments in the central Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.P. de

    1992-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses were made of the smaller than 2 J..Lm fraction from about 1250 samples of the central Mediterranean Miocene to Recent and the southeastern North-Atlantic Miocene in order to reconstruct climatic changes. Relative quantities of the clay minerals chlorite, illite, pyrophylli

  13. Significance of saturation index of certain clay minerals in shallow coastal groundwater, in and around Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chidambaram; U Karmegam; P Sasidhar; M V Prasanna; R Manivannan; S Arunachalam; S Manikandan; P Anandhan

    2011-10-01

    The saturation index of clay minerals like Gibbsite, Kaolinite, Illite, Montmorillonite and Chlorite in groundwater were studied in detail by collecting 29 groundwater samples from the shallow coastal aquifers in and around Kalpakkam. The samples collected were analysed for major cations, anions and trace elements by using standard procedures. The study reveals that pH has a significant role in the saturation index (SI) of minerals. It also shows that the relationship of electrical conductivity to the SI of these minerals is not significant than that of the ionic strength, log pCO2 values, and alumina silica ratio have significant relation to the SI of these clay minerals. The SI of these clay minerals was spatially distributed to identify the areas of higher SI. Silica has good correlation to SI of Kaolinite, Gibbsite and Montmorillonite and Al has good correlation to SI of all the minerals except to that of Chlorite.

  14. The role of paramagnetic minerals in clay sediments magnetic anisotropy: correlation between magnetic fabric and chlorite preferred orientation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cifelli, F.; Mattei, M.; Chadima, Martin; Hirt, A. M.; Lenser, S.

    Geofyzikální ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 38, - (2006), s. 24-24 ISSN 0231-5548. [Castle Meeting New Trends in Geomagnetism, Paleo, Rock and Environmental Magnetism /10./. 03.09.2006-08.09.2006, Valtice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy * neutron diffraction analysis * clay sediments Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  15. Evolution of chlorite composition in the Paleogene prototype basin of Jiyang Depression, Shandong, China, and its implication for paleogeothermal gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Ming; CHEN; XiaoMing; JI; JunFeng; ZHANG; Zhe; ZHANG; Yun

    2007-01-01

    The Dongying Basin,Huimin Basin,and Zhanhua Basin constitute the Jiyang Depression in Shandong Province.They are major oil and gas exploring districts within the depression.Through reconstructions of the paleotemperature of the three basins facilitated with the chlorite geothermometry,the thermal history of the Paleogene prototype basin in Jiyang Depression and its geologic significance were explored.This study reveals that the Si4+ component in chlorites reduces gradually as its buried depth increases,while the AlIV component increases accordingly.The chlorite type changes from silicon-rich diabantite to silicon-poor ferroamesite and prochlorite.The prochlorite in this district only appears in the deep buried depth,high temperature,and relatively old stratigraphies; while the diabantite appears in the shallower buried,low temperature,and newly formed strata; the ferroamesite exists in the conditions between prochlorite and diabantite formation.The diagenetic temperatures of the chlorites in these Paleogene basins are 171―238℃ for the Dongying Basin,160―202℃ for the Huimin Basin,and 135―180℃ for the Zhanhua Basin.The differences of the chlorite diagenetic temperatures in the three basins were controlled by the duration time of the structural depressing processes.Higher temperature indicates longer depression time.The relationship between the chlorite diagenetic temperature and its buried depth indicates that the average paleogeothermal gradient is about 38.3℃/km in the Paleogene prototype basin of Jiyang Depression.It was higher than the present geothermal gradient (29―30℃/km).This phenomenon was attributed to the evolution of the structural dynamics in the depression basin.

  16. Enhancement of the nanofibrillation of wood cellulose through sequential periodate-chlorite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Henrikki; Visanko, Miikka; Sirviö, Juho Antti; Hormi, Osmo E O; Niinimaki, Jouko

    2012-05-14

    Sequential regioselective periodate-chlorite oxidation was employed as a new and efficient pretreatment to enhance the nanofibrillation of hardwood cellulose pulp through homogenization. The oxidized celluloses with carboxyl contents ranging from 0.38 to 1.75 mmol/g could nanofibrillate to highly viscous and transparent gels with yields of 100-85% without clogging the homogenizer (one to four passes). On the basis of field-emission scanning electron microscopy images, the nanofibrils obtained were of typical widths of approximately 25 ± 6 nm. All of the nanofibrillar samples maintained their cellulose I crystalline structure according to wide-angle X-ray diffraction results, and the crystallinity index was approximately 40% for all samples. PMID:22512713

  17. Ferrihydrite formation during the dissolution of chlorite and its effect on the sorption behavior of U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the dissolution of a Fe-rich chlorite spherical ferrihydrite particles are formed in neutral and alkaline solutions. The ferrihydrite particles are predominantly covering the {hk0} faces due to the reactivity of the edge surfaces of sheet silicates. Their huge specific surface area is significantly influencing the natural attenuation processes of contaminants, i.e. uranium. (orig.)

  18. 法国比利牛斯山Trimouns滑石-绿泥石矿床地质与成因%Geology and ore genesis of the Trimouns talc-chlorite ore deposit,Pyrénées,France

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ph de PARSEVAL; 蒋少涌; F FONTAN; 王汝成; F MARTIN; J FREEET

    2004-01-01

    位于法国比利牛斯山的nimouns矿床是世界上最大的滑石-绿泥石矿床之一.对该矿床形成的条件及滑石和绿泥石矿石的含量已较清楚.它是由不同类型的岩石通过热液交代蚀变而形成的,主要包括白云岩蚀变为滑石为主的矿石和硅铝质岩石(云母片岩和伟晶岩)蚀变为绿泥石为主的矿石.滑石矿石显示片理化结构(滑石片岩)或压实块状结构(块滑石).由伟晶岩蚀变而来的绿泥石矿石为呈绿色的球状矿体,而由云母片岩蚀变而来的绿泥石矿石呈块状或片理状、颜色为灰绿色和深灰色.本文对欧洲这个独一无二的滑石和绿泥石矿床的地质特征和成因进行了总结和讨论.流体包裹体研究表明成矿流体为高盐度(20 to30%eq.wt%NaCl)、中温(320℃)、压为为2.5kbars.磷钇矿和独居石的U-Pb定年结果表明,成矿年代为112~97Ma,成矿作用可能持续了16Ma以上.%The Trimouns deposit, in the French Pyr閚閑s, is one of the largest talc and chlorite exploitation in the world. The conditions of formation and concentration for talc and chlorite ores are now well known. The deposit consists the metasomatic alteration of various rocks, mainly dolostones altered into talc-dominant ore and silico-aluminous rocks (mica schists and pegmatites) into chlorite-dominant ore. The talc ore shows schisteous texture (talc schist) or in compact mass (steatite). The chlorite ore altered from pegmatite show green colors and ball bodies. The chlorite ores altered from mica schists are either massive or schisteous ores with graygreenish and dark gray colors. This paper summarizes the general geology and ore genesis of this exceptional talc and chlorite ore deposit in Europe. Fluid inclusion study shows high salinity of 20 to 30% eq. wt% NaCl, intermediate temperature of 320℃ and pressure of 2.5 kbars for the formation of Trimouns deposit. According to U-Pb dating on xenotime and monazite, the mineralization took

  19. Evidence for low-grade metamorphism, hydrothermal alteration, and diagenesis on mars from phyllosilicate mineral assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, B.L.; Mustard, J.F.; Clark, R.N.; Swayze, G.A.; Murchie, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced spatial and spectral resolution provided by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has led to the discovery of numerous hydrated silicate minerals on Mars, particularly in the ancient, cratered crust comprising the southern highlands. Phases recently identified using visible/near-infrared spectra include: smectite, chlorite, prehnite, high-charge phyllosilicates (illite or muscovite), the zeolite analcime, opaline silica, and serpentine. Some mineral assemblages represent the products of aqueous alteration at elevated temperatures. Geologic occurrences of these mineral assemblages are described using examples from west of the Isidis basin near the Nili Fossae and with reference to differences in implied temperature, fluid composition, and starting materials during alteration. The alteration minerals are not distributed homogeneously. Rather, certain craters host distinctive alteration assemblages: (1) prehnite-chlorite-silica, (2) analcime-silica-Fe,Mg-smectite-chlorite, (3) chlorite-illite (muscovite), and (4) serpentine, which furthermore has been found in bedrock units. These assemblages contrast with the prevalence of solely Fe,Mg-smectites in most phyllosilicate-bearing terrains on Mars, and they represent materials altered at depth then exposed by cratering. Of the minerals found to date, prehnite provides the clearest evidence for subsurface, hydrothermal/metamorphic alteration, as it forms only under highly restricted conditions (T = 200 400??C). Multiple mechanisms exist for forming the other individual minerals; however, the most likely formation mechanisms for the characteristic mineralogic assemblages observed are, for (1) and (2), low- grade metamorphism or hydrothermal (400??C has not been found.

  20. Biotite and chlorite weathering at 25 degrees C: the dependence of pH and (bi)carbonate on weathering kinetics, dissolution stoichiometry, and solubility; and the relation to redox conditions in granitic aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the kinetics and thermodynamics of biotite and chlorite weathering in the pH range 22-102 year); and 2. the development of characteristic Fe(III) concentrations (10-5 M in 10-1 years). The Fe(III)-bearing clay minerals formed during these experiments are similar to the fracture-filling-material observed at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Such clays can provide reducing capacity to a repository. They can help maintain anoxic conditions by consuming oxygen that enters the repository during the construction and operation phases thereby helping maintain the redox stability of the repository regarding canister corrosion. The half-life of oxygen trapped in the repository at the time of closure depends on the rate of oxygen uptake by Fe(II) minerals, sulfide minerals and organic carbon. Fe(II)-clay minerals are important to the redox stability of a repository, as well as providing a sorption barrier to radionuclide migration. 107 refs, 52 figs, 35 tabs

  1. Comparison of ion chromatography and flow injection analysis methods for monitoring chlorite and chlorate ions in drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Ledder, Tracey

    1991-01-01

    Up-coming regulations on chlorine dioxide in drinking water treatment require low level measurement of chlorite ion (CI02-) and chlorate ion (CI03-). This research investigated analysis of CI02- and CI03-; in drinking water by flow injection analysis with iodometric detection (FIA) and ion chromatography with conductivity detection (IC). Both the FIA and IC methods were accurate for the determination of CIO2-; and CIO3-; in reagent water. The IC method was accurate in dr...

  2. Uraniferous mineralizations in the Kuusamo Schist Belt, northeastern Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kouveraara Co-Cu-Au mineralization was found in 1982 with the aid of a geophysical ground survey. This survey was connected with research on the Kouvervaara uranium mineralization in the Early Proterozoic Kuusamo Schist Belt, located just south of the Arctic Circle. In further work, using the Kouvervaara sulphide mineralization as a reference, six Co and Au bearing sulphide mineralizations were discovered, with the help of low altitude aerial geophysical techniques. The Co-Au mineralizations, hosted by the Sericite Quartzite Formation, occur within the hydrothermally altered zones. These zones consist of chloritization, carbonatization, sulphidization, sericitization and albitization, the latter being the most extensive. Excluding the Juomasuo mineralization, uranium is only a trace element in these mineralizations. Other characteristic trace elements are molybdenum and tungsten. The Sivakkaharju and Konttiaho Co-Au-U-Mo mineralizations were found by radiometric ground surveys carried out in 1985 and 1986. These hydrothermal mineralizations occur within brecciated quartz-albite-carbonate rocks and are good manifestations of the positive correlation between uranium and gold in the Kuusamo area. Compared with the other sulphide mineralizations, the Au, U, and Mo contents are remarkably high. Genetically, the mineralizations in the Kuusamo area are associated with deep seated fracture and fault zones, controlled by ancient intracontinental hot spot activity and continental rifting. (author). 31 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Clay-mineral suites, sources, and inferred dispersal routes: Southern California continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Dowling, J.S.; Schuetze, A.; Lee, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay mineralogy is useful in determining the distribution, sources, and dispersal routes of fine-grained sediments. In addition, clay minerals, especially smectite, may control the degree to which contaminants are adsorbed by the sediment. We analyzed 250 shelf sediment samples, 24 river-suspended-sediment samples, and 12 river-bed samples for clay-mineral contents in the Southern California Borderland from Point Conception to the Mexico border. In addition, six samples were analyzed from the Palos Verdes Headland in order to characterize the clay minerals contributed to the offshore from that point source. The clay-mineral suite for the entire shelf sediment data set (26% smectite, 50% illite, 24% kaolinite+chlorite) is closely comparable to that for the mean of all the rivers (31% smectite, 49% illite, 20% kaolinite+chlorite), indicating that the main source of shelf fine-grained sediments is the adjacent rivers. However, regional variations do exist and the shelf is divided into four provinces with characteristic clay-mineral suites. The means of the clay-mineral suites of the two southernmost provinces are within analytical error of the mineral suites of adjacent rivers. The next province to the north includes Santa Monica Bay and has a suite of clay minerals derived from mixing of fine-grained sediments from several sources, both from the north and south. The northernmost province clay-mineral suite matches moderately well that of the adjacent rivers, but does indicate some mixing from sources in adjacent provinces.

  4. Abiotic CO2 reduction during geologic carbon sequestration facilitated by Fe(II)-bearing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Maher, K.; Bird, D. K.; Brown, G. E.; Thomas, B.; Johnson, N. C.; Rosenbauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Redox reactions involving subsurface minerals and fluids and can lead to the abiotic generation of hydrocarbons from CO2 under certain conditions. Depleted oil reservoirs and saline aquifers targeted for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) can contain significant quantities of minerals such as ferrous chlorite, which could facilitate the abiotic reduction of carbon dioxide to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and amorphous carbon (C0). If such reactions occur, the injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) could significantly alter the oxidation state of the reservoir and cause extensive reorganization of the stable mineral assemblage via dissolution and reprecipitation reactions. Naturally occurring iron oxide minerals such as magnetite are known to catalyze CO2 reduction, resulting in the synthesis of organic compounds. Magnetite is thermodynamically stable in Fe(II) chlorite-bearing mineral assemblages typical of some reservoir formations. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that GCS reservoirs buffered by the chlorite-kaolinite-carbonate(siderite/magnesite)-quartz assemblage favor the reduction of CO2 to n-carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and C0, although the extent of abiotic CO2 reduction may be kinetically limited. To investigate the rates of abiotic CO2 reduction in the presence of magnetite, we performed batch abiotic CO2 reduction experiments using a Dickson-type rocking hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures (373 K) and pressures (100 bar) within the range of conditions relevant to GCS. Blank experiments containing CO2 and H2 were used to rule out the possibility of catalytic activity of the experimental apparatus. Reaction of brine-suspended magnetite nanoparticles with scCO2 at H2 partial pressures typical of reservoir rocks - up to 100 and 0.1 bars respectively - was used to investigate the kinetics of magnetite-catalyzed abiotic CO2 reduction. Later experiments introducing ferrous chlorite (ripidolite) were carried out to determine the potential for

  5. [Mineral Spectrum Change Analysis under the Conditions of Different Particle Size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-xia; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Liang-guang; Hou, Lan-gong; Wang, Dong; Cao, Min

    2015-03-01

    Mineral particle size is an important factor affecting mineral spectrum characteristics, so to explore the changes of the mineral spectrum curves under different particle sizes and the spectrum difference of different minerals under the same particle size are the keys of hyperspectral remote sensing information mineral identification and the theoretical basis of research on spectral differences of different particle -sizes. Six kinds of collected minerals were observed by spectrometer to get the reflectivity spectrum curve and first order differential spectral curve under different particle sizes, and the spectral characteristics of various kinds of minerals under different particle sizes were analyzed. At the same time, spectrum difference of different mineral under the same particle size was compared to explore possible wavelengths of hyperspectral remote sensing mineral identify. Results show that the spectrum curves of various minerals have a larger difference with the change of the particle size, but change law is not the same. The whole spectrum curve of hypersthene will be decreased with the increase of particle size, and the spectrum curve at a specific wavelength range of antigorite, hematite, kaolinite and chlorite will be decreased with the increase of particle size, and there is no direct correlation between the spectrum of olivine and the particle size. Under the same size, different mineral spectral reflectance change a lot in most band range and it provides the possibility for high precision identification of mineral. Antigorite, kaolinite and chlorite all have more absorption peaks of narrow width and smaller intensity than the other minerals. Spectrum curves of hematite, olivine and hypersthene are relatively smooth, and the number of the absorption and reflection peaks is relatively small. This study aims at providing basic data and theoretical support for mineral spectral library construction and mineral hyperspectral identification technology

  6. Geochemistry of clay minerals for uranium exploration in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookins, D. G.

    1982-03-01

    Clay mineralogy studies of ore rocks versus barren rocks in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, show that some combination of chlorite (rosette form), illite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, (±Mg-montmorillonite) are penecontemporaneous with uranium minerals in trend ore; these same clay minerals plus kaolinite are related to the roll-type ore near the main redox front of the Grants mineral belt. Clay minerals from barren rocks are characterized by a greater abundance of Na-montmorillonite, kaolinite, and face-to-edge form chlorite. Chlorites from ore zones contain much more vanadium than do chlorites from barren rocks. Trend orr probably formed from southeasterly flowing waters following paleochannels in the Late Jurassic. These deposits are found almost entirely in reduced rocks, and organic carbon may have been an important reductant to remove U-V-U-V-Se-Mo from solution as carbonate from ore zones contains some organic carbon based on stable isotope studies. Uplift, remobilization, and reprecipitation of some of the trend ore resulted in the formation of redistributed ore, some of which possesses a roll-type geometry. Mineralization for the roll-type ore was apparently controlled by sulfide-sulfate equilibria at or near the main redox front in the Grants mineral belt. Trend and roll-type ore possess different assemblages of clay minerals and different trace element abundances. Laramide-age faults cut both trend ore and some roll-type ores. Stack ore is found in Laramide-age fault zones. Limited oxygen isotopic data from clay minerals collected from two mines at Ambrosia Lake in reduced rocks indicate probable preservation of ancient, formational waters and show no evidence of infiltration by young meteoric waters. This information, plus the pre-Laramide-age faults, suggest, but do not unequivocally prove, that the main redox front has been relatively stable since its formation, probably some time in the Cretaceous. Younger encroachment of the redox front

  7. CLAY MINERAL ASSEMBLAGES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN SHIHEZI FORMATION FROM THE HUAIBEI COAL-BEARING STRATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文辉; 许光泉; 刑军

    1998-01-01

    Clay mineral assemblages in Shihezi Formation of Huaibei coal-bearing strata are determined by X-ray diffraction and Differential Thermal Analyzer, that is restated to the sedimentfaces and climatic changes in the source area, and to a lesser extent, alterations during burial diagenesis. In the Upper Shihezi Formation, the clay fraction is dominated by kaolinite in norther npart of the coal field, which was formed in alluvial sediment environment. But in the South ofHuaibei coal field, the clay mineral assemblage consists of mainly illite that reflects the influenceof sea water. The predominately kaolinite and sederite composition of the clay fraction in the lower Shihezi Formation sediments documents less relief and gentle erosion of kaolinite rich soils developing under warm source area. In the lower part of Shihezi Formation, some chlorite is detected, which suggests transformation of illite or kaolinite to chlorite under conditions of burial diagenesis.

  8. Fluid flow and polymetallic sulfide mineralization in the Kettara shear zone (Jebilet Massif, Variscan Belt, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'diaye, I.; Essaifi, A.; Dubois, M.; Lacroix, B.; Goodenough, K. M.; Maacha, L.

    2016-07-01

    The Kettara shear zone is a regional wrench shear zone within the Jebilet massif of Western Morocco, part of the Variscan orogenic belt. This massif is characterized by bimodal magmatism, largely intrusive, and by a number of polymetallic massive sulfide deposits. A syntectonic mafic-ultramafic intrusion and an adjacent, deformed pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide deposit are located within a 'compressional jog' of the shear zone. Hydrothermal alteration in both the intrusion and the wall rocks adjacent to the deposit is characterized by syntectonic replacement processes leading to formation of chlorite-schists and quartz ± calcite veins. Fluid inclusions in mineralized (pyrrhotite-bearing) quartz veins from the wall rocks adjacent to the deposit and in veins associated with chlorite-schists within the intrusion indicate a prevalence of H2O-CO2-CH4-N2 and H2O-salt fluid systems. In the mineralized veins the fluid shows reducing conditions, with gas dominated by CH4 and N2 and salinities around 7.5 wt% NaCl, whereas in the chlorite shear zones fluid is CO2 dominated and salinities are higher than 23 wt% NaCl. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of chlorite and quartz are similar and demonstrate involvement of metamorphic water in both the deposit and the intrusion. The data are consistent with a regional metamorphic fluid flow through the Kettara shear zone. The migrating metamorphic fluids were reduced in the organic matter-rich host rocks leading to deposition of sulfides in the mineralized veins. There are two possible hypotheses for the origin of these mineralized veins: either they were formed during deformation and remobilization of a syn-sedimentary massive sulfide deposit, or they were formed synchronously with the sulfide deposit during development of the Kettara shear zone.

  9. Characteristics and genesis of clay minerals in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Linlin; Jiang Bo; Peng Dehua; Yin Chengming; Zeng Chunlin

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop appropriate reservoir protection measures in the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin and improve its oil and gas recovery efficiency, characteristics of clay minerals from eleven clay rock samples from the northern margin of the Qaidam Basin were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and energy spectrum analysis. Clay mineral composition and distribution characteristics of the main hydrocarbon reservoirs, I.e., from the Jurassic and Paleogene-Neogene, were explored. We analyzed the main factors which affected these attributes. The results show that the major clay minerals in the northern margin are chlorite, kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite/smectite inter-stratified minerals, Illite is the most widely spread clay mineral in this area.Chlorite is mainly found in the entire Neogene and in shallow horizons of the Paleogene. Smectite is enriched in the shallow Paleogene-Neogene. There are large amounts of kaolinite and illite/smectite inter-stratified minerals in the Jurassic. The major factors affecting the different development of clay minerals in the region are properties of parent rocks, paleoclimate and paleowater media conditions,diagenesis transformation, tectonic and terrain conditions.

  10. Mineral resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M.L.C.M.; Ierland, van E.C.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Worrell, E.

    2016-01-01

    The extractable ores of the world's geologically scarcest mineral resources (e.g. antimony, molybdenum and zinc) may be exhausted within several decades to a century, if their extraction continues to increase. This paper explores the likelihood that these scarce mineral resources can be conserved

  11. Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes

  12. Secondary mineral-fluid equilibria in the Krafla and Namafjall geothermal systems, Iceland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquifer fluid compositions and aqueous species distribution have been calculated for 22 samples collected from producing wells in the Krafla and Namafjall geothermal areas, Iceland. Overall mineral-solution equilibrium is rather closely approached in the aquifer beyond the depressurization zone around wells for all major components entering hydrothermal minerals. The minerals involved are in alphabetical order: albite, calcite, chlorite, epidote, K-feldspar (adularia), prehnite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, quartz and wairakite. Calculated saturation indices for OH-bearing Al-silicates show more scatter than for minerals of simpler composition. A large scatter is also observed for pyrite and pyrrhotite. The main uncertainty involved in calculating mineral saturation indices, particularly in the case of 'excess' enthalpy well discharges, lies in the model adopted to calculate the aquifer water composition and its aqueous species distribution and not in the quality of the thermodynamic data on the aqueous species and the minerals with the possible exception of epidote and Fe2+

  13. The dissolution of biotite and chlorite at 25°C in the near-neutral pH region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Maria; Banwart, Steven; Lewenhagen, Jeanette; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    1996-02-01

    We studied the dissolution of biotite and chlorite in laboratory systems with flow-through and batch reactors. The initial dissolution of biotite in the near-neutral pH region, under N 2(g) atmosphere is highly non-stoichiometric. A slow linear release of iron during a period of weeks indicates a surface-chemical-reaction-controlled mechanism of release for iron. The release of potassium is much faster than that of iron. A parabolic dependence of accumulated release with time suggests a diffusion-controlled mechanism of potassium release. The rates of magnesium, aluminium and silicon release are between those for potassium and iron and approach that of iron with time. There is no significant influence of (bi)carbonate or pH on biotite dissolution rate or stoichiometry in the pH region 7 < pH < 8.5. The release rates of elements from chlorite are close to stoichiometric and similar to the iron release rate from biotite. In closed batch reactors at near-basic pH the composition of test solutions in contact with biotite is apparently controlled by gibbsite (Al), kaolinite (Si) and Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide. We estimated a turn-over time (10 1-10 2 yr) for molecular oxygen and a time scale (10 months) to develop characteristic Fe(II) concentrations for a granitic groundwater.

  14. Distribution of clay minerals in drift sediments on the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula, ODP Leg 178, Sites 1095 and 1096

    OpenAIRE

    Hillenbrand, C.-D.; W. Ehrmann

    2001-01-01

    The clay mineral compositions of upper Miocene to Quaternary sediments recovered at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 178, Sites 1095 and 1096, from the continental rise west of the Antarctic Peninsula were analyzed in order to reconstruct the Neogene and Quaternary Antarctic paleoclimate and ice dynamics. The clay mineral assemblages are dominated by smectite, illite, and chlorite. Kaolinite occurs only in trace amounts. Analysis of a surface-sample data set facilitates the assignment of thes...

  15. Mineral Composition and Weathering of Soils Derived from Xiashu Loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGYOU-JUN; MAYI-JIE; 等

    1992-01-01

    Mineralogical,physical and chemical analyses of the soils derived from Xiashu loess were carried out.The primary minerals of these soils were found to be mainly composed of light minerals,such as quartz,feldspar and mica,with traces of heavy minerals.Clay minerals,more complicate in composition,were dominated by hydromica,accompanied by smectite,vermiculite,chlorite,kaolinite,2:1/1:1 randomly interstratified minerals and small amounts of quartz,goethite,lepidocrocite and hematite,Clay minerals were characterized by low crystallinity and fine particle size.In light of the quartz/feldspars ratio of the 0.01-0.05mm silt fraction,and the clay mineral composition,the freeness of iron oxide,and the silica/ sesquioxide and silica/ alumina ratios in <0.002mm clay fraction,it is concluded that the weathering intensity of these soils was lower than those of red soil and yellow earth,but higher than that of brown earth,and that the soil allitization,depotassication and hydroxylation of clay minerals increased from west to east and from north to south geographically.However,this general tendence did not coincide exactly with the gradual alteration of the geographic coordinates,and in some places,a reverse tendency also appeared,which could be attributed to the influence of some soil forming factors such as parent material and microtopography.

  16. Mineral Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb. PMID:26939263

  17. Effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and other sanitizers to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Juneja, Vijay; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2010-06-01

    The use of a suitable sanitizer can reduce the risk of produce-related foodborne illnesses. We evaluated the effectiveness of several sanitizers to reduce inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiform). Depending on the method of inoculation (dipping/spotting), each of 80 g (eight tomatoes) of inoculated cherry tomatoes was washed in 400 mL of sanitizer solutions or 400 mL distilled water for 5 minutes. The effectiveness of sanitizers on spot-inoculated E. coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces was found higher than on dip-inoculated tomatoes. Washing with water or chlorine water (0.1 g/L as free chlorine) could reduce 1.3 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated (6.8 log CFU/g) tomatoes. Washing with lactic acid (LA) solution (1.0 g/L), phytic acid solution (1.0 g/L), calcinated seashells (oyster/sakhalin surf clam), and 1.0 g/L chitosan in 0.5 g/L LA (Chito) did not exhibit a significant higher effectiveness than that of water wash alone (1.0 log CFU/g). Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution prepared from 0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L LA or phytic acid reduced 3.5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated tomato surfaces. ASC (0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L of LA) wash followed by a second wash with LA exhibited an additional sanitary effectiveness compared to a single wash with ASC. However, washing with ASC followed by a second wash with Chito exhibited an additional 1.0 log CFU/g reduction compared to a secondary wash with water. No significant difference of color, taste, and texture was observed among the washed cherry tomatoes. PMID:20113205

  18. Clay minerals assemblage in the Neogene fluvial succession of the Pishin Belt, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Akhtar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    indicate derivation of material from the Pre-Miocene sedimentary and meta-sedimentary terrains of the Pishin Belt. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate that clay minerals in various mudstones and sandstone samples are identical and detrital in nature and include smectite, chlorite, illite, serpentine...... sedimentary and metasedimentary successions. The source of kaolinite seems to be pedogenic or lateritic. The clay minerals assemblage in mudstones and sandstones of the Dasht Murgha group, Malthanai formation and Bostan formation appears to have been derived from the nearby-exposed Pre-Miocence mafic...

  19. Mineral Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Ababsa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Jordan’s natural resources are very limited: water is scarce, there is little arable land and the country has few sources of energy (fig. I.11). Jordan’s mineral industry has a long history: flint was used in prehistoric times and early copper mining started in Wadi Faynan during the Chalcolithic Period. The following is a brief presentation of Jordan’s resources. Mining and investments will be studied in Part 3. Figure I.11 — Jordan Mineral Resources. NRA 2012 Phosphates The Jordanian Natur...

  20. Surficial clay mineral distribution on the southwestern continental margin of India: Evidence of input from the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Gujar, A.R.

    are also present in significant quantities on the slope with traces of gibbsite and palygorskite in some samples. The high contents of illite and chlorite (clay minerals which are not abundant in the soils and estuarine sediments of this region...) in the southern region of the study area are evidence for sediment contribution from the Bay of Bengal waters (BBW), which enter this region after the SW monsoon. Distribution trends of kaolinite, smectite, gibbsite, and laterite granules on the slope...

  1. A case of severe chlorite poisoning successfully treated with early administration of methylene blue, renal replacement therapy, and red blood cell transfusion : case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H.; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-01-01

    The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100 mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum.Initial laboratory tests revealed 40%

  2. Assessment of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite as antimicrobial agents to inhibit growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and natural microflora on shredded carrots

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of cold tap water, sodium hypochlorite (200 ppm) and acidified sodium chlorite (100, 250, 500 and 1000 ppm) washes on survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated onto shredded carrots was determined after treatment and 7 and 14 days of storage. Growth of total mesophilic...

  3. Clay mineral records of East Asian monsoon evolution during late Quaternary in the southern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhifei; C. Colin; A. Trentesaux; D. Blamart

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution clay mineral records combined with oxygen isotopic stratigraphy over the past 190 ka during late Quaternary from core MD01-2393 off the Mekong River in the southern South China Sea are reported to reconstruct a history of East Asian monsoon evolution.The dominating clay mineral components indicate a strong glacial-interglacial cyclicity, with high glacial illite, chlorite, and kaolinite contents and high interglacial smectites content. The provenance analysis indicates the direct input of clay minerals via the Mekong River drainage basin.Illite and chlorite derived mainly from the upper reach of the Mekong River, where physical erosion of meta-sedimentary rocks is dominant. Kaolinite derived mainly from active erosion of inhered clays from reworked sediments in the middle reaches. Smectites originated mainly through bisiallitic soils in the middle to lower reaches of the Mekong River. The smectites/(illite+chlorite)and smectites/kaolinite ratios are determined as mineralogical indicators of East Asian monsoon variations. Relatively high ratios occur during interglacials and indicate strengthened summer-monsoon rainfall and weakened winter-monsoon winds; relatively lower ratios happened in glacials, indicating intensified winter monsoon and weakened summer monsoon. The evolution of the summer and winter monsoons provides an almost linear response to the summer insolation of the Northern Hemisphere, implying an astronomical forcing of the East Asian monsoon evolution.

  4. Analysis of mixed-layer clay mineral structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    Among the enormously abundant natural occurrences of clay minerals, many examples are encountered in which no single specific crystallization scheme extends through a single ultimate grain. The characterization of such assemblages becomes an analysis of the distribution of matter within such grains, rather than the simple identification of mineral species. It having become established that the particular coordination complex typified by mica is a common component of many natural subcrystalline assemblages, the opportunity is afforded to analyze scattering from random associations of these complexes with other structural units. Successful analyses have been made of mixed hydration states of montmorillonite, of montmorillonite with mica, of vermiculite with mica, and of montmorillonite with chlorite, all of which are variants of the mica complex, and of halloysite with hydrated halloysite.

  5. Coal cleaning residues and Fe-minerals implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luis F O; Macias, Felipe; Oliveira, Marcos L S; da Boit, M Kátia; Waanders, Frans

    2011-01-01

    In the present investigation, a study was undertaken to understand the origin of Fe-minerals presents in Brazilian coal mining and to understand the environmental implication and the chemical heterogeneity in the study area. Coal cleaning residue samples rich in clays, quartz, sulphides, carbonates, sulphates, etc. were sampled from Lauro Muller, Urussanga, Treviso, Siderópolis, and Criciúma cities in the Santa Catarina State and a total of 19 samples were collected and Mössbauer, XRD, SEM/EDX, and TEM analyses were conducted on the samples. The major Fe-minerals identified are represented by the major minerals chlorite, hematite, illite, and pyrite, while the minor minerals include, ankerite, chalcopyrite, goethite, hematite, jarosite, maghemite, magnetie, marcasite, melanterite, natrojarosite, oligonite, pyrrhotite, rozenite, schwertmannite, siderite, and sideronatrile. Pyrite is relatively abundant in some cases, making up to around 10% of the mineral matter in several samples. The sulphates minerals such as jarosite and others, probably represent oxidation products of pyrite, developed during exposure or storage. PMID:20127406

  6. Preferential Treatment: Interaction Between Amino Acids and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapster-Pregont, E. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Hazen, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are important for some models of the origin of life. Polymerization of amino acids from dilute solution is unlikely without a scaffold or catalyst. The surfaces of early Earth minerals are the most likely candidates for this role. The surface adsorption behavior of 12 amino acids (L-alanine, L-serine, L-aspartic acid, L-proline, L- phenylalanine, L-valine, L-arginine, d-amino valeric acid, glycine, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, and B-alanine) on 21 minerals (quartz, calcite, enstatite, illite, olivine, pyrrhotite, pyrite, alkali basalt, albite, analcime, chlorite, barite, hydroxyl apatite, hematite, magnetite, aluminum hydroxide, kaolin, silica gel, corundum, rutile, and montmorillonite) was determined via batch adsorption experiments. Absorption was determined for concentrations between 10-4M and 10-6M in the presence of 0.1M NaCl, and between pH values of 3 and 9 at 25 degrees C. The equilibrated solutions were centrifuged, filtered, derivatized using a fluorescent amino group tag (dansyl-chloride) and analyzed by HPLC. Adsorption was standardized using BET surface area measurements for each mineral to give the number of mols of each amino acid adsorbed per square meter for each mineral. The results indicate an enormous difference in the adsorption of amino acids between minerals, along with major differences in the adsorption of individual amino acids on the same mineral surface. There is also a change in the absorbance of amino acids as the pH changes. Many previous studies of amino acid concentration and catalysis by minerals have used clay minerals because of their high surface areas, however, this data suggests that the surfaces of minerals such as calcite, quartz and pyrite have even higher affinities for amino acids. The results suggest mineral surfaces that could be optimal locations for the polymerization of molecules linked to the origin of life.

  7. Hydrothermal minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    ridge system, sulfide minerals crystallize from the hot water directly onto the volcanic rocks surrounding the hydrothermal vent leading to the formation of hollow, chimney like sulfide structure through which the hot water continues to flow... systems, which are in turn an integral component of global mid-ocean ridge system. Hydrothermal systems are composed of convection cells in the crust and upper mantle through which seawater freely circulates reacting with magmatic material, which...

  8. Mineral characterization of soil type ranker formed on serpentines occurring in southern Belgrade environs Bubanj Potok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekić Božidar Đ.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the issue of health risk associated with the presence of chrysotile in the soil type ranker formed on massive serpentines occurring in the area of Bubanj Potok, a settlement located in the southern Belgrade environs, Serbia. Characterization of the ranker soil was conducted by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy figures showed regular shaped smectite (montmorillonite particles, aggregates of chlorite, and elongated sheets of serpentines minerals antigorite. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the presence of detrital mineral quartz polymorph as well as minor amounts of other mineral species. Micro-Raman spectroscopy identified the presence of dominant minerals, such as montmorillonite, kaolinite, muscovite, gypsum, calcite, albite, amphiboles (hornblende/kaersutite and orthoclase. Important polymorph silica modifications of quartz, olivine (forsterite, pyroxene (enstatite/ferrosilite, diopside/hedenbergite, and serpentine (antigorite/lizardite/chrysotile were identified.

  9. Clay mineral distributions in the southern Yellow Sea and their significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the characteristics of the clay minerals in the southern Yellow Sea, the X-ray quantitative determinations have been carried out for the surface samples obtained from the Yellow Sea. With newly compiled clay mineral synoptic maps, the depositional processes were described for four main clay minerals (illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite). The analysis shows that most clay minerals are of terrigenous source with the Huanghe River acting as the major sediment supplier. Besides, the source of muddy sediments in the Yellow Sea was also discussed. As for the central Yellow Sea mud (CYSM), the sediments in its northern part mainly come from the Huanghe River, and those in the rest are of multi-origin. Very similarly, a large amount of sediments in the northern part of the southeastern Yellow Sea Mud (SEYSM) derive from the Keum River and Yeongsan River, while those in the southern part are of multi-origin.

  10. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to acidified Sodium chlorite or tri-sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppasamy, K; Yadav, Ajit S; Saxena, Gaurav K

    2015-12-01

    Thermal inactivation of normal and starved cells of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to different concentrations of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was investigated. Inoculated skin was pretreated with different concentration of ASC or TSP, packaged in bags, and then immersed in a circulating water bath at 60 to 68 °C. The recovery medium was Hektoen enteric agar. D-values, determined by linear regression, for normal cells on chicken skin, were 2.79, 1.17 and 0.53 min whereas D-values for starved cells were 4.15, 1.83 and 0.66 at 60, 64 and 68 °C, respectively. z-values for normal cells were 3.54 and for starved cells were 2.29. Pretreatment of Salmonella Enteritidis cells with 0 to 200 ppm of ASC or 0 to 1.0 % TSP resulted in lower D-values at all temperatures. Sensory results indicated no significance differences for control and treatments. Thus, results of this study indicated that pretreatment of chicken skin with ASC or TSP increased sensitivity of Salmonella Enteritidis to heat without affecting organoleptic quality of chicken meat. PMID:26604399

  11. On the possibilities of occurrence of structure controlled unconformity-proximal uranium mineralization in Madhawanpalli - Rayalgandi Sector, Srisailam Sub-Basin, Cuddapah Basin, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The northern margin of Srisailam Sub-basin is well known for its potential to host unconformity proximal uranium mineralization and so far three deposits have been established at Lambapur, Peddagattu and Chitrial. Recent exploration in Madhawanpalli-Rayalgandi sector and follow up sub-surface exploration has indicated uranium mineralization in the granites beneath the cover of Srisailam sediments. The host rock is characterized by intense fracturing, brecciation, cataclasism and alterations like chloritization, illitization and silicification signifying the role of basement structures in uranium mineralization near the unconformity surface. (author)

  12. Statistical analysis of results from the quantitative mapping of fracture minerals in Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling - complementary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the Laxemar site investigation campaign, quantitative mapping of different fracture minerals has been performed. This has been done by studying fracture surfaces of drill core sections from many different boreholes at the Laxemar site /Eklund and Mattsson 2008/. The drill core mapping was focused on the rock in the vicinity of flow anomalies detected by the Posiva Flow Log (PFL). The quantitative mapping was performed only on open fractures. The fracture minerals that were mapped are calcite, chlorite, clay minerals (as a group), hematite, and pyrite. In this present report, data from the quantitative mineral mapping campaign are refined, sorted into different data subsets, and analysed by parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. The data subsets are associated with 17 different rock volumes, representing different elevations, rock domains, fracture domains, and groups of deformation zones. In total 1,852 fractures were mapped at the site, and the most frequent mineral was calcite. Its amount could be quantitatively estimated in 51% of the mapped fractures. Of the other minerals, chlorite was quantitatively estimated in 46%, pyrite in 19%, clay minerals in 16%, and hematite in 0.05% of the mapped fractures. For fractures where the averaged fracture mineral thickness, dmean [mm], and visible coverage, Cvis [%], could be quantitatively estimated, the following arithmetic means were found: calcite = 0.25 mm and 22%, chlorite = 0.29 mm and 41%, pyrite =1.3 μm and 0.2%, and clay minerals = 0.15 mm and 35%. These quantities are based on visual inspection of fracture surfaces and do not include the contribution from non-consolidated fracture fillings. It is shown that there is significant spatial variability of dmean and Cvis within the examined rock volumes. Furthermore, the non-parametric analyses indicate that there are differences in dmean and Cvis between the different rock volumes. Even so, the differences are generally shown to be small and if

  13. Clay mineral distribution in surface sediments of the South China Sea and its significance for in sediment sources and transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建国; 陈木宏; 陈忠; 颜文

    2010-01-01

    Clay minerals of surface sediments in the South China Sea (SCS) are analyzed with X-ray diffraction, and their transport is explored with a grain size trend analysis (GSTA) model. Results show that clay mineral types in various sedimentary environments have different sediment sources and transport routes. Sediments in the northern SCS (north of 20°N) between the southwest of Taiwan Island and the outer mouth of the Pearl River have high contents of illite and chlorite, which are derived mainly from sediment...

  14. Features of Clay Minerals in the YSDP102 Core on the Continental Shelf of the Southeast Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xuejun; QU Gaosheng; LI Shaoquan

    2004-01-01

    Ninety-eight clay mineral samples from the YSDP102 core were analyzed by x-ray diffractometer to study the four clay minerals: illite, chlorite, kaolinite and smectite. Twenty-eight samples had been analyzed on the laser particle-size analyzer to reveal the particle features of the sediments. Distribution of the clay minerals and the particle characteristics in the YSDP102 core show that the core experienced three different depositional periods and formed three different sedimentary intervals due to different sediment sources and different depositional environments. Features of the clay minerals and the heavy minerals in the YSDP102 core indicate that coarse-grained sediments and fine-grained sediments result from different sources. The Yellow Sea Warm Current has greatly influenced the sedimentary framework of this region since the current's formation.

  15. Expression of Chlorite Dismutase and Chlorate Reductase in the Presence of Oxygen and/or Chlorate as the Terminal Electron Acceptor in Ideonella dechloratans

    OpenAIRE

    Hellberg Lindqvist, Miriam; Johansson, Nicklas; Nilsson, Thomas; Rova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to perform dissimilatory (per)chlorate reduction is, for most species, known to be oxygen sensitive. Consequently, bioremediation processes for the removal of oxochlorates will be disturbed if oxygen is present. We measured the expression of chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase in the presence of different terminal electron acceptors in the chlorate reducer Ideonella dechloratans. Enzyme activity assays and mRNA analyses by real-time quantitative reverse tra...

  16. Determination of chlorite, muscovite, albite and quartz in claystones and clay shales by infrared spectroscopy and partial least-squares regression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ritz, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka; Plevová, Eva; Matýsek, D.; Mališ, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2012), s. 511-520. ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : claystone and clay shale * infrared spectroscopy * chemometrics * chlorite * muscovite Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011 https://www.irsm.cas.cz/materialy/acta_content/2012_04/9.Ritz.pdf

  17. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Chlorite-Periodate System: Formation of a Short-Lived Key Intermediate OClOIO3 and Its Subsequent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Nóra; Csekő, György; Valkai, László; Xu, Li; Horváth, Attila K

    2016-03-01

    The chlorite-periodate reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C, monitoring the absorbance at 400 nm in acetate/acetic acid buffer at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M). We have shown that periodate was exclusively reduced to iodate, but chlorite ion was oxidized to chlorate and chlorine dioxide via branching pathways. The stoichiometry of the reaction can be described as a linear combination of two limiting stoichiometries under our experimental conditions. Detailed initial rate studies have clearly revealed that the formal kinetic orders of hydrogen ion, chlorite ion, and periodate ion are all strictly one, establishing an empirical rate law to be d[ClO2]/dt = kobs[ClO2(-)][IO4(-)][H(+)], where the apparent rate coefficient (kobs) was found to be 70 ± 13 M(-2) s(-1). On the basis of the experiments, a simple four-step kinetic model with three fitted kinetic parameters is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation. The reaction was found to proceed via a parallel oxygen transfer reaction leading to the exclusive formation of chlorate and iodate as well as via the formation of a short-lived key intermediate OClOIO3 followed by its further transformations by a sequence of branching pathways. PMID:26849795

  18. Characterization of potential mineralization in Afghanistan: four permissive areas identified using imaging spectroscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Trude V.V.; Berger, Byron R.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Defense Task Force for Business and Stability Operations natural resources revitalization activities in Afghanistan, four permissive areas for mineralization, Bamyan 1, Farah 1, Ghazni 1, and Ghazni 2, have been identified using imaging spectroscopy data. To support economic development, the areas of potential mineralization were selected on the occurrence of selected mineral assemblages mapped using the HyMap™ data (kaolinite, jarosite, hydrated silica, chlorite, epidote, iron-bearing carbonate, buddingtonite, dickite, and alunite) that may be indicative of past mineralization processes in areas with limited or no previous mineral resource studies. Approximately 30 sites were initially determined to be candidates for areas of potential mineralization. Additional criteria and material used to refine the selection and prioritization process included existing geologic maps, Landsat Thematic Mapper data, and published literature. The HyMapTM data were interpreted in the context of the regional geologic and tectonic setting and used the presence of alteration mineral assemblages to identify areas with the potential for undiscovered mineral resources. Further field-sampling, mapping, and supporting geochemical analyses are necessary to fully substantiate and verify the specific deposit types in the four areas of potential mineralization.

  19. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  20. Laboratory of minerals purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratory of minerals purification was organized in 1962 where with application of modern physical and chemical methods were investigated the mechanism of flotation reagents interaction with minerals' surface, was elaborated technologies on rising complexity of using of republic's minerals

  1. Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-07-09

    A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

  2. Mineral Spectroscopy Server

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, George R.

    2010-01-01

    This server provides information about mineralogy and is primarily dedicated to providing information about color in minerals and access to data on Mineral Absorption Spectra in the visible and infrared regions of the spectrum and Raman spectra of minerals. Most data on the server were obtained in the Caltech mineral spectroscopy labs. Other types of spectroscopic data on minerals are also available. Visible, near-infrared and infrared absorption spectra are available for a number of minerals...

  3. Trade in mineral resources

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of current thinking on the economics of international trade in mineral resources. I first define what is meant by trade in mineral resources. I then discuss patterns of trade in mineral resources. The paper then moves on to the five topics requested by the World Trade Organization: theoretical and empirical literature on international trade in minerals; trade impacts of mineral abundance and the resource curse; the political economy of mineral trade in resource-ab...

  4. Mineralization stages of the unique shear zone-hosted "Felsit-type" Sn-polymetallic mineralization in the eastern Erzgebirge, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Járóka, Tom; Seifert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The polymetallic cassiterite-bearing mineralization of the "Felsit-type" is located in the NW of the Freiberg mining district within the Großschirma area. The mineralization is hosted by metamorphic rocks of the Preßnitzer Group unit that form the most northeastern part of the Erzgebirge metamorphic core complex. This geological unit is in the Großschirma area predominantly composed of two-mica gneisses and mica schists, whereas intercalations of muscovite-gneiss ("red gneiss"), amphibolites and metacarbonates occur less commonly. These metamorphic rocks were deformed by several NE-SW striking fault zones. The hydrothermal Sn-bearing fluids migrated within shear zones that developed primarily at the contact between different lithotypes. The shear zones are characterized by strong pervasive metasomatic alterations which were triggered by small chlorite-cassiterite-quartz-sulfide-veins. The rock-forming minerals are strongly corroded and displaced by the ore and gangue minerals within the shear zones. The bulk geochemistry of selected drill core samples feature grades up to 0.28 wt. % Sn, 0.15 wt. % Cu, 300 ppm Pb, 140 ppm Zn, 1.1 wt. % F, 250 ppm Li, 820 ppm Rb, 90 ppm Cs, and 130 ppm W. Microscopic and geochemical studies of the samples show that the Sn-polymetallic mineralization of the "Felsit-type" can be distinguished into three different mineralization stages. The first one is dominated by chlorite and quartz. Cassiterite probably appears in two generations with different grain shapes: acicular (< 1 - 100 µm) and isometric cassiterite (< 10 - 650 µm). Smaller amounts of fluorite, rutile, apatite, and scheelite are also associated with the first stage. The second mineralization stage is dominated by pyrite which is the most abundant ore mineral of this paragenesis, while marcasite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, bismuthinite, and magnetite appear only subordinately. The third stage is dominated by carbonates that are often

  5. Precipitation of uraninite in chlorite-bearing veins of the hydrothermal alteration zone (argile de pile) of the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe, Republic of Gabon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the mineralogy of a phyllosilicate/uraninite/galena-bearing vein located within the hydrothermal alteration halo associated with the Bangombe reactor. Phyllosilicates within the vein include a trioctahedral Al-Mg-Fe chlorite (ripidolite), Al-rich clay (kaolinite and/or donbassite) and illite. Textural relations obtained by backscattered-electron imaging suggest that ripidolite crystallized first among the sheet silicates. Uraninite is spatially associated with ripidolite and probably precipitated at a later time. While energy-dispersive X-ray analyses suggest that the uranium phase is predominantly uraninite, coffinite or other phases may also be present

  6. Occurrence, Structure and Mineral Phases of Nanoparticles in an Anthrosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Sheng-Gao; SUN Fang-Fang; ZONG Yu-Tong

    2013-01-01

    Soils contain various kinds of crystalline to amorphous solid particles with at least one dimension in the nanoscale (< 100 nm).These nanoparticles contribute greatly to dynamic soil processes such as soil genesis,trace element cycling,contaminant transport,and chemical reaction.The nano-sized fraction of an Anthrosol was obtained to determine the occurrence,chemical composition,structure,and mineral phases of nanoparticles using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.Selected area electron diffraction or the fast Fourier transform of high-resolution images was used in structural characterization of the nanoparticles with HRTEM.Two nanoscale mineral types,i.e.,mineral nanoparticles and nanominerals,were observed in the Anthrosol.Mineral nanoparticles in soil included well crystalline aluminumsilicate nanosheets,nanorods,and nanoparticles.Nanosheets with a length of 120-150 nm and a width of about 10-20 nm were identified as chlorite/vermiculite series.The presence of clear lattice fringe spacing in HRTEM image of nanoparticles indicated that mineral nanoparticles had a relatively good crystallinity.The nanomineral ferrihydrite also existed in the Anthrosol.The HRTEM images and the particle size distribution histogram suggested that these ferrihydrite nanoparticles were quite homogeneous,and had a narrow size distribution range (1-7 nm) with a mean diameter of 3.6 ± 1.6 nm.Our HRTEM observation indicated that mineral nanoparticles and nanominerals were common and widely distributed in Anthrosols.HRTEM and selected area diffraction or lattice fringe spacing characterization provided further proofs to the structure of nanoparticles formed in soil.

  7. Clay Minerals and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Abdurrahman Dalgıç; Orhan Kavak

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine clay minerals, which take very importantplace in relationships of minerals and human health. They have high areadensity, adsorption capacity, rheological properties, chemical inertia and verylow or nontoxic effects to human health. So, they are widely used in medicaltreatments. Commercially used clay minerals are; smectit, polygrstite, caoliniteand talc. The other clay minerals are under investigations for medicaltreatments.

  8. Occurrence mechanism of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals in Sarcheshmeh copper flotation concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R. Barkhordari; E. Jorjani; A. Eslami; M. Noaparast

    2009-01-01

    The Sarcheshmeh copper flotation circuit is producing 5×10~4 t copper concentrate per month with an averaging grade of 28% Cu in rougher, cleaner and reeleaner stages. In recent years, with the increase in the open pit depth, the content of aluminosili- cate minerals increased in plant feed and subsequently in flotation concentrate. It can motivate some problems, such as unwanted consumption of reagents, decreasing of the copper concentrate grade, increasing of Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 in the copper concentrate, and needing a higher temperature in the smelting process. The evaluation of the composite samples related to the most critical working period of the plant shows that quartz, illite, biotite, chlorite, orthoclase, albeit, muscovite, and kaolinite are the major Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 beating minerals that accompany chalcopyrite, chalcoeite, and covellite minerals in the plant feed. The severe alteration to clay min-erals was a general rule in all thin sections that were prepared from the plant feed. Sieve analysis of the flotation concentrate shows that Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 bearing minerals in the flotation concentrate can be decreased by promoting the size reduction from 53 to 38 μm. Interlocking of the Al_2O_3 and SiO_2 beating minerals with ehalcopyrite and ehalcocite is the occurrence mechanism of silicate and aluminosilicate minerals in the flotation concentrate. The dispersed form of interlocking is predominant.

  9. Nature of uranium mineralization and associated wall rock alteration in the White's East area of the Embayment, Rum Jungle, Northern Territory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium mineralisation in the White's East area of The Embayment is hosted by Lower Proterozoic schists of the Masson formation which have undergone polyphase deformation and upper greenschist metamorphism. Significant mineralisation is also present in apatite rocks. The ore zones occur near an unconformity with overlying Middle Proterozoic sandstone and breccia conglomerate. Kink breccias and fracture systems related to post Middle Proterozoic reverse faults are the controls for mineralising fluid migration. Pitchblende is the main uranium mineral and it occurs as fine disseminated grains, fibrous webs, clusters composed of botryoidal aggregates and locally as veins. Two generations of uranium mineralisation are present. The first generation (pitchblende I) occurs as fine grained inclusions within chlorite II, and the second (pitchblende II) as hydraulic fracture networks and massive veins intimately associated with sericite-hematite-chlorite III. Two hydrothermal alteration phases have affected both Lower Proterozoic and Middle Proterozoic sequences. The most extensive alteration mineral is chlorite, of which a number of varieties has been identified

  10. Structure related uranium mineralization in the Westmoreland district, Queensland, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westmoreland Uranium District straddles the boundary between Queensland and the Northern Territory of Australia some 100 km south of the coastline. Middle Proterozoic conglomerate/sandstones and a basic volcanic sequence of the McArthur River Basin unconformably overly Lower Proterozoic metamorphics and acid volcanics, both intruded by high level granites, which are exposed in an EW trending uplift. Basic dikes, thought to be feeders to the multiple basic extrusions were emplaced mainly along the NE trending structures dissecting the sandstone sequence. Uranium mineralization in the district frequently occurs as vertical or subvertical, discontinuous lenses or sheets adjacent to or within these dike filled structures. The primary minerals are uraninite and protobrannerite. Gold may occur coincidental to uranium. Uraninite is the last replacive mineral phase, following cementation and argillic alteration of the host rocks and the introduction of chlorite/hematite. The primary origin of the uranium remains open due to lack of conclusive evidence for introduction of the uranium into the system either as detrital component or by exhalative volcanogenic activity or by hydrothermal remobilization from deep seated sources. It is postulated that a heat flow event at about 820 Ma generated and maintained convection flow cells within permeable host rocks and that uranium introduced to circulating oxygenated formation waters by any one or more of the above processes was precipitated against physico-chemical barriers such as basic dikes or basaltic flows due to the abundant supply of divalid iron as reductant. (author)

  11. Efficacy of two acidified chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid on prevention of contagious mastitis using an experimental challenge protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, L Y; Fox, L K; Warf, C C; Kempt, G K

    2002-01-01

    Two acidified sodium chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants were evaluated for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae by using National Mastitis Council experimental challenge procedures. The effect of these teat dips on teat skin and teat end condition was also determined. Both dips contained 0.32% sodium chlorite, 1.32% lactic, and 2.5% glycerin. Dips differed in the amount of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (0.53 or 0.27%) added as a surfactant. Both dips significantly reduced new intramammary infection (IMI) rates compared with undipped controls. The dip containing 0.53% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 72% and Strep. agalactiae by 75%. The dip containing 0.27% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 100% and by Strep. agalactiae by 88%. Changes in teat skin and teat end condition for treatment and control groups varied in parallel over time. Teats treated with either teat dip had higher mean teat skin and teat end scores than control teats at some weeks. However, teat skin and teat end condition did not tend to change from the start to the completion of the trial. Application of the two new postmilking teat dips was effective in reducing new IMI from contagious mastitis pathogens. (Key words: teat dip, contagious mastitis, chlorous acid) PMID:11860118

  12. Distribution of clay minerals in marine sediments off Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India:Indicators of sediment sources and transport processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subramanian VEERASINGAM; Ramdoss VENKATACHALAPATHY; Thirunavukkarasu RAMKUMAR

    2014-01-01

    Clay mineralogy, texture size and statistical analyses were carried out on surface sediments from the continental shelf of Chennai, Bay of Bengal, India. The purpose of this study is to characterize the clay mineral distribution and its relation to the hydrodynamics off Chennai to identify the sources and transport pathways of the marine sediments. Characterization of clay minerals in coastal sediments by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has provided the association of quartz, feldspar, kaolinite, chlorite, illite and iron oxides (magnetite and hematite) derived from river catchments and coastal erosion. Kaolinite, chlorite, illite, iron oxides, and organic matter are the dominant minerals in Cooum, and Adayar region. High quartz and feldspar zones were identified in Marina, which are being confined the sand zone and paralleling the coast. The strong relationships among the wave energy density, sand, quartz and carbonate revealed that wave induced littoral drift system play a dominant role in transportation and deposition of sediments in the Chennai coast. The sediment texture and minerals data are in agreement well with the previous results of hydrodynamics and littoral drift models in this region. Multivariate statistical analyses (correlation, cluster and factor analyses) were carried out and obtained results suggested that clay minerals and organic matter are trapped in silt and clay particles, whereas quartz, feldspar and carbonate are associated with sand particles. Results of sediment sources and transport processes from this study will be useful to predict the fate of the pollutants released from land or the potential change in sediment delivery to coastal areas.

  13. Geochemical modelling for the unconformity-related uranium mineralization. A case study from Baskati area, Madhya Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signatures of concealed unconformity-related uranium mineralization at the contact of Chhotanagpur Granite Gneissic Complex (CGGC)/Mahakoshal and Lower Vindhyan Semri sequence have come to light at Baskati, in Vindhyan-Mahakoshal Basin, following a multiprolonged exploratory efforts. Systematic lithogeochemical sampling brought out uranium halos with concentration sufficiently above the normal background along reactivated faults/fractures occurring parallel and oblique to the unconformity contact. Alteration features like haematitization, chloritization and illitization have also been observed in surroundings of these reactivated faults/fractures. Geochemical modelling indicates a hypogene source for mineralizing fluids. Based on geochemical modelling supported by geology, structure and lithogeochemistry, unconformity-related U mineralization model has been envisaged and the target area has been narrowed down for sub-surface exploration. (author)

  14. Construction Minerals Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes construction minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  15. Mineral Resources Data System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mineral resource occurrence data covering the world, most thoroughly within the U.S. This database contains the records previously provided in the Mineral Resource...

  16. Chelated minerals for poultry

    OpenAIRE

    SL Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confu...

  17. Mineral Composition of Loess—Paleosol Samples from the Loess Plateau of China and Its Environmental Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑洪汉; B.K.G.THENG; 等

    1994-01-01

    34samples of loess-paleosol from the Luochuan and Xifeng sections in the Loess Plateau,northern China were eparated into sand,silt and clay fractions and analyzed for their mineral compositions.The results indicate that there is almost no difference between loess and paleosol in mineral composition.Major mineral species are quartz,mica,feldspar and chlorite,accounting for about 88-92% of the total;other minerals are kandite,smectite,vermiculite and a few heavy minerals.The calcite,magnetite and hematite were not taken into consideration because of their removal in the process of sample preparation.The main difference with respect to the mineral composition of samples collected from different sections and different statigraphic levels lies in the amount and grain size of minerals hosted.Comparisons between the Luochuan section and the Xifeng section,between paleosol and loess and between the upper part and the lower part of some paleosol layers show that the formers contain less feldspar but more mica and vermiculite and are finer in grain size,indicating the co-occurrence of both biochemical weathering process responsible for mineral change and physical weathering process leading to grain-size change during the soil-forming processes.This result favours such an explanation of the soil-forming mechanism that loess deposition and paleosol development occurred synchronously,though the rate of soil formation was greater than that of loess deposition,thus leading to soil development.

  18. Dynamics of mineral crystallization from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Wilhelm, Heribert; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-03-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. The mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet-orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatized at ~4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometres and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80-90 vol%) occur with constant volume proportions and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by synchrotron radiation at Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Such information is discussed in relation to the physico-chemical aspects of nucleation and growth, shedding light on the mode of mineral crystallization from a fluid phase trapped at supercritical conditions.

  19. Mineral Supply Challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Faced with shortcomings in its mineral supply, it’s imperative for China to balance its desire for reserves with its current economic needs Mineral resources are the corner- stone of materials needed for China’s national economic and social development.The country even counts on its mineral resources to satisfy 90 percent of its energy demands and over 95

  20. High-dose stabilized chlorite matrix WF10 prolongs cardiac xenograft survival in the hamster-to-rat model without inducing ultrastructural or biochemical signs of cardiotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A; Kemp, K; Kemp, E;

    2001-01-01

    WF10 is a stabilized chlorite matrix with immunosuppressive effects. In vitro studies have demonstrated its ability to suppress T cells and delay or abolish antigen presentation. Hence, WF10 may prove useful to prolong graft survival after transplantation. In this study, we evaluated the use of...... high dose WF10 as a single drug regimen in the hamster-to-rat xenotransplantation model and searched for possible cardiotoxic side effects. WF10 prolonged cardiac xenograft survival, but did not induce tolerence or inhibit pathological signs of acute rejection. Hamsters from the donor population......, receiving high dose WF10 for 5 days, were compared with a matched control group. Ultrastructural examination of cardiac tissue as well as biochemical analysis of the cardiac enzymes troponin I, myoglobin and MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase showed no signs of damage. Thus, while prolonging graft survival...

  1. Chromite Composition and Accessory Minerals in Chromitites from Sulawesi, Indonesia: Their Genetic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zaccarini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Several chromite deposits located in the in the South and Southeast Arms of Sulawesi, Indonesia, have been investigated by electron microprobe. According to the variation of the Cr# = Cr/(Cr + Fe3+, the chromite composition varies from Cr-rich to Al-rich. Small platinum-group minerals (PGM, 1–10 μm in size, occur in the chromitites. The most abundant PGM is laurite, which has been found included in fresh chromite or in contact with chlorite along cracks in the chromite. Laurite forms polygonal crystals, and it occurs as a single phase or in association with amphibole, chlorite, Co-pentlandite and apatite. Small blebs of irarsite (less than 2 μm across have been found associated with grains of awaruite and Co-pentlandite in the chlorite gangue of the chromitites. Grains of olivine, occurring in the silicate matrix or included in fresh chromite, have been analyzed. They show a composition typical of mantle-hosted olivine. The bimodal composition and the slight enrichment in TiO2 observed in some chromitites suggest a vertical zonation due to the fractionation of a single batch magma with an initial boninitic composition during its ascent, in a supra-subduction zone. This observation implies the accumulation of Cr-rich chromitites at deep mantle levels and the formation of the Al-rich chromitites close or above the Moho-transition zone. All of the laurites are considered to be magmatic in origin, i.e., entrapped as solid phases during the crystallization of chromite at temperature of around 1200 °C and a sulfur fugacity below the sulfur saturation. Irarsite possibly represents a low temperature, less than 400 °C, exsolution product.

  2. Fissure minerals, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a review of methods used for direct and indirect dating of tectonic events. Isotope geochemistry including stable isotopes as well as fission track- dating, fluid inclusion and thermoluminescens techniques have been considered. It has been concluded that an investigation of tectonic (and thermal) events should start with a detailed study of the mineral phases grown in seald fissures as well as minerals from fissure walls. This study should include phase identification, textures as well as mineral chemistry. The information from this study is fundamental for the decision of further investigations. Mineral chemistry including isotopes and fluid inclusion studies will give an essential knowledge about crystallization conditions for fissure minerals concerned. Direct dating using fission tracks as well as radioactive isotopes could be useful for some minerals. Application of thermoluminescens dating on fissure minerals is doubtful. (Auth.)

  3. Chelated minerals for poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Vieira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic minerals have been subject of an increasing number of investigations recently. These compounds can be considered the most significant event regarding commercial forms of minerals targeting animal supplementation in the last decades. Minerals, especially metals, are usually supplemented in poultry feeds using cheap saline sources and have never required a lot of attention in terms of quality. On the other hand, definitions of organic minerals are very broad and frequently lead to confusion when decision-making becomes necessary. Organic minerals include any mineral bound to organic compounds, regardless of the type of existing bond between mineral and organic molecules. Proteins and carbohydrates are the most frequent candidates in organic mineral combinations. Organic fraction size and bond type are not limitations in organic mineral definition; however, essential metals (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Mn can form coordinated bonds, which are stable in intestinal lumen. Metals bound to organic ligands by coordinated bonds can dissociate within animal metabolism whereas real covalent bonds cannot. Chelated minerals are molecules that have a metal bound to an organic ligand through coordinated bonds; but many organic minerals are not chelates or are not even bound through coordinated bonds. Utilization of organic minerals is largely dependent on the ligand; therefore, amino acids and other small molecules with facilitated access to the enterocyte are supposed to be better utilized by animals. Organic minerals with ligands presenting long chains may require digestion prior to absorption. After absorption, organic minerals may present physiological effects, which improve specific metabolic responses, such as the immune response. Many studies have demonstrated the benefits of metal-amino acid chelates on animal metabolism, but the detection positive effects on live performance is less consistent.

  4. Sorption and desorption of cesium on rapakivi granite and its minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch sorption experiments of cesium were performed for rapakivi granite and its main minerals, and also for some fracture minerals. The main minerals quartz, potassium feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and hornblende were magnetically separated from crushed rapakivi granite. The fracture minerals were chlorite, dolomite and kaolinite. Sorption was studied in fresh and saline reference waters containing cesium in the range of 10-8 to 10-3 mol/l. The distribution ratios for rapakivi granite generally decreased with an increasing Cs concentration and an increasing ionic strength. For fresh rapakivi granite, the sorption behaviour was rather complex in both fresh and saline reference waters, being complex for the other alteration stages only in saline water. Sorption increased unexpectedly when the initial cesium concentration was raised to 10-5 - 10-4 mol/l. The sorption on rapakivi granite was non-linear, especially in saline water. Sorption was reversible for rapakivi granite. The sorption on the minerals proved to be very non-linear, especially on biotite. Sorption was also reversible for biotite and kaolinite. For the other minerals, sorption was irreversible to some degree. As to the sorption of cesium investigated by studying thin sections of rapakivi granite and their autoradiograms, the most dominating mineral was biotite. The water analyses made during the sorption experiment revealed the exchange of potassium and cesium. The corresponding changes were difficult to detect in saline water. Calculation of the Rd values for the rock, based on the Rd values of minerals and the portions of minerals in the rock, yielded smaller distribution ratios than the values determined for the rock. (orig.)

  5. gold mineralization in Masjeddaghi area, east of Jolfa, NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Imamalipour

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two types of mineralization including porphyry copper and epithermal gold mineralization have occurred in relation with an intermediate volcano-plutonic complex in Masjeddaghi area. Different alterations including silica, advanced argillic, intermediate argillic and propylitic have been distinguished in relation with epithermal mineralization, which have a zonal pattern. Elemental mass gains and losses during alterations were calculated using Zr as an immobile monitor. Silica zone has enriched in SiO2 and relatively in Al2O3 and K2O, and has depleted in Na2O, MgO and CaO. Ba, Sr, Pb, Rb and Cu elements have also enriched. The advanced argillic zone shows enrichment in SO3, Al2O3, SiO2, K2O, MgO and L.O.I; and depletion in Fe2O3, CaO, Na2O, MnO and MgO. Barium, Cu, Sr and Zn have depleted in this zone. Propylitic zone has enriched in MgO, CaO, L.O.I and SiO2, and has depleted in Na2O and K2O. Geochemical and mineralogical evidences indicate that the hydrothermal leaching of mafic minerals in parent rocks and formation of quartz, kaolinite, sericite and alunite assemblage in advanced argillic zone; and chlorite, epidote and calcite assemblage in propylitic zone is responsible for the above mentioned chemical variations. It is likely that the gains and losses of elements have been controlled by agents such as water/rock ratios, temperature changes and chemistry of hydrothermal solutions. The CIA and MIA indicators in the altered rocks indicate the intensity of alteration in silica and advanced argillic zones in comparison with propylitic zone.

  6. Mineral composite assessment of Kelkit River Basin in Turkey by means of remote sensing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hakan Mete Dogan

    2009-12-01

    Utilizing remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) tools, mineral composite characteristics (ferrous minerals (FM), iron oxide (IO), and clay minerals (CM)) of the Kelkit River Basin (15913.07 km2) in Turkey were investigated and mapped. Mineral composite (MC) index maps were produced from three LANDSAT-ETM+ satellite images taken in 2000. Resulting MC index maps were summarized in nine classes by using ‘natural breaks’ classification method in GIS. Employing bi-variety correlation analysis, relationships among index maps were investigated. According to the results, FM and IO index maps showed positive correlation, while CM index map is negatively correlated with FM and IO index maps. Negative correlations between iron and clay variables suggested that the dominant clay minerals of the study area might be smectite, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite, which have little or no iron content. Using field data for which their geographic coordinates had been determined by global positioning system (GPS), developed MC maps were verified, and found dependable for environmental and ecological modeling studies.

  7. Clay minerals in surface sediments of the Pearl River drainage basin and their contribution to the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZhiFei; Christophe COLIN; HUANG Wei; CHEN Zhong; Alain TRENTESAUX; CHEN JianFang

    2007-01-01

    Clay minerals have played a significant role in the study of the East Asian monsoon evolution in the South China Sea by being able to track oceanic current variations and to reveal contemporaneous paleoclimatic changes prevailing in continental source areas. As one of the most important rivers inputting terrigenous matters to the northern South China Sea, the Pearl River was not previously paid attention to from the viewpoint of clay mineralogy. This paper presents a detailed study on clay minerals in surface sediments collected from the Pearl River drainage basin (including all three main channels,various branches, and the Lingdingyang in the estuary) by using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method.The results indicate that the clay mineral assemblage consists dominantly of kaolinite (35%-65%),lesser abundance of chlorite (20%-35%) and illite (12%-42%), and very scare smectite occurrences (generally <5%). Their respective distribution does not present any obvious difference throughout the Pearl River drainage basin. However, downstream the Pearl River to the northern South China Sea, the clay mineral assemblage varies significantly: kaolinite decreases gradually, smectite and illite increase gradually. Additionally, illite chemistry index steps down and illite crystallinity steps up. These variations indicate the contribution of major kaolinite, lesser illite and chlorite, and very scarce smectite to the northern South China Sea from the Pearl River drainage basin. The maximum contribution of clay minerals from the Pearl River is 72% to the northern margin and only 15% to the northern slope of the South China Sea. In both glacials and interglacials, kaolinite indicates that the ability of mechanical erosion occurred in the Pearl River drainage basin.

  8. Sorption of radioiodine on organic rich soil, clay minerals and alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch method was used to investigate the sorption behavior of radioiodine on organic rich soil, alumina, chlorite-illite clay mixture and bentonite. 131 I was used as tracer. The grain sizes of the samples used were all below 38μm. A rather slow kinetics was observed for the adsorption of radioiodine on organic rich soil. The distribution ratio increased with increasing solution/solid (V/m) ratio, and the contact time. The pH of the synthetic groundwater did not change the distribution ratio appreciably. The soil biomass however, showed a striking effect on the adsorption of radioiodine. Among the clay minerals, the highest distribution ratio value was found for chlorite-illite clay mixture. All the values were however well below those of the organic rich soil. The sorption data were fitted to Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich type isotherms. Mean energies of adsorption, as well as the affinity ratios of the sorption sites to iodine and chlorine were calculated. (author) 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 6 tabs

  9. On the geology of the uranium mineralization in the Swiss Alps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous radiometric anomalies and several uranium occurrences were found in the Swiss Alps by systematic prospecting of selected areas carried out between 1957 and 1984. Most of the uranium indications lie in a rather narrow belt that follows roughly the valleys of the Rhone und of the Rhine Anterior, from Martigny onto Ilanz and extending northwards towards the Lake of Walenstadt. The uranium occurrences were found in the following geological environments: - permocarboniferous continental, variably metamorphosed series, belonging either to the formation of the 'Verrucano' or to the Penninic St. Bernhard nappe; - muscovite-chlorite-albite gneisses belonging to the pre-Westphalian basement of the St. Bernhard nappe; - muscovite-chlorite gneisses and phyllites of the Hercynian Tavetsch massiv; - muscovite-biotite gneisses within the southern border of the Aar massif; - Vallorcine granite of the Auguilles-Rouges massiv and polymetamorphic biotite gneisses along its northwestern contact zone. The possible geological (or 'in situ') resources are estimated to be 50-250 tonnes uranium in each one of the investigated mineralization zones of some importance; the respective estimated grades are 50-250 ppm U. Therefore the occurrences are actually of no economic value. (author) 25 figs., 1 tab., refs

  10. Metallic mineral deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Crow, M J; van Leeuwen, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    This account concentrates on the the primary metallic mineral deposits and occurrences in Sumatra, in particular the recent discoveries of gold, tin and base metals. The residual and placer deposits are given less emphasis, as no significant discoveries have been made in recent years. The history of mineral exploration and discovery in Indonesia has been reviewed recently by van Leeuwen (1993, 1994), documenting the change in emphasis of mineral-based activities from western to eastern I...

  11. Radioactive minerals in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, there is given the review of the radioactive minerals which contain uranium and thorium and their occurrence in the Slovakia. Chemical composition of most often occurred uranium minerals of West Carpaty was confirmed with wave-dispersion, occasionally energy-dispersion-roentgen microanalysis. Their identification was confirmed by roentgen diffraction or electron diffraction. Homogeneity, occasionally heterogeneity of studied samples was verified by scanning line electron microscope. The development of the uranium mineralization is given, too

  12. Reagan issues mineral policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  13. Brazilian minerals annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistics of Brazilian mineral resources and production in 1976 are presented. Data included refer also to economic aspects, market, taxes, governments incentives, manpower, exportation, importation, etc

  14. Brazilian minerals annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistics of Brazilian mineral resources and production in 1977 are presented. Data included refer also to economic aspects, market, taxes, government incentives, manpower, exportation, importation, etc

  15. What Are the Time Scales for Carbonate Mineral Sequestration in the Subsurface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steefel, C. I.; Landrot, G.; Bolton, E. W.; Pride, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral trapping of CO2 in the subsurface is acknowledged to be the most secure form of sequestration, but some studies have suggested that the process is extremely slow, perhaps on the order of 10,000 years or more. But what are the arguments for these long time scales based on? Certainly part of it has to do with the slow dissolution rates of silicates needed to provide a source of cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Fe2+) and alkalinity for carbonate precipitation. Rates of dissolution for many silicates are very slow (e.g., albitic plagioclase and chlorite), while other silicate minerals (anorthitic feldspar, olivine) dissolve appreciably faster. Determining which mineral is rate-limiting in the case of the faster dissolving silicates (is it the dissolving silicate or precipitating carbonate?), however, is not always straightforward without a careful analysis of dissolution and precipitation as a coupled process. We use micro-continuum modeling to address the issue of time scales for carbonate mineral trapping of CO2. Two sets of simulations have been carried out: 1) largely generic simulations at the centimeter scale that include heterogeneous distributions of both residually trapped scCO2 and reactive mineral phases (Ca-bearing plagioclase and chlorite), and 2) flow plus diffusion and pure diffusion simulations of the reactivity of a reservoir sandstone from a scCO2 pilot injection site at Cranfield, Mississippi. The first set of simulations are designed specifically to examine the assumption that the reservoir within which carbonate mineral precipitation might occur is well-mixed and therefore characterized everywhere by the low pH values typical of brine in equilibrium with supercritical CO2. Our analysis of physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface materials, especially during the residual trapping stage, suggest that local chemical microenvironments can develop in which pH, alkalinity, and cation concentrations rise sufficiently high that substantial

  16. Significant mineral variations in the Lower Karoo deposits of the Mid-Zambezi Basin, Zimbabwe, and their palaeoenvironmental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineralogical composition of Lower Karoo deposits from the Mid-Zimbabwe Basin, Zimbabwe, have been established by means of X-ray diffractometry to evaluate mineralogical variables as possible palaeoenvironment indicators. Mineral variations are stratigraphically controlled. Dwyka tillites are composed of quartz, K-feldspar and plagioclase. Varvites contain additional calcite. The clay fraction is dominated by kaolinite in the northwestern part of the study area while in the southwest only subordinate proportions of kaolinite occur associated with approximately equal amounts of mica, chlorite, smectite, and interstratifications. The overlying Ecca sediments are characterized by a high kaolinite content, traces of K-feldspar, mica and occasional pyrite. In mudstones of the uppermost Ecca, the kaolonite proportion decreases in favour of mica and chlorite. The mineral composition of Beaufort mudstones differs significantly with considerable amounts of plagioclase and a more than sporadic presence of analcime which is restricted to this stratigraphic unit. The clay fraction is dominated by either kaolinite, mica, or smectite. Within the geotectonical setting discussed by this paper the kaolinite dominance in Ecca sediments corresponds well with freshwater depositional conditions deduced from sedimentological and palaeontological evidence. However, the abundance of 2:1 phyllosilicates and especially analcime prevalence in the Beaufort section indicates an alkaline palaeoenvironment. 10 figs., 29 refs

  17. Mineral types of hydrothermal alteration zones in the Dukat ore field and their relationships to leucogranite and epithermal gold-silver ore, northeastern Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filimonova, L. G.; Trubkin, N. V.; Chugaev, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The paper considers the localization of potassic and propylitic hydrothermal alteration zones in the domal volcanic-plutonic structure controlling the position of the Dukat ore field with the eponymous unique epithermal Au-Ag deposit. Comprehensive mineralogical and geochemical data on rocks and minerals in hydrothermal alteration zones and associated intrusions have shown that quartz-jarosite-sericite, quartz-pyrite-sericite, and quartz-adularia-chlorite alterations were formed with the participation of fluid flows related to a fingerlike projection of a high-K leucogranite porphyry intrusion with large phenocrysts. These hydrothermal alterations developed in the rifted graben under conditions of divergent plate boundaries, whereas quartz-clinozoisite-calcite, epidote-chlorite, and garnet-calcite-chlorite alterations were linked to K-Na leucogranite intrusive bodies and developed under conditions of convergent plate boundaries reactivated as a result of formation of the marginal Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt. Phase separation and coagulation of specific portions of ascending fluids resulted in the formation and stabilization of small-sized particles of native silver and other ore components, which enabled involvement in flows of secondary geothermal solutions and ore-forming fluids. The Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of rocks and minerals from the hydrothermal alteration zones, associated intrusions, and economic orebodies at the Dukat deposit indicate that their components have been derived from the juvenile continental crust, which was altered in pre-Cretaceous periods of endogenic activity. The components of gangue minerals of potassic and propylitic hydrothertmal alterations and associated intrusions have been taken from deep sources differing in 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd at similar U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios. Chalcophile lead in products of hydrothermal activity and melanocratic inclusions in leucogranite has been taken from regions with elevated U/Pb and

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  19. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  20. Luobusaite: A New Mineral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Wenji; SHI Nicheng; FANG Qingsong; LI Guowu; XIONG Ming; YANG Jingsui; RONG He

    2006-01-01

    A group of mantle minerals including about 70-80 subtypes of minerals are discovered from a podiform chromitite in Tibet, China. Recovered minerals include diamond, coesite, moissanite,wustite, Fe-silides and a new mineral, luobusaite. All of these minerals were hand-picked from heavy-mineral separates of the podiform chromitite in the mantle peridotite of an ophiolite. The grains of luobusaite are as host mineral with inclusions of native silicon or as an intergrowth with native silicon and Fe-Si phase. Luobusaite occurs as irregular grains, with 0.1-0.2 mm in size, consisting of very finegrained aggregates. The mineral is steel-grey in color, metallic luster, and opaque. The empirical formula (based on 2 for Si) is Fe0.83Si2, according to the chemical compositions of luobusaite. X-ray powder-diffraction data: orthorhombic system, space group Cmca, a = 9.874 (14) (A), b = 7.784 (5) (A), c=7.829(7) (A), Z=16.

  1. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  2. Surface miner MTS 1250

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D. [MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Mining and Machinery Planning dept.

    1999-10-01

    The German manufacturer MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH has developed a new series of surface miners with capacities ranging between 500-2000 bm{sup 3}/h. The Surface Miner MTS 1250, launched at MINETIME '99, is described in this article. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  3. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  4. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  5. Lithium mineral waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munteanu Constantin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological surveys showed that Romania basement contains a variety of balneary resources located within on the surface crust. Mineral waters are spread over more than 20% of the country at different depths, with a wide range of physical, chemical and therapeutic properties depending on their genesis.Balneary resources are represented mainly by therapeutic minerals that the physicochemical properties answer the needs of medical and prophylactic maintenance, enhancement and restoration of health, work capacity and physical and mental comfort of the individual.The surface waters arising from a natural source or updated by drilling and whose physical and chemical characteristics that may exert dynamic pharmaco-therapeutic are considered therapeutic mineral waters. Mineral waters are waters that have a variable content of salts, gas, minerals, radioactive elements, which gives them therapeutic properties. In the past, name of mineral water was attributed to all shallow or groundwater mineral water that could be used for therapeutic purposes. In recent years, mineral water that could be used for therapeutic purposes have been given the name of curative water.Lithium arouses a great scientific interest because, although his structure is so simple, easy to analyze, with chemical and physical properties well established the myriad of the effects on biological systems by influencing many cellular processes and molecular and the mechanism of action are still unclear generates a mystery that modern science attempting to decipher.

  6. Investigation on type and origin of iron mineralization at Mesgar occurrence, south of Zanjan, using petrological, mineralogical and geochemical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ebrahimi

    2015-04-01

    150 m in length and average 1.5 m in width, reaching a maximum of 3 m. Two stages of mineralization identified at Mesgar. Stage-1 mineralization formed before the hydrothermal brecciation events. This stage is characterized by disseminated fine-grained hematite in the andesitic basalt lavas. Clasts of stage-1 mineralization have been recognized in the hydrothermal breccias of stage-2. Stage-2 is represented by quartz, hematite and chlorite veins and breccias cement. This stage contains abundant hematite, together with minor magnetite and chalcopyrite. The hydrothermal alteration assemblages at Mesgar grade from proximal quartz and chlorite to distal sericite and chlorite-calcite. The quartz and chlorite alteration types are spatially and temporally closely associated with iron mineralization. The sericite and chlorite-calcite alterations mark the outer limit of the hydrothermal system. Supergene alteration (kaolinite is commonly focused along joints and fractures. The ore minerals at Mesgar formed as vein and hydrothermal breccia cements, and show vein-veinlet, massive, brecciated, clastic and disseminated textures. Hematite is the main ore which is accompanied by minor magnetite and chalcopyrite. Goethite is a supergene mineral. Quartz and chlorite are present in the gangue minerals that represent vein-veinlet, vug infill, colloform, cockade and crustiform textures. The Mesgar volcanic host rocks are characterized by LILE and LREE enrichment coupled with HFSE depletion. They have positive U, Th and Pb and negative Ba, Nb, P and Ti anomalies. Our geochemical data indicate a calc-alkaline affinity for the volcanic rocks (Kuster and Harms, 1998; Ulmer, 2001, and suggest that they originated from mantle melts contaminated by the crustal materials (Chappell and White, 1974; Miyashiro, 1977; Harris et al., 1986. The ore zones show lower concentrations of REE, except Ce, relative to fresh volcanic host rocks. LREE are more depleted than HREE. These signatures indicate high

  7. Mineral industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.)

  8. Underground mineral extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  9. Taxation of unmined minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Kentucky Revenue Cabinet which began implementing its controversial unmined minerals tax program. The Revenue Cabinet should complete its first annual assessment under this program in December, 1989. The Revenue Cabinet's initial efforts to collect basic data concerning the Commonwealth's coal bearing lands has yielded data coverage for 5 million of Kentucky's 10 million acres of coal lands. Approximately 1000 detailed information returns have been filed. The returns will be used to help create an undeveloped mineral reserves inventory, determine mineral ownership, and value mineral reserves. This new program is run by the Revenue Cabinet's Mineral Valuation Section, under the Division of Technical Support, Department of Property Taxation. It has been in business since September of 1988

  10. Identification of secondary minerals crystallized by low and high temperature alteration in the Northern Kyushu-Palau Ridge volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.

    2008-12-01

    characteristics of bulk composition of the Nichinan Seamount rocks are assumed similarity to primary signature. On the other hand, the Komahashi-Daini Seamount samples show completely re-crystallization, and igneous textures are observed to pseudomorph. These are identified by XRD to be quartz, clinochlore (one of chlorite), and albite. Secondary mineral assemblage is homogeneous in these rocks. The temperature of replacement by chlorite accompanied by enrichment in MgO is estimated to be more than 150°C on the basis of experimental studies (e.g. Mottle 1983). And interpreted two types of albitization, low temperature ( 100°C), are identified on the basis of study of ODP Leg 123 Site 765 igneous rocks (Gillis et al. 1992). Therefore, it is considered that volcanic rocks from the Komahashi-Daini Seamount were under effect of hydrothermal alteration more than 150°C. Many elements show significant movement under high temperature hydrothermal alteration (e.g. Laverne et al. 1996). That is, re-crystallization of chlorite under high temperature hydrothermal alteration accompanied addition of magnesium from seawater and remarkable bulk MgO enrichment (e.g. Nakamura, 2001). Therefore, it is considered that the Komahashi-Daini Seamount rocks show significant MgO-enrichment because of secondary mineralization of chlorite, and assumed to significant movement of other elements. These observations suggest that geochemical investigation of highly altered rocks must be made with caution.

  11. Diffusion and sorption of HTO, Np, Na and Cl in rocks and minerals of Kivetty and Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is conclusion to the project, which started in 1993, and is direct continuation to technical reports TURVA-95-05 and TURVA-96-03. In this project rocks of Olkiluoto (mica gneiss and pegmatite) and Kivetty (granite) research areas and minerals found in these rocks were studied. A part of the rock samples were natural fracture surface samples and a part of them were intact rock. The main minerals were quartz, potassium feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and hornblende. The accessory minerals were calcite, chlorite, kaolinite, muscovite and pyrite. The mass distribution coefficients of Np and Na (Rd) under aerobic conditions were determined for crushed rocks and crushed minerals by batch experiments. The Ra values for crushed rocks and crushed minerals were calculated using the measured specific surface areas. The effective diffusion coefficients De of tritiated water (HTO) and neptunium and the apparent diffusion coefficients Da calculated from the time lag values of through-diffusion were determined for the rock slices. In the through-diffusion experiments for neptunium under aerobic conditions the stationary state was reached only in the pegmatite samples. The apparent diffusion coefficients Da of neptunium and sodium for rock slices and mineral pieces were determined from the concentration profiles. The diffusion coefficients (De, Da) obtained from through-diffusion and its time-lag and from concentration profiles were converted into mass distribution coefficients Rd. which were compared with the Rd values measured by batch experiments. (orig.)

  12. A field technique for rapid lithological discrimination and ore mineral identification: Results from Mamandur Polymetal Deposit, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Ramakrishnan; M Nithya; K D Singh; Rishikesh Bharti

    2013-02-01

    This work illustrates the efficiency of field spectroscopy for rapid identification of minerals in ore body, alteration zone and host rocks. The adopted procedure involves collection of field spectra, their processing for noise, spectral matching and spectral un-mixing with selected library end-members. Average weighted spectral similarity and effective peak matching techniques were used to draw end-members from library. Constrained linear mixture modelling technique was used to convolve end-member spectra. Linear mixture model was optimized based on root mean square error between field- and modelled-spectra. Estimated minerals and their abundances were subsequently compared with conventional procedures such as petrography, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence for accuracy assessment. The mineralized zone is found to contain azurite, galena, chalcopyrite, bornite, molybdenite, marcacite, gahnite, hematite, goethite, anglesite and malachite. The alteration zone contains chlorite, kaolinite, actinolite and mica. These mineral assemblages correlate well with the petrographic measurements (2 = 0.89). Subsequently, the bulk chemistry of field samples was compared with spectroscopically derived cumulative weighted mineral chemistry and found to correlate well (2 = 0.91–0.98) at excellent statistical significance levels (90–99%). From this study, it is evident that field spectroscopy can be effectively used for rapid mineral identification and abundance estimation.

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2008 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2007 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. National reserves and reserve base information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves and reserve base estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves and reserve base information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, common business practice, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves and reserve base information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported reserves and reserve base information carried for years without alteration because no new information is available; historically reported reserves and reserve base reduced by the amount of historical production; and company reported reserves. International minerals availability studies conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, before 1996, and estimates of identified resources by an international collaborative effort (the International Strategic Minerals

  14. Paleoenvironmental Implications of Clay Minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas F.; Blake, David F.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx. 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx. 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx. 10A with a slight inflexion at approx. 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and

  15. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Thomas; Blake, David; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Farmer, Jack, D.; Treiman, Allan H; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Achilles, Cherie; DesMarais, David J.; Crisp, Joy A.; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael; Grotzinger. John P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent approx 150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (approx 3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of approx 20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 021 band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at approx 10A with a slight inflexion at approx 12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating

  16. Identification of mineral composition and weathering product of tuff using reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2009-12-01

    Tuff is intricately composed of various types of rock blocks and ash matrixes during volcanic formation processes. Qualitative identification and quantitative assessment of mineral composition of tuff usually have been done using manual inspection with naked-eyes and various chemical analyses. Those conventional methods are destructive to objects, time consuming and sometimes carry out biased results from subjective decision making. To overcome limits from conventional methods, assessment technique using reflectance spectroscopy was applied to tuff specimens. Reflectance spectroscopy measures electromagnetic reflectance on rock surface and can extract diagnostic absorption features originated from chemical composition and crystal structure of constituents in the reflectance curve so mineral species can be discriminated qualitatively. The intrinsic absorption feature from particular mineral can be converted to absorption depth representing relative coverage of the mineral in the measurement area by removing delineated convex hull from raw reflectance curve. The spectral measurements were performed with field spectrometer FieldSpec®3 of ASD Inc. and the wavelength range of measurement was form 350nm to 2500nm. Three types of tuff blocks, ash tuff, green lapilli tuff and red lapilli tuff, were sampled from Hwasun County in Korea and the types of tuffs. The differences between green tuff and red tuff are from the color of their matrixes. Ash tuff consists of feldspars and quartz and small amount of chalcedony, calcite, dolomite, epidote and basalt fragments. Green lapilli tuff consists of feldspar, quartz and muscovite and small amount of calcite, chalcedony, sericite, chlorite, quartzite and basalt fragments. Red lapilli tuff consists of feldspar, quartz and muscovite and small amount of calcite, chalcedony, limonite, zircon, chlorite, quartzite and basalt fragments. The tuff rocks were coarsely crushed and blocks and matrixes were separated to measure standard

  17. The First X-ray Diffraction Patterns of Clay Minerals from Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, T.; Blake, D.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Chipera, S.; Rampe, E. B.; Farmer, J. D.; Treiman, A. H.; Downs, R.; Morrison, S.; Achilles, C.; Des Marais, D. J.; Crisp, J. A.; Sarrazin, P.; Morookian, J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, Curiosity spent ~150 sols at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) studying a section of fluvio-lacustrine sedimentary rocks (with potential indications of volcanic influence), informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. YKB lies in a distal region of the Peace Vallis alluvial fan, which extends from the northern rim of Gale Crater toward the dune field at the base of Mt Sharp. Sedimentological and stratigraphic observations are consistent with the Yellowknife Bay formation being part of a distal fan deposit, which could be as young as middle Hesperian to even early Amazonian in age (~3.5 to 2.5 Ga). The Yellowknife Bay formation hosts a unit of mudstone called the Sheepbed member. Curiosity obtained powdered rock samples from two drill holes in the Sheepbed Member, named John Klein and Cumberland, and delivered them to instruments in Curiosity. Data from CheMin, a combined X-ray diffraction (XRD)/X-ray fluorescence instrument (XRF), has allowed detailed mineralogical analysis of mudstone powders revealing a clay mineral component of ~20 wt.% in each sample. The clay minerals are important indicators of paleoenvironmental conditions and sensitive recorders of post-depositional alteration processes. The XRD pattern of John Klein reveals a 02l band consistent with a trioctahedral phyllosilicate. A broad peak at ~10A with a slight inflexion at ~12A indicates the presence of 2:1 type clay minerals in the John Klein sample. The trioctahedral nature of the clay minerals, breadth of the basal reflection, and presence of a minor component with larger basal spacing suggests that John Klein contains a trioctahedral smectite (probably saponite), whose interlayer is largely collapsed because of the low-humidity conditions. The XRD patterns show no evidence of corrensite (mixed-layer chlorite/smectite) or chlorite, which are typical diagenetic products of trioctahedral smectites when subjected to burial and heating >60°C in the presence of water

  18. Reduction and immobilization of hexavalent chromium by microbially reduced Fe-bearing clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10, 20, and 30 °C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10 °C, though at 30 °C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  19. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly

  20. Remote Sensing, Geology and Geochemistry on the GVIII Uranium Mineralization, Gabal Gattar, North Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GVIII- uranium occurrence of Gabal Gattar is located at the intersection of Lat. 27° 05' 56and Long. 33° 16' 33to the south of GH-uranium occurrence. This occurrence is hosted in the alkali feldspar granite of Gabal Gattar. It is dissected by NNE-SSW, ENE-WSW and NW-SE faults and fractures. The granite is strongly altered in the zones of these faults and fractures. This granite is composed of K-feldspars, quartz, plagioclase and biotite as essential minerals and zircon, apatite, fluorite as accessories. The secondary minerals are chlorite, sericite, muscovite and iron oxides. The main alterations along the fault and fracture zones are hematitization, silicification, kaolintiization, chloritization and fluoritization that increase at the zones of intersection.The Advanced Spacebome Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) discriminated and mapped the hematitized zones in the studied granitic rocks predicting iron oxides as pathfinder minerals that be helpful in localizing high uranium concentration. The compilated and integrated data as alteration zones, geological and structural features using Geographic Information System (GIS) played an important role in correlating, manipulating, visualizing and extracting the information getting a better result for interpretation and evaluation of this occurrence. The study granite is geochemically, alkali- feldspar granite to syenogranite originated from weakly peraluminous magma of alkaline affinity and of within plate tectonic setting due to crustal relaxation. This granite shows many geochemical characterestics similar to the A-type granite, high contents of SiO2, (Na2O + K2O), Rb, Nb, Y, low contents of MgO, CaO and Sr and apparently F-rich granite.Radiometric measurements of GVIII U-occurrence show that the study granite records uranium values between 15 and 28 ppm, while the anomalies record uranium values range from 400 to more than 30000 ppm. Surfacial yellow secondary uranium mineralization was

  1. Tectonic conditions of hydrothermal polymetallic vein-type mineralization, Sainte Marie-aux-Mines, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeznia, Y.; Bourlange, S.; Ohnenstetter, M.

    2012-04-01

    -W strike-slip faults. Early strike-slip movements are assessed by the presence of striated iron oxides, the crystallization of which is considered to be early during the ore deposition process. Mineralizing fluids were probably fluorine-rich as F-bearing minerals, sericite, chlorite and apatite are present in the chlorite zone associated with early sulphide-rich ores. The E-W mineralized faults are only easily compatible with the tectonics known in Permian times. c) Late-stage faults - These could be related to the numerous changes in plate configuration which occur during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic times, in accordance with the creation of the Paris basin, the opening of Atlantic ocean and Rhine Graben, as well as with the Tethys closure. For example, the vertical lineation superposed on an horizontal lineation observed on mineralized rocks indicate reactivation of the former E-W mineralized veins under a normal movement. The latter may correspond to an extensive regime known during Oligocene times. On the other hand, one of the major late-stage faults strikes N-S and is related to a dextral strike-slip system, which could be considered as Miocene. It is expected that fluid remobilization occurred during fault reactivation, a process which could have led to successive ore deposition following the emplacement of the major E-W mineralized veins. A fluid inclusion study in the gangue minerals of the Gabe Gottes is now under investigation. This together with isotopic studies will help to determine the source of the mineralizing fluids, as well as the conditions of ore deposition. Keywords: Faults, polymetallic mineralization, variscan orogeny, Gabe-Gottes, Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines, Vosges, F-rich fluids.

  2. Dynamics of mineral crystallization at inclusion-garnet interface from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in-situ synchrotron x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. These inclusions are frequently hosted by minerals stable at mantle depths, such as garnet, and show the same textural features as fluid inclusions. The mineral infillings of the solid multiphase inclusions are generally assumed to have crystallized by precipitation from the solute load of dense supercritical fluids equilibrating with the host rock. Notwithstanding the validity of this assumption, the mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatised at ~ 4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometers and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol.%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80- 90 vol.%) occur with constant volume ratios and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by means of Synchrotron Radiation at DLS-Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and their reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Epitaxy drives a first-stage nucleation of spinel under near-to-equilibrium conditions

  3. Synergistic Effect of Sodium Chlorite and Edible Coating on Quality Maintenance of Minimally Processed Citrus grandis under Passive and Active MAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Zhaojun; Feng, Jianhua; Wei, Wenwen; Yang, Xiangzheng; Li, Jilan; Guan, Junfeng; Li, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Edible coating has been an innovation within the bioactive packaging concept. The comparative analysis upon the effect of edible coating, sodium chlorite (SC) and their combined application on quality maintenance of minimally processed pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits during storage at 4 °C was conducted. Results showed that the combination of edible coating and SC dipping delayed the microbial development whereas the sole coating or dipping treatment was less efficient. The synergetic application of edible coating and SC treatment under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP, 10% O2 , 10% CO2 ) was able to maintain the total soluble solids level and ascorbic acid content, while reduce the weight loss as well as development of mesophiles and psychrotrophs. Nonetheless, the N, O-carboxymethyl chitosan solely coated samples showed significantly higher level of weight loss during storage with comparison to the untreated sample. Furthermore, the combined application of edible coating and SC dipping under active MAP best maintained the sensory quality of minimally processed pomelo fruit during storage. PMID:26147928

  4. Mineral Industry in Egypt-Part I: Metallic Mineral Commodities

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Zaher M. Abouzeid; Abdel-Aziz M. Khalid

    2011-01-01

    This The mineral potential in Egypt is quite high. Almost all sorts of industrial minerals such as metallic and non-metallic commodities exist in commercial amounts. However, Egypt imports many of the mineral commodities needed for the local mineral industries. The main reason for this is that the investors, either the governmental or the private sectors, refrain from investing into the mineral industry for prospecting, evaluation, and developing the mining and mineral processing technologies...

  5. The differences in clay minerals between the northern and southern Chelungpu fault, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y.

    2004-12-01

    In 1999, we obtained a detailed data about motion of fault from the Taiwan Chi-Chi earthquake. The motion represents the high frequency of acceleration and small slip distance in southern part, and low frequency of acceleration and large slip distance in the northern part. Those differences in the fault motion between the southern and northern parts are coincidence with occurrences of deformation textures of rocks which were sampled by drilling of shallow parts (a few hundreds meter) of the fault in 2000. In the southern core, a relatively strong deformation structure is preserved in total, and gouge containing fragments of pseudotachylytes and ultracataclasites is observed at the Chi-Chi- earthquake fault, which indicates that the main deformation mechanisms for the southern part of the fault was brittle. On the other hands, in the northern part, sand layer with much amount of water is found at the Chi-Chi- earthquake fault zone, and no breakage of sand grain is observed, which suggests that the deformation mechanism for northern part is independent particulate flow. The purpose of this study is to reveal the differences in clay minerals between the southern and northern part of the Chi-Chi earthquake fault. And then, we discuss about rock-fluid interaction and frictional heating characterized in seismogenic fault system. We analyzed clay minerals by X-ray diffract meter (XRD) after classification of rock types such as sandstone, alteration of sandstone and mudstone, breccia, and gouge. 1.33 micron meter of grains are obtained. Oriented sample was made. XRD analysis was conducted under following condition; 35kV, 15mA, 1 degree per minute of scan rate, and 0.02 degree of scan step. Range of 2 theta was from 2 degree to 35 degree. At first, air-dried condition of samples was measured. After that, ethylene glycol solvated samples were measured. The result represents that all samples contain smectite, illite, chlorite. No difference in components of clay mineral is

  6. Neutron scattering - a method for the investigation of structure and dynamics of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron scattering is complementary to X-ray techniques for structural studies. Inelastic scattering offers additional possibilities to investigate lattice dynamics and diffusion of molecules. Applications on the cation distribution in gamets and the Si/Al relation in feldspars are reported. Examples on hydrogen bonds are citd for bayerite(β-Al(OH)3), the chlorite mineral penninite and for the zeolite scolecite. The diffusion of water molecules in natural zeolites is studied by inelastic incoherent neutron scattering. An example is given for natrolite. Preliminary charge and magnetization densities for fayalite (Fe2SiO4) are reported. The experimental phonon dispersion curves for anhydrite (CaSO4) are compared with results from theoretical model calculations. (orig.)

  7. Evolution of models for conversion of smectite to non-expandable minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal alteration of smectite has long been regarded as conversion to illite and chlorite as concluded from investigations of Gulf sediments. As manifested by statements given earlier at various international scientific meetings and in the literature, smectite-to-illite conversion (S→I) has been assumed to be a solid-state reaction with layer-by-layer alteration via mixed layer I/S to illite. In the last 10 years this opinion has successively changed and in recent years the concept of dissolution of smectite and accessory minerals and precipitation of illite and possibly I/S has been favored by many investigators. The present report reports laboratory and field investigations on bentonite and also calculations based on geochemical codes, which all support the dissolution/precipitation process. Applying Pytte's model for calculating the rate of conversion to illite, one finds good agreement with a number of experiments and field data, and this model is therefore recommended for practical use

  8. Indicator minerals as guides to base metal sulphide mineralisation in Betul Belt, central India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Ghosh; M N Praveen

    2008-08-01

    Zn-bearing minerals that act as indicator minerals for base metal sulphide mineralization from the Proterozoic Betul Belt,central India with special emphasis on their genetic significance have been discussed.Sulphide mineralisation is hosted by the felsic volcanic rocks and has similarities with volcanic-hosted massive sulphide deposits in other parts of the world.Synvolcanic hydrothermal alteration is crudely zoned with an inner high Mg-Ca core and an outer wider envelop of Al-Fe rich mineral assemblage.Most of the prospects have strata bound,moderately to steeply dipping, multiple,sub-parallel sheet like ore bodies composed of disseminated and semi-massive to massive ores.Zn-bearing spinel,staurolite,biotite and ilmenite typically occur within the foot-wall altera- tion zones in close proximity to the sulphide mineralization.Zincian spinel is ubiquitous irrespective of the nature of alteration zone.Zincian staurolite is nearly absent in Mg-Ca alteration zones but commonly present in Al-Fe alteration zone along with zincian ilmenite.Zn-bearing biotite in intimate association with zincian spinel is generally found in Mg-Ca alteration zone and in the transition to Al-Fe alteration zone.Most of these indicator minerals can be considered as products of desulphidation of sphalerite during metamorphism.Mechanisms other than desulphidation like formation of gahnite by overstepping of the zinc saturation limit of biotite during retrogression to chlorite and formation of zincian staurolite at the expense of gahnite is also recorded.Field presence of these minerals has immense significance in exploration in Betul Belt as they occur in close spatial relationship with the sulphide rich zones and therefore act as direct vectors to ore.

  9. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  10. Alteration and petrology of Intrusive Rocks associated with Gold Mineralization at Kuh-E-Zar Gold Deposit, Torbat-e-Heydaryeh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mazloumi Bajestani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Kuh- e -Zar gold deposit located 35 km west of Torbat-e-Heydaryeh, (Khorassan e- Razavi province, East of Iran. This deposit is a specularite-rich Iron oxide type (IOCG. This mine is situated within Khaf-Bardascan volcanic plutonic belt. Based on recent exploration along this belt, several IOCG type system plus Kuh-e-Zar deposit are discovered. In the study area, several type of tuff and lava having acid to intermediate composition are identified (upper Eocene. Oligo-Miocene granite, granodiorite, synogranite and monzonite intruded upper Eocene andesite-dacite-rhyolite. Intrusive rocks are meta-aluminous, medium to high-K series I-type. Based on spider diagram, intrusive rocks show enrichment in LILE = K, Th, Rb and depletion in HFSE = Nb, Sr, Ti. Based geochemistry of igneous rock, they formed in continental margin subduction zone. Propylitic (chlorite alteration is dominated and covers large area. Silicification is restricted only to mineralized zones. Argillic and albitization is found in certain location and cover small areas. The style of mineralization was controlled by the type and geometry of fault zones. Mineralization is found as vein, stockwork and breccias. Hypogene mineral Paragenesis include: specularite-quartz-gold-chlorite ± chalcopyrite ± pyrite ± galena ± barite. Secondary minerals formed due to oxidation are: goethite, limonite, lepidocrucite, Malachite, Azurite, Covelite, Cerucite, hydrocerucite, Pyrolusite and Smitsonite. In a few localities, chalcopyrite and minor pyrite and galena are found. Based on SEM analysis gold is present as electrum. Mineralization appeared in different type such as vein, stockwork and Hydrothermal breccia in strike sleep fault zone which are hidden inside volcano plutonic rocks. The average gold grade is between 3.02 ppm and ore reserve is estimated more than 3 million tons (cut off grade = 0.7 ppm.

  11. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  12. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  13. Multivitamin/Mineral Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Consumer Datos en español Health Professional Other Resources Multivitamin/mineral ... Vitamin K lowers the drug's effectiveness and doctors base the medicine dose partly on the amount of ...

  14. Coastal placer minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Gujar, A.R.

    plagioclase weathers first while quartz remains unaltered. Transport: The weathered material would be transported by natural agents such as water, wind and glaciers. Humans to a large extent (e.g., by quarrying and mining) and animals and birds... at Chavara (Kerala) and Manavalakurichi (Tamil Nadu). The IREL started production after renovating the mineral separation plants that belonged previously to the Travancore Minerals Ltd. and was jointly owned by the central and state governments of Kerala...

  15. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  16. Lithium mineral waters

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu Constantin; Munteanu Diana

    2011-01-01

    Hydrological surveys showed that Romania basement contains a variety of balneary resources located within on the surface crust. Mineral waters are spread over more than 20% of the country at different depths, with a wide range of physical, chemical and therapeutic properties depending on their genesis.Balneary resources are represented mainly by therapeutic minerals that the physicochemical properties answer the needs of medical and prophylactic maintenance, enhancement and restoration of hea...

  17. Clay Minerals: Adsorbophysical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and features of surfaces of clay minerals (kaolin, montmorillonite, etc) have an important scientific and practical value. On the surface the interrelation of processes at electronic, atomic and molecular levels is realized. Availability of mineral surface to external influences opens wide scientific and technical opportunities of use of the surface phenomena, so the research of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near-surface area of clay minerals is important. After long term researches of gas-clay mineral system in physical fields the author has obtained experimental and theoretical material contributing to the creation of the surface theory of clays. A part of the researches is dedicated to studying the mechanism of crystal-chemical and crystal-physical processes in near surface area of clay mineral systems, selectivity of the surface centers to interact with gas phase molecules and adsorbophysical properties. The study of physical and chemical properties of fine clay minerals and their modification has a decisive importance for development of theory and practice of nanotechnologies: they are sorbents, membranes, ceramics and other materials with required electronic features

  18. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  19. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  20. Sorption and desorption hysteresis of radiocesium on clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desorption of cesium on montmorillonite artificially loaded (3.36 mg/g) by humic acid and contaminated with cesium-137 solution 10-7 M CsCl[137Cs] was investigated. There was used repeated leaching technique (RLT) according to Kokotov and Popova. 6-8 leaching steps was accomplished to determine Kd and fraction of irreversibly sorbed (fixed) radiocesium Rfix values. A number of desorption solutions of various concentration and composition containing following competitive cations (K+, [Ag(tu)3]+, Na+, Ca2+, Fe3+, Fe2+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ba2+, Cu2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, Tl+) were examined. Rate of immobilised cesium is specific for each competitive cation, not depended on its concentration and the ratio of solid and liquid phases. Kd value drops with increasing concentration of desorption solution. Sorption and desorption of cesium on various clay minerals (illite, illite/smectite, hectorite, chlorite, vermiculite, kaolinite, montmorillonite) were investigated. Cation exchange capacity and Kd values were obtained. Sorption properties of cesium can be successfully described by the Sips isotherm. Kd and Rfix values were also obtained by desorption experiment using RLT method. Differences between the Kd values calculated for sorption and desorption steps were caused not only by various composition of solutions, but also by contribution of unknown Rfix at sorption. (authors)

  1. Towards the ability to retrieve dust mineral composition from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klüser, L.; Martynenko, D.; Holzer-Popp, T.

    2012-04-01

    In modern satellite aerosol retrieval algorithms mostly bulk optical properties of mineral dust samples with specific composition are used. Over- or underestimation of dust optical depth often reflects the unability to account for variations in optical properties of the airborne dust. Consequently also other dust properties like particle size or mass concentration cannot be retrieved with any good accuracy. The situation is even worse in the thermal infrared, where the use of different optical property databases has shown to give totally different results in terms of changes to the observed radiance. Although originally designed for sounding of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, thermal infrared instruments with high spectral resolution like the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) or the newly launched Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) provide valuable information about dust extinction in the infrared window region. Extinction spectra of mineral dust components show highly variable extinction profiles in the infrared window between 830cm-1 and 1250cm-1. Differences in the shape of extinction functions can be used to estimate the optical fraction of the respective component to total dust extinction. For the current version of a IASI dust retrieval measured extinction spectra of six different dust components are used for estimating their relive contributions to the dust optical depth in the infrared. These components are quartz, anhydrite and feldspar as non-clay minerals and the clays illite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and chlorite. Unfortunately, iron oxides cannot be detected from infrared window observations as their spectral extinction variability is insufficient (this would be of large interest, as they are a major source of uncertainty for solar wavelength single-scattering albedo). In the current IASI algorithm singular vector decomposition is used to separate the contributions of

  2. Statistical analysis of results from the quantitative mapping of fracture minerals in Forsmark. Site descriptive modelling - complementary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin (Niressa AB, Norsborg (Sweden)); Sidborn, Magnus (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    Within the Forsmark site investigation campaign, quantitative mapping of different fracture minerals has been performed. This has been done by studying fracture surfaces of drill core sections from many different boreholes at the Forsmark site /Eklund and Mattsson 2009/. The drill core mapping was focused on the rock in the vicinity of flow anomalies detected by the Posiva Flow Log (PFL). The quantitative mapping was performed only on open fractures. The fracture minerals that were mapped are calcite, chlorite, clay minerals (as a group), hematite, and pyrite. In this present report, data from the quantitative mineral mapping campaign are refined, sorted into different data subsets, and analysed by parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. The data subsets are associated with 21 different rock volumes, representing different elevations, rock domains, fracture domains, and groups of deformation zones. In total 2,071 fractures were mapped at the site, and the most frequent mineral was calcite. Its amount could be quantitatively estimated in 32% of the mapped fractures. Of the other minerals, chlorite was quantitatively estimated in 24%, clay minerals in 11%, pyrite in 10%, and hematite in 0.4% of the mapped fractures. For fractures where the averaged fracture mineral thickness, d{sub mean} [mm], and visible coverage, C{sub vis} [%], could be quantitatively estimated, the following arithmetic means were found: calcite = 0.11 mm and 18%, chlorite = 0.22 mm and 38%, clay minerals = 0.14 mm and 40%, pyrite = 2.3 mum and 0.5%, hematite = 19 mum and 14%. These quantities are based on visual inspection of fracture surfaces and do not include the contribution from non-consolidated fracture fillings. It is shown that there is significant spatial variability of d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} within the examined rock volumes. Furthermore, the non-parametric analyses indicate that there are differences in d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} between the different rock volumes. Even

  3. Statistical analysis of results from the quantitative mapping of fracture minerals in Laxemar. Site descriptive modelling - complementary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin (Niressa AB, Norsborg (Sweden)); Sidborn, Magnus (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    Within the Laxemar site investigation campaign, quantitative mapping of different fracture minerals has been performed. This has been done by studying fracture surfaces of drill core sections from many different boreholes at the Laxemar site /Eklund and Mattsson 2008/. The drill core mapping was focused on the rock in the vicinity of flow anomalies detected by the Posiva Flow Log (PFL). The quantitative mapping was performed only on open fractures. The fracture minerals that were mapped are calcite, chlorite, clay minerals (as a group), hematite, and pyrite. In this present report, data from the quantitative mineral mapping campaign are refined, sorted into different data subsets, and analysed by parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. The data subsets are associated with 17 different rock volumes, representing different elevations, rock domains, fracture domains, and groups of deformation zones. In total 1,852 fractures were mapped at the site, and the most frequent mineral was calcite. Its amount could be quantitatively estimated in 51% of the mapped fractures. Of the other minerals, chlorite was quantitatively estimated in 46%, pyrite in 19%, clay minerals in 16%, and hematite in 0.05% of the mapped fractures. For fractures where the averaged fracture mineral thickness, d{sub mean} [mm], and visible coverage, C{sub vis} [%], could be quantitatively estimated, the following arithmetic means were found: calcite = 0.25 mm and 22%, chlorite = 0.29 mm and 41%, pyrite =1.3 mum and 0.2%, and clay minerals = 0.15 mm and 35%. These quantities are based on visual inspection of fracture surfaces and do not include the contribution from non-consolidated fracture fillings. It is shown that there is significant spatial variability of d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} within the examined rock volumes. Furthermore, the non-parametric analyses indicate that there are differences in d{sub mean} and C{sub vis} between the different rock volumes. Even so, the differences are

  4. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  5. Evaluation of CO₂ solubility-trapping and mineral-trapping in microbial-mediated CO₂-brine-sandstone interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Fengjun; Lu, Cong; Du, Juanjuan; Zhu, Rongyue; Sun, Lei

    2014-08-15

    Evaluation of CO₂ solubility-trapping and mineral-trapping by microbial-mediated process was investigated by lab experiments in this study. The results verified that microbes could adapt and keep relatively high activity under extreme subsurface environment (pHtemperature>50 °C, salinity>1.0 mol/L). When microbes mediated in the CO₂-brine-sandstone interaction, the CO₂ solubility-trapping was enhanced. The more biomass of microbe added, the more amount of CO₂ dissolved and trapped into the water. Consequently, the corrosion of feldspars and clay minerals such as chlorite was improved in relative short-term CO₂-brine-sandstone interaction, providing a favorable condition for CO₂ mineral-trapping. Through SEM images and EDS analyses, secondary minerals such as transition-state calcite and crystal siderite were observed, further indicating that the microbes played a positive role in CO₂ mineral trapping. As such, bioaugmentation of indigenous microbes would be a promising technology to enhance the CO₂ capture and storage in such deep saline aquifer like Erdos, China. PMID:25015018

  6. Uranium deposits of the Grants mineral belt: geochemical constraints on origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polygenetic origin of the uranium deposits of the Grants mineral belt is consistent with geologic and geochemical evidence. The characteristic suite of elements associated with uranium from distant source areas, viz. V, Mo, Se, As, indicates processes for deposition similar to those for Wyoming and Texas roll types of deposits, except that the rates of deposition were probably more dynamic thus leading to primary ore body geometries described as trend ore. Organic matter is associated with the ore and was important for both transport and precipitation; directly by providing reductants in addition to sulfide: sulfate redox reactions, and indirectly by promoting attack on allogenic rock forming and early formed diagenetic clay minerals. The trend ore in the Ambrosia Lake district and Smith Lake area is very nearly syngenetic; recent Rb-Sr age determinations yield ages of mineralization for coffinite-chlorite-organic carbon-pyrite assemblages of 135 +- 10 My as opposed to age of sedimentation for barren host rock of 145 +- 10 My. Only in the Jackpile-Paguate area are ages of mineralization quite different, i.e., 110-115 My. The Rb-Sr data also reveal for the Ambrosia Lake-Smith Lake areas Precambrian source materials and Permian--Triassic source material; both of which provided U to the Grants mineral belt. The trace element suites from ore zones, oxidized rocks near ore, and both oxidized and reduced rocks removed from ore suggest that the upper units of the Morrison Formation (i.e., Brushy Basin Member) contained volcanic detritus which provided not only U, V, Mo, Se, As but other trace elements which are not usually transported far from their sites of origin; viz. rare earth elements, Th, Ta, Sb.Thus a polygenetic model similar to the rolltype mechanisms but involving more complex sedimentary control and U from several source areas is compatible with the trend and other ore in the Grants mineral belt

  7. Change of minerals due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis contains new results on radio-induced alteration in solids, presenting investigations on alpha-particle haloes in several minerals (chlorite, muscovite, biotite, cordierite, diamond, fluorite, quartz, feldspars) and results of artificial irradiation experiments (with He2+ and O6+ ions, electrons and gamma-rays) on natural and synthetic crystals and glasses. Samples were characterised using modern micro- and nano-techniques: spectroscopic methods (Raman, PL, CL, IR, UV-VIS-NIR, EELS, EPR), microscopy (polarisation microscopy, SEM, TEM), diffraction (SAED, PXRD, SXRD) and chemical analysis (EDX, WDX, in addition TG). Furthermore, the presented work yields a comprehensive literature review of investigations on radiohaloes (from 1873 until present day) and is completed by results of mathematical modelling and Monte-Carlo-simulations of the interaction of radiation with matter. In all cases, there was very good agreement between measured penetration depths of irradiated particles and radiohalo radii on the one hand and particle ranges calculated by Monte-Carlo-simulations on the other hand. The phenomena of either inexplicably small or large radiohaloes (so called dwarf or giant haloes) reported in the literature could be explained using geometrical models and simulations. For the first time, radiohaloes in muscovite were analysed by spectroscopic methods. A comparison with haloes in chlorite and biotite showed that alpha-induced effects are similar in all investigated sheet silicates: It was observed in all cases that there is no amorphization but merely radio-induced disturbance of the short range order (due to accumulation of point defects). Changes of the coloration of sheet silicates are not caused by distinct additional absorption bands but by a shift of the high-energy absorption edge into the visible range. By obtaining spectra from different regions within haloes, it was possible to reconstruct the dose-dependent evolution of radio-induced light

  8. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  9. [Mineralization of heart valves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R

    1992-01-01

    Mineralization (calcification) of heart valves (mitral, aortic and aortic bioprosthesis) have been analyzed using; histology, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning microscopy, atomic absorption and electron microprobe. Obtained results showed the presence of two type of mineralization. First type is represented by grains composed of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonates. This mineralization is seen macroscopically. Second type of mineralization is possible to determine only using chemical methods. It is represented by biological structures containing amount of Ca, P and other elements higher then normal heart valves. This second type of the mineralization conducts to the changes of physical features of the tissue. Both types of calcification develops because of the defects of atomic structure of biological components of heart valves (mainly collagen). These defects show the presence of free atomic bindings i.e. electric potential. Because of this, they are able to react with surrounding free joints, starting calcification. Defects of biological structures of heart valves are the results of infections, mechanical destruction of the valves etc. Calcification may be stopped on different stages of its development: or as secret calcification or may pass to the stage seen as apatite grains. PMID:1342999

  10. Marine Mineral Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    exploration requires knowledge of mineral deposits and models of their formation, of geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, and of data evaluation and interpretation methods. These topics are described in detail by an international group of authors. A short description is also given of marine......The past 20 years have seen extensive marine exploration work by the major industrialized countries. Studies have, in part, been concentrated on Pacific manganese nodule occurrences and on massive sulfides on mid-oceanic ridges. An international jurisdictional framework of the sea-bed mineral...... resources was negotiated by the United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III). A most important outcome of this conference was the establishment of an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of at least 200 nautical miles for all coastal states and the recognition of a deep-sea regime. Mineral deposits...

  11. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National...

  12. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  13. Analytical and mineralogical studies of ore and impurities from a chromite mineral using X-ray analysis, electrochemical and microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramos, S; Doménech-Carbó, A; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Peris-Vicente, J

    2008-02-15

    A wide analytical study of South African chromite ore, material with high interest in ceramic industry, has been carried out. With this purpose, an accurate chemical identification and mineralogical characterization of the mineral and the gangue have been performed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), voltammetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), light microscopy (LM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX). The elemental composition of the sample (ore and gangue) has been obtained by XRF. The voltammetric analysis has allowed to demonstrate that iron in the sample was as Fe(II). The main compound of the chromite ore was a spinel (magnesiochromite ferroan), identified by XRD from the sample, which constitutes the chromite ore. This technique has also been useful to characterize some silicates as impurities in the chromite ore sample. Light microscopy has allowed the detection of the spinel and the identification of a silicate impurity (chrome chlorite), by means of their colouration. On the other hand, the other silicate impurity was identified as labradorite by means of X-ray microscopy by SEM/EDX. Finally, a strategy was developed to calculate the composition of each mineral in the unknown sample. The obtained results were: chromite spinel 82.89%, chlorite 12.79% and labradorite 4.32%. PMID:18371822

  14. Metamorphism of mineral matter in coal from the Bukit Asam deposit, south Sumatra, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susilawati, Rita; Ward, Colin R.

    2006-10-02

    The coal of the Miocene Bukit Asam deposit in south Sumatra is mostly sub-bituminous in rank, consistent with regional trends due to burial processes. However, effects associated with Plio-Pleistocene igneous intrusions have produced coal with vitrinite reflectance up to at least 4.17% (anthracite) in different parts of the deposit. The un-metamorphosed to slightly metamorphosed coals, with Rv{sub max} values of 0.45-0.65%, contain a mineral assemblage made up almost entirely of well-ordered kaolinite and quartz. The more strongly heat-affected coals, with Rv{sub max} values of more than 1.0%, are dominated by irregularly and regularly interstratified illite/smectite, poorly crystallized kaolinite and paragonite (Na mica), with chlorite in some of the anthracite materials. Kaolinite is abundant in the partings of the lower-rank coals, but is absent from the partings in the higher-rank areas, even at similar horizons in the same coal seam. Regularly interstratified illite/smectite, which is totally absent from the partings in the lower-rank coals, dominates the mineralogy in the partings associated with the higher-rank coal beds. A number of reactions involving the alteration of silicate minerals appear to have occurred in both the coal and the associated non-coal lithologies during the thermal metamorphism generated by the intrusions. The most prominent involve the disappearance of kaolinite, the appearance of irregularly interstratified illite/smectite, and the formation of regular I/S, paragonite and chlorite. Although regular I/S is identified in all of the non-coal partings associated with the higher-rank coals, illite/smectite with an ordered structure is only recognised in the coal samples collected from near the bases of the seams. The I/S in the coal samples adjacent to the floor of the highest rank seam also appears to have a greater proportion of illitic components. The availability of sodium and other non-mineral inorganic elements in the original coal

  15. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  16. Iron oxide modified minerals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mashlan, M.; Bartoňková, H.; Jančík, D.; Tuček, J.; Martinec, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 191, 1-3 (2009), s. 151-157. ISSN 0304-3843 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : Mössbauer spectroscopy * clay minerals * iron oxide * nanoparticle Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.209, year: 2007 http://www.springerlink.com/content/9870444lu2g66382/fulltext.pdf

  17. Uruguay minerals fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the bases for the development of the necessary works of prospection are exposed on mineral fuels of Uruguay. We have taken the set from: coal, lutitas bituminous, uranium, petroleum and disturbs. In all the cases we have talked about to the present state of the knowledge and to the works that we considered necessary to develop in each case

  18. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay

  19. Bioreduction of Fe-bearing clay minerals and their reactivity toward pertechnetate (Tc-99)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Liu, Chongxuan; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2011-09-01

    99Technetium ( 99Tc) is a fission product of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 and poses a high environmental hazard due to its long half-life ( t1/2 = 2.13 × 10 5 y), abundance in nuclear wastes, and environmental mobility under oxidizing conditions [i.e., Tc(VII)]. Under reducing conditions, Tc(VII) can be reduced to insoluble Tc(IV). Ferrous iron, either in aqueous form (Fe 2+) or in mineral form [Fe(II)], has been used to reduce Tc(VII) to Tc(IV). However, the reactivity of Fe(II) from clay minerals, other than nontronite, toward immobilization of Tc(VII) and its role in retention of reduced Tc(IV) has not been investigated. In this study the reactivity of a suite of clay minerals toward Tc(VII) reduction and immobilization was evaluated. The clay minerals chosen for this study included five members in the smectite-illite (S-I) series, (montmorillonite, nontronite, rectorite, mixed layered I-S, and illite), chlorite, and palygorskite. Surface Fe-oxides were removed from these minerals with a modified dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) procedure. The total structural Fe content of these clay minerals, after surface Fe-oxide removal, ranged from 0.7% to 30.4% by weight, and the structural Fe(III)/Fe(total) ratio ranged from 45% to 98%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy results showed that after Fe oxide removal the clay minerals were free of Fe-oxides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that little dissolution occurred during the DCB treatment. Bioreduction experiments were performed in bicarbonate buffer (pH-7) with structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor, lactate as the sole electron donor, and Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 cells as a mediator. In select tubes, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) was added as electron shuttle to facilitate electron transfer. In the S-I series, smectite (montmorillonite) was the most reducible (18% and 41% without and with AQDS, respectively) and illite the least (1% for both

  20. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - Industrial Mineral Mining Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — An Industrial Mineral Mining Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Industrial Mineral Mining Program. The sub-facility types are listed below:Deep...

  1. Paleoenvironmental significance of clay mineral assemblages in the southeastern Arabian Sea during last 30 kyr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siddhartha Sankar Das; Ajai K Rai; Vaseem Akaram; Dhananjai Verma; A C Pandey; Koushik Dutta; G V Ravi Prasad

    2013-02-01

    A gravity core SK-221 recovered from the southeastern Arabian Sea near Laccadive–Chagos Ridge was examined to identify the sources of detrital clay minerals and to decipher paleoenvironmental changes for the last 30 kyr. The clay mineral assemblages predominantly consist of illite, kaolinite and chlorite with small amounts of smectite. Quartz, feldspar and occasionally gibbsite are the clay-sized non-clay minerals present in the examined section. The detrital clay minerals primarily originated from the hinterland and were supplied to the present site by the numerous small rivers draining western India during preglacial and Holocene periods, and partly by the strong reworking of Indian continental shelf during glacial period. The low values of humidity proxies (kaolinite content, kaolinite to illite and smectite to illite ratios) and better illite crystallinity indicate relatively weak summer monsoon condition that resulted in reduced chemical weathering during glacial period, which was interrupted by a discrete event of winter monsoon intensification at ∼20–17 ka. The increased kaolinite content, higher values of humidity indices and poorer illite crystallinity reflect high humidity that resulted in strong hydrolysis activity during the preglacial and Holocene periods. The increased CaCO3 during above periods also indicates less terrigenous dilution and intensified southwest monsoon-led upwelling which result in higher surface biogenic productivity. The characteristic clay mineral associations broadly suggest dry to semi-drier conditions during Heinrich Events H1, H2, and H3 and also during Younger Dryas. The low values of biogenic carbonate and organic carbon also indicate low productivity associated with weak summer monsoons during Heinrich Events. Abrupt increased humidity was recorded at 15–12.7 ka (Bølling/Allerød Event) sandwiched between two lows of Heinrich Events. Cycles of millennial timescale variations 2300, 1800, 1300 and 1000 yr have been

  2. Chapter 5. Origin of Mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter author deals with the origin of uranium mineralization in Slovakia. There are discussed (1) Stratiform mineralization, particularly: (A) Uranium in Ti-rare earth elements (REE)-Zr placers in sandstone, (B) uranium mineralization in sandstone with abundant organic matter, (C) Uranium mineralization in phosphatic sandstone,(D) Cu±U mineralization (copper sandstone), (E) U-Mo mineralized horizons in volcanoclastic and volcanic rocks; (2) Vein mineralization, particularly: (F) Uranium mineralization in pegmatite, (G) Mo-W-(U-Ti-REE) mineralization in granite, (H) U-REE±Au mineralization in proximity of granite, (I) U±Mo and Cu mineralization cutting the permian sequences, (J) Uranium mineralization in the Neogene volcanics; and (3) Evolution of uranium mineralization. Uraninite occurrence in pegmatite of Dubrava deposit in Nizke Tatry Mts is the oldest manifestation of the uranium mineralization in the Western Carpathians. Its origin is related to the Hercynian magmatic activity. The most important uranium mineralization occurs in the Permian sequences. The stratiform mineralization is related to sandstones with abundant organic matter of Hronicum in the Kozie Chrbty Mts. or to volcanic and volcanoclastic rocks of Gemericum and Tatricum. The low-grade Permian ores display age ranging from (270 to 240±30) Ma. The Permian low-grade mineralization wa re-mobilized during the Alpine orogeny forming ore bodies of high-grade uranium mineralization especially on northern Gemericum and Tatricum of the Povazsky Inovec Mts. Big tectonic structures in ore deposits were favourable for remobilization. The younger re-mobilized mineralization overlaps the older low grade mineralization. U-Pb isotopic dating gave 130±20 Ma in high-grade ores of Gemericum in Novoveska Huta and 100±20 in high-grade ores of Tatricum in Kalnica. The Alpine granite with dissemination U-Ti-REE mineralization displays age 101±5 Ma according to Rb-Sr dating. As reliable U-Pb dating of U

  3. Mineral processing of heavy mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Processing of heavy mineral sands involves many techniques including gravity, magnetic and electrostatic separation. As part of a laboratory programme to develop effective mineral processing techniques, two mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia were processed using the standard techniques, with emphasis placed on the Carpco electrostatic separator. These sands were initially characterised mineralogically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA...

  4. Clay-mineral assemblages from some levels of K-118 drill core of Maha Sarakham evaporites, northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanich, Parkorn

    Clay-mineral assemblages in Middle Clastic, Middle Salt, Lower Clastic, Potash Zone, and Lower Salt, totalling 13 samples from K-118 drill core, in the Maha Sarakham Formation, Khorat Basin, northeastern Thailand were studied. The clay-size particles were separated from the water-soluble salt by water leaching. Then the samples were leached again in the EDTA solution and separated into clay-size particles by using the timing sedimentation. The EDTA-clay residues were divided and analyzed by using the XRD and XRF method. The XRD peaks show that the major-clay minerals are chlorite, illite, and mixed-layer corrensite including traces of rectorite? and paragonite? The other clay-size particles are quartz and potassium feldspar. The XRF results indicate Mg-rich values and moderate MgAl atom ratio values in those clay minerals. The variable Fe, Na, and K contents in the clay-mineral assemblages can explain the environment of deposition compared to the positions of the samples from the core. Hypothetically, mineralogy and the chemistry of the residual assemblages strongly indicate that severe alteration and Mg-enrichment of normal clay detritus occurred in the evaporite environment through brine-sediment interaction. The various Mg-enrichment varies along the various members reflecting whether sedimentation is near or far from the hypersaline brine.

  5. Construction Minerals Operations - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes construction minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  6. Agricultural Minerals Operations - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes agricultural minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  7. The compositions of minerals within high pressure tectonic blocks from Horse Mountain, Northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, C.E. (Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    High pressure metamorphic blocks occur within serpentinite between the South Fork Mountain Schist and the Coast Range Fault, Humboldt Co., Northern California. Samples from three of these blocks were studied by petrographic techniques and quantitatively analyzed using the energy dispersive spectrometer on out scanning electron microscope. The mineral assemblages for three samples are as follows: WC86-7-3 contains omphacite (jd53, di36, hd11), pumpellyite, and relic igneous clinopyroxene. WC86-9-3 contains titanite, epidote chlorite, pumpellyite, and relic clinopyroxene. WC86-18-3 contains garnet, lawsonite, glaucophane, albite, chlorite, pumpellyite, minor quartz, and relic clinopyroxene. All samples contain relic clinopyroxene that, in the case of SC86-7-3, acts as a nucleus for omphacite growth. When present in cross cutting veins, omphacite has both radiating fibrous and blocky textures. Some epidote, titanite, clinopyroxene and pumpellyite were too fine to identify optically as well, but occur in the ground mass. Large grains of euhedral glaucophane, (Na[sub 2.0] Ca[sub .2])(Mg[sub 1.3] Fe[sub 2.0] Al[sub 1.7])Si[sub 8.0] O[sub 22] (OH)[sub 2], and garnet, (alm 33, pyO, sp30, gr37), containing relic ( ) clinopyroxene, glaucophane, and albite inclusions, were present in WC86-18-3. The high SiO[sub 2] and low TiO[sub 2] relative to Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] in relic clinopyroxene indicates a non-alkaline tholeiitic protolith. Omphacite compositions correspond to the type IV blueschist typical of the Franciscan Complex and constrain the pressures of metamorphism to be approximately 9 kb while lawsonite in WC86-18-3 implies a temperature below 450C. These observations indicate that the blocks are derived from subducted material that underwent metamorphism in a low temperature, high pressure setting. The process of their exhumation remains a mystery.

  8. Hydrated silicate minerals on Mars observed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F; Murchie, S L; Pelkey, S M; Ehlmann, B L; Milliken, R E; Grant, J A; Bibring, J-P; Poulet, F; Bishop, J; Dobrea, E Noe; Roach, L; Seelos, F; Arvidson, R E; Wiseman, S; Green, R; Hash, C; Humm, D; Malaret, E; McGovern, J A; Seelos, K; Clancy, T; Clark, R; Marais, D D; Izenberg, N; Knudson, A; Langevin, Y; Martin, T; McGuire, P; Morris, R; Robinson, M; Roush, T; Smith, M; Swayze, G; Taylor, H; Titus, T; Wolff, M

    2008-07-17

    Phyllosilicates, a class of hydrous mineral first definitively identified on Mars by the OMEGA (Observatoire pour la Mineralogie, L'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activitié) instrument, preserve a record of the interaction of water with rocks on Mars. Global mapping showed that phyllosilicates are widespread but are apparently restricted to ancient terrains and a relatively narrow range of mineralogy (Fe/Mg and Al smectite clays). This was interpreted to indicate that phyllosilicate formation occurred during the Noachian (the earliest geological era of Mars), and that the conditions necessary for phyllosilicate formation (moderate to high pH and high water activity) were specific to surface environments during the earliest era of Mars's history. Here we report results from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of phyllosilicate-rich regions. We expand the diversity of phyllosilicate mineralogy with the identification of kaolinite, chlorite and illite or muscovite, and a new class of hydrated silicate (hydrated silica). We observe diverse Fe/Mg-OH phyllosilicates and find that smectites such as nontronite and saponite are the most common, but chlorites are also present in some locations. Stratigraphic relationships in the Nili Fossae region show olivine-rich materials overlying phyllosilicate-bearing units, indicating the cessation of aqueous alteration before emplacement of the olivine-bearing unit. Hundreds of detections of Fe/Mg phyllosilicate in rims, ejecta and central peaks of craters in the southern highland Noachian cratered terrain indicate excavation of altered crust from depth. We also find phyllosilicate in sedimentary deposits clearly laid by water. These results point to a rich diversity of Noachian environments conducive to habitability. PMID:18633411

  9. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  10. Cataracts in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question was studied of whether or not uranium miners with a long history of work underground develop alterations of the eye lens as a result of a long-term chronic exposure to gamma radiation. Investigated were the area of opacities and the occurrence of alterations of the lens posterior pole in a group of 800 uranium miners (i.e., 1,600 eyes) with work underground longer than 10 years. As against controls, no statistical differences were found in the lens transparency. Significant differences were also not found in the extent of cataracts and the occurrence of posterior pole alterations, nor in the rate of an increased occurrence of cataracts due to age. (L.O.)

  11. Magnetic birefringence of minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Barry R; Wilson, Stephen R; Ridler, Peter J

    2005-01-15

    The earliest reports of magnetically induced optical birefringence included data for liquids, magnetic fluids and colloidal suspensions. Recent work has shown that with relatively straightforward apparatus, when carefully designed and aligned, measurable effects can be recorded even for suspensions of relatively weak diamagnetic materials, including mineral particles. By recording the magnitude of the birefringence induced in magnetic fields of up to two Tesla, a method for the analysis of the magnetic and optical characteristics of these diamagnetic colloids is evidenced. The principles, apparatus and methodology involved are described and novel data reported for the minerals attapulgite, bentonite, hectorite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite. Preliminary experiments using pulsed fields on vermiculite sols show that, in favourable circumstances, estimates of particle size can be made by analysing signal response rates. PMID:15571692

  12. Mineral concentration by flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variables of the pulp, the influence of flotation reagents, and the phenomena of the mineralization of air bubbles are treated in some detail besides explanations of the disaggregation of minerals. The machines used in technical flotation processes are described and the possibilities of designing flotation cycles are indicated and explained by practical examples. Measuring techniques used to monitor important process parameters are reported and reference is made to radiometric techniques presently developed and used to a growing extent. Because of the increasing tendency of flotation system control, the application of radioactive tracers proves to be an important method of investigation for fundamental research required to describe mathematically the flotation process. The steps of automation leading to process optimization are indicated and flotation systems characterized by different degree of automation are presented. (orig.)

  13. Mineral accretion in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Ronald Richard

    2000-10-01

    By performing electrolysis in seawater a concrete-like accretion of precipitating aragonite (one crystalline form of CaCO3) and brucite (Mg(OH) 2) slowly develops onto the cathode. The accretion forms by high pH conditions caused by the reduction reactions occurring at the cathode. A solid casing of accretions over a preformed cathodic mesh has the potential for many engineering applications such as artificial reefs, sub-surface breakwaters and pipe construction. To investigate using mineral accretion as an alternative means of construction, experiments in the open coast, laboratory and ocean harbor have resulted in tables that can projected into a feasibility study. Inevitable current density variations over the cathodic framework and sensitivity to seawater hydrodynamics make accretion thickness difficult to predict and control in practice. Ideal conditions for growing a large-scale mineral accretion structure are still, clean ocean waters where low DCV power can be delivered on the order of years.

  14. Mapping Weathering and Alteration Minerals in the Comstock and Geiger Grade Areas using Visible to Thermal Infrared Airborne Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Greg R.; Calvin, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    To support research into both precious metal exploration and environmental site characterization a combination of high spatial/spectral resolution airborne visible, near infrared, short wave infrared (VNIR/SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) image data were acquired to remotely map hydrothermal alteration minerals around the Geiger Grade and Comstock alteration regions, and map the mineral by-products of weathered mine dumps in Virginia City. Remote sensing data from the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), SpecTIR Corporation's airborne hyperspectral imager (HyperSpecTIR), the MODIS-ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER), and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) were acquired and processed into mineral maps based on the unique spectral signatures of image pixels. VNIR/SWIR and TIR field spectrometer data were collected for both calibration and validation of the remote data sets, and field sampling, laboratory spectral analyses and XRD analyses were made to corroborate the surface mineralogy identified by spectroscopy. The resulting mineral maps show the spatial distribution of several important alteration minerals around each study area including alunite, quartz, pyrophyllite, kaolinite, montmorillonite/muscovite, and chlorite. In the Comstock region the mineral maps show acid-sulfate alteration, widespread propylitic alteration and extensive faulting that offsets the acid-sulfate areas, in contrast to the larger, dominantly acid-sulfate alteration exposed along Geiger Grade. Also, different mineral zones within the intense acid-sulfate areas were mapped. In the Virginia City historic mining district the important weathering minerals mapped include hematite, goethite, jarosite and hydrous sulfate minerals (hexahydrite, alunogen and gypsum) located on mine dumps. Sulfate minerals indicate acidic water forming in the mine dump environment. While there is not an immediate threat to the community, there are clearly sources of

  15. Discussion on Nontraditional Mineral Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce the concept of nontraditional mineral resources, and pro pose the major system of nontraditional mineral resources, including nontraditional resources, research methods, mining and mineral economics. Then the authors conclude that the research on nontraditional mineral resources is not only significant to satisfication the human needs in the 21st century, but also important to the development of the present geological theory.

  16. Organic or mineral fertilization

    OpenAIRE

    Heeb, Anuschka

    2005-01-01

    To meet Swedish environmental goals organic farming will play an important role in the development of a sustainable and high quality food production system. However, several conflicts exist, such as the achievement of high yields without the use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides and the minimization of nutrient losses. In this thesis the effect of organic fertilizers compared to mineral fertilizers on plant product quality was investigated. Tomato yield and quality aspects such as taste a...

  17. Refractory Minerals in Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Qinguo; LI Jing; LIU Jiehua; LIU Yanjun

    2004-01-01

    Henan province is very rich in refractory minerals of many varieties including silica, dolomite, graphite,pearlite, sepiolite, olivine, and sillimanite group minerals, besides the abundant reserves of fireclay and bauxite,which lay a good foundation for the development of the refractories industry of the province. The paper introduces the reserves, distribution and character of the refractory minerals in Henan province.

  18. Titanium minerals for new materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, O.; Ozhogina, E.; Ponaryadov, A.; Golubeva, I.

    2016-04-01

    The mineral composition of titanium minerals of modern coastal-marine placer in Stradbroke Island (Australia) and Pizhma paleoplacer in Middle Timan (Russia) has been presented. The physical features of titanium minerals and their modification methods were shown. Photocatalysts on the basis of the Pizhma leucoxene were developed for water purification.

  19. Lulak Abad Iron Occurrence, Northwest of Zanjan: Metamorphosed and Deformed Volcano-Sedimentary Type of Mineralization in Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Karami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Keywords: Iron mineralization, hydrothermal vein, alteration, Lulak Abad, Zanjan, Central Iran Introduction The Lulak Abad iron occurrence is located in the northwestern part of the Central Iran, 55 km west of Zanjan. Mineralization at the Lulak Abad area was originally identified by Zamin Gostar Company (2007, during a geophysical exploration. The present paper provides an overview of the geological framework, the mineralization characteristics, and the results of a geochemical study of the Lulak Abad iron occurrence with an application to the ore genesis. Identification of these characteristics can be used as a model for exploration of this type of iron mineralization in the Central Iran and elsewhere. Materials and methods Detailed field work was carried out at different scales (give scales in parentheses in the Lulak Abad area. About 16 polished thin and thin sections from host rocks and mineralized and altered zones were studied by conventional petrographic and mineralogical methods at the Department of Geology, University of Zanjan. In addition, a total of 7 samples from ore zones at the Lulak Abad occurrence were analyzed by ICP-OES for minor and trace elements and REE compositions at Geological Survey of Iran, Tehran, Iran. Result Rock units exposed in the Lulak Abad area consist of schists and metavolcanic units the Kahar Formation; Lotfi, 2001 that were intruded by granite and microdiorite bodies. The schist units consist of chlorite-biotite-muscovite schist and muscovite schist that show granolepidoblastic texture with foliation-parallel disseminated magnetite. The metavolcanic units consist of metadacite, rhyolitic metatuff and meta-andesite with porphyritic textures. They are marked by dominant mylonitic foliation surrounding feldspar and quartz porphyroclasts. Alkali feldspar and quartz are the principal minerals of the granite. The intrusion is characterized by intense deformation features and is highly mylonitized. Based on field

  20. Clay minerals and geochemistry of the bottom sediments in the northwestern East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Clay minerals of 34 sediments collected from the northwestern continental shelf of the East China Sea have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The clay mineral distribution is mainly controlled by the sediment source and the dominant circulation pattern. The predominant clay mineral in our study area is illite comprising more than 67% of the whole clay fraction. The highest concentration of illite (>68%) is found in the southeastern offshore parts beyond the reach of terrigenous input from the Jeju Island. It means that these illites are largely transported by the Kuroshio Current from the South China Sea (SCS). Smectite is highly concentrated in the northwest middle part and in the outer-shelf mud patch. It seems to be due to the high supply of smectite transported from China where fine-grained sediments are discharged from modern and ancient Huanghe (Yellow) River. The relatively high abundant kaolinite is likely derived from the Changjiang (Yangtze) River via the Taiwan Warm Current. In contrast,large amounts of chlorite and high chlorite/kaolinite ratios occur in the northwestern area, reflecting the transportation by the Yellow Sea Coastal Current from the southern Yellow Sea. The discrimination diagrams clearly show that the sediments in the northwestern East China Sea are ultimately sourced from Chinese rivers, especially from the Huanghe River, whereas the sediment in the northeast part might come from the Jeju Island. The muddy sediments of the Changjiang River's submerged delta have much lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7162-0.7180) than those of the Shandong Peninsular mud wedge (0.7216-0.7249),which are supposed to be originated from the Huanghe River, suggesting the distribution pattern of 87Sr/86Sr ratios as a new tracer to discriminate the provenance of shelf sediments in the study area. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the outer-shelf muddy sediments ranged from 0.7169 to 0.7216 in a wide range and was between those of the Huanghe River and Changjiang

  1. Chemical and mineralogical data of the metalliferous mineralization from S. Carlo mine (Peloritani mts, Ne Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisacane, G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The mineralization processes in the Peloritani Belt (Southern Sector of the Calabria- Peloritani Arc prevalently developed during the Variscan orogenesis producing Pb, Zn, Fe, As, Sb, Cu, Ag, W, etc. polymetalliferous ore-bearing horizons. This paper focuses on the polymetalliferous mineralization recognised in the ancient S. Carlo Mine, which has already been subject of some studies and is part of an important discordant vein deposits system that are widespread in the Mandanici Unit (MaU. This Unit is characterized by a Variscan low-P, polyphasic and plurifacial metamorphic basement, exhibiting a prograde zoning, from chlorite zone of greenschist facies to oligoclase-almandine zone of amphibolite facies. The Variscan main foliation (Fv2 is irregularly cut by mineralized veins of decimetric to metric width. They are also perpendicular to the Alpine mylonitic shear zones of metric thickness developing along the sub-horizontal tectonic contacts between the tectono-stratigraphic units. These vein deposits formed along late-Alpine systems of fractures and faults, after Peloritani nappe emplacement. Minerographic study reveals a metalliferous mineral association mainly composed of tetrahedrite associated with, in order of decreasing abundance, chalcopyrite, bournonite, pentlandite, stromeyerite, arsenopyrite, scheelite, galena, sphalerite, pyrite, bismuthinite, boulangerite, jamesonite, covellite, bornite and argentite. Quartz, siderite and ankerite among non-metalliferous minerals are predominant. This work has been supported by mineralogical studies and chemical analyses carried out by Atomic Absorption and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry on powdered and separated samples of minerals. Geochemical data (major and trace elements have allowed a detailed characterization of the minerals. They have revealed that the most significant minerals with Au contents around 1 ppm are tetrahedrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and bournonite. The

  2. The Genesis of Precious and Base Metal Mineralization at the Miguel Auza Deposit, Zacatecas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, A. A.; Olivo, G. R.; Godin, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Miguel Auza mine located in Zacatecas State, Mexico, is a vein-type polymetallic epithermal deposit hosted in deformed argillite, siltstone and, greywacke of the Cretaceous Caracol Formation. Silver-rich base metal veins (0.2 m to >1.5 m wide) are spatially associated with the NE-striking, steeply SE- dipping (70-80°) Miguel Auza fault over a strike length of 1.6 km and a depth of 460 m. A 2 km2 monzonitic stock located in the proximity of the mineralized zones, has previously been interpreted as the source of the mineralizing fluids. Four distinct structural stages are correlated with hydrothermal mineral deposition: (I) The Pre-ore stage is characterized by normal faulting, fracturing of host rock, and rotation of bedding planes. This stage consists of quartz, illite, chlorite, +/- pyrite alteration of sedimentary wall rocks. (II) The Pyrite-vein stage is associated with reverse-sense reactivation of early normal faults, dilation of bedding planes/fractures, and deposition of generally barren calcite + pyrite veinlets. (III) The Main-ore stage is related to the development of reverse-fault- hosted massive sulphide veins. During this stage three phases of mineral deposition are recorded: early pyrite and arsenopyrite, intermediate chalcopyrite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, and base metals, and late base metals and Ag-bearing minerals. Associated gangue minerals during the main ore stage are quartz, muscovite, calcite and chlorite. (IV) The Post-ore stage involves late NW-SE striking block faulting, brecciation and calcite veining. Later supergene oxidation of veins led to deposition of Fe-oxides and hydroxides, commonly filling fractures or replacing early-formed sulphide assemblages. The various vein types display classic epithermal textures including open space filling, banding, comb quartz and brecciation. The Ag-bearing minerals comprise pyrargyrite [Ag3(Sb,As)S3], argentotennantite [(Cu,Ag)10(Zn,Fe)2(Sn,As)4S13], polybasite-pearceite [(Ag,Cu)16(Sb,As)2S11], and

  3. Geology and associated mineral occurrences of the Araxa Group, Mossamedes Region, Goias, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the region of Mossamedes, State of Goias, Brazil, the Precambrian metamorphic rocks of the Araxa group were mapped at the scale of 1:25,000, with emphasis on stratigraphic, structural, petrographic and economic aspects. These metamorphites represent a continous stratigraphic sequence which, from bottom to top can be subdivided into five informal lithostratigraphic units: 1) psamitic unit (quartzite, metaconglomerate); 2) psamitic-pelitic unit (quartzite, quartz schist, muscovite schist); 3) lower pelitic - volcanic unit (chlorite - biotite schist, fine grained blastoporphyritic gneiss, amphibolite and calc-schist); 4) upper pelitic - volcanic unit (garnet muscovite schist, biotite schist and gneiss, amphibolite, magnetite muscovite schist); 5) gneissic unit (epidote biotite gneiss, amphibolite). Three types of meta-intrusive rocks were found, besides basic dykes related to Mesozoic magmatism. Four phases of deformation affected the volcano-sedimentary sequence;D1, D2, D3 and D4, each of them developing distinct deformational features. Barrowian type metamorphism increases progressively from North to South from the biotite zone to the garnet zone (greenschist facies), reaching the staurolite-kyanite zone (amphibolite facies). The magmatism throughout the Group's evolution consists of mafic to felsic volcanic activity, mustly intermediary, as well as three intrusive events. Gold, copper and zinc minerals of economic interest occur within the studied area. The gold mineralizations are related to the pelitic-volcanic sequences. Copper occurs in several rocks from the pelitic-volcanic and gneissic sequences. (Author)

  4. Multiple techniques for mineral identification of terrestrial evaporites relevant to Mars exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivaletta, N.; Dellisanti, F.; D'Elia, M.; Fonti, S.; Mancarella, F.

    2013-05-01

    Sulfates, commonly found in evaporite deposits, were observed on Mars surface during orbital remote sensing and surface exploration. In terrestrial environments, evaporite precipitation creates excellent microniches for microbial colonization, especially in desert areas. Deposits comprised of gypsum, calcite, quartz and silicate deposits (phyllosilicates, feldspars) from Sahara Desert in southern Tunisia contain endolithic colonies just below the rock surface. Previous optical observations verified the presence of microbial communities and, as described in this paper, spectral visible analyses have led to identification of chlorophylls belonging to photosynthetic bacteria. Spectral analyses in the infrared region have clearly detected the presence of gypsum and phyllosilicates (mainly illite and/or smectite), as well as traces of calcite, but not quartz. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis has identified the dominant presence of gypsum as well as that of other secondary minerals such as quartz, feldspars and Mg-Al-rich phyllosilicates, such as chlorite, illite and smectite. The occurrence of a small quantity of calcite in all the samples was also highlighted by the loss of CO2 by thermal analysis (TG-DTA). A normative calculation using XRD, thermal data and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis has permitted to obtain the mineralogical concentration of the minerals occurring in the samples. The combination of multiple techniques provides information about the mineralogy of rocks and hence indication of environments suitable for supporting microbial life on Mars surface.

  5. Clay Mineral Assemblages as Proxies for Reconstructing Messinian Paleoenvironments in the Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ruiz, Francisca; Comas, Menchu; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-05-01

    Significant tectonic and climate changes at time of the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC) led to a complex sedimentation involving marked changes in sediment composition, particularly in clay mineral assemblages. One of the noticeable mineralogical changes across this time interval is the strong smectite increase in Messinian deposits in comparison to the underlying Tortonian and overlaying Pliocene sediments. As no break in the clay mineralogy is recognized in the open ocean (Chamley et al., 1978), such changes are also distinctive of the Mediterranean basins. Since the early discoveries of the giant Messinian evaporite formation (DSDP Legs 13 and 42A), a vast literature contributed, during the last decades, to the continuous debate and re-examination of the actual Messinian paleoenvironment. Drilled records in the westernmost Mediterranean (Alboran Sea) have shown significant changes in the mineralogical assemblages associated to the Messinian events. This basin is depleted of significant salt deposits. Site 976 (ODP Leg 161) recovered a 670-m-thick, middle Miocene (Serravallian) to Pleistocene/Holocene sedimentary sequence, including a thin interval of Messinian sediment, lying directly upon the metamorphic basement. Analysis of clay mineral assemblages from the sedimentary cover of Hole 976B revealed an homogeneous clay association composed of illite, smectite, chlorite and kaolinite with no major changes in clay mineral abundances except for the sediment interval dated as Messinian, which is characterized by a sharp smectite increase (Martinez-Ruiz et al., 1999). Transmission Electron Microscope analyses of clay minerals revealed that smectite composition corresponds to Al-rich beidellites, which supports the existence of such smectites in peri-Mediterranean soils. Smectite formation was favored by the climate conditions at that time, comprising progressive aridification and the alternation of wet and dry climatic episodes. Diagenesis in these smectites is

  6. 二氧化氯消毒饮用水中亚氯酸盐污染的初步研究%Priliminary Study on Chlorite Pollution of Drinking Water Disinfected by Chlorine Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施小平; 周明浩

    2000-01-01

    [Objective] To explore the status of chlorite pollution in drinking water due to chlorine dioxide , aswell as its causes and counter measures. [Methods]A water plant collecting surface water as raw water slightly pol-luted by organic compounds and B water plant collecting ground water without organic compounds pollution wereselected as observed objectives. Chlorine dioxide generators were used in both of A and B water plants, their rawmaterials was chlorite for A plant and chlorate for B plant. The levels of chlorite in treated water from these twowater plants were determined by amperometric titration. [Results]The levels of chlorite in treated water of A waterplant ranged 0.530~0.760 mg/L, 2.6~3.8 times of the standard value, with a over standard rate of 100%, thelevels of B water plant range 0.257~0.733 mg/L, 1.3~3.7 times of the standard value, with a over standard rateof 83.3%. [Conclusion] The treated water of A and B water plants presented higher pollution by chlorite, the by-product of chlorine dioxide disinfection.%[目的]了解二氧化氯消毒饮用水产生的亚氯酸盐(ClO2-)污染现状,并探讨其成因和对策。[方法]选择2个自来水厂,其中甲水厂以受轻度有机物污染的地面水为水源,乙水厂以未受有机物污染的地下水为水源,两个水厂均使用二氧化氯发生器,主要原料甲厂为亚氯酸盐,乙厂为氯酸盐。采用电流滴定仪法测定这2个水厂出厂水中ClO2-浓度。[结果]出厂水ClO2-浓度:甲厂0.530~0.760 mg/L,为标准值的2.6~3.8倍,超标率100%;乙厂0.100~0.733 mg/L,其中超标浓度值范围0.257~0.733 mg/L,为标准值的1.3~3.7倍,超标率83.3%。[结论]甲、乙自来水厂出厂水中由二氧化氯消毒产生的消毒副产物亚氯酸盐污染较严重。

  7. Minerals and rumen function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanisms are discussed of some clinical disorders, characteristic only of ruminants and related to the effects of abnormal mineral intake on rumen function. With particular attention to tropical conditions, consideration is given to: (a) the possible effects of phosphorus deficiency on rumen microbial activity; (b) the depression of rumen microbial synthesis in sulphur deficiency; (c) the inhibition of magnesium absorption from the forestomachs; and (d) the involvement of the rumen microorganisms in leading to copper and vitamin B12 deficiencies as a result of low intakes of cobalt. (author)

  8. Metasomatic uranium mineralization of the Mount Isa North Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proterozoic uranium deposits of the Mt Isa North Project are centred 40 km north of Mt Isa, NW Queensland. Regionally, the deposits occur within the Leichhardt River Fault Trough of the Mt Isa Inlier. Uranium mineralisation is likely related to the 1 600-1 500 Ma Isan Orogeny. Structurally controlled uranium mineralisation is preferentially hosted in greenschist facies basalts and interbedded clastic sediments of the Eastern Creek Volcanics (ECV). Uranium deposits of the Mt Isa North Project are defined by the following general characteristics: - Pervasive sodium and calcium metasomatism, expressed as red albitite with finely disseminated hematite and calcite, with distal zones of chlorite and magnetite. - Uraniferous albitite deposits typically comprise en echelon lenses and shoots. - Mineralisation is developed along N- to NE-striking shear zones with associated brittle deformation of the host lithologies. - Host rocks are mostly basalt flows with flow-top breccias and interbedded sandstones and siltstones of the ECV; quartzites are also locally mineralised. - Geochemically the deposits are characterized by enrichment of U, Na, Ca, Sr, Zr, Th, Hf and P, and depletion of K, Ba, Rb and Cs. Uranium mineralogy of albitites comprises several phases of refractory uranium minerals (e.g. brannerite, coffinite). The Mt Isa North Project includes 11 tenements being explored for uranium by Summit Resources. Summit's five uranium resources total 95.7 Mlb U3O8. Scoping studies focused on geologic assessment, environmental baseline monitoring and metallurgical test work of the Valhalla deposit are in progress. Summit is in a 50/50 Joint Venture with Paladin on the Valhalla and Skal deposits. Paladin also has a direct ownership of 81.99% of the issued shares of Summit Resources. (author)

  9. Pressure, temperature, and timing of mineralization of the sedimentary rock-hosted orogenic gold deposit at Klipwal, southeastern Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnasamy, Sakthi Saravanan; Uken, Ron; Reinhardt, Jürgen; Selby, David; Johnson, Spencer

    2015-08-01

    Gold mineralization in the Klipwal Shear Zone (KSZ) at the Klipwal Gold Mine is confined to laminated quartz-carbonate lodes, stringers, and associated alteration in sandstone and siltstone of the Delfkom Formation in the upper Mozaan Group of the Mesoarchaean Pongola Supergroup. The moderately dipping brittle-ductile KSZ strikes N-S with an oblique-reverse, sinistral sense of shear. The deformational events that are recognized include an early compressional phase that produced anastomosing shears defined by shear fabrics with numerous shear-parallel laminated quartz-carbonate fault-fill veins and, in places, extensional quartz vein stockworks, and a late brittle reactivation phase that produced fault breccias, displacing earlier extensional veins. Three closely spaced economic reefs (lodes) are developed: the main R-reef constitutes the KSZ, while the J- and H-reefs represent footwall splays. Alteration comprises chlorite, muscovite, epidote, feldspar, and carbonates along with pyrite, arsenopyrite, and chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite. An inner alteration zone is dominated by laminated quartz-carbonate veins with alternating quartz-carbonate-rich and muscovite-chlorite-rich laminae, whereas the proximal zone is characterized by alteration halos of K-feldspar, albite, epidote, chlorite, and muscovite along with carbonates and associated quartz veins. Chlorite thermometry from the inner and proximal zones yielded temperatures of 267 to 312 °C. Arsenopyrite compositions provide temperatures in the same range, 255 to 318 °C. Fluid inclusion microthermometry and Raman spectrometry of quartz veins in the mineralized reefs reveal the presence of metamorphogenic aqueous-gaseous fluid with an average salinity of 6.5 wt% NaCl equiv. Fluid compositions and estimated pressure-temperature (P-T) range (1.1 to 2.5 kbar at 255 to 318 °C) are typical of orogenic gold deposits. Devolatilization during the regional facies metamorphism of the Pongola Supergroup is considered the likely

  10. Surface miner MTS 1250

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D. [MAN TAKRAF Foerdertechnik GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    The Surface Miner MTS 1250 has been developed and tested by MAN TAKRAF with technical support from MIBRAG mbH. Its technology is based on a detailed analysis of all machines on the market and constitutes an optimum combination of their advantages. The unit can either be driven by a diesel-hydraulic drive for truck operation or by an electro-mechanical/electro-hydraulic drive for beltwagon and belt conveyor operation. The new equipment design is particularly suitable for mining deposits of difficult configuration. For specific requirements, MAN TAKRAF offers tailor-made solutions with smaller or greater throughputs and with enhanced specific cutting strength. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Surface Miner MTS 1250 wurde von MAN TAKRAF mit fachlicher Unterstuetzung der MIBRAG entwickelt und erprobt. Seine Technik basiert auf einer detaillierten Analyse aller am Markt befindlichen Geraete und kombiniert deren Vorteile optimal. Mit diesel-hydraulischem Antrieb wird er in Verbindung mit Trucks eingesetzt. Mit elektro-mechanischem/elektro-hydraulischem Antrieb wird er in Kombination mit einem Spezialbrandwagen und einer Bandanlage eingesetzt. Das neue Geraetekonzept ist fuer den Abbau von schwierigen Lagerstaetten sehr gut geeignet. Selbstverstaendlich werden entsprechend den Einsatzanforderungen auch Geraete mit kleinerer oder groesserer Durchsatzleistung und mit hoeherer spezifischer Schneidleistung von MAN TAKRAF angeboten (orig.)

  11. Mineral supplementation for grazing ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazing ruminants to which concentrate feeds cannot be economically fed must rely on self-feeding of mineral supplements. A number of factors affect mineral consumption of free-choice mixtures. Livestock exhibit little nutritional wisdom and will select palatable mixtures in preference to mixtures designed to meet their requirements. Palatability and appetite stimulators are often used to achieve a more uniform herd-wide consumption. It is best to formulate free-choice mixtures on the basis of analyses or other available data. However, when no information on mineral status is known, a free-choice complete mineral supplement is warranted. A 'complete' mineral mixture usually includes salt, a low fluoride P source, Ca, Co, Cu, I, Mn and Zn. Selenium, Mg, K, S, Fe or additional elements can be incorporated into a mineral supplement as new information suggests a need. The detriment to ruminant production caused by providing Ca, Se and Cu in excess can be greater than any benefit derived by providing a mineral supplement. In regions where high forage Mo predominates, three to five times the Cu content in mineral mixtures is needed to counteract Mo toxicity. Supplemental minerals are most critical during the wet season, when cattle are gaining weight rapidly and energy and protein supplies are adequate. Economic return on mineral supplementation is high. (author)

  12. Clay minerals in uraniferous deposit of Imouraren (Tim Mersoi basin, Niger): implications on genesis of deposit and on ore treatment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigerian uraniferous deposits are located in carboniferous and Jurassic formations of Tim Mersoi basin. AREVA is shareholder of 3 mine sites in this area: SOMAIR and COMINAK, both in exploitation since 1960's and IMOURAREN, 80 km further South, whose exploitation is planned for 2015. Mineralization of Imouraren deposit is included in the fluvial formation of Tchirezrine 2 (Jurassic), composed of channels and flood plains. Facies of channel in-fillings range from coarse sandstones to siltstones, while overflow facies are composed of analcimolites. Secondary mineralogy was acquired during 2 stages: 1- diagenesis, with formation of clay minerals, analcime, secondary quartz and albites, and 2- stage of fluids circulations, which induced alteration of detrital and diagenetic minerals, formation of new phases and uranium deposition. A mineralogical zoning, at the scale of deposit resulted from this alteration. The heterogeneity of Tchirezrine 2, at the level of both facies and mineralogy, is also evidenced during ore treatment, as ore reacts differently depending on its source, with sometimes problems of U recovery. Ore treatment tests showed that analcimes and chlorites were both penalizing minerals, because of 1- the sequestration of U-bearing minerals into analcimes, 2- their dissolution which trends to move away from U solubilization conditions (pH and Eh) and to form numerous sulfates, and 3- problems of percolation. A detection method of analcime-rich ores, based on infrared spectroscopy, was developed in order to optimize ore blending and so to reduce negative effects during ore treatment process. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals, markers of the mobility of the uranium in solution in the unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the works driven on three groups of clay minerals (kaolins, illite, sudoite (di-tri-octahedral chlorites)) characteristics of the alteration halos surrounding unconformity-type uranium deposits, in order to reveal uranium paleo-circulations in the intra-cratonic meso-Proterozoic basins (1,2 - 1,6 Ga). Thanks to Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR), we were able to highlight the persistence of structural defects in kaolin-group minerals contemporaneous of the basin diagenesis, and demonstrate the existence of relatively stable defects in illites and sudoites contemporaneous of the uranium deposits setting. Thus, the main defect in illite (Ai centre) and the main defect in sudoite (As centre) are characterized by their g components such as, respectively, gt = 2,003 et g// = 2,051 for illite and gt = 2,008 et g// = 2,051 for sudoite. As the main defect in kaolins (kaolinite/dickite), the main defects in illite and sudoite are perpendicularly oriented according to the (ab) plane, on the tetrahedral Si-O bound. However, their thermal stabilities seem different. The observation of samples from different zones (background, anomal or mineralized) of the Athabasca basin (Canada) allowed to identify a parallel evolution between actual defects concentration measured in the different clay minerals and the proximity of the mineralisation zones. Consequently, clays minerals can be considered as potential plotters of zones where uranium-rich solutions have circulated. (author)

  14. Chemical and phase-mineral composition of mazut fly ash and slag generated from a Syrian power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical and phase-mineral composition, as well as thermal behavior of mazut fly ash (MFA) and slag (MS) generated from a Syrian power plant were studied. The data show that the major elements (> 1%) in MFA are Fe > Si > Al > S > Ca > V > Mg; the minor elements (0.1–1%) include Zn > Na > Ni > Ti > K > P > Mn > Mo; while the other 20 elements studied are trace elements (< 0.1%). In contrast, the major elements in MS are V > Ni > Fe > Na > S; the minor elements include Si > Al > Ca > Zn > Cr > Mg; whereas the other 13 elements investigated are trace elements. The major minerals and phases identified in MFA and MS samples are glass, char, kaolinite, jarosite and pyracmonite; the minor minerals include quartz, magnetite and hematite; while the accessory minerals are plagioclase, K feldspar, illite + muscovite, chlorite, anhydrite, V oxides and Ni oxide. It was found that elements such as V > Mo > Ni > Zn > Ag > S in MFA and Ni > V > Zn > Mo > S > Co > Cr in MS have contents which are orders of magnitude greater than the Clarke values for coal ashes. Such element enrichments could be of great industrial interest for their recovery. On the other hand, a number of toxic and potentially toxic elements (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, V and Zn) have high concentrations in MFA and MS and they could contaminate soils, waters, air and plants during the transport, storage, processing and/or utilization of these products. It was also highlighted that a clarification of the modes of element occurrence (minerals and phases) in MFA and MS is required in respect to utilization and element extractions from these combustion wastes. Key words: mazut fly ash, mazut slag, chemical composition, phase-mineral composition

  15. Diffusion and sorption of HTO, Np, Na and Cl in rocks and minerals of Kivetty and Olkiluoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaukonen, V.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Lindberg, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    This report is conclusion to the project, which started in 1993, and is direct continuation to technical reports TURVA-95-05 and TURVA-96-03. In this project rocks of Olkiluoto (mica gneiss and pegmatite) and Kivetty (granite) research areas and minerals found in these rocks were studied. A part of the rock samples were natural fracture surface samples and a part of them were intact rock. The main minerals were quartz, potassium feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and hornblende. The accessory minerals were calcite, chlorite, kaolinite, muscovite and pyrite. The mass distribution coefficients of Np and Na (R{sub d}) under aerobic conditions were determined for crushed rocks and crushed minerals by batch experiments. The R{sub a} values for crushed rocks and crushed minerals were calculated using the measured specific surface areas. The effective diffusion coefficients D{sub e} of tritiated water (HTO) and neptunium and the apparent diffusion coefficients D{sub a} calculated from the time lag values of through-diffusion were determined for the rock slices. In the through-diffusion experiments for neptunium under aerobic conditions the stationary state was reached only in the pegmatite samples. The apparent diffusion coefficients D{sub a} of neptunium and sodium for rock slices and mineral pieces were determined from the concentration profiles. The diffusion coefficients (D{sub e}, D{sub a}) obtained from through-diffusion and its time-lag and from concentration profiles were converted into mass distribution coefficients R{sub d}. which were compared with the R{sub d} values measured by batch experiments. (orig.). 20 refs.

  16. Mineralization (calcification) of coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R; Wachowiak, J

    1994-01-01

    Mineralogical investigations of calcifications located in coronary vessels were performed on the material obtained from the endarterectomized arteries of 18 patients (15 M, 3 F, aged 36-65) during surgical revascularization procedures consisting in coronary artery bypass grafting. The samples were tested using scanning microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe and neutron activation spectroscopy. The results of analyses were calculated with the use of computer programmes. Two types of mineralization were determined: 1. secret mineralization identified as higher than normal content of elements in biological tissues, not demonstrating any mineral grains, and 2. apparent mineralization, appearing micro- and macroscopically as grains composed mainly of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonate groups, i.e. a mineral identical with apatite present in bones, or as calcification of other tissues (heart valves, lungs etc.). The authors suggest that the phenomenon of mineralization should be taken into consideration in the preventive treatment of coronary atheriosclerosis. PMID:7808039

  17. Radioactivity of phosphate mineral products

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Branislava; Vitorović Gordana; Stojanović Mirjana; Vitorović Duško

    2011-01-01

    The phosphate industry is one of the biggest polluters of the environment with uranium. Different products are derived after processing phosphoric ore, such as mineral and phosphate fertilizers and phosphate mineral supplements (dicalcium-and monocalcium phosphate) for animal feeding. Phosphate mineral additives used in animal food may contain a high activity of uranium. Research in this study should provide an answer to the extent in which phosphate minera...

  18. Is Struvite a Prebiotic Mineral?

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew A. Pasek; Maheen Gull

    2013-01-01

    The prebiotic relevance of mineral struvite, MgNH4PO4·6H2O, was studied experimentally as a phosphorylating reagent and, theoretically, to understand the geochemical requirements for its formation. The effectiveness of phosphorylation by the phosphate mineral, monetite, CaHPO4, was also studied to compare to the efficiency of struvite. The experiments focused on the phosphorylation reactions of the minerals with organic compounds, such as nucleosides, glycerol and choline chloride, and heat a...

  19. Minerals, markets and open access

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2014-01-01

    Minerals, Markets and Open Access Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Nottingham, UK Email: The British Geological Survey (BGS) is a world-leading geological survey that focuses on public-good science for government and research to understand earth and environmental processes. The BGS is the UK provider of spatial and statistical minerals information, in addition it carries out research in areas such as metallogenesis, land-use im...

  20. Determination of the mineral stability field of evolving groundwater in the Lake Bosumtwi impact crater and surrounding areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Yvonne Sena Akosua; Yidana, Sandow Mark; Banoeng-Yakubo, Bruce; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah; Addai, Millicent Obeng; Asiedu, Daniel Kwadwo

    2016-09-01

    Conventional graphical techniques, mass balance geochemical modelling, and multivariate statistical methods were jointly applied to hydrogeochemical data of groundwater from the fractured rock aquifer system, and surface water in the Bosumtwi and surrounding areas to reveal evolutionary trends and the characteristics of evolving groundwater in the area. Four clusters distinguished from the Q-mode hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) comprised three main groundwater associations and one surface water group (lake water). Although both water resources are of low mineralization (TDS < 1000 mg/l), it was observed that the groundwater from the upper catchment with hydrochemical facies dominated by Nasbnd Mgsbnd HCO3-, evolves to Casbnd Mgsbnd and mixed cations HCO3- water types at the lower reaches. The lake water on the other hand is Nasbnd HCO3- water type. Results from principal component analyses (PCA) and other geochemical interpretations distinguished three sources of variations in the hydrochemistry. Saturation indices of possible reactive mineral phases show groundwater undersaturation relative to albite, anorthite, aragonite, barite, calcite, chlorite, chrysotile, dolomite, gypsum, k-felspar and talc, and supersaturation with respect to gibbsite, kaolinite, Ca-montmorillonite and k-mica in the area. The PCA and other geochemical interpretation identify weathering of feldspars and carbonate mineral dissolution as predominantly influencing the hydrochemistry of the groundwater. Hydrolysis of the aluminosilicates causes the groundwater to reach equilibrium with kaolinite. In addition to dissolution of silicates, the chemical composition of the lake water has been influenced by evaporation and consequent carbonate saturation.

  1. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  2. Mineral fibres and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of inorganic fibrous materials is a comparatively new phenomenon and was uncommon before the Industrial Revolution. Humans evolved in a comparatively fibre-free environment and consequently never fully developed the defence mechanisms needed to deal with the consequences of inhaling fibres. However, the urban environment now has an airborne fibre concentration of around 1 f.l-1, which is a tenfold increase on the natural background. Any sample of ambient air collected indoors or outdoors will probably contain some mineral fibres, but there is little evidence that these pose any risk to human health. They come from asbestos used in brakes, glass and mineral wools used as insulation and fire proofing of buildings, gypsum from plaster and a variety of types from many sources. Few of these have the potential to do any harm. Asbestos is the only fibre of note but urban levels are insignificant compared to occupational exposures. When the health of cohorts occupationally exposed to the several types of asbestos is studied the problem can be put into perspective. Studies of workers in the chrysotile industry exposed to much higher dust levels than in a factory today show no excess lung cancer or mesothelioma. By comparison those living near crocidolite mines, let alone working in them, may develop asbestos-related disease. As always, dose is the critical factor. Chrysotile is cleared from the lungs very efficiently, only the amphiboles are well retained. The only real health problem comes from the earlier use of asbestos products that may now be old, friable and damaged and made from amphibole or mixed fibre. If though, these are still in good condition, they do not pose a health problem. Asbestos-related diseases are very rare in those not occupationally exposed. Where they exist exposure has nearly always been to crocidolite. (author)

  3. Characteristics of Clay Minerals in the Northern South China Sea and Its Implications for Evolution of East Asian Monsoon since Miocene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Shiming; Li Anchun; Xu Kehui; Yin Xueming

    2008-01-01

    Clay mineral assemblages, crystallinity, chemistry, and micromorphology of clay particles in sediments from ODP Site 1146 in the northern South China Sea (SCS) were analyzed, and used to trace sediment sources and obtain proxy records of the past changes in the East Asian monsoon climate since the Miocene, based on a multi-approach, including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Clay minerals consist mainly of illite and smectite, with associated chlorite and kaolinite. The illite at ODP Site 1146 has very well-to-well crystallinity, and smectite has moderate-to-poor crystallinity. In SEM the smectite particles at ODP Site 1146 often appear cauliflower-like, a typical micromorphology of volcanic smecites. The smectite at ODP Site 1146 is relatively rich in Si element, but poor in Fe, very similar to the smectite from the West Philippine Sea. In contrast, the chemical composition of illite at ODP Site 1146 has no obvious differences from those of the Loess plateau, Yellow River, Yangtze River, and Pearl River. A further study on sediment source indicates that smectite originates mainly from Luzon, kaolinite from the Pearl River, and illite and chlorite from the Pearl River, Taiwan and/or the Yangtze River. The clay mineral assemblages at ODP Site 1146 were not only controlled by continental eathering regimes surrounding the SCS, but also by the changing strength of the transport processes. The ratios of (illite+chlorite)/smectite at ODP Site 1146 were adopted as proxies for the East Asian monsoon evolution. Relatively higher ratios reflect strongly intensified winter monsoon relative to summer monsoon, in contrast, lower ratios indicate a strengthened summer monsoon relative to winter monsoon. The consistent variation of this clay proxy from those of Loess plateau, eolian deposition in the North Pacific, planktonic, benthic foraminifera, and black carbon in the SCS since 20 Ma shows

  4. Recent advances in the study of H environments and behavior in minerals using neutron powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. D.

    2002-12-01

    It is now possible to probe the structural environments and behavior of H atoms directly in complex minerals such as amphiboles, micas, chlorites and humites using neutron powder diffraction, in some cases as a function of pressure and/or temperature. A combination of high neutron flux and increased detector sensitivity and size offers the chance to see details of H behaviour. In the last year or so the advent of new gasket designs for the Paris-Edinburgh pressure cell allow the use of ethanol/methanol (EtOD/MeOD) as a pressure medium, removing peak broadening arising from deviatoric stress that occurs above 3 GPa for the standard fluorinert pressure medium. Essentially hydrostatic conditions obtain with EtOD/MeOD to 8 GPa at 298 K. A further recent development has been the design of a high P-T module for use with the Paris-Edinburgh cell. These technological improvements in pressure-cell design now allow us to make meaningful correlations between OH vibrational spectra collected at high P and/or T and detailed structural information on H behaviour obtained from neutron diffraction under similar conditions. In this talk I shall discuss recent neutron diffraction experiments on the effect of pressure upon hydrogen bonding in deuterated chlorite to 5 GPa (298 K), and a high P-T study of hydrogen bonding in deuterated brucite to 7 GPa, 1100 K. These two studies illustrate how far high-pressure neutron diffraction has come in the last 5 years. Finally, I shall describe a neutron powder diffraction study (ambient conditions) of leucophoenicite, Mn7Si3O12(OH)2, a close structural analogue of Phase-B and Superhydrous-B: the structure of leucophoenicite is topologically identical to the hydrous sheet of Phase-B and similar to that of Superhydrous-B. For various reasons it was not possible to deuterate the sample. Nonetheless, the two distinct H atoms were approximately located in difference-Fourier maps and then refined isotropically. The H positions in Phase-B were only

  5. 76 FR 6110 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... FR 80948 (December 23, 2010)]. The original comment period for Release No. 34-63547 is scheduled to... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 229 and 249 RIN 3235-AK84 Conflict Minerals AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... 1934 (the ``Exchange Act'') and would require any such issuer for which conflict minerals are...

  6. The classification of minerals deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this part of book author present the classification of minerals deposits. Deposit formation take place as a result of complicated and long geology processes in the wide temperature intervals (from 1500 digC to usual) and pressures (from usual and to tens kilobars). Deposits of minerals as other investigation objects require in definite systematization on the base of definite characteristics

  7. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  8. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... (Jan. 7, 2011) (``WGC I''). \\33\\ Conflict Minerals, Release No. 34-63793 (Jan. 28, 2011) [76 FR 6110..., Release No. 34-63547 (Dec. 15, 2010) [75 FR 80948] (the ``Proposing Release''). \\5\\ Public Law 111-203... trade of conflict minerals by armed groups is helping to finance the conflict and that the...

  9. Investigating Minerals: Promoting Integrated Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rudi; Carmack, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    "Mineral Detectives!" is one of eighteen lessons in the "Private Whys?" integrated science unit, which uses a guided inquiry investigation to teach students in grades three through five about the role of minerals in our lives. The University of North Texas developed "Private Whys?" with funding from the Copper Development Association. This lesson…

  10. Evidence for rapid epithermal mineralization and coeval bimodal volcanism, Bruner Au-Ag property, NV USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Dylan

    The character of Au-Ag mineralization and volcanic/hydrothermal relationships at the underexplored Miocene-age Bruner low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposit are elucidated using field and laboratory studies. Bruner is located in central Nevada within the Great Basin extensional province, near several major volcanic trends (Western Andesite, Northern Nevada Rift) associated with world-class Miocene-age epithermal Au-Ag provinces. Despite its proximity to several >1 Moz Au deposits, and newly discovered high-grade drill intercepts (to 117 ppm Au/1.5m), there is no published research on the deposit, the style of mineralization has not been systematically characterized, and vectors to mineralization remain elusive. By investigating the nature of mineralization and time-space relationships between volcanic/hydrothermal activity, the deposit has been integrated into a regional framework, and exploration targeting improved. Mineralization occurs within narrow quartz + adularia +/- pyrite veins that manifest as sheeted/stockwork zones, vein swarms, and rare 0.3-2 m wide veins hosted by two generations of Miocene high-K, high-silica rhyolite flow dome complexes overlying an andesite flow unit. The most prominent structural controls on veining are N­striking faults and syn-mineral basalt/rhyolite dikes. Productive veins have robust boiling indicators (high adularia content, bladed quartz after calcite, recrystallized colloform quartz bands), lack rhythmic banding, and contain only 1-2 stages; these veins overprint, or occur separately from another population of barren to weakly mineralized rhythmically banded quartz-only veins. Ore minerals consist of coarse Au0.5Ag 0.5 electrum, fine Au0.7Ag0.3 electrum, acanthite, uytenbogaardtite (Ag3AuS2) and minor embolite Ag(Br,Cl). Now deeply oxidized, veins typically contain montmorillonite-chlorite (after biotite). The distribution of steam-heated alteration zones and vitrophyre units, along with prominent chemical and textural

  11. Mineral exploration in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the level of mineral exploration in much of Africa over the last ten to fifteen years has stagnated or declines, it has risen dramatically in South Africa. This chapter reviews this growth trend along with changes in the type of minerals sought through these exploration expenditures, and then identifies factors important to these shifts over time in the level and distribution of exploration expenditures. The chapter describes certain aspects of the South African mining industry which are important for exploration and which distinguish South Africa from other mineral-producing countries. Annual exploration expenditures for South Africa are shown in millions of current and constant (1982) and in figure 5-2 for the period from 1960 to 1983. The data include exploration for nonfuel minerals as well as two mineral fuels - uranium and coal

  12. Similarity of nannobacterial lifeforms in cultures, in the human body, in minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, R.

    Nearly a dozen labs world-wide have succeeded in culturing minute organisms in the 50-200 nm size range, so the characterization of nannobacteria as some form of "life" is no longer arguable. Within the human body, they are found in blood, kidney stones, dental plaque, arterial disease and cataracts as shown by the Kajander group in Finland, and by our work with Mayo Clinic (e.g. Folk et al., 2001 GSA abs.). Nannobacteria can be concentrated in waters from hot springs, lakes, rivers and the sea. Their charged cell walls attract ions thus triggering precipitation of such varied authigenic minerals as aragonite, calcite, dolomite and siderite; sulfur, pyrite, chalcocite, chalcopyrite; phosphates; chalcedony quartz; and smectite, illite, kaolinite, chlorite and palygorskite clay. So it should be no surprise that on Mars, with reactive FeMg minerals, subsurface (and once surface) water, and internal heat, nannobacteria would be able to thrive both in vein-fill carbonates (McKay et al, 1996) and on the altered surfaces of unstable pyroxenes (Folk and Taylor, in press Met. &Plan. S i., 2002). Striking identities of sizes, shapes, and colonial affinitiesc are found between Martian nannobacteria and those in clays from Sicily and elsewhere (Folk and Lynch, 1997 SPIE). Extraterrestrial forms range from spheroids and ovoids of 30-80 nm, to worm- and caterpillar-shaped objects (40 X 150 nm) and chains of 40 nm beads. Even in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite, groups of 40- 150 nm bodies resembly earthly Streptococcus and Staphylococcus are found (Folk and Lynch 1998 SPIE). The highly-matured nature of the kerogen-like carbon in Allende demonstrates that it is not the result of earthly contamination; furthermore Allende contains clay minerals which demand the former presence of some water, a requirement for biology.The only objection to the claimed discovery of extraterrestrial life in the form of nannobacteria is the Old Testament view that God created life only on Earth and

  13. Study of Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    KAUST Repository

    Prakash, P. Jish

    2016-03-23

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content, and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Red Sea Arabian coastal plane, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effect on the Red Sea and land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of wind-blown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included Optical Microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), Ion Chromatography (IC), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays, and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The wide range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used

  14. 30 CFR 57.5070 - Miner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miner training. 57.5070 Section 57.5070 Mineral... Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Only § 57.5070 Miner training. (a) Mine operators must provide annual training to all miners at a mine covered by this part who...

  15. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P.C. [Geology Department, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)], E-mail: pryan@middlebury.edu; Hillier, S. [Macaulay Institute, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH UK (United Kingdom); Wall, A.J. [Department of Geosciences, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 ({+-} 1) % of ripidolite, 19 ({+-} 1) % of saponite, and 19 ({+-} 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases.

  16. Stepwise effects of the BCR sequential chemical extraction procedure on dissolution and metal release from common ferromagnesian clay minerals: A combined solution chemistry and X-ray powder diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) are commonly used to determine speciation of trace metals in soils and sediments. However, the non-selectivity of reagents for targeted phases has remained a lingering concern. Furthermore, potentially reactive phases such as phyllosilicate clay minerals often contain trace metals in structural sites, and their reactivity has not been quantified. Accordingly, the objective of this study is to analyze the behavior of trace metal-bearing clay minerals exposed to the revised BCR 3-step plus aqua regia SEP. Mineral quantification based on stoichiometric analysis and quantitative powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) documents progressive dissolution of chlorite (CCa-2 ripidolite) and two varieties of smectite (SapCa-2 saponite and SWa-1 nontronite) during steps 1-3 of the BCR procedure. In total, 8 (± 1) % of ripidolite, 19 (± 1) % of saponite, and 19 (± 3) % of nontronite (% mineral mass) dissolved during extractions assumed by many researchers to release trace metals from exchange sites, carbonates, hydroxides, sulfides and organic matter. For all three reference clays, release of Ni into solution is correlated with clay dissolution. Hydrolysis of relatively weak Mg-O bonds (362 kJ/mol) during all stages, reduction of Fe(III) during hydroxylamine hydrochloride extraction and oxidation of Fe(II) during hydrogen peroxide extraction are the main reasons for clay mineral dissolution. These findings underscore the need for precise mineral quantification when using SEPs to understand the origin/partitioning of trace metals with solid phases

  17. [Mineral water as a cure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  18. The Genesis of tectonically and hydrothermally controlled industry mineral deposits: A geochemical and structural study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Anke; Prochaska, Walter; Henjes-Kunst, Friedhelm; Fritz, Harald

    2010-05-01

    surfaces was proposed by Sandrone & Zucchetti, 1988. Magnesite and talc bearing shearzones in ultramafic hostrocks (Lahnaslampi & Horsmanaho, Finland): Both deposits are situated in the Proterozoic schist belt where the talc-magnesite rocks at Lahnaslampi are associated with minor serpentine breccias. The steatitization took place in two different stages: During prograde metamorphism with H2O-dominated solutions and at declining temperature and pressure in the presence of CO2-bearing fluids that resulted in the main steatitization along tectonic structures. A combined geological, petrological and geochronological is chosen to resolve mechanism of mineralisation within the different tectonic setting. Different phases of mineral formation are first distinguished by pertrological and structural field work and then dated by radiometric techniques. Fluid species and chemical environment during mineralisation is resolved by geochemical techniques and stable isotope studies. References Grillo, S., Prochaska, W. (2007): Fluid Chemistry and Stable Isotope Evidence of Shearzone related Talc and Chlorite Mineralizations in Central Sardinia-Italy, In: Conference Abstracts SGA-Meeting. Radvanec, M., Koděra, P., Prochaska, W. (2004): Mg replacement of the Gemerska Poloma talk-magnesite deposit, Western Carpathians, Slovakia. Acta Petrologica Sinica, 20, 773-790. Sandrone, Zucchetti (1988): Geology of the Italian high-quality cosmetic talc from the Pinerolo district (Western Alps). Zuffar' Days - Symposium held in Cagliari, 10-15

  19. Genesis of secondary uranium minerals associated with jasperoid veins, El Erediya area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Naby, Hamdy H.

    2008-11-01

    Uranium mineralization in the El Erediya area, Egyptian Eastern Desert, has been affected by both high temperature and low temperature fluids. Mineralization is structurally controlled and is associated with jasperoid veins that are hosted by a granitic pluton. This granite exhibits extensive alteration, including silicification, argillization, sericitization, chloritization, carbonatization, and hematization. The primary uranium mineral is pitchblende, whereas uranpyrochlore, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral are the most abundant secondary uranium minerals. Uranpyrochlore and the unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral are interpreted as alteration products of petscheckite. The chemical formula of the uranpyrochlore based upon the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) is A {left( {{text{U}}_{{1.07}} {text{Ca}}_{{0.28}} {text{Pb}}_{{0.03}} {text{Na}}_{{0.21}} {text{Mg}}_{{0.02}} } right)}_{{Σ 1.6}} B {left( {{text{Nb}}_{{0.57}} {text{Si}}_{{0.62}} {text{Zr}}_{{0.35}} {text{P}}_{{0.20}} {text{Fe}}_{{0.17}} {text{Al}}_{{0.06}} {text{Ti}}_{{0.03}} } right)}_{{Σ 2}} . It is characterized by a relatively high Zr content (average ZrO2 = 6.6 wt%). The average composition of the unidentified hydrated uranium niobate mineral is ^{{text{U}}} {left( {{text{U}}_{{1.89}} {text{Ca}}_{{0.49}} {text{Pb}}_{{0.13}} {text{Na}}_{{0.06}} {text{Mg}}_{{0.02}} } right)}_{{Σ 2.59}} ^{{{text{Nb}}}} {left( {{text{Nb}}_{{1.31}} {text{Fe}}_{{0.34}} {text{Si}}_{{0.14}} {text{P}}_{{0.10}} {text{Ti}}_{{0.05}} {text{Zr}}_{{0.03}} {text{Al}}_{{0.03}} } right)}_{{Σ 2.0}} , where U and Nb represent the dominant cations in the U and Nb site, respectively. Uranophane is the dominant U6+ silicate phase in oxidized zones of the jasperoid veins. Kasolite is less abundant than uranophane and contains major U, Pb, and Si but only minor Ca, Fe, P, and Zr. A two-stage metallogenetic model is proposed for the alteration processes and uranium mineralization at

  20. Mineral induction by immobilized phosphoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, T.; Arsenault, A. L.; Yamauchi, M.; Kuboki, Y.; Crenshaw, M. A.

    1997-01-01

    Dentin phosphoproteins are thought to have a primary role in the deposition of mineral on the collagen of dentin. In this study we determined the type of binding between collagen and phosphoproteins necessary for mineral formation onto collagen fibrils and whether the phosphate esters are required. Bovine dentin phosphophoryn or phosvitin from egg yolk were immobilized on reconstituted skin type I collagen fibrils by adsorption or by covalent cross-linking. In some samples the ester phosphate was removed from the covalently cross-linked phosphoproteins by treatment with acid phosphatase. All samples were incubated at 37 degrees C in metastable solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. Reconstituted collagen fibrils alone did not induce mineral formation. The phosphoproteins adsorbed to the collagen fibrils desorbed when the mineralization medium was added, and mineral was not induced. The mineral induced by the cross-linked phosphoproteins was apatite, and the crystals were confined to the surface of the collagen fibrils. With decreasing medium saturation the time required for mineral induction increased. The interfacial tensions calculated for apatite formation by either phosphoprotein cross-linked to collagen were about the same as that for phosphatidic acid liposomes and hydroxyapatite. This similarity in values indicates that the nucleation potential of these highly phosphorylated surfaces is about the same. It is concluded that phosphoproteins must be irreversibly bound to collagen fibrils for the mineralization of the collagen network in solutions that do not spontaneously precipitate. The phosphate esters of phosphoproteins are required for mineral induction, and the carboxylate groups are not sufficient.

  1. Phase-mineral and chemical composition of coal fly ashes as a basis for their multicomponent utilization. 1. Characterization of feed coals and fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislav V. Vassilev; Rosa Menendez; Diego Alvarez; Mercedes Diaz-Somoano; M. Rosa Martinez-Tarazona [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Central Laboratory of Mineralogy and Crystallography

    2003-10-01

    The phase-mineral and chemical composition of feed coals and their fly ashes (FAs) produced in four large Spanish thermo-electric power stations was characterized as a basis for multicomponent FA utilization. The feed fuels used are bituminous coals, semi-anthracites and anthracites with high detrital mineral abundance and mixed carbonate and sulphide sulphate authigenic mineral tendency. Their mineral composition includes quartz, kaolinite, illite muscovite, pyrite, chlorite, plagioclase, K-feldspar, gypsum, siderite, calcite, dolomite, marcasite, montmorillonite, jarosite, and ankerite. The FAs studied have aluminosilicate composition with higher concentrations of alkaline and alkaline-earth oxides than Fe oxide. Elements such as Ag, As, Ba, Cr, Cs, Li, P, Sb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr are relatively enriched in these FAs in comparison with the respective mean values for bituminous coal ashes worldwide. The FAs consist basically of aluminosilicate glass, to a lesser extent of mineral matter (with high silicate abundance and dominant oxide tendency) and moderate char occurrence. The phase-mineral composition (in decreasing order of significance) of these FAs is normally glass, mullite, quartz, char, kaolinite metakaolinite, hematite, cristobalite, plagioclase, K-feldspar, melilite, anhydrite, wollastonite, magnetite and corundum plus 42 important accessory minerals or phases. A scheme of conventional separation procedures was applied to recover sequentially six initial and potentially useful and/or hazardous products from FAs, namely: (1) a ceramic cenosphere concentrate; (2) a water-soluble salt concentrate; (3) a magnetic concentrate; (4) a char concentrate; (5) a heavy concentrate; and finally (6) an improved FA residue. 29 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Dikes and mineralization in uraniferous apatite deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the age relationships between dike bodies and the mineralization in deposits of uraniferous apatites in carbonate rocks is reconsidered. The post-ore history of apatite mineralization reveals a combination of polygenic mineral associations

  3. Mineral exploration in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter provides an overview and comparisons of mineral exploration in Botswana and Papua New Guinea, including selection comparisons with Australia and Canada. It describes the history of exploration in Botswana and PNG. The concluding section summarizes the findings

  4. BET measurements: Outgassing of minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2000-01-01

    in minor errors, implying that aquifer sediments containing poorly crystalline materials can be outgassed at low temperatures if the outgassing time is increased. Scanning electron microscopy of the studied minerals demonstrated that the particle size as calculated from BET data compares well with......Outgassing minerals at elevated temperatures prior to BET measurements can lead to phase changes, especially in the case of amorphous and poorly crystalline materials. In order to evaluate the applicability of the BET method when low outgassing temperatures are required, selected aquifer minerals...... were outgassed at different temperatures and for different times. The studied minerals are 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, quartz, calcite, ®-alumina, and kaolinite. The results demonstrate that measured specific surface areas of iron oxides are strongly dependent on outgassing conditions...

  5. US Forest Service Mineral Rights

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service on the www depicting ownership parcels of the subsurface estate representing mineral rights; it is collected only if the subsurface estate is...

  6. The geopolitics of mineral supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vital importance of Southern- and Central Africa as far as strategic and critical minerals to the West in the form of chromium, platinum, manganese and cobalt are concerned is the topic of this article. Geopolitics and the role it plays in Southern Africa in terms of adequacy, availability and access is examined in more detail. The mineral industry makes South Africa in terms of value of annual output the third largest mineral producing country in the Western World. Soviet Union and the United States differ indefinetely as far as geopolitics concern, especially the Soviet's control of the mineral resources in Southern Africa. This article deals with this problem and concludes by asking whether a resource war is on it's way or not

  7. Clay Minerals Deposit of Halakabad (Sabzevar- Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohammad Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Clay minerals are expanded in south of Sabzevar. They are identified with light color in the filed. The XRD and XRF chemical and mineralogical studies on the Clay minerals indicated that their main clay minerals are Kaolinite, Illite and Dickite. Pyrophyllite is minor clay mineral. Quartz and Sanidine non clay minerals are present with clay minerals .Ratio of Al2O3 is about 40 per cent, it is very good for industrial minerals .Volcanic rocks are origin clay minerals .Their composition are bas...

  8. Mineral of the month: magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration averaging 0.13 percent. Magnesium is found in over 60 minerals, and also is recovered from seawater, wells, and lake brines and bitterns.

  9. The Zapot pegmatite mineral county

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, E.E.; Soregaroli, A.E.; Gordon, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Zapot pegmatite is currently being mined for mineral specimens (chiefly amazonite, topaz and smoky quartz in miarolitic cavities), for gemstones (topaz and smoky quartz) and for decorative rock (amazonite). The deposit is owned and operated by Harvey Gordon Minerals of Reno, Nevada, and is the only amazonite-topaz mining operation in the state. Thousands of specimens from this operation have reached the collector market.

  10. The Location of Minerals Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Moomy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A popular perception has arisen that the mineral production of developing countries is too often exported in unprocessed form, thereby depriving the host country of the value-added and benefiting the developed country importer. The validity of this allegation and possible explanations for the location of minerals processing is the subject of this working paper. An examination of the patterns and trends in the location of processing for aluminum, copper, iron, nickel, tin and zinc, up to the r...

  11. Outlook for mineral raw materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyerhoff, H.A.

    1979-04-01

    No better summary of the outlook for the mineral raw materials industry during the next two decades can be offered than the oft-repeated aphorism, The more things change, the more they remain the same. Each mineral commodity will pursue its own individual course, but overall, the growth and increasing sophistication of the world population will double consumption and narrow such gaps as exist between supply and demand. Sources of supply will be found over a widening geographic range and will cross an increasing number of political boundaries. Although the need for an international mineral policy is obvious, confrontation between the industrial nations of the West and the anti-colonialism and nationalism of Third World countries offers little hope of anything better than ad hoc solutions in the form of bilateral agreements or cartelization of specific commodities involving several producing nations with common interests. Japan has shown the efficacy of bilateral agreements; the International Tin Council and OPEC are examples of cartelization. Although its mineral resources make the USSR all but self-sufficient, analysis of its military and maritime programmes indicates that one of its aims is to fill the vacuum created by the lack of an international mineral policy. It is following closely a modernized formula for world domination set forth by Sir Halford Mackinder in 1904. Success would enable it to impose a mineral policy on the rest of the world, which will be well advised to ponder this possibility.

  12. Aspects of the X-ray identification of swelling clay minerals in soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the interest in and necessity for identifying swelling clay minerals of the smectite group because of their economic importance, routine investigation by conventional X-ray diffraction methods seldom includes any attempt to identify the sub-group or species of smectite. The more important techniques for achieving such identification are examined with special reference to the Greene-Kelly test and intercalation with alkylammonium chlorides. The Greene-Kelly test can only be used for dioctahedral species and stevensite and fails to distinguish between montmorillonite and beidellite in a manner consistent with the internationally recognised definitions for these species based on layer charge. A better differentiation of species is achieved by the alkylammonium chloride method, but the effort involved makes routine application unattractive unless an abbreviated version is applied, in which case, however, the presence of chlorite may produce an ambiguos result. There are, nevertheless, distinct advantages to the use of this method, both in obtaining an identification of smectite species which is most consistent with definition, and in being able to predict the usefulness of a particular smectite for certain types of industrial application

  13. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  14. Metamorphism and gold mineralization of the Kenticha Katawicha area: Adola belt, southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsige, Lulu

    2006-05-01

    I present geological and mineral chemistry results aiming at understanding the relationship between metamorphism and gold mineralization in the N-trending Neoproterozoic Kenticha-Katawicha area in the Adola belt of southern Ethiopia. The Kenticha-Katawicha area comprises low-grade metamorphic rocks including pelitic schists, marble, graphite schists and Fe-Mn quartzites (Kenticha marine metasedimentary rocks) and serpentinites and talc-tremolite-chlorite schists with podiform chromites (Kenticha ophiolite). Lenses of high-grade amphibolite schist are also locally present within the Kenticha-Katawicha area. These rocks are sandwiched between high-grade para- and ortho-gneisses, migmatites, schists and amphibolites. Post-orogenic granites intrude the metamorphic sequences. Mineral assemblages and textural data obtained from the high-grade rocks indicate that the dominant metamorphic condition is of upper amphibolite facies. Garnet-biotite (garnet-core-matrix-biotite) and amphibole-plagioclase geothermometry gave estimates for peak metamorphic temperatures of 630-650 °C and pressure of 7 kbar for the high-grade rocks. On the other hand, the low-grade rocks recrystallized in the greenschist facies conditions. The estimated peak T- P values for the high-grade rocks suggest a burial to ˜25 km depth and a clockwise P- T path is deduced from mineral thermometry and the textural and paragenetic relations. This combined with the geochemistry of the magmatic rocks and clockwise P- T is consistent with a collision setting in which rocks of the calc-alkaline, volcanic-arc, and oceanic fragments are assembled. In the study area, gold occurs in quartz veins and veinlets in lenses of biotite schists within ultramafic rocks that are confined to shear zones. Fluid inclusion studies of gold quartz veins and veinlets indicate a H 2O- and CO 2-rich fluid with low salinity (<5 wt% NaCl equivalent). The gold mineralization in the area is post-peak regional metamorphism and is

  15. Study on mineral processing technology for abrasive minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Woong; Yang, Jung Il; Hwang, Seon Kook; Choi, Yeon Ho; Cho, Ken Joon; Shin, Hee Young [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Buyeo Materials in Buyeogun, Choongnam province is a company producing feldspar concentrate, but does not yet utilize the garnet as abrasive material and other useful heavy minerals wasted out from the process of feldspar ore. The purpose of this study is to develop technology and process for the recovery of garnet concentrate. As results, the garnet is defined as ferro manganese garnet. The optimum process for recovery of garnet concentrate is to primarily concentrate heavy minerals from tailings of feldspar processing. And secondly the heavy minerals concentrated is dried and separated garnet concentrate from other heavy minerals. At this time, the garnet concentrate is yield by 0.176%wt from 0.31%wt of heavy minerals in head ore. The garnet concentrate contains 33.35% SiO{sub 2}, 12.20% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 28.47% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.96% MnO. As for utilization of abrasive materials, a fundamental data was established on technology of grinding and classification. (author). 13 refs., 47 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. Ancient and recent clay formation on Mars as revealed from a global survey of hydrous minerals in crater central peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Vivian Z.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals on Mars have commonly been interpreted as the remnants of pervasive water-rock interaction during the Noachian period (>3.7 Ga). This history has been partly inferred by observations of clays in central peaks of impact craters, which often are presumed uplifted from depth. However, combined mineralogical and morphological analyses of individual craters have shown that some central peak clays may represent post-impact, possibly authigenic processes. Here we present a global survey of 633 central peaks to assess their hydrous minerals and the prevalence of uplifted, detrital, and authigenic clays. Central peak regions are examined using high-resolution Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment data to identify hydrous minerals and place their detections in a stratigraphic and geologic context. We find that many occurrences of Fe/Mg clays and hydrated silica are associated with potential impact melt deposits. Over 35% of central peak clays are not associated with uplifted rocks; thus, caution must be used when inferring deeper crustal compositions from surface mineralogy of central peaks. Uplifted clay-bearing rocks suggest the Martian crust hosts clays to depths of at least 7 km. We also observe evidence for increasing chloritization with depth, implying the presence of fluids in the upper portions of the crust. Our observations are consistent with widespread Noachian/Early Hesperian clay formation, but a number of central peak clays are also suggestive of clay formation during the Amazonian. These results broadly support current paradigms of Mars' aqueous history while adding insight to global crustal and diagenetic processes associated with clay mineral formation and stability.

  17. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  18. Clinical analysis of vitamin B(6): determination of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and 4-pyridoxic acid in human serum by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with chlorite postcolumn derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Michael E; Pfeiffer, Christine M

    2004-10-15

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with fluorometric detection was developed for the routine determination of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and 4-pyridoxic acid (4-PA) in serum. Chlorite postcolumn derivatization was used to oxidize PLP to a more fluorescent carboxylic acid form. Sensitivity improved fourfold for PLP using chlorite postcolumn derivatization over traditional bisulfite postcolumn derivatization. The HPLC injection cycle was 15 min, facilitating a throughput of 60 patient samples (72 injections that included standards and quality control (QC) samples) in 18.5h. Method precision was evaluated using three serum QC pools with PLP and 4-PA concentrations of 11.5-34.8 nmol/L and 10.4-21.0 nmol/L, respectively. Within-run (n=7) repeatabilities were 0.6-1.2% for PLP and 0.9-1.8% for 4-PA. Run-to-run (n=23) reproducibilities were 3.6-6.7% for PLP and 3.7-5.6% for 4-PA. Relative detection (3sigma(0)) and quantitation (10sigma(0)) limits were 0.3 and 0.9 nmol/L, respectively, for both PLP and 4-PA using a 10-microl sample injection volume. Analytical recoveries ranged from 97 to 102%. Patient-matched serum and plasma specimens (n=25) were analyzed to evaluate specimen-type bias. Of the plasma types evaluated, heparinized plasma introduced the lowest relative bias for PLP (-5.3%) and minimal bias for 4-PA (-2.3%) compared with serum. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) plasma showed the lowest bias for 4-PA (0.7%) but a relatively high bias for PLP (13.0%) due to a chromatographic interference. Human serum samples from a non-representative population subset (n=303) were commensurate with values published for other vitamin B(6) HPLC methods. These values gave geometric means of 42.4 nmol/L for PLP and 27.3 nmol/L for 4-PA. Medians for PLP and 4-PA were 40.1 and 21.8 nmol/L, respectively. The high sensitivity, precision, and throughput of this method, combined with its minimal serum specimen (150 microl) and sample injection

  19. 21 CFR 573.680 - Mineral oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mineral oil. 573.680 Section 573.680 Food and... Listing § 573.680 Mineral oil. Mineral oil may be safely used in animal feed, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Mineral oil, for the purpose of this section, is that complying with the...

  20. Proton induced luminescence of minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo del Castillo, H.; Millan, A.; Calderon, T. [Depto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra. Colmenar, km. 15, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Beneitez, P. [Departamento Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ruvalcaba S, J.L. [lFUNAM, Circuito de la lnvestigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of Ionoluminescence (IL) for several minerals commonly found in jewellery pieces and/or artefacts of historical interest. Samples including silicates and non-silicates (native elements, halide, oxide, carbonate and phosphate groups) have been excited with a 1.8 MeV proton beam, and IL spectra in the range of 200- 900 nm have been collected for each one using a fiber optic coupled spectrometer. Light emissions have been related to Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Pr{sup 3+} ions, as well as intrinsic defects in these minerals. Results show the potential of IL for impurity characterization with high detection limits, local symmetry studies, and the study of the origin of minerals. (Author)

  1. KeyPathwayMinerWeb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Dissing-Hansen, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    We present KeyPathwayMinerWeb, the first online platform for de novo pathway enrichment analysis directly in the browser. Given a biological interaction network (e.g. protein-protein interactions) and a series of molecular profiles derived from one or multiple OMICS studies (gene expression, for...... instance), KeyPathwayMiner extracts connected sub-networks containing a high number of active or differentially regulated genes (proteins, metabolites) in the molecular profiles. The web interface at (http://keypathwayminer.compbio.sdu.dk) implements all core functionalities of the KeyPathwayMiner tool set...... such as data integration, input of background knowledge, batch runs for parameter optimization and visualization of extracted pathways. In addition to an intuitive web interface, we also implemented a RESTful API that now enables other online developers to integrate network enrichment as a web service...

  2. Mineral requirements of dairy sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral requirements of dairy sheep under semi-intensive and intensive management systems are reviewed. Basically, mineral requirements obtained with mutton breeds are supplemented with specific information obtained with dairy sheep. The daily requirements of sheep in major elements have been estimated using the factorial method, first to calculate the net requirements during maintenance, growth, reproduction and lactation, and second to assess the efficiency of absorption for converting net requirements into dietary allowance. The requirements in trace elements were estimated from the results of feeding trials. The choice of values for endogenous losses and particularly the precision with which efficiency of absorption can be predicted are the main sources of error in estimates of dietary allowances, especially when efficiency of absorption is low. The net requirements in major elements are given for maintenance, pregnancy and lactation, together with the recommended coefficients of absorption. Dietary requirements in trace elements are expressed as milligram per kilogram dry matter. The requirements in all nutrients and particularly in Ca and P increase during late pregnancy, especially during lactation. The requirements during lactation mainly reflect milk composition, the level of milk yield and lactation length, but also the feed intake level. The factors related to the confinement, feeding and management of dairy breeds, which differ from those of mutton breeds, may affect their mineral requirements. Changes in husbandry practices resulting in increased production may increase the stress on the animal and therefore alter its metabolic equilibrium. Direct supplementation of the diet of dairy sheep is the cheapest and most convenient method of mineral supplementation. The cost is outweighed by the enhanced performance of sheep. Determination of the mineral composition of feedstuffs available for feeding dairy sheep indicates the type and level of mineral

  3. Geochemistry and Minerality of Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oze, C.; Horton, T. W.; Beaman, M.

    2010-12-01

    Kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4) and gibbsite (Al(OH)3) are capable of forming in a variety of environments including anthropogenic solutions such as wine. Here, we evaluate the geochemistry of twelve white wines in order to assess the potential relationship between kaolinite/gibbsite saturation and minerality, a common wine descriptor used to express the rock and/or soil character in the aromas and flavors of wines. Aluminum and Si concentrations ranged from 228-1,281 µg L-1 and 6,583-19,746 µg L-1, respectively, where Si and Al are the only elements to demonstrate positive covariance with minerality scores. Sulfur levels varied from 25,013-167,383 µg L-1 and show the strongest negative covariance with minerality scores. However, like all of the elements studied (Al, Si, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, and Fe), these trends were not significantly different than random at the 95% confidence level. In contrast, the relative degrees of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation display strong positive covariance with minerality scores and these trends are not random at the greater than 95% confidence level. Overall, our tasters were able to accurately assess the degree of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation amongst the twelve wines based on the objective of assessing minerality. Although the wines were undersaturated with respect to gibbsite/kaolinite, geochemical modeling reveals that increasing the wines’ pHs from ~3.3 to 4.1-4.6 (which is achievable on the palate where saliva has a pH of 7.4) results in gibbsite/kaolinite oversaturation. By considering that minerality is a function of gibbsite/kaolinite saturation and decreasing S, the origin of minerality’s taste and chemical origin in wine with known physical standards becomes increasingly crystalline.

  4. Radon risk in ore miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground workers are exposed to various clastogenic agents. One of these agents, radon, attracts attention of recent research as it causes lung cancer in the population occupationally exposed to its various concentrations especially in mine air of uranium mines or ore mines. This paper is a pilot study in which the numbers of chromosomal aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes of ore mines (Nizna Slana-iron ore, Hnusta-talc ore) located in east central Slovakia were followed and related to the lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. Seventy miners volunteering after an informed consent served as donors of venous blood. Twenty healthy pro-bands, age matched with the miners, which never worked underground (mostly clerks) served as donors of control blood samples. The exposure to radon and smoking has been estimated according to working-records and personal anamnesis. The findings unequivocally showed a small but statistically significant clastogenic effect of the exposure to underground environment of the mines concerned. This study has shown also a small but significant influence of smoking, which in the subgroup of miners working underground less than 1500 shifts may have acted synergically with the underground exposure. It was concluded tat: (1) Significantly higher counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of 70 miners than in an age matched control group of 20 white-collar workers were found; (2) The higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; (3) The positive dependence of the number of chromosomal aberrations from the exposure to smoking was loose and it was expressed by significantly higher chromosomal aberrations counts in the group of miners working less than 1500 shifts underground; (4) A dependence of chromosomal aberrations counts from the exposure to radon could not be assessed. At relatively low numbers of pro-bands in subgroups it was not ruled out the confounding

  5. Validation of lactic acid bacteria, lactic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite as decontaminating interventions to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in mechanically tenderized and brine-enhanced (nonintact) beef at the purveyor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, Alejandro; Brooks, J Chance; Miller, Markus F; Collins, Jesse A; Loneragan, Guy H; Brashears, Mindy M

    2010-12-01

    After three different outbreaks were linked to the consumption of nonintact meat products contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service published notice requiring establishments producing mechanically tenderized and moisture-enhanced beef products to reassess their respective hazard analysis and critical control point systems, due to potential risk to the consumers. The objective of this study was to validate the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), and lactic acid (LA) sprays when applied under a simulated purveyor setting as effective interventions to control and reduce E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in inoculated U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Choice strip loins (longissimus lumborum muscles) pieces intended for either mechanical blade tenderization or injection enhancement with a brine solution after an aging period of 14 or 21 days at 4.4°C under vacuum. After the mechanical process, translocation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 from the surface into the internal muscles occurred at levels between 1.00 and 5.72 log CFU/g, compared with controls. LAB and LA reduced internal E. coli O157:H7 loads up to 3.0 log, while ASC reduced the pathogen 1.4 to 2.3 log more than the control (P tenderization or enhancement of steaks should increase the safety of these types of products. PMID:21219733

  6. Miners take stock after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australia's uranium producers, already facing a tough market have been plunged further into the unknown following the accident at Chernobyl. The production of uranium in Australia is reviewed with emphasis on the three uranium miners -Queensland Mines, Energy Resources of Australia and Western Mining Corporation

  7. Radioactive radiation from uranium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aid of contamination meters and autoradiography, the intensity of the radiation emitted by uranium- and thorium-containing pieces (about 50 stages) of a mineral collection. The measuring instrument, the radiation measurements, the autoradiographic procedure, the radiation shields, and the consequences with regard to radiation protection are described. (HK)

  8. Mysterious Lava Mineral on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This graph or spectrum captured by the Moessbauer spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the presence of three different iron-bearing minerals in the soil at the rover's landing site. One of these minerals has been identified as olivine, a shiny green rock commonly found in lava on Earth. The other two have yet to be pinned down. Scientists were puzzled by the discovery of olivine because it implies the soil consists at least partially of ground up rocks that have not been weathered or chemically altered. The black line in this graph represents the original data; the three colored regions denote individual minerals and add up to equal the black line.The Moessbauer spectrometer uses two pieces of radioactive cobalt-57, each about the size of pencil erasers, to determine with a high degree of accuracy the composition and abundance of iron-bearing minerals in martian rocks and soil. It is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.'

  9. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140786Deng Zhenping(Institute of Karst Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Guilin 541004,China);Yang Wen-qiong Application of Stripping Voltammetry with a Solid Amalgam Electrode for Determination of Copper in a Tracer and Groundwater Tracing Experiment(Rock and Mineral Analy-

  10. Lagoa Real design - Mineral engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the works realized, in course and to realize of Lagoa Real Design, including the works for implantation of Mineral-Industrial complex with the production capacity of 1.000 ton of U sub(3) O sub(8) per year from 1988. (author)

  11. 75 FR 80947 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... indirectly finance or benefit armed groups'' in the DRC countries.\\22\\ Each person must make their Conflict... or benefit'' these armed groups, the issuer may describe such products as ``DRC conflict free... Exchange Commission 17 CFR Parts 229 and 249 Conflict Minerals; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register /...

  12. Estudo mineral de plantas medicinais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Gomes Lopes

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Determinations of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn were evaluated in five different samples of medicinal plant leaves. Atomic absorption spectrometry was applied to the metals quantification. Except for Fe in Artemisia vulgaris L, significant levels of these elements were found in all investigated plant as compared to other vegetables which are abundant concerning that mineral content.

  13. A guide to mineral safeguarding in England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvoy, F.M.; Cowley, J.; Hobden, K.; Bee, E.; Hannis, S.

    2007-10-15

    A key aspect of sustainable development is the conservation and safeguarding of non-renewable resources, such as minerals, for future generations. The UK is endowed with a wide range of indigenous minerals but these natural resources are finite. With increased pressure on land-use in the UK, there is a need to ensure that these natural resources are not needlessly sterilised by other development, leaving insufficient supplies for future generations. Safeguarding will also help ensure that the planning system retains the flexibility to identify sites which have the least impact on the environment. Safeguarding is the term that encompasses the process necessary to ensure that outcome. Mineral Policy Statement 1: Planning and minerals, published in November 2006, aims to prevent unnecessary sterilisation of mineral resources by providing national policy for mineral safeguarding. The 'Guide to mineral safeguarding' is designed to complement this policy which introduces an obligation on all Mineral Planning Authorities to define Mineral Safeguarding Areas. Defining Mineral Safeguarding Areas carries no presumption that the resources will be worked. The guide provides guidance on how current mineral safeguarding policy can be complied with and puts forward a relatively simple step-by-step methodology for delineating Mineral Safeguarding Areas, together with examples of policies through which they would have effect. When linked to appropriate local planing policies, Mineral Safeguarding Areas should ensure that mineral resources are adequately and effectively considered in making land-use planning decisions. 3 annexes.

  14. Radiological hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present document is to review and assess the occupational hazards to uranium miners in Canada. Amendments to regulations set the maximum permissible dose to uranium miners at 50 mSv per year. Uranium miners are exposed to radon and thoron progeny, external gamma radiation and long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides in dust. The best estimate for the lifetime risk of inhaled radon progeny is about 3 x 10-4 lung cancers per WLM for the average miner, with a range of uncertainty from about 1 -6 x 10-4 per WLM. This central value is nearly twice as high as that recommended by the ICRP in 1981. The probability of serious biological consequences following exposure to external gamma rays is currently under review but is expected to be in the range of 3 - 6 x 10-2 Sv-1. Dosimetric calculations indicate that the stochastic risks per WLM of thoron progeny are about one-third of those for radon progeny. The annual limits on intake of inhaled ore dusts recommended by the ICRP are probably too low by at least a factor of two for the type of ore and dust normally encountered in underground uranium mines in Ontario; this is due in part to the fact that the average diameter of these dusts is five times greater than the value used by the ICRP. Radiological exposures of uranium miners in Canada were reviewed. The biological impact of these exposures were compared with those of conventional accidents on the basis of the years of normal life expectancy that are lost or seriously impaired due to occupational hazards. The objectives in considering all occupational risks are to reduce the total risk from all causes and to use funds spent for health protection as effectively as possible

  15. Microprobe to closely examine minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of South Australia will develop synchrotron-based technology that can determine the structure and chemical composition of mineral samples at microscopic levels. The planned multi-analysis synchrotron X-ray facility Beam-line 11 is for implementing on the Australian Synchrotron. UniSA's Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies (ACeSSS) will use Beamline 11 to shed new light on factors that constrain recoveries of copper and gold from typical copper ores. ACeSSS director Professor Andrea Gerson is working with an international team and the Australian Synchrotron on the design of Beamline 11. According to Gerson, there is scope to improve processing and/or increase recoveries in copper, gold and valueless pyrite either through separation, smelting, leaching or electro-processing. Using synchrotron technology, researchers will determine the structure and chemical composition of mineral samples to understand the fundamental behaviour of these materials in order to identify process and : environmental benefits. Three different strategies will be employed: tracing the movement of gold through the mineral processing chain to optimise and increase gold recovery; examining the surface layers formed when copper is leached from the mineral, chalcopyrite, to enhance the understanding of this surface layer formation and ultimately maximise cop-per recovery; and improving environmental remediation by understanding the mineralisation process during acid-rock drainage. ACeSSS will work with the minerals and environmental remediation sectors, building on the I establishment of the Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment, and cementing close collaboration with UniSA's Ian Wark Research Institute. Contributions from the SA Premier's Science and Research Fund, BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto, synchrotron partners Advanced Light Source (USA) and the Canadian Light Source Funding totalling $1.38m are available for

  16. Late-Quaternary variations in clay minerals along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence of climatic variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S.; Sukhija, B.S.; Gujar, A.R.; Nagabhushanam, P.; Paropkari, A.L.

    Down-core variations in illite, chlorite, smectite and kaolinite (the major clays) in two sup(14)C-dated cores collected along the SW continental margin of India show that illite and chlorite have enhanced abundance during 20-17, 12.5, 11-9.5, and 5-4...

  17. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - INDUSTRIAL_MINERALS_POINTS_IN: Industrial Mineral Data in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — INDUSTRIAL_MINERALS_POINTS_IN is a shapefile that shows the distribution of stratigraphic data for various industrial minerals in Indiana. These data were derived...

  18. Minería de datos con Oracle Data Miner

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Ruiz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    La intención del proyecto es mostrar las diferentes características que ofrece Oracle en el campo de la minería de datos, con la finalidad de saber si puede ser una plataforma apta para la investigación y la educación en la universidad. En la primera parte del proyecto se estudia la aplicación “Oracle Data Miner” y como, mediante un flujo de trabajo visual e intuitivo, pueden aplicarse las distintas técnicas de minería (clasificación, regresión, clustering y asociación). Para mostrar la ej...

  19. Characterizing Geology and Mineralization at High Latitudes in Alaska Using Airborne and Field-Based Imaging Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, T. M.; Kokaly, R. F.; Graham, G. E.; Kelley, K. D.; Buchhorn, M.; Johnson, M. R.; Hubbard, B. E.; Goldfarb, R. J.; Prakash, A.

    2015-12-01

    Passive optical remote sensing of high latitude regions faces many challenges including a short acquisition season and poor illumination. Identification of surface minerals can be complicated by steep terrain and vegetation cover. In July 2014, the HyMap* imaging spectrometer was flown over two study areas in Alaska. Contemporaneously, field spectra and samples of geologic units were collected, including altered and unaltered parts of intrusions hosting mid-Cretaceous porphyry copper deposits at Orange Hill and Bond Creek in the eastern Alaska Range. The HyMap radiance data were converted to surface reflectance using a radiative transfer correction program and reflectance spectra of calibration sites. Reflectance data were analyzed with the Material Identification and Characterization Algorithm (MICA), a module of USGS PRISM (Processing Routines in IDL for Spectroscopic Measurements; speclab.cr.usgs.gov). Large areas of abundant epidote/chlorite, muscovite/illite, calcite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and (or) pyrophyllite were mapped, which are minerals typically formed during alteration of host rocks surrounding porphyry copper deposits. A map showing the wavelength position of the muscovite/illite absorption feature was made. Shifts in wavelength position have been related to the aluminum composition of micas and areas of high metal concentrations in past studies. In July 2015, rock and spectral sampling was continued in areas with surface exposures of copper- and molybdenum-bearing sulfides. Also, high-spatial resolution (~6 cm pixel size) imaging spectrometer data were collected at the Orange Hill deposit using the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF) HySpex imaging spectrometer (www.hyperspectral.alaska.edu). Laboratory, field, and airborne spectra are being examined to define indicators of mineralization. The study results will be used to assess the effectiveness of spectroscopic remote sensing for geologic mapping and exploration targeting in Alaska and

  20. Investigating the behaviour of Mg isotopes during the formation of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimpenny, Joshua; Colla, Christopher A.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Rustad, James R.; Casey, William H.

    2014-03-01

    We present elemental and isotopic data detailing how the Mg isotope system behaves in natural and experimentally synthesized clay minerals. We show that the bulk Mg isotopic composition (δ26Mg) of a set of natural illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite spans a 2‰ range, and that their isotopic composition depends strongly on a balance between the relative proportions of structural and exchangeable Mg. After acid leaching, these natural clays become relatively enriched in isotopically heavy Mg by between 0.2‰ and 1.6‰. Results of exchange experiments indicate that the Mg that has adsorbed to interlayer spaces and surface charged sites is relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg compared to the residual clay. The isotopic composition of this exchangeable Mg (-1.49‰ to -2.03‰) is characteristic of the isotopic composition of Mg found in many natural waters. Further experiments with an isotopically characterized MgCl2 solution shows that the clay minerals adsorb this exchangeable Mg with little or no isotopic fractionation, although we cannot discount the possibility that the uptake of exchangeable Mg does so with a slight preference for 24Mg. To characterize the behaviour of Mg isotopes during clay mineral formation we synthesized brucite (Mg(OH)2), which we consider to be a good analogue for the incorporation of Mg into the octahedral sheet of Mg-rich clay minerals or into the brucitic layer of clays such as chlorite. In our experiment the brucite mineral becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of Mg while the corresponding solution is always relatively enriched in isotopically light Mg. The system reaches a steady state after 10 days with a final fractionation factor (αsolid-solution) of 1.0005 at near-neutral pH. This result is consistent with the general consensus that secondary clay minerals preferentially take up isotopically heavy Mg during their formation. However our results also show that exchangeable Mg is an important component within bulk

  1. Mineral Operations of Latin America and Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries...

  2. Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tables Online DRI Tool Daily Value (DV) Tables Vitamin and Mineral Supplement Fact Sheets Search the list ... Supplements: Background Information Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information Vitamin and Mineral Fact Sheets Botanical Supplement Fact Sheets ...

  3. Beneficiation of industrial minerals by air classification

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive John; Inglethorpe, Simon; Morgan, David

    1992-01-01

    Workshop handout accompanying poster which summarises the use of air classification for the beneficiation (mineral processing) of industrial minerals. Illustrated with examples of processing trials on graphite, feldspar and diatomite.

  4. Mineral operations outside the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mineral facilities and operations outside the United States compiled by the National Minerals Information Center of the USGS. This representation combines source...

  5. ARC Code TI: sequenceMiner

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The sequenceMiner was developed to address the problem of detecting and describing anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences. sequenceMiner works...

  6. Miscellaneous Industrial Minerals Operations - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes miscellaneous industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team...

  7. The heat capacities of osumilite from 298.15 to 1000 K, the thermodynamic properties of two natural chlorites to 500 K, and the thermodynamic properties of petalite to 1800 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, B.S.; Robie, R.A.; Kittrick, J.A.; Grew, E.S.; Nelen, J.A.; London, D.

    1984-01-01

    Modifications to an automated low-T, adiabatic calorimeter are described. Thermodynamic data obtained with this instrument are reported for minerals from metamorphic terrains. (U.S. Bureau of Mines Report of Investigations 8451)-J.A.Z.

  8. Mineral bridges in nacre revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Checa, Antonio G; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2012-01-01

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200 nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (> 100 nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (< 60 nm), earlier reported to be mineral bridges, found to be such.

  9. Reducing the extraction of minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzon, Marina; Govindan, Kannan; Rodriguez, Carlos Manuel Taboada

    2015-01-01

    Mass consumption and shortening product lifecycles have increased worldwide production. Consequently, more raw materials such as minerals are used, and available landfills are filling up. Companies are urged to effectively incorporate sustainability issues such as End-of-life (EOL) management and...... Policy related issues barrier category, which means that the lack of specific laws and lack of motivational legislation are still significant impediments to RL implementation in Brazil....... Reverse Logistics (RL) practices to close the loop and diminish the amount of raw materials used in their production systems. However, implementing RL implies dealing with its barriers. The purpose of this article is to focus on the recovery of EOL products that use mostly raw materials from the mining...... and minerals industry by identifying and analyzing the interactions among the barriers that hinder RL development in Brazil. First, international peer-reviewed publications were considered to select the barriers and classify them into categories. In a second moment, an empirical research was conducted...

  10. Borate Minerals and RNA Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Di Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The abiotic origin of genetic polymers faces two major problems: a prebiotically plausible polymerization mechanism and the maintenance of their polymerized state outside a cellular environment. The stabilizing action of borate on ribose having been reported, we have explored the possibility that borate minerals stabilize RNA. We observe that borate itself does not stabilize RNA. The analysis of a large panel of minerals tested in various physical-chemical conditions shows that in general no protection on RNA backbone is exerted, with the interesting exception of ludwigite (Mg2Fe3+BO5. Stability is a fundamental property of nucleic polymers and borate is an abundant component of the planet, hence the prebiotic interest of this analysis.

  11. Mineralization Potential of Polarized Dental Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Reina; Shibata, Yo; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Background Management of human teeth has moved from a surgical to a more conservative approach of inhibiting or preventing lesion progression. Increasing enamel mineralization is crucial in this regard. A potential difficulty is the preferential mineralization of the outermost portion of the enamel that can prevent overall mineralization. We describe a strategy for increasing the mineralization potential of dental enamel. Methodology/Principal Findings Extracted human premolar teeth enamel (n...

  12. World mineral production 2004-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, T. J.; Bide, T.; Hannis, S.D.; Idoine, N.E.; Hetherington, L.E.; R. A. Shaw; Walters, A S; Lusty, P.A.J.; Kendall, R.

    2010-01-01

    This volume is the latest in the series World Mineral Production, published by the British Geological Survey. It comprises the most recent addition to a continuous dataset on global mineral production which stretches back to 1913. It contains production statistics, by country, for the majority of economically important mineral commodities, including ferrous and non–ferrous metals, industrial minerals and hydrocarbons. Commentary is provided detailing the characteristics, uses, production t...

  13. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological) and their exposure levels that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumonconiosis and emphysema

  14. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132374 Dong Yongsheng(Third Institute of Geologic Mineral Exploration and Development of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region,Hohhot 010050,China);Cheng Haoyang Determination of Nb,Ta,Th,and Zr by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,31(4),2012,p.113-114,129,3tables,2refs.)Key words:X-ray fluorescence spectra,rare

  15. KNIME: the Konstanz Information Miner

    OpenAIRE

    Berthold, Michael R.; Cebron, Nicholas; Dill, Fabian; Di Fatta, Giuseppe; Gabriel, Thomas R.; Georg, Florian; Meinl, Thorsten; Ohl, Peter; Sieb, Christopher; Wiswedel, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    The Konstanz Information Miner is a modular environment, which enables easy visual assembly and interactive execution of a data pipeline. It is designed as a teaching, research and collaboration platform, which enables simple integration of new algorithms and tools as well as data manipulation or visualization methods in the form of new modules or nodes. In this paper we describe some of the design aspects of the underlying architecture and briefly sketch how new nodes can be incorporated.

  16. Copper minerals under the microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Hjeltström, Anna

    2015-01-01

    From many perspectives copper is a very important metal for the modern society. It can be found in everything from jewellery to electronics. For this reason it is very important for geologists to be able to develop efficient methods for identification, characterisation, extraction and processing of copper. One method for the identification of copper bearing minerals is ore microscopy which has been used in this paper along with a general introduction. Samples from the study collection of the ...

  17. Epidemiological studies of Czech miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer risk from radon was analysed in three cohorts of uranium (N=4320+5628) and burnt clay (N=915) miners. The follow-up of miners was extended up to 1990. Most of the cases (708) have been observed in the oldest (S) cohort followed since 1952. The other two cohorts, 18 years younger in average with substantially lower exposures, contributed 72 cases. Therefore, the main analyses of risk from radon were based on the S cohort. The data of the S cohort were subjected to checks both as for the individual exposures of the miners and the completeness of follow-up. The present mortality analyses from other causes suggest the follow-up is correct. The general patterns of mortality from violent deaths and diseases other than lung cancer show similar features in all the three cohorts, i.e. decreasing trend with time since first exposure in the first case, and increasing trend in the second one, confirming thus the healthy worker effect, in the first 20 years. A raised mortality was observed in later periods in respiratory and circulatory diseases and also in cancers other than lung cancer, suggesting that smoking habits among miners might be more frequent than in the general population. The estimates of lung cancer risk from radon exposure were based on relative linear models, where cumulative exposures were lagged by 5 years. The linear effect of cumulative exposure was substantially modified by time since exposure, exposure rate, and age at exposure. From the estimated intercept, it can be deduced that in the absence of exposure to radon, the estimated mortality from lung cancer in the cohort is about 1.5 times higher than in the general population. (orig.)

  18. Martian rocks, minerals, and mantles

    OpenAIRE

    Albee, Arden

    2002-01-01

    The variable nature of Mars was first observed almost 400 years ago and modern observations began almost 40 years ago, culminating with the flotilla of spacecraft now at or heading for Mars. We now know that the atmosphere, which produced the visible variation of Mars, has also covered it with a mantle that makes difficult any detailed investigation of the rocks and minerals of Mars.

  19. Ultrasound-Intensified Mineral Carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; François, Davy; Mertens, Gilles; Elsen, Jan; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting / Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (p...

  20. Cancer of lung in miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period of 1983-1994 was registered at Clinic of occupational diseases 87 cases of professional cancer of lung. Mostly /85/ of cases was related to miners, by whom act as risk factor alpha ionisation from radon. Average age group was 60.2 y, average time of exposition was 21.6 y. Epidermoid carcinoma was the most frequent type of tumor /46.5 %/ of cases/. Smoking plays a supportive role. (authors)

  1. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yogurt legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils Zinc Zinc helps your immune system, which is ... peanuts legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils When people don't get enough of these ...

  2. Is Struvite a Prebiotic Mineral?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Pasek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The prebiotic relevance of mineral struvite, MgNH4PO4·6H2O, was studied experimentally as a phosphorylating reagent and, theoretically, to understand the geochemical requirements for its formation. The effectiveness of phosphorylation by the phosphate mineral, monetite, CaHPO4, was also studied to compare to the efficiency of struvite. The experiments focused on the phosphorylation reactions of the minerals with organic compounds, such as nucleosides, glycerol and choline chloride, and heat at 75 °C for about 7–8 days and showed up to 28% phosphorylation of glycerol. In contrast, the compositional requirements for the precipitation of struvite are high ammonium and phosphate concentrations, as well as a little Ca2+ dissolved in the water. Combined, these requirements suggest that it is not likely that struvite was present in excess on the early Earth to carry out phosphorylation reactions. The present study focuses on the thermodynamic aspects of struvite formation, complementing the results given by Orgel and Handschuh (1973, which were based on the kinetic effects.

  3. 36 CFR 331.17 - Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minerals. 331.17 Section 331..., KENTUCKY AND INDIANA § 331.17 Minerals. All activities in connection with prospecting, exploration, development, mining or other removal or the processing of mineral resources and all uses reasonably...

  4. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Locatable Minerals AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice... approved information collection, Locatable Minerals-36 CFR part 228, subpart A. DATES: Comments must be... should be addressed to: USDA, Forest Service, Minerals and Geology Management Staff, Mail Stop 1126,...

  5. Sustainability in the UK construction minerals industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Sustainability in the UK construction minerals industry Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Nottingham, UK Email: Sustainability is not just about environmental protection it also concerns biodiversity, community relations, competence, employment, geodiversity, health and safety, resource efficiency, restoration and stakeholder accountability. The UK construction minerals industry aims to supply essential materials in a sustainabl...

  6. Mortality among sulfide ore miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer mortality was studied during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township in North Karelia, where an old copper mine was located. Age-specific lung cancer death rates (1968-1985) were higher among the male population of Outokumpu than among the North Karelian male population of the same age excluding the Outokumpu district (p less than .01). Of all 106 persons who died from lung cancer during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township, 47 were miners of the old mine, 39 of whom had worked there for at least three years and been heavily exposed to radon daughters and silica dust. The study cohort consisted of 597 miners first employed between 1954 and 1973 by a new copper mine and a zinc mine, and employed there for at least 3 years. The period of follow-up was 1954-1986. The number of person-years was 14,782. The total number of deaths was 102; the expected number was 72.8 based on the general male population and 97.8 based on the mortality of the male population of North Karelia. The excess mortality among miners was due mainly to ischemic heart disease (IHD); 44 were observed, the expected number was 22.1, based on the general male population, and the North Karelian expected number was 31.2 (p less than .05). Of the 44 miners who died from IHD, 20 were drillers or chargers exposed to nitroglycerin in dynamite charges, but also to several simultaneous stress factors including PAHs, noise, vibration, heavy work, accident risk, and working alone. Altogether 16 tumors were observed in the cohort. Ten of these were lung cancers, the expected number being 4.3. Miners who had died from lung cancer were 35-64 years old, and had entered mining work between 1954 and 1960. Five of the ten lung cancer cases came from the zinc mine (1.7 expected). Three of them were conductors of diesel-powered ore trains

  7. SHRIMP II analysis of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ion microprobes are specialised mass spectrometers that allow in situ isotopic and abundance measurements of chemically complex materials with a spatial resolution of 5 to 20 micrometers. The Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion Micro-Probe (SHRIMP II), an Australian built instrument, is designed to achieve high mass resolution (>5000 MRP at the 1% level) and great sensitivity, with detection limits in the ppb range for most elements in the Periodic Table. The SHRIMP ion microprobes have revolutionised geochronology and they are primarily used for U-Th-Pb dating of zircons from geological samples. The in situ analysis capability of the SHRIMP is now recognised as the best method for obtaining highly precise ages for zircons and other accessory minerals in ancient rocks with complex geological histories. The Western Australian SHRIMP II, which is located at Curtin University, provides rapid, precise measurements of isotope ratios in minerals and glasses and has been applied to a wide variety of geological problems and to a few applied physics problems. During the last three years we have expanded the number of minerals that can be used for U-Th-Pb age dating to include titanite, rutile, apatite, badellyite, perovskite and monazite. In addition to age dating the SHRIMP can be used for isotopic tracing. SHRIMP analysis provides the spatial resolution required to study S isotopes in very complex ores from many of Australia's largest ore deposits (Mt Isa, Broken Hill, Olympic Dam). Sulphur isotope ratios can be measured with a precision of 1-2 ppm in both sulphides and sulphates. In situ S isotopic compositions of galena (PbS), sphalerite (ZnS), chalcopyrite (CuS) and pyrite (FeS) has been crucial in the development of models of ore deposition. The in situ analytical capability and the high sensitivity of the SHRIMP II has allowed measurement of, diffusion profiles of REE and other trace element in melt couples, the mineral-melt partition coefficients of these

  8. Nuclear technology and mineral recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particular aspect of nuclear technology most applicable to the mineral field, as has been pointed out by various authors, is nuclear blasting. The prime target for this nuclear blasting has usually been a large disseminated deposit of copper mineralization which, because of large dimensions, employs the nuclear devices most effectively. From the work of the AEC we know that the larger nuclear devices fragment rock for a lower energy cost per unit of ground broken than do smaller nuclear devices or chemical explosives. A mineralized deposit near the surface is usually not amenable to nuclear fragmentation, nor are the more deeply buried thin deposits. Also, one would not anticipate fragmenting a zone of excessively erratic mineralization with nuclear devices. Many of our mineralized areas would be eliminated using the above criteria, so at this point you are well aware that my self-imposed limitation is to nuclear blasting and large disseminated copper deposits. As with most other industries, copper mining faces rising costs and greater demands for its products. One of the rising cost features peculiar to extractive industries is the reliance placed on production from lower grade deposits as the higher grade deposits are depleted. As the grade or metal content of an orebody decreases more material must be handled to produce a given amount of metal. The increased volume of ore which must be handled as the grade declines requires expansion of facilities and higher capital expenditures. Expansion of facilities for mining, milling, and concentrating of the ore increases the per unit capital cost of the end product--copper. Increased copper consumption will aggravate this situation with demand for more metal, much of which will have to be obtained from lower grade deposits. As the higher grade deposits are depleted, future production will come from those deposits which cannot be exploited economically today. Most familiar of the proposed new methods for copper mining

  9. 25 CFR 215.25 - Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Other minerals and deep-lying lead and zinc minerals. 215.25 Section 215.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.25 Other minerals and deep-lying...

  10. Sorption of pesticides to aquifer minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes results from a work were the sorption of five pesticides on seven minerals were studied in order to quantify the adsorption to different mineral surfaces. Investigated mineral phases are: quartz, calcite, kaolinite, a-alumina, and three iron oxides (2-line ferrihydrite......, goethite, lepidocrocite). Selected pesticides are: atrazine, isoproturon, mecoprop, 2,4-D, and bentazone. The results demonstrate that pesticides adsorb to pure mineral surfaces. However, the size of the adsorption depends on the type of pesticide and the type of mineral....

  11. Relationship between nanoscale mineral properties and calcein labeling in mineralizing bone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aido, Marta; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Hoerth, Rebecca; Burghammer, Manfred; Montero, Cédric; Checa, Sara; Fratzl, Peter; Duda, Georg N; Willie, Bettina M; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Bone's mineral properties, such as particle thickness and degree of alignment have been associated with bone quality. Bone formation, remodeling, aging of the tissue and mineral homeostasis influence mineral particle properties leading to specific patterns across bone. Scanning small angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) with synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool, which allows us to study bone's nanoscale mineral properties in a position-resolved way. We used sSAXS, fluorescence light microscopy and backscattered electron (BSE) imaging to study bone's mineral properties at the tibial midshaft of in vivo-loaded mice. By combining these techniques, we could detect local changes in mineral properties. Regions labeled with calcein fluorochrome have lower mean mineral thickness and degree of mineral alignment. We also observed thinner and less aligned mineral particles near blood vessels. We conclude that mineral properties (i) are altered by fluorochrome labeling and (ii) depend on the proximity to blood vessels. PMID:25158172

  12. Quantitative Prediction for Deep Mineral Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Pengda; Cheng Qiuming; Xia Qinglin

    2008-01-01

    On reviewing the characteristics of deep mineral exploration, this article elaborates on the necessity of employing quantitative prediction to reduce uncertainty. This is caused by complexity of mineral deposit formational environments and mineralization systems as increase of exploration depth and incompleteness of geo-information from limited direct observation. The authors wish to share the idea of "seeking difference" principle in addition to the "similar analogy" principle in deep mineral exploration, especially the focus is on the new ores in depth either in an area with discovered shallow mineral deposits or in new areas where there are no sufficient mineral deposit models to be compared. An on-going research project, involving Sn and Cu mineral deposit quantitative prediction in the Gejiu (个旧) area of Yunnan (云南) Province, China, was briefly introduced to demonstrate how the "three-component" (geoanomaly-mineralization diversity-mineral deposit spectrum) theory and non-linear methods series in conjunction with advanced GIS technology, can be applied in multi-scale and multi-task deep mineral prospecting and quantitative mineral resource assessment.

  13. The mineralization processes in teleost fish scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbörner, A A; Boivin, G; Baud, C A

    1979-11-01

    In Teleost fish scales, growth and mineralization are continuous. Different mineralization processes can be distinguished. The external layer of the scale is the first to be mineralized and may be classified as the initial calcifying structure of the scale. The initial calcification loci are matrix vesicles of cellular origin always observed during the formation of this layer. This mineralization process takes place progressively, closely following the elaboration of the organic matrix in the scale periphery. The outer limiting and internal layers of the scale are developed after the external layer has been formed. A mineral substance is deposited without the mediation of matrix vesicles, but in contact with the previously mineralized external layer. This type of mineralization is called subsequential. However, the mineralization of the outer limiting layer closely follows the secretion of a collagen-free organic matrix and is thus different from the mineralization of the internal layer in which the calcification front remains remote from the collagen matrix surface and corresponds to a delayed mineralization process. The isolated calcifications (Mandl's corpuscles) which develop in the unmineralized laminae of the internal layer are mineralized in the absence of matrix vesicles and without making contact with a pre-existing calcified tissue, probably by a heterogeneous nucleation of the collagen fibrils. PMID:519703

  14. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O' Connor, W

    2015-01-01

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  15. The radioactivity of bottled mineral waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineral waters with increased contents of minerals (total mineralization ranging from 1000 to 4000 mg.dm-3) can also contain increased concentrations of natural radionuclides. For this reason it is necessary to monitor radioactivity of mineral and thermal springs. Hundreds of springs which are used for drinking purposes are spread in many regions all over Slovakia. In our laboratory we determined these radionuclides in mineral waters: total alpha, total beta, volume activity 222Rn, concentration of Unat, volume 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Po. From values of determined volume activities of radionuclides we calculated total effective dose from reception mineral waters. By calculation of effective dose we supposed consumption of mineral water 150 dm3.year-1 (0.4 dm3.day-1) for adults (according to UNSCEAR). Conversion factors are initiated in the regulation of Ministry of Health of Slovak Republic (MZ SR No.12/2001). (authors)

  16. The Minerals of Aureum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation of 3-dimensional model with 5x vertical exaggeration This image of chaotic terrain in the Aureum Chaos region of Mars was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) at 0858UTC (3:58 a.m. EST) on January 24, 2008, near 3.66 degrees south latitude, 26.5 degrees west longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 18 meters (60 feet) across. The image is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. Aureum Chaos is a 368 kilometer (229 mile) wide area of chaotic terrain in the eastern part of Valles Marineris. The chaotic terrain is thought to have formed by collapse of the surrounding Margaritifer Terra highland region. Aureum Chaos contains heavily eroded, randomly oriented mesas, plateaus, and knobs many revealing distinct layered deposits along their slopes. These deposits may be formed from remnants of the collapsed highlands, sand carried by Martian winds, dust or volcanic ash that settled out of the atmosphere, or sediments laid down on the floor of an ancient lake. The top panel in the montage above shows the location of the CRISM image on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The CRISM data cover a narrow plateau near the edge of the chaotic terrain, that stretches across from the southwest to the northeast. The lower left image, an infrared false color image, reveals the plateau and several eroded knobs of varying sizes. The plateau's layer-cake structure is similar to that of other layered outcrops in Valles Marineris. The lower right image reveals the strengths of mineral spectral features overlain on a black-and-white version of the infrared image. Areas shaded in red hold more of the mineral pyroxene, a primary component of basaltic rocks that are prevalent in the highlands. Spots of green indicate monohydrated sulfate

  17. Chapter 2. Geological setting of uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium mineralization in the Western Carpathians is mainly bound to the Permian sequences. The most important stratiform uranium mineralization is related either to the Permian acid volcanism of Gemericum and Tatricum, or to sandstones with abundant organic matter in Hronicum of the Kozie Chrbty Mts. Less important uranium mineralization occurs in veins and stock-works cutting the Paleozoic sequences of Gemericum and the Neogene volcanic rocks of Central Slovakia. The most important stratiform uranium-molybdenum mineralization occurs in the Permian volcanoclastic and volcanic rocks near Novoveska Huta. The important stratiform uranium mineralization occurs near Kalnica in the Permian Selec formation of Tatricum in the Povazsky Inovec Mts. The Permian acid volcanism was the important factor of primary uranium mineralization. The Permian Maluzina Formation of Hronicum contains uranium and copper mineralization in the Kozie Chrbty, Nizke Tatry and Male Karpaty Mts. The most important is the uranium mineralization in the Kozie Chrbty Mts in Vikartovce, Kravany, Svabovce and Spissky Stiavnik deposits. The Maluzina Formation is of similar character as the Kozie Chrbty Mts that continues on the northern slopes of the Nizke Tatry Mts. The stratiform uranium mineralization occurs in the lower ore-bearing horizon underlying the Kravany Beds in valleys Benkovsky Potok, Ipoltica and Nizny Chmelenec. Quartz and quartz-apatite veins with uranium mineralization occur in the eastern part of the Slovenske Rudohorie Mts. The common feature of this vein mineralization is cutting of the Early Paleozoic rocks of Gemericum in a proximity of the Gemeric granites. Quartz veins with uranium mineralization represented by uranite and brannerite are accompanied by gold in Peklisko and Zimna Voda. The oldest manifestation of uranium mineralization in the Western Carpathians is occurrence of pegmatite with uraninite in antimony deposit Dubrava in the Nizke Tatry Mts. It is related to the

  18. Impact of Long-Term Alfalfa Cropping on Soil Potassium Content and Clay Minerals in a Semi-Arid Loess Soil in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-Cheng; B. VELDE; LI Feng-Min; ZHANG Gan-Lin; ZHAO Ming-Song; HUANG Lai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Alfalfa cropping has been considered an efficient method of increasing soil fertility.Usually nitrogen increase in root nodules is considered to be the major beneficial effect.A 21-year time series (five sampling periods) of alfalfa cultivation plots on a loess soil,initially containing illite and chlorite,in Lanzhou of northwestern China was selected to investigate the relationships among alfalfa cropping,soil potassium (K) content and soil clay minerals.The results indicated that soil K significantly accumulated after cropping,with a peak value at about 15 years,and decreased afterwards.The accumulated K was associated with the K increase in the well-crystallized illite,which was not extracted by the traditional laboratory K extraction methods in assessing bioavailability.The steep decline in soil K content after 15-year cropping was in accord with the observed fertility loss in the alfalfa soil.Plant biomass productivity peaked at near 9 years of culture,whereas soil K and clay minerals continued to increase until cropping for 15 years.This suggested that K increased in the topsoil came from the deep root zone.Thus alfalfa continued to store K in clays even after peak production occurred.Nitrogen did not follow these trends,showing a general decline compared with the native prairie soils that had not been cropped.Therefore,the traditional alfalfa cropping can increase K content in the topsoil.

  19. Occurrence of tephra/volcanic tuff in the tertiary sediments of Himachal Himalaya from Tileli area, Mandi district, H.P.: implication for stratigraphy and uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presence of Early Tertiary pyroclastic material (tephra) has been documented petrographically, for the first time, in the Mandi-Bilaspur Sector from Tileli area, Dharamsala basin of Himachal Pradesh. The tephra is reported from the red shale, identified as tuffaceous siltstone belonging to lower Dharamsala Formation that lies above the uraniferous sandstone body and occurs as thin layers of over 300m along the strike, close to the contact of lower and upper Dharamsala formations. The tuffaceous material shows crude but preferred orientation of minerals like biotite, muscovite, chlorite, clay, hematite and specularite. Various features indicating presence of tephra are, glass shards altered to clay but retaining 'U' shaped outline, spindle-shaped hematite with preferred orientation, spherical to sub-spherical clay and altered Fe oxide rich balls, clay groundmass with flow pattern, flaky minerals in association with clast depicting asymmetrical ramp structure. A zone of approximately 300 m length containing tuffaceous material has been established at Tileli overlying the uraniferous sandstone body. Identification of tephra at Tileli has significant implications as it enabled in demarcating the boundary between the upper and lower Dharamsala formations in central part of the basin in Bilaspur-Mandi Sector of HP Himalaya and also in guiding the uranium exploration programme in the lower Dharamsala Formation. (author)

  20. Leukaemia among Czech uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study presents recent findings in an extended cohort of miners, now including nearly 10 000 uranium and 2 000 tin miners and followed up to 1999. A total of 30 cases of leukaemia were observed among Czech uranium miners, corresponding to standardized mortality ratio of 1.5, 90% CI: 1.0-2.1. The risk is analyzed in relation to cumulated dose from radon, external gamma radiation and alpha radiation from long lived radionuclides contained in mining aerosol. Doses to red bone marrow were estimated using measurements of external gamma activities since the early 1960s and measurements of long lived radionuclides in the aerosol since the 1970s. The red bone marrow dose from inhaled long lived radionuclides is estimated by applying respiratory tract model and relevant biokinetic models. The substantial point is that the dose is cumulated even after the underground work has stopped. Another important point is the difference of the exposure by job category. By extrapolating available exposure data and applying models based on ICRP-66 and ICRP-68, individual doses were estimated using working histories, job matrix, and time since exposure. The cumulated red bone marrow dose includes external gamma radiation, dose from radon and its progeny, and committed equivalent dose from long lived alpha-emitters in dependence on the individual length of follow-up. The mean cumulated dose is 158 mSv. Among uranium miners, about 52% of the total dose is due to inhalation of uranium and its decay products with aerosol in mines, about 33% is due to gamma radiation, and some 15% of the dose is from radon and its progeny. The risk coefficient (excess relative risk per sievert) corresponding to these estimates in the present study is 3.1 (90% CI: 1.3 - 5.4). The estimated risk is subject to a considerable uncertainty, due to small numbers and the uncertainty in the estimated dose. However, the magnitude of the risk is consistent with estimates from other studies. (orig.)

  1. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150204 Abaydulla Alimjan(Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences,Kashgar Teachers College,Kashgar 844006,China);Cheng Chunying Non-Metallic Element Composition Analysis of Non-Ferrous Metal Ores from Oytagh Town,Xinjiang(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,33(1),2014,p.44-50,5illus.,4tables,28refs.)Key words:nonferrous metals ore,nonmetals,chemical analysis,thermogravimetric analysis Anions in non-ferrous ore materials

  2. Skull melting of synthetic minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, S.D.; Hull, D.E.; Herrick, C.C.

    1977-12-01

    Direct high-frequency induction melting of dielectric materials in a water-cooled cage has been developed in the LASL synthetic minerals program. Molten material is contained in a skull, i.e., sintered shell, of its own composition so the traditional problems associated with refractory melt contamination are essentially eliminated. Preliminary analyses of power input, cage design, and coil geometry are discussed. Initial experimental results on the preparation of polycrystalline ingots, single crystals, and glasses are presented along with possible applications of this technique.

  3. Ultrasound-intensified mineral carbonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of ultrasound-assisted mineral carbonation were investigated in this work. The objectives were to intensify the CO2 sequestration process to improve reaction kinetics and maximal conversion. Stainless steel slags, derived from the Argon Oxygen Decarburization (AOD) and Continuous Casting/Ladle Metallurgy (CC/LM) refining steps, were used for assessing the technical feasibility of this concept, as they are potential carbon sinks and can benefit from reduction in alkalinity (pH) by mineral carbonation. Ultrasound was applied by use of an ultrasound horn into the reaction slurry, where mineral carbonation reaction took place at 50 °C for up to 4 h; comparison was made to solely mechanically mixed process. It was found that sonication increases the reaction rate after the initial stage, and permits achieving higher carbonate conversion and lower pH. AOD slag conversion increased from 30% to 49%, and pH decreased from 10.6 to 10.1; CC slag conversion increased from 61% to 73% and pH decreased from 10.8 to 9.9. The enhancement effect of ultrasound was attributed to the removal of passivating layers (precipitated calcium carbonate and depleted silica) that surround the unreacted particle core and inhibit mass transfer. Significant particle size reduction was observed for sonicated powders, compared to particle size growth in the case of stirring-only; D[4,3] values increased without sonication by 74% and 50%, and decreased with sonication by 64% and 52%, respectively for AOD and CC slags. Considerations on scale-up of this technology, particularly with regards to energy efficiency, are also discussed. Highlights: ► Ultrasound increased CaO, AOD and CC slags mineral carbonation rates and conversions. ► Enhancement effect linked to removal of mass transfer inhibiting passivating layers. ►Carbonated particle size grew with stirring-only, and decreased with sonication. ► Lower pH of slags with greater carbonation extent can reduce heavy metal leaching

  4. Alteration mineral mapping and metallogenic prediction using CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data in Mingshujing area of Gansu Province, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Zhao, Yingjun; Qin, Kai; Tian, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is a frontier of remote sensing. Due to its advantage of integrated image with spectrum, it can realize objects identification, superior to objects classification of multispectral remote sensing. Taken the Mingshujing area in Gansu Province of China as an example, this study extracted the alteration minerals and thus to do metallogenic prediction using CASI/SASI airborne hyperspectral data. The Mingshujing area, located in Liuyuan region of Gansu Province, is dominated by middle Variscan granites and Indosinian granites, with well developed EW- and NE-trending faults. In July 2012, our project team obtained the CASI/SASI hyperspectral data of Liuyuan region by aerial flight. The CASI hyperspectral data have 32 bands and the SASI hyperspectral data have 88 bands, with spectral resolution of 15nm for both. The hyperspectral raw data were first preprocessed, including radiometric correction and geometric correction. We then conducted atmospheric correction using empirical line method based on synchronously measured ground spectra to obtain hyperspectral reflectance data. Spectral dimension of hyperspectral data was reduced by the minimum noise fraction transformation method, and then purity pixels were selected. After these steps, image endmember spectra were obtained. We used the endmember spectrum election method based on expert knowledge to analyze the image endmember spectra. Then, the mixture tuned matched filter (MTMF) mapping method was used to extract mineral information, including limonite, Al-rich sericite, Al-poor sericite and chlorite. Finally, the distribution of minerals in the Mingshujing area was mapped. According to the distribution of limonite and Al-rich sericite mapped by CASI/SASI hyperspectral data, we delineated five gold prospecting areas, and further conducted field verification in these areas. It is shown that there are significant gold mineralized anomalies in surface in the Baixianishan and Xitan prospecting

  5. Persulfate activation by naturally occurring trace minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Persulfate decomposition and activation by 13 trace minerals was investigated. ► Pyrite and cobaltite addition resulted in rapid persulfate decomposition. ► Pyrite promoted rapid generation of sulfate radical and hydroxyl radical. ► Most trace minerals did not decompose or activate persulfate. ► Some trace minerals inhibited persulfate decomposition and activation. - Abstract: The potential for 13 naturally occurring minerals to mediate the decomposition of persulfate and generate a range of reactive oxygen species was investigated to provide fundamental information on activation mechanisms when persulfate is used for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Only four of the minerals (cobaltite, ilmenite, pyrite, and siderite) promoted the decomposition of persulfate more rapidly than persulfate–deionized water control systems. The other nine minerals decomposed persulfate at the same rate or more slowly than the control systems. Mineral-mediated persulfate activation was conducted with the addition of one of three probe compounds to detect the generation of reactive oxygen species: anisole (sulfate + hydroxyl radical), nitrobenzene (hydroxyl radical), and hexachloroethane (reductants and nucleophiles). The reduced mineral pyrite promoted rapid generation of sulfate + hydroxyl radical. However, the remainder of the minerals provided minimal potential for the generation of reactive oxygen species. The results of this research demonstrate that the majority of naturally occurring trace minerals do not activate persulfate to generate reactive oxygen species, and other mechanisms of activation are necessary to promote contaminant destruction in the subsurface during persulfate ISCO.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangles 2964, 2966, 3064, and 3066, Shah-Esmail (617), Reg-Alaqadari (618), Samandkhan-Karez (713), Laki-Bander (611), Jahangir-Naweran (612), and Sreh-Chena (707) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; King, Trude V.V.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected carbonates, phyllosilicates, sulfates, altered minerals, and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. The map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Epidote or chlorite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  8. 30 CFR 281.8 - Rights to minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rights to minerals. 281.8 Section 281.8 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General § 281.8 Rights to minerals. (a)...

  9. The spatial and seasonal variations in mineral particle composition on the snow surface and their possible effect on snow algae in the Tateyama Mountains, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, T.; Takeuchi, N.

    2012-12-01

    Snow algae are autotrophic microbes and play an important role as primary producers in food chain of glaciers and snowfield. Although their reproduction requires nutrients, snow and ice is extreamly poor in nutrients. One of the possible sources of nutrients is mineral particles blown by wind and deposited on the snow. They may contain variable elements and provide nutrients for snow algae. However, we scarcely know about the relationship between mineral particles and snow algae. In this study, we described spatial and seasonal variations in mineral particle composition and also snow algae on the snow surface in the Tateyama Mountains, Japan. We discussed the possible effect of mineral particles on snow algae. Tateyama Mountains are located in middle-north part of Japan ranging from 2000 - 3000 m above sea level and have heavy snow fall in winter due to strong monsoon wind from Siberia. The snow starts to thaw in April and remains until late summer as perennial snow patches in some valleys. Kosa eolian dust is known to be blown from Chinese deserts and deposited on the snow every spring. Also, snow algal bloom is often observed as red-colored snow in summer. Samples were collected from the snow surface during summer in 2008 - 2011 at four different sites (A - D) in this area. We examined them by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and microscope to obtain composition of mineral particles and structure of snow algae community. XRD analysis revealed mineral particles on the snow surface were mainly composed of quartz, plagioclase, hornblende, mica, chlorite, and amorphous. In April, mineral compositions of all sites were almost similar to that of Kosa eolian dust, indicating that these mineral particles were derived from Chinese arid regions. After May, the mineral compositions changed according to sites. The proportion of hornblende at the site C significantly increased whereas that of mica increased at the site D. Since the site C was located near geological features mainly

  10. Geochemistry and provenance of some detrital heavy minerals of alluvial sediments from Neagra Şarului River, Eastern Carpathians, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciortescu, Catalina; Iancu, Ovidiu Gabriel; Bulgariu, Dumitru; Popa, Ciprian

    2014-05-01

    The present work focuses on the analyses of a selection of heavy mineral assemblages sampled from the Neagra Şarului River's alluvia, in order to determine their provenance and distribution, using their geochemical and physical characteristics. The study focused on a mountain river of about 30 km long, located in the north-western part of the Eastern Carpathians, an important tributary of the Bistria River. The bedrocks in the river drainage basin are constituted mainly by igneous rocks from Călimani Volcanic Complex in the west, and secondarily by a small area of low to medium grade metamorphic rocks, part of Crystalline-Mesozoic Zone, in the east. In order to trace the source of each individual mineral species, we prepared our samples via field separation and subsequent laboratory sieving using 8 different size fractions. An electromagnetic separator (Frantz Isodynamic) was used to separate and classify each heavy minerals species, depending on their magnetic susceptibility. Thus prepared, more than 500 grains per samples (from the 0.5-1 mm size fraction) were mounted on thin sections and analyzed using a Cambridge Microscan M9 with EDS system. These analyses served for mineral identification and relative abundance determination. The classification of the minerals and the nature of their inclusions are derived from the major element compositions computed from SEM-EDX analysis. We also used a stereo microscope in order to determine complementary properties of the grains, such as: color, degree of roundness and degree of alteration. In order of abundance, the main heavy minerals are magnetite, hematite, pyroxene, pyrite, manganese oxides, garnet, apatite, titanium oxides (ilmenite, titanite and rutile/anatase), chlorite, olivine, epidote, biotite and rhodochrosite. A particularity of the studied area is the presence of an altered magnetite caused first by the hydrothermal alteration and strong weathering of the source rocks and second by the river's acid water

  11. A review and comparison of fracture mineral investigations and their application to radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, A.R., E-mail: Alec.Blyth@arc.ab.ca [Alberta Research Council, Integrated Water Management Program, 3608 - 33 Street NW, Calgary, AB, T2L 2A6 (Canada); Frape, S.K. [University of Waterloo, Department of Earth Sciences, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Tullborg, E.-L. [Terralogical AB, Ostra Annekaerrsvaegen 17, 443 72 Grabo (Sweden)

    2009-05-15

    A compilation and comparison of fracture mineral studies from the Canadian and Fennoscandian Shields and the French Massif Central shows many similarities indicating larger external control over fracture mineral deposition, with different rock types exerting local controls. The sites investigated represent a wide range of geological settings, and host rock types ranging from felsic intrusive and extrusives to ultramafic intrusives and volcanics that span an age range from 2.5 to 0.36 Ga. Typical fracture minerals found at Canadian Shield sites include calcite, quartz, chlorite and clays, and these do not appear to be dependant on age, erosional depth or geological environment. The Fennoscandian Shield has a much larger variety of fracture filling minerals with epidote, zeolites, prehnite, fluorite, pyrrhotite, Fe oxides, serpentine, graphite, magnesite and barite in addition to the minerals typically found at Canadian Shield sites. The major control on fracture mineral type is most likely variations in rock type, and fluid chemistry and temperature. The C and O isotopic range of calcite is very similar among sites. Late-stage hydrothermal calcite, with strongly depleted {delta}{sup 18}O values, is common at many sites. All of the sites have calcite with {delta}{sup 18}O isotopic values in the range of -5 to -20 per mille PDB, indicative of formation from meteoric water or basinal brines that have undergone varying degrees of water/rock interaction. One Canadian and a few Swedish sites have calcite in the shallower portion of the rock that shows isotopic evidence of dissolution and re-precipitation in equilibrium with the present-day waters. There are some striking similarities in fluid inclusion data among sites. Most sites have an elevated temperature (100-300 deg. C), low salinity group of fluid inclusions within the NaCl-H{sub 2}O system, and a lower temperature (50-150 deg. C), higher salinity group of fluid inclusions within the NaCl-CaCl{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O

  12. Mining and minerals policy: 1976 bicentennial edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-07-01

    The report is organized into three basic parts. The first part, the Executive Summary, provides a brief description of the major topics and lists the issues and recommendations. The report then is divided into two sections. Section I, Summary, is comprised of three chapters: Increased Energy Security; Metals and Nonmetallic Minerals; and Trends and Events. Section II, Issues in Energy and Minerals Policy, is comprised of seven chapters: Federal Leasing; The Federal Role in Reducing the Fiscal Impacts of Energy Development; Availability of Federal Lands for Mineral Exploration and Development; Environmental Issues and the Mineral Industry; Developments in International Minerals Trade and Investment; Ocean Mining; and The Development of New Tools for Energy and Minerals Policy Analysis. (MCW)

  13. Genetic Types of Diamond Mineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.A.MARAKUSHEV; 桑隆康; 等

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the proposed models of diamond formation both in meteorites and in kimberlite and lamproite bodies.metamorphic complexes and explosive-ring structures ("astroblemes"),The diamond distribution in meteorites(chondrites,iron meteorites and ureilites)is restricted to taente-kamasite phase.The diamond generation here is tied up with the first stage of evolution of the planets,This stage is characterized by high pressure of hydrogen. leading to the formation of the planet envelope,The second stage of planet evolution began with the progressive imopoverishment of their atmospheres in hydrogen due to its predominant emission into the space and to progressive development of oxidative conditions.The model appears to have proved the relict nature of diamond mineraolization in meteorites.Diamond and other high-pressure minerals(its"satellites") were crystallized without any exception in the early intratelluric stages of peridotite and eclogite-pyroxenite magma evolution just before the magma intrusion into the higher levels of the mantle and crust where diamond is not thermodynamically stable,The ultramafic intrusive bodies(bearing rich relict diamonds)in the dase of a platform paaear to be the substrata for the formation of kimberlite-lamproite magma chambers as a result of magmatic replacement.The model explains the polyfacial nature of diamondiferous eclotgites,pyroxenites and peridotites and discusses the process of inheritance of their diamond mineralization by kimberlites and lamproites.Dimond oproductivity of metamorthic complexes is originated by the inheritance of their diamonds from the above-mentioned primary diamondiferous rocks.Large diamondiferous explosive-ring structures were formed by high-energy endogenic explosion of fluid which came from the Earth's core.This high energy differs endogenic impactogenesis from explosive volcanism.It proceeds at very high temperature to create diaplectic galsses(monomineral pseudomorphs)-the product of

  14. Clay minerals and sedimentary basin history

    OpenAIRE

    Merriman, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Clay minerals in the mud and soil that coat the Earth's surface are part of a clay cycle that breaks down and creates rock in the crust. Clays generated by surface weathering and shallow diagenetic processes are transformed into mature clay mineral assemblages in the mudrocks found in sedimentary basins. During metamorphism, the release of alkali elements and boron from clay minerals generates magmas that are subsequently weathered and recycled, representing the magma-to-mud pathway of the cl...

  15. Natural radionuclides in mineral fertilizers and farmland

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Branislava M.; Vitorović Gordana; Andrić Velibor; Stojanović Mirjana; Vitorović Duško; Grdović Svetlana; Vićentijević Mihajlo

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary agriculture production is based on use of mineral fertilizers, which however can have high activity of natural radionuclides and so cause the appearance of technologically elevated radioactivity. In order to determine the influence of mineral fertilizers application in arable land, there was used gamma spectrometric method for defining the activity of natural radionuclides (40 K, 238U, 226Ra) in imported mineral fertilizers as well as in arable...

  16. Dietary Supplements and Sports Performance: Minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Williams Melvin H

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Minerals are essential for a wide variety of metabolic and physiologic processes in the human body. Some of the physiologic roles of minerals important to athletes are their involvement in: muscle contraction, normal hearth rhythm, nerve impulse conduction, oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, enzyme activation, immune functions, antioxidant activity, bone health, and acid-base balance of the blood. The two major classes of minerals are the macrominerals and the trace element...

  17. Inter-species variation in bone mineral

    OpenAIRE

    Beckett, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a complex heterogeneous composite material with organic and inorganic components. The inorganic component; bone mineral, is a poorly crystalline, non-stoichiometric form of calcium hydroxylapatite. A model for the general structure and composition of bone mineral has been established within the literature. However, the nature and extent of variation in bone mineral composition and structure has, to date, been poorly understood. This situation also applies to the general response of bo...

  18. Role of minerals in animal health disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinovec Zlatan J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available All mineral matter, essential or non-essential, can have a significant influence on production results and the health of animals, if large quantities of them are present in a feed ration. A maximally tolerant content depends on the animal specie and category. Many factors, such as physiological status (growth, lactation, etc., nutritive status, content and ratio of nutritive matter in the ration, duration of exposure, and the biological level of utilization of elements, also affect the maximally tolerant content of mineral matter in feed. The content of certain mineral matter in plant feed significantly depends on the soil factor, as well as the content and level of utilization of mineral matter from the soil. Mn, Se and Mo can be present in plant feed in such quantities as to induce toxicosis. Industrial contaminants, Cd, Pb or F, can contaminate plants, in particular their leaves, in quantities which lead to the appearance of clinical signs of conventional toxicosis. Moreover, natural water can contain large quantities of S, F, Na, Mg, or Fe, and certain mineral matter can get into water through industrial waste. In addition to the above, it is possible to cause unwanted effects through the frequent, but primarily unprofessional use of mineral additives, since it is extremely important, besides meeting the mineral requirements of each individual element, to secure a ratio among the mineral matter themselves as well as with other nutritive matter. Mineral matter present in food are in mutual interference, and these relations can be synergistic or antagonistic. The sufficiency of a large number of mineral matter has a negative effect on the utilization of other matter (conditional and/or border deficiency, while certain elements cause the clinical appearance of toxic effects. The accidental intake of large quantities of certain mineral matter is revealed as clinical signs of acute toxicosis, which is very different from chronic effects caused by

  19. Mineral distributions at the developing tendon enthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Schwartz

    Full Text Available Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, "the enthesis". A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. A zone (∼20 µm exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked

  20. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    OpenAIRE

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept behind mineral CO2 sequestration is the mimicking of natural weathering processes in which calcium or magnesium containing minerals react with gaseous CO2 and form solid calcium or magnesium carbonate...

  1. Mineral zircon: A novel thermoluminescence geochronometer

    OpenAIRE

    Van Es, HJ; Vainshtein, DI; De Meijer, RJ; den Hartog, HW; Donoghue, JF; Rozendaal, A.

    2002-01-01

    Mineral zircon contains trace amounts (typically 10-1000 ppm) of the alpha-emitters uranium and thorium, which irradiate this mineral internally. This outstanding feature of zircon turns out to be extremely useful when this mineral is applied as a thermoluminescence (TL) dating medium, because the build-up of the age-dependent luminescence is dominated by the presence of well-defined internal radioactive sources and the contributions to the dose from external radiation sources are two orders ...

  2. Needs and opportunities in mineral evolution research

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, R. M.; Bekker, A.; Bish, D. L.; Bleeker, W.; Downs, R. T.; Farquhar, J.; Ferry, J. M.; Grew, E. S.; Knoll, Andrew Herbert; Papineau, D.; Ralph, J. P.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Valley, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in understanding mineral evolution, Earth’s changing near-surface mineralogy through time, depends on the availability of detailed information on mineral localities of known ages and geologic settings. A comprehensive database including this information, employing the mindat.org web site as a platform, is now being implemented. This resource will incorporate software to correlate a range of mineral occurrences and properties vs. time, and it will thus facilitate studies of the chang-...

  3. World mineral production 2003-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Teresa; Hetherington, Linda; Hannis, Sarah; Bide, Tom; Benham, Antony John; Idoine, Naomi; Lusty, Paul

    2009-01-01

    World Mineral Production includes five year tables of production, by country, for the majority of economically important mineral commodities, including ferrous and non-ferrous metals, industrial minerals and hydrocarbons. Additional information has been added describing the characteristics, uses production trends, prices and industry events for 11 commodities including bauxite/alumina/aluminium, coal, copper, fluorspar, gold, iron ore, lead, nickel, platinum, uranium and zinc.

  4. Mineral elements in milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimun Zamberlin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral elements occur in milk and dairy products as inorganic ions and salts, as well as part of organic molecules, such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. The chemical form of mineral elements is important because it determines their absorption in the intestine and their biological utilization. The mineral composition of milk is not constant because it depends on lactation phase, nutritional status of the animal, and environmental and genetic factors. The objective of this research is to point out the research results of chemical form, content and nutritional importance of individual mineral elements that are present in various milks and dairy products.

  5. Radioactive minerals, collections to be secured

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minerals collected by private collectors or by museums (for example the Paris national museum of natural history, MNHN) can be radioactive. Therefore experts in radiation protection belonging to the IRSN intervene in the concerned premises to assess radiological risks and to propose solutions. The most radioactive minerals may be stored by the ANDRA (ANDRA packages and removes minerals) during works recommended by the IRSN and concerning storage location, coating, and indoor arrangement. Moreover a passive and active dose monitoring is implemented. The article outlines the fact that many rocks may contain uranium. Issues related to risks are evoked. Recommendations regarding mineral handing are proposed

  6. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  7. In Brief: Astronomer honored with a mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-06-01

    ``I have always been very intrigued by minerals, so it is great to be one,'' commented NASA Stardust mission principal investigator and University of Washington astronomer Donald Brownlee, AGU member, after learning the International Mineralogical Association had named a new mineral in his honor. Brownleeite, a combination of manganese and silicon, is the first mineral discovered in a particle from a comet. The mineral was found inside a particle collected by a high-altitude NASA aircraft from a dust stream that entered Earth's atmosphere in 2003. A team led by NASA scientist Keiko Nakamura-Messenger found the particle and had requested that it be named for Brownlee.

  8. Mineral content of commercial pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzáez Villanueva, M T; Díaz Marquina, A; Bravo Serrano, R; Blaźquez Abellán, G

    2001-05-01

    Pollen is a natural product which is extending its marketing day by day, given that it is considered to be a dietetic product and it is consumed everyday by a broad sector of the Spanish population. In its composition it presents valuable nutrients, among which we can find minerals, which is the main object of this study. We have analysed sodium, potassium, magnesium, copper, iron, manganese and zinc in 15 pollen samples which correspond to different brands. The technique we have used is atomic absortion spectroscopy. The results show us the great potassium contribution of this natural product, with values over 400 mg/100 g, and about microelements, mainly iron and zinc, although with different results, depending on the brand which markets it, with average values of 4.01 +/- 1.00 and 3.66 +/- 1.02, respectively. PMID:11400473

  9. Shock waves data for minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  10. Mineral oil biodegradation in wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even in remote areas there has been a constant increase in the demands on the quality of wastewater treatment. Small decentralized purification plants with helophyte beds serving as the biological step may be regarded as an alternative to centralized large-scale treatment plants. Under certain circumstances these constructed wetlands may also be used for industrial wastewater. Pollutants are degraded by microorganisms finding favourable growth conditions in the root zone. Both hydraulic performance and the development of a stable ecosystem may be ensured by certain constructive features. An investigation was carried out on the constructed wetlands of a German steel plant operating since 1984. An analysis of the chemical and microbiological parameters revealed that there was microbial degradation of mineral oil hydrocarbons. (orig.)

  11. mineral sequestration by wollastonite carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenjin; Fu, Liangjie; Ouyang, Jing; Yang, Huaming

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrated a new approach to CO2 mineral sequestration using wollastonite carbonation assisted by sulfuric acid and ammonia. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance. The change in Gibbs free energy from -223 kJ/mol for the leaching reaction of wollastonite to -101 kJ/mol for the carbonation reaction indicated that these two reactions can proceed spontaneously. The leached and carbonated wollastonite showed fibrous bassanite and granular calcium carbonate, respectively, while the crystal structure of pristine wollastonite was destroyed and the majority of the Ca2+ in pristine wollastonite leached. The chemical changes in the phases were monitored during the whole process. A high carbonation rate of 91.1 % could be obtained under the action of sulfuric acid and ammonia at 30 °C at normal atmospheric pressure, indicating its potential use for CO2 sequestration.

  12. Zirconium - an imported mineral commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines Canada's position in regard to the principal zirconium materials: zircon; fusion-cast zirconium-bearing refractory products; zirconium-bearing chemicals; and zirconium metal, master alloys, and alloys. None of these is produced in Canada except fused alumina-zirconia and certain magnesium-zirconium alloys and zirconium-bearing steels. Most of the 3 000-4 000 tonnes of the various forms of zircon believed to be consumed in Canada each year is for foundry applications. Other minerals, notably chromite, olivine and silica sand are also used for these purposes and, if necessary, could be substituted for zircon. Zirconium's key role in Canada is in CANDU nuclear power reactors, where zirconium alloys are essential in the cladding for fuel bundles and in capital equipment such as pressure tubes, calandria tubes and reactivity control mechanisms. If zirconium alloys were to become unavailable, the Canadian nuclear power industry would collapse. As a contingency measure, Ontario Hydro maintains at least nine months' stocks of nuclear fuel bundles. Canada's vulnerability to short-term disruptions to supplies of nuclear fuel is diminished further by the availability of more expensive electricity from non-nuclear sources and, given time, from mothballed thermal plants. Zirconium minerals are present in many countries, notably Australia, the Republic of South Africa and the United States. Australia is Canada's principal source of zircon imports; South Africa is its sole source of baddeleyite. At this time, there are no shortages of either material. Canada has untapped zirconium resources in the Athabasca Oil Sands (zircon) and at Strange Lake along the ill-defined border between Quebec and Newfoundland (gittinsite). Adequate metal and alloy production facilities exist in France, Japan and the United States. No action by the federal government in regard to zirconium supplies is called for at this time

  13. The mineralization and mechanism of the endogenetic mineral deposit in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the process of mineralization, due to the difference in rank, scale and order of structures orebody, mine colomn or rich ore bag are often produced in the specific structural parts. Obviously, it is controlled by favourite structure. The important and direct control of the structure to metal endogenetic mineralization evolution are representative on the affect of pulse action of structure to the multi-stage of mineralization evolution. According to the formation environment of the mineralization, it can be classified as collision orogeny mineralization, release(extension)mineralization, slide draw-division basin mineralization and shear zone extension mineralization. Throng the discuss of endogenetic deposit in the geological evolution, structure and formation machenism, the metallogenic model was preliminary established,and the criteria for delineating favourable metallogenic area was identified. (authors)

  14. Geology, geochemistry, geophysics, mineral occurrences, and mineral resource assessment for the commonwealth of Puerto Rico

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geologic map with faults, along with additional scientific information needed for mineral resource assessment (geochemical analyses, mineral occurrences, geologic...

  15. Aggregate and Mineral Resources, This data set consists of mineral deposit areas (KMDAs) for locatable minerals., Published in 1993, Arizona State Land Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aggregate and Mineral Resources dataset as of 1993. It is described as 'This data set consists of mineral deposit areas (KMDAs) for locatable minerals.'. Data...

  16. Relationship between nanoscale mineral properties and calcein labeling in mineralizing bone surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Aido, Marta; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Hoerth, Rebecca; Burghammer, Manfred; Montero, Cédric; Checa, Sara; Fratzl, Peter; Duda, Georg; Willie, Bettina; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Bone's mineral properties, such as particle thickness and degree of alignment have been associated with bone quality. Bone formation, remodeling, aging of the tissue and mineral homeostasis influence mineral particle properties leading to specific patterns across bone. Scanning small angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) with synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool, which allows us to study bone's nanoscale mineral properties in a position-resolved way. We used sSAXS, fluorescence light microscopy ...

  17. EXTRATERRESTRIAL MINERALS AND FUTURE FRONTIERS IN MINERAL EXPLORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WILMER GIRALDO

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Debido a las altas tasas de consumo de minerales y el alto crecimiento de la población humana, los recursos minerales en el planeta Tierra se encuentran en proceso de agotamiento, esta escasez crea la necesidad de encontrar nuevas alternativas para suplir las crecientes necesidades. Una alternativa adicional a la tradicional búsqueda de nuevos yacimientos en la tierra, es la búsqueda de yacimientos más allá de nuestro planeta, estos nuevos recursos se pueden buscar en la vecindad de nuestro planeta. La extracción en cuerpos de nuestro sistema solar como la Luna, Marte y el cinturón de asteroides puede proporcionar abundantes recursos energéticos como el helio 3 y minerales como el potasio, elementos de tierras raras, hierro y minerales del grupo del platino. Ahora, algunas compañías están planeando esta exploración y para los geólogos y profesionales de la minería en general, esto abre grandes posibilidades para la investigación científica, innovación tecnológica y desarrollo profesional en nuevos campos.

  18. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  19. Current concepts in perinatal mineral metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Yasuhisa; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi

    2016-01-01

    The serum levels of calcium (Ca) and phosphate are maintained higher in the fetus than in the pregnant mother, especially in late gestation, to meet the demands of fetal bone development. In order to maintain this fetal stage-specific mineral homeostasis, the placenta plays a critical role through active transcellular mineral transport. Although the molecular mechanism of transplacental Ca transport has been well studied, little is known about the transport mechanism of phosphate and magnesium. Maternal mineral homeostasis is also altered during pregnancy to supply minerals to the fetus. In the lactating mother, osteocytic osteolysis is suggested to be involved in the supply of minerals to the baby. The levels of some calcitropic and phosphotropic (Ca- and phosphate-regulating, respectively) hormones in the fetus are also different from those in the adult. The PTH level in the fetus is lower than that in the mother and nonpregnant adult. It is suggested, however, that low fetal PTH plays an important role in fetal mineral metabolism. The concentration of PTHrP in the fetus is much higher than that of PTH and plays a critical role in perinatal Ca homeostasis. Uncovering the molecular mechanisms for fetal stage-specific mineral metabolism will lead to better management of perinatal patients with mineral abnormalities. PMID:26865750

  20. Isotope analysis of molybdenum in selected minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical method is described for the mass spectrometric determination of molybdenum abundance values. The results of analyses of three molybdenum mineral samples are presented and compared with the results of other authors. It is shown that the fine variations of molybdenum in natural minerals cannot be analysed with currently available mass spectrometers

  1. Intracellular transport of ions in mineralizing tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study resulted in the development of a new model for bone cell physiology and has provided the means for studying the mechanism and site of action of bone affecting hormones and vitamin metabolites and has provided new information on mechanisms of mineralization and mineralization defects

  2. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew D; Fischer, Philip R; Reed, Ann M; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  3. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  4. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  5. Barrier properties of natural clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Дудар, Т.В.; С.П. Бугера; В.М. Кадошніков; Б.П. Злобенко

    2009-01-01

     Clay minerals is a perfect material for geochemical barrier due to their high water resistivity, plasticity, high sorbing capacity, well developed surface and cheapness in extraction and processing. This work studies the peculiarities of uranium sorbtion on clay minerals on the example of bentonite and palygorskite clay from Cherkassy deposit, and clay usage as a barrier material.

  6. Mineral resources and geo-engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Fathi Habashi

    2015-01-01

    Metals used in everyday life are produced from ores occurring in the Earth’s crust. Geological processes are known to concentrate minerals to form ores of economic value. Mineral processing engineers concentrate these ores by mechanical and physico-chemical methods while the extractive metallurgist extracts the metals by chemical means.

  7. Barrier properties of natural clay minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.В. Дудар

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  Clay minerals is a perfect material for geochemical barrier due to their high water resistivity, plasticity, high sorbing capacity, well developed surface and cheapness in extraction and processing. This work studies the peculiarities of uranium sorbtion on clay minerals on the example of bentonite and palygorskite clay from Cherkassy deposit, and clay usage as a barrier material.

  8. Utilization of mining and mineral wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Ho; Hong, Seung Woong; Choi, Young Yoon; Kim, Byung Gyu; Park, Je Shin [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Up to now, it is estimated that more than 50 million tons of mineral wastes have been generated mining industries and deposited on the land in Korea. Much of cultivated land and hilly areas have been occupied by this wastes, which cause pollution of the environment. Utilization of the mineral wastes is preferable to stabilization because full use would both eliminate the waste and broaden the mineral resource base. Therefore, the development of utilization techniques of mineral wastes is very important not only for improving the environment but also for resource conservation. In countries with high population and poor natural resources like Korea, the utilization of these wastes is essential to decrease the environmental problem and the secure the resources and the study on this field play a important part. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop the utilization techniques of the mineral wastes. In first year's research, the contents and scope of this study are 1) Present condition and Field Survey on the mineral wastes with respect of their utilization, 2) Reviews of Current effects and research to utilize mineral wastes, 3) Characterization of mineral wastes and environmental test, 4) Evaluation and study on the utilization. (author). 67 refs., 25 tabs., 54 figs.

  9. Biochemical bases of mineral waters genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Zhernosekov

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This work directs data about mineral water genesis. The accent on balneological sense is done. We suggest the criteria of biochemical processes estimation which take part in mineral water compounds creation. These criteria can be used for illustration of dependence between waters medical properties and biochemical processes of their genesis.

  10. Earth mineral resource of the month: asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the characteristics and feature of asbestos. According to the author, asbestos is a generic name for six needle-shaped minerals that possess high tensile strengths, flexibility, and resistance to chemical and thermal degradation. These minerals are actinolite, amosite, anthophyllite, chrysolite, crocilodite and tremolite. Asbestos is used for strengthening concrete pipe, plastic components, and gypsum plasters.

  11. Characterization of Mexican zeolite minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    50% of the Mexican territory is formed by volcanic sequences of the Pliocene type, which appear extensively in the northwest states (Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Durango) and west of Mexico (Jalisco and Nayarit), in central Mexico (Zacatecas, Guanajuato, San Luis Potosi, Queretaro, Hidalgo) and south of Mexico (Guerrero, Oaxaca); therefore, it is to be expected that in our country big locations of natural zeolites exist in its majority of the clinoptilolite type. The present study was focused toward the characterization of two Mexican natural zeolite rocks presumably of the clinoptilolite and filipsite types, one of them comes from the state of Chihuahua and the other of a trader company of non metallic minerals, due that these materials are not characterized, its are not known their properties completely and therefore, the uses that can be given to these materials. In this investigation work it was carried out the characterization of two Mexican zeolite rocks, one coming from the Arroyo zone, municipality of La Haciendita, in the state of Chihuahua; and the other one was bought to a trader company of non metallic minerals. The two zeolites so much in their natural form as conditioned with sodium; they were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum and elementary microanalysis (EDS), surface area analysis (BET), thermal gravimetric analysis. To differentiate the heulandite crystalline phase of the other clinoptilolite rock, its were carried out thermal treatments. The quantification of Al, Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe was carried out in solution, by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy and the quantity of Si was determined by gravimetry. The zeolite rocks presented for the major part the crystalline heulandite and clinoptilolite phases for the most part, and it was found that the zeolite coming from the state of Chihuahua possesses a bigger content of heulandite and the denominated filipsite it is really a zeolite

  12. Aluminium Phosphate Sulfate minerals (APS): Some markers of paleoconditions in unconformity related uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the mineralized and anomalous zones, APS from the Athabasca basin are LREE poorer than APS from the Kombolgie basin. Conversely, in barren areas, APS from the Athabasca basin are closer to the svanbergite pole than APS from the Kombolgie basin. 1- illite + (Sr, S)-rich APS (APS1) ± hematite, in the sandstone, several tens of meters far away above the unconformity. 2- illite + sudoite + APS2 ± hematite, on both sides of the unconformity and close to the regional faults that reworked both sandstone and the basement rocks above and below the unconformity. 3- massive trioctahedral chlorite ± (LREE, P)-rich APS (APS3) ± apatite ± uraninite, close to the uranium deposits. A thermodynamic study on the stability domains of the APS minerals solid solution series has been investigated in the thermal conditions prevailing during the U ore deposition in order to correlate their crystal-chemistry according to pH, Eh or elements activities like strontium or cerium and then to precise the origin of strontium and the conditions of formation of the three different identified APS minerals. Gibbs free energies of the APS are estimated. Entropy, heat capacity are estimated by the Helgeson's algorithm from measured values of alunite. Solubility products of these APS are then calculated by the Johnson's code SUPCRT92 at 200 deg C and 600 bars. A first simulation has been done to illustrate diagenetic environments far away from the uranium deposits in a barren sandstone area. This study has been realized with the KINDIS software which simulate the dissolution of minerals in a given solution and calculate the mass balance versus the reaction progress. The modal composition of the rocks has been chosen in agreement with the mineralogy of a sandstone only affected by an early diagenesis (95% quartz, 2% kaolinite, 2% K-feldspar, pyrite and hematite, monazite, apatite 1. The evolution of saturation index (Log Q/K) for the selected minerals versus the reaction progress is displayed. The late

  13. Biohydrometallurgy for nonsulfidic minerals - A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, N.; Sharma, D.K. [Indian Institute of Technology of Delhi, New Delhi (India). Center for Energy Studies

    2004-05-01

    Bioleaching is a technology applicable to metal extraction from low-grade ores, ore beneficiation, coal beneficiation, metal detoxification, and recovery of metals from waste materials. The technology is environmentally sound and it may lower operational cost and energy requirement. Whereas leaching of sulfidic minerals using chemolithoautotrophic bacteria is the most studied and commercially exploitable aspect of mineral biotechnology today, there is a dearth of literature on the dissolution of nonsulfidic minerals. Biohydrometallurgy of nonsulfidic minerals involves the action of heterotrophic microorganisms. Heterotrophic bacteria and fungi have the potential for producing acidic metabolites that are able to solubilize oxide, silicate, carbonate and hydroxide minerals by reduction, acidolysis and complexation mechanisms. It is an important aspect of biohydrometallugy that requires development to meet future needs.

  14. Phosphorus removal by powdered minerals in wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Y.; Nakai, T.; Sato, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Murayama, K.; Hirai, M. (National Research Institute for Pollution and Resources, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1991-09-25

    In this paper, removal of phosphate in wastewater, which is one of the main nutrients, has been investigated. Various powdered minerals were tested for whether they had abilities as adsorbents for phosphate. For experiments, solution samples of HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} were used. Magnetite, apatite, dolomite, cristobalite, silica, alumina, coal ash, halloysite, quartz, diatomaceous earth, kaolinite, and feldsper were used as powdered minerals. Various dosages of a powdered mineral and a reagent were added to the solutions. These were agitated using a stirrer, and after that, they were analyzed. Consequently, each mineral did not show any good removal ability for HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} by only themselved. Those minerals with Ca{sup 2{plus}} also did not show any good removal abilities for HPO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} only except dolomite. Dolomite with Ca{sub 2{plus}} showed a high removal rate of above 95%. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Thermoelastic properties of minerals at high temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Upadhyay; Hem Chandra; Meenakashi Joshi; Deepika P Joshi

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of elasticity of the minerals is useful for interpreting the structure and composition of the lower mantle and also in seismic studies. The purpose of the present study is to discuss a simple and straightforward method for evaluating thermoelastic properties of minerals at high temperatures. We have extended the Kumar’s formulation by taking into the account the concept of anharmonicity in minerals above the Debye temperature (D). In our present study, we have investigated the thermophysical properties of two minerals (pyrope-rich garnet and MgAl2O4) under high temperatures and calculated the second-order elastic constant () and bulk modulus (T) of the above minerals, in two cases first by taking Anderson–Gruneisen parameter (T) as temperature-independent and then by treating T as temperature-dependent parameter. The results obtained when T is temperature-dependent are in close agreement with experimental data.

  16. Mechanisms of submicron inclusion re-equilibration during host mineral deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Thomas; Habler, Gerlinde; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Both brittle and ductile deformation can facilitate re-equilibration of mineral inclusions. The presence of inclusions also influences stress and strain distribution in the host. The processes governing feedbacks between brittle deformation, ductile deformation, and inclusion re-equilibration have been studied using unique microstructures in Permian meta-pegmatite garnets from the Koralpe, Eastern Alps, Austria. Sampled almandine-spessartine garnets contain highly abundant submicron-sized inclusions, which originated during or subsequent to magmatic garnet growth. The Permian magmatic assemblages were affected by eclogite facies metamorphism during the Cretaceous tectono-metamorphic event. The meta-pegmatite garnet deformed crystal-plastically at this metamorphic stage (Bestmann et al. 2008) and the host-inclusion system was affected by partial recrystallization. Trails of coarser inclusions (1-10µm diameter) crosscut the magmatic submicron inclusion density zoning in the garnet, defining curviplanar geometrical surfaces in 3D. In 10-40µm broad 'bleaching zones' flanking inclusion trails, the original ≤1µm sized inclusions are not seen in the optical microscope or SEM, however inclusions <100nm are still abundant in TEM foils from these areas. From their microstructural characteristics it is inferred that the trails formed at sites of healed brittle cracks. FEG-microprobe data showed that inclusion-trails and associated bleaching zones can be formed isochemically, although some trails showed non-isochemical coarsening. In both cases no change in garnet major element composition was observed. EBSD mapping revealed two phenomena that were investigated by cutting targeted TEM foils. Firstly, bleaching zones are associated with systematic very low angle (ca. 0.5°) garnet lattice orientation changes along discrete boundaries. TEM foils transecting such a boundary show a lower concentration of dislocations than expected for the lattice rotation inferred from EBSD

  17. Feldspar minerals as efficient deposition ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Yakobi-Hancock

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dusts are well known to be efficient ice nuclei, where the source of this efficiency has typically been attributed to the presence of clay minerals such as illite and kaolinite. However, the ice nucleating abilities of the more minor mineralogical components have not been as extensively examined. As a result, the deposition ice nucleation abilities of 24 atmospherically-relevant mineral samples have been studied, using a continuous flow diffusion chamber at −40.0 ± 0.3 °C. The same particle size (200 nm and particle preparation procedure were used throughout. The ice nucleation behaviour of the pure minerals is compared to that of complex mixtures, such as Arizona Test Dust (ATD and Mojave Desert Dust (MDD, and to lead iodide, which has been previously proposed for cloud seeding. Lead iodide was the most efficient ice nucleus (IN, requiring a critical relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi of 122.0 ± 2.0% to activate 0.1% of the particles. MDD (RHi 126.3 ± 3.4% and ATD (RHi 129.5 ± 5.1% have lower but comparable activity. From a set of clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, non-clay minerals (e.g. hematite, magnetite, calcite, cerussite, quartz, and feldspar minerals (orthoclase, plagioclase present in the atmospheric dusts it was found that the feldspar minerals (particularly orthoclase, and not the clays, were the most efficient ice nuclei. Orthoclase and plagioclase were found to have critical RHi values of 127.1 ± 6.3% and 136.2 ± 1.3%, respectively. The presence of feldspars (specifically orthoclase may play a significant role in the IN behaviour of mineral dusts despite their lower percentage in composition relative to clay minerals.

  18. Dietary mineral supplies in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Edward J M; Ander, E Louise; Young, Scott D; Black, Colin R; Watts, Michael J; Chilimba, Allan D C; Chilima, Benson; Siyame, Edwin W P; Kalimbira, Alexander A; Hurst, Rachel; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Stein, Alexander J; Gibson, Rosalind S; White, Philip J; Broadley, Martin R

    2014-07-01

    Dietary micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs) are widespread, yet their prevalence can be difficult to assess. Here, we estimate MND risks due to inadequate intakes for seven minerals in Africa using food supply and composition data, and consider the potential of food-based and agricultural interventions. Food Balance Sheets (FBSs) for 46 countries were integrated with food composition data to estimate per capita supply of calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), iodine (I), magnesium (Mg), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), and also phytate. Deficiency risks were quantified using an estimated average requirement (EAR) 'cut-point' approach. Deficiency risks are highest for Ca (54% of the population), followed by Zn (40%), Se (28%) and I (19%, after accounting for iodized salt consumption). The risk of Cu (1%) and Mg (risks are generally lower in the north and west of Africa. Multiple MND risks are high in many countries. The population-weighted mean phytate supply is 2770 mg capita(-1) day(-1). Deficiency risks for Fe are lower than expected (5%). However, 'cut-point' approaches for Fe are sensitive to assumptions regarding requirements; e.g. estimates of Fe deficiency risks are 43% under very low bioavailability scenarios consistent with high-phytate, low-animal protein diets. Fertilization and breeding strategies could greatly reduce certain MNDs. For example, meeting HarvestPlus breeding targets for Zn would reduce dietary Zn deficiency risk by 90% based on supply data. Dietary diversification or direct fortification is likely to be needed to address Ca deficiency risks. PMID:24524331

  19. Surface mining of mineral resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeunig, H.D.

    1982-05-01

    This article outlines general advantages of surface mining technology and aspects of selecting the most suitable mining technology in surface mine projection. Heavy surface mining equipment of the TAKRAF engineering plants is recommended for efficient excavation and overburden removal up to 230,000 m/sup 3/d capacity with the largest excavator type and 440,000 m/sup 3/d capacity with the largest overburden conveyor bridge. Two major variants of surface mine technology are outlined: design of surface mines with continuous working equipment (bucket wheel or bucket chain excavators requiring up to 200 N/cm digging force for minerals and overburden and haulage by belt conveyors) or discontinuously working equipment (dragline excavators, truck transportation, etc.). The second major variant concerns overburden removal to the spoil bank, either by haulage in a semicircle around the pit or by a shortcut across the pit from the excavation to the spoil bank side (direct spoil removal method). TAKRAF equipment for surface mining operations is described with various specifications and details on its performance. (In German)

  20. 30 CFR 256.80 - Leases of other minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leases of other minerals. 256.80 Section 256.80 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Section 6 Leases § 256.80 Leases of other minerals....

  1. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  2. Some Key Features and Possible Origin of the Metamorphic Rock-Hosted Gold Mineralization in Buru Island, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arifudin Idrus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.172This paper discusses characteristics of some key features of the primary Buru gold deposit as a tool for a better understanding of the deposit genesis. Currently, about 105,000 artisanal and small-scale gold miners (ASGM are operating in two main localities, i.e. Gogorea and Gunung Botak by digging pits/shafts following gold-bearing quartz vein orientation. The gold extraction uses mercury (amalgamation and cyanide processing. The field study identifies two types/generations of quartz veins namely (1 Early quartz veins which are segmented, sigmoidal, dis­continous, and parallel to the foliation of host rock. The quartz vein is lack of sulfides, weak mineralized, crystalline, relatively clear, and maybe poor in gold, and (2 Quartz veins occurred within a ‘mineralized zone’ of about 100 m in width and ~1,000 m in length. The gold mineralization is strongly overprinted by an argillic alteration zone. The mineralization-alteration zone is probably parallel to the mica schist foliation and strongly controlled by N-S or NE-SW-trending structures. The gold-bearing quartz veins are characterized by banded texture particularly colloform following host rock foliation and sulphide banding, brecciated, and rare bladed-like texture. The alteration types consist of propylitic (chlorite, calcite, sericite, argillic, and carbonation represented by graphite banding and carbon flakes. The ore mineralization is characterized by pyrite, native gold, pyrrhotite, and arsenopyrite. Cinnabar, stibnite, chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite are rare or maybe absent. In general, sulphide minerals are rare (<3%. Fifteen rock samples were collected in Wamsaid area for geochemical assaying for Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Eleven of fifteen samples yielded more than 1.00 g/t Au, in which six of them are in excess of 3.00 g/t Au. It can be noted that all high-grade samples are originally or containing limonitic materials, that suggest

  3. Characteristics of ophiolite-related metamorphic rocks in the Beysehir ophiolitic mélange (Central Taurides, Turkey), deduced from whole rock and mineral chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Delaloye, Michel F.

    2006-04-01

    Small outcrops of the metamorphic rocks of the Beysehir ophiolite appear to the west of Gencek and to the south of Durak (South of Beysehir Lake) in the Central Tauride Belt in Turkey. Amphibolitic rocks in the ophiolitic mélange have an igneous origin. Protoliths of these rocks were probably alkali basalts, gabbros or some ultramafic cumulates, such as pyroxenite. The amphibolites of the Beysehir Ophiolite can be divided into four groups: (1) amphibole+garnet+plagioclase±epidote (as secondary minerals)±opaque such as ilmenite±accessory minerals such as sphene and apatite; (2) amphibole+pyroxene+plagioclase±epidote±accessory minerals such as sphene, apatite±chlorite, calcite (as secondary mineral); (3) amphibole±plagioclase±opaque±accessory minerals; (4) amphibole+plagioclase±epidote±biotite and muscovite±opaque±accessory minerals. These metamorphic rocks show mainly granoblastic, grano-nematoblastic, porphyroblastic and/or poikiloblastic textures. All amphiboles in the amphibolites are calcic and cluster in the range from magnesio-hastingsite, pargasite to actinolite. Amphibole compositions are characterized by SiO 2=(38.02-54.3%), Al 2O 3=(1.5-12.8), FeO=(10.03-14.67%), K 2O=(0.2-1.8%), MgO=(5.5-15.7), Mg*=(0.3-0.8). The amphibolites show an alkaline to subalkaline character. However, the primitive mantle normalized incompatible trace element diagram shows close similarity with the typical ocean island basalt (OIB) pattern. The Rock/Chondrite normalized REE diagram of the amphibolites also confirms their OIB signature. Tectonomagmatic discrimination diagrams based on the immobile trace elements suggest a mostly within-plate alkali basalt (WPB) environment. Beysehir ophiolitic mélange contains amphibolites from ophiolite-related metamorphic rocks, but the matrix of the Beysehir ophiolitic mélange is not metamorphosed. Blocks of metamorphic rocks and the ophiolitic rocks may have been incorporated into the ophiolitic mélange in an oceanic

  4. Stable isotope systematics and fluid inclusion studies in the Cu-Au Visconde deposit, Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil: implications for fluid source generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Silva, Antonia Railine; Villas, Raimundo Netuno Nobre; Lafon, Jean-Michel; Craveiro, Gustavo Souza; Ferreira, Valderez Pinto

    2015-06-01

    The Cu-Au Visconde deposit is located in the Carajás Mineral Province (CMP), northern Brazil, near the contact between the ca. 2.76 Ga metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Itacaiunas Supergroup rocks and the ~3.0 Ga granitic-gneissic basement. It is hosted by mylonitized Archean rocks, mainly metadacites, the Serra Dourada granite, and gabbros/diorites, which have been successively altered by sodic, sodic-calcic-magnesian, potassic, and calcic-magnesian hydrothermal processes, producing diverse mineralogical associations (albite-scapolite; albite-actinolite-scapolite-epidote; K-feldspar-biotite; chlorite-actinolite-epidote-calcite, etc.). Chalcopyrite is the dominant ore mineral and occurs principally in breccias and veins/veinlets. The aqueous fluids responsible for the alteration/mineralization were initially hot (>460 °C) and very saline (up to 58 wt.% equivalent (equiv.) NaCl), but as the system evolved, they experienced successive dilution processes. Mineral oxygen and hydrogen isotope data show that 18O-rich ( to +9.4 ‰) fluids prevailed in the earlier alteration (including magnetitites) and reached temperatures as high as 410-355 °C. Metamorphic/formation waters, most likely derived from the Carajás Basin rocks, appear to have contributed a major component to the fluid composition, although some magmatic input cannot be discounted. In turn, the later alterations and the mineralization involved cooler (<230 °C), 18O-depleted ( to +3.7 ‰) and less saline (7-30 wt.% equiv. NaCl) fluids, indicating the influx of meteoric water. Fluid dilution and cooling might have caused abundant precipitation of sulfides, especially as breccia cement. Ore δ 34 S values (+0.5 to +3.4 ‰) suggest a magmatic source for sulfur (from sulfide dissolution in pre-existing igneous rocks). The chalcopyrite Pb-Pb ages (2.73 ± 0.15 and 2.74 ± 0.10 Ga) indicate that the Visconde mineralization is Neoarchean, rather than Paleoproterozoic as previously considered. If so, the

  5. Mineral Occurrence, Translocation, and Weathering in Soils Developed on Four Types of Carbonate and Non-carbonate Alluvial Fan Deposits in Mojave Desert, Southeastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; McDonald, E. V.

    2007-12-01

    Soil geomorphology and mineralogy can reveal important clues about Quaternary climate change and geochemical process occurring in desert soils. We investigated (1) the mineral transformation in desert soils developed on four types of alluvial fans (carbonate and non-carbonate) under the same conditions of climate and landscape evolution; and (2) the effects of age, parent materials, and eolian processes on the transformation and translocation of the minerals. Four types of alluvial-fan deposits along the Providence Mountains piedmonts, Mojave Desert, southeastern California, USA were studied: (1) carbonate rocks, primarily limestone and marble (LS), (2) fine-grained rhyodacite and rhyolitic tuff mixed with plutonic and carbonate rocks (VX), (3) fine- to coarse- grained mixed plutonic (PM) rocks, and (4) coarse-grained quartz monzonite (QM). These juxtaposed fan deposits are physically correlated in a small area (about 20 km by 15 km) and experienced the same climatic changes in the late Pleistocene and Holocene. The soils show characteristic mineral compositions of arid/semiarid soils: calcite is present in nearly all of the samples, and a few of the oldest soils contain gypsum and soluble salts. Parent material has profound influence on clay mineral composition of the soils: (1) talc were observed only in soils developed on the volcanic mixture fan deposits, and talc occurs in all horizons; (2) palygorskite occur mainly in the petrocalcic (Bkm) of old soils developed on the LS and VX fan deposits, indicating pedogenic origin; (3) chlorite was observed mainly in soils developed on VX fan deposits (all ages) and on some LS deposits, but it is absent in soils developed on PM and QM fan deposits; and (4) vermiculite was common throughout soils developed on plutonic rock fan deposits. These mineralogical differences suggest that minerals in the soils are primarily inherited from their parent materials and that mineral weathering in this area was weak. Except the

  6. Authigenic minerals: Biologically influenced and induced organomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Organominerals are minerals precipitated by interactions with organic matter without enzymatic control. Organomineralization of authigenic carbonate minerals depends on two key components: (1) the "carbonate alkalinity engine" impacting the calcium carbonate saturation index and (2) the organic matrix comprised of extracellular organic matter (EOM), which provides a template for carbonate nucleation. The alkalinity engine can be "intrinsic" when microbial metabolisms increase supersaturation or lower the kinetic barrier of precipitation, or "extrinsic" when the physicochemical environment creates the conditions for mineral formation. The organic matrix produced by various communities within the microbial mats is known to influence nucleation, morphology and mineralogy of minerals through binding of cations. By playing with these two key components, three types of authigenic minerals can be formed: (1) a purely physicochemical precipitation on an abiotic substrate, (2) a precipitation "influenced" by the presence of an organic matrix but resulting from a physicochemical forcing (environmentally driven), or (3) a "microbially-induced" precipitation, in which both supersaturation and organic matrix are resulting from microbial activity. In this keynote, we will review important processes involved in the precipitation of authigenic carbonate minerals in modern microbial mats and open the discussion on the potential use of authigenic carbonate minerals as biosignatures in the fossil record.

  7. 43 CFR Appendix F to Part 2 - Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands-Special Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing... 2—Mineral Leasing Act and Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands—Special Rules (a) Definitions. As... conduct coal exploration operations on land subject to the Mineral Leasing Act, under 30 U.S.C. 201(b),...

  8. Mineral supplementation of low quality roughages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineral concentrations in low quality roughages (LQRs) are often low and availability for absorption has often been presumed to be low. However, radioisotope dilution studies have shown that the fraction of P in rice bran, wheat bran and barley straw which is available is surprisingly high (0.57-0.72). Chemical processing ought to improve the release of minerals from LQR in the rumen but possible effects of the chemicals on the absorption and retention of the released mineral make it impossible to predict net effects on the mineral status of animals. Effects of physical processing have received little attention but are probably small and not worth pursuing. Supplementation of LQRs with energy and protein may indirectly enhance Mg and Zn absorption respectively and improve intakes of minerals by increasing food intake. However, feeding LQRs will increase the faecal endogenous losses and hence maintenance requirements for P, Ca and possibly other elements. Improving the quality of LQRs by improving their digestibility may further increase both maintenance needs and negative balances by increasing food intake. Because of uncertainties in the stated mineral requirements of ruminants, in the ability of LQRs to meet those needs and in the capacity of animals to adapt to deficient diets, production responses cannot be predicted: responses to mineral supplementation in long term feeding trials are the best guide to the need to supplement. The ideal method is conservative supplementation of complete diets based on LQRs with all essential minerals at the time of treatment with energy and protein. The need to supplement may be greater in the field than in experiments because parasitic infections increase mineral requirements. (author). 46 refs, 3 tabs

  9. Rheology of unstable mineral emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolović Dunja S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the rheology of mineral oils and their unstable water emulsion were investigated. The oil samples were domestic crude oil UA, its fractions UA1, UA4 and blend semi-product UP1, while the concentration of oil in water emulsions was in the range from 1 up to 30%. The results were analyzed based on shear stress. The oil samples UA, UA1 and UP1 are Newtonian fluids, while UA4 is pseudoplastic fluid. The samples UA and UA4 show higher value of shear stress (83.75 Pa, 297 Pa, then other two samples UA1 and UP1 (18.41 Pa, 17.52 Pa. Rheology of investigated oils due to its complex chemical composition should be analyzed as a simultaneous effect of all their components. Therefore, structural composition of the oils was determined, namely content of paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and asphaltenes. All samples contain paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics but only oils UA and UA4 contain asphaltenes as well. All investigated emulsions except 30% EUA4 are Newtonian fluids. The EUA4 30% emulsion shows pseudoplastic behaviour, and it is the only 30% emulsion among investigated ones that achieves lower shear stress then its oil. The characteristics of oil samples that could have an influence on their properties and their emulsion rheology, were determined. These characteristics are: neutralization number, interfacial tension, dielectric constant, and emulsivity. Oil samples UA and UA4 have significantly higher values of neutralization number, dielectric constants, and emulsivity. The sample UA has the lowest value of interface tension and the greatest emulsivity, indicating that this oil, among all investigated, has the highest preference for building emulsion. This could be the reason why 20% and 30% emulsions of the oil UA achieve the highest shear stress among all investigated emulsions.

  10. The DataMiner manager Web interface

    OpenAIRE

    Panichi, Giancarlo; Coro, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    In this document we describe the DataMiner Manager Web interface that allows interacting with the gCube DataMiner service. DataMiner is a cross-usage service that provides users and services with tools for performing data mining operations. Specifically, it offers a unique access to perform data mining and statistical operations on heterogeneous data, which may reside either at client side, in the form of comma-separated values files, or be remotely hosted, possibly in a database. The DataMin...

  11. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.; Kralik, M.; Taylor, B.E.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses.

  12. World mineral exploration trends and economic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects and methodologies presented in this book vary from the presentation of a heretofore unavailable collection of data on worldwide mineral exploration to case studies of mineral exploration in the developing countries of Botswana and Papua New Guinea to a study of the economic productivity of base metal exploration in Australia and Canada. Some authors concentrate on particular actors or participants in the exploration process, such as major mining companies, while other focus on a particular country such as the Soviet Union, France, or South Africa. Most chapters deal with exploration for nonfuel minerals, and particularly metals, although some take in uranium and coal exploration; oil and gas exploration is specifically excluded

  13. Uranyl adsorption at clay mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesch, N.

    2014-07-01

    This first exemplary survey of actinide adsorption at complex clay mineral surfaces, which provided new insights at the atomic level, will be extended to other pertinent adsorbates like neptunyl NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and more complex minerals like iron-substituted phyllosilicates. In this way we will check if the concepts developed so far can be applied more generally, to support the interpretation of upcoming experiments. An essential facet of these studies will be to account also for the dynamical nature of the mineral/water interface by means of exemplary dynamical simulations. (orig.)

  14. Ostwald ripening of clays and metamorphic minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, D D; Sacuterodonacute, J; Kralik, M; Taylor, B E; Peterman, Z E

    1990-04-27

    Analyses of particle size distributions indicate that clay minerals and other diagenetic and metamorphic minerals commonly undergo recrystallization by Ostwald ripening. The shapes of their particle size distributions can yield the rate law for this process. One consequence of Ostwald ripening is that a record of the recrystallization process is preserved in the various particle sizes. Therefore, one can determine the detailed geologic history of clays and other recrystallized minerals by separating, from a single sample, the various particle sizes for independent chemical, structural, and isotopic analyses. PMID:17815598

  15. Characterization of minerals, metals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Bai, Chengguang; Carpenter, John; Cai, Mingdong; Firrao, Donato; Kim, Byoung-Gon

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference contains chapters on all aspects of the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials. The title presents papers from one of the largest yearly gatherings of materials scientists in the world and thoroughly discusses the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials The scope includes current industrial applications and research and developments in the following areas:  Characterization of Ferrous Metals Characterization of Non-Ferrous Materials Characterization of Minerals and Ceramics Character

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in ore miners of Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot study was performed in which the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners in ore mines located in Central Slovakia was monitored and related to lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. The conclusions drawn from the results of the study were as follows: the counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners were significantly higher than in an age matched control group of white-collar staff; the higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; a dependence of chromosomal aberration counts on the exposure to radon could not be assessed. (A.K.)

  17. Recovery modelling and water resources of the abandoned open-pit talc-chlorite-feldspar mine excavations at Lasasai-Bonucoro,Central Sardinia,Italy%意大利撒丁岛中部Lasasai-Bonucoro地区的废弃露天滑石-绿泥石-长石采矿场的水资源及其修复模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maddalena FIORI; Carlo MATZUZZI

    2004-01-01

    In the district of Orani, central Sardinia, several talc-chlorite-feldspar bodies, hosted in Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks and granites, have long been mined by open- pit operations. The mining activity has deeply modified the original landscape of the Lasasai-Bonucoro area. Thus the rearrangement of this area, in particular of the open-pit works that are now occupied by newly formed pools, filled with water from aquifers flowing along faults crossed by mining operations, should be considered as an overall project of landscape restoration. In the first phase of this work, the environmental and hydrogeological characterisation and the general definition of different zones characterised by different sets of intervention operations has already been made. The following step will include the detailed definition of the different technological interventions to be performed. In order to attain a rehabilitation of this area, first of all the interventions will include: 1) smoothing and re-modelling of local morphology in its still rough sites, namely a few points of the mine benches and dumps, by removing the volumes in excess and settling them again in the hollows, on the base of the indications obtained from opportunely plotted sections; 2) restoration of the removed soil covers, and rehabilitation of the newly formed surfaces after waste disposal, trough re-vegetation techniques including settlement of vegetal soil and nutrients, herbaceous essence hydrosowing, temporary automatic sprinkling; 3) rehabilitation of the corrected slopes, and in general of the remaining poorly vegetated surfaces, trough the above re-vegetation techniques.The above operations will result in a slightly modified plane-altimetrical and landscape arrangement. However these interventions will be sufficient to reach a new environmental qualification, characterised by several opportunities of exploitation. Particular conditions, such as the constant outflow of good-quality water and the amenity of

  18. Minerals safeguarding areas for Shropshire and Telford & Wrekin

    OpenAIRE

    Newsham, R.; Hough, E.; Morigi, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    Minerals Policy Statement 1: Planning and Minerals (DCLG, November 2006) requires all Mineral Planning Authorities to define Mineral Safeguarding Areas (MSA’s). This report describes work carried out by the British Geological Survey on behalf of Shropshire County Council and Telford & Wrekin Council to delineate Mineral Safeguarding Areas in Shropshire, Telford & Wrekin. The report uses the methodology outlined in “A guide to mineral safeguarding in England” (McEvoy et al., 200...

  19. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Kirkpatrick, R. James

    1999-07-19

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation.

  20. Mineral Resource Data System: Conterminous US

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — MRDS describes metallic and nonmetallic mineral resources throughout the world. Included are deposit name, location, commodity, deposit description, geologic...

  1. Effects of earthworms on nitrogen mineralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, J.J.G.M.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.; Blair, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris and Aporrectodea tuberculata) on the rate of net N mineralization was studied, both in soil with intact soil structure (partly influenced by past earthworm activity) and in columns with sieved soil

  2. Contribution to the knowledge of metamict minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The used techniques in different analysis about metamict minerals, its results and conclusions. These samples went on Minas Gerais State, and they belong at the mineralogical collection of National Museum is presented. (C.M.)

  3. NOAA and MMS Marine Minerals Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Minerals Geochemical Database was created by NGDC as a part of a project to construct a comprehensive computerized bibliography and geochemical database...

  4. Sorption Energy Maps of Clay Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A molecular-level understanding of mineral-water interactions is critical for the evaluation and prediction of the sorption properties of clay minerals that may be used in various chemical and radioactive waste disposal methods. Molecular models of metal sorption incorporate empirical energy force fields, based on molecular orbital calculations and spectroscopic data, that account for Coulombic, van der Waals attractive, and short-range repulsive energies. The summation of the non-bonded energy terms at equally-spaced grid points surrounding a mineral substrate provides a three dimensional potential energy grid. The energy map can be used to determine the optimal sorption sites of metal ions on the exposed surfaces of the mineral. By using this approach, we have evaluated the crystallographic and compositional control of metal sorption on the surfaces of kaolinite and illite. Estimates of the relative sorption energy and most stable sorption sites are derived based on a rigid ion approximation

  5. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  6. Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C, D and E. Examples of minerals are zinc, iron and copper. They help your body use ... from your food. Some phosphorus binder medications contain calcium. They can give you extra calcium if you ...

  7. Major mineral deposits of the world

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Regional locations and general geologic setting of known deposits of major nonfuel mineral commodities. Originally compiled in five parts by diverse authors,...

  8. The Minerals of Candor Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) took this image of sulfate- and pyroxene-containing deposits in the Candor Chasma region of Mars at 0747 UTC (2:47 a.m. EST) on December 2, 2006, near 6.7 degrees south latitude, 75.8 degrees west longitude. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The image is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) wide at its narrowest point. Candor Chasma is a deep, elongated, steep-sided depression some 813 kilometers (505 miles) long. It is one of two large chasmata that make up the northern end of the Valles Marineris system. The top panel in the montage above illustrates the location of CRISM data on a mosaic taken by the Mars Odyssey spacecraft's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). CRISM data cover an area centered on the southwestern part of Candor Chasma, where highland crust was depressed by faulting and buried by a kilometers-thick stack of layered deposits. The bottom two images are views of CRISM data. The lower left image is an infrared false color image, while at lower right is a spectral image that illustrates the distribution of sulfates in the layered deposits, the olivine and pyroxene that make up the faulted highland crust, and high-calcium pyroxene in the highland crust. The northern part of CRISM's data swath covers interior deposits formed after the canyon floor was faulted and depressed. This lighter region in the infrared image at lower left exhibits the spectral signatures of sulfates (blues) in the CRISM spectral image at lower right. The southern end of CRISM's data reveals volcanic minerals (pyroxene and olivine) that make up the older, underlying highland crust. The strongest signature comes from the common diopside-hedenbergite series of pyroxenes a group of silicate materials rich in iron, magnesium, and calcium. CRISM is one of six science instruments on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Led by The

  9. Geochronologic studies in the Grants mineral belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geologic observation coupled with radiometric age dating can be used to assess ages of ore formation and, in some cases, ages of sedimentation in the Grants mineral belt. Rb-Sr studies indicate the earliest mineralization is trend ore at Ambrosia Lake and Smith Lake, dated at 139 +- 9.5 m.y. This date is similar to that for barren-rock montmorillonite from the Jackpile sandstone (Late Jurassic): 142 +- 14 m.y.; it may be used, with caution, to indicate the minimum age of sedimentation for the Morrison Formation. Geologic evidence indicates epigenetic rather than syngenetic ore formation. Barren-rock montmorillonites from Ambrosia Lake yield a poorly defined isochron of 132 +- 26 m.y. Early formed ore at the Jackpile-Paguate mine, Laguna district, was remobilized and reprecipitated at 113 +- 7 m.y. This date is older than the range of dates for the Dakota Formation (Cretaceous) and Mancos Shale. The 113 +- 7 m.y. mid-Cretaceous date for the Jackpile-Paguate ore is consistent with geologic evidence; geologic control suggests that other ore deposits are post-Late Jurassic but pre-Dakota Formation. Based on geologic evidence, mineralization in the Dakota Formation is thought to be very young. Laramide mineralization (60 to 70 m.y.) is evidenced by the presence of some stack ore. At least one uranium deposit, located partly in oxidized ground at the main redox front of the Grants mineral belt, may represent Tertiary mineralization; the clay-mineral Rb-Sr systematics of this deposit have been severely perturbed. Younger mineralization is indicated by U-Pb dates on uranophane (9 to 10 m.y.), and Pleistocene mineralization is noted for some ore. U-Pb dates of U4+ -rich ore minerals cluster between 80 and 100 m.y., although some are as old as 140 to 150 m.y. K-Ar dates on clay minerals range from 49 to 138 m.y. The reasons for this scatter are not known, although loss of radiogenic 40Ar due to burial is probable

  10. Industrial mineral powder production in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The recent annual output of major industrial mineral powders in the mainland of China has been more than 100 million t, accompanied by active development of such supporting technology as comminution, classification, separation/purification, and surface modification. In particular, the present paper reviews technologies for preparing ultra-fine particles involving dry and wet processing, modification and composition, calcination of kaolin clay, and processing of spherical/acerous industrial minerals.

  11. Surface geochemistry of the clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Sposito, Garrison; Skipper, Neal T.; Sutton, Rebecca; Park, Sung-Ho; Soper, Alan K.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    1999-01-01

    Clay minerals are layer type aluminosilicates that figure in terrestrial biogeochemical cycles, in the buffering capacity of the oceans, and in the containment of toxic waste materials. They are also used as lubricants in petroleum extraction and as industrial catalysts for the synthesis of many organic compounds. These applications derive fundamentally from the colloidal size and permanent structural charge of clay mineral particles, which endow them with significant ...

  12. Structure and theoretical calculations of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and spectroscopic methods are combined to determine the full structure, including hydrogen atom positions, of dickite, which is a member of the kaolin group. Using the structural information obtained, quantum chemical calculations are performed on these kaolin group minerals. Special emphasis is laid on the relationship between the experimentally derived structure and theory. Finally, the application of quantum chemical methods to study clay minerals at several levels of approximation is reviewed

  13. Magnetic Separation of Weakly Magnatic Copper Minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Agricola, J. N.M.; Top, J. L.; Fort, A. F.

    1989-01-01

    High Gradient Magnetic Separation of small (5-38 µm) weakly magnetic copper mineral particles from a copper concentrate and ore has been performed. In previous work coarser fractions of these minerals, bornite and chalcopyrite, were separated successfully. The recovery of the smaller particles in the magnetic fraction decreases but their grade increases compared to the results obtained on the larger particles. At a magnetic background field of 1.3 T the concentrate was upgraded from 72% borni...

  14. Riqueza Mineral Y Pobreza En Los Andes

    OpenAIRE

    Leonith Hinojosa

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the paradox found in mineral-rich Andean countries where the sustained economic growth observed over the last decade has not provoked a corresponding decrease in poverty. The impact of the expansion of the extractive industries (mining and hydrocarbons) on these countries is addressed from the perspective of political economy, indicating that the permanence of poverty, in particular rural poverty in areas where mineral wealth is concentrated, can be explained by inconsis...

  15. Infrared Extinction Spectra of Mineral Dust Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, P.; Laskina, O.; Alexander, J. M.; Young, M.; Grassian, V. H.

    2012-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol affects the atmosphere by absorbing and scattering radiation and plays an important role in the Earth's radiative budget. The effect of atmospheric dust on climate is studied by various remote sensing techniques that use measurements from narrow band IR channels of satellites to determine key atmospheric properties. Therefore, it is essential to take radiative effects of mineral dust aerosol into account to correctly process remote sensing data. As aerosols are transported through the atmosphere they undergo aging and heterogeneous chemistry. This leads to changes in their optical properties and their effects on climate. In this study we carried out spectral simulations using both Mie theory and solutions derived in the Rayleigh regime for authentic dust samples and several processed components of mineral dust. Simulations of the extinction based on Mie theory shows that it does not accurately reproduce the peak position and band shape of the prominent IR resonance features. Errors in the simulated peak position and the line shape associated with Mie theory can adversely affect determination of mineral composition based on IR satellite data. Analytic solutions for various shapes derived from Rayleigh theory offer a better fit to the major band features of the spectra, therefore the accuracy of modeling atmospheric dust properties can be improved by using these analytic solutions. It is also important to take aging of mineral dust into account. We investigated the effect of chemical processing on the optical properties. It was shown that interactions of components of mineral dust (calcite, quartz and kaolinite) with humic and organic acids cause a shift of the IR resonance bands of these minerals. It may indicate changes in shape of the particles as well as changes in hygroscopicity and, as the result, the water content in these samples. Therefore, care should be taken when modeling optical properties of aged mineral dust.

  16. Cyanobacteria as Biocatalysts for Carbonate Mineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Christer Jansson; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M.; Kamennaya, Nina A.; Trent Northen

    2012-01-01

    Microbial carbonate mineralization is widespread in nature and among microorganisms, and of vast ecological and geological importance. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that trigger and control processes such as calcification, i.e., mineralization of CO2 to calcium carbonate (CaCO3), is limited and literature on cyanobacterial calcification is oftentimes bewildering and occasionally controversial. In cyanobacteria, calcification may be intimately associated with the carbon dioxide-...

  17. Exploring data with RapidMiner

    CERN Document Server

    Chisholm, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial style using examples so that users of different levels will benefit from the facilities offered by RapidMiner.If you are a computer scientist or an engineer who has real data from which you want to extract value, this book is ideal for you. You will need to have at least a basic awareness of data mining techniques and some exposure to RapidMiner.

  18. World Mineral Production 2002-06

    OpenAIRE

    Hetherington, Linda; Brown, Teresa; Benham, Antony; Bide, Tom; Lusty, Paul; Hards, Vicky; Hannis, Sarah; Idoine, Naomi

    2008-01-01

    This publication includes five year tables of production, by country, for the majority of economically important mineral commodities, including ferrous and non-ferrous metals, industrial minerals and hydrocarbons. Additional information has been added describing the characteristics, uses production trends, prices and industry events for 11 commodities including bauxite/alumina/aluminium, coal, copper, fluorspar, gold, iron ore, lead, nickel, titanium, uranium and zinc. This is part ...

  19. Mineral resources in Afghanistan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite Afghanistan's wide variety of mineral resources and long history of small-scale mining of gems, gold, copper, and coal, it was not until the 1950's that the country's mineral resources were subject to systematic exploration. The report documents the past and present status of these resources and examines alternative strategies for their exploitation. Chapter 2 provides a brief history of minerals exploration, exploitation, and planning in Afghanistan, including the roles of Great Britain, France, Germany, the Soviet bloc, and the United States in Afghanistan's mineral sector; mineral policy in the five national plans during the years 1962-83; and sector assessments conducted by the World Bank (1978) and the US Department of Energy (1989). Chapter 3 discusses three strategies for developing the country's mineral and hydrocarbon resources. (1) a national orientation focusing on domestic needs; (2) a regional strategy that would consider markets in countries close to Afghanistan; and (3) an international strategy that would place Afghan resources on the international market

  20. Mineral oxide transformation of antimicrobial contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B.; Kendall, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    The quality of our water supply is dependent on the organic-mineral interface. Organics contain reactive groups that dissolve minerals, and release surface associated contaminants into aquifers and reservoirs. Conversely, minerals may transform organic pollutants, including antimicrobial drugs that are potentially deleterious to aquatic ecosystems or human health. Under aqueous conditions typical of soils and natural waters, the antibiotic agent sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is transformed in the presence of pyrolusite, presumably on the MnO2 surface. At least 50 percent loss of SMX was observed after 269 h, in both acidic and basic solutions (pH 3-9). Nearly 100 percent loss is recorded at pH 3 and 66 percent loss was recorded at circumneutral pH. Initial mass spectrometry of the reaction products suggests an oxidative pathway where hydroxylation and oxidation occurs at the aniline moiety and isoxazolamine ring of SMX. Concomitant increases in aqueous manganese concentrations suggest reductive transformation of the mineral surface. Ongoing electric force spectroscopy and force microscopy experiments probe potential mineral surface alteration associated with the SMX-MnO2 reaction. Coupling bulk aqueous observations and mass spectrometry with molecular-scale force microscopy should further elucidate sulfonamide reactivity as influenced by mineral surface chemistry and topography. Moreover, the observed transformation suggests manganese oxides likely play an important role in the fate of SMX in the environment.

  1. Radon daughter exposure to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon exposures to U.S. uranium miners average about 1.3 WLM per year approximately equal to 60 WLM per full working lifetime. This is intermediate between (a) the lowest exposures for which there have been excess lung cancers reported among U.S. miners (120-240 WLM) and (b) average environmental radon exposures (16 WLM), so models based on these two situations are used to estimate expected effects on present uranium miners. In Model A, the loss of life expectancy is 45 days, the SMR (standardized mortality ratio) for lung cancer is 1.10, and the SMR for all causes between ages 18 and 65 is 1.013. In Model B these are 10 days, 1.03 and 1.002 respectively. It is shown that the radon exposures to miners are similar to those to millions of Americans from environmental exposure, and that miner health risks are comparable to those of other radiation workers. Their lung cancer risk from radon is 7-50 times less than their job-related accident mortality risk, and represents 0.7-4% of their total risk in mining. Miners suffer from many diseases with SMR very much larger than that for radon-induced lung cancer. (author)

  2. Thin Ice Films at Mineral Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-07-21

    Ice films formed at mineral surfaces are of widespread occurrence in nature and are involved in numerous atmospheric and terrestrial processes. In this study, we studied thin ice films at surfaces of 19 synthetic and natural mineral samples of varied structure and composition. These thin films were formed by sublimation of thicker hexagonal ice overlayers mostly produced by freezing wet pastes of mineral particles at -10 and -50 °C. Vibration spectroscopy revealed that thin ice films contained smaller populations of strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules than in hexagonal ice and liquid water. Thin ice films at the surfaces of the majority of minerals considered in this work [i.e., metal (oxy)(hydr)oxides, phyllosilicates, silicates, volcanic ash, Arizona Test Dust] produced intense O-H stretching bands at ∼3400 cm(-1), attenuated bands at ∼3200 cm(-1), and liquid-water-like bending band at ∼1640 cm(-1) irrespective of structure and composition. Illite, a nonexpandable phyllosilicate, is the only mineral that stabilized a form of ice that was strongly resilient to sublimation in temperatures as low as -50 °C. As mineral-bound thin ice films are the substrates upon which ice grows from water vapor or aqueous solutions, this study provides new constraints from which their natural occurrences can be understood. PMID:27377606

  3. Irritative symptoms and exposure to mineral wool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R; Sabroe, S

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study undertaken in 1981 using a postal questionnaire, the prevalence of irritative symptoms was investigated among 2,654 Danish construction workers working with mineral wool. An evaluation was undertaken in a multivariate logit analysis of the relationship between exposure level (measured by hours of exposure to mineral wool per month) and prevalence of symptoms. The analysis controlled for the confounders of age, smoking habits, and exposure to organic solvents. With greater exposure to mineral wool, there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of irritative symptoms from the eyes, the skin, and the upper respiratory tract. Among construction workers working with mineral wool 160-180 hours per month, two-thirds had these symptoms once a week or oftener. The occurrence was 2-3 times higher compared with the construction workers not working with mineral wool. The relationship between exposure to mineral wool and skin and mucous membrane symptoms may be explained by the irritative action of the fibers that are given off during insulation work. PMID:1831004

  4. Rheological Characterization of Bioinspired Mineralization in Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitsky, Abigail; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    With increasing amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere linked to potentially catastrophic climate change, it is critical that we find methods to permanently sequester and store CO2. Inspired by the natural biomineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), one future goal of this project is to understand the mechanisms of CaCO3 mineralization in order to ultimately optimize a bioinspired hydrogel system, which produces high value industrial powders that consume CO2 as a feedstock. Along the way, we are developing a rheological technique to study mineral nucleation and growth events by measuring the modulations in mechanical properties of a hydrogel system during mineralization. Our initial system consists of a gelatin hydrogel matrix, which is preloaded with calcium ions, and an aqueous solution of carbonate ions, which are allowed to diffuse through the gel to initiate the mineralization process. In order to monitor how the growth of minerals affects the mechanical properties of the gel network, we measure the storage (G') and loss (G'') moduli of the system in situ. Future work will focus on modifying the properties of the minerals formed by changing the polymer used in the hydrogel network and adding other organic molecules into the system.

  5. European mineral statistics 2004-08 : a product of the World Mineral Statistics database

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, T J; Idoine, N.E.; Bide, Tom; Mills, A.J.; Hobbs, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    European Mineral Statistics is the only up-to-date publication dedicated to statistical information about minerals and metals in Europe, and presented in a convenient form. It provides the essential background intelligence for any European minerals-related activities. Production, export and import tables are presented for all EU members and EU candidate countries, plus Norway and Switzerland, in two sections: •by individual country •by commodity, with bullets on salient features an...

  6. Bioleaching of serpentine group mineral by fungus Talaromyces flavus: application for mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Lianwen, L.; Zhao, L.; Teng, H.

    2011-12-01

    Many studies of serpentine group mineral dissolution for mineral carbonation have been published in recent years. However, most of them focus mainly on either physical and chemical processes or on bacterial function, rather than fungal involvement in the bioleaching of serpentine group mineral. Due to the excessive costs of the magnesium dissolution process, finding a lower energy consumption method will be meaningful. A fungal strain Talaromyces flavus was isolated from serpentinic rock of Donghai (China). No study of its bioleaching ability is currently available. It is thus of great significance to explore the impact of T. flavus on the dissolution of serpentine group mineral. Serpentine rock-inhabiting fungi belonging to Acremonium, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Botryotinia, Cladosporium, Clavicipitaceae, Cosmospora, Fusarium, Monascus, Paecilomyces, Penicillium, Talaromyces, Trichoderma were isolated. These strains were chosen on the basis of resistance to magnesium and nickel characterized in terms of minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC). Specifically, the strain Talaromyces flavus has a high tolerance to both magnesium (1 mol/L) and nickel (10 mM/L), and we examine its bioleaching ability on serpentine group mineral. Contact and separation experiments (cut-off 8 000-14 000 Da), as well as three control experiments, were set up for 30 days. At least three repeated tests were performed for each individual experiment. The results of our experiments demonstrate that the bioleaching ability of T. flavus towards serpentine group mineral is evident. 39.39 wt% of magnesium was extracted from lizardite during the bioleaching period in the contact experiment, which showed a dissolution rate at about a constant 0.126 mM/d before reaching equilibrium in 13 days. The amount of solubilized Mg from chrysotile and antigorite were respectively 37.79 wt% and 29.78 wt% in the contact experiment. These results make clear the influence of mineral structure on mineral bioleaching

  7. Deglacial Record in the Illinois River Valley Explains Asynchronous Phases of Meltwater Pulses and Clay Mineral Excursions in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.

    2014-12-01

    One prominent event of the Bølling/Allerød (B/A) interstadial was the large meltwater release to global oceans. The Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) is usually considered the main source. But, the large LIS meltwater discharge conflicts with the marine record showing an active North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) during the B/A interval. Continuous dune-lacustrine successions in the Illinois River Valley (IRV) have shown complete records of the last deglacial chronozones. Their grain-size distributions and accurate B/A age 14C dates of plant fossils from 15 m deep lacustrine sediment in the IRV suggest that most of the IRV and parts of the adjacent upland were inundated by water. The inundation was caused by a sediment dam interpreted to have been constructed and followed by a breach at the confluence of the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers during the B/A interval due to sediment mobilization by the large meltwater release. The grain size distributions correlate with meltwater pulses and mineralogical excursions in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) very well. The blockage and release of illite and chlorite rich fine-grained sediments from the Lake Michigan basin changed the relative abundance of clay minerals and thus the ratio of smectite/(illite + chlorite) in the sediment of the GOM. This finding explains why the meltwater episodes from the LIS and the associated detrital discharges are not synchronous in the sediments in the GOM. The finding also ties meltwater pulses and associated detrital discharges in the GOM closely to the LIS discharges via the Mississippi River Valley on chronozonal scales. Three arguments can be made from this result: 1) unaffected AMOC during B/A interval resulted potentially from the hyperpycnal inflow into the GOM floor; 2) limited volume of the meltwater discharge did not significantly influence the AMOC; and 3) the freshwater input into the GOM from the LIS at this particular location did not significantly

  8. 30 CFR 702.16 - Stockpiling of minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stockpiling of minerals. 702.16 Section 702.16 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL EXEMPTION FOR COAL EXTRACTION INCIDENTAL TO THE EXTRACTION OF OTHER MINERALS § 702.16 Stockpiling...

  9. Xinjiang Integrates Mineral Resources of 11 Major Mining Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>According to reports,from this year,Xinjiang, a large mineral resource province,will implement mineral resource integration of 11 major mining areas involving minerals including coal, iron,copper and bentonite,so as to further adjust the structure of mineral exploitation and optimize the distribution of resources.

  10. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, or from the authorized... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510... § 72.510 Miner health training. (a) Operators must provide annual training to all miners at a mine...

  11. Ilmenite Mineral's Recovery from Beach Sand Tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral ilmenite is the major source of rutile for industrial use and is of interest to paint and fertiliser industries. Enormous unutilised tailing dams lie on the eastern coast of the South Africa. Although covered by a simulation of the original indigenous vegetation, these tailings are still ilmenite bearing and of economic value. Tailings emanating from beach sand mineral slimes dams of the Kwazulu-Natal area (South Africa) have been processed. Screening, flotation, spiral concentration and magnetic separation methods were used either separately or successively. The present work sheds light on alternative routes for the extraction of the ilmenite, from these tailings. It moreover points out the usefulness of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in the mineral processing product monitoring. Tailings from the beach sands were used in the present study after the economic industrial minerals zirconia, ilmenite and rutile had been extracted in previous mining operations. About 61% natural ilmenite recovery was observed in the flotation concentrate of a Humphrey Spiral concentrate while a 62% recovery of hematite was found in the flotation tailings. The combination of screening, spiral concentration and magnetic separation, and flotation yielded a product with the highest ilmenite and hematite concentration being 71% and 19%, respectively. A natural ilmenite mineral, containing 87% ilmenite and 13% hematite, could be produced and extracted from the tailings of the flotation process, collected subsequently to the spiral concentration and the initial screening.

  12. Mineral wealth and the economic transition: Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exploitation of mineral wealth can amplify the problems of the transition economies in three basic ways. First, the rebound of the real exchange rate that characterises a successful transition may be augmented by the capital inflow required to expand mineral production. This can cause both recession in the short-run and lower growth in the medium-term. Second, when the mineral revenues expand, the Dutch Disease effects may intensify the transition-related shrinkage of the non-mining tradable sector, thereby retarding economic diversification and rendering the economy vulnerable to external shocks. Third, a mineral boom tends to concentrate revenue on the government, which may use it to postpone difficult decisions on economic reform and/or dissipate the revenue due to weak financial markets and inadequate public accountability. Kazakhstan, like oil-rich Azerbaijan, is a late reformer and displays evidence of a faster transition rebound than other less resource-rich countries in the CIS do. However, Kazakhstan has two advantages over Azerbaijan. First, Kazakhstan has a more diversified mineral endowment with which to counter any trend towards single commodity specialization. Second, Kazakhstan is making a later start on oil expansion so that it can learn from the experience of Azerbaijan. Priorities for Kazakhstan are the continuation of prudent economic policies, the creation of institutions to enhance the transparency of the revenue flows, and the use of environmental accounting to provide a rationale for the deployment of the oil rents. (author)

  13. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  14. Impacts of Nickel Nanoparticles on Mineral Carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Bodor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents experimental results regarding the use of pure nickel nanoparticles (NiNP as a mineral carbonation additive. The aim was to confirm if the catalytic effect of NiNP, which has been reported to increase the dissolution of CO2 and the dissociation of carbonic acid in water, is capable of accelerating mineral carbonation processes. The impacts of NiNP on the CO2 mineralization by four alkaline materials (pure CaO and MgO, and AOD and CC steelmaking slags, on the product mineralogy, on the particle size distribution, and on the morphology of resulting materials were investigated. NiNP-containing solution was found to reach more acidic pH values upon CO2 bubbling, confirming a higher quantity of bicarbonate ions. This effect resulted in acceleration of mineral carbonation in the first fifteen minutes of reaction time when NiNP was present. After this initial stage, however, no benefit of NiNP addition was seen, resulting in very similar carbonation extents after one hour of reaction time. It was also found that increasing solids content decreased the benefit of NiNP, even in the early stages. These results suggest that NiNP has little contribution to mineral carbonation processes when the dissolution of alkaline earth metals is rate limiting.

  15. Nitrogen mineralization of sewage sludges in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garau, M.A.; Felipo, M.T.; de Villa, M.C.R.

    In order to profit from recycling sewage sludge through the soil-plant system and avoid the hazards associated with excessive NO/sub 3//sup -/-N in soils, it is necessary to know the amount of mineralizable organic-N from sludge. The purpose of this study was to determine N-mineralization of two sewage sludges in two different soils, comparing leached and nonleached incubation procedures. The cumulative N mineralized during successive incubation periods increased linearly with incubation time and sludge incorporation rate. The mineralization process was more influenced by soil type than by rate and kind of sludge applied. The amount of mineralized-N was higher for the leaching procedure. This cumulative-N expressed as the percentage of applied organic-N was inversely dependent on sewage sludge rate added for the leached procedure and is independent of the rate for the nonleached. The N-mineralization rate was 0.0202 +/- 0.0011 and 0.0650 +/- 0.0068 d/sup -1/, respectively, for leached and nonleached procedures. The potentially mineralizable N increased with the sludge rate applied and was higher for aerobic sludge and neutral soil. In general, the leached method gave twofold higher values than the nonleached method. The net percentage of potentially mineralizable N vs. organic-N added was 43.0 +/- 7.8 and 27.7 +/- 4.0, respectively, for leached and nonleached procedures.

  16. Leukaemia and lymphoma among Czech uranium miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasek, L.; Malatova, I. [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    Leukaemia is one of the most sensitive cancers in relation to ionizing radiation. It is surprising that in studies of uranium miners, no risk of leukaemia in relation to cumulated radon exposure was observed (Darby et al, 1995). However, when the risk among Czech uranium miners was analyzed in dependence on duration of exposure, the trend was significant. These results were based on 10 cases (Tomasek, 1993). Since then the original cohort of 4320 miners has been extended by another cohort, now including nearly 10 000 uranium miners and the follow-up is longer by 10 years. The present report aims to analyze the risk of haemopoietic cancers in the Czech cohort accounting for both external and internal doses, similarly as reported by Jacobi and Roth (1995), and using available data on metal content and airborne particulates for dose estimates.The present results of follow-up show that increased risk of leukaemia among uranium miners is significantly associated with cumulated equivalent red bone marrow doses which is dominated by exposures to long lived alpha radionuclides in airborne particulates. The increased mortality is mainly observed decades after exposure and is consistent with estimated internal dose to red bone marrow. The estimated risk coefficient for leukaemia is consistent with results from other studies, however, further studies are needed to reduce uncertainty in the risk estimates. (N.C.)

  17. Cyanobacteria as Biocatalysts for Carbonate Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Jansson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial carbonate mineralization is widespread in nature and among microorganisms, and of vast ecological and geological importance. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that trigger and control processes such as calcification, i.e., mineralization of CO2 to calcium carbonate (CaCO3, is limited and literature on cyanobacterial calcification is oftentimes bewildering and occasionally controversial. In cyanobacteria, calcification may be intimately associated with the carbon dioxide-(CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM, a biochemical system that allows the cells to raise the concentration of CO2 at the site of the carboxylating enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco up to 1000-fold over that in the surrounding medium. A comprehensive understanding of biologically induced carbonate mineralization is important for our ability to assess its role in past, present, and future carbon cycling, interpret paleontological data, and for evaluating the process as a means for biological carbon capture and storage (CCS. In this review we summarize and discuss the metabolic, physiological and structural features of cyanobacteria that may be involved in the reactions leading to mineral formation and precipitation, present a conceptual model of cyanobacterial calcification, and, finally, suggest practical applications for cyanobacterial carbonate mineralization.

  18. Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, Nicola; Torriani, Stefano F. F.; Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; de Waele, Jo; Tavagna, Maria Luisa; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Helictites—an enigmatic type of mineral structure occurring in some caves—differ from classical speleothems as they develop with orientations that defy gravity. While theories for helictite formation have been forwarded, their genesis remains equivocal. Here, we show that a remarkable suite of helictites occurring in Asperge Cave (France) are formed by biologically-mediated processes, rather than abiotic processes as had hitherto been proposed. Morphological and petro-physical properties are inconsistent with mineral precipitation under purely physico-chemical control. Instead, microanalysis and molecular-biological investigation reveals the presence of a prokaryotic biofilm intimately associated with the mineral structures. We propose that microbially-influenced mineralization proceeds within a gliding biofilm which serves as a nucleation site for CaCO3, and where chemotaxis influences the trajectory of mineral growth, determining the macroscopic morphology of the speleothems. The influence of biofilms may explain the occurrence of similar speleothems in other caves worldwide, and sheds light on novel biomineralization processes.

  19. Influence of oil and mineral characteristics on oil-mineral interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory study was conducted to simulate the process of oil-mineral interaction in seawater. Thirteen different crudes, emulsions and oil products were used in the study. The objective was to improve the fundamental understanding of the characteristics of oils and minerals that influence the process. The findings of an initial phase of studies based on the swirling flask and marine simulation procedures were also described. Oil content associated with flocs to oil and mineral characteristics were discussed. Emulsions were prepared at 10 degrees C by vigorously mixing the oil with excess artificial seawater in a Kilner jar using a high shear homogenizer. Topped oils were prepared by distillation to 250 degrees C. The biodegraded oil was prepared from the topped crude oil. Biodegradation was achieved over a 28 day period using natural seawater and naturally occurring hydrocarbon degraders. The relationships between oil concentration, oil density and mineral exchange capacity were determined. The study showed that greater oil concentrations in the water column could be expected with (1) the presence of mineral fines, (2) minerals with greater cation exchange rates, (3) minerals with finer sizes, and (4) oils of lower viscosity and density. It was determined that in coastal waters the viscosity of the oil/emulsion will likely be the main factor affecting oil-mineral interactions. The viscosity limit for allowing oil fines interaction is likely to be dependent on the energy in the coastal zone affected by the oil pollution. 18 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs

  20. Calderas and mineralization: volcanic geology and mineralization in the Chianti caldera complex, Trans-Pecos Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duex, T.W.; Henry, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes preliminary results of an ongoing study of the volcanic stratigraphy, caldera activity, and known and potential mineralization of the Chinati Mountains area of Trans-Pecos Texas. Many ore deposits are spatially associated with calderas and other volcanic centers. A genetic relationship between calderas and base and precious metal mineralization has been proposed by some and denied by others. Steven and others have demonstrated that calderas provide an important setting for mineralization in the San Juan volcanic field of Colorado. Mineralization is not found in all calderas but is apparently restricted to calderas that had complex, postsubsidence igneous activity. A comparison of volcanic setting, volcanic history, caldera evolution, and evidence of mineralization in Trans-Pecos to those of the San Juan volcanic field, a major mineral producer, indicates that Trans-Pecos Texas also could be an important mineralized region. The Chianti caldera complex in Trans-Pecos Texas contains at least two calderas that have had considerable postsubsidence activity and that display large areas of hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. Abundant prospects in Trans-Pecos and numerous producing mines immediately south of the Trans-Pecos volcanic field in Mexico are additional evidence that ore-grade deposits could occur in Texas.

  1. A Review of Mineral Resources and GIS Applications in Mineral Resource Assessment in Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Yunxuan; Wang Lei; Liu Wansong; Xu Huiping; Sun Fengyue

    2000-01-01

    Northeast China is one of the regions in China that possesses a great abundance of mineral resources.Coal, petroleum, natural gas, gold, iron, magnesite, graphite, talc, molding sand, glass sand and some others account for large portion in reserves and yields of that in the whole country. The region faced also shortages of copper, molybdenum, oil shale, zirconium, tantalum, rare earth, and beryllium, although they have large reserves,but limited by economical and technical factors. Geological mapping and mineral exploration activities have been intensive. Only the north part of Daxinanling Mountains in the region leaves unexplored. GIS applications in mineral resource assessment in the region start not long. Databases for GIS applications are on the way of construction.Well - trained technical staff and expertise do not meet the demand.This article reviews the situation of mineral resources and GIS applications for mineral resource assessment in the region. Suggestions on multi - lateral cooperation and GIS training are also made.

  2. Lability of soil organic carbon in tropical soils with different clay minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Thilde Bech; Elberling, Bo; Christensen, Bent Tolstrup

    2010-01-01

    of SOC in tropical soils with contrasting clay mineralogy (kaolinite, smectite, allophane and Al-rich chlorite). Soil was sampled from A horizons at six sites in humid tropical areas of Ghana, Malaysian Borneo and the Solomon Islands and separated into fractions above and below 250 µm by wet sieving...

  3. Using of Mineral Recourses for Water Purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollution of surface waters results in necessity of underground waters using for drinking. Underground waters are characterized by the high quantity of heavy metals salts. This led to development of methods reducing the concentration of the metal salts in water. Wide spread occurrence, cheapness and high sorption properties of nature minerals allow to consider them as perspective sorbents for different impurities extraction, including dissoluble compounds of heavy metals. Reachable purification efficiency with mineral resources use for the moment satisfies sanitary indexes and standards presenting to portable water in Russia. In given material there are presented the results of research of artificial sorbent and certain minerals sorption characteristics, which are typical for West Siberia. For purification quality improvement from Fe and Mn ions there are suggested to use the method of boiling bed.

  4. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  5. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  6. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  7. Mineral lung burden of an urban population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, L.; Falchi, M.; Batisti, D.; Carrieri, M. P.; Petrelli, M. G.; Ciallella, C.; Donelli, G.

    A study was carried out on mineral lung burden in 85 autopsy cases who died accidentally. Subjects of both sexes aged from 15 to 70 years were selected from all the autopsies performed at the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Rome. These subjects were living in an urban area and were not affected by neoplasm diseases. All selected subjects were residing in Rome at the time of their death. Information on years of legal residence in urban areas, smoking habits and occupational history were obtained by interviews with relatives. Lung parenchyma samples were obtained from the right upper lobe. The mineral particulate matter present in the tissue samples was studied by means of analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) techniques: 16 mineral varieties and 22 metallic elements were identified. Smoke, age and residence seem to have influence on the lung burden.

  8. Radioactivity and the French uranium bearing minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of Regne Mineral journal is entirely devoted to the French uranium mining industry. It comprises 4 parts dealing with: the uranium mining industry in France (history, uranium rush, deposits, geologic setting, prosperity and recession, situation in 1998, ore processing); radioactivity and the uranium and its descendants (discovery, first French uranium bearing ores, discovery of radioactivity, radium and other uranium descendants, radium mines, uranium mines, atoms, elements and isotopes, uranium genesis, uranium decay, isotopes in an uranium ore, spontaneous fission, selective migration of radionuclides, radon in mines and houses, radioactivity units, radioprotection standards, new standards and controversies, natural and artificial radioactivity, hazards linked with the handling and collecting of uranium ores, conformability with radioprotection standards, radioactivity of natural uranium minerals); the French uranium bearing minerals (composition, crystal structure, reference, etymology, fluorescence). (J.S.)

  9. State of the art and challenges in cave minerals studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan P. Onac; Paolo Forti

    2011-01-01

    The present note is an updated inventory of all known cave minerals as March 2011. After including the new minerals described since the last edition of the Cave Minerals of the World book (1997) and made the necessary corrections to incorporate all discreditations, redefinitions, or revalidation proposed by the Commission on New Minerals, Nomenclatures and Classification (CNMNC) of the International Mineralogical Association (IMA), we summed up 319 cave minerals, many of these only known from...

  10. Effects of Minerals on Human Health and Their Analysis Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Kavak; Abdurrahman Dalgıç; Abdurrahman Senyigit

    2004-01-01

    Health effects of minerals depend on mineralogical structure and dimension ofinhaled dust. Diseases caused by minerals were known as only occupational diseases upto recently. However, many researchers pointed out that many diseases at various partsof body resulted from minerals. Minerals are naturally occurred solid particles whichhave a determined chemical and physical structure properties and interior crystalstructure. In mineral analyses basic disciplines such as chemistry, physics andmath...

  11. Wet High Intensity Magnetic Separation of Iron Minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Y.; Veasey, T. J.; Rowson, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    Four different iron minerals were selected for study, and five size fractions of each mineral were prepared. The magnetic properties of these minerals were measured. The effect of particle size and magnetic susceptibility on wet high intensity magnetic separation was studied simultaneously. It was found that hematite—1 was a strongly paramagnetic mineral, and the effect of particle size in WHIMS was not significant. Goethite and limonite were weakly paramagnetic minerals, and could not be eff...

  12. Phosphorus K-edge XANES spectroscopy of mineral standards

    OpenAIRE

    Ingall, Ellery D.; Brandes, Jay A.; Diaz, Julia M.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson,David; McNulty, Ian; Elliott, W. Crawford; Northrup, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on phosphate mineral specimens including (a) twelve specimens from the apatite group covering a range of compositional variation and crystallinity; (b) six non-apatite calcium-rich phosphate minerals; (c) 15 aluminium-rich phosphate minerals; (d) ten phosphate minerals rich in either reduced iron or manganese; (e) four phosphate minerals rich in either oxidized iron or manganese; (f) eight phosphate mine...

  13. Utilization of milk minerals by Iberian suckling piglets

    OpenAIRE

    Castellano, R; Aguinaga, M. A.; R. Nieto; AGUILERA, J.F.; Haro, A; I. Seiquer

    2013-01-01

    Little information is available concerning mineral metabolism in suckling piglets. The utilization of milk minerals and the mineral composition of Iberian (IB) suckling piglets were studied in two consecutive experiments at different ambient temperatures (trial 1, 27 ± 2°C; trial 2, 22 ± 2°C). Milk composition and the piglets’ performance were determined weekly over a 34 days lactation period and, at the end, body mineral contents were analyzed and mineral retention and bioavailability were c...

  14. Estimation of palaeohydrochemical conditions using carbonate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamiya, H.; Mizuno, T.; Iwatsuki, T.; Yuguchi, T.; Murakami, H.; Saito-Kokubu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The long-term evolution of geochemical environment in deep underground is indispensable research subject for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, because the evolution of geochemical environment would impact migration behavior of radionuclides in deep underground. Many researchers have made efforts previously to elucidate the geochemical environment within the groundwater residence time based on the analysis of the actual groundwater. However, it is impossible to estimate the geochemical environment for the longer time scale than the groundwater residence time in this method. In this case, analysis of the chemical properties of secondary minerals are one of useful method to estimate the paleohydrochemical conditions (temperature, salinity, pH and redox potential). In particular, carbonate minerals would be available to infer the long-term evolution of hydrochemical for the following reasons; -it easily reaches chemical equilibrium with groundwater and precipitates in open space of water flowing path -it reflects the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater at the time of crystallization We reviewed the previous studies on carbonate minerals and geochemical conditions in deep underground and estimated the hydrochemical characteristics of past groundwater by using carbonate minerals. As a result, it was found that temperature and salinity of the groundwater during crystallization of carbonate minerals were evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, pH and redox potential can only be understood qualitatively. However, it is suggested that the content of heavy metal elements such as manganese, iron and uranium, and rare earth elements in the carbonate minerals are useful indicators for estimating redox potential. This study was carried out under a contract with METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) as part of its R&D supporting program for developing geological disposal technology.

  15. Applications of PIXE to mineral characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article illustrates the application of the proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique to detailed documentation of mineral assemblages, with emphasis on base-metal ores. Some of the investigations aided by the PIXE laboratory at Guelph since 1993 include determinations of the distribution of minor and trace elements in magmatic Ni-Cu ores, volcanogenic massive sulphide Cu-Pb-Zn-(Ag-Au) ores and lode Au-(Ag) deposits. Minor elements of importance include possible by-products or co-products of metal refining, as well as deleterious impurities in mill-feed, e.g. Cd, In, Sn, As, Se, Te, Tl and Hg. Weathering products of primary sulphide mineralization, including tropical laterites and other oxidized assemblages, have been analysed successfully and can contain a wide range of minor elements which reflect the bedrock style of mineralization. The iron oxyhydroxide goethite, α-FeO(OH), contains trace levels of many elements, and in some cases 1 wt.% or more of base metals and arsenic, elements which are invisible in reflected-light microscopy. Other metals such as Ag are of sporadic occurrence in oxidized ores: they may be found as discrete mineral species, not incorporated into the dominant oxyhydroxides. A summary of findings from three base-metal deposits in Canada, the Philippines and Portugal serves to illustrate the manner in which PIXE data benefit our knowledge of metal distributions in metallic ores. PIXE can contribute to several facets of mineral-deposit research, such as: (1) the development of ore textures, and specifically the distribution of elements within zoned crystals, or between multiple generations of a particular mineral; (2) the location of precious metals, Ag being in general the simplest case; and (3) pinpointing elements that may have implications for ore genesis, environmental quality or metal refining, such as Cr, As and Se

  16. Quantitative Measures of Mineral Supply Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, K. R.

    2009-12-01

    Almost all metals and many non-metallic minerals are traded internationally. An advantage of global mineral markets is that minerals can be obtained from the globally lowest-cost source. For example, one rare-earth element (REE) mine in China, Bayan Obo, is able to supply most of world demand for rare earth elements at a cost significantly less than its main competitors. Concentration of global supplies at a single mine raises significant political risks, illustrated by China’s recent decision to prohibit the export of some REEs and severely limit the export of others. The expected loss of REE supplies will have a significant impact on the cost and production of important national defense technologies and on alternative energy programs. Hybrid vehicles and wind-turbine generators, for example, require REEs for magnets and batteries. Compact fluorescent light bulbs use REE-based phosphors. These recent events raise the general issue of how to measure the degree of supply risk for internationally sourced minerals. Two factors, concentration of supply and political risk, must first be addressed. Concentration of supply can be measured with standard economic tools for measuring industry concentration, using countries rather than firms as the unit of analysis. There are many measures of political risk available. That of the OECD is a measure of a country’s commitment to rule-of-law and enforcement of contracts, as well as political stability. Combining these measures provides a comparative view of mineral supply risk across commodities and identifies several minerals other than REEs that could suddenly become less available. Combined with an assessment of the impact of a reduction in supply, decision makers can use these measures to prioritize risk reduction efforts.

  17. Development of industrial minerals in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Belinda F.; Knepper, Daniel H.; Langer, William H.; Cappa, James A.; Keller, John W.; Widmann, Beth L.; Ellefsen, Karl J.; Klein, Terry L.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Dersch, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Technology and engineering have helped make mining safer and cleaner for both humans and the environment. Inevitably, mineral development entails costs as well as benefits. Developing a mine is an environmental, engineering, and planning challenge that must conform to many Federal, State, and local regulations. Community collaboration, creative design, and best management practices of sustainability and biodiversity can be positive indicators for the mining industry. A better understanding of aesthetics, culture, economics, geology, climate, vegetation and wildlife, topography, historical significance, and regional land planning is important in resolving land-use issues and managing mineral resources wisely. Ultimately, the consuming public makes choices about product use (including water, food, highways, housing, and thousands of other items) that influence operations of the mineral industry. Land planners, resource managers, earth scientists, designers, and public groups have a responsibility to consider sound scientific information, society's needs, and community appeals in making smart decisions concerning resource use and how complex landscapes should change. An effort to provide comprehensive geosciences data for land management agencies in central Colorado was undertaken in 2003 by scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Colorado Geological Survey. This effort, the Central Colorado Assessment Project, addressed a variety of land-use issues: an understanding of the availability of industrial and metallic rocks and minerals, the geochemical and environmental effects of historic mining activity on surface water and groundwater, and the geologic controls on the availability and quality of groundwater. The USDA Forest Service and other land management agencies have the opportunity to contribute to the sustainable management of natural aggregate and other mineral resources through the identification and selective development of mineral resources and the

  18. French mineral exploration, 1973-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both private and government-controlled organizations play significant roles in French mineral exploration. This chapter reviews French exploration from 1973 to 1982, a period in which exploration expenditures increased significantly. It begins by examining aggregate exploration expenditures for the period, as well as the allocation of funds according to geographic area and mineral type, and then identifies several influences upon these expenditure trends. The chapter concludes by looking at the productivity of French exploration and making tentative international comparisons. French uranium exploration is detailed

  19. Minerals with metal-organic framework structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskić, Igor; Pekov, Igor V.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Friščić, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an increasingly important family of advanced materials based on open, nanometer-scale metal-organic architectures, whose design and synthesis are based on the directed assembly of carefully designed subunits. We now demonstrate an unexpected link between mineralogy and MOF chemistry by discovering that the rare organic minerals stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite exhibit structures found in well-established magnetic and proton-conducting metal oxalate MOFs. Structures of stepanovite and zhemchuzhnikovite, exhibiting almost nanometer-wide and guest-filled apertures and channels, respectively, change the perspective of MOFs as exclusively artificial materials and represent, so far, unique examples of open framework architectures in organic minerals.

  20. Geoethical approach to mineral activities in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Antarctica is the outermost from civilization space continent. From 14.0 million km2 of surface area about 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1.6 km in thickness. Geologically, the continent is the least explored in the world, and it is almost absolutely unknown what mineral resources Antarctica has as they are buried in rock that is covered by a thick ice sheet. It is thought to have large and valuable mineral deposits under the ice. This is because of what has been found in samples taken from the small areas of rock that are exposed, and also from what has been found in South Africa and South America. Up until 180 million years ago, Antarctica was a part of the Gondwanaland super continent, attached to South America, the Southern part of Africa, India and Australia, these continents then drifted apart until they reached their current positions. This leads to a possibility that Antarctica may also share some of the mineral wealth of these continents. Right now on the ice-free areas of Antarctica iron ore, chromium, copper, gold, nickel, platinum, coal and hydrocarbons have been found. The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, also known as the Madrid Protocol, was signed in 1991 by the signatories to the Antarctic Treaty and became law in January 1998. The Protocol provides for comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment and associated ecosystems and includes a ban on all commercial mining for at least fifty years (this is up for review in 2041). Current climate change and melting ice in Polar Regions is opening up new opportunities to exploit mineral and oil resources. Even Antarctica's weather, ice and distance from any industrialized areas mean that mineral extraction would be extremely expensive and also extremely dangerous, the depletion of mineral recourses on the Earth can reverse banning of mining in Antarctica in future. There is no question that any resource exploitation in Antarctica will cause

  1. Structure of chitosan gels mineralized by sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrzejewska, Z.; Skwarczyńska, A.; Douglas, T. E. L.; Biniaś, D.; Maniukiewicz, W.; Sielski, J.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the structural studies of mineralized chitosan hydrogels. Hydrogels produced by using sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) as a neutralizing agent. Mineralization was performed method "post loading", which consisted in sorption to the gels structure Ca ions. In order to obtain - in the structure of gels - compounds similar to the hydroxyapatites present naturally in bone tissue, gels after sorption were modified in: pH 7 buffer and sodium hydrogen phosphate. In order to determine the structural properties of the gels, the following methods were used: infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transformation, FTIR, X-ray diffractometry, XRD, scanning electron microscopy, SEM.

  2. Industrialization and the demand for mineral commodities

    OpenAIRE

    Stuermer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    What drives the long-term demand for mineral commodities? This paper provides empirical evidence on the long-run demand for mineral commodities since 1840. I extend the partial adjustment model to account for country-specific structures and technological change. I find that a one percent increase in manufacturing output leads to a 1.5 percent increase in the demand for aluminum and a one percent increase in the demand for copper. The estimated manufacturing output elasticities of demand for l...

  3. Radiological safety of bone mineral densitometry equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent disease leading to increased risk of bone fractures. Bone mineral densitometry (BMD) is a well accepted clinical tool for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. There are several different modalities for BMD such as Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry, Quantitative Ultrasound, Radiographic Absorptiometry and Quantitative Computerized Tomography. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is now well established as the method of choice for osteoporosis assessment. This study was conducted to assess the radiation dose to patients and staff from the standard scan modes

  4. Radioactive logging parameters for common minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmundson, H.; Raymer, L.L.

    1979-09-01

    This paper presents a list of about seventy minerals encountered in sedimentary formations together with their associated radioactive logging parameters. A procedure to calculate the radioactive parameters is given, and exact details are furnished for all logs but the neutron, which requires extensive and complex computation. It is significant that without considering rare elements such as boron, the computed neutron porosities assuming a thermal detecting device are consistently higher in shales, micas and zeolites than with an epithermal detecting device. This confirms our experience in the field. It is hoped that this compilation will serve as a qualititative aid in gauging the effect of most common minerals on the usual radioactive logging devices.

  5. Radioactive logging parameters for common minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a list of about seventy minerals encountered in sedimentary formations together with their associated radioactive logging parameters. A procedure to calculate the radioactive parameters is given, and exact details are furnished for all logs but the neutron, which requires extensive and complex computation. It is significant that without considering rare elements such as boron, the computed neutron porosities assuming a thermal detecting device are consistently higher in shales, micas and zeolites than with an epithermal detecting device. This confirms our experience in the field. It is hoped that this compilation will serve as a qualititative aid in gauging the effect of most common minerals on the usual radioactive logging devices

  6. An Overview of Mineral Processing in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The latest progress in mineral processing in China is described. It is also pointed out that the existing techno logy can not meet the needs of economic development. The combined challenges of poor resources, economical benefits and environmental pollution issues require further research to upgrade the separation efficiency economically. The me thods of mineral processing should play a more important part in waste treatment such as wastewater treatment, the re mediation of contaminated soil and the recycling of wastes. Biomineral technology will be utilised in the near future.

  7. OXYGEN TENSION REGULATES PREOSTEOCYTE MATURATION AND MINERALIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Zahm, Adam; Bucaro, Michael; Srinivas, Vickram; Shapiro, Irving M.; Adams, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that low pO2 regulates bone cell mineralization. MLO-A5 and MLO-Y4 cells were cultured in monolayer and alginate scaffolds in hypoxia (2% O2) or normoxia (20% O2). Reduction of the O2 tension from 20% to 2% resulted in reduced mineralization and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of MLO-A5 cells in both monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Similar changes in osteogenic activity were seen when these preosteocyte-like cells wer...

  8. Radioactive minerals - Multimedias strategies for their divulgation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João; Gomes, Ana; Aldano, Ana; Fonseca, Pedro; Cabral, Tiago; Nobre, José

    2014-05-01

    The region corresponding to Sortelha-Penalobo - Bendada, located deep in the transition zone between the Hesperian massif and the Cova da Beira in the central part of Portugal, more specifically in the Mountainous region of the province of Beira Alta, county Sabugal. This region is characterized by great mineral wealth combined with geomorphology of recognized landscape value. Under the scientific point of view, this region is the origin of the mineral sabugalite (HAl(UO2)4(PO4)4.16H2O) that was described by the famous American mineralogist Clifford Frondel (1907-2002) in the fifties of the 20th century. Uranium minerals of Sabugal region were also associated with the radioactivity studies made by the well-known French physicist Marie Curie (1867-1934). In 2007, U. Kolitsch et al described the Bendadaite (Fe (AsO4) 2 (OH) 2 • 4H2O), which corresponds to a new mineral from the group arthurite. The mineral wealth of this region is responsible for a rich history of mining and to highlight the importance until the 1990s the extraction of uranium minerals. The main uranium minerals extracted were the tobernite (Cu (UO2) 2 (PO4) 2 • 12 H2O), the metatobernite (Cu (UO2) 2 (PO4) 2 • 8 H 2 O), the autonite (Ca (UO2) 2 (PO4 ) 2 • 12H2O-10) and sabugalite (HAL (UO2) 4 (PO4) 4 16H2O). Due to the high radioactivity of these minerals, their handling becomes infeasible for disclosure purposes. An integrated and multidisciplinary museological strategy aims to access 3D images by QR codes, using multitouch as the primary means of interaction with the user, and can handle even the virtual samples, access various magnifications and enjoy explanations supplied by a mascot, in a fun way. All this framework and geological environment becomes an asset for the scientific, educational and economic development of the region. On the other hand, it has a vital importance in the context of a strategy of forming a geological park, in the point of view of tourism, research and

  9. Cancer of the lung in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer of the lung in uranium miners is due to cigarette smoking and high radon daughter product exposure in uranium mines. The incidence of oat cell cancer was very high (75 to 80%) when the miners were exposed to high levels of radiation (WLM). Exposure to these two carcinogens causes squamous cell metaplasia which is also due to upper respiratory inflammatory disease. The squamous metaplasia is not distinguishable as to cause, but when due to carcinogen, these cells persist over a longer period of time and become progressively more and more atypical until invasive neoplasia develops. This is the latent period and lasts about 10 to 15 years

  10. Provisional 2008 assessment of solid mineral fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article first comments data on solid mineral fuel consumption in France in 2008, i.e., the overall consumption, and the consumption by different sectors (energy production in coal plants, iron and steel industry, other industries, housing and office buildings). Then, it comments solid mineral fuel imports and their origins. It comments and explains the price evolution since 1999 (notably on the Antwerp-Rotterdam-Amsterdam market) in relationship with maritime transport price, availabilities and problems, and with the evolution of coal demand (notably in China) and oil prices. Finally, it briefly comments the French residual production and stocks

  11. Mineral chemistry and genesis of Zr, Th, U, Nb, Pb, P, Ce and F enriched peralkaline granites of El-Sibai shear zone, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Ali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El-Sibai mineralized shear zone trending NNE-SSW is located at the northern segment of Gabal El-Sibai (500m in length and 0.5 to 1.5 m in width. Rocks along the shear zone show different types of alterations such ashematization, kaolinitization, fluoritization, and silicification. These alterations are good traps for rare metals ofthorite, ferrocolumbite, pyroclore, plumbopyroclore, fluorite, cerite-(Ce, zircon, Th-rich zircon, zirconolite (mixtureof zircon & columbite, fluorapatite, titanite, and monazite minerals.The detailed mineralogical study of the El-Sibai shear zone revealed its enrichment in Th, Zr, Nb, Pb, U, F, P,LREE (Ce, especially concerning the hematization processes. The close correlation of ferruginated (hematitizedsamples with high radioactivity is related to the high ability of iron oxides for adsorption of radioactive elementsfrom their solutions. The rare-metal minerals found in altered peralkaline granites (shear zone are associated withhematitization, albititization, chloritization, fluoritization, and pyritization. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMAprovides an indication of a range of solid solution between thorite and zircon, in which intermediate phases, such asTh-rich zircon were formed. These phases have higher sum of all cations per formula (2.0 to 2.09 atoms per formulaunit, for 4 oxygen atoms than that of ideal thorite and zircon. This is attributed to the presence of substantialamount of interstitial cations such as U, Y, Ca, and Al in these phases. Altered zircon enriched in Th and U (Th-richzircon preferentially involves coupled substitution Ca2+ + (Th,U4+ ↔ 2Zr4+ + 2Si4+, implying that significant amountof U and Th may enter the Zr and Si position in zircon.Thorite and Th-rich zircon are related to hydrothermal fluid. Also the genesis of the studied zircon is related tometasomatic hydrothermal zircon (MHZ. The abundantly detected zircon, Th-rich zircon, Th-bearing minerals andfluorite of demonstrably

  12. Mineral chemical and petrographic occurrences os iron of the south east of Uruguay (Nico Pere z terrane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two iron-formation deposits from S E Uruguay were petrographic ally and mineralogically investigated (including microprobe mineral chemistry). The deposit from Piedra de Gigante (ANCAP) quarry is related to tectonic slivers of a platform succession in ortho gneiss of ca. 1750 Ma. Data of detrital zircon in this platform succession point to Meso- to Neo proterozoic age.The iron deposit of Piedra del Gigante (ANCAP) quarry belongs to a succession of mica schists, quartz-muscovite schists, marbles and basic rocks. Magnetite rich layers alternate with banded rocks rich in hematite, carbonate and amphibole. Carbonate is dolomite (Mg0.7Ca1.08Mn0.05Fe0.11(CO3)2) and the amphibole is a pale green tremolite (Na0,18Ca1,68Mn0,07Mg4,16Fe+++0,2Fe++0,55Al0,03(Si7,86Al0,13)O22(OH)2). This iron deposit shows strong deformation associated with martitization of magnetite and formation of specularite rich layers where relicts of magnetite (partly martitized) are occasionally observed. Available data are not conclusive about the genesis. The low iron-content of the amphibole together with dolomite in the mineral association cast doubts on a BIF-type origin, but low contents of Al2O3, V2O3, MnO and ZnO in magnetite do not indicate an igneous origin. High oxygen fugacity during martitization in medium-T metamorphic conditions could have determined that iron rich amphiboles were not formed as is normally expected in iron-formations. In the outcrop of Cerro la Higuerita (Grupo Arroyo del Soldado; Ediacaran) a succession of metapelites (bottom), iron rich pelites and iron formations (top) is observed. The metapelites contain evidences of volcanic contribution (phenochrysts of quartz and alkali feldspar as well as shards in the matrix) suggesting a volcanic source for the iron. This iron-formation contains magnetite pheno blasts (partly martitized) and fine disseminated laths of hematite in the matrix, together with grunerite (Na0,04Ca0,17 Mn0,02Mg1,36Fe5,35Al0,07(Si7,97Al0,03)O22(OH)2

  13. Electromagnetic emission in mineral and rock dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salnikov, V.; Popov, V.; Terre, D.

    2016-03-01

    The article considers regularities of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation from minerals and rocks, with samples being heated in a vacuum to 20° C- 1000° C. The examples of electromagnetic emission correlation with electric conductivity, thermoluminescence and thermographic analysis during physic-chemical processes resulting from diagenesis, catagenesis and metagenesis have been provided.

  14. Carbon dioxide sequestration by mineral carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    The increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, mainly caused by fossil fuel combustion, has lead to concerns about global warming. A possible technology that can contribute to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions is CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. The basic concept beh

  15. Geochemical evaluation of mineral precipitation and transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lingli

    2015-01-01

    fluvial environment. The basement granite plots as A2-type indicative of emplacement in a post-collisional setting at ~1.4Ga, and the Nexø sandstone was deposited in a tectonic setting of passive margin at the early Cambrian. A mineral growth pattern on the surface of Al plate, which is similar to the...

  16. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...

  17. Heavy minerals : from 'Edelstein' to Einstein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, RJ

    1998-01-01

    Identification in 1982 on the Dutch Frisian Island of Ameland of beach sand with;ln enhanced level of natural radioactivity, due to concentrations of heavy minerals, inspired a multi-disciplinary research project. A joint research effort in geochemistry, sedimentology, hydrodynamics, solid-state phy

  18. 75 FR 58330 - Minerals Management: General

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management 43 CFR Part 3000 Minerals Management: General CFR Correction In Title 43 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1000 to End, revised as of October 1, 2009, on page 331, in ]...

  19. New Mexico Known Mineral Deposit Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains all Known Mineral Deposit Areas in the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital structure digitized from a 1:500,000 scale map of the...

  20. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1999-01-01

    Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations and...