WorldWideScience

Sample records for chlorine organic compounds

  1. Chlorinated organic compounds in urban river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soma, Y.; Shiraishi, H.; Inaba, K. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Among anthropogenic chemicals, many chlorinated organic compounds have been used as insecticides and detected frequently as contaminants in urban river sediments so far. However, the number and total amount of chemicals produced commercially and used are increasing year by year, though each amount of chemicals is not so high. New types of contaminants in the environment may be detected by the use of newly developed chemicals. Chlorinated organic compounds in the urban river sediments around Tokyo and Kyoto, large cities in Japan, were surveyed and recent trends of contaminants were studied. Contaminants of the river sediments in industrial areas had a variety, but PCB (polychlorinated biphenyls) was detected in common in industrial areas. Concentration of PCB related well to the number of factories on both sides of rivers, although the use of PCB was stopped 20 years ago. In domestic areas, Triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)-phenol) and Triclocarban (3,4,4{prime}-trichlorocarbanilide)(both are contained in soap or shampoo for fungicides), p-dichlorobenzene (insecticides for wears) and TCEP(tris-chloroethyl phosphate) were detected. EOX(extracted organic halogen) in the sediments was 5 to 10 times of chlorinated organic compounds detected by GC/MS. Major part of organic halogen was suggested to be included in chlorinated organics formed by bleaching or sterilization.

  2. Chlorinated organic compounds produced by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntushelo, Khayalethu

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a pathogen of wheat and maize, not only reduces grain yield and degrades quality but also produces mycotoxins in the infected grain. Focus has been on mycotoxins because of the human and animal health hazards associated with them. In addition to work done on mycotoxins, chemical profiling of F. graminearum to identify other compounds produced by this fungus remains critical. With chemical profiling of F. graminearum the entire chemistry of this fungus can be understood. The focus of this work was to identify chlorinated compounds produced by F. graminearum. Various chlorinated compounds were detected and their role in F. graminearum is yet to be understood. PMID:27165533

  3. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996

  4. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R. [Transducer Research, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Transducer Research, Inc. (TRI) has been working with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center to develop a new chemical monitor based on a unique sensor which responds selectively to vapors of chlorinated solvents. We are also developing field applications for the monitor in actual DOE cleanup operations. During the initial phase, prototype instruments were built and field tested. Because of the high degree of selectivity that is obtained, no response was observed with common hydrocarbon organic compounds such as BTX (benzene, toluene, xylene) or POLs (petroleum, oil, lubricants), and in fact, no non-halogen-containing chemical has been identified which induces a measurable response. By the end of the Phase I effort, a finished instrument system was developed and test marketed. This instrument, called the RCL MONITOR, was designed to analyze individual samples or monitor an area with automated repetitive analyses. Vapor levels between 0 and 500 ppm can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ppm using the handportable instrument. In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems are being developed to: (1) extend the dynamic range of the instrument through autodilution of the vapor and (2) allow chemical analyses to be performed on aqueous samples. When interfaced to the samplers, the RCL MONITOR is capable of measuring chlorinated solvent contamination in the vapor phase up to 5000 ppm and in water and other condensed media from 10 to over 10,000 ppb(wt)--without hydrocarbon and other organic interferences.

  5. [Chlorination byproducts formation potentials of typical nitrogenous organic compounds in water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Xu, Bin; Qin, Cao; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Gao, Nai-Yun; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Li, Da-Peng

    2011-07-01

    Twelve typical nitrogenous organic compounds including herbicides, pesticides, amino acids, industrial products etc in polluted raw water were selected to investigate formation of typical carbonaceous and nitrogenous DBPs during chlorination and chloramination. To indentify the formation mechanism of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts from nitrogenous chemicals, chlorination and chloroamination of urea herbicides, triazine herbicides, amino acid, and other compounds were investigated. As a result, the potential precursors for different DBPs were defined as well. It has been identified that widely used urea herbicides could produce as many as 9 specific DBPs. The chlorotoluron shows highest reactivity and yields chloroform (CF), monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), 1,1-dichloro-acetone (1,1-DCP), 1,1,1-trichloro-acetone (1,1,1-TCP), chloropicrin (NTCM), dichloro-acetonitrile (DCAN), dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA). The results indicated that aldicarb and dinoseb are important precursors of CF, DCAA, MCAA, NTCM as well. High concentrations of CF and DCAA were found during L-tryptophan chlorination. Furthermore, DBPs formation pathways and mechanisms were suggested during chlorination and chloramination of chlorotoluron, ametryn, dinoseb L-tryptophan.

  6. Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-bleach-containing household products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa

    2008-03-01

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and many organic chemicals contained in household cleaning products may react to generate halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Halogenated VOC emissions from eight different chlorine bleach containing household products (pure and diluted) were investigated by headspace experiments. Chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were the leading compounds along with several halogenated compounds in the headspace of chlorine bleach products. One of the most surprising results was the presence of carbon tetrachloride (a probable human carcinogen and a powerful greenhouse gas that was banned for household use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration) in very high concentrations (up to 101 mg m(-3)). By mixing surfactants or soap with NaOCl, it was shown that the formation of carbon tetrachloride and several other halogenated VOCs is possible. In addition to quantitatively determined halogenated VOCs (n = 15), several nitrogen-containing (n = 4), chlorinated (n = 10), oxygenated compounds (n = 22), and hydrocarbons (n = 14) were identified in the headspace of bleach products. Among these, 1,1-dichlorobutane and 2-chloro-2-nitropropane were the most abundant chlorinated VOCs, whereas trichloronitromethane and hexachloroethane were the most frequently detected ones. Indoor air halogenated VOC concentrations resulting from the use of four selected household products were also measured before, during, and 30 min after bathroom, kitchen, and floor cleaning applications. Chloroform (2.9-24.6 microg m(-3)) and carbon tetrachloride (0.25-459 microg m(-3)) concentrations significantly increased during the use of bleach containing products. During/ before concentration ratios ranged between 8 and 52 (25 +/- 14, average +/- SD) for chloroform and 1-1170 (146 +/- 367, average +/- SD) for carbon tetrachloride, respectively. These results indicated that the bleach use can be important in terms of inhalation exposure to carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and

  7. Rapid dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds by nickel/iron bimetallic system in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Shao-ping; WEI Hong; MA Chun-an; LIU Wei-ping

    2005-01-01

    Detoxification of chlorinated organic compounds via reaction with nickel/iron powder was implemented in aqueous solution. Compared to iron, nickel/iron bimetallic powder had higher hydrodechlorination activities for both atrazine (ATR) and p-chlorophenol (pCP); nickel/iron (2.96%, w/w) was shown to have the largest specific surface area and the optimum proportion for the dechlorination of both ATR and pCP. Electrochemical measurements showed that the adsorbed hydrogen atom on the nickel must have been the dominant reductive agent for the dechlorination of both ATR andpCP in this system.

  8. Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds. Topical report, September 1992--May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, W.J.; Williams, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Through a U.S. DOE-funded program, an advanced chlorinated organic (RCL) vapor monitor has been built and tested in actual hazardous waste site operations. The monitor exploits the analytical capabilities of a solid-state sensor which was recently developed and has remarkable selectivity for chlorinated organic vapors at sub-parts-per-million sensitivity. The basic design goal of a user-friendly, reliable, instrument with a broad dynamic range for the selective detection of chlorinated solvent vapors was demonstrated. To date, no non-halogen-containing compound has been identified that induces a measurable response on the sensor, including commonly encountered contaminants such as BTXs (benzene, toluene, and xylenes) or POLs (petroleum, oils, lubricants). In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems were developed to further extend the analytical capability of this instrument, allowing chemical analyses to be performed for both vapor phase and condensed contamination. The sampling methods include fixed dilution, preconcentration, and closed-loop air stripping for condensed media. With uniform success, these different series of field tests were conducted at DOE facilities on several types of samples. Independent cost-benefit analysis has concluded that significant cost savings can be achieved using the RCL MONITOR in DOE applications. This effort provides a sound fundamental technology base for the development of advanced analytical methods that are needed by the US DOE. In addition, advanced methods for detecting chlorinated hydrocarbons that are made possible by this technology will save time, reduce costs, and improve human health and safety in restoration operations. To fully achieve all possible cost savings, continued effort is necessary to develop validated methods for the use of the RCL MONITOR. The development of methods through case studies is the theme of the Phase II effort, which is currently underway.

  9. Formation of halogenated organic byproducts during medium-pressure UV and chlorine coexposure of model compounds, NOM and bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Quan; Shang, Chii; Zhang, Xiangru; Ding, Guoyu; Yang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    When chlorine is applied before or during UV disinfection of bromide-containing water, interactions between chlorine, bromide and UV light are inevitable. Formation of halogenated organic byproducts was studied during medium-pressure UV (MPUV) and chlorine coexposure of phenol, nitrobenzene and benzoic acid and maleic acid, chosen to represent electron-donating aromatics, electron-withdrawing aromatics, and aliphatic structures in natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. All were evaluated in the presence and absence of bromide. MPUV and chlorine coexposure of phenol produced less total organic halogen (TOX, a collective parameter for halogenated organic byproducts) than chlorination in the dark, and more haloacetic acids instead of halophenols. Increases in TOX were found in the coexposure of nitrobenzene and benzoic acid, but maleic acid was rather inert during coexposure. The presence of bromide increased the formation of brominated TOX but did not significantly affect total TOX formation, in spite of the fact that it reduced hydroxyl radical levels. MPUV and chlorine coexposure of NOM gave a higher differential UV absorbance of NOM and a larger shift to lower molecular weight compounds than chlorination in the dark. However, TOX formation with NOM remained similar to that observed from dark chlorination.

  10. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the ...

  11. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  12. Technology status report: Off-gas treatment technologies for chlorinated volatile organic compound air emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.; Haselow, J.S.

    1992-04-15

    The purpose of this document is to review technologies for treatment of air streams that contain chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCS) and to describe a Department of Energy Office of Technology Development program that is planned to demonstrate innovative technologies for the abatement of CVOC emissions. This report describes the first phase of testing of off-gas treatment technologies. At least one more phase of testing is planned. Guidance for the preparation of this document was provided by a predecisional draft outline issued by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. The report is intended to evaluate the technical and regulatory aspects, public acceptance, and estimated costs of technologies selected for development and testing. These technologies are compared to currently practiced or baseline methods for treatment of CVOC-laden airstreams. A brief overview is provided rather than detailed cost and data comparisons because many of these technologies have not yet been field tested. A description of other promising technologies for the treatment of CVOC emissions is also included. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) were used for industrial cleaning and solvent applications for several decades. These chemicals can be classified as CVOCS. As a result of past standard disposal practices, these types of compounds are persistent groundwater and soil contaminants throughout the United States and the Department of Energy Complex.

  13. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Olsen, Lisa D.; Smith, Barrett L.; Johnson, Mark A.; Fleck, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water contaminant plumes that are flowing toward or currently discharging to wetland areas present unique remediation problems because of the hydrologic connections between ground water and surface water and the sensitive habitats in wetlands. Because wetlands typically have a large diversity of microorganisms and redox conditions that could enhance biodegradation, they are ideal environments for natural attenuation of organic contaminants, which is a treatment method that would leave the ecosystem largely undisturbed and be cost effective. During 1992-97, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated the natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in a contaminant plume that discharges from a sand aquifer to a freshwater tidal wetland along the West Branch Canal Creek at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Characterization of the hydrogeology and geochemistry along flowpaths in the wetland area and determination of the occurrence and rates of biodegradation and sorption show that natural attenuation could be a feasible remediation method for the contaminant plume that extends along the West Branch Canal Creek.

  14. DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE MAIN DRAINAGE CHANNEL OF KONYA

    OpenAIRE

    AYDIN, Mehmet Emin

    2000-01-01

    The main drainage channel of Konya collects drainage waters from farmlands of Konya and discharges to the salt lake. Since there is not any city municipal sewarage system in Konya sewage of the city also discharged to the main drainage channel. Along the channel, farmers use the channels water for irrigation purposes. Therefore a through examination of wastewater and determination of chlorinated compounds were necessary. In this research, analyses were carried by gas chromatography (GC) on wa...

  15. Formation of emerging DBPs from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Nihemaiti, Maolida

    2014-05-01

    Limited studies focused on reactions occurring during disinfection and oxidation processes of seawater. The aim of this work was to investigate disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds. Simulated algal blooms directly growing in Red Sea, red tide samples collected during an algal bloom event and Hymenomonas sp. monoculture were studied as algal organic matter sources. Experiments were conducted in synthetic seawater containing bromide ion. A variety of DBPs was formed from the chlorination and chloramination of algal organic matter. Brominated DBPs (bromoform, DBAA, DBAN and DBAcAm) were the dominant species. Iodinated DBPs (CIAcAm and iodinated THMs) were detected, which are known to be highly toxic compared to their chlorinated or brominated analogues. Algal organic matter was found to incorporate important precursors of nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs), which have been reported to be more toxic than regulated THMs and HAAs. Isotopically-labeled monochloramine (15N- NH2Cl) was used in order to investigate the nitrogen source in N-DBPs. High formation of N-DBPs was found from Hymenomonas sp. sample in exponential growth phase, which was enriched in nitrogen-containing organic compounds. High inorganic nitrogen incorporation was found from the algal samples enriched in humic-like compounds. HAcAms formation was studied from chlorination and chloramination of amino acids. Asparagine, aspartic acid and other amino acids with an aromatic structure were found to be important precursors of HAcAms and DCAN. Factors affecting HAcAms formation (Cl2/ amino acid molar ratio and pH) were evaluated. Studies on the formation kinetics of DCAcAm and DCAN from asparagine suggested a rapid formation of DCAcAm from organic nitrogen (amide group) and a slower incorporation of inorganic nitrogen coming from monochloramine to form DCAN. High amounts of DCAN and DCAcAm were detected from the

  16. DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE MAIN DRAINAGE CHANNEL OF KONYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin AYDIN

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The main drainage channel of Konya collects drainage waters from farmlands of Konya and discharges to the salt lake. Since there is not any city municipal sewarage system in Konya sewage of the city also discharged to the main drainage channel. Along the channel, farmers use the channels water for irrigation purposes. Therefore a through examination of wastewater and determination of chlorinated compounds were necessary. In this research, analyses were carried by gas chromatography (GC on water samples collected hourly, daily and monthly from the channel.

  17. In Situ and Laboratory Studies on the Fate of Specific Organic Compounds in an Anerobic Landfill Leachate Plume, 2. Fate of Aromatic and Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Bjarnadóttir, Helga; Winter, Pia L.;

    1995-01-01

    and laboratory batch microcosm experiments performed focusing on redox conditions, microbiology and the fate of 7 phenolic compounds. In this paper we present the results on the fate of 8 aromatic compounds and 4 chlorinated aliphatic compounds. Nitrobenzene was transformed at all distances from the landfill......The transformation of specific organic compounds was investigated by in situ and laboratory experiments in an anaerobic landfill leachate pollution plume at four different distances from the landfill. In a previous paper (Part 1, also published in this issue) we described the in situ microcosm...... the landfill. In general, good accordance with respect to compound transformation was observed between in situ and laboratory experiments, but in a few cases more compounds were transformed in in situ experiments than in the corresponding laboratory experiments....

  18. A hand-portable instrument system for the real-time analysis of chlorinated organic compound contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Working with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Transducer Research, Inc. (TRI) recently developed a new chemical monitor which responds selectively to vapors of chlorinated solvents. No response is observed with common hydrocarbon organic compounds such as BTXs (benzene, toluene, xylene) or POLs (petroleum, oil, lubricants), and in fact, no nonhalogen containing chemical has been identified which induces a measurable response. This instrument, the RCL MONITOR, was designed to analyze individual samples or monitor an area with automated repetitive analyses. Vapor levels between 0 and 500 ppm can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.2 ppm using the hand-portable instrument. In addition to the development of the RCL MONITOR, advanced sampler systems are being developed to: (1) extend the dynamic range of the instrument through autodilution of the vapor and (2) allow chemical analyses to be performed on groundwater with a unique closed-loop sampler. When interfaced to the samplers, the RCL MONITOR is capable of measuring chlorinated solvent contamination in the vapor phase up to 5,000 ppm and in water and other condensed media from 10 to over 10,000 ppbwt. The performance of RCL MONITOR was demonstrated at several DOE facilities and applications have been identified in which the selective and sensitive measurement and monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons is essential. Case studies are currently underway at DOE Hanford and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  19. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  20. Interactively interfacial reaction of iron-reducing bacterium and goethite for reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiaoMin; LI YongTao; LI FangBai; ZHOU ShunGui; FENG ChunHua; LIU TongXu

    2009-01-01

    The interactively interfacial reactions between the iron-reducing bacterium (Shewanella decolorationis,S12) and iron oxide (α-FeOOH) were investigated to determine reductive dechlorination transformation of chlorinated organic compounds (chloroform and pentachlorophenol).The results showed that the interactive system of S12+ α-FeOOH exhibited relatively high dechlorination rate.By comparison,the S12 biotic system alone had no obvious dechlorination,and the α-FeOOH abiotic system showed low dechlorination rate.The enhanced dechlorination of chloroform and pentachlorophenol in the interactive system of S12+α-FeOOH was derived from the promoted generation of adsorbed Fe(Ⅱ) by S12.A decrease in redox potential of the Fe (Ⅲ)/Fe (Ⅱ) couple in the interactive reaction system was determined by cyclic voltammetry.Our results will give new insight into interactively interfacial reaction between iron-reducing bacterium and iron oxides for degradation of chlorinated organic compounds under anaerobic condition.

  1. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland: Field evidence of anaerobic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Olsen, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Field evidence collected along two groundwater flow paths shows that anaerobic biodegradation naturally attenuates a plume of chlorinated volatile organic compounds as it discharges from an aerobic sand aquifer through wetland sediments. A decrease in concentrations of two parent contaminants, trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA), and a concomitant increase in concentrations of anaerobic daughter products occurs along upward flow paths through the Wetland sediments. The daughter products 1,2-dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane are produced from hydrogenolysis of TCE and from PCA degradation through hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination (reductive dechlorination) pathways. Total concentrations of TCE, PCA, and their degradation products, however, decrease to below detection levels within 0.15-0.30 m of land surface. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of TCE and PCA in the wetland sediments is associated with the naturally higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and the lower redox state of the groundwater compared to the aquifer. This field study indicates that wetlands and similar organic-rich environments at groundwater/surface-water interfaces may be important in intercepting groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organics and in naturally reducing concentrations and toxicity before sensitive surface-water receptors are reached.

  2. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  3. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development's VOC's in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry

  4. Interim report on testing of off-gas treatment technologies for abatement of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, J.S.; Jarosch, T.R.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.; Lombard, K.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to briefly summarize the results to date of the off-gas treatment program for atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program is part of the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development`s Integrated Demonstration for Treatment of Organics in Soil and Water at a Non-Arid Site. The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed. That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment program would complement the Integrated Demonstration not only because off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the US to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate systematic and unbiased evaluation of the emerging technologies.

  5. Interim report on testing of off-gas treatment technologies for abatement of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to briefly summarize the results to date of the off-gas treatment program for atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program is part of the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development's Integrated Demonstration for Treatment of Organics in Soil and Water at a Non-Arid Site. The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed. That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment program would complement the Integrated Demonstration not only because off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the US to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate systematic and unbiased evaluation of the emerging technologies

  6. Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs) in environment - sources, potential human health impacts, and current remediation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Binbin; Lei, Chao; Wei, Chaohai; Zeng, Guangming

    2014-10-01

    Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl-VOCs), including polychloromethanes, polychloroethanes and polychloroethylenes, are widely used as solvents, degreasing agents and a variety of commercial products. These compounds belong to a group of ubiquitous contaminants that can be found in contaminated soil, air and any kind of fluvial mediums such as groundwater, rivers and lakes. This review presents a summary of the research concerning the production levels and sources of Cl-VOCs, their potential impacts on human health as well as state-of-the-art remediation technologies. Important sources of Cl-VOCs principally include the emissions from industrial processes, the consumption of Cl-VOC-containing products, the disinfection process, as well as improper storage and disposal methods. Human exposure to Cl-VOCs can occur through different routes, including ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact. The toxicological impacts of these compounds have been carefully assessed, and the results demonstrate the potential associations of cancer incidence with exposure to Cl-VOCs. Most Cl-VOCs thus have been listed as priority pollutants by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) of China, Environmental Protection Agency of the U.S. (U.S. EPA) and European Commission (EC), and are under close monitor and strict control. Yet, more efforts will be put into the epidemiological studies for the risk of human exposure to Cl-VOCs and the exposure level measurements in contaminated sites in the future. State-of-the-art remediation technologies for Cl-VOCs employ non-destructive methods and destructive methods (e.g. thermal incineration, phytoremediation, biodegradation, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) and reductive dechlorination), whose advantages, drawbacks and future developments are thoroughly discussed in the later sections. PMID:25016450

  7. Influence of Organic Nitrogen Compounds on Chlorine Disinfection%有机氮类化合物对氯消毒影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐华; 杨艳玲; 王花平; 梁贞淑

    2012-01-01

    受污染饮用水水源中都含多种有机氮类化合物,会对氯消毒效果产生影响.试验采用有机氮类化合物甘氨酸、亮氨酸、赖氨酸、天冬氨酸、半胱氨酸和甲胺,研究了有机氮类化合物浓度和pH值对消毒效果的影响.结果表明,有机氮类化合物都会和自由氯迅速反应生成大量的有机氯胺,使消毒效果显著下降;不同有机氮类化合物对氯消毒效果的影响有很大差异,半胱氨酸的影响最为明显,使得氯几乎丧失消毒能力.因此,对有机氮类化合物的含量和去除应考虑改善氯的投加方式或氯消毒工艺,建立安全有效的消毒方法.%Many organic nitrogen compounds are contained in polluted resource of drinking water, which seriously influence on chlorine disinfection. Typical organic nitrogen compounds including glycine, leucine, lysine, aspartic acid, cysteine, and methylamine were applied. Influences of organic nitrogen compound dosage and pH on disinfection effects are investigated. Results show that many organic chloramines are produced by prompt action of organic nitrogen compounds and free chlorine to decrease disinfection effects pronounced. Influences on chlorine disinfection effects are different through different organic nitrogen compounds. Influence of cysteine is most obvious to cause chlorine losing disinfection capacity. Therefore, contents and removal of organic nitrogen compounds must be attached. The chlorine dosing mode and chlorine disinfection process can be improved and the effective safe disinfection method must be established.

  8. Preliminary assessment of microbial communities and biodegradation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in wetlands at Cluster 13, Lauderick Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Spencer, Tracey A.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the microbial communities and biodegradation processes for chlorinated volatile organic compounds was con-ducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in wetlands at the Cluster 13, Lauderick Creek area at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The U.S. Geological Survey collected wetland sediment samples from 11 sites in the Lauderick Creek area for microbial analyses, and used existing data to evaluate biodegradation processes and rates. The bacterial and methanogen communities in the Lauderick Creek wetland sediments were similar to those observed in a previous U.S. Geological Survey study at the West Branch Canal Creek wet-land area, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Evaluation of the degradation rate of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and the daughter compounds produced also showed similar results for the two wetlands. How-ever, a vertical profile of contaminant concentra-tions in the wetlands was available at only one site in the Lauderick Creek area, and flow velocities in the wetland sediment are unknown. To better evaluate natural attenuation processes and rates in the wetland sediments at Lauderick Creek, chemi-cal and hydrologic measurements are needed along ground-water flowpaths in the wetland at additional sites and during different seasons. Nat-ural attenuation in the wetlands, enhanced biore-mediation, and constructed wetlands could be feasible remediation methods for the chlorinated volatile organic compounds discharging in the Lauderick Creek area. The similarities in the microbial communities and biodegradation pro-cesses at the Lauderick Creek and West Branch Canal Creek areas indicate that enhanced bioreme-diation techniques currently being developed for the West Branch Canal Creek wetland area would be transferable to this area.

  9. Formation of chlorinated organic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of recycled fuels; Kloorattujen orgaanisten yhdisteiden muodostuminen kierraetyspolttoaineiden leijukerrospoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesterinen, R.; Kallio, M.; Kirjalainen, T.; Kolsi, A.; Merta, M. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Four tests of co-combustion of recycled fuels (REP) with peat and coal in the 15 kW fluidized bed reactor were performed. The recycled fuel was so-called dry fraction in four vessels sampling at Keltinmaeki. In three tests a part of peat energy was replaced with coal. The mixtures were prepared so that in all mixtures 25 % of energy was recycled fuel and 75 % was either peat or the mixture of peat and coal. The concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and chlorophenols decreased with increasing part of coal due to the increasing sulphur/chlorine ratio. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression analysis (PLS) showed that the chlorine, copper and sulphur contents of the fuel effected most on the concentrations of chlorophenols, chlorobenzenes, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs. Other variables influencing on a model were the lead concentration and the sulphur/chlorine ratio in fuel and the hydrogen chloride concentration of the flue gas. The concentrations of chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes were also significant for PCDD/PCDF concentrations in flue gas. The sulphur, chlorine, copper and chromium contents in fly ash and the temperature of the reactor influenced on the chlorophenol, chlorobenzene, PCB and PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash. The chlorophenol and chlorobenzene contents in fly ash, the sulphur/chlorine ratio and the lead content in fuel, the sulphur dioxide, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide concentrations in flue gas had also influence on PCDD/PCDF concentrations in fly ash

  10. Heterogeneous photocatalysis of aromatic and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for non-occupational indoor air application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Wan-Kuen; Park, Kun-Ho

    2004-11-01

    The current study evaluated the technical feasibility of applying TiO2 photocatalysis to the removal of low-ppb concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly associated with non-occupational indoor air quality issues. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate five parameters (relative humidity (RH), hydraulic diameter (HD), feeding type (FT) for VOCs, photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) reactor material (RM), and inlet port size (IPS) of PCO reactor) in relation to the PCO destruction efficiencies of the selected target VOCs. None of the target VOCs exhibited any significant dependence on the RH, which is inconsistent with a previous study where, under conditions of low humidity and a ppm toluene inlet level, a drop in the PCO efficiency was reported with a decreasing humidity. However, the other four parameters (HD, RM, FT, and IPS) were found to be important for better VOC removal efficiencies as regards the application of TiO2 photocatalytic technology for cleansing non-occupational indoor air. The PCO destruction of VOCs at concentrations associated with non-occupational indoor air quality issues was up to nearly 100%, and the CO generated during PCO was a negligible addition to indoor CO levels. Accordingly, a PCO reactor would appear to be an important tool in the effort to improve non-occupational indoor air quality.

  11. Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankland, Kenneth

    For many years, powder X-ray diffraction was used primarily as a fingerprinting method for phase identification in the context of molecular organic materials. In the early 1990s, with only a few notable exceptions, structures of even moderate complexity were not solvable from PXRD data alone. Global optimisation methods and highly-modified direct methods have transformed this situation by specifically exploiting some well-known properties of molecular compounds. This chapter will consider some of these properties.

  12. Chlorination of organic material in different soil types

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, Malin

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that formation of chlorinated organic matter occurs naturally and that organic chlorine is as abundant as the chloride ion in organic soils. A large number of organisms are known to convert inorganic chloride (Clin) to organic chlorine (Clorg) (e.g. bacteria, lichen, fungi and algae) and some enzymes associated to these organisms are capable of chlorinating soil organic matter. The aim with the study was to compare organic matter chlorination rates in soils from several dif...

  13. Chlorinated organic pesticides in marketed food: Barcelona, 2001-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports concentration levels of 22 chlorinated organic compounds (both primary compounds and metabolites) in food marketed in the city of Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) in 2001-06. Samples included meat products, fish and seafood, eggs, milk and dairy, vegetal oils, cereal products and derivates, vegetables, fresh fruits, dry fruits, spices, formula and baby food, tea and wine. Levels of chlorinated organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography with selective detectors: electron capture (ECD), flame photometric (FPD) and confirmation with mass-spectrometry. Chlorinated organic pesticides were detected in 7 of the 1,484 samples analyzed in the 2001-06 period (0.5%): 1 dairy product, 1 fruit, 1 olive oil and 4 vegetables. Specific pesticides detected are lindane and endosulfan α, β or sulphate. A decrease in both the proportion of samples with detectable residues and in the variety of chlorinated pesticides found is visible when comparing these results with those of the previous 1989-2000 period. These results suggest the gradual disappearance of regulated chlorinated organic pesticides as a consequence of the growing worldwide implementation of current regulatory agreements

  14. Chlorine-containing natural compounds in higher plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    More than 130 chlorine-containing compounds have been isolated from higher plants and ferns; about half are polyacetylenes, thiophenes and sesquiterpene lactones from the Asteraceae. A chlorinated chlorophyll may be an important part of photosystem 1. High biological activity is found in 4...

  15. Chlorinated and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from ozonation and post-chlorination of natural organic matter surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Rifai, Omar; Ali, Hussain; Graham, Nigel J D

    2014-09-01

    Ozonation before chlorination is associated with enhanced formation of chloropicrin, a halonitromethane disinfection by-product (DBP), during drinking water treatment. In order to elucidate reasons for this, five natural organic matter (NOM) surrogates were treated using both chlorination and ozonation-chlorination under controlled laboratory conditions. Selected surrogates comprised two phenolic compounds, two free amino acids and one dipeptide; these were resorcinol, 3-aminophenol, L-aspartic acid, β-alanine and ala-ala, respectively. Quantified DBPs included chloropicrin, chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloroacetonitrile. Relative to chlorination alone, increases in the formation of chloropicrin from ozonation-chlorination varied from 138% for 3-aminophenol to 3740% for ala-ala for the four amine surrogates. This indicates that ozone is more effective than chlorine in mediating a rate-limiting oxidation step in chloropicrin formation, most plausibly involving conversion of an amine group to a nitro group. While both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surrogates acted as chloropicrin precursors, ala-ala was the most reactive precursor following ozonation-chlorination. Since peptides are far commoner in drinking water sources than free amino acids, further research into chemical oxidation of these species by ozone and chlorine is recommended. In contrast, oxidation with ozone prior to chlorination reduced chloroform formation moderately for the two phenolic compounds.

  16. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  17. Two-phase ozonation of chlorinated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years the amount of research being conducted in the field of single-phase ozonation has grown extensively. However, traditional aqueous-phase ozonation systems are limited by a lack of selective oxidation potential, low ozone solubility in water, and slow intermediate decomposition rates. Furthermore, ozone may decompose before it can be utilized for pollutant destruction since ozone can be highly unstable in aqueous solutions. Naturally occurring compounds such as NaHCO3 also affect ozone reactions by inhibiting the formation of OH-free radicals. To compensate for these factors, excess ozone is typically supplied to a reactor. Since ozone generation requires considerable electric power consumption (16 - 24 kWh/kg of O3), attempts to enhance the ozone utilization rate and stability should lead to more efficient application of this process to hazardous waste treatment. To improve the process, ozonation may be more efficiently carried out in a two-phase system consisting of an inert solvent (saturated with O3) contacted with an aqueous phase containing pollutants. The non-aqueous phase must meet the following criteria: (1) non-toxic, (2) very low vapor pressure, (3) high density (for ease of separation), (4) complete insolubility in water, (5) reusability, (6) selective pollutant extractability, (7) high oxidant solubility, and (8) extended O3 stability. Previously published studies (1) have indicated that a number of fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds fit these criteria. For this project, FC40 (a product of 3M Co.) was chosen due to its low vapor pressure (3 mm Hg) and high specific gravity (1.9). The primary advantages of the FC40 solvent are that it is non-toxic, reusable, has an ozone solubility 10 times that of water, and that 85 % of the ozone remains in the solvent even after 2 hours. This novel two-phase process has been utilized to study the rapid destruction of organic chlorine compounds and organic mixtures

  18. Chlorine dioxide as an oxidant for organoboron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practicability of using chlorine dioxide aqueous solution as an oxidant for terpene organoboron compounds prepared by hydroborating (+)α-pinene (1) and (-)β-pinene (2) is studied. By the methods of IR spectroscopy and 13C NMR it is shown that products of 1 and 2 oxidation are (-)-isopinocampheol and (-)-cis-myrtanol, which are formed with a high yield. In terms of its efficiency chlorine dioxide is no worse than hydrogen peroxide in reactions of organoboric compounds oxidation

  19. Microbial Consortia Development and Microcosm and Column Experiments for Enhanced Bioremediation of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds, West Branch Canal Creek Wetland Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Majcher, Emily H.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Voytek, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents, including 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform, are reaching land surface in localized areas of focused ground-water discharge (seeps) in a wetland and tidal creek in the West Branch Canal Creek area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Garrison, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, the U.S. Geological Survey is developing enhanced bioremediation methods that simulate the natural anaerobic degradation that occurs without intervention in non-seep areas of the wetland. A combination of natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation could provide a remedy for the discharging ground-water plumes that would minimize disturbance to the sensitive wetland ecosystem. Biostimulation (addition of organic substrate or nutrients) and bioaugmentation (addition of microbial consortium), applied either by direct injection at depth in the wetland sediments or by construction of a permeable reactive mat at the seep surface, were tested as possible methods to enhance anaerobic degradation in the seep areas. For the first phase of developing enhanced bioremediation methods for the contaminant mixtures in the seeps, laboratory studies were conducted to develop a microbial consortium to degrade 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane and its chlorinated daughter products under anaerobic conditions, and to test biostimulation and bioaugmentation of wetland sediment and reactive mat matrices in microcosms. The individual components required for the direct injection and reactive mat methods were then combined in column experiments to test them under groundwater- flow rates and contaminant concentrations observed in the field. Results showed that both direct injection and the reactive mat are promising remediation methods, although the success of direct injection likely would depend on adequately distributing and maintaining organic substrate throughout the wetland sediment in the seep

  20. Identification of Some AOX Compounds Formed in Wool Chlorination Using Model Chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; HE Jin-xin; DAJ Jin-jin

    2002-01-01

    The AOX (adsorbable organic halogens) problem in wool shrinkproofing effluents has attracted more attention in recent years. The probable origins and structures of AOX compounds were proved by the reaction of DCCA with the model substances of different amino acid residues.The GC-MS results indicated that available chlorine could chlorinate the side chain of tyrosine, histidine and trypotophan and generate AOX load in the effluent.

  1. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Lacombe, Pierre J

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  2. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Organic Compounds' Impact on Indoor Air Quality Volatile Organic Compounds' Impact on Indoor Air Quality On this page: ... Exposure Standards or Guidelines Additional Resources Introduction Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted as gases from certain solids ...

  3. 地下水中氯代烃的格栅水处理技术%TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY OF VOLATILE CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN GROUNDWATER BY PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菲; 钟佐燊

    2001-01-01

    Volatile chlorinated organic compounds are the kind of organic contaminant that has the higher detection frequency in groundwater, and that is the main byproducts of drinking water disinfected with chlorine. The volatile chlorinated organic compounds have been proved to be harmful to human’s health by USEPA. This paper described the treatment technology of volatile chlorinated organic compounds in groundwater by permeable reactive barrier (PRB) including the materials of PRB, degradation mechanism, the factors of dechlorination efficient, and the problems of engineering and development direction. It introduces the newest development and practical value of reductive dechlorination by PRB. It proposes the potential and problems to be solved. Particularly, there are problems of catalytic principle and catalyst deactivation in bimetallic systems. The paper will give some study information for domestic researcher.%挥发性氯代烃是地下水中检出率较高的有机污染物,同时也是饮用水氯气消毒的副产物,而它对人体的危害也已经得到了USEPA等机构的认同。文中主要从格栅材料、降解机理、影响还原性脱氯效率的因素、实际工程中应注意的问题以及发展方向等方面,对地下水中挥发性氯代烃的处理技术进行了阐述,介绍了格栅处理地下水中挥发性氯代烃的最新进展和实际意义,提出了格栅系统的实际应用潜力和存在的问题,特别是双金属系统的催化机理和催化剂失活问题,给国内这方面的研究者提供思路。

  4. Reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine: Implications for herbicide transformation during drinking water disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusaksri, Sarinma; Sutthivaiyakit, Somyote; Sedlak, David L; Sutthivaiyakit, Pakawadee

    2012-03-30

    Phenylurea herbicides have been known to contaminate surface waters serving as potable supplies. To access the potential for transformation of these compounds during drinking water treatment, reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine at different pHs were investigated. The effect of substitution at the amino-N on the rate of transformation depends upon pH. Under acidic conditions, all of the phenylurea studied except 3,4-dichloro-3'-N-methylphenylurea (3,4-DCMPU) exhibited third-order kinetics, second order with respect to chlorine and first order with respect to phenylurea, while the reactions of 3,4-DCMPU were first order with respect to both chlorine and the organic compound. Under neutral and alkaline conditions, all compounds exhibited second-order kinetics that was first order with respect to chlorine and the organic compound. Apparent second-order rate constants at 25°C and pH 7 were 0.76 ± 0.16, 0.52 ± 0.11, 0.39 ± 0.02, 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.23 ± 0.05 M(-1)s(-1) for phenylurea, 3, 4-dichlorophenylurea, 3, 4-DCMPU, metoxuron and monuron, respectively. Studies of the chlorination products, monitored by LC/MS/MS, under different pH values indicated the reaction to take place at both N atoms and also at ortho- and para- positions of the phenylurea aromatic group. The main chlorinating species were found to be different in different pH ranges. Under conditions typically encountered in drinking water treatment systems, transformation of these compounds by chlorine will be incomplete.

  5. 催化燃烧脂肪族氯代易挥发性有机物的研究进展%Developments in catalytic combustion of aliphatic chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽雷; 张新民; 李子健; 刘绍英; 王公应

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic combustion is one of the most effective routes for treatment of waste gases containing low concentration volatile organic compounds(VOC). In this paper, the reaction mechanism for aliphatic chlorinated volatile organic compounds were reviewed. The properties and characteristics of the currently most focused-on catalysts, such as noble metal, transition metal oxides, perovskite-type composite oxides and molecular sieve, were outlined, too, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and trends. Influence of water vapor and non-chlorinated hydrocarbons in the waste gases on the catalytic oxidation was discussed.%催化燃烧是处理低浓度挥发性有机物废气的有效方法.阐述了催化燃烧脂肪族氯代易挥发性有机物的反应机理,对贵金属、过渡金属氧化物、钙钛矿型复合氧化物和分子筛近年来研究较广泛和深入的催化剂体系的性能和特点进行了论述,分析催化剂的优缺点.讨论了反应原料气中水和非氯代有机物的加入对催化反应效果的影响,对今后研究和发展方向进行展望.

  6. Reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine: Implications for herbicide transformation during drinking water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mechanism of chlorine reaction with phenylurea compounds has been studied. ► It depends on both chlorinating species and substitutents on the compounds. ► Main products were identified using LC–MS/MS and authentic standards. ► Their transformation under normal drinking water disinfection was predicted. - Abstract: Phenylurea herbicides have been known to contaminate surface waters serving as potable supplies. To access the potential for transformation of these compounds during drinking water treatment, reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine at different pHs were investigated. The effect of substitution at the amino-N on the rate of transformation depends upon pH. Under acidic conditions, all of the phenylurea studied except 3,4-dichloro-3′-N-methylphenylurea (3,4-DCMPU) exhibited third-order kinetics, second order with respect to chlorine and first order with respect to phenylurea, while the reactions of 3,4-DCMPU were first order with respect to both chlorine and the organic compound. Under neutral and alkaline conditions, all compounds exhibited second-order kinetics that was first order with respect to chlorine and the organic compound. Apparent second-order rate constants at 25 °C and pH 7 were 0.76 ± 0.16, 0.52 ± 0.11, 0.39 ± 0.02, 0.27 ± 0.04 and 0.23 ± 0.05 M−1 s−1 for phenylurea, 3, 4-dichlorophenylurea, 3, 4-DCMPU, metoxuron and monuron, respectively. Studies of the chlorination products, monitored by LC/MS/MS, under different pH values indicated the reaction to take place at both N atoms and also at ortho- and para- positions of the phenylurea aromatic group. The main chlorinating species were found to be different in different pH ranges. Under conditions typically encountered in drinking water treatment systems, transformation of these compounds by chlorine will be incomplete.

  7. Reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine: Implications for herbicide transformation during drinking water disinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chusaksri, Sarinma [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Kasetsart, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Sutthivaiyakit, Somyote [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok 10240 (Thailand); Sedlak, David L., E-mail: sedlak@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sutthivaiyakit, Pakawadee, E-mail: fscipws@ku.ac.th [Department of Chemistry and Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Kasetsart, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of chlorine reaction with phenylurea compounds has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It depends on both chlorinating species and substitutents on the compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main products were identified using LC-MS/MS and authentic standards. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their transformation under normal drinking water disinfection was predicted. - Abstract: Phenylurea herbicides have been known to contaminate surface waters serving as potable supplies. To access the potential for transformation of these compounds during drinking water treatment, reactions of phenylurea compounds with aqueous chlorine at different pHs were investigated. The effect of substitution at the amino-N on the rate of transformation depends upon pH. Under acidic conditions, all of the phenylurea studied except 3,4-dichloro-3 Prime -N-methylphenylurea (3,4-DCMPU) exhibited third-order kinetics, second order with respect to chlorine and first order with respect to phenylurea, while the reactions of 3,4-DCMPU were first order with respect to both chlorine and the organic compound. Under neutral and alkaline conditions, all compounds exhibited second-order kinetics that was first order with respect to chlorine and the organic compound. Apparent second-order rate constants at 25 Degree-Sign C and pH 7 were 0.76 {+-} 0.16, 0.52 {+-} 0.11, 0.39 {+-} 0.02, 0.27 {+-} 0.04 and 0.23 {+-} 0.05 M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for phenylurea, 3, 4-dichlorophenylurea, 3, 4-DCMPU, metoxuron and monuron, respectively. Studies of the chlorination products, monitored by LC/MS/MS, under different pH values indicated the reaction to take place at both N atoms and also at ortho- and para- positions of the phenylurea aromatic group. The main chlorinating species were found to be different in different pH ranges. Under conditions typically encountered in drinking water treatment systems, transformation of these compounds by chlorine will be

  8. Transformation of chlorinated compounds by methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekert, van M.H.A.

    1999-01-01

    Chlorinated compounds are an important group of contaminants often found in sediments, groundwater, soils, wastewaters, and off-gasses. Many of these pollutants are found on the EPA list of Priority Pollutants indicating their potential hazard for the environment. Initial degradation can occur via d

  9. Degradation of Chlorinated Aromatic Compounds in UASB Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Nina; Hendriksen, Hanne Vang; Järvinen, Kimmo T.;

    1995-01-01

    Data on anaerobic degradation of chloroaromatic compounds in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors (UASB-reactor) are presented and compared. Special attention is given to the metabolic pathways for degradation of chlorinated phenols by granular sludge. Results indicate that PCP can be degraded...

  10. 水中典型含氮有机物氯化生成消毒副产物的潜能研究%Chlorination Byproducts Formation Potentials of Typical Nitrogenous Organic Compounds in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐倩; 徐斌; 覃操; 夏圣骥; 高乃云; 田富箱; 李大鹏

    2011-01-01

    选取了受污染原水中广泛存在的12种含氮有机物(除草剂、杀虫剂、氨基酸、工业品等),开展了氯化和氯胺化培养生成典型消毒副产物的实验,目的是通过对水中脲类除草剂、嗪类除草剂和其他含氮化合物培养生成不同消毒副产物的生成量,讨论不同种类含氮化合物生成含碳和含氮消毒副产物规律以及考察不同消毒副产物的可能前体物.研究发现,脲类除草剂经过量氯化和氯胺化可产生多达9种消毒副产物,反应活性最高的绿麦隆可生成三氯甲烷(CF)、一氯乙酸(MCAA)、二氯乙酸(DCAA)、1,1-二氯丙酮(1,1-DCP)、1,1,1-三氯丙酮%Twelve typical nitrogenous organic compounds including herbicides,pesticides,amino acids,industrial products etc in polluted raw water were selected to investigate formation of typical carbonaceous and nitrogenous DBPs during chlorination and chloramination.To indentify the formation mechanism of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts from nitrogenous chemicals,chlorination and chloroamination of urea herbicides,triazine herbicides,amino acid,and other compounds were investigated.As a result,the potential precursors for different DBPs were defined as well.It has been identified that widely used urea herbicides could produce as many as 9 specific DBPs.The chlorotoluron shows highest reactivity and yields chloroform(CF),monochloroacetic acid(MCAA),dichloroacetic acid(DCAA),1,1-dichloro-acetone(1,1-DCP),1,1,1-trichloro-acetone(1,1,1-TCP),chloropicrin(NTCM),dichloro-acetonitrile(DCAN),dimethylnitrosamine(NDMA).The results indicated that aldicarb and dinoseb are important precursors of CF,DCAA,MCAA,NTCM as well.High concentrations of CF and DCAA were found during L-tryptophan chlorination.Furthermore,DBPs formation pathways and mechanisms were suggested during chlorination and chloramination of chlorotoluron,ametryn,dinoseb L-tryptophan.

  11. Complete Detoxification of Short Chain Chlorinated Aliphatic Compounds: Isolation of Halorespiring Organisms and Biochemical Studies of the Dehalogenating Enzyme Systems - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedje, J.M.

    1999-10-01

    Work focused on the isolation and characterization of halorespiring populations, and the initial investigation of the dechlorinating enzyme systems. In addition, tools to evaluate the presence/activity to halorespiring populations in the environment were developed. The tools developed in this work (measurements of hydrogen consumption thresholds, molecular probes) are relevant for regulatory agencies in order to facilitate decisions on which bioremediation technology (biostimulation or bioaugmentation) is most promising at a particular site. In addition, a better understanding of the physiology of the halorespiring organisms as well as the biochemistry of the dehalogenating enzyme systems enhances our knowledge of how these organisms can successfully be employed in the bioremediation of contaminated sites.

  12. Highly chlorinated unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants generated during the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes: A case study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Wenlong; Zhang, Linli; Li, Xiaoxiu

    2015-08-01

    The formation of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutants (POPs) may occur during various chlorination processes. In this study, emissions of unintentionally produced POPs during the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes were investigated. High concentrations of highly chlorinated compounds such as decachlorobiphenyl, octachloronaphthalene, octachlorostyrene, hexachlorobutadiene, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, hexachlorobenzene, and pentachlorobenzene were found in the carbon tetrachloride byproduct of the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes. The total emission amounts of hexachlorocyclopentadiene, hexachlorobutadiene, polychlorinated benzenes, polychlorinated naphthalenes, octachlorostyrene, and polychlorinated biphenyls released during the production of chlorinated methanes in China in 2010 were estimated to be 10080, 7350, 5210, 427, 212, and 167 kg, respectively. Moreover, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were formed unintentionally during chlorinated methanes production, the emission factor for PCDDs/DFs was 364 μg toxic equivalency quotient (TEQ) t(-1) product for residues, which should be added into the UNEP toolkit for updating. It was worth noting that a high overall toxic equivalency quotient from polychlorinated naphthalenes and PCDDs/DFs was generated from the chlorinated methanes production in China in 2010. The values reached 563 and 32.8 g TEQ, respectively. The results of the study indicate that more research and improved management systems are needed to ensure that the methanol-based production of chlorinated methanes can be achieved safely. PMID:25777670

  13. Advances in catalysts for catalytic combustion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds%含氯挥发性有机化合物催化燃烧催化剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚家伟; 李兵; 李林; 王小军; 陈英文; 祝社民; 沈树宝

    2016-01-01

    含氯挥发性有机化合物(CVOCs)是一类重要的大气污染物,催化燃烧是实现CVOCs高效减排的一种主流处理技术,但工艺过程中存在氯元素易吸附在催化剂表面致使催化剂失活的问题。本文从催化燃烧CVOCs的反应机理、催化剂活性组分、催化剂载体等几个方面,对近年来催化燃烧处理CVOCs的研究进行了综述,其中催化活性组分可分为以钌、钯为主的贵金属催化剂和集中在高活性的过渡金属复合氧化物、钙钛矿型非贵金属催化剂,并重点阐述了水蒸气对催化燃烧CVOCs反应活性的影响及机制。根据国内外研究状况和技术水平,提出了催化燃烧技术的研究及发展方向,充分利用一定浓度水蒸气的优点抑制催化剂氯中毒及产生较低含量的副产物,为CVOCs高效工业化处理提供了重要的参考。%Chlorinated volatile organic compounds(CVOCs) is a class of important air pollutants and catalytic combustion is a mainstream processing technology in efficiently reducing CVOCs’ emission, but that chlorine is easily adsorbed on the catalyst surface has resulted in the deactivation of the catalyst in the process. In this paper,the recent development in catalytic combustion of CVOCs with regard to reaction mechanism,active species,catalyst supports were examined,active species of catalysts can be divided into noble metal catalysts based on ruthenium,palladium and concentrated transition metal composite oxide,perovskite type non-noble metal catalysts with high activity. Additionally,the mechanism and effect of water vapor on catalytic combustion process is discussed. According to the global research status,research and development directions of the catalysts for catalytic combustion in the future are presented. Taking full advantages of a certain concentration of water vapor to inhibit chlorine poisoning of catalyst and producing fewer by-products provide an important reference for

  14. Investigation of chlorination of zirconium and hafnium and their compounds in discharge from hollow cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility is investigated of chlorinating various zirconium and hafnium compounds (metal, oxide, carbide) in a hot discharge from a hollow cathode with various chlorinating reagents: copper monochloride, nickel chloride, magnesium chloride, for the purpose of accelerating their entrance into the excitation zone. It has been shown thermodynamically and experimentally that chlorination of metal zirconium and hafnium and their carbides with copper monochloride in hot hollow cathode conditions provides a sharp increase in the intensity of the lines of these elements

  15. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Thornton, Kathleen R.; Northrup, Paul A.; Dunigan, Marisa R.; Ness, Katherine J.; Gellis, Austin B.

    2015-08-01

    Chloride--the most abundant ion in sea water--affects ocean salinity, and thereby seawater density and ocean circulation. Its lack of reactivity gives it an extremely long residence time. Other halogens are known to be incorporated into marine organic matter. However, evidence of similar transformations of seawater chloride is lacking, aside from emissions of volatile organochlorine by marine algae. Here we report high organochlorine concentrations from 180 to 700 mg kg-1 in natural particulate organic matter that settled into sediment traps at depths between 800 and 3,200 m in the Arabian Sea, taken between 1994 and 1995. X-ray spectromicroscopic imaging of chlorine bonding reveals that this organochlorine exists primarily in concentrated aliphatic forms consistent with lipid chlorination, along with a more diffuse aromatic fraction. High aliphatic organochlorine in particulate material from cultured phytoplankton suggests that primary production is a source of chlorinated organic matter. We also found that particulate algal detritus can act as an organic substrate for abiotic reactions involving Fe2+, H2O2 or light that incorporate chlorine into organic matter at levels up to several grams per kilogram. We conclude that transformations of marine chloride to non-volatile organochlorine through biological and abiotic pathways represent an oceanic sink for this relatively unreactive element.

  16. Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Farrington, J W

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussing chemical and geochemical aspects of biogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of...

  17. atmospheric volatile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Koss

    2016-07-01

    organic compounds (VOCs that cannot be ionized with H3O+ ions (e.g., in a PTR-MS or H3O+ CIMS instrument. Here we describe the adaptation of a high-resolution time-of-flight H3O+ CIMS instrument to use NO+ primary ion chemistry. We evaluate the NO+ technique with respect to compound specificity, sensitivity, and VOC species measured compared to H3O+. The evaluation is established by a series of experiments including laboratory investigation using a gas-chromatography (GC interface, in situ measurement of urban air using a GC interface, and direct in situ measurement of urban air. The main findings are that (1 NO+ is useful for isomerically resolved measurements of carbonyl species; (2 NO+ can achieve sensitive detection of small (C4–C8 branched alkanes but is not unambiguous for most; and (3 compound-specific measurement of some alkanes, especially isopentane, methylpentane, and high-mass (C12–C15 n-alkanes, is possible with NO+. We also demonstrate fast in situ chemically specific measurements of C12 to C15 alkanes in ambient air.

  18. Variation in assimilable organic carbon formation during chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingbin; Yuan, Ting; Ni, Huishan; Li, Yanpeng; Hu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter (EOM) solutions under different conditions, to determine how the metabolites produced by these organisms affect water safety and the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The effects of chlorine dosages, coagulant dosage, reaction time and temperature on the formation of AOC were investigated during the disinfection of M.aeruginosa metabolite solutions. The concentration of AOC followed a decreasing and then increasing pattern with increasing temperature and reaction time. The concentration of AOC decreased and then increased with increasing chlorination dosage, followed by a slight decrease at the highest level of chlorination. However, the concentration of AOC decreased continuously with increasing coagulant dosage. The formation of AOC can be suppressed under appropriate conditions. In this study, chlorination at 4mg/L, combined with a coagulant dose of 40mg/L at 20°C over a reaction time of 12hr, produced the minimum AOC. PMID:27372113

  19. Catalytic ozonation-biological coupled processes for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing refractory chlorinated nitroaromatic compounds*

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing-zhi; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Liang

    2010-01-01

    A treatability study of industrial wastewater containing chlorinated nitroaromatic compounds (CNACs) by a catalytic ozonation process (COP) with a modified Mn/Co ceramic catalyst and an aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated. A preliminary attempt to treat the diluted wastewater with a single SBR resulted in ineffective removal of the color, ammonia, total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Next, COP was applied as a pretreatment in order to obtain a bio-c...

  20. Volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal is: Not more emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than necessary. The items discussed in this presentation are the VOCs, how to calculate emission of VOCs, how to reduce or avoid them, and different recovery processes. The largest source of Norwegian emissions of non methane VOCs (NMVOCs) is offshore loading of raw petroleum. Emissions of VOCs should be reduced mainly for two reasons: (1) on sunny days NMVOCs may react with NOx to form ozon and smog close to the surface, (2) ozone and smog close to the surface may be harmful to plants and animals, and they are hazardous to human health. As for the calculation of VOC emissions, the VOCON project will release the calculation program HCGASS in 1999. This project is a cooperative project headed by SINTEF/Marintek

  1. Ozonated water and chlorine effects on the antioxidant properties of organic and conventional broccoli during postharvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Pace Pereira Lima

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in studies on sanitizers other than chlorine that can maintain the quality of organic products without affecting their phytochemical content. The effects of using chlorinated and ozonized water treatments, as sanitizing procedures, on the post-harvest quality of organic and conventional broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. cv. Italica was evaluated. The biochemical parameters (chlorophyll, polyphenols, flavonoids, vitamin C and antioxidant capacity of the broccoli samples were analyzed at day 0 (arrival of the plant from the field, original features, and 1, 4 and 7 days after harvest. The polyamine analysis was performed on arrival of the plant from the field and on the first and seventh days. The cultivation procedure influenced polyphenol, vitamin C and total chlorophyll content, and the highest value was observed in organic broccoli after the fourth day. Flavenoid content was higher in organic broccoli. The use of ozone appears not to have had an influence on the amount of polyphenolic, flavonoids and vitamin C during storage. Total chlorophyll content was less affected by ozonized water than by the chlorine treatment as at the first and fourth days of storage. The highest content of putrescine was found in conventional broccoli, while the highest levels of spermidine and spermine were found in organic broccoli. Antioxidant capacity was highest in organic broccoli after day 4 of storage and was affected by the bioactive compounds analyzed. Methods of cultivation influenced natural antioxidant and chlorophyll contents in broccoli under cold storage.

  2. Predicting total organic halide formation from drinking water chlorination using quantitative structure-property relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luilo, G B; Cabaniss, S E

    2011-10-01

    Chlorinating water which contains dissolved organic matter (DOM) produces disinfection byproducts, the majority of unknown structure. Hence, the total organic halide (TOX) measurement is used as a surrogate for toxic disinfection byproducts. This work derives a robust quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for predicting the TOX formation potential of model compounds. Literature data for 49 compounds were used to train the QSPR in moles of chlorine per mole of compound (Cp) (mol-Cl/mol-Cp). The resulting QSPR has four descriptors, calibration [Formula: see text] of 0.72 and standard deviation of estimation of 0.43 mol-Cl/mol-Cp. Internal and external validation indicate that the QSPR has good predictive power and low bias (‰<‰1%). Applying this QSPR to predict TOX formation by DOM surrogates - tannic acid, two model fulvic acids and two agent-based model assemblages - gave a predicted TOX range of 136-184 µg-Cl/mg-C, consistent with experimental data for DOM, which ranged from 78 to 192 µg-Cl/mg-C. However, the limited structural variation in the training data may limit QSPR applicability; studies of more sulfur-containing compounds, heterocyclic compounds and high molecular weight compounds could lead to a more widely applicable QSPR.

  3. Chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  4. Metals elements and chlorinated compounds in cetaceans; Elementi metallici e composti organoclorurati in cetacei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellicchio, N. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche. Ist. Sperimentale Talassografico, Taranto (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    Non-degradable pollutants determination in cetacea, high tropic level organisms, represents an evaluating element both for bioaccumulation phenomena and sea ecosystem quality. In this paper is shown determination results for metals, chlorinated pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in Stenella coeruleoalba specimens, beached along the coast of Puglia (Italy), in the period February-June 1987. Chemical-toxicological surveys verified that in there Mediterranean marine mammals pollutant accumulation is higher than in Atlantic species. Lipophylous toxical compounds transferred from mothers to offspring represents a high risk for their survival. even though this survey failed to establish a direct cause-effect relationship between pollutant levels and anatomical-pathological lesions, it is apparent that sea pollution phenomena are reflected negatively in the top of the food chains.

  5. The natural chlorine cycle - Formation of the carcinogenic and greenhouse gas compound chloroform in drinking water reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forczek, Sándor T; Pavlík, Milan; Holík, Josef; Rederer, Luděk; Ferenčík, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine cycle in natural ecosystems involves formation of low and high molecular weight organic compounds of living organisms, soil organic matter and atmospherically deposited chloride. Chloroform (CHCl3) and adsorbable organohalogens (AOX) are part of the chlorine cycle. We attempted to characterize the dynamical changes in the levels of total organic carbon (TOC), AOX, chlorine and CHCl3 in a drinking water reservoir and in its tributaries, mainly at its spring, and attempt to relate the presence of AOX and CHCl3 with meteorological, chemical or biological factors. Water temperature and pH influence the formation and accumulation of CHCl3 and affect the conditions for biological processes, which are demonstrated by the correlation between CHCl3 and ΣAOX/Cl(-) ratio, and also by CHCl3/ΣAOX, CHCl3/AOXLMW, CHCl3/ΣTOC, CHCl3/TOCLMW and CHCl3/Cl(-) ratios in different microecosystems (e.g. old spruce forest, stagnant acidic water, humid and warm conditions with high biological activity). These processes start with the biotransformation of AOX from TOC, continue via degradation of AOX to smaller molecules and further chlorination, and finish with the formation of small chlorinated molecules, and their subsequent volatilization and mineralization. The determined concentrations of chloroform result from a dynamic equilibrium between its formation and degradation in the water; in the Hamry water reservoir, this results in a total amount of 0.1-0.7 kg chloroform and 5.2-15.4 t chloride. The formation of chloroform is affected by Cl(-) concentration, by concentrations and ratios of biogenic substrates (TOC and AOX), and by the ratios of the substrates and the product (feedback control by chloroform itself). PMID:27231877

  6. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

    2008-01-01

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue...

  7. Xenobiotic organic compounds in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Baun, Anders; Henze, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    Information regarding the contents of xenobiotic organic compounds (XOCs) in wastewater is limited, but it has been shown that at least 900 different compounds / compound groups could potentially be present in grey wastewater. Analyses of Danish grey wastewater revealed the presence of several...... hundred of XOCs, among them mainly originating from hygiene products: chlorophenols, detergents and phthalates. Several compounds not deriving from hygiene products were also identified e.g. flame-retardants and drugs. A environmental hazard identification showed that a large number of compounds with high...... aquatic toxicity were present and that data for environmental fate could only be retrieved for about half of the compounds....

  8. Measurement of the collection efficiency and adsorptive distribution of semi and low volatile organic chlorine (SLVOCI) in flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakura, A. [Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, Osaka (Japan); Watanabe, N.; Minami, Y.; Mizutani, S.; Takatsuki, H. [Kyoto University Environment Preservation Center, Kyoto (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Municipal waste incineration (MWI) flue gas includes various organic halogen compounds, which show a close correlation between PCDD/Fs concentration and organic halogen group parameters, e.g. TOX and SNVOX. Last year, we reported a newly developed sampling method and atomic emission spectrophotometry system equipped with barrier discharge radio-frequency helium plasma, which detect organic halogen compounds with the advantages of elemental selectivity, high sensitivity and robustness. In this sampling system, flue gas was directed to a two-drain trap and two empty impingers, which removed drain water, hydrochloric acid and moisture (Fig. 1). After those four impingers, semi and low volatile organic halogens (SLVOX) were captured with two different adsorbents. Carbotrap C was the adsorbent for LVOX and Carbotrap B was for SVOX. The flow rate and the sampled gas were 2 L/min and 10-40 L, respectively. In this paper, in order to investigate the passage efficiency through the drain trap and the adsorptive distribution to Carbotrap C and B of various organic chlorinated compounds, chlorinated benzenes (CBs) and chlorinated phenols (CPs) were tested in the sampling system as model organic halogen compounds.

  9. The activation of thin film CdTe solar cells using alternative chlorine containing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniscalco, B., E-mail: B.Maniscalco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom); Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Kaminski, P.M.; Bass, K. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom); West, G. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    The re-crystallisation of thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) using cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) is a vital process for obtaining high efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, the precise micro-structural mechanisms involved are not well understood. In this study, we have used alternative chlorine-containing compounds to determine if these can also assist the re-crystallisation of the CdTe layer and to understand the separate roles of cadmium and chlorine during the activation. The compounds used were: tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl{sub 4}), cadmium acetate (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}). TeCl{sub 4} was used to assess the role of Cl and the formation of a Te-rich outer layer which may assist the formation of the back contact. (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}) and HCl were used to distinguish between the roles of cadmium and chlorine in the process. Finally, ZnCl{sub 2} was employed as an alternative to CdCl{sub 2}. We report on the efficacy of using these alternative Cl-containing compounds to remove the high density of planar defects present in untreated CdTe. - Highlights: • Cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) activation treatment • Alternative chlorine containing compounds • Microstructure analysis and electrical performances.

  10. Organic Compounds in Stardust

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

    2011-01-01

    The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

  11. Organophosphorus Compounds in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, Muhammad Anwar; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-25

    This Minireview describes recent advances of organophosphorus compounds as opto-electronic materials in the field of organic electronics. The progress of (hetero-) phospholes, unsaturated phosphanes, and trivalent and pentavalent phosphanes since 2010 is covered. The described applications of organophosphorus materials range from single molecule sensors, field effect transistors, organic light emitting diodes, to polymeric materials for organic photovoltaic applications.

  12. Organophosphorus Compounds in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameem, Muhammad Anwar; Orthaber, Andreas

    2016-07-25

    This Minireview describes recent advances of organophosphorus compounds as opto-electronic materials in the field of organic electronics. The progress of (hetero-) phospholes, unsaturated phosphanes, and trivalent and pentavalent phosphanes since 2010 is covered. The described applications of organophosphorus materials range from single molecule sensors, field effect transistors, organic light emitting diodes, to polymeric materials for organic photovoltaic applications. PMID:27276233

  13. Correlation of low volatile organic chlorine (LVOCI) and PCDD/Fs in verious municipal waste incinerators (MWI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, N.; Minami, Y.; Mizutani, S.; Takatsuki, H. [Kyoto University Environment Preservation Center, Kyoto (Japan); Takakura, A. [Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, Osaka (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Formation of PCDD/Fs through combustion has been a matter of concern for a few decades. As research on the formation mechanism has advanced, it has been revealed that PCDD/Fs are only a limited fraction of the various organic chlorinated compounds. For this reason, the group parameter of ''organic halogens'' is considered to be a good indicator or surrogate for PCDD/Fs. However, the traditional method of halogen determination using combustion - coulometric titration is neither selective nor sensitive to the elements. This problem was overcome by the development of atomic emission spectrometry (AES) detection of halogens using radiofrequency helium plasma. This method was initially introduced by Rice et al in 1985 as a GC detector and improved by others. We have modified the plasma to barrier discharge and simplified the optical detection. Gaseous organic chlorine was determined by adsorptive collection and direct introduction of thermally desorbed sample to the plasma. In order to examine the correlation of organic chlorine and PCDD/Fs, we have measured organic chlorine in conjunction with the legislated periodical PCDD/Fs inspections of MWI stack gas emissions in Osaka City, Japan. From data collected during 2001, a fairly good correlation between low-volatile organic chlorine (LVOCl) and PCDD/Fs was found, while semi-volatile organic chlorine (SVOCl) gave a poor correlation with PCDD/Fs. However, a study conducted in 2002 resulted in some shift of the regression line of LVOCl - PCDD/Fs. As the determination of LVOCl involves fractionation based on boiling points (b.p.), it is expected that removal of PCDD/Fs with adsorptive devices influences the regression. In this paper, the experimental results are summarized and the effect of the gas treatment condition on the correlation between LVOCl and PCDD/Fs is discussed.

  14. ASCORBIC ACID REDUCTION OF ACTIVE CHLORINE PRIOR TO DETERMINING AMES MUTAGENICITY OF CHLORINATED NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many potable water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that result from the reaction of natural organic matter (NOM) with oxidizing chlorine are known or suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. The Ames assay is routinely used to assess an overall level of mutagenicity for all com...

  15. Breakpoint chlorination curves of greywater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, J G; Gual, M

    2007-08-01

    A study on chlorination of raw greywater with hypochlorite is reported in this paper. Samples were chlorinated in a variety of conditions, and residual chlorine (Cl2) was measured spectrophotometrically. For each sample, the chlorination curve (chlorine residuals versus chlorine dose) was obtained. Curves showed the typical hump-and-dip profile attributable to the formation and destruction of chloramines. It was observed that, after reactions with strong reductants and chloramines-forming compounds, the remaining organic matter exerted a certain demand of chlorine. The evolution of chlorination curves with addition of ammonia and dodecylbencene sulfonate sodium salt and with dilution of the greywater sample were studied. In addition, chlorination curves at several contact times have been obtained, resulting in slower chlorine decay in the hump zone than in the dip zone. In addition, the decay of coliforms in chlorinated samples was also investigated. It was found that, for a chlorination dosage corresponding to the maximum of the hump zone (average 8.9 mg Cl2/ L), samples were negative in coliforms after 10 to 30 minutes of contact time. After-growth was not observed within 3 days after chlorination. Implications in chlorination treatments of raw greywater can be derived from these results. PMID:17824528

  16. Natural solar photolysis of total organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Hua, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Municipal wastewater has been increasingly used to augment drinking water supplies due to the growing water scarcity. Wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) may negatively affect the aquatic ecosystems and human health of downstream communities during water reuse. The objective of this research was to determine the degradation kinetics of total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr) and iodine (TOI) in water by natural sunlight irradiation. Outdoor solar photolysis experiments were performed to investigate photolytic degradation of the total organic halogen (TOX) formed by fulvic acid and real water and wastewater samples. The results showed that TOX degradation by sunlight irradiation followed the first-order kinetics with half-lives in the range of 2.6-10.7 h for different TOX compounds produced by fulvic acid. The TOX degradation rates were generally in the order of TOI > TOBr ≅ TOCl(NH2Cl) > TOCl(Cl2). High molecular weight TOX was more susceptible to solar photolysis than corresponding low molecular weight halogenated compounds. The nitrate and sulfite induced indirect TOX photolysis rates were less than 50% of the direct photolysis rates under the conditions of this study. Fulvic acid and turbidity in water reduced TOX photodegradation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the fate of chlorinated, brominated and iodinated DBPs in surface waters.

  17. Impact of bromide on halogen incorporation into organic moieties in chlorinated drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J; Allard, S; Gruchlik, Y; McDonald, S; Joll, C A; Heitz, A

    2016-01-15

    The impact of elevated bromide concentrations (399 to 750 μg/L) on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs), namely trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), in two drinking water systems was investigated. Bromine was the main halogen incorporated into all of the DBP classes and into organic carbon, even though chlorine was present in large excess to maintain a disinfectant residual. Due to the higher reactivity of bromine compared to chlorine, brominated DBPs were rapidly formed, followed by a slower increase in chlorinated DBPs. Higher bromine substitution and incorporation factors for individual DBP classes were observed for the chlorinated water from the groundwater source (lower concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)), which contained a higher concentration of bromide, than for the surface water source (higher DOC). The molar distribution of adsorbable organic bromine to chlorine (AOBr/AOCl) for AOX in the groundwater distribution system was 1.5:1 and almost 1:1 for the surface water system. The measured (regulated) DBPs only accounted for 16 to 33% of the total organic halogen, demonstrating that AOX measurements are essential to provide a full understanding of the formation of halogenated DBPs in drinking waters. In addition, the study demonstrated that a significant proportion (up to 94%) of the bromide in source waters can be converted AOBr. An evaluation of AOBr and AOCl through a second groundwater treatment plant that uses conventional treatment processes for DOC removal produced 70% of AOX as AOBr, with 69% of the initial source water bromide converted to AOBr. Exposure to organobromine compounds is suspected to result in greater adverse health consequences than their chlorinated analogues. Therefore, this study highlights the need for improved methods to selectively reduce the bromide content in source waters.

  18. Chlorinated aromatic compounds in a thermal process promoted by oxychlorination of ferric chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takaoka, Masaki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2010-03-15

    The relationship between the formation of chlorinated aromatic (aromatic-Cl) compounds and ferric chloride in the solid phase during a thermal process motivated us to study the chemical characteristics of iron in a model solid sample, a mixture of FeCl(3) x 6H(2)O, activated carbon, and boron nitride, with increasing temperature. Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy revealed drastic changes in the chemical form of amorphous iron, consistent with other analytical methods, such as X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation (SR-XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Atomic-scale evidence of the chlorination of aromatic carbon was detected by Cl-K X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. These results showed the thermal formation mechanism of aromatic-Cl compounds in the solid phase with ferric chloride. We attribute the formation of aromatic-Cl compounds to the chlorination of carbon, based on the oxychlorination reaction of FeCl(3) at temperatures in excess of ca. 300 degrees C, when the carbon matrix is activated by carbon gasification, catalyzed by Fe(2)O(3), and surface oxygen complexes (SOC) generated by a catalytic cycle of FeCl(2) and FeOCl. Chemical changes of trace iron in a thermal process may offer the potential to generate aromatic-Cl compounds in the solid phase.

  19. Sulfated compounds from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornprobst, J M; Sallenave, C; Barnathan, G

    1998-01-01

    More than 500 sulfated compounds have been isolated from marine organisms so far but most of them originate from two phyla only, Spongia and Echinodermata. The sulfated compounds are presented according to the phyla they have been identified from and to their chemical structures. Biological activities, when available, are also given. Macromolecules have also been included in this review but without structural details. PMID:9530808

  20. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain BCP1, a Biodegrader of Alkanes and Chlorinated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, M.; Di Gennaro, P.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Landini, M.; Fedi, S.; Frascari, D.; Presentato, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 cometabolizes chlorinated compounds and mineralizes a broad range of alkanes, as it is highly tolerant to them. The high-quality draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1, consisting of 6,231,823 bp, with a G+C content of 70.4%, 5,902 protein-coding genes, and 58 RNA genes, is presented here. PMID:24158549

  1. Formation of disinfection byproducts upon chlorine dioxide preoxidation followed by chlorination or chloramination of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Lee, Wontae

    2013-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is often used as an oxidant to remove taste, odor and color during water treatment. Due to the concerns of the chlorite formation, chlorination or chloramination is often applied after ClO2 preoxidation. We investigated the formation of regulated and emerging disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in sequential ClO2-chlorination and ClO2-chloramination processes. To clarify the relationship between the formation of DBPs and the characteristics of natural organic matter (NOM), changes in the properties of NOM before and after ClO2 oxidation were characterized by fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and size and resin fractionation techniques. ClO2 preoxidation destroyed the aromatic and conjugated structures of NOM and transformed large aromatic and long aliphatic chain organics to small and hydrophilic organics. Treatment with ClO2 alone did not produce significant amount of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), but produced chlorite. ClO2 preoxidation reduced THMs, HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs) and chloral hydrate (CH) during subsequent chlorination, but no reduction of THMs was observed during chloramination. Increasing ClO2 doses enhanced the reduction of most DBPs except halonitromethanes (HNMs) and haloketones (HKs). The presence of bromide increased the formation of total amount of DBPs and also shifted DBPs to more brominated ones. Bromine incorporation was higher in ClO2 treated samples. The results indicated that ClO2 preoxidation prior to chlorination is applicable for control of THM, HAA and HAN in both pristine and polluted waters, but chlorite formation is a concern and HNMs and HKs are not effectively controlled by ClO2 preoxidation.

  2. Prechlorination of algae-laden water: The effects of transportation time on cell integrity, algal organic matter release, and chlorinated disinfection byproduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jing; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Ruiping; Miao, Shiyu; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-10-01

    The prechlorination-induced algal organic matter (AOM) released from Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) cells has been reported to serve as a source of precursors for chlorinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, previous studies have mainly focused on the precursors either extracted directly from the cell suspension or derived immediately after algal suspension prechlorination. This study aims to investigate the impacts of water transportation time after algal suspension prechlorination on cell integrity, AOM release, and DBP formation during the dissolved phase chlorination. The damage to cell integrity after prechlorination was indicated to depend not only on chlorine dose but also on transportation time. The highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) values were observed at 2 mg/L chlorine preoxidation before transportation, but were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine after 480-min simulated transportation. The variation of DON with transportation time was indicated to be mainly influenced by the small molecular weight nitrogenous organic compounds, such as amino acids. Additionally, formation of the corresponding chlorinated carbonaceous disinfection byproducts (C-DBPs) and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) during the dissolved phase chlorination showed the same variation tendency as DOC and DON respectively. The highest C-DBP (98.4 μg/L) and N-DBP (5.5 μg/L) values were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine preoxidation after 480-min simulated transportation. Therefore, when prechlorination is applied for algae-laden water pretreatment, not only chlorine dose but also transportation time needs to be considered with regard to their effects on cell integrity, AOM release, and chlorinated DBP formation.

  3. Prechlorination of algae-laden water: The effects of transportation time on cell integrity, algal organic matter release, and chlorinated disinfection byproduct formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jing; Lan, Huachun; Liu, Ruiping; Miao, Shiyu; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-10-01

    The prechlorination-induced algal organic matter (AOM) released from Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) cells has been reported to serve as a source of precursors for chlorinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, previous studies have mainly focused on the precursors either extracted directly from the cell suspension or derived immediately after algal suspension prechlorination. This study aims to investigate the impacts of water transportation time after algal suspension prechlorination on cell integrity, AOM release, and DBP formation during the dissolved phase chlorination. The damage to cell integrity after prechlorination was indicated to depend not only on chlorine dose but also on transportation time. The highest dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) values were observed at 2 mg/L chlorine preoxidation before transportation, but were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine after 480-min simulated transportation. The variation of DON with transportation time was indicated to be mainly influenced by the small molecular weight nitrogenous organic compounds, such as amino acids. Additionally, formation of the corresponding chlorinated carbonaceous disinfection byproducts (C-DBPs) and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) during the dissolved phase chlorination showed the same variation tendency as DOC and DON respectively. The highest C-DBP (98.4 μg/L) and N-DBP (5.5 μg/L) values were obtained at 0.4 mg/L chlorine preoxidation after 480-min simulated transportation. Therefore, when prechlorination is applied for algae-laden water pretreatment, not only chlorine dose but also transportation time needs to be considered with regard to their effects on cell integrity, AOM release, and chlorinated DBP formation. PMID:27348194

  4. Students' Categorizations of Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domin, Daniel S.; Al-Masum, Mohammad; Mensah, John

    2008-01-01

    Categorization is a fundamental psychological ability necessary for problem solving and many other higher-level cognitive tasks. In organic chemistry, students must establish groupings of different chemical compounds in order not only to solve problems, but also to understand course content. Classic models of categorization emphasize similarity as…

  5. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2008-07-02

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  6. Ozonated water and chlorine effects on the antioxidant properties of organic and conventional broccoli during postharvest

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppina Pace Pereira Lima; Tatiana Marquini Machado; Luciana Manoel de Oliveira; Luciana da Silva Borges; Valber de Albuquerque Pedrosa; Paola Vanzani; Fabio Vianello

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest in studies on sanitizers other than chlorine that can maintain the quality of organic products without affecting their phytochemical content. The effects of using chlorinated and ozonized water treatments, as sanitizing procedures, on the post-harvest quality of organic and conventional broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.) cv. Italica was evaluated. The biochemical parameters (chlorophyll, polyphenols, flavonoids, vitamin C and antioxidant capacity) of the broccoli sample...

  7. Nomenclature on an organic compound (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is about nomenclature on an organic compound, which includes introduction with general principle on nomenclature on compounds it describes hydrocarbon like terpene hydrocarbon, basic heterocyclic organic compound including carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, halogen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium such as nomenclature system, halogen derivatives, alcohol and phenol derivatives, compound with sulfur, amino, nitroso and nitro compound, amino radical ion, azo and azoxy compound, compound including an atom group, hydrazine and derivatives.

  8. Effects of assimilable organic carbon and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Liu

    Full Text Available Assimilable organic carbon (AOC is one of the most important factors affecting the re-growth of microorganisms in drinking water. High AOC concentrations result in biological instability, but disinfection kills microbes to ensure the safety of drinking water. Free chlorine is an important oxidizing agent used during the disinfection process. Therefore, we explored the combined effects of AOC and free chlorine on bacterial growth in drinking water using flow cytometry (FCM. The initial AOC concentration was 168 μg.L(-1 in all water samples. Without free chlorine, the concentrations of intact bacteria increased but the level of AOC decreased. The addition of sodium hypochlorite caused an increase and fluctuation in AOC due to the oxidation of organic carbon. The concentrations of intact bacteria decreased from 1.1 × 10(5 cells.mL(-1 to 2.6 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.6 mg.L(-1 to 4.8 × 10(4 cells.mL(-1 at an initial free chlorine dose of 0.3 mg.L(-1 due to free chlorine originating from sodium hypochlorite. Additionally, free chlorine might be more obviously affected AOC concentrations than microbial growth did. These results suggested that AOC and free chlorine might have combined effects on microbial growth. In this study, our results showed concentrations determined by FCM were higher than those by HPC, which indicated that some E. coli detected by FCM might not be detected using HPC in drinking water. The level of free chlorine might restrain the consumption of AOC by inhibiting the growth of E. coli; on the other hand, chlorination might increase the level of AOC, thereby increase the potential for microbial growth in the drinking water network.

  9. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in January 2010 and March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Gerald; Birk, Manfred; de Lange, Arno; Oelhaf, Hermann; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Kirner, Oliver; Kleinert, Anne; Maucher, Guido; Nordmeyer, Hans; Orphal, Johannes; Ruhnke, Roland; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin

    2014-05-01

    Arctic winters 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were characterized by strong vortices with extremely cold temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia. Hence, the occurrence of widespread polar stratospheric clouds enabled a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx) which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 24 January 2010 and 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortices have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine is undergoing activation and deactivation. The first flight was carried out in very cold chlorine-activated air with widespread polar stratospheric clouds. The second one was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The Terahertz and submillimeter Limb Sounder TELIS was mounted on the MIPAS balloon gondola. TELIS is able to detect the chlorine species ClO and HCl. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget in the stratosphere has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. Observations are compared and discussed with calculations performed with the 3-dimensional Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry).

  10. Monitoring of the aerobe biodegradation of chlorinated organic solvents by stable isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Anikó; Futó, István; Palcsu, László

    2014-05-01

    Our chemical-biological basic research aims to eliminate chlorinated environmental contaminants from aquifers around industrial areas in the frame of research program supported by the European Social Fund (TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0043). The most careful and simplest way includes the in situ biodegradation with the help of cultured and compound specific strains. Numerous members of Pseudomonas bacteria are famous about function of bioremediation. They can metabolism the environmental hazardous chemicals like gas oils, dyes, and organic solvents. Our research based on the Pseudomonas putida F1 strain, because its ability to degrade halogenated hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene. Several methods were investigated to estimate the rate of biodegradation, such as the measurement of the concentration of the pollutant along the contamination pathway, the microcosm's studies or the compound specific stable isotope analysis. In this area in the Transcarpathian basin we are pioneers in the stable isotope monitoring of biodegradation. The main goal is to find stable isotope fractionation factors by stable isotope analysis, which can help us to estimate the rate and effectiveness of the biodegradation. The subsequent research period includes the investigation of the method, testing its feasibility and adaptation in the environment. Last but not least, the research gives an opportunity to identify the producer of the contaminant based on the stable isotope composition of the contaminant.

  11. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine species observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, G.; Oelhaf, H.; Birk, M.; de Lange, A.; Engel, A.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Kirner, O.; Kleinert, A.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Orphal, J.; Ruhnke, R.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Vogt, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Arctic winter 2010/2011 was characterized by a persistent vortex with extremely low temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia leading to a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx) like Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClOOCl, OClO, and HOCl, which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. The MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) and TELIS (TErahertz and submillimeter LImb Sounder) balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortex have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine has been undergoing activation and deactivation. This flight was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget for 31 March 2011, assumed to be representative for the late-winter Arctic stratosphere, has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. A total chlorine amount of 3.41 ± 0.30 parts per billion by volume is inferred from the measurements (above 24 km). This value is in line with previous stratospheric observations carried out outside the tropics confirming the slightly decreasing chlorine amount in the stratosphere. Observations are compared and discussed with the output of a multi-year simulation performed with the chemistry climate model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry). The simulated stratospheric total chlorine amount is in accordance with the MIPAS-B/TELIS observations, taking into account the fact that some chlorine source gases and very short-lived species are not included in the model.

  12. Partitioning and budget of inorganic and organic chlorine species observed by MIPAS-B and TELIS in the Arctic in March 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wetzel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic winter 2010/11 was characterized by a persisting vortex with extremely cold temperatures in the lower stratosphere above northern Scandinavia leading to a strong activation of chlorine compounds (ClOx like Cl, Cl2, ClO, ClOOCl, OClO, and HOCl which rapidly destroyed ozone when sunlight returned after winter solstice. MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding and TELIS (Terahertz and submillimeter Limb Sounder balloon measurements obtained in northern Sweden on 31 March 2011 inside the polar vortex have provided vertical profiles of inorganic and organic chlorine species as well as diurnal variations of ClO around sunrise over the whole altitude range in which chlorine is undergoing activation and deactivation. This flight was performed at the end of the winter during the last phase of ClOx deactivation. The complete inorganic and organic chlorine partitioning and budget in the stratosphere has been derived by combining MIPAS-B and TELIS simultaneously observed molecules. A total chlorine amount of 3.41 ± 0.30 ppbv is inferred from the measurements. This value is in line with previously carried out stratospheric observations confirming the slightly decreasing chlorine trend in the stratosphere. Observations are compared and discussed with the output of a multi-year simulation performed with the Chemistry Climate Model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry. The simulated stratospheric total chlorine amount is in accordance with the MIPAS-B/TELIS observation taking into account the fact that some chlorine source gases and very short lived species are not included in the model.

  13. Dechlorination progress of chlorinated organic pollutants degraded by use of ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics and mechanisms of dechlorination of chlorinated organic pollutants induced by ionizing radiation were described in this article. The progress on the dechlorination of chlorophenols, polychlorinated biphenyl, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene involved in radiolysis was also reviewed. In oxidative condition, hydroxyl radical (·OH) would attack chlorophenol to form ·OH-adducts, which could be dechlorinated gradually. However, chlorophenol can be directly reduced by hydrated electron (eaq-) to release Cl-. It was found that radiolytic degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in organic solvent would release chlorine atoms gradually by chain reactions and the final products were Cl- and biphenyl. Trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene mainly reacted with ·OH with the final products of CO2, HCOOH and HCI. As conclusion, the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organic pollutants possesses advantages of high degradation efficiency, simple products and relatively low radiation dose compared with the oxidation methods. (authors)

  14. Spatial patterns and storage of organic chlorine and chloride in coniferous forest soil in south-east Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Wesström, Karin

    2002-01-01

    The concentration and storage of organic chlorine and chloride were determined in soil, to a depth of 40 cm, in a coniferous forest in the Stubbetorp catchment area in south-east Sweden. Also, the spatial distribution of the two forms of chlorine was determined. Soil samples were collected at 49 of the nodes in a grid with approximately 105 m between the nodes. The analysis of spatial variability suggested that no spatial autocorrelation was present either within the variable organic chlorine...

  15. 污水中溶解性有机氮类化合物的氯化反应特性及其消毒副产物生成潜能%Chlorination Characteristic and Disinfection By-product Formation Potential of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Municipal Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冰; 于鑫; 余国忠; 古励; 赵承美; 翟慧敏; 李清飞

    2013-01-01

    为探讨城市污水厂二级出水中溶解性有机氮(dissolved organic nitrogen,DON)类化合物的氯化消毒副产物生成潜能及其化学结构变化,首先测定DON、溶解性有机炭(dissolved organic carbon,DOC)、NH4+-N和UV254等指标以及与氯反应前后DON相对分子质量分布,并采用气相色谱测定消毒副产物(disinfection by-products,DBPs)质量浓度,最后应用红外光谱和三维荧光光谱对与氯反应前后的水样进行表征.结果表明,城市污水厂二级出水中DON、DOC、UV254和NH4+-N分别为2.47mg·L-1、14.45 mg·L-1、15.88 m-1和5.42 mg·L-1,DOC与DON比值[m(DOC)/m(DON)]为5.85 mg·mg-1,SUVA为1.09L·(m·mg)-1;与氯反应后,小相对分子质量(Mr<6 000) DON所占比例由70%提高到78%,大相对分子质量(Mr>20 000)DON所占比例从21%降到14%,占较小比例的中等相对分子质量(Mr6 000 ~ 20 000)DON基本不变;氯化消毒副产物生成潜能中一氯一溴乙腈(BCAN)质量浓度最大为6.887 μg·L-1,三氯乙腈(TCAN)质量浓度最小仅为0.217 μg· L-1;与氯反应前,水样的红外光谱出现6个主要吸收区域分别在3 500 ~3 400、2 260 ~2 200、1 700~1 640、1 500 ~1 450、1 150 ~1 100和850~ 800 cm-;与氯反应后水样的红外光谱在1 380 ~1 350 cm-1“和600 ~ 550 cm-增加两个吸收区域;三维荧光光谱证实,与氯反应前后水样中变化与3个主要特征峰有关,分别代表色氨酸类蛋白质、芳香族类蛋白质和富里酸类等物质.%In order to explore the chlorinated disinfection by-product formation potential and chemical structure of dissolved organic nitrogen compounds in municipal wastewater,the water quality parameters,such as DON,DOC,NH4+-N and UV254 etc,were determined in the secondary effluent and the molecular weight distribution of the DON was investigated before and after the reaction with chlorine.DBPs were determined by gas chromatography,and the changes of DON were characterized

  16. Chemical aspects of incinerating highly chlorinated and actinide α contaminated organic waste: application to the Iris process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fraction of the waste produced by nuclear activities is combustible, and thus suitable for incineration to produce gases, ash and fines. A typical composition representative of actual organic waste mixtures was defined for the purpose of investigating possible heat treatment processes; the composition is identified according to components Table 1 and elements Table II. The high polyvinyl chloride (PVC) content is responsible for the high chlorine potential in the process equipment. The quantity and quality of the resulting solid residue depends entirely on the inorganic load of the organic waste, whose behavior is entirely conditioned by the process conditions. For example, pure polyethylene is totally converted to gases (water and carbon dioxide), while the composition shown in Table II produces a range of oxides and chlorides. The high chlorine content results in partial chlorination of the inorganic compounds, but can also lead to interactions with the process equipment. The temperature dependent variation of the chlorination equilibrium constants of various metals clearly shows that all the elements of technological alloys may be subject to active corrosion by hydrochloric acid. However, the corresponding oxides-notably alumina-are much less sensitive to corrosion; aluminum-based alloys are therefore preferred for incinerator construction and to limit corrosion by hydrochloric acid. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies led to the development of the IRIS three-step process. Gas emissions occurring during processing of solid materials are completely oxidized in the after-burning step at 1100 deg C, and are then ducted to a HERA filtration system capable of retaining all the actinide α radionuclides. Although corrosion-related problems are attenuated in the two-step process chlorine can combine with the inorganic waste material to form chlorides with potentially damaging effects on the system; this is the case for zinc chloride and for volatile chlorides in

  17. Effect of nitrite on the formation of halonitromethanes during chlorination of organic matter from different origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Huachang; Qian, Lingya; Xiao, Zhuoqun; Zhang, Jianqing; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun; Yu, Haiying; Shen, Liguo; Liang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of halonitromethanes (HNMs) in drinking water has been a public concern due to the potential risks to human health. Though quite a lot of work has been carried out to understand the formation of HNMs, the relationship between HNMs formation and the nitrite remains unclear. In this study, the effects of nitrite on the formation of HNMs during chlorination of organic matter from different origin were assessed. Organic matter (OM) derived from phoenix tree (fallen leaves: FLOM; green leaves: GLOM) and Microcystis aeruginosa (intracellular organic matter: IOM) were used to mimic the allochthonous and autochthonous organic matter in surface water, respectively. Results showed that HNMs yields were significantly enhanced with the addition of nitrite, and the highest enhancement was observed for FLOM, successively followed by GLOM and IOM, suggesting that the contribution of nitrite to HNMs formation was positively related with SUVA (an indicator for aromaticity) of OM. Therefore, the nitrite contamination should be strictly controlled for the source water dominated by allochthonous OM, which may significantly reduce the formation of HNMs during chlorination. Moreover, given a certain nitrite level, the higher pH resulted in higher stimulation of HNM formation, yet the chlorine dose (always added in excess resulting in residual reactive chlorine), reaction time and temperature did not show obvious influence.

  18. Formation of haloacetamides during chlorination of dissolved organic nitrogen aspartic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Wenhai, E-mail: 1world1water@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Gao Naiyun [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Deng Yang, E-mail: yang.deng@upr.edu [Department of Civil Engineering and Surveying, University of Puerto Rico, P.O. Box 9041, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, 00681-9041 (Puerto Rico)

    2010-01-15

    The stability of haloacetamides (HAcAms) such as dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) and trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) was studied under different experimental conditions. The yield of HAcAms during aspartic acid (Asp) chlorination was measured at different molar ratio of chlorine atom to nitrogen atom (Cl/N), pH and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly consisted of humic acid (HA) mixture. Ascorbic acid showed a better capacity to prevent the decay of DCAcAm and TCAcAm than the other two dechlorinating agents, thiosulfate and sodium sulfite. Lower Cl/N favored the DCAcAm formation, implying that breakpoint chlorination might minimize its generation. The pH decrease could lower the concentration of DCAcAm but favored dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) formation. DCAcAm yield was sensitive to the DOC due to higher chlorine consumption caused by HA mixture. Two possible pathways of DCAcAm formation during Asp chlorination were proposed. Asp was an important precursor of DCAN, DCAcAm and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), and thus removal of Asp before disinfection may be a method to prevent the formation of DCAcAm, DCAN and DCAA.

  19. Selective chlorination of natural organic matter: identification of previously unknown disinfection byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, Elin E; Gonsior, Michael; Tranvik, Lars J; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Köhler, Stephan J

    2013-03-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) serve as precursors for disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water production making NOM removal essential in predisinfection treatment processes. We identified molecular formulas of chlorinated DBPs after chlorination and chloramination in four Swedish surface water treatment plants (WTPs) using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chlorine-containing formulas were detected before and after disinfection and were therefore classified to identify DBPs. In total, 499 DBPs were detected, of which 230 have not been reported earlier. The byproducts had, as a group, significantly lower ratio of hydrogen to carbon (H/C) and significantly higher average carbon oxidation state (COS), double bond equivalents per carbon (DBE/C) and ratio of oxygen to carbon (O/C) compared to Cl-containing components present before disinfection and CHO formulas in samples taken both before and after disinfection. Electrophilic substitution, the proposed most significant reaction pathway for chlorination of NOM, results in carbon oxidation and decreased H/C while O/C and DBE/C is left unchanged. Because the identified DBPs had significantly higher DBE/C and O/C than the CHO formulas we concluded that chlorination of NOM during disinfection is selective toward components with relatively high double bond equivalency and number of oxygen atoms per carbon. Furthermore, choice of disinfectant, dose, and predisinfection treatment at the different WTPs resulted in distinct patterns in the occurrence of DBP formulas.

  20. Organic halogen compounds in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 20 research reports on selected problems concerning the analysis, the occurence, and the behaviour of a wide spectrum of organic halogen compounds. The work was carried out in the framework of the project 'Organic Halogen Compounds in the Environment', financed by the BMFT, between 1975 and 1978. (orig.)

  1. Occurrence and Distribution of Pharmaceutical Organic Compounds in the Groundwater Downgradient of a Landfill (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, John V.; Rügge, Kirsten; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    1995-01-01

    in the plume (4). In this paper, we describe the occurrence and distribution of organic compounds originating from waste from the pharmaceutical industry in the groundwater downgradient of the same landfill. According to our knowledge, this is the first report on pharmaceutical compounds in a leachate plume.......Usually landfill leachates contain specific organic compounds as BTEXs (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and chlorobenzenes originating from household chemicals and waste from small businesses (I). However, where industrial waste has been landfilled...

  2. Catalytic combustion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds over V-M/TiO2 (M=Cu、Cr、Ce、Mn、Mo) catalysts%V-M/TiO2(M=Cu、Cr、Ce、Mn、Mo)催化燃烧含氯有机废气

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄海凤; 宁星杰; 蒋孝佳; 顾蕾; 卢晗锋

    2014-01-01

    以 TiO2为载体,采用浸渍法制备 V-M/TiO2(M=Cu、Cr、Ce、Mn、Mo)双金属氧化物催化剂,考察其催化燃烧氯苯、二氯甲烷等含氯有机废气(CVOCs)的性能,并通过 XRD、BET、H2-TPR 和 NH3-TPD 对催化剂进行了表征.结果表明,V-Mo/TiO2催化剂比表面积最大,催化剂表面活性组分的高分散性和良好的酸性分布使得V-Mo/TiO2能够在260oC将氯苯完全转化为CO2和HCl.而V-Mn/TiO2则具有丰富的活性氧,可显著提高催化剂深度氧化二氯甲烷的能力,在380℃时二氯甲烷即可完全燃烧,并且反应对CO2有着很高的选择性.%A series of V-M/TiO2 (M=Cu、Cr、Ce、Mn、Mo)catalysts were prepared by impregnation method. The catalytic activity of chlorinated volatile organic compounds(CVOCs), such as chlorobenzene(CB)、dichloromethane(DCM) over V-M/TiO2were investigated. The physical-chemical properties of the catalysts were also investigated by XRD、BET、H2-TPR and NH3-TPD. It was found that the V-Mo/TiO2 catalyst could completely combustion oxidation of chlorobenzene into CO2 and HCl at 260℃, which was related to the biggest BET surface and highly dispersed of surface acidity; Moreover, the V-Mn/TiO2 catalyst showed a high activity and good selectivity for catalytic combustion of dichloromethane (DCM), with a 100%conversion obtained at 380℃. This performance was attributed to a large amount of active surface oxygen, which could enhance the ability of deep oxidation of dichloromethane.

  3. Removal of hexenuronic acid by xylanase to reduce adsorbable organic halides formation in chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuangxi; Wang, Shuangfei; Qin, Chengrong; Yao, Shuangquan; Ebonka, Johnbull Friday; Song, Xueping; Li, Kecheng

    2015-11-01

    Xylanase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp was investigated. The pulp was pretreated with xylanase and followed a chlorine dioxide bleaching stage. The ATR-FTIR and XPS were employed to determine the surface chemistry of the control pulp, xylanase treated and chlorine dioxide treated pulps. The hexenuronic acid (HexA) could obviously be reduced after xylanase pretreatment, and the adsorbable organic halides (AOX) were reduced after chlorine dioxide bleaching. Compared to the control pulp, AOX could be reduced by 21.4-26.6% with xylanase treatment. Chlorine dioxide demand could be reduced by 12.5-22% to achieve the same brightness. The ATR-FTIR and XPS results showed that lignin and hemicellulose (mainly HexA) were the main source for AOX formation. Xylanase pretreatment could remove HexA and expose more lignin, which decreased the chlorine dioxide demand and thus reduced formation of AOX. PMID:26263004

  4. Methods of making organic compounds by metathesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Timothy W.; Kaido, Hiroki; Lee, Choon Woo; Pederson, Richard L.; Schrodi, Yann; Tupy, Michael John

    2015-09-01

    Described are methods of making organic compounds by metathesis chemistry. The methods of the invention are particularly useful for making industrially-important organic compounds beginning with starting compositions derived from renewable feedstocks, such as natural oils. The methods make use of a cross-metathesis step with an olefin compound to produce functionalized alkene intermediates having a pre-determined double bond position. Once isolated, the functionalized alkene intermediate can be self-metathesized or cross-metathesized (e.g., with a second functionalized alkene) to produce the desired organic compound or a precursor thereto. The method may be used to make bifunctional organic compounds, such as diacids, diesters, dicarboxylate salts, acid/esters, acid/amines, acid/alcohols, acid/aldehydes, acid/ketones, acid/halides, acid/nitriles, ester/amines, ester/alcohols, ester/aldehydes, ester/ketones, ester/halides, ester/nitriles, and the like.

  5. Biogas from MSW landfill: Composition and determination of chlorine content with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exhaustive characterization of the biogas from some waste disposal facilities has been carried out. The analysis includes the main components (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen) as well as trace components such as hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and VOCs (volatile organic compounds) including siloxanes and halogenated compounds. VOCs were measured by GC/MS (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry) using two different procedures: thermal desorption of the Tenax TA and Carbotrap 349 tubes and SPME (Solid Phase Micro-Extraction). A method has been established to measure the total halogen content of the biogas with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique. The equipment used to analyze the samples was a Total Organic Halogen Analyzer (TOX-100). Similar results were obtained when comparing the TOX (Total Organic Halogen) values with those obtained by GC/MS. The halogen content in all the samples was under 22 mg Cl/Nm3 which is below the limit of 150 mg/Nm3 proposed in the Spanish Regulations for any use of the biogas. The low chlorine content in the biogas studied, as well as the low content of other trace compounds, makes it suitable for use as a fuel for electricity generating engines

  6. Chlorinated pesticides in stream sediments from organic, integrated and conventional farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if current sheep/beef farming practices affect pesticide residues in streams, current-use and legacy chlorinated pesticides were quantified in 100 sediment samples from 15 streams on the South Island of New Zealand. The study involved five blocks of three neighboring farms, with each block containing farms managed by organic, integrated and conventional farming practices. Significantly higher concentrations of dieldrin, ∑ endosulfans, ∑ current-use pesticides, and ∑ chlorinated pesticides were measured in sediments from conventional farms compared to organic and integrated farms. However, streams in the latter two farming categories were not pesticide-free and sometimes contained relatively high concentrations of legacy pesticides. Comparison of measured pesticide concentrations with sediment quality guidelines showed that, regardless of farming practice, mean pesticide concentrations were below the recommended toxicity thresholds. However, up to 23% of individual samples contained chlorpyrifos, endosulfan sulfate, ∑ DDT, dieldrin, or ∑ chlordane concentrations above these thresholds. -- Highlights: •Pesticides were measured in streams in organic, integrated, and conventional farms. •Higher concentrations of some pesticides were found in conventional sites. •Streams in organic and integrated sites were not pesticide free. •Mean pesticide concentrations were below the recommended toxicity thresholds. -- Higher concentrations of several chlorinated pesticides were found in conventional farms; however, organic and integrated practices were not pesticide-free

  7. Changes in dissolved organic matter fluorescence and disinfection byproduct formation from UV and subsequent chlorination/chloramination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, Bonnie A.; Cory, Rose M.; Weinberg, Howard S., E-mail: howard_weinberg@unc.edu

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • DBP formation from UV-chlorine/chloramine drinking water treatment was measured. • The effect of UV on DBP precursors was evaluated by fluorescence and PARAFAC. • UV alone decreased protein/tryptophan- and humic-like fluorescence. • Loss of two components correlated with cyanogen chloride formation (R{sup 2} = 0.79–0.91). • Loss of the components also correlated with chloral hydrate formation (R{sup 2} = 0.95–1.000). -- Abstract: Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is being increasingly used to help drinking water utilities meet finished water quality regulations, but its influence on disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors and DBP formation is not completely understood. This study investigated the effect of medium pressure (MP) UV combined with chlorination/chloramination on the fluorescent fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from a United States surface water with median total organic carbon content. Parallel factor analysis was used to understand how UV may alter the capacity of DOM to form DBPs of potential human health concern. The production of chloral hydrate and cyanogen chloride from MP UV followed by chlorine or chloramine, respectively, correlated with a decrease in fluorescence intensity of a protein/tryptophan-like component (R{sup 2} = 0.79–0.99) and a humic-like component (R{sup 2} = 0.91–1.00). This suggests that the UV-induced precursors to these compounds originated from DOM with similar characteristics to these components. The fluorescent DOM components identified in this study are similar to reoccurring components that have been previously identified in a range of raw and treated waters, and this work demonstrates the value of using fluorescence analysis of DOM to understand the relationships between DOM source and DBP formation under a range of treatment conditions.

  8. Changes in dissolved organic matter fluorescence and disinfection byproduct formation from UV and subsequent chlorination/chloramination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bonnie A; Cory, Rose M; Weinberg, Howard S

    2014-01-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is being increasingly used to help drinking water utilities meet finished water quality regulations, but its influence on disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors and DBP formation is not completely understood. This study investigated the effect of medium pressure (MP) UV combined with chlorination/chloramination on the fluorescent fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from a United States surface water with median total organic carbon content. Parallel factor analysis was used to understand how UV may alter the capacity of DOM to form DBPs of potential human health concern. The production of chloral hydrate and cyanogen chloride from MP UV followed by chlorine or chloramine, respectively, correlated with a decrease in fluorescence intensity of a protein/tryptophan-like component (R(2)=0.79-0.99) and a humic-like component (R(2)=0.91-1.00). This suggests that the UV-induced precursors to these compounds originated from DOM with similar characteristics to these components. The fluorescent DOM components identified in this study are similar to reoccurring components that have been previously identified in a range of raw and treated waters, and this work demonstrates the value of using fluorescence analysis of DOM to understand the relationships between DOM source and DBP formation under a range of treatment conditions.

  9. Real-time monitoring of volatile chlorinated compounds in the subsurface environment using a HaloSnif/cone penetrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has regulatory jurisdiction for the cleanup of hazardous wastes sites designated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). According to EPA's guidance specific activities are required to characterize a site listed under CERCLA or SARA. This activity includes a preliminary site investigation followed by a comprehensive remedial site investigation. During remedial investigation site activities, various environmental samples are collected including air, water, and soils and sediments. Because of the sheer volume of samples sent to the laboratory for analysis and the high analytical cost associated to produce legally defensible analytical data, remedial investigations costs have skyrocketed. Clearly, alternative characterization technologies are needed. A new innovative technology being evaluated couples a cone penetrometer system to a chlorinated compound specific detector system (HaloSnif). The cone penetrometer provides access to the subsurface environment and the HaloSnif system measures the concentrations of volatile chlorinated compounds in the gas phase (soil gas) in real-time. Testing of the cone penetrometer/HaloSnif system was conducted at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State. The test location was adjacent to several cribs that received from 500 to 1,500 tons of CCl4. An in-depth description of the HaloSnif technology, concentration profiles of volatile chlorinated compounds as a function of depth and time, and other relevant observations will be presented

  10. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  11. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-10-23

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  12. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2013-03-19

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  13. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  14. Organic halogen compounds and surface water pollution; Composti organoalogenati alifatici e contaminazione delle acque superficiali

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocchioni, M.; Pellegrini, M. G.; Grappasonni, I.; Nacciarriti, L.; Bernacchia, G. [Camerino, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Igienistiche e Sanitarie-Ambientali

    1997-03-01

    A brief review of the effects of halogenated organic compounds on the fluvial ecosystem is followed by results from a detailed monitoring of these substances in all the Marches Region rivers. The results show generally modest concentrations, except for sporadic peaks for chloroform. Sites revealing significant concentrations of halogenated organic compounds also manifested a worsening of the biological quality of the waters with lessening of E.B.I. Attention is drawn to the negative effects of indiscriminate chlorination of purification plant outputs, as this practice often fails to resolve infective problems and in itself adds toxicity to the watercourse.

  15. Halogenase-Inspired Oxidative Chlorination Using Flavin Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Thea; Mühldorf, Bernd; Wolf, Robert; König, Burkhard

    2016-04-18

    Chlorine gas or electropositive chlorine reagents are used to prepare chlorinated aromatic compounds, which are found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and polymers, and serve as synthetic precursors for metal-catalyzed cross-couplings. Nature chlorinates with chloride anions, FAD-dependent halogenases, and O2 as the oxidant. A photocatalytic oxidative chlorination is described based on the organic dye riboflavin tetraacetate mimicking the enzymatic process. The chemical process allows within the suitable arene redox potential window a broader substrate scope compared to the specific activation in the enzymatic binding pocket.

  16. Efficiency of conventional drinking-water-treatment processes in removal of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackelberg, P.E.; Gibs, J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Lippincott, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Samples of water and sediment from a conventional drinking-water-treatment (DWT) plant were analyzed for 113 organic compounds (OCs) that included pharmaceuticals, detergent degradates, flame retardants and plasticizers, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fragrances and flavorants, pesticides and an insect repellent, and plant and animal steroids. 45 of these compounds were detected in samples of source water and 34 were detected in samples of settled sludge and (or) filter-backwash sediments. The average percent removal of these compounds was calculated from their average concentration in time-composited water samples collected after clarification, disinfection (chlorination), and granular-activated-carbon (GAC) filtration. In general, GAC filtration accounted for 53% of the removal of these compounds from the aqueous phase; disinfection accounted for 32%, and clarification accounted for 15%. The effectiveness of these treatments varied widely within and among classes of compounds; some hydrophobic compounds were strongly oxidized by free chlorine, and some hydrophilic compounds were partly removed through adsorption processes. The detection of 21 of the compounds in 1 or more samples of finished water, and of 3 to 13 compounds in every finished-water sample, indicates substantial but incomplete degradation or removal of OCs through the conventional DWT process used at this plant. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiolytic generation of chloro-organic compounds in transuranic and low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolytic degradation of chloro-plastics is being investigated to evaluate the formation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in radioactive waste. These chlorinated VOCs, when their subsequent migration in the geosphere is considered, are potential sources of ground-water contamination. This contamination is an important consideration for transuranic waste repositories being proposed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant project and the several additional low-level radioactive waste sites being considered throughout the United States. The production of chlorinated volatile organic compounds due to the interaction of ionizing radiation with chloro-plastic materials has been well-established in both this work and past studies. This occurs as a result of gamma, beta, and alpha particle interactions with the plastic material. The assemblage of organic compounds generated depends on the type of plastic material, the type of ionizing radiation, the gaseous environment present and the irradiation temperature. In the authors' experiments, gas generation data were obtained by mounting representative plastics near (3 mm) an alpha particle source (Am-241 foil). This assembly was placed in an irradiation vessel which contained air, nitrogen, or a hydrogen/carbon dioxide mixture, at near-atmospheric pressures, to simulate the range of atmospheres likely to be encountered in the subsurface. The gas phase in the vessels are periodically sampled for net gas production. The gas phase concentrations are monitored over time to determine trends and calculate the radiolytic yield for the various gaseous products

  18. Occurrence and availability of prioritary compounds (chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, alkylphenols and heavy metals) in freshwater sediments and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this work was to determine priority organic and inorganic compounds in river sediments and fish and to study their availability. Twelve organ chlorinated compounds (OC), 40 polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 2 alkylphenols (nonylphenol and octylphenol) (AP), and 9 heavy metals (HM) were investigated in samples taken in 20 locations along the Ebro river, in north east Spain. Sediment samples represent a stable matrix which indicate recent pollution episodes, whereas fish samples are good sentinels to monitor bioavailability and bioaccumulation. Compound selection was based on their inclusion in European priority lists (Directives 76/464/CEE and 60/2000/EU). The study area covered the Ebro hydrographic basin which is the main tributary in Spain and flows through large agricultural areas characterized by wines, corn and maize and represents an important water source for the many industrial and urban activities settled along its course. To control the quality of the river basin, and in accordance with EU Directives, priority pollutants have been determined in sediment and fish to determine most ubiquitous compounds, geographical distribution and bioavailability of pollutants to two different fish species. For such purpose, different analytical methods were developed to analyse all the above mentioned chemical species in the upper 2 cm sediment layer and in whole fish (Barbus graellsii, Cyprinus carpio). Among compounds studied, hexachlorocyclohexane, pentachlorophenol, aldrin, dieldrin and isodrin, and trichlorobenzene were never detected. All samples contained organic pollutants at total levels between 134 and 3199 μg/Kg-dw and total HM from 60.9 and 5131 mg/kg-dw, depending on sample location. For 18 of the 20 samples points, a correlation of 0.53 was found between total organic and total inorganic concentration. In sediment samples, among the 4 chemical groups studied, HM were present at levels between 0.17 and 4036 mg/kg dry weight (dw), being

  19. Occurrence and availability of prioritary compounds (chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, alkylphenols and heavy metals) in freshwater sediments and fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this work was to determine priority organic and inorganic compounds in river sediments and fish and to study their availability. Twelve organ chlorinated compounds (OC), 40 polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 2 alkylphenols (nonylphenol and octylphenol) (AP), and 9 heavy metals (HM) were investigated in samples taken in 20 locations along the Ebro river, in north east Spain. Sediment samples represent a stable matrix which indicate recent pollution episodes, whereas fish samples are good sentinels to monitor bioavailability and bioaccumulation. Compound selection was based on their inclusion in European priority lists (Directives 76/464/CEE and 60/2000/EU). The study area covered the Ebro hydrographic basin which is the main tributary in Spain and flows through large agricultural areas characterized by wines, corn and maize and represents an important water source for the many industrial and urban activities settled along its course. To control the quality of the river basin, and in accordance with EU Directives, priority pollutants have been determined in sediment and fish to determine most ubiquitous compounds, geographical distribution and bioavailability of pollutants to two different fish species. For such purpose, different analytical methods were developed to analyse all the above mentioned chemical species in the upper 2 cm sediment layer and in whole fish (Barbus graellsii, Cyprinus carpio). Among compounds studied, hexachlorocyclohexane, pentachlorophenol, aldrin, dieldrin and isodrin, and trichlorobenzene were never detected. All samples contained organic pollutants at total levels between 134 and 3199 μg/Kg-dw and total HM from 60.9 and 5131 mg/kg-dw, depending on sample location. For 18 of the 20 samples points, a correlation of 0.53 was found between total organic and total inorganic concentration. In sediment samples, among the 4 chemical groups studied, HM were present at levels between 0.17 and 4036 mg/kg dry weight (dw), being

  20. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, July 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2016-05-18

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision for the site.

  1. Quantification of Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Saturated Low Permeability Sediments Using Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Philipp; Parker, Beth L; Chapman, Steven W; Aravena, Ramon; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    This field and modeling study aims to reveal if degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in low permeability sediments can be quantified using compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). For that purpose, the well-characterized Borden research site was selected, where an aquifer-aquitard system was artificially contaminated by a three component chlorinated solvent mixture (tetrachloroethene (PCE) 45 vol %, trichloroethene (TCE) 45 vol %, and chloroform (TCM) 10 vol %). Nearly 15 years after the contaminant release, several high-resolution concentration and CSIA profiles were determined for the chlorinated hydrocarbons that had diffused into the clayey aquitard. The CSIA profiles showed large shifts of carbon isotope ratios with depth (up to 24‰) suggesting that degradation occurs in the aquitard despite the small pore sizes. Simulated scenarios without or with uniform degradation failed to reproduce the isotope data, while a scenario with decreasing degradation with depth fit the data well. This suggests that nutrients had diffused into the aquitard favoring stronger degradation close to the aquifer-aquitard interface than with increasing depth. Moreover, the different simulation scenarios showed that CSIA profiles are more sensitive to different degradation conditions compared to concentration profiles highlighting the power of CSIA to constrain degradation activities in aquitards. PMID:27153381

  2. Adsorption of Organic Compounds to Building Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Ulla Dorte

    The presence of VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) in the indoor air may be a contributory cause of complaints about irritation of mucous membranes in eyes, nose and throat, difficulty in breathing, frequent airway inflammation, skin irritation, fatigue, concentration difficulty, dizziness and hea...

  3. Groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, June 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Raegan L.; Frans, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. Phytoremediation combined with ongoing natural attenuation processes was the preferred remedy selected by the U.S. Navy, as specified in the Record of Decision for the site. The U.S. Navy planted two hybrid poplar plantations on the landfill in spring 1999 to remove and to control the migration of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in shallow groundwater. The U.S. Geological Survey has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision. This report presents groundwater geochemical and selected volatile organic compound data collected at Operable Unit 1 by the U.S. Geological Survey during June 20-22, 2011, in support of long-term monitoring for natural attenuation. In 2011, groundwater samples were collected from 13 wells and 9 piezometers. Samples from all wells and piezometers were analyzed for redox sensitive constituents and dissolved gases, and samples from 5 of 13 wells and all piezometers also were analyzed for chlorinated volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of redox sensitive constituents measured in 2011 were consistent with previous years, with dissolved oxygen concentrations all at 0.4 milligram per liter or less; little to no detectable nitrate; abundant dissolved manganese, iron, and methane; and commonly detected sulfide. The reductive declorination byproducts - methane, ethane, and ethene - were either not detected in samples collected from the upgradient wells in the landfill and the upper aquifer beneath the northern phytoremediation plantation or were detected at concentrations less than those measured in 2010. Chlorinated volatile organic compound concentrations in 2011 at most piezometers

  4. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, Z.

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquife

  5. Relation between chlorine with the quality of crude water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine as disinfection agent in drinking water was used widely since it was successfully been practiced in drinking water in Jersey City, 1908. Mostly, water treatment plants in Malaysia were using chlorine as disinfection agent to kill pathogen and contaminated materials that can be dangerous to consumer. Because of chlorine was a strongly disinfection agent, it also can react with another chemical components such as manganese, hydrogen, sulfides, ammonia and phenol in water. These reactions happen very fast, and chlorine will not react as disinfection agent unless all the organic and inorganic substitution presented in water reacts with chlorine. These reactions between components will increase demand of chlorine in water. The demand of chlorine in water must be filled before the free radical chlorine occurred. These free radical chlorine will decay into hypochlorous acid and hypochlorite ion that so important in disinfection process to kill pathogens and pollutants in water. Most of water treatment plant to maintain free chlorine up to 0.2 mg/ L in distribution system to consumer. These researches involved determination of parameters that can be trusted to react with the chlorine in nine sampling station along Semenyih River and four stations in water treatment plants. These parameters were determined from ammonia, cyanides, sulfides, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese, iron and sum of organic carbons. Overall, these researches concluded that ammonia and sum of organic carbons were the most compounds that react with the chlorine to produce tryhalometane and chloramines. Besides that, the concentration of cyanides compounds, sulfide, phenol, phosphorus, nitrite, manganese and iron also decrease after the chlorination process. Results can used to evaluate demanding levels of chlorine in Semenyih River. (author)

  6. Organic compounds in produced waters from shale gas wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire-Boyle, Samuel J; Barron, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis is reported of the organic composition of produced water samples from typical shale gas wells in the Marcellus (PA), Eagle Ford (TX), and Barnett (NM) formations. The quality of shale gas produced (and frac flowback) waters is a current environmental concern and disposal problem for producers. Re-use of produced water for hydraulic fracturing is being encouraged; however, knowledge of the organic impurities is important in determining the method of treatment. The metal content was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Mineral elements are expected depending on the reservoir geology and salts used in hydraulic fracturing; however, significant levels of other transition metals and heavier main group elements are observed. The presence of scaling elements (Ca and Ba) is related to the pH of the water rather than total dissolved solids (TDS). Using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of the chloroform extracts of the produced water samples, a plethora of organic compounds were identified. In each water sample, the majority of organics are saturated (aliphatic), and only a small fraction comes under aromatic, resin, and asphaltene categories. Unlike coalbed methane produced water it appears that shale oil/gas produced water does not contain significant quantities of polyaromatic hydrocarbons reducing the potential health hazard. Marcellus and Barnett produced waters contain predominantly C6-C16 hydrocarbons, while the Eagle Ford produced water shows the highest concentration in the C17-C30 range. The structures of the saturated hydrocarbons identified generally follows the trend of linear > branched > cyclic. Heterocyclic compounds are identified with the largest fraction being fatty alcohols, esters, and ethers. However, the presence of various fatty acid phthalate esters in the Barnett and Marcellus produced waters can be related to their use in drilling fluids and breaker additives

  7. Degradation of air polluted by organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the Mexican standard NOM-010-STPS-1994 it has been established concentrations of maximum permissible levels in workable air for styrene in the range 420-1710 mg/m3 and for xylene between 218-870 mg/m3. In this work it is studied a biological treatment (bio filtration) for air polluted by xylene and styrene where the microorganisms are adhered at synthetic fiber, these degrade to the organic compounds that across in gaseous state and they are mineralized toward CO2 and H2O. The characteristics of temperature, p H, concentration of organic compound and mineral parameters, as well as, the biomass quantity have been optimized for that bio filters efficiency were greater than those reported in other works. (Author)

  8. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from wood

    OpenAIRE

    Granström, Karin

    2005-01-01

    The central aim of this thesis is to support the efforts to counteract certain environmental problems caused by emissions of volatile organic compounds. The purpose of this work was (1) to develop a method to establish the amount of emitted substances from dryers, (2) to determine the effect of drying medium temperature and end moisture content of the processed material on emissions of monoterpenes and other hydrocarbons, (3) to examine the emissions of monoterpenes during production of pelle...

  9. Characterization of A New Organic Photochromic Compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Guang-Fei; LIU,Lang; JIA,Dian-Zeng; HU,Xin; YU,Kai-Bei

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new organic photochromic compound, 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-(4-fluoro)-benzal-5-pyrazolone ethanyl-thiosemicarbazone (PM4FBP-ETSC) was found to undergo photochromic reactions in the solid state. Upon irradiation with 365nm light the white powder sample turned light yellow. The photochromic properties were characterized by the time-dependent UV-vis reflective spectra. The structure of PM4FBP-ETSC was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  10. Metabolic Reactions among Organic Sulfur Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, M.; Rogers, K.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur is central to the metabolisms of many organisms that inhabit extreme environments. Numerous authors have addressed the energy available from a variety of inorganic sulfur redox pairs. Less attention has been paid, however, to the energy required or gained from metabolic reactions among organic sulfur compounds. Work in this area has focused on the oxidation of alkyl sulfide or disulfide to thiol and formaldehyde, e.g. (CH3)2S + H2O yields CH3SH + HCHO + H2, eventually resulting in the formation of CO2 and SO4(-2). It is also found that reactions among thiols and disulfides may help control redox disequilibria between the cytoplasm and the periplasm. Building on our earlier efforts for thiols, we have compiled and estimated thermodynamic properties for alkyl sulfides. We are investigating metabolic reactions among various sulfur compounds in a variety of extreme environments, ranging from sea floor hydrothermal systems to organic-rich sludge. Using thermodynamic data and the revised HKF equation of state, along with constraints imposed by the geochemical environments sulfur-metabolizing organisms inhabit, we are able to calculate the amount of energy available to these organisms.

  11. Dichloroacetonitrile and dichloroacetamide can form independently during chlorination and chloramination of drinking waters, model organic matters, and wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huang; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Hu, Hong-Ying; Mitch, William A

    2012-10-01

    The increasing usage of organic nitrogen-rich wastewater- or algal-impacted waters, and chloramines for secondary disinfection, raises concerns regarding the formation of haloacetonitriles, haloacetamides and other nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs). Previous research obtained contradictory results regarding the relative importance of chlorination or chloramination for promoting these byproducts, but applied chlorine and chloramines at different doses and exposure periods. Additionally, mechanistic work, mostly using model precursors, suggested that haloacetonitrile and haloacetamide formation should be correlated because hydrolysis of haloacetonitriles forms haloacetamides. In this work, the formation of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) were compared across a range of chlorine and chloramine exposures for drinking waters, wastewater effluents, algal extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), NOM isolates and model precursors. While chlorination favored formation of DCAN over DCAcAm, chloramination nearly always formed more DCAcAm than DCAN, suggesting the existence of haloacetamide formation pathways that are independent of the hydrolysis of haloacetonitriles. Experiments with asparagine as a model precursor also suggested DCAcAm formation without a DCAN intermediate. Application of (15)N-labeled monochloramine indicated initial rapid formation of both DCAN and DCAcAm by pathways where the nitrogen originated from organic nitrogen precursors. However, slower formation occurred by pathways involving chloramine incorporation into organic precursors. While wastewater effluents and algal EPS tended to be more potent precursors for DCAN during chlorination, humic materials were more potent precursors for DCAcAm during chlorination and for both DCAN and DCAcAm during chloramination. These results suggest that, rather than considering haloacetamides as haloacetonitrile hydrolysis products, they should be treated as a separate N

  12. The Atmospheric Fate of Organic Nitrogen Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borduas, Nadine

    Organic nitrogen compounds are present in our atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and have impacts on air quality and climate. Due to recent advances in instrumentation, these compounds are being detected in the gas and particle phases, raising questions as to their source, processing and sinks in the environment. With their recently identified role as contributors to aerosol formation and growth, their novel large scale use as solvents in carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and their emissions from cigarette smoke, it is now important to address the gaps in our understanding of the fate of organic nitrogen. Experimentally and theoretically, I studied the chemical atmospheric fate of specific organic nitrogen compounds in the amine, amide and isocyanate families, yielding information that can be used in chemical transport models to assess the fate of this emerging class of atmospheric molecules. I performed kinetic laboratory studies in a smog chamber to measure the room temperature rate coefficient for reaction with the hydroxyl radical of monoethanolamine, nicotine, and five different amides. I employed online-mass spectrometry techniques to quantify the oxidation products. I found that amines react quickly with OH radicals with lifetimes of a few hours under sunlit conditions, producing amides as oxidation products. My studies on amides revealed that they have much longer lifetimes in the atmosphere, ranging from a few hours to a week. Photo-oxidation of amides produces isocyanates and I investigated these mechanisms in detail using ab initio calculations. Furthermore, I experimentally measured isocyanic acid's Henry's Law constant as well as its hydrolysis rate constants to better understand its sinks in the atmosphere. Finally, I re-examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of organic nitrogen molecules for improved model parameterizations.

  13. Surface microlayer enrichment of volatile organic compounds and semivolatile organic compounds in drinking water source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi; ZHOU Wen; YU Ya-juan; ZHANG Ai-qian; HAN Shuo-kui; WANG Lian-sheng

    2004-01-01

    Enrichment of volatile organic compounds(VOC) and semi-volatility organic compounds(SVOC) in surface microlayer(SM) of three drinking water sources were studied. The enrichment factor(EFs) were 0.67 to 13.37 and 0. 16 to 136, respectively. The results showed some VOC and most SVOC could enrich in SM. Some EFs of SVOC was quite high. Suspension and temperature could affect EFs of SVOC, slim wind and water movement do not destroy enrichment of organic in SM.

  14. Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil: Impact on Microbial Biodegradation of Organic Compounds and Possible Improvement Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishna Pillay

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Co-contamination of the environment with toxic chlorinated organic and heavy metal pollutants is one of the major problems facing industrialized nations today. Heavy metals may inhibit biodegradation of chlorinated organics by interacting with enzymes directly involved in biodegradation or those involved in general metabolism. Predictions of metal toxicity effects on organic pollutant biodegradation in co-contaminated soil and water environments is difficult since heavy metals may be present in a variety of chemical and physical forms. Recent advances in bioremediation of co-contaminated environments have focussed on the use of metal-resistant bacteria (cell and gene bioaugmentation, treatment amendments, clay minerals and chelating agents to reduce bioavailable heavy metal concentrations. Phytoremediation has also shown promise as an emerging alternative clean-up technology for co-contaminated environments. However, despite various investigations, in both aerobic and anaerobic systems, demonstrating that metal toxicity hampers the biodegradation of the organic component, a paucity of information exists in this area of research. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the problems associated with the degradation of chlorinated organics in co-contaminated environments, owing to metal toxicity and shed light on possible improvement strategies for effective bioremediation of sites co-contaminated with chlorinated organic compounds and heavy metals.

  15. Sono-catalytic degradation of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike aqueous effluents from the PUREX process, aqueous effluents from advanced separation processes developed to separate the minor actinides (Am, Cm) contain organic reagents in large amounts. To minimize the impact of these organic compounds on the next steps of the process, and to respect standard discharges, it is necessary to develop new techniques of degradation of organic compounds. Sono-chemistry appears as a very promising solution to eliminate organic species in aqueous nuclear effluents. Indeed, the propagation of an ultrasonic wave in a liquid medium induces the appearance of cavitation bubbles which will quickly grow and implode, causing local conditions and extreme temperatures and pressures. Each cavitation bubble can then be considered as a microreactor at high temperature and high pressure able to destroy organic molecules without the addition of specific reagents. The first studies on the effect of ultrasonic frequency on sono-luminescence and sono-lysis of formic acid have shown that the degradation of formic acid occurs at the bubble/liquid interface. The most striking difference between low-frequency and high-frequency ultrasound is that the sono-lysis of HCOOH at high ultrasonic frequencies initiates secondary reactions not observed at 20 kHz. However, despite a much higher sono-chemical activity at high frequency, highly concentrated carboxylic acids in the aqueous effluents from advanced separation processes cannot be destroyed by ultrasound alone. To increase the efficiency of sono-chemical reactions, the addition of supported platinum catalysts has been studied. In these conditions, an increase of the kinetics of destruction of carboxylic acids such as oxalic acid is observed. (author)

  16. Effects of UV irradiation and UV/chlorine co-exposure on natural organic matter in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zaili; Yang, Xin; Xu, Yiyue; Liang, Yongmei, E-mail: liangym@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2012-01-01

    The effects of co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (with either low- or medium-pressure UV lamps) and free chlorine (chloramine) at practical relevant conditions on changes in natural organic matter (NOM) properties were investigated using four waters. The changes were characterized using the specific disinfection by-product formation potential (SDBPFP), specific total organic halogen formation potential (STOXFP), differential UV absorbance ( Increment UVA), and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The results for exposure to UV irradiation alone and for samples with no exposure were also obtained. The SDBPFPs in all UV-irradiated NOM waters observed were higher than those of non-irradiated samples. UV irradiation led to increases in STOXFPs as a result of chlorination, but no changes, or only small decreases, from chloramination. UV irradiation alone led to positive Increment UVA spectra of the four NOM waters; co-exposure to UV and chlorine gave larger negative Increment UVA spectra than those obtained by chlorine exposure alone. No obvious changes in SEC results were observed for samples only irradiated with UV light; co-exposure gave no detectable changes in the abundances of small fractions for exposure to chlorine only. Both UV photooxidation and photocatalytic oxidation appear to affect the reactivity of the NOM toward subsequent chlorination, and the magnitude of the changes is generally greater for medium-pressure lamps than for low-pressure lamps. These results suggest that applying UV disinfection technology to a particular source may not always be disinfection by-product-problem-free, and the interactions between UV light, chlorine, and NOM may need to be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discussed the effects of co-exposure to UV light and chlorine on properties of natural organic matters in waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV irradiation led to increases in SDBPFP and STOXFP of NOM waters from chlorination. Black

  17. Viscoelastic Properties of Organic Hybrid of Chlorinated Polythylene and Small Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chifei Wu

    2000-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of an organic hybrid of chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) and N,Ndicyclohexyl-benzthiazyl-2-sulfenaamid (DZ) are investigated. All CPE/DZ hybrids show a single loss tangent (Fan δ ) peak. Its position shift linearly to higher temperature and its maximum value increases nonlinearly with increasing DZ content. The energy absorptinity (EA, a ratio of loss modulus to complex modulus) is used to characterize these hybrids. The DZ content dependence of EA changes at a critical value. The existence of a bending point in the DZ content dependence of glass transition temperature and energy absorptinity is due to the microseparation and the crystallization of DZ molecules in CPE/DZ hybrids with high DZ content. The molecular structural model can successfully explain the influence of dispersion state of DZ molecules in the matrix polymer CPE on the maximum value and the position of Tan δ of CPE/DZ hybrids.

  18. Chlorine adlayer-templated growth of a hybrid inorganic-organic layered structure on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeźnicka, I. I.; Horino, H.; Yagyu, K.; Suzuki, T.; Kajimoto, S.; Fukumura, H.

    2016-10-01

    Growth of a hybrid inorganic-organic layered structure on the Au(111) surface using a one-step solution growth is reported. The hybrid structure is consist of 4,4‧-bipyridine [4,4‧-BiPyH2]2 + cations, Cl anions and Au adatoms, provided from substrate by means of the adsorbate-induced surface phase transition of a surface reconstruction. Its surface and bulk structures were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and Raman spectroscopy. STM results reveal growth of the first [4,4‧-BiPyH2]2 + layer on top of the p(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})" separators=", R 30 ° chlorine overlayer formed on the Au(111) surface. These two layers are found to provide a platform for a following three-dimensional growth facilitated by hydrogen bonding, aurophilic and π-π stacking interactions.

  19. Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2008-01-01

    for commonly encountered situations, such as the application of a pesticide or the emission of a plasticizer or flame retardant from its host material. Calculations suggest that many SVOCs have long indoor persistence, even after the primary source is removed. If the only removal mechanism is ventilation......Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous in indoor environments, redistributing from their original sources to all indoor surfaces. Exposures resulting from their indoor presence contribute to detectable body burdens of diverse SVOCs, including pesticides, plasticizers, and flame...

  20. Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

    2012-12-01

    While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (α-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, α-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species

  1. Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hu, Jianli; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2008-09-16

    The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

  2. Organic compounds trapped in aqueous fluid inclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruble, T.E.D.; George, S.C.; Lisk, M.; Quezada, R.A. [CSIRO Div. of Petroleum Resources, North Ryde (Australia)

    1998-12-31

    Fluid inclusion samples from several Australian oil wells have been analysed to document the prevalence and composition of volatile hydrocarbons contained within aqueous inclusions. These results clearly establish that trapped palaeo formation waters can be a source of such compounds, which are frequently predominant in samples with a low content of oil-bearing inclusions. The apparent ``anomalous`` hydrocarbons distributions derived from aqueous inclusions contain abundant water-soluble compounds, such as benzene and toluene, which may originate from interaction of formation waters with subsurface petroleum accumulations. Aqueous inclusions are also often enriched in alkenes and oxygenated species, such as furans, which are minor constituents of petroleum but could form via secondary processes such as anoxic microbial degradation in formation waters. The co-occurrence of aqueous-derived organic compounds within samples containing oil inclusions suggest the need for caution when interpreting volatile hydrocarbon distributions. However, the presence of these components in samples from dry wells could be used as a tool to substantiate the proximity of a petroleum accumulation in an area which would otherwise be considered to have low prospectivity. (author)

  3. Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, H. James; Miller, Stanley L.

    1998-01-01

    It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecul...

  4. Reactivity of selenium-containing compounds with myeloperoxidase-derived chlorinating oxidants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Luke; Pattison, David I.; Fu, Shanlin;

    2015-01-01

    and N-chloramines, causes damage to host tissue. Low molecular mass thiol compounds, including glutathione (GSH) and methionine (Met), have demonstrated efficacy in scavenging MPO-derived oxidants, which prevents oxidative damage in vitro and ex vivo. Selenium species typically have greater reactivity...... toward oxidants compared to the analogous sulfur compounds, and are known to be efficient scavengers of HOCl and other hypohalous acids produced by MPO. In this study, we examined the efficacy of a number of sulfur and selenium compounds to scavenge a range of biologically relevant N-chloramines and...... oxidants produced by both isolated MPO and activated neutrophils and characterized the resulting selenium-derived oxidation products in each case. A dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of each N-chloramine was observed on addition of the sulfur compounds (cysteine, methionine) and selenium...

  5. Development of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for In-Situ Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome L. Wright

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW sensor that is designed to be operated continuously and in situ to detect volatile organic compounds. A ruggedized stainless-steel package that encases the SAW device and integrated circuit board allows the sensor to be deployed in a variety of media including air, soil, and even water. Polymers were optimized and chosen based on their response to chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene, which are common groundwater contaminants. Initial testing indicates that a running-average data-logging algorithm can reduce the noise and increase the sensitivity of the in-situ sensor.

  6. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  7. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS REMOVAL METHODS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Berenjian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs are among the most toxic chemicals which are detrimental to humans and environment. There is a significant need of fully satisfactory method for removal of VOCs. There are several methods including physical, chemical and biological treatments available to remove VOCs by either recovery or destruction. The aim of the present study is to summarize the available methods for VOC removal; trying to find a promising method among the available techniques. A wide range of VOCs can be treated biologically in which it offers advantages over more traditional processes including lower operating and capital costs and a smaller carbon footprint. However, due to a complex nature and diversity of VOCs it is hard to find a simple and promising method. Treatment still requires more research to solve the associate problems with available VOC elimination techniques.

  8. Organic compounds as indicators of air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The most important indoor air pollutants have already been addressedwith individual national guidelines or recommendations. However, an interna-tional set of guidelines or recommendations for indoor air quality (IAQ) isneeded for these pollutants based on general and uniform rules for setting...... suchstandards. A major research need exist on the less adverse pollutants beforerecommendations or guidelines can be established. In the interim period a pre-caution principle should lead to an ALARA principle for these secondary cau-salities. It should be noted that volatile organic compound (VOC......) is an indicatorfor the presence of VOC indoors. The TVOC indicator can be used in relation toexposure characterization and source identification but for VOCs only, not as anindictor of other pollutants and their health effects. In risk assessment the TVOCindicator can only be used as a screening tool and only...

  9. Wet scrubber analysis of volatile organic compound removal in the rendering industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, James R; Das, K C

    2002-04-01

    The promulgation of odor control rules, increasing public concerns, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) air regulations in nonattainment zones necessitates the remediation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated by the rendering industry. Currently, wet scrubbers with oxidizing chemicals are used to treat VOCs; however, little information is available on scrubber efficiency for many of the VOCs generated within the rendering process. Portable gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) units were used to rapidly identify key VOCs on-site in process streams at two poultry byproduct rendering plants. On-site analysis was found to be important, given the significant reduction in peak areas if samples were held for 24 hr before analysis. Major compounds consistently identified in the emissions from the plant included dimethyl disulfide, methanethiol, octane, hexanal, 2-methylbutanal, and 3-methylbutanal. The two branched aldehydes, 2-methylbutanal and 3-methylbutanal, were by far the most consistent, appearing in every sample and typically the largest fraction of the VOC mixture. A chlorinated hydrocarbon, methanesulfonyl chloride, was identified in the outlet of a high-intensity wet scrubber, and several VOCs and chlorinated compounds were identified in the scrubbing solution, but not on a consistent basis. Total VOC concentrations in noncondensable gas streams ranged from 4 to 91 ppmv. At the two plants, the odor-causing compound methanethiol ranged from 25 to 33% and 9.6% of the total VOCs (v/v). In one plant, wet scrubber analysis using chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as the oxidizing agent indicated that close to 100% of the methanethiol was removed from the gas phase, but removal efficiencies ranged from 20 to 80% for the aldehydes and hydrocarbons and from 23 to 64% for total VOCs. In the second plant, conversion efficiencies were much lower in a packed-bed wet scrubber, with a measurable removal of only dimethyl sulfide (20-100%).

  10. Simulations of charge transport in organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehoff, Thorsten

    2010-05-05

    We study the charge transport properties of organic liquid crystals, i.e. hexabenzocoronene and carbazole macrocycle, and single crystals, i.e. rubrene, indolocarbazole and benzothiophene derivatives (BTBT, BBBT). The aim is to find structure-property relationships linking the chemical structure as well as the morphology with the bulk charge carrier mobility of the compounds. To this end, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed yielding realistic equilibrated morphologies. Partial charges and molecular orbitals are calculated based on single molecules in vacuum using quantum chemical methods. The molecular orbitals are then mapped onto the molecular positions and orientations, which allows calculation of the transfer integrals between nearest neighbors using the molecular orbital overlap method. Thus we obtain realistic transfer integral distributions and their autocorrelations. In case of organic crystals the differences between two descriptions of charge transport, namely semi-classical dynamics (SCD) in the small polaron limit and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) based on Marcus rates, are studied. The liquid crystals are investigated solely in the hopping limit. To simulate the charge dynamics using KMC, the centers of mass of the molecules are mapped onto lattice sites and the transfer integrals are used to compute the hopping rates. In the small polaron limit, where the electronic wave function is spread over a limited number of neighboring molecules, the Schroedinger equation is solved numerically using a semi-classical approach. The carbazole macrocycles form columnar structures arranged on a hexagonal lattice with side chains facing inwards, so columns can closely approach each other allowing inter-columnar and thus three-dimensional transport. We are able to show that, on the time-scales of charge transport, static disorder due to slow side chain motions is the main factor determining the mobility. The high mobility of rubrene is explained by two main

  11. Formation of bromate and halogenated disinfection byproducts during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of dissolved organic matter and CuO

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2015-12-02

    Previous studies showed that significant bromate (BrO3-) can be formed via the CuO-catalyzed disproportionation of hypobromous acid (HOBr) pathway. In this study, the influence of CuO on the formation of BrO3- and halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes, THMs and haloacetic acids, HAAs) during chlorination of six dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolates was investigated. Only in the presence of slow reacting DOM (from treated Colorado River water, i.e., CRW-BF-HPO), significant BrO3- formation is observed, which competes with bromination of DOM (i.e., THM and HAA formation). Reactions between HOBr and 12 model compounds in the presence of CuO indicates that CuO-catalyzed HOBr disproportionation is completely inhibited by fast reacting phenols, while it predominates in the presence of practically unreactive compounds (acetone, butanol, propionic, and butyric acids). In the presence of slow reacting di- and tri-carboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, and citric acids), BrO3- formation varies, depending on its competition with bromoform and dibromoacetic acid formation (i.e., bromination pathway). The latter pathway can be enhanced by CuO due to the activation of HOBr. Therefore, increasing CuO dose (0-0.2 g L-1) in a reaction system containing chlorine, bromide, and CRW-BF-HPO enhances the formation of BrO3-, total THMs and HAAs. Factors including pH and initial reactant concentrations influence the DBP formation. These novel findings have implications for elevated DBP formation during transportation of chlorinated waters in copper-containing distribution systems.

  12. Clean production of chlorine from hydrogen chloride with Mn-compound as intermediate☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Yang; Yong Sun; Jinping Zhang; Zuohu Li; Yunshan Wang

    2015-01-01

    A new process is developed by using compound Mn as intermediate to produce Cl2 from HCl, with the following steps. (1) HCl steam is decomposed by intermediate Mn2O3 to produce Cl2 and MnCl2 at 500 °C. (2) Produced MnCl2 is oxidized by water steam to produce MnO at 450 °C. (3) The MnO compound is oxidized by air to yield Mn2O3. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) crystallite characterization results indicate the high conversion in each step under the optimum experimental conditions. Long term experiments for continuous conversion of HCl to Cl2 by using Mn2O3 as intermediate in a fixed bed reactor indicate that over 90%of HCl could be converted to Cl2 on stream of 30 h. The production of Cl2 from HCl with Mn compound as an intermediate and atmospheric steam is a feasible and recyclable process.

  13. Uranium-oxide-based catalysts for the destruction of volatile chloro-organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial release of hydrocarbons and chlorine-containing organic molecules into the environment continues to attract considerable public concern, which in turn has led to governmental attempts to control such emissions. The challenge is to reduce pollution without stifling economic growth. Chlorine-containing pollutants are known to be particularly stable, and at present the main industrial process for their destruction involves thermal oxidation at 1,000oC, an expensive process that can lead to the formation of highly toxic by-products such as dioxins and dibenzofurans. Catalytic combustion at lower temperatures could potentially destroy pollutants more efficiently (in terms of energy requirements) and without forming toxic by-products. Current industrial catalysts are based on precious metals that are deactivated rapidly by organochlorine compounds. Here we report that catalysts based on uranium oxide efficiently destroy a range of hydrocarbon and chlorine-containing pollutants, and that these catalysts are resistant to deactivation. We show that benzene, toluene, chlorobutane and chlorobenzene can be destroyed at moderate temperatures (oC) and industrially relevant flow rates. (Author)

  14. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxi...

  15. Chemical oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subsurface contamination with fuel hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is prevalent throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in many sites managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program. The most commonly reported chlorinated hydrocarbons (occurring > 50% of DOE contaminated sites) were trichloroethylene (TCE), 1, 1, 1,-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with concentrations in the range of 0.2 μg/kg to 12,000 mg/kg. The fuel hydrocarbons most frequently reported as being present at DOE sites include aromatic compounds and polyaromatic compounds such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and naphthalene. The primary sources of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are coal waste from coal fired electric power plants used at many of these facilities in the past and gasoline spills and leaks. Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) can migrate within the subsurface for long periods of time along a variety of pathways including fractures, macropores, and micropores. Diffusion of contaminants in the non-aqueous, aqueous, and vapor phase can occur from the fractures and macropores into the matrix of fine-textured media. As a result of these contamination processes, removal of contaminants from the subsurface and the delivery of treatment agents into and throughout contaminated regions are often hindered, making rapid and extensive remediation difficult

  16. New uranium compounds preparation and use as catalyst for hydrogenation of non-saturated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of new organic uranium compounds and their use as catalysts for hydrogenation of non-saturated organic compounds are described. These compounds include Uranium III, a cyclopentadienic group, an alkyl group and an acetylenic derivative C6H5C triple bonds CR fixed by a π bond. Catalysts can be prepared with depleted uanium for hydrogenation of olefins for example

  17. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work. PMID:26164853

  18. Organic compounds in concrete from demolition works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praagh, M; Modin, H; Trygg, J

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effect of physically removing the outer surface of contaminated concrete on total contents and on potential mobility of pollutants by means of leaching tests. Reclaimed concrete from 3 industrial sites in Sweden were included: A tar impregnated military storage, a military tar track-depot, as well as concrete constructions used for disposing of pesticide production surplus and residues. Solid materials and leachates from batch and column leaching tests were analysed for metals, Cl, F, SO4, DOC and contents of suspected organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH, and pesticides/substances for pesticide production such as phenoxy acids, chlorophenols and chlorocresols, respectively). In case of PAH contaminated concrete, results indicate that removing 1 or 5 mm of the surface lead to total concentrations below the Swedish guidelines for recycling of aggregates and soil in groundwork constructions. 3 out of 4 concrete samples contaminated with pesticides fulfilled Swedish guidelines for contaminated soil. Results from batch and column leaching tests indicated, however, that concentrations above environmental quality standards for certain PAH and phenoxy acids, respectively, might occur at site when the crushed concrete is recycled in groundwork constructions. As leaching tests engaged in the study deviated from leaching test standards with a limited number of samples, the potential impact of the leaching tests' equipment on measured PAH and pesticide leachate concentrations has to be evaluated in future work.

  19. Nucleophilic reactivity and electrocatalytic reduction of halogenated organic compounds by nickel o-phenylenedioxamidate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siva Prasad; Ganguly, Rakesh; Li, Yongxin; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-09-14

    A growing number of halogenated organic compounds have been identified as hazardous pollutants. Although numerous advanced oxidative processes have been developed to degrade organohalide compounds, reductive and nucleophilic molecular approaches to dehalogenate organic compounds have rarely been reported. In this manuscript, we employ nickel(ii)-ate complexes bearing the o-phenylenebis(N-methyloxamide) (Me2opba) tetraanionic ligand as nucleophilic reagents that can react with alkyl halides (methyl up to the bulky isobutyl) by O-alkylation to give their respective imidate products. Four new nickel(ii) complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography, and the salient structural parameters and FT-IR vibrational bands (∼1655 cm(-1)) concur with their assignment as the imidate tautomeric form. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the nucleophilic reactivity of Ni(II)(Me2opba) with halogenated organic compounds. The parent nickel(ii) Me2opba complex exhibits reversible electrochemical oxidation and reduction behavior. As a proof of concept, Ni(II)(Me2opba) and its alkylated congeners were utilized for the electrocatalytic reduction of chloroform, as a representative, simple polyhalogenated organic molecule that could arise from the oxidative treatment of organic compounds by chlorination. Modest turnover numbers of up to 6 were recorded, with dichloromethane identified as one of the possible products. Future efforts are directed towards bulkier -ate complexes that possess metal-centered instead of ligand-centered nucleophilic activity to create more effective electrocatalysts for the reduction of halogenated organic compounds. PMID:27506275

  20. Integrated modelling of two xenobiotic organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Gernaey, K.V.; Henze, Mogens;

    2006-01-01

    rate and concentration profiles. The wet weather day induces resuspension of stored sediments, which increases the pollutant load on the downstream system. The potential of the model to elucidate important phenomena related to origin and fate of the model compounds is demonstrated....... compounds, is carried out. Sorption and specific biological degradation processes are integrated with standardised water process models to model the fate of both compounds. Simulated mass flows of the two compounds during one dry weather day and one wet weather day are compared for realistic influent flow...

  1. [Formation of disinfection by-products by Microcystis aeruginosa intracellular organic matter: comparison between chlorination and bromination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chuan; Guo, Ting-Ting; Liu, Rui-Ping; Jefferson, William; Liu, Hui-Juan; Qu, Jiu-Hui

    2013-11-01

    In order to illustrate the effects of released algal organic matter in cyanobacteria blooms on raw water quality and water treatment process, intracellular organic matter (IOM) of Microcystis aeruginosa, which is the dominant species in cyanobacteria blooms, was chosen as a precursor and characterized. In addition, the transformation of IOM and the formation of disinfection byproducts were evaluated at different pH of 6.5, 7.1 and 8.4 after chlorination or bromination, with subsequent correlation analysis. The results indicated that IOM was primarily composed of macromolecular matter, i. e. , the species with relative molecular weight of > 30 x 10(3), constituting 68.8% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix indicated that IOM was mainly composed of aromatic protein-like matter with an intensity of 92.6 AU x L x mg(-1). After reaction with chlorine or bromine, the intensity of aromatic protein-like peaks decreased sharply by 76.6% - 93.3%, and its reduction correlated well with the formation of trihalomethane (THMs, R2 = 0.81) and haloacetic acid (HAAs, R2 = 0.77). The formation of THMs and HAAs increased with the increase in pH. Compared with chlorine, bromine formed more THMs and HAAs, and tended to form highly halogenated HAAs. However, with increasing pH, the reactivity with IOM between chlorine and bromine was closer, i.e, k(OBr-IOM)/k(OCl-(IOM) < k(HOBr-IOM/k(HOCl-IOM).

  2. Secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compound mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2011-04-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the ozonolysis of a Siberian fir needle oil (SFNO), a Canadian fir needle oil (CFNO), and several SOA precursor mixtures containing reactive and non-reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. The use of precursor mixtures more completely describes the atmosphere where many VOCs exist. The addition of non-reactive VOCs such as bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol had very little to no effect on SOA yields. The oxidation of VOC mixtures with VOC mass percentages similar to the SFNO produced SOA yields that became more similar to the SOA yield from SFNO as the complexity and concentration of VOCs within the mixture became more similar to overall SFNO composition. The SOA yield produced by the oxidation of CFNO was within the error of the SOA yield produced by the oxidation of SFNO at a similar VOC concentration. The SOA yields from SFNO were modeled using the volatility basis set (VBS), which predicts the SOA yields for a given mass concentration of mixtures containing similar VOCs.

  3. One novel multidimensional organic-inorganic hybrid based on polyoxometalates and copper chlorine coordination polymers with 4,4′-bipyridine ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chun Xuan; Qing Jiang Pan

    2012-01-01

    One novel organic-inorganic hybrid materials with 4,4′-bipy ligands and copper chlorine coordination polymers as linkers,with new topology,{[CuI(4,4′-bipy)]10Cl2(SiW12O40)2}·6H2O (1) (4,4′-bipy =4,4′-bipyridine),has been hydrothermally synthesized.The single crystal X-ray structural analysis reveals that the structure of 1 is constructed from classical Keggin anions and [CuI(4,4′-bipy)] cations into a novel,three-dimensional (3D) polyoxometalates (POMs)based network.From the topological view,compound 1 is a novel (3.44.52.63)(32.44.56.69) topology.The electrochemical and photocatalysis properties of 1 have been investigated in details.

  4. Application of nanoporous silicas as adsorbents for chlorinated aromatic compounds. A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Michał; Geszke-Moritz, Małgorzata

    2014-08-01

    The removal of two selected environmental pollutants such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and Triclosan (TC) was examined by adsorption experiments on the modified SBA-15 and MCF mesoporous silicas. Mesoporous adsorbents were modified by a grafting process with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 1-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (TMSPU). Mesoporous materials were synthesized and characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption experiment, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis and adsorption studies. The results show that both APTES-functionalized SBA-15 and MCF nanoporous carriers are potentially good adsorbents for the removal of 2,4-D in a wide range of concentrations from 0.1 to 4 mg/cm(3). Maximum adsorption capacity of as-modified adsorbents for 2,4-D estimated from the Langmuir model was ~280 mg/g. The ionic interaction between the adsorbent and 2,4-D seems to play a key role in the adsorption process of the pollutant on APTES-modified siliceous matrices. The efficiency of TC sorption onto all prepared mesoporous adsorbents was significantly lower as compared to the entrapment of 2,4-D. Experimental data were best fitted by the Langmuir isotherm model. The results of this study suggest that mesoporous silica-based materials are promising adsorbents for the removal of selected organic pollutants.

  5. Toxicity on aquatic organisms exposed to secondary effluent disinfected with chlorine, peracetic acid, ozone and UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Juliana Berninger; Rodgher, Suzelei; Daniel, Luiz Antonio; Espíndola, Evaldo Luiz Gaeta

    2014-11-01

    The toxic potential of four disinfectant agents (chlorine, ozone, peracetic acid and UV radiation), used in the disinfection of urban wastewater, was evaluated with respect to four aquatic organisms. Disinfection assays were carried out with wastewater from the city of Araraquara (São Paulo State, Brazil), and subsequently, toxicity bioassays were applied in order to verify possible adverse effects to the cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia similis), midge larvae Chironomus xanthus and fish (Danio rerio). Under the experimental conditions tested, all the disinfectants were capable of producing harmful effects on the test organisms, except for C. xanthus. The toxicity of the effluent to C. silvestrii was observed to increase significantly as a result of disinfection using 2.5 mg L(-1) chlorine and 29.9 mg L(-1) ozone. Ozonation and chlorination significantly affected the survival of D. similis and D. rerio, causing mortality of 60 to 100 % in comparison to the non-disinfected effluent. In experiments with effluent treated with peracetic acid (PAA) and UV radiation, a statistically significant decrease in survival was only detected for D. rerio. This investigation suggested that the study of the ideal concentrations of disinfectants is a research need for ecologically safe options for the treatment of wastewater.

  6. Toxicity on aquatic organisms exposed to secondary effluent disinfected with chlorine, peracetic acid, ozone and UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Juliana Berninger; Rodgher, Suzelei; Daniel, Luiz Antonio; Espíndola, Evaldo Luiz Gaeta

    2014-11-01

    The toxic potential of four disinfectant agents (chlorine, ozone, peracetic acid and UV radiation), used in the disinfection of urban wastewater, was evaluated with respect to four aquatic organisms. Disinfection assays were carried out with wastewater from the city of Araraquara (São Paulo State, Brazil), and subsequently, toxicity bioassays were applied in order to verify possible adverse effects to the cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Daphnia similis), midge larvae Chironomus xanthus and fish (Danio rerio). Under the experimental conditions tested, all the disinfectants were capable of producing harmful effects on the test organisms, except for C. xanthus. The toxicity of the effluent to C. silvestrii was observed to increase significantly as a result of disinfection using 2.5 mg L(-1) chlorine and 29.9 mg L(-1) ozone. Ozonation and chlorination significantly affected the survival of D. similis and D. rerio, causing mortality of 60 to 100 % in comparison to the non-disinfected effluent. In experiments with effluent treated with peracetic acid (PAA) and UV radiation, a statistically significant decrease in survival was only detected for D. rerio. This investigation suggested that the study of the ideal concentrations of disinfectants is a research need for ecologically safe options for the treatment of wastewater. PMID:25213288

  7. Trends of chlorinated organic contaminants in Great Lakes trout and walleye from 1970-1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, J.P.; Batterman, S.A.; Chernyak, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Levels of chlorinated organic contaminants in predator fish have been monitored annually in each of the Great Lakes since the 1970s. This article updates earlier reports with data from 1991 to 1998 for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and (Lake Erie only) walleye (Sander vitreus) to provide a record that now extends nearly 30 years. Whole fish were analyzed for a number of industrial contaminants and pesticides, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), dieldrin, toxaphene, and mirex, and contaminant trends were quantified using multicompartment models. As in the past, fish from Lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Huron have the highest levels of PCBs, DDT, and dieldrin; Superior has the highest levels of toxaphene; and Ontario has the highest levels of mirex. In the period after curtailment of chemical use, concentrations rapidly decreased, represented by relatively short half-lives from approximately 1 to 9 years. Although trends depend on both the contaminant and the lake, in many cases the rate of decline has been decreasing, and concentrations are gradually approaching an irreducible concentration. For dioxin-like PCBs, levels have not been decreasing during the most recent 5-year period (1994 to 1998). In some cases, the year-to-year variation in contaminant levels is large, mainly because of food-web dynamics. Although this variation sometimes obscures long-term trends, the general pattern of a rapid decrease followed by slowing or leveling-off of the downward trend seems consistent across the Great Lakes, and future improvements of the magnitude seen in the 1970s and early 1980s likely will take much longer.

  8. Application of nanoporous silicas as adsorbents for chlorinated aromatic compounds. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritz, Michał, E-mail: michal.moritz@put.poznan.pl [Poznan University of Technology, Faculty of Chemical Technology, Institute of Chemistry and Technical Electrochemistry, Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Adam Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Chemistry, Umultowska 89b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Geszke-Moritz, Małgorzata, E-mail: Malgorzata.Geszke-Moritz@amu.edu.pl [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2014-08-01

    The removal of two selected environmental pollutants such as 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and Triclosan (TC) was examined by adsorption experiments on the modified SBA-15 and MCF mesoporous silicas. Mesoporous adsorbents were modified by a grafting process with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 1-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (TMSPU). Mesoporous materials were synthesized and characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption experiment, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis and adsorption studies. The results show that both APTES-functionalized SBA-15 and MCF nanoporous carriers are potentially good adsorbents for the removal of 2,4-D in a wide range of concentrations from 0.1 to 4 mg/cm{sup 3}. Maximum adsorption capacity of as-modified adsorbents for 2,4-D estimated from the Langmuir model was ∼ 280 mg/g. The ionic interaction between the adsorbent and 2,4-D seems to play a key role in the adsorption process of the pollutant on APTES-modified siliceous matrices. The efficiency of TC sorption onto all prepared mesoporous adsorbents was significantly lower as compared to the entrapment of 2,4-D. Experimental data were best fitted by the Langmuir isotherm model. The results of this study suggest that mesoporous silica-based materials are promising adsorbents for the removal of selected organic pollutants. - Graphical abstract: Adsorption of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and Triclosan inside 3-amino-functionalized mesoporous channel.

  9. Organic compounds in the urban dusts in Celje area

    OpenAIRE

    Gorazd Žibret

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of organic chemicals in different urban dusts. The aim of the researchis preliminary evaluation of the presence of organic contaminants in household dust, attic dust and streetsediment. Celje area has been chosen as a pilot study site due to availability of sampling materials from previoussampling campaigns. Samples have been tested to the presence of 120 organic compounds. Attic dust contains 98different organic compounds or 82 % of all measure...

  10. Anaerobic treatment of cellulose bleach plant wastewater: chlorinated organics and genotoxicity removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Chaparro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the removal efficiency of organic matter and how it relates to the decrease of toxic and mutagenic effects when an anaerobic reactor is used to treat the bleaching effluent from two kraft pulp mills. Parameters such as COD (chemical oxygen demand, DOC (dissolved organic carbon, AOX (adsorbable organic halogen, ASL (acid soluble lignin, color, chlorides, total phenols and absorbance values in the UV-VIS spectral region were measured. The acute and chronic toxicity and genetic toxicity assessments were performed with Daphnia similis, Ceriodaphnia sp. and Allium cepa L, respectively. The removal efficiency of organic matter measured as COD, ranged from 45% to 55%, while AOX removal ranged from 40% to 45%. The acute toxic and chronic effects, as well as the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic effects, decrease as the biodegradable fraction of the organics is removed. These results, together with the organic load measurement of the effluents of the anaerobic treatment, indicate that these effluents are recalcitrant but not toxic. As expected, color increased when the anaerobic treatment was applied. However, the colored compounds are of microbial origin and do not cause an increase in genotoxic effects. To discharge the wastewater, it is necessary to apply a physico-chemical or aerobic biological post-treatment to the effluents of the anaerobic reactor.

  11. Methane oxidation and degradation of organic compounds in landfill soil covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero-order kin......High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero...... in the anaerobic zone in the lower part of soil columns permeated with artificial landfill gas. The lesser-chlorinated compounds were degraded in the upper oxic zone with overlapping gradients of methane and oxygen. Methane oxidation and degradation of HOCs in the top-soils may play a very important role...

  12. 40 CFR 60.712 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.712 Section 60.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Magnetic Tape Coating Facilities § 60.712 Standards for volatile organic compounds. Each owner or...

  13. 40 CFR 60.742 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.742 Section 60.742 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Polymeric Coating of Supporting Substrates Facilities § 60.742 Standards for volatile organic compounds....

  14. 40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Industrial Surface Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or...

  15. 40 CFR 60.602 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.602 Section 60.602 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Synthetic Fiber Production Facilities § 60.602 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On and after...

  16. 40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date...

  17. 40 CFR 60.722 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.722 Section 60.722 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... volatile organic compounds. (a) Each owner or operator of any affected facility which is subject to...

  18. 40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.582 Section 60.582 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 60.622 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.622 Section 60.622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Petroleum Dry Cleaners § 60.622 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) Each affected...

  20. Effect of chlorination and ozone pre-oxidation on the photobacteria acute toxicity for dissolved organic matter from sewage treatment plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The effect of chlorination and ozone pre-oxidation on the photobacteria acute toxicity for dissolved organic matter(DOM) from sewage treatment plants was investigated in this study.The results show that ozone pre-oxidation enhanced the photobacteria acute toxicity of the water samples.DOM before and after ozone pre-oxidation was fractionated by resins into six kinds of hydrophobic and hydrophilic organics.The six fractions were chlorinated individually and the photobacteria acute toxicity before and after chlorination was tested.It was found that the percentage of hydrophilic organics in DOM significantly increased after ozone pre-oxidation and hydrophilic organics exhibited remarkably higher acute toxicity than hydrophobic organics.In view of potentiometric titration and fourier transform infrared(FTIR) analysis,the hydrophilic organics showed a rather higher content of ph-OH structures than hydrophobic organics.

  1. Fate of chlorinated fatty acids in migrating sockeye salmon and their transfer to arctic grayling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Ewald, G.; Nilsson, E.;

    2004-01-01

    organohalogen compounds in the salmon were halogenated fatty acids, predominantly chlorinated species that accounted for up to 35% of the extractable, organically bound chlorine (EOCl) in the fish tissues. The amount of chlorinated fatty acids in the salmon muscle decreased as a result of spawning migration....... The decrease was correlated with that of triacylglycerols in the salmon muscle, indicating the chlorinated fatty acids to be mobilized and metabolized to approximately the same extent as the other fatty acids. Chlorinated fatty acids were also transferred to the maturing roe in a manner similar...... to that of the unchlorinated fatty acids. Lipids of the Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus), a fish resident to the spawning lake of the salmon, contained higher concentrations of chlorinated fatty acids than grayling in a lake without migratory salmon. This may reflect a food-chain transfer of the chlorinated fatty acids...

  2. OCCURRENCE & CHEMISTRY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HANFORD SITE WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STOCK, L.M.; MEACHAM, J.E.

    2004-07-29

    Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds continuously evolve from the waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Some are identical to the compounds originally transferred to tanks and others are formed through interdependent chemical and radiolytic reactions. This document provides a technical basis for understanding the chemical consequences of long term storage, sluicing, the addition of chemicals, and the prediction of other organic compounds that may be present in the wastes.

  3. Kineic Modelling of Degradation of Organic Compounds in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGZONGSHENG; ZHANGSHUIMING; 等

    1997-01-01

    A set of equations in suggested to describe the kinetics of degradation of organic ompounds applied to soils ad the kinetics of growth of the inolved microorganisms:-dx/dt=jx+kxm dm/dt=-fm+gxm where x is the concentration of organic compound at time t,m is the numer of microorganisms capable of degrading the organic compound at time t,while j,k,f and g are positive constants,This model can satisfactorily be used to explain the degradation curve of organic compounds and the growth curve of the involved microorganisms.

  4. Mutagenic and Estrogenic Effects of Organic Compounds in Water Treated by Different Processes:A Pilot Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yi; LYU Xue Min; XIAO San Hua; YANG Xiao Ming; WANG Ya Zhou; TANG Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, a pilot-scale investigation was conducted to examine and compare the biotoxicity of the organic compounds in effluents from five treatment processes (P1-P5) where each process was combination of preoxidation (O3), coagulation, sedimentation, sand filtration, ozonation, granular activated carbon, biological activated carbon and chlorination (NaClO). Methods Organic compounds were extracted by XAD-2 resins and eluted with acetone and dichlormethane (DCM). The eluents were evaporated and redissolved with DMSO or DCM. The mutagenicity and estrogenicity of the extracts were assayed with the Ames test and yeast estrogen screen (YES assay), respectively. The organic compounds were detected by GC-MS. Results The results indicated that the mutation ratio (MR) of organic compounds in source water was higher than that for treated water. GC-MS showed that more than 48 organic compounds were identified in all samples and that treated water had significantly fewer types and concentrations of organic compounds than source water. Conclusion To different extents, all water treatment processes could reduce both the mutagenicity and estrogenicity, relative to source water. P2, P3, and P5 reduced mutagenicity more effectively, while P1 reduced estrogenicity, most effectively. Water treatment processes in this pilot plant had weak abilities to remove Di-n-butyl phthalate or 1, 2-Benzene dicarboxylic acid.

  5. Atmospheric degradation mechanism of organic sulfur compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Arsene, C.

    2002-02-01

    In the present work a detailed product study has been performed on the OH radical initiated oxidation of dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl sulphoxide, under different conditions of temperature, partial pressure of oxygen and NO{sub x} concentration, in order to better define the degradation mechanism of the above compounds under conditions which prevail in the atmosphere. (orig.)

  6. Organic Compounds in Circumstellar and Interstellar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sun

    2015-06-01

    Recent research has discovered that complex organic matter is prevalent throughout the Universe. In the Solar System, it is found in meteorites, comets, interplanetary dust particles, and planetary satellites. Spectroscopic signatures of organics with aromatic/aliphatic structures are also found in stellar ejecta, diffuse interstellar medium, and external galaxies. From space infrared spectroscopic observations, we have found that complex organics can be synthesized in the late stages of stellar evolution. Shortly after the nuclear synthesis of the element carbon, organic gas-phase molecules are formed in the stellar winds, which later condense into solid organic particles. This organic synthesis occurs over very short time scales of about a thousand years. In order to determine the chemical structures of these stellar organics, comparisons are made with particles produced in the laboratory. Using the technique of chemical vapor deposition, artificial organic particles have been created by injecting energy into gas-phase hydrocarbon molecules. These comparisons led us to believe that the stellar organics are best described as amorphous carbonaceous nanoparticles with mixed aromatic and aliphatic components. The chemical structures of the stellar organics show strong similarity to the insoluble organic matter found in meteorites. Isotopic analysis of meteorites and interplanetary dust collected in the upper atmospheres have revealed the presence of pre-solar grains similar to those formed in old stars. This provides a direct link between star dust and the Solar System and raises the possibility that the early Solar System was chemically enriched by stellar ejecta with the potential of influencing the origin of life on Earth.

  7. Determination of gaseous semi-and low-volatile organic halogen compounds by barrier-discharge atomic emission spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifei Sun; Nobuhisa Watanabe; Wei Wang; Tianle Zhu

    2013-01-01

    A group parameter approach using "total organic halogen" is effective for monitoring gaseous organic halogen compounds,including fluorine,chlorine,and bromine compounds,generated from combustion.We described the use of barrier-discharge radiofrequencyhelium-plasma/atomic emission spectrometry,for the detection of semi-and low-volatile organic halogen compounds (SLVOXs),which can be collected by CarbotrapTM adsorbents and analyzed using thermal desorption.The optimal carrier gas flow rates at the injection and desorption lines were established to be 100 mL/min.The detection range for SLVOXs in the gaseous samples was from 10 ng to tens of micrograms.Measuring F was more diflicult than measuring Cl or Br,because the wavelength ofF is dose to that of air.The barrierdischarge radiofrequency-helium-plasma/atomic emission spectrometry measured from 85% to 103% of the SLVOXs in the gas sample.It has been found that Carbotrap B is appropriate for high-boiling-point compounds,and Carbotrap C is suitable for the determination of organic halogen compounds with lower boiling points,in the range 200-230℃.Under optimal analysis conditions,a chlorinecontaining plastic was destroyed using different oxygen concentrations.Lower oxygen concentrations resulted in the production of lower amounts of organic halogen compounds.

  8. Binary systems solubilities of inorganic and organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen, H

    1963-01-01

    Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds, Volume 1: Binary Systems, Part 1 is part of an approximately 5,500-page manual containing a selection from the International Chemical Literature on the Solubilities of Elements, Inorganic Compounds, Metallo-organic and Organic Compounds in Binary, Ternary and Multi-component Systems. A careful survey of the literature in all languages by a panel of scientists specially appointed for the task by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, Moscow, has made the compilation of this work possible. The complete English edition in five separately bound volumes w

  9. 40 CFR 60.542 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after...) For each green tire spraying operation where both water-based and organic solvent-based sprays...

  10. Volatile organic compound ratios as probes of halogen atom chemistry in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Shepson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compound concentration ratios can be used as indicators of halogen chemistry that occurs during ozone depletion events in the Arctic during spring. Here we use a combination of modeling and measurements of [acetone]/[propanal] as an indicator of bromine chemistry, and [isobutane]/[n-butane] and [methyl ethyl ketone]/[n-butane] are used to study the extent of chlorine chemistry during four ozone depletion events during the Polar Sunrise Experiment of 1995. Using a 0-D photochemistry model in which the input of halogen atoms is controlled and varied, the approximate ratio of [Br]/[Cl] can be estimated for each ozone depletion event. It is concluded that there must be an additional source of propanal (likely from the snowpack to correctly simulate the VOC chemistry of the Arctic, and further evidence that the ratio of Br atoms to Cl atoms can vary greatly during ozone depletion events is presented.

  11. Volatile organic compound ratios as probes of halogen atom chemistry in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Cavender

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compound concentration ratios can be used as indicators of halogen chemistry that occurs during ozone depletion events in the Arctic during spring. Here we use a combination of modeling and measurements of [acetone]/[propanal] as an indicator of bromine chemistry, and [isobutane]/[n-butane] and [methyl ethyl ketone]/[n-butane] are used to study the extent of chlorine chemistry during four ozone depletion events during the Polar Sunrise Experiment of 1995. Using a 0-D photochemistry model in which the input of halogen atoms is controlled and varied, the approximate ratio of [Br]/[Cl] can be estimated for each ozone depletion event. It is concluded that there must be an additional source of propanal (likely from the snowpack to correctly simulate the VOC chemistry of the Arctic, and that the ratio of Br atoms to Cl atoms can vary greatly during ozone depletion events.

  12. Investigations on organogermanium compounds XII. Reactions of trialkylgermylalkalimetal compounds in hexamethylphosphoric triamide (HMPT) with some inorganic and organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulten, E.J.; Noltes, J.G.

    1971-01-01

    Trialkylgermyl alkali metal compounds in HMPT have been found to be highly reactive nucleophiles. Reactions with some inorganic and organic compounds, such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, inorganic and orgaanic halides, aldehydes, ketones, epoxides and lactones are described. Several new carbon-functiona

  13. Synthesis of fluorinated organic compounds using oxygen difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Oxygen difluoride synthesis is a much simpler, higher-yield procedure than reactions originally followed to synthesize various fluorinated organic compounds. Extreme care is taken in working with oxygen difluoride as its reactions present severe explosion hazard.

  14. An investigation of recalcitrant organic compounds in leachates

    OpenAIRE

    Yunus, Anika

    2009-01-01

    Recalcitrant organic compounds remain a key challenge in landfill leachate management as they are resistant to microbial degradation and have potential to damage the water environment. Conventional leachate characterisation methods are time consuming and limited by their inability to provide compositional analysis. This research therefore investigates the characteristics of recalcitrant organic compounds in leachates and undertakes a feasibility study of the possible use of UV absorption and ...

  15. Thermodynamic properties of organic compounds estimation methods, principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Janz, George J

    1967-01-01

    Thermodynamic Properties of Organic Compounds: Estimation Methods, Principles and Practice, Revised Edition focuses on the progression of practical methods in computing the thermodynamic characteristics of organic compounds. Divided into two parts with eight chapters, the book concentrates first on the methods of estimation. Topics presented are statistical and combined thermodynamic functions; free energy change and equilibrium conversions; and estimation of thermodynamic properties. The next discussions focus on the thermodynamic properties of simple polyatomic systems by statistical the

  16. Total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) in indoor air quality investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, L.; Clausen, Geo; Berglund, B.;

    1997-01-01

    The amount of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air, usually called TVOC (total volatile organic compounds), has been measured using different definitions and techniques which yield different results. This report recommends a definition of TVOC referring to a specified range of VOCs...... for characterizing indoor pollution and for improving source control as required from the points of view of health, comfort, energy efficiency and sustainability. (C) Indoor Air (1997)....

  17. Metal organic frameworks for removal of compounds from a fluid

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-03

    Embodiments provide a method of compound removal from a fluid. The method includes contacting one or more metal organic framework (MOF) compositions with a fluid and sorbing one or more compounds, such as CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons. One or more of CO2, H2S and condensable hydrocarbons can be sorbed simultaneously or in series. The metal organic framework can be an M-soc-MOF.

  18. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  19. Thermodynamics of Organic Compound Alteration in Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E. L.

    2005-12-01

    Organic compounds enter hydrothermal systems through infiltrating surface waters, zones of microbial productivity in the subsurface, extracts of organic matter in surrounding host rocks, and abiotic synthesis. Owing to variations in pH, oxidation state, composition, temperature, and pressure throughout the changing pathways of fluid migration over the duration of the system, organic compounds from all of these sources are introduced to conditions where their relative stabilities and reactivities can be dramatically transformed. If those transformations were predictable, then the extent to which organic alteration reactions have occurred could be used to reveal flowpaths and histories of hydrothermal systems. Speciation and mass transfer calculations permit some insight into the underlying thermodynamic driving forces that result in organic compound alteration. As an example, the speciation of many geochemist's canonical organic matter: CH2O depends strongly on oxidation state, temperature, and total concentration of dissolved organic matter. Calculations show that at oxidation states buffered by iron-bearing mineral assemblages, organic acids dominate the speciation of CH2O throughout hydrothermal systems, with acetic acid (itself equivalent to 2 CH2O by bulk composition) and propanoic acid generally the most abundant compounds. However, at more reduced conditions, which may prevail in organic-rich iron-poor sediments, the drive is to form ketones and especially alcohols at the expense of organic acids. The distribution of organic carbon among the various members of these compound classes is strongly dependent on the total concentration of dissolved organic matter. As an example, at a bulk concentration equivalent to average dissolved organic matter in seawater (45μm), the dominant alcohols at 100°C are small compounds like ethanol and 1-propanol. In contrast, at a higher bulk concentration of 500μm, there is a drive to shift large percentages of dissolved

  20. Compound-specific stable isotopes of organic compounds from lake sediments track recent environmental changes in an alpine ecosystem, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, S.K.; Pagani, M.; Pantoja, S.; Baron, J.S.; Wolfe, A.P.; Pedentchouk, N.; Nunez, L.

    2008-01-01

    Compound-specific nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotope records from sediments of Sky Pond, an alpine lake in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado, United States of America), were used to evaluate factors contributing to changes in diatom assemblages and bulk organic nitrogen isotope records identified in lake sediments across Colorado, Wyoming, and southern Montana. Nitrogen isotopic records of purified algal chlorins indicate a substantial shift in nitrogen cycling in the region over the past ???60 yr. Temporal changes in the growth characteristics of algae, captured in carbon isotope records in and around Sky Pond, as well as a -60??? excursion in the hydrogen isotope composition of algal-derived palmitic acid, are coincident with changes in nitrogen cycling. The confluence of these trends is attributed to an increase in biologically available nitrogenous compounds caused by an expansion of anthropogenic influences and temporal changes in catchment hydrology and nutrient delivery associated with meltwater dynamics. ?? 2008, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  1. Sorption of Organic Compounds in Soil Organic Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM)is the predominant component for sorption of hydrophobic organic compouds in soil and sorption by SOM ultimately affects chemical fate and availability in soil ,and the degree of remedia tion success of contaminated soils. This paper summarizes the latest development on sorption of organic com pounds in soil (natural) organic matter, addresses four sorption mechanisms: surface adsorption, solid - phase partitioning,dual-mode sorption,and fixed-pore sorption model ,and presents future research directions as well.

  2. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil - A combined modelling and experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelius, Malin; Svensson, Teresia; Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Thiry, Yves; Bastviken, David

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl(-) transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl(-) per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d(-1) and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01-0.03d(-1) and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. PMID:26950634

  3. In Situ and Laboratory Studies on the Fate of Specific Organic Compounds in an Anerobic Landfill Leachate Plume, 1. Experimental Conditions and Fate of Phenolic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm;

    1995-01-01

    microcosm experiments performed and the results on the fate of 7 phenolic compounds. Part 2 of this series of papers, also published in this issue, presents the results on the fate of 8 aromatic compounds and 4 chlorinated aliphatic compounds. The redox conditions in the plume were characterized as...

  4. New Aspects of Zirconium Containing Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ilan

    Metal carbene complexes have made their way from organometallic curiosities to valuable reagents and catalysts. They offer novel synthetic opportunities in carbon-carbon bond formation based on either carbene-centered reactions or on metal-templated processes which makes them indispensable in modern synthetic methodology. The most prominent metal carbenes are now either commercially available or easy to synthesize and handle with modern laboratory techniques. This volume organized in eight chapters written by the leading scientists in the field illustrates the theoretical background, non-classical nucleophilic and cycloaddition patterns, chromium-templated benzannulation and photo-induced reactions, rhodium-catalyzed carbene transfer as well as the principles and applications of olefin metathesis which has coined the progress in synthetic methodology over the past decade.

  5. Can volatile organic compounds be markers of sea salt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabel; Coimbra, Manuel A; Barros, António S; Marriott, Philip J; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2015-02-15

    Sea salt is a handmade food product that is obtained by evaporation of seawater in saltpans. During the crystallisation process, organic compounds from surroundings can be incorporated into sea salt crystals. The aim of this study is to search for potential volatile markers of sea salt. Thus, sea salts from seven north-east Atlantic Ocean locations (France, Portugal, Continental Spain, Canary Islands, and Cape Verde) were analysed by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 165 compounds were detected, ranging from 32 to 71 compounds per salt. The volatile composition revealed the variability and individuality of each salt, and a set of ten compounds were detected in all samples. From these, seven are carotenoid-derived compounds that can be associated with the typical natural surroundings of ocean hypersaline environment. These ten compounds are proposed as potential volatile markers of sea salt. PMID:25236204

  6. 40 CFR 60.432 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.432 Section 60.432 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Graphic Arts Industry: Publication Rotogravure Printing § 60.432 Standard for volatile organic...

  7. 40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds 60.392 Section 60.392 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic...

  8. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND CYCLODEXTRIN-CLAY SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational and experimental techniques are combined in order to better understand interactions involving organic compounds and cyclodextrin (CD)-clay systems. CD-clay systems may have great potential in the containment of organic contaminants in the environment. This study w...

  9. Metals, pesticides, and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment in Valley Forge National Historical Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andrew G.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    1997-01-01

    The Schuylkill River flows through Valley Forge National Historical Park in Lower Providence and West Norriton Townships in Montgomery County, Pa. The concentration of selected metals, pesticides, semivolatile organic compounds, and total carbon in stream-bottom sediments from Valley Forge National Historical Park were determined for samples collected once at 12 sites in and around the Schuylkill River. Relatively low concentrations of arsenic, chromium, copper, and lead were detected in all samples. The concentrations of these metals are similar to concentrations in other stream-bottom sediment samples collected in the region. The concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were elevated in samples from four sites in the Schuylkill River, and the concentration of mercury was elevated in a sample from an impoundment along the river. The organophosphorus insecticide diazinon was detected in relatively low concentrations in half of the 12 samples analyzed. The organo-chlorine insecticide DDE was detected in all 12 samples analyzed; dieldrin was detected in 10 samples, chlordane, DDD, and DDT were detected in 9 samples, and heptachlor epoxide was detected in one sample. The concentrations of organo-chlorine and organophosphorus insecticides were relatively low and similar to concentrations in samples collected in the region. Detectable concentrations of 17 semivolatile organic compounds were measured in the 12 samples analyzed. The most commonly detected compounds were fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and pyrene. The maximum concentration detected was 4,800 micrograms per kilogram of phenanthrene. The highest concentrations of compounds were detected in Lamb Run, a small tributary to the Schuylkill River with headwaters in an industrial corporate center. The concentration of compounds in the Schuylkill River below Lamb Run is higher than the Schuylkill River above Lamb Run, indicating that sediment from Lamb Run is increasing the concentration of semivolatile organic

  10. Lipid–water partition coefficients and correlations with uptakes by algae of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Wei-Nung [Green Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu 30011, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Cary T., E-mail: carychio@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Environment Research Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Lin, Tsair-Fuh, E-mail: tflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Environment Research Laboratory, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Partition coefficients of contaminants with lipid triolein (K{sub tw}) are measured. • Measured K{sub tw} values are nearly the same as the respective K{sub ow}. • Sorption of the contaminants to a dry algal powder is similarly measured. • Algal uptake of a compound occurs primarily by partition into the algal lipid. - Abstract: In view of the scarcity of the lipid–water partition coefficients (K{sub tw}) for organic compounds, the log K{sub tw} values for many environmental contaminants were measured using ultra-pure triolein as the model lipid. Classes of compounds studied include alkyl benzenes, halogenated benzenes, short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides. In addition to log K{sub tw} determination, the uptakes of these compounds from water by a dry algal species were measured to evaluate the lipid effect on the algal uptake. The measured log K{sub tw} are closely related to their respective log K{sub ow} (octanol–water), with log K{sub ow} = 1.9 to 6.5. A significant difference is observed between the present and early measured log K{sub tw} for compounds with log K{sub ow} > ∼5, which is attributed to the presence and absence of a triolein microemulsion in water affecting the solute partitioning. The observed lipid-normalized algae–water distribution coefficients (log K{sub aw/lipid}) are virtually identical to the respective log K{sub tw} values, which manifests the dominant lipid-partition effect of the compounds with algae.

  11. Method of processing organic phosphate ester compound waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; Nishimura, Kenji.

    1988-03-26

    Purpose: To convert organic solvent wastes mainly composed of organic phosphate esters into inorganic compounds, stabilize by solidification and apply volume-reduction treatment. Method: Hydrous aluminum chloride or aluminum polychloride is added to and mixed with organic solvent wastes containing organic phosphate esters as the main ingredient resulted from spent fuel reprocessings, by an amount of 0.3 or more mol per mol of the organic phosphate ester and then heated to solidify at a temperature from 50 to 150 deg C. Then, solidification products are sintered at a temperature higher than 270 deg C to remove alkyl group organic ingredients remained in the solidification products to convert them into stable inorganic phosphoric acid compounds. (Yoshino, Y.).

  12. Use of Bromine and Bromo-Organic Compounds in Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Indranirekha; Borah, Arun Jyoti; Phukan, Prodeep

    2016-06-22

    Bromination is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis and can be carried out using bromine and many other bromo compounds. Use of molecular bromine in organic synthesis is well-known. However, due to the hazardous nature of bromine, enormous growth has been witnessed in the past several decades for the development of solid bromine carriers. This review outlines the use of bromine and different bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis. The applications of bromine, a total of 107 bromo-organic compounds, 11 other brominating agents, and a few natural bromine sources were incorporated. The scope of these reagents for various organic transformations such as bromination, cohalogenation, oxidation, cyclization, ring-opening reactions, substitution, rearrangement, hydrolysis, catalysis, etc. has been described briefly to highlight important aspects of the bromo-organic compounds in organic synthesis.

  13. Well-purging criteria for sampling purgeable organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibs, J.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    The results indicate that 1) purgeable organic compound concentrations stabilized when three casing volume were purged in only 55% of the cases evaluated in this study, 2) purgeable organic compounds concentrations did not consistently follow the temporal variation of, nor stabilize at the same time as, the measure field characteristics, and 3) purging to achieve hydraulic equilibrium between casing and aquifer water consistently underestimated the time and casing volumes needed to achieve stable values of water-quality measurements in highly transmissive aquifers. The conclusion from these data is that none of the previously recommended criteria for purging a well can be applied reliably to collecting a "representative' sample of purgeable organic compounds. These results indicate that the criteria for purging a well prior to sampling for purgeable organic compounds must take into account other factors, such as the unique hydrogeologic characteristics of a site, the nature and extent of purgeable organic compounds present, and areal extent of the contamination, the well construction, and the sampling objectives of the investigation. -from Authors

  14. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  15. Effect of the Presence of Chlorates and Perchlorates on the Pyrolysis of Organic Compounds: Implications for Measurements Done with the SAM Experiment Onboard the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, M.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Belmahdi, I.; Coll, P.; Glavin, D. P.; Freissinet, C.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Summons, R. E.; Mahaffy, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover carries a suite of instruments, one of which is the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) experiment. SAM is devoted to the in situ molecular analysis of gases evolving from solid samples collected by Curiosity on Mars surface/sub-surface. Among its three analytical devices, SAM has a gaschromatograph coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer (GC-QMS). The GC-QMS is devoted to the separation and identification of organic and inorganic material. Before proceeding to the GC-QMS analysis, the solid sample collected by Curiosity is subjected to a thermal treatment thanks to the pyrolysis oven to release the volatiles into the gas processing system. Depending on the sample, a derivatization method by wet chemistry: MTBSTFA of TMAH can also be applied to analyze the most refractory compounds. The GC is able to separate the organic molecules which are then detected and identified by the QMS (Figure 1). For the second time after the Viking landers in 1976, SAM detected chlorinated organic compounds with the pyrolysis GC-QMS experiment. The detection of perchlorates salts (ClO4-) in soil at the Phoenix Landing site suggests that the chlorohydrocarbons detected could come from the reaction of organics with oxychlorines. Indeed, laboratory pyrolysis experiments have demonstrated that oxychlorines decomposed into molecular oxygen and volatile chlorine (HCl and/or Cl2) when heated which then react with the organic matter in the solid samples by oxidation and/or chlorination processes.

  16. Volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in laboratory peat fire emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ingrid J.; Black, Robert R.; Geron, Chris D.; Aurell, Johanna; Hays, Michael D.; Preston, William T.; Gullett, Brian K.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, volatile and semi-volatile organic compound (VOCs and SVOCs) mass emission factors were determined from laboratory peat fire experiments. The peat samples originated from two National Wildlife Refuges on the coastal plain of North Carolina, U.S.A. Gas- and particle-phase organic compounds were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by high pressure liquid chromatography. Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) accounted for a large fraction (∼60%) of the speciated VOC emissions from peat burning, including large contributions of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and chloromethane. In the fine particle mass (PM2.5), the following organic compound classes were dominant: organic acids, levoglucosan, n-alkanes, and n-alkenes. Emission factors for the organic acids in PM2.5 including n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenoic acids, n-alkanedioic acids, and aromatic acids were reported for the first time for peat burning, representing the largest fraction of organic carbon (OC) mass (11-12%) of all speciated compound classes measured in this work. Levoglucosan contributed to 2-3% of the OC mass, while methoxyphenols represented 0.2-0.3% of the OC mass on a carbon mass basis. Retene was the most abundant particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Total HAP VOC and particulate PAH emissions from a 2008 peat wildfire in North Carolina were estimated, suggesting that peat fires can contribute a large fraction of state-wide HAP emissions.

  17. Sonochemical Treatment of Water Polluted by Chlorinated Organocompounds. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Louisnard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available As one of several types of pollutants in water, chlorinated compounds have been routinely subjected to sonochemical analysis to check the environmental applications of this technology. In this review, an extensive study of the influence of the initial concentration, ultrasonic intensity and frequency on the kinetics, degradation efficiency and mechanism has been analyzed. The sonochemical degradation follows a radical mechanism which yields a very wide range of chlorinated compounds in very low concentrations. Special attention has been paid to the mass balance comparing the results from several analytical techniques. As a conclusion, sonochemical degradation alone is not an efficient treatment to reduce the organic pollutant level in waste water.

  18. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Select Volatile Organic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chia-Li

    2015-01-01

    This thesis enhances our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from select anthropogenic sources including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PAHs mixed with m-xylene and an atmospheric surrogate, and unburned whole gasoline vapors. Major SOA chemical characteristics and physical properties were explored along with SOA formation within the UCR CE-CERT environmental chamber. SOA formation was significant for all three PAHs precursors during photooxidation under high ...

  19. Inventory of volatile organic compound emissions in Finland, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to compile an inventory of the emissions of volatile organic compounds in Finland for the year 1985. The report was prepared for the ECE Task Force on Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from Stationary Sources according to the classification given by the Task Force. It considers anthropogenic as well as natural sources. Mobile sources are excluded. The quantities as well as the main components are listed, as far as possible. The values given exclude methane which according to the present understanding is regarded as unreactive

  20. Synthesis of Organic Compounds over Selected Types of Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohamed Saad Ismail

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an overview for the utilization of different catalytic material in the synthesis of organic compounds for important reactions such as heck reaction, aldol reaction, Diels- Alder and other reactions. Comparisons between multiple catalysts for the same reaction and justifications for developing new catalyzed materials are discussed. The following topics are introduced in this work; (1 solid base catalysts, (2 clay catalysts, (3 palladium catalysts, and (4 catalysts to produce organic compound from CO2. The features of these catalysts a long with the conjugated reactions and their selectivity are explained in details, also, some alternatives for toxic or polluting catalysts used in industry are suggested.

  1. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H. [comp.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  2. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: Comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Wu, Deyi, E-mail: dywu@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, No. 800, Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surfactant modified zeolite could greatly retain organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uptake of organic compounds was due to the loaded surfactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer k{sub ow} is crucial for the uptake of both ionizable and non-ionizable organic solutes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pK{sub a} is another factor affecting adsorption process of ionizable organic pollutants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption mechanisms of the two kinds of organic pollutants were proposed. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK{sub a}) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na{sub 6}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 10}O{sub 32}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Angstrom-Sign Multiplication-Sign 4.5 Angstrom-Sign [1 0 0] and 2.8 Angstrom-Sign Multiplication-Sign 4.8 Angstrom-Sign [1 0 1]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k{sub ow} value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained

  3. [Pollution characteristics of volatile organic compounds from wastewater treatment system of vitamin C production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bin; Lu, Guo-Li; Ren, Ai-Ling; Du, Zhao; Xing, Zhi-Xian; Han, Peng; Gao, Bo; Liu, Shu-Ya

    2013-12-01

    Using a portable gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS), the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution in each unit of the wastewater treatment system for vitamin C production was studied, and the species characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed and summarized. The results showed that 32 kinds of volatile organic compounds were identified, and the total mass concentration range of volatilizing VOCs was 0.9629-32.0970 mg x m(-3). The most species and the largest concentration (25 and 32.0970 mg x m(-3)) of volatilizing VOCs were found in grit chamber, which was located in the most front-end of the wastewater treatment system and was in semi-closed state. The proportion of molecular sulfide in the grit chamber was as high as 30.02%; Higher proportions of aromatic hydrocarbons were monitored in the subsequent processing units, with percentages of 21.06%-31.48%. The main types of VOCs monitored were chlorinated hydrocarbons and ketones, accounting for 6.39%-55.80% and 10.40%-58.08% of the total amount, respectively; 14 kinds of VOCs were detected in every unit of the wastewater treatment system: acetone, 2-butanone, n-hexane, chloroform, chlorobenzene etc, among which, vinyl chloride, styrene and 1,3-butadiene belong to the highly toxic substances. The vinyl chloride concentration exceeded the standard of "atmospheric pollutants emission standards" (GB 16297-1996), while 1,3-butadiene and other pollutants have no national standard limits. The results of this study provide a scientific basis for the revision of China's pharmaceutical wastewater VOCs emission standards. PMID:24640904

  4. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Zhiqiang [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 86 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan; Chi, Qijin [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Mortensen, Ninell P. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Qu, Di [Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Molin, Soren [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens, E-mail: ju@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-07-15

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S. epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamide derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four compounds evoke significant inhibitory effects on the formation of S. epidermidis biofilms with compounds 47 and 73 being most effective. None of the compounds were found to inhibit growth of S. epidermidis in liquid cultures. Bacteria attached to the substrate when exposed to the compounds were not affected indicating that these compounds inhibit initial adhesion. These results suggest a pretreatment for medically implanted surfaces that can prevent the biofilm formation and reduce infection.

  5. Determination of total organic halogens (TOX); Bias from a non-halogenated organic compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gron, C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Dybdahl, H.P. [Water Quality Institute, Harsholm (Denmark)

    1996-08-01

    Determination of total organic halogens (TOX) has proven susceptible to bia high concentrations of a non-halogenated organic compound, N-butylbenzenesulfonamide (NBSA). High apparent TOX values occurred with more than 5-10 mg of NBSA applied to the carbon columns of the TOX procedure. Other non-halogenated organic compounds and inorganic sulfide may bias the method as well. When the TOX method is used as a measure of total organic halogens in environmental regulation and control, the risk of positive bias from non-halogenated compounds should always be emphasized. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes in aquifer thermal energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Z

    2015-01-01

      Subjects: bioremediation; biodegradation; environmental biotechnology, subsurface and groundwater contamination; biological processes; geochemistry; microbiology The combination of enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) and aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) appears attractive because such integration provides a promising solution for redevelopment of urban areas in terms of improving the local environmental quality as well as achieving ...

  7. Catalytic hydrogen-chlorine exchange between chlorinated hydrocarbons under oxygen-free conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.W.A.M.; Podkolzin, S.G.; Jones, M.E.; Bitter, J.H.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) remain important industrial chemical intermediates and solvents, especially for the exploration of the potential of La-based materials for the conversion of chlorinated waste compounds.[1] The production of industrially important CHCs frequently occurs with concurrent

  8. Non-targeted analyses of organic compounds in urban wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Sartori, Luci; Silva, Lorena M A; Silva, Bianca F; Fadini, Pedro S; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Andre; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    A large number of organic pollutants that cause damage to the ecosystem and threaten human health are transported to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The problems regarding water pollution in Latin America have been well documented, and there is no evidence of substantive efforts to change the situation. In the present work, two methods to study wastewater samples are employed: non-targeted 1D ((13)C and (1)H) and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis to characterize the largest possible number of compounds from urban wastewater and analysis by HPLC-(UV/MS)-SPE-ASS-NMR to detect non-specific recalcitrant organic compounds in treated wastewater without the use of common standards. The set of data is composed of several compounds with the concentration ranging considerably with treatment and seasonality. An anomalous discharge, the influence of stormwater on the wastewater composition and the presence of recalcitrant compounds (linear alkylbenzene sulfonate surfactant homologs) in the effluent were further identified. The seasonal variations and abnormality in the composition of organic compounds in sewage indicated that the procedure that was employed can be useful in the identification of the pollution source and to enhance the effectiveness of WWTPs in designing preventive action to protect the equipment and preserve the environment.

  9. [Binding of Volatile Organic Compounds to Edible Biopolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I; Medvedeva, I B

    2016-01-01

    Capillary gas chromatography was used to study the influence of the composition and structure of different edible polymers (polysaccharides, vegetable fibers, and animal protein gelatin) on the binding of essential oil components. The retention of volatile organic compounds on biopolymers was shown to depend on their molecule structure and the presence, type, and position of a functional group. The maximum extent of the binding was observed for nonpolar terpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, and the minimum extent was observed for alcohols. The components of essential oils were adsorbed due mostly to hydrophobic interactions. It was shown that the composition and structure of a compound, its physico-chemical state, and the presence of functional groups influence the binding. Gum arabic and guar gum were found to bind nonpolar compounds to a maximum and minimum extent, respectively. It was demonstrated the minimum adsorption ability of locust bean gum with respect to all studied compounds.

  10. SOIL CONTAMINATION BY NITROGEN COMPOUNDS DURING ORGANIC FUEL COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Bubnov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a transition mechanism of flue gas nitrogen oxides being formed due to organic fuel combustion from atmosphere into soil. Mechanisms of nitrogen compound origination and transformation in atmosphere and their transition into soil have been presented in the paper. The paper recommends a generalized equation for mathematical description of nitrogen migration into soil. 

  11. The growth of bacteria on organic compounds in drinking water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooy, van der D.

    1984-01-01

    Growth ("regrowth") of bacteria In drinking water distribution systems results in a deterioration of the water quality. Regrowth of chemoheterotrophic bacteria depends on the presence of organic. compounds that serve as a nutrient source for these bacteria. A batch-culture technique was developed to

  12. Green chemistry principles in organic compound synthesis and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Verma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review focus on various green chemistry approaches which could be utilized in the organic compounds in practical classes for undergraduate level in comparison of conventional methods. These methods avoid the usage of hazardous substances and are environmental friendly.

  13. OXYGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUND CONCENTRATIONS NEAR A ROADWAY IN LITHUANIA, SSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the period June 1 to June 9, 1989, aldehyde and other oxygenated organic compound concentrations were examined at sites 3, 10, and 80 meters northeast of the Vilnius-Kaunas highway in Lithuania, SSR by collecting 120 liter (1 L/min for 120 min) samples on 2,4-dinitrophenyl...

  14. Atmospheric deposition of semivolatile organic compounds to plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Martine Inez

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes how the deposition of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) to plant surfaces is affected by the characteristics of the plant. From a literature review, it was concluded that differences between SOC concentrations in different plant species are often very small (< a factor o

  15. Modeling organic compounds in the estuarine and coastal environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.P.M. Laane; D. van de Meent; P. de Voogt; J. Parsons; J. Hendriks; J. van Gils

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the historical development and present applications of water-quality models for organic chemical compounds (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)). Various types of water-quality models are described, varying in the amount of compar

  16. Instrument for Analysis of Organic Compounds on Other Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, Riley M.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop the Instrument for Solvent Extraction and Analysis of Extraterrestrial Bodies using In Situ Resources (ISEE). Specifically, ISEE will extract and characterize organic compounds from regolith which is found on the surface of other planets or asteroids. The techniques this instrument will use are supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). ISEE aligns with NASA's goal to expand the frontiers of knowledge, capability, and opportunities in space in addition to supporting NASA's aim to search for life elsewhere by characterizing organic compounds. The outcome of this project will be conceptual designs of 2 components of the ISEE instrument as well as the completion of proof-of-concept extraction experiments to demonstrate the capabilities of SFE. The first conceptual design is a pressure vessel to be used for the extraction of the organic compounds from the regolith. This includes a comparison of different materials, geometry's, and a proposition of how to insert the regolith into the vessel. The second conceptual design identifies commercially available fluid pumps based on the requirements needed to generate supercritical CO2. The proof-of-concept extraction results show the percent mass lost during standard solvent extractions of regolith with organic compounds. This data will be compared to SFE results to demonstrate the capabilities of ISEE's approach.

  17. 40 CFR 60.442 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.442 Section 60.442 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Pressure Sensitive Tape and Label Surface Coating Operations § 60.442 Standard for volatile...

  18. Biogas from MSW landfill: Composition and determination of chlorine content with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique

    OpenAIRE

    Rey Martínez, María Dolores; Font Montesinos, Rafael; Aracil, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    An exhaustive characterization of the biogas from some waste disposal facilities has been carried out. The analysis includes the main components (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen) as well as trace components such as hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and VOCs (volatile organic compounds) including siloxanes and halogenated compounds. VOCs were measured by GC/MS (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry) using two different procedures: thermal desorption of the Tenax TA and Carbotrap 349 tubes...

  19. Poly(3-Methylthiophene) Thin Films Deposited Electrochemically on QCMs for the Sensing of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Sadullah; Kösemen, Arif; Şen, Zafer; Kılınç, Necmettin; Harbeck, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Poly(3-methylthiophene) (PMeT) thin films were electrochemically deposited on quartz crystal microbalance QCM transducers to investigate their volatile organic compound (VOC) sensing properties depending on ambient conditions. Twelve different VOCs including alcohols, ketones, chlorinated compounds, amines, and the organosphosphate dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) were used as analytes. The responses of the chemical sensors against DMMP were the highest among the tested analytes; thus, fabricated chemical sensors based on PMeT can be evaluated as potential candidates for selectively detecting DMMP. Generally, detection limits in the low ppm range could be achieved. The gas sensing measurements were recorded at various humid air conditions to investigate the effects of the humidity on the gas sensing properties. The sensing performance of the chemical sensors was slightly reduced in the presence of humidity in ambient conditions. While a decrease in sensitivity was observed for humidity levels up to 50% r.h., the sensitivity was nearly unaffected for higher humidity levels and a reliable detection of the VOCs and DMMP was possible with detection limits in the low ppm range. PMID:27023539

  20. The impact of ice clouds on retrieval of ozone and chlorine compounds in the UTLS from SMILES data - an error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendrok, J.; Kasai, Y. J.; Takahashi, C.; Buehler, S.; Mission Team, S.

    2006-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb Emission Sounder SMILES, planned to be operated on the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) from the year 2008, has been designed to measure various trace gases that are important for a detailed understanding of atmospheric chemistry related to ozone destruction. One of the most unique characteristics of JEM/SMILES will be its exceptionally low noise, and thus high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the sub-mm wave range, allowing the observation of trace gases that have only weak spetroscopic signatures. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the instrument may facilitate the detection of even thin ice clouds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), which are supposed to increase the efficiency of chemical processes leading to ozone loss. On the other hand, when not taken into account in the retrieval, the change in broadband spectral signal caused by ice clouds introduces further uncertainty in the estimation of background continuum and retrieved trace gas profiles around the UTLS. Within this work we analyse the error budget, that is introduced by not accounting for ice clouds in the retrieval of UTLS profiles of ozone and chlorine compounds like ClO, HOCl and HCl. For that, SMILES observations of a wide variety of cirrus clouds are simulated by the radiative transfer model SARTre, which is capable to model scattering of microwave radiation in a spherical atmosphere. From the simulated measurements profile retrievals of ozone and chlorine compounds are performed using SMOCO, the official retrieval code for SMILES L2 processing. The error budget introduced by cirrus is evaluated and compared to other error sources (like instrumental effects, spectroscopic errors, etc.), that have been analysed within previous studies.

  1. Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Selected Strains of Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Milovanović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal biomass can be used in creating various functional food and feed products, but certain species of microalgae and cyanobacteria are known to produce various compounds causing off-flavour. In this work, we investigated selected cyanobacterial strains of Spirulina, Anabaena, and Nostoc genera originating from Serbia, with the aim of determining the chemical profile of volatile organic compounds produced by these organisms. Additionally, the influence of nitrogen level during growth on the production of volatile compounds was investigated for Nostoc and Anabaena strains. In addition, multivariate techniques, namely, principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, were used for making distinction among different microalgal strains. The results show that the main volatile compounds in these species are medium chain length alkanes, but other odorous compounds such as 2-methylisoborneol (0.51–4.48%, 2-pentylfuran (0.72–8.98%, β-cyclocitral (0.00–1.17%, and β-ionone (1.15–2.72% were also detected in the samples. Addition of nitrogen to growth medium was shown to negatively affect the production of 2-methylisoborneol, while geosmin was not detected in any of the analyzed samples, which indicates that the manipulation of growth conditions may be useful in reducing levels of some unwanted odor-causing components.

  2. Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

    2010-10-01

    Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles. PMID:21121267

  3. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during malting and beer manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nigel B.; Costigan, Gavin T.; Swannell, Richard P. J.; Woodfield, Michael J.

    Estimates have been made of the amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released during different stages of beer manufacture. The estimates are based on recent measurements and plant specification data supplied by manufacturers. Data were obtained for three main manufacturing processes (malting, wort processing and fermentation) for three commercial beer types. Some data on the speciation of emitted compounds have been obtained. Based on these measurements, an estimate of the total unabated VOC emission. from the U.K. brewing industry was calculated as 3.5 kta -1, over 95% of which was generated during barley malting. This value does not include any correction for air pollution control.

  4. Anaerobic treatment of cellulose bleach plant wastewater: chlorinated organics and genotoxicity removal

    OpenAIRE

    T. R. Chaparro; E. C. Pires

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the removal efficiency of organic matter and how it relates to the decrease of toxic and mutagenic effects when an anaerobic reactor is used to treat the bleaching effluent from two kraft pulp mills. Parameters such as COD (chemical oxygen demand), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), AOX (adsorbable organic halogen), ASL (acid soluble lignin), color, chlorides, total phenols and absorbance values in the UV-VIS spectral region were measured. The acute and chronic toxicity and g...

  5. A Review of the Tissue Residue Approach for Organic and Organometallic Compounds in Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews the tissue residue approach (TRA) for toxicity assessment as it applies to organic chemicals and some organometallic compounds (tin, mercury, and lead). Specific emphasis was placed on evaluating key factors that influence interpretation of critical body resid...

  6. Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoneit, B.R.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Coll. of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Abas, M.R. bin [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Cass, G.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Environmental Engineering Science Dept.; Rogge, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Florida International Univ., University Park, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Standley, L.J. [Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States). Stroud Water Research Center; Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

  7. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan;

    2009-01-01

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S....... epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both...... air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamicle derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four...

  8. Organic Electrofluorescent Materials Using Pyridine-Containing Macrocyclic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingxi LI; Long FU; Wenwen YU; Renhe HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Novel pyridine-containing macrocyclic compounds, such as 6,12,19,25-tetramethyl-7,11,20,24-dinitrilo-dibenzo[b,m]l,4,12,15-tetra-azacyclodoc osine (TMCD), were synthesized and used as electron transport layer in organic electroluminescent devices. Devices with a structure of glass/indium-tin oxide/arylamine derivative/tris(quinolinolato)aluminum(Ⅲ) (AIq)/TMCD/LiF/AI exhibited green emission from the Alq layer with external quantum efficiency of 0.84% and luminous efficiency of 1.3 lm/W. The derivatives of TMCD were synthesized and characterized as well. These compounds were also found to be useful as the electron-transporting materials in organic electroluminescent devices.

  9. Release of chlorinated, brominated and mixed halogenated dioxin-related compounds to soils from open burning of e-waste in Agbogbloshie (Accra, Ghana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Goto, Akitoshi; Takahashi, Shin; Itai, Takaaki; Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-01-25

    Although complex mixtures of dioxin-related compounds (DRCs) can be released from informal e-waste recycling, DRC contamination in African e-waste recycling sites has not been investigated. This study examined the concentrations of DRCs including chlorinated, brominated, mixed halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs, PXDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in surface soil samples from the Agbogbloshie e-waste recycling site in Ghana. PCDD/F and PBDD/F concentrations in open burning areas (18-520 and 83-3800 ng/g dry, respectively) were among the highest reported in soils from informal e-waste sites. The concentrations of PCDFs and PBDFs were higher than those of the respective dibenzo-p-dioxins, suggesting combustion and PBDE-containing plastics as principal sources. PXDFs were found as more abundant than PCDFs, and higher brominated analogues occurred at higher concentrations. The median total WHO toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentration in open burning soils was 7 times higher than the U.S. action level (1000 pg/g), with TEQ contributors in the order of PBDFs>PCDD/Fs>PXDFs. DRC emission to soils over the e-waste site as of 2010 was estimated, from surface soil lightness based on the correlations between concentrations and lightness, at 200mg (95% confidence interval 93-540 mg) WHO-TEQ over three years. People living in Agbogbloshie are potentially exposed to high levels of not only chlorinated but also brominated DRCs, and human health implications need to be assessed in future studies.

  10. Release of chlorinated, brominated and mixed halogenated dioxin-related compounds to soils from open burning of e-waste in Agbogbloshie (Accra, Ghana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Goto, Akitoshi; Takahashi, Shin; Itai, Takaaki; Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-01-25

    Although complex mixtures of dioxin-related compounds (DRCs) can be released from informal e-waste recycling, DRC contamination in African e-waste recycling sites has not been investigated. This study examined the concentrations of DRCs including chlorinated, brominated, mixed halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs, PXDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in surface soil samples from the Agbogbloshie e-waste recycling site in Ghana. PCDD/F and PBDD/F concentrations in open burning areas (18-520 and 83-3800 ng/g dry, respectively) were among the highest reported in soils from informal e-waste sites. The concentrations of PCDFs and PBDFs were higher than those of the respective dibenzo-p-dioxins, suggesting combustion and PBDE-containing plastics as principal sources. PXDFs were found as more abundant than PCDFs, and higher brominated analogues occurred at higher concentrations. The median total WHO toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentration in open burning soils was 7 times higher than the U.S. action level (1000 pg/g), with TEQ contributors in the order of PBDFs>PCDD/Fs>PXDFs. DRC emission to soils over the e-waste site as of 2010 was estimated, from surface soil lightness based on the correlations between concentrations and lightness, at 200mg (95% confidence interval 93-540 mg) WHO-TEQ over three years. People living in Agbogbloshie are potentially exposed to high levels of not only chlorinated but also brominated DRCs, and human health implications need to be assessed in future studies. PMID:26474377

  11. Comprehensive Mapping of Volatile Organic Compounds in Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaste, Manoj Shahaji

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the key aroma producers in fruits and sensory quality of fruits is widely determined by qualitative and quantitative composition of VOCs. The aroma of grape is a complex of hundreds of VOCs belonging to different chemical classes like alcohols, esters, acids, terpenes, aldehydes, furanones, pyrazines, isoprenoids and many more. VOCs play important role as they determine the flavor of grapes and wine made from it. The objective of this thesis is to study o...

  12. Carbon dioxide capture by means of cyclic organic nitrogen compounds

    OpenAIRE

    García Abuín, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The research work included in present PhD Thesis involves the research studies to capture carbon dioxide using different cyclic nitrogen organic compounds (glucosamine (GA), chitosan (C), alkyl-pyrrolidones, pyrrolidine (PYR) and piperidine (PIP). This investigation is based on the study of three experimental systems. Each of them has characteristics potentially suitable to achieve the aim of this work, that is to say, to improve the carbon dioxide capture process, which is pre...

  13. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    OpenAIRE

    Misztal, P. K.; T. Karl; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; A. H. Goldstein

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight...

  14. Volatile organic compounds released by barley roots attract wireworms

    OpenAIRE

    Barsics, Fanny; Fiers, Marie; Haubruge, Eric; Verheggen, François

    2012-01-01

    Wireworms are the soil dwelling larvae of click beetles and are pests of many crops worldwide. Alternatives to insecticide treatments are needed in order to develop integrated management strategies. Our work consists in elucidating the role of barley root-emitted volatile organic compounds on the orientation behaviour of Agriotes sordidus wireworms. Using a dual choice olfactometer we have evaluated the attractiveness of a variety of baits ranging from barley roots themselves to isolated root...

  15. Advanced Methods for Treatment of Organic Compounds Contamined Water

    OpenAIRE

    PREDESCU Andra; A.Predescu; Ecaterina MATEI

    2009-01-01

    The progress recorded in the field of science and advanced engineering at nanometric scale supplies largeopportunities for more efficient (from the point of view of the costs) and more ecological approach of the processes ofwater purifying. This paper delivers a short description of the possibilities of using advanced materials in purifying thecontamined water with toxic metallic ions, organic and anorganic compounds. The opportunities and challenges werealso emphasized when nanomaterials wer...

  16. Advanced Methods for Treatment of Organic Compounds Contamined Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDESCU Andra

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The progress recorded in the field of science and advanced engineering at nanometric scale supplies largeopportunities for more efficient (from the point of view of the costs and more ecological approach of the processes ofwater purifying. This paper delivers a short description of the possibilities of using advanced materials in purifying thecontamined water with toxic metallic ions, organic and anorganic compounds. The opportunities and challenges werealso emphasized when nanomaterials were used for the surface, underground and industrial used waters treatment.

  17. Speciation of volatile organic compounds from poultry production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Li, Hong; Burns, Robert; Xin, Hongwei; Hatfield, Jerry

    2010-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from poultry production are leading source of air quality problems. However, little is known about the speciation and levels of VOCs from poultry production. The objective of this study was the speciation of VOCs from a poultry facility using evacuated canisters and sorbent tubes. Samples were taken during active poultry production cycle and between production cycles. Levels of VOCs were highest in areas with birds and the compounds in those areas had a higher percentage of polar compounds (89%) compared to aliphatic hydrocarbons (2.2%). In areas without birds, levels of VOCs were 1/3 those with birds present and compounds had a higher total percentage of aliphatic hydrocarbons (25%). Of the VOCs quantified in this study, no single sampling method was capable of quantifying more than 55% of compounds and in several sections of the building each sampling method quantified less than 50% of the quantifiable VOCs. Key classes of chemicals quantified using evacuated canisters included both alcohols and ketones, while sorbent tube samples included volatile fatty acids and ketones. The top five compounds made up close to 70% of VOCs and included: 1) acetic acid (830.1 μg m -3); 2) 2,3-butanedione (680.6 μg m -3); 3) methanol (195.8 μg m -3); 4) acetone (104.6 μg m -3); and 5) ethanol (101.9 μg m -3). Location variations for top five compounds averaged 49.5% in each section of the building and averaged 87% for the entire building.

  18. Studies on the Quantitative Structure-activity Relationship of Toxicity of Chlorophenol Serial Compounds in the ab initio Methods and Substitutive Position of Chlorine Atom (NPCS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Qing; WANG Lian-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    20 Quantum chemical parameters of chlorophenol compounds were fully optimized by using B3LYP method on both 6-31G* and 6-311G* basis sets. These structural parameters are taken as theoretical descriptors, and the experimental data of 20 compounds' aquatic photogen toxicity(-1gEC50) are used to perform stepwise regression in order to obtain two predicted -lgEC50 correlation models whose correlation coefficients R2 are respectively 0.9186 and 0.9567. In addition, parameters of chlorine atom's substitutive positions and their correlations (NPCs) are taken as descriptors to obtain another predicted -1gEC50 model with the correlation coefficient R2 of 0.9444. Correlation degree of each independent variable in the three models is verified by using variance inflation factors (VIF) and t value. In the cross-validation method, cross-validation coefficients q2 of 3 models are respectively 0.8748, 0.9119 and 0.8993, which indicates that the relativity and prediction ability of this model are superior to those of the model obtained by topological and BLYP methods.

  19. Incineration method for plutonium recovery from alpha contaminated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An incineration method for plutonium recovery from α contaminated organic compounds in a flow of controlled oxygen gas is stated. The species of such thermal decomposition products as hydrocarbons, free carbon, carbon monoxide and hydrogen were determined by mass spectrography. The mixture of the products which are the source of tar or soot was converted to CO2 and H2O in contact with copper oxide catalyst without flaming. This incineration method is composed of two stages. The first stage is the decomposition of organic compounds in the streams of gas mixtures containing oxygen in low ratios. The second stage is the incineration of the decomposition products by catalytic reaction in the streams of gas with higher oxygen ratios. Plutonium was recovered as the form of plutonium dioxide from the incineration residues of the first stage. The behavior of oil was examined as a representative of liquid organic compounds. It was found to evaporate below ca. 500 0C, but was completely incinerated by the catalytic reaction with copper oxide catalyst in the flow of gas with controlled oxygen amount and was changed to CO2 and H2O. (author)

  20. Occurrence mode and concentration of chlorine in liquid product from co-pyrolysis of waste plastic and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhen; Liu Ze-chang; Zhou Li-xia [Chemical and Environmental Department of Taishan College, Taian (China)

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence mode and concentration of chlorine in liquid product including tar and water from co-pyrolysis of waste plastic (WP) and coal were studied. The effect of temperature, holding time, heating rate and gas flow on chlorine concentration in the liquid product was examined. The result indicates that the addition of WP to coal in co-pyrolysis does not increase the organic chlorine compound in the liquid product. However, the tar yield increases, and the water yield decreases. The chlorine in water mainly exists as inorganic form (NH{sub 4}Cl) and organic amine hydrochloride. There is no obvious C-Cl band in IR spectra of tar is observed. This indicates that the organic chlorine in tar is very little. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    subsampling of the clay till cores. The study demonstrates that an integrated approach combining chemical analysis, molecular microbial tools and compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was required in order to document biotic and abiotic degradations in the clay till system. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  2. Effectiveness of chlorine, organic acids and UV treatments in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica on apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, M E; Velázquez, L; Favier, G; de Guzmán, A M

    2003-06-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of 200 and 500 ppm of chlorine and organic acids (0.5% lactic acid and 0.5% citric acid) in wash solutions, and UV radiation for reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica on apples contaminated by two different methods. Residual levels of these pathogens after different treatments were compared. On dip inoculated apples, Y. enterocolitica reductions of 2.66 and 2.77 logs were obtained with 200 and 500 ppm chlorine combined with 0.5% lactic acid, respectively. The E. coli O157:H7 population decreased 3.35 log with 0.5% lactic acid wash solution, and 2.72 and 2.62 logs after 500 ppm chlorine and 500 ppm chlorine plus 0.5% lactic acid treatments, respectively. Similar reductions were obtained with UV radiation. On spot inoculated apples, significant (p lactic acid treatment as compared with the control. In sectioned apples, microorganisms infiltrated in inner core region and pulp were not significantly (p lactic acid solution were very proximal to the 5-log score required by FDA for apple disinfection. PMID:12884547

  3. Study on an Organic Hybrid Made from Chlorinated Polyethylene and 2,2'-methylene-bis-(4-methyl-6-cyclohexylphenol)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘继涛; 李玮茹; 俞建勇; 王善元

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and miscibility of an organic hybrid made from chlorinated polyethylene (CPE) and 2, 2'-methylene-bis-(4-methyl-6-cyclohexylphenol) (ZKF) are mainly discussed in this paper. It is found that ZKF acts as an antiplasticizer in CPE matrix and has good miscibility even with large ratio in CPE /ZKF hybrids. The glass transition temperature of various CPE/ZKF hybrids determined by DSC give a good fit to Wood's equation. Bifunctional ZKF is supposed to improve the intermolecular force of CPE, and the improvement is developed when the ZKF content increases. On the other hand, the viscoelastic properties are highly improved with the addition of ZKF. TA and tanδ peak values increase when the ZKF content increase in the CPE /ZKF hybrids, the damping capacity has been improved during the glass transition of CPE /ZKF hybrids. In addition, the glass transition temperature shifts to room temperature from the low temperature with the continuous addition of ZKF to CPE.

  4. Biodegradation of volatile organic compounds by five fungal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, B.; Moe, W.M. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Kinney, K.A. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Five fungal species, Cladosporium resinae (ATCC 34066), Cladosporium sphaerospermum (ATCC 200384), Exophiala lecanii-corni (CBS 102400), Mucor rouxii (ATCC 44260), and Phanerochaete chrysosporium (ATCC 24725), were tested for their ability to degrade nine compounds commonly found in industrial off-gas emissions. Fungal cultures inoculated on ceramic support media were provided with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) via the vapor phase as their sole carbon and energy sources. Compounds tested included aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and styrene), ketones (methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and methyl propyl ketone), and organic acids (n-butyl acetate, ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate). Experiments were conducted using three pH values ranging from 3.5 to 6.5. Fungal ability to degrade each VOC was determined by observing the presence or absence of visible growth on the ceramic support medium during a 30-day test period. Results indicate that E. lecanii-corni and C. sphaerospermum can readily utilize each of the nine VOCs as a sole carbon and energy source. P. chrysosporium was able to degrade all VOCs tested except for styrene under the conditions imposed. C. resinae was able to degrade both organic acids, all of the ketones, and some of the aromatic compounds (ethylbenzene and toluene); however, it was not able to grow utilizing benzene or styrene under the conditions tested. With the VOCs tested, M. rouxii produced visible growth only when supplied with n-butyl acetate or ethyl 3-ethoxypropionate. Maximum growth for most fungi was observed at a pH of approximately 5.0. The experimental protocol utilized in these studies is a useful tool for assessing the ability of different fungal species to degrade gas-phase VOCs under conditions expected in a biofilter application. (orig.)

  5. Simulation of Comet Impact and Survivability of Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B T; Lomov, I N; Blank, J G; Antoun, T H

    2007-07-18

    Comets have long been proposed as a potential means for the transport of complex organic compounds to early Earth. For this to be a viable mechanism, a significant fraction of organic compounds must survive the high temperatures due to impact. We have undertaken three-dimensional numerical simulations to track the thermodynamic state of a comet during oblique impacts. The comet was modeled as a 1-km water-ice sphere impacting a basalt plane at 11.2 km/s; impact angles of 15{sup o} (from horizontal), 30{sup o}, 45{sup o}, 65{sup o}, and 90{sup o} (normal impact) were examined. The survival of organic cometary material, modeled as water ice for simplicity, was calculated using three criteria: (1) peak temperatures, (2) the thermodynamic phase of H{sub 2}O, and (3) final temperature upon isentropic unloading. For impact angles greater than or equal to 30{sup o}, no organic material is expected to survive the impact. For the 15{sup o} impact, most of the material survives the initial impact and significant fractions (55%, 25%, and 44%, respectively) satisfy each survival criterion at 1 second. Heating due to deceleration, in addition to shock heating, plays a role in the heating of the cometary material for nonnormal impacts. This effect is more noticeable for more oblique impacts, resulting in significant deviations from estimates using scaling of normal impacts. The deceleration heating of the material at late times requires further modeling of breakup and mixing.

  6. Characterisation of polar organic compounds in fog water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gyula; Varga, Bálint; Gelencsér, András; Krivácsy, Zoltán; Molnár, Ágnes; Alsberg, Tomas; Persson, Linn; Hansson, Hans-Christen; Cristina Facchini, Maria

    In this paper the results of a systematic liquid chromatographic investigation are described to characterise water-soluble organic compounds in fog. A diode array detector is used to record the UV spectrum of the components during separation and a mass spectrometer is applied to obtain information on the ion masses of the constituents. The combination of UV and mass spectra reveal that the organic carbon content of fog water is distributed among a great number of acidic compounds which have polar functional groups and polyconjugated systems absorbing up to 500 nm. Due to the complexity of the organic fraction in fog water an unresolved hump of ions was recorded by the mass spectrometer from m/ z=100-600 the most intense peaks being detected around m/ z=200-250. Tannin and fulvic acid were also examined under the same conditions. In terms of complexity and ion distribution the mass spectrum of the organic fraction was similar to that of a fulvic acid reference material rather than to that of tannin.

  7. Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl4 and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies

  8. Determination of organic nitro compounds using HPLC-UV-PAED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marple, Ronita L.; LaCourse, William R.

    2004-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with ultra violet and photo-assisted electrochemical detection (HPLC-UV-PAED) has been applied to the sensitive and selective determination of organic nitro compounds. The system was first developed for the determination of nitro explosives, and PAED has shown superior sensitivity over UV detection for these compounds (i.e., detectors can be used for improved analyte identification. Also, having two detectors permits chemometric resolution of overlapping peaks, and this is not addressed in the UV method. Because this method is applicable to a wide range of nitro explosives, it was predicted that PAED would show the same sensitivity and selectivity toward other types of nitro compounds. Since its development, the system's use has been expanded to include the determination of nitro-containing pharmaceuticals and glycosylated nitro compounds in biological matrices. Model compounds were chosen, specifically nitroglycerin and related compounds and nitrophenyl-glucoside, to represent these classes. PAED showed superior detection limits over low wavelength UV detection for nitroglycerin (PAED = 0.3ppb, UV at 220nm = 48ppb), demonstrating PAED"s applicability to determining nitro-pharmaceuticals. Conversely, UV detection at 220nm proved to be more sensitive than PAED for nitrophenyl-glucoside (UV at 220 = 0.6ppb, PAED = 3.6ppb). However, when nitrophenyl-glucoside was spiked into urine, PAED determination resulted in 99+0.3% recovery, while UV at 220nm resulted in 116+0.2% recovery, suggesting that UV determination may suffer from matrix interference.

  9. Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in

  10. Global simulation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of chemical compounds in the atmosphere, the organic group plays a key role in the tropospheric chemistry. Specifically the subgroup called aromatics is of great interest. Aromatics are the predominant trace gases in urban areas due to high emissions, primarily by vehicle exhausts and fuel evaporation. They are also present in areas where biofuel is used (i.e residential wood burning). Emissions of aromatic compounds are a substantial fraction of the total emissions of the volatile organic compounds (VOC). Impact of aromatics on human health is very important, as they do not only contribute to the ozone formation in the urban environment, but they are also highly toxic themselves, especially in the case of benzene which is able to trigger a range of illness under long exposure, and of nitro-phenols which cause detrimental for humans and vegetation even at very low concentrations. The aim of this work is to assess the atmospheric impacts of aromatic compounds on the global scale. The main goals are: lifetime and budget estimation, mixing ratios distribution, net effect on ozone production and OH loss for the most emitted aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene and trimethylbenzenes). For this purpose, we use the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model to build the global atmospheric budget for the most emitted and predominant aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. A set of emissions was prepared in order to include biomass burning, vegetation and anthropogenic sources of aromatics into the model. A chemical mechanism based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) was developed to describe the chemical oxidation in the gas phase of these aromatic compounds. MCM have been reduced in terms of number of chemical equation and species in order to make it affordable in a 3D model. Additionally other features have been added, for instance the production of HONO via ortho

  11. Impact of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization on Nosocomial Organism Viability in a Hospital Room

    OpenAIRE

    Hewlett, Angela L.; Smith, Philip W.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Iwen, Peter C.; Lowe, John J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of ClO2 to decontaminate pathogens known to cause healthcare-associated infections in a hospital room strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Staphylococcus aureus were spot placed in duplicate pairs at 10 sites throughout a hospital room and then exposed to ClO2 gas. Organisms were collected and evaluated for reduction in colony forming units following gas exposure. Six sterilization cycles with varied ...

  12. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  13. A critical review of reported air concentrations of organic compounds in aircraft cabins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagda, N L; Rector, H E

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a review and assessment of aircraft cabin air quality studies with measured levels of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs). VOC and SVOC concentrations reported for aircraft cabins are compared with those reported for residential and office buildings and for passenger compartments of other types of transportation. An assessment of measurement technologies and quality assurance procedures is included. The six studies reviewed in the paper range in coverage from two to about 30 flights per study. None of the monitored flights included any unusual or episodic events that could affect cabin air quality. Most studies have used scientifically sound methods for measurements. Study results indicate that under routine aircraft operations, contaminant levels in aircraft cabins are similar to those in residential and office buildings, with two exceptions: (1). levels of ethanol and acetone, indicators of bioeffluents and chemicals from consumer products are higher in aircraft than in home or office environments, and (2). levels of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and fuel-related contaminants are higher in residential/office buildings than in aircraft. Similarly, ethanol and acetone levels are higher in aircraft than in other transportation modes but the levels of some pollutants, such as m-/p-xylenes, tend to be lower in aircraft.

  14. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  15. Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, R.E.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties that make them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution of VOCs in the environment is necessary. The transport, behavior, and fate of VOCs in streams are determined by combinations of chemical, physical, and biological processes. These processes are volatilization, absorption, wet and dry deposition, microbial degradation, sorption, hydrolysis, aquatic photolysis, oxidation, chemical reaction, biocon-centration, advection, and dispersion. The relative importance of each of these processes depends on the characteristics of the VOC and the stream. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program selected 55 VOCs for study. This article reviews the characteristics of the various processes that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

  16. Effects of organic compounds on actinoid transfer in natural environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Keizo; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology; Senoo, Muneaki; Nagao, Seiya; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki

    1996-01-01

    For safety evaluation of geological disposal of radioactive wastes, it seems necessary to elucidate the geological transfer of radioactive nuclides in the soil and the undersea sediments. It has been known that there exist various organic compounds highly potential to form a complex with TRU elements, uranium, copper etc. in the soil and the sediments and those compounds may play an important role for geological transfer of nuclides. In this study, fluorescent substances contained in underground and river water were focused as the measures to identify the molecular species of organic compounds in natural water and their interactions with radionuclides and minor metals, and their geological transfers were investigated. Spectrophotometric properties of humic acid obtained in the market were examined. Its fluorescent intensity was strongest at pH 10 and stable for 2 weeks or more. Then, highly polluted river water was taken from Yamato river to determine the contents of humic acid and other fluorescent substances. Further, the effects of the additions of Cu and Fe on the fluorescent intensity were examined. (M.N.)

  17. Natural attenuation of organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Contaminated land poses a serious problem with respect to soil quality and the risk of spreading of pollutants into other compartments of the environment. A major concern at most contaminated sites is the risk of groundwater pollution by organic and inorganic compounds. Since the remediation of all of the contaminated sites is economically not feasible in many countries, groundwater risk assessment procedures are needed for the ranking of sites, decision making on further use and remedial actions. Recently 'Natural Attenuation' of organic pollutants received much interest as a remediation strategy in groundwater. Studies on natural attenuation in the unsaturated zone, however, are very limited although processes like aerobic degradation and volatilization of organic compounds are very likely more efficient than in the water saturated zone. This contribution presents results on scenario-specific modelling of natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons volatilizing from complex organic mixtures ('fuels') in the unsaturated zone. The model is validated with data from a unique field experiment conducted at a Airforce base in Denmark. Hydrocarbons can reach the groundwater by transport with seepage water and by spreading in the soil-gas. Degradation processes can limit the spreading in the unsaturated soil zone and - in the best case - restrict the contamination to the unsaturated zone. The objective of this study was to use numerical simulations to elucidate the processes/parameters which are relevant in contaminant spreading and thus for groundwater risk assessment. The modelling results compare well to data from the well-controlled field test with an emplaced kerosene source. Sensitivity analyses were performed accounting for physical-chemical properties of fuel constituents and soil properties. Scenario-specific numerical simulations illustrate that the overall biodegradation rates depend mainly on properties of the organic

  18. Structure and function of vanadium compounds in living organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, D

    1992-01-01

    Vanadium has been recognized as a metal of biological importance only recently. In this mini-review, its main functions uncovered during the past few years are addressed. These encompass (i) the regulation of phosphate metabolizing enzymes (which is exemplified for the inhibition of ribonucleases by vanadate), (ii) the halogenation of organic compounds by vanadate-dependent non-heme peroxidases from seaweeds, (iii) the reductive protonation of nitrogen (nitrogen fixation) by alternative, i.e. vanadium-containing, nitrogenases from N2-fixing bacteria, (iv) vanadium sequestering by sea squirts (ascidians), and (v) amavadine, a low molecular weight complex of V(IV) accumulated in the fly agaric and related toadstools. The function of vanadium, while still illusive in ascidians and toadstools, begins to be understood in vanadium-enzyme interaction. Investigations into the structure and function of model compounds play an increasingly important role in elucidating the biological significance of vanadium. PMID:1392470

  19. Prediction of solvation enthalpy of gaseous organic compounds in propanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Hassan; Dashtbozorgi, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a novel way for developing quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models to predict the gas-to-propanol solvation enthalpy (Δ H solv) of 95 organic compounds. Different kinds of descriptors were calculated for each compound using the Dragon software package. The variable selection technique of replacement method (RM) was employed to select the optimal subset of solute descriptors. Our investigation reveals that the dependence of physical chemistry properties of solution on solvation enthalpy is nonlinear and that the RM method is unable to model the solvation enthalpy accurately. The results established that the calculated Δ H solv values by SVM were in good agreement with the experimental ones, and the performances of the SVM models were superior to those obtained by RM model.

  20. Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kulwant; Sandhu, G. K.; Lark, B. S.

    2004-05-01

    Molar extinction coefficients of aqueous solutions of some organic compounds, viz. formamide (CH_{3}NO), N-methylformamide (C_{2}H_{5}NO), NN-dimethylformamide (C_{3}H_{7}NO), NN-dimethylacetamide (C_{4}H_{9}NO), 1,4-dioxane (C_{4}H_{8}O_{2}), succinimide (C_{4}H_{5}NO_{2}) and solutions of acetamide (C_{2}H_{5}NO) and benzoic acid (C_{7}H_{6}O_{2}) in 1,4-dioxane (C_{4}H_{8}O_{2}) have been determined by narrow beam gamma-ray transmission method at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients of these compounds have been used to calculate effective atomic numbers and electron densities. The additivity rule earlier used for aqueous solution has been extended to non-aqueous (1,4-dioxane) solutions.

  1. Native Fluorescence Detection Methods, Devices, and Systems for Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Lane, Arthur L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Naphthalene, benzene, toluene, xylene, and other volatile organic compounds VOCs have been identified as serious health hazards. Embodiments of the invention are directed to methods and apparatus for near-real-time in-situ detection and accumulated dose measurement of exposure to naphthalene vapor and other hazardous gaseous VOCs. The methods and apparatus employ excitation of fluorophors native or endogenous to compounds of interest using light sources emitting in the ultraviolet below 300 nm and measurement of native fluorescence emissions in distinct wavebands above the excitation wavelength. The apparatus of some embodiments are cell-phone-sized sensor/dosimeter "badges" to be worn by personnel potentially exposed to hazardous VOCs. The badge sensor of some embodiments provides both real time detection and data logging of exposure to naphthalene or other VOCs of interest from which both instantaneous and accumulated dose can be determined.

  2. Biodesulfurization of refractory organic sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mehran; Bassi, Amarjeet; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2007-01-01

    The stringent new regulations to lower sulfur content in fossil fuels require new economic and efficient methods for desulfurization of recalcitrant organic sulfur. Hydrodesulfurization of such compounds is very costly and requires high operating temperature and pressure. Biodesulfurization is a non-invasive approach that can specifically remove sulfur from refractory hydrocarbons under mild conditions and it can be potentially used in industrial desulfurization. Intensive research has been conducted in microbiology and molecular biology of the competent strains to increase their desulfurization activity; however, even the highest activity obtained is still insufficient to fulfill the industrial requirements. To improve the biodesulfurization efficiency, more work is needed in areas such as increasing specific desulfurization activity, hydrocarbon phase tolerance, sulfur removal at higher temperature, and isolating new strains for desulfurizing a broader range of sulfur compounds. This article comprehensively reviews and discusses key issues, advances and challenges for a competitive biodesulfurization process.

  3. First Detection of Non-Chlorinated Organic Molecules Indigenous to a Martian Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Szopa, C.; Summons, R. E.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Brunner, A. E.; Cabane, M.; Franz, H. B.; Kashyap, S.; Malespin, C. A.; Martin, M.; Millan, M.; Miller, K.; Navarro-González, R.; Prats, B. D.; Steele, A.; Teinturier, S.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard Curiosity can perform pyrolysis of martian solid samples, and analyze the volatiles by direct mass spectrometry in evolved gas analysis (EGA) mode, or separate the components in the GCMS mode (coupling the gas chromatograph and the mass spectrometer instruments). In addition, SAM has a wet chemistry laboratory designed for the extraction and identification of complex and refractory organic molecules in the solid samples. The chemical derivatization agent used, N-methyl-N-tert-butyldimethylsilyl- trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), was sealed inside seven Inconel metal cups present in SAM. Although none of these foil-capped derivatization cups have been punctured on Mars for a full wet chemistry experiment, an MTBSTFA leak was detected and the resultant MTBSTFA vapor inside the instrument has been used for a multi-sol MTBSTFA derivatization (MD) procedure instead of direct exposure to MTBSTFA liquid by dropping a solid sample directly into a punctured wet chemistry cup. Pyr-EGA, Pyr-GCMS and Der-GCMS experiments each led to the detection and identification of a variety of organic molecules in diverse formations of Gale Crater.

  4. Spatial Arrangment of Organic Compounds on a Model Mineral Surface: Implications for Soil Organic Matter Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Ambaye, Haile Arena [ORNL; Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Kilbey, S. Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lokitz, Bradley S [ORNL; Lauter, Valeria [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface: The entropic penalty of confining the less mobile glucose on the mineral surface is lower than for stearic acid. The fundamental information obtained here helps rationalize how complex arrangements of organic carbon on soil mineral surfaces may arise

  5. Review on Volatile Organic Compounds Emission from Wood Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu; YU Yaoming; SHEN Jun; LIU Ming

    2006-01-01

    The problem of indoor air quality (IAQ) is mainly caused by the volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission from the wood-based composites. As a material for decoration, furniture manufacturing or building, wood-based composite is one of the sources of VOC emissions. Most of them are formaldehyde, terpene, ketone and benzene. The paper reviews on VOC emission of wood-based composites at home and abroad, including the source of the VOC, its impacts on IAQ, its emission during processing and using, the usual sampling and analyse methods of VOC in different conditions. Meanwhile, main problems existed in the past researches are summarized and some suggestions are put forward.

  6. The sampling apparatus of volatile organic compounds for wood composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENJun; ZHAOLin-bo; LIUYu

    2005-01-01

    Terpenes, aldehydes, ketones, benzene, and toluene are the important volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from wood composites. A sampling apparatus of VOCs for wood composites was designed and manufactured by Northeast Forestry University in China.The concentration of VOCs derived from wood based materials, such as flooring, panel wall, finishing, and furniture can be sampled in a small stainless steel chambers. A protocol is also developed in this study to sample and measure the new and representative specimens. Preliminary research showed that the properties of the equipment have good stability. The sort and the amount of different components can be detected from it. The apparatus is practicable.

  7. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Volatile Organic Compounds Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobri S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption effect of volatile organic compounds (chloroacetophenone, acetonitrile and hexane towards the change of resistance of CNTs pellet as sensor signal was investigated. CNTs used in this research were synthesized using Floating Catalyst – Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD method in optimum condition. The synthesized CNTs were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The variation of resistance changes towards the tested gases were recorded using a multimeter. CNTs sensor pellet showed good responses towards the tested gases, however, the sensitivity, response time and recovery time of sensor pellet need to be optimized.

  8. Volatile organic compound emission profiles of four common arctic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Petersen, Ida; Schollert, Michelle; Nymand, Josephine;

    2015-01-01

    The biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions from plants impact atmosphere and climate. The species-specific emissions, and thereby the atmospheric impact, of many plant species are still unknown. Knowledge of BVOC emission from arctic plants is particularly limited. The vast area...... and relatively high leaf temperature give the Arctic potential for emissions that cannot be neglected. This field study aimed to elucidate the BVOC emission profiles for four common arctic plant species in their natural environment during the growing season. BVOCs were sampled from aboveground parts of Empetrum...

  9. Sorption- and diffusion-associated isotope effects for chlorinated and non chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in a sediment pore water diffusion sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeport, E.; Chu, K.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Landis, R.; Lutz, E. J.; Mack, E. E.; West, K.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2013-12-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) has gained prominence for evaluation of microbial and abiotic degradation processes governing the fate of organic contaminants in groundwater. At the sediment pore water interface, in wetland or river bottom sediments, variations in oxidation-reduction conditions can affect reaction mechanisms and hence the contaminant mass flux discharged to surface waters. Carbon isotope fractionation has been shown to be an important tool in identifying the effects of degradation and differentiating between different degradation pathways. To date, while passive diffusion samplers (commonly called 'peepers') have provided a powerful tool for high spatial resolution sampling for dissolved VOC across the sediment water interface, peepers' compatibility with CSIA has never been evaluated. The operating principle of peepers involves compound diffusion from the sediment pore water to the peeper chambers via a membrane. In this study, we evaluated the isotope effects of diffusion through, and possible adsorption to a polysulfone membrane for priority groundwater contaminants including chlorinated and non-chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. Chlorinated benzenes tend to accumulate in the food web and therefore represent a significant threat to water resources. This is due to their larger sorption coefficients (Koc) and higher hydrophobicity properties (logKow) compared to other commonly-studied compounds (e.g., chlorinated ethenes). Application of CSIA to BTEX and chlorinated ethenes has demonstrated that non-degradative processes (e.g., sorption, volatilization, diffusion) typically result in smaller carbon isotope fractionation compared to degradative processes that involve breaking bonds. The large sorption properties of chlorinated benzenes preclude a direct extrapolation to these compounds of existing data on sorption-associated isotope effects obtained on other compounds. To date, similar studies have not been done for chlorinated aromatics

  10. Applications of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios in organic contaminant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper results are presented on the application of compound-specific isotope ratios measurements to assess biodegradation of chlorinated solvents, in particularly on microbial dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Analytical aspects and isotope data from laboratory and field studies are discussed. The analytical tests showed that both headspace and SPME techniques provide accurate δ13C values with a similar precision for a wide range of chlorinated solvents. However, the SPME method is generally more sensitive. The microcosm experiments show that a significant isotopic fractionation occurs during dechlorination of PCE and TCE to ethene. The largest fractionation factors are observed in the steps DCE-VC and VC-Ethene. In general, the δ13C of each dechlorination product was always more negative than the δ13C of the corresponding precursor. In addition, the δ13C values of each compound increased with time. A similar pattern was observed for dechlorination of PCE at a field site. These results show that compound-specific carbon isotope ratios technology is a very sensitive tool for evaluation of natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. (author)

  11. Rapid Reconnaissance Mapping of Volatile Organic Compounds by Photoionization Detection at the USGS Amargosa Desert Research Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thordsen, J. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Conaway, C. H.; Luo, W.; Baker, R. J.; Andraski, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Two types of handheld photoionization detectors were evaluated in April 2015 for reconnaissance mapping of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone surrounding legacy disposal trenches for commercial low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nevada (USA). This method is rapid and cost effective when compared to the more conventional procedure used ate the site, where VOCs are collected on sorbent cartridges in the field followed by thermal desorption, gas chromatographic separation, and quantitation by mass spectroscopy in the laboratory (TD-GC-MS analysis). Using the conventional method, more than sixty distinct compounds have been identified in the 110-m deep unsaturated zone vapor phase, and the changing nature of the VOC mix over a 15-yr timeframe has been recorded. Analyses to date have identified chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chlorinated ethenes, chlorinated ethanes, gasoline-range hydrocarbons, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride as the main classes of VOCs present. The VOC plumes emanating from the various subgroups of trenches are characterized by different relative abundances of the compound classes, and total VOC concentrations that cover several orders of magnitude. One of the photoionization detectors, designed for industrial compliance testing, lacked sufficient dynamic range and sensitivity to be useful. The other, a wide range (1 ppb-20,000 ppm) research-grade instrument with a 10.6 eV photoionization detector (PID) lamp, produced promising results, detecting roughly half of the non-CFC VOCs present. The rapid and inexpensive photoionization method is envisioned as a screening tool to supplement, expedite, and direct the collection of additional samples for TD-GC-MS analyses at this and other VOC-contaminated sites.

  12. Measurement and Comparison of Organic Compound Concentrations in Plasma, Whole Blood, and Dried Blood Spot Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterman, Stuart A.; Chernyak, Sergey; Su, Feng-Chiao

    2016-01-01

    The preferred sampling medium for measuring human exposures of persistent organic compounds (POPs) is blood, and relevant sample types include whole blood, plasma, and dried blood spots (DBS). Because information regarding the performance and comparability of measurements across these sample types is limited, it is difficult to compare across studies. This study evaluates the performance of POP measurements in plasma, whole blood and DBS, and presents the distribution coefficients needed to convert concentrations among the three sample types. Blood samples were collected from adult volunteers, along with demographic and smoking information, and analyzed by GC/MS for organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Regression models were used to evaluate the relationships between the sample types and possible effects of personal covariates. Distribution coefficients also were calculated using physically-based models. Across all compounds, concentrations in plasma were consistently the highest; concentrations in whole blood and DBS samples were comparable. Distribution coefficients for plasma to whole blood concentrations ranged from 1.74 to 2.26 for pesticides/CHCs, averaged 1.69 ± 0.06 for the PCBs, and averaged 1.65 ± 0.03 for the PBDEs. Regression models closely fit most chemicals (R2 > 0.80), and whole blood and DBS samples generally showed very good agreement. Distribution coefficients estimated using biologically-based models were near one and did not explain the observed distribution. Among the study population, median concentrations of several pesticides/CHCs and PBDEs exceeded levels reported in the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, while levels of other OCPs and PBDEs were comparable or lower. Race and smoking status appeared to slightly affect plasma/blood concentration ratios for several POPs. The experimentally

  13. Bioaccumulation of emerging organic compounds (perfluoroalkyl substances and halogenated flame retardants) by earthworm in biosolid amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Irene; de la Torre, Adrián; Sanz, Paloma; Pro, Javier; Carbonell, Gregoria; Martínez, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the bioaccumulation behavior of 49 target emerging organic compounds (20 perfluoroalkyl substances, PFASs, and 29 halogenated flame retardants, HFRs) was studied in soil invertebrates (Eisenia andrei). Multi species soil systems (MS·3) were used to assess the fate and the effects associated with the application of four biosolids in agricultural soil on terrestrial soil organisms. Biosolid amendment increased concentrations 1.5-14-fold for PFASs, 1.1-2.4-fold for polybrominated diphenyl ethers, PBDEs, and 1.1-3.6-fold for chlorinated flame retardants, CFRs. Perfluorooctanesulfonate, PFOS, (25%) and BDE-209 (60%) were the predominant PFAS and HFR compounds, respectively, in biosolids-amended soils. Total concentrations (ng/g dry weight) in earthworms from biosolid-amended soils ranged from 9.9 to 101 for PFASs, from 45 to 76 for PBDEs and 0.3-32 for CFRs. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were calculated to evaluate the degree of exposure of pollutants in earthworms. The mean BAF ranged from 2.2 to 198 for PFASs, 0.6-17 for PBDEs and 0.5-20 for CFRs. The relationship of PFAS and PBDE BAFs in earthworms and their log Kow were compared: PFAS BAFs increased while PBDE BAFs declined with increasing log Kow values. The effect of the aging (21 days) on the bioavailability of the pollutants in amended soils was also assessed: the residence time affected differently to the compounds studied. PMID:27174781

  14. Microbial degradation of chlorinated compounds. Application of specialized bacteria in the treatment of contaminated soil and waste water.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenhuis, Roelof

    1992-01-01

    The development of (aerobic) treatment technologies for polluted environments and waste streams will require an understanding of the microbial potential and the ecophysiology of the most suitable organisms. Therefore, we have studied physiological pathways and some kinetic aspects of the biotransfor

  15. Cyclodextrin-based microsensors for volatile organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, B.; Johnson, S.; Shi, J.; Yang, Xiaoguang

    1997-10-01

    Host-guest chemistry and self-assembly techniques are being explored to develop species selective thin-films for real-time sensing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Cyclodextrin (CD) and calixarene (CA) molecules are known to form guest-host inclusion complexes with a variety of organic molecules. Through the control of the cavity size and chemical functionality on the rims of these bucket-like molecules, the binding affinities for formation of inclusion complexes can be controlled and optimized for specific agents. Self-assembly techniques are used to covalently bond these reagent molecules to the surface of acoustic transducers to create dense, highly oriented, and stable thin films. Self-assembly techniques have also been used to fabricate multilayer thin film containing molecular recognition reagents through alternating adsorption of charged species in aqueous solutions. Self-assembly of polymeric molecules of the SAW device was also explored for fabricating species selective interfaces.

  16. Laboratory Studies of Organic Compounds With Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchin, J. M.; Clark, R. N.; Hoefen, T. M.

    2007-12-01

    In order to properly interpret reflectance spectra of any solar system surface from the earth to the Oort cloud, laboratory spectra of candidate materials for comparative analysis are needed. Although the common cosmochemical species (H2O, CO2, CO, NH3, and CH4) are well represented in the spectroscopic literature, comparatively little reflectance work has been done on organics from room to cryogenic temperatures at visible to near infrared wavelengths. Reflectance spectra not only enhance weak or unseen transmission features, they are also more analogous to spectra obtained by spacecraft that are imaging such bodies as giant planet moons, kuiper belt objects, centaurs, comets and asteroids, as well as remote sensing of the earth. The USGS Spectroscopy Laboratory is measuring reflectance spectra of organic compounds from room to cryogenic temperatures over the spectral range of 0.35 to 15.5 microns. This region encompasses the fundamental absorptions and many overtones and combinations of C, H, O, and N molecular bonds. Because most organic compounds belong to families whose members have similar structure and composition, individual species identification within a narrow wavelength range may be ambiguous. By measuring spectral reflectance of the pure laboratory samples from the visible through the near and mid-infrared, absorption bands unique to each can be observed, cataloged, and compared to planetary reflectance data. We present here spectra of organic compounds belonging to five families: the alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, and cyanides. Common to all of these are the deep C-H stretch fundamental absorptions, which shift shortward from 3.35+ microns in alkanes to 3.25+ microns in aromatics, to 3.2+ microns in alkenes, and down to 3.0+ microns in alkynes. Mid-IR absorptions due to C-H bending deformations at 6.8+ and 7.2+ microns are also identified. In the near infrared these stretching and bending fundamentals yield a diagnostic set of combination

  17. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs Mycotoxins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan W. Bennett

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that “volatoxin” might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  18. [Ion mobility spectrometry for the isomeric volatile organic compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hai-yan; Jia, Xian-de; Huang, Guo-dong; Wang, Hong-mei; Li, Jian-quan; Jin, Shun-ping; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan; Zhou, Shi-kang

    2007-10-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is based on determining the drift velocities, which the ionized sample molecules attain in the weak electric field of a drift tube at atmospheric pressure. The drift behavior can be affected by structural differences of the analytes, so that ion mobility spectrometry has the ability to separated isomeric compounds. In the present article, an introduction to IMS is given, followed by a description of the instrument used for the experiments to differentiate isomeric compounds. Positive ion mobility spectras of three kinds of isomeric volatile organic compounds were studied in a homemade high-resolution IMS apparatus with a discharge ionization source. The study includes the differences in the structure of carbon chain, the style of function group, and the position of function group. The reduced mobility values were determined, which are in very good agreement with the previously reported theoretical values using neural network theory. The influence of the structural features of the substances and including the size and shape of the molecule has been investigated. The reduced mobility values increases in the order: alcohols ion mobility spectra of the constitutional isomers studied reflect the influence of structural features. In order to calibrate or determine the detection limits and the sensitivity of the ion mobility spectrometry, the exponential dilution flask (EDF) was used. Using this method, the detection limit of the analytes can reach the order of magnitude of ng x L(-1).

  19. Volatile organic compounds adsorption onto neat and hybrid bacterial cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Violeta Alexandra; Pârvulescu, Oana Cristina; Dobre, Tănase

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption dynamics of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) vapour from air streams onto fixed bed adsorbent were measured and simulated under various operation conditions. Isopropanol (IPA) and n-hexane (HEX) were selected as representatives of polar and nonpolar VOCs, whereas bacterial cellulose (BC) and BC incorporated with magnetite nanoparticles (M/BC), were tested as adsorbents. An experimental study emphasizing the influence of air superficial velocity (0.7 cm/s and 1.7 cm/s), operation temperature (30 °C and 40 °C), adsorbate and adsorbent type, on fixed bed saturation curves was conducted. Optimal adsorption performances evaluated in terms of saturation adsorption capacity were obtained for the adsorption of polar compound (IPA) onto M/BC composite (0.805 g/g) and of nonpolar compound (HEX) onto neat BC (0.795 g/g), respectively, at high values of air velocity and operation temperature. A mathematical model including mass balance of VOC species, whose parameters were fitted based on experimental data, was developed in order to predict the fixed bed saturation curves. A 23 statistical model indicating a significant increase in adsorption performances with process temperature was validated under the experimental conditions.

  20. Are Some Fungal Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Mycotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan W; Inamdar, Arati A

    2015-09-22

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are carbon-compounds that easily evaporate at room temperature. Toxins are biologically produced poisons; mycotoxins are those toxins produced by microscopic fungi. All fungi emit blends of VOCs; the qualitative and quantitative composition of these volatile blends varies with the species of fungus and the environmental situation in which the fungus is grown. These fungal VOCs, produced as mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, acids, ethers, esters, ketones, terpenes, thiols and their derivatives, are responsible for the characteristic moldy odors associated with damp indoor spaces. There is increasing experimental evidence that some of these VOCs have toxic properties. Laboratory tests in mammalian tissue culture and Drosophila melanogaster have shown that many single VOCs, as well as mixtures of VOCs emitted by growing fungi, have toxic effects. This paper describes the pros and cons of categorizing toxigenic fungal VOCs as mycotoxins, uses genomic data to expand on the definition of mycotoxin, and summarizes some of the linguistic and other conventions that can create barriers to communication between the scientists who study VOCs and those who study toxins. We propose that "volatoxin" might be a useful term to describe biogenic volatile compounds with toxigenic properties.

  1. Expanded uncertainties of preconcentration neutron activation measurements of extractable organo-chlorine, bromine and iodine compounds in bovine milk lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milk is known to contain organohalogen compounds. A mixture of hexane and isopropanol was used to extract lipids from bovine milk and neutron activation analysis (NAA) was employed to measure extractable organohalogens in the lipids. The samples were irradiated in a neutron flux of 2.5 × 1011 cm2 s-1 for 10 min, allowed to decay for 2 min, and counted for 10 min. Uncertainties associated with the preconcentration NAA measurements were investigated in detail. The mass fractions of halogens in mg kg-1 and their relative expanded uncertainties in percent in bovine milk lipids were: 32 (8.4 %), 2.65 (9.8 %) and 0.211 (6.6 %) for Cl, Br and I, respectively. (author)

  2. Identity and biodegradability of organic compounds migrating from PEX pipes used in water installations in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.;

    2012-01-01

    Migration of organic compounds from PEX pipes used in water installations in buildings was investigated by batch set ups. Several compounds were identified and quantified. The organic compounds released to the water phase could support microbial growth and a few of the identified compounds...

  3. The cellular uptake of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin entrapped in organically modified silica nanoparticles is mediated by serum proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized objects made of various materials are gaining increasing attention as promising vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) appears to offer a very attractive opportunity to implement drug delivery systems since no release of the sensitizer is needed to obtain the therapeutic effect and the design of the nanovehicle should be much easier. The aim of our study was to investigate the use of organic-modified silica nanoparticles (NPs) for the delivery of the second-generation photosensitizer meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) to cancer cells in vitro. mTHPC was entrapped in NPs (∼33 nm diameter) in a monomeric form which produced singlet oxygen with a high efficiency. In aqueous media with high salt concentrations, the NPs underwent aggregation and precipitation but their stability could be preserved in the presence of foetal bovine serum. The cellular uptake, localization and phototoxic activity of mTHPC was determined comparatively in human oesophageal cancer cells after its delivery by the NPs and the standard solvent ethanol/poly(ethylene glycol) 400/water (20:30:50, by vol). The NP formulation reduced the cellular uptake of mTHPC by about 50% in comparison to standard solvent while it did not affect the concentration-dependent photokilling activity of mTHPC and its intracellular localization. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements, using NPs with mTHPC physically entrapped and a cyanine covalently linked, and ultracentrifugation experiments indicated that mTHPC is transferred from NPs to serum proteins when present in the medium. However, the coating of the NP surface with poly(ethylene glycol) largely prevented the transfer to proteins. In conclusion, mTHPC is rapidly transferred from the uncoated nanoparticles to the serum proteins and then internalized by the cells as a protein complex, irrespective of its modality of delivery.

  4. The cellular uptake of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin entrapped in organically modified silica nanoparticles is mediated by serum proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnin, Chiara; Mognato, Maddalena; Celotti, Lucia; Moret, Francesca; Fede, Caterina; Selvestrel, Francesco; Echevarria, Iria M Rio; Reddi, Elena [Department of Biology, University of Padova, via Ugo Bassi 58/B, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bau, Luca; Arduini, Maria; Mancin, Fabrizio [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, via Marzolo 1, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Miotto, Giovanni, E-mail: elena.reddi@unipd.i [Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Padova, via Ugo Bassi 58/B, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-08-26

    Nanosized objects made of various materials are gaining increasing attention as promising vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) appears to offer a very attractive opportunity to implement drug delivery systems since no release of the sensitizer is needed to obtain the therapeutic effect and the design of the nanovehicle should be much easier. The aim of our study was to investigate the use of organic-modified silica nanoparticles (NPs) for the delivery of the second-generation photosensitizer meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) to cancer cells in vitro. mTHPC was entrapped in NPs ({approx}33 nm diameter) in a monomeric form which produced singlet oxygen with a high efficiency. In aqueous media with high salt concentrations, the NPs underwent aggregation and precipitation but their stability could be preserved in the presence of foetal bovine serum. The cellular uptake, localization and phototoxic activity of mTHPC was determined comparatively in human oesophageal cancer cells after its delivery by the NPs and the standard solvent ethanol/poly(ethylene glycol) 400/water (20:30:50, by vol). The NP formulation reduced the cellular uptake of mTHPC by about 50% in comparison to standard solvent while it did not affect the concentration-dependent photokilling activity of mTHPC and its intracellular localization. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements, using NPs with mTHPC physically entrapped and a cyanine covalently linked, and ultracentrifugation experiments indicated that mTHPC is transferred from NPs to serum proteins when present in the medium. However, the coating of the NP surface with poly(ethylene glycol) largely prevented the transfer to proteins. In conclusion, mTHPC is rapidly transferred from the uncoated nanoparticles to the serum proteins and then internalized by the cells as a protein complex, irrespective of its modality of delivery.

  5. Screening of Soil for Alcohol-Extracted Organic Compounds by Turbidity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Hiroyuki; Okada, Akira; Fujita, Takeshi; Wada, Shin-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    To quickly detect organic compounds in soil, a low-cost screening method has been developed to use a simple procedure without requiring specific reagents or equipment.This method semi-quantitatively detects organic compounds and indicates at concentration levels of 2,000 to 15,000 mg kg-1. The indication will be helpful to know where grounds are polluted with organic compounds at a site, especially when tracking organic compounds in soil during remediation work.

  6. Development and Mining of a Volatile Organic Compound Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md.; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Morita, Aki Hirai; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Muto, Ai; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are small molecules that exhibit high vapor pressure under ambient conditions and have low boiling points. Although VOCs contribute only a small proportion of the total metabolites produced by living organisms, they play an important role in chemical ecology specifically in the biological interactions between organisms and ecosystems. VOCs are also important in the health care field as they are presently used as a biomarker to detect various human diseases. Information on VOCs is scattered in the literature until now; however, there is still no available database describing VOCs and their biological activities. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology Database, which contains the information on the relationships between VOCs and their emitting organisms. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology is also linked with the KNApSAcK Core and KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database to provide further information on the metabolites and their biological activities. The VOC database can be accessed online. PMID:26495281

  7. Development and mining of a volatile organic compound database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Morita, Aki Hirai; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Muto, Ai; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are small molecules that exhibit high vapor pressure under ambient conditions and have low boiling points. Although VOCs contribute only a small proportion of the total metabolites produced by living organisms, they play an important role in chemical ecology specifically in the biological interactions between organisms and ecosystems. VOCs are also important in the health care field as they are presently used as a biomarker to detect various human diseases. Information on VOCs is scattered in the literature until now; however, there is still no available database describing VOCs and their biological activities. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology Database, which contains the information on the relationships between VOCs and their emitting organisms. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Ecology is also linked with the KNApSAcK Core and KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database to provide further information on the metabolites and their biological activities. The VOC database can be accessed online.

  8. Critical review of relations for predicting the normal freezing point of organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanović Jovan D.; Grozdanić Dušan K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents empirical relations for predicting the normal freezing point of organic compounds. Nine relations were tested with 90 organic compounds. The Meyer-van der Wyk and Kreglewski-Marano-Holder models are recommended for normal alkanes, and the Constantinou-Gani and Wen-Qiang II models for all tested organic compounds.

  9. Approach to predict partitioning of organic compounds from air into airborne particulate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cong; FENG Liu

    2005-01-01

    Based on the theoretical linear solvation energy relationship and quantum chemical descriptors computed by AM1 Hamiltonian, a new approach was developed to predict the partitioning of some organic compounds between the airborne particulate and air. It could be successfully used to study the partitioning of organic compounds from air into airborne particulate, and evaluate the potential risk of organic compounds.

  10. Reaction products from the chlorination of seawater. Final report 15 Jul 75-14 Jul 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J.H.; Smith, C.A.; Zika, R.G.

    1981-03-01

    Chemical treatment of natural waters, in particular the use of chlorine as a biocide, modifies the chemistry of these waters in ways that are not fully understood. The research described in this report examined both inorganic and organic reaction products from the chlorination of seawater using a variety of analytical approaches. Some analytical methods in widespread current use underestimate the residual oxidants in chlorinated seawater by as much as 70% depending upon the detail of the procedures. The chlorination of seawater in the presence of light produces substantial quantities of bromate ions which can influence standard analytical procedures and represents an unknown factor in estuarine and coastal waters. The copper complexing capacity of Biscayne Bay, Florida water was found to be substantially reduced with the addition of chlorine. Analysis was made by anodic stripping voltammetry on water samples after successive additions of copper sulfate solution. Laboratory chlorination of water from the intake of the Port Everglades, Florida power plant produces bromoform levels comparable to that found in the plant discharge. These results are in contrast to results reported in the literature for a power plant on the Patuxent estuary in Maryland, so that bromoform production appears to be site-specific. Chloroform extracts of chlorinated Biscayne Bay water are found to contain halogenated compounds which are new and different, and which pose unusual analytical problems. Studies using GC/ECD, GC/MS, HPLC, H NMR, differential pulsed polarography and other techniques on natural extracts and synthesized compounds are reported.

  11. Volatile organic compound emissions from Larrea tridentata (creosotebush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ortega

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs from plants impacts both climate and air quality by fueling atmospheric chemistry and by contributing to aerosol particles. While a variety of ecosystems have been investigated for VOC emissions, deserts remain essentially unstudied, partially because of their low biomass densities and water limitations. However, during the North American monsoon, a pronounced increase in rainfall from an extremely dry June (<5 mm precipitation to a rainy July (>80 mm occurs over large areas of the Sonoran desert in the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. We present results from the CREosote ATmosphere Interactions through Volatile Emissions (CREATIVE 2009 field study in Southern Arizona aimed at quantifying emission rates of VOCs from creosotebush (Larrea tridentata during the summer 2009 monsoon season. This species was chosen because of its vast distribution in North and South American deserts and because its resins have been reported to contain a rich set of VOCs. We observed a strong diurnal pattern with branch emissions and ambient concentrations of an extensive suite of VOCs with maxima in early afternoon. These include VOCs typically observed in forest sites (oxygenated VOCs and volatile isoprenoids as well as a large number of other compounds, some of which have not been previously described from any plant including 1-chloro-2-methoxy-benzene and isobutyronitrile. Although generally considered to be derived from anthropogenic sources, we observed emissions of aromatic compounds including benzene, and a broad range of phenolics. Dimethyl sulfide emissions from creosotebush were higher than reported from any previously studied plant suggesting that terrestrial ecosystems should be reconsidered as an important source of this climatically important gas. We also present direct, primary emission measurements of isoprene and its apparent oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and 3

  12. Compound-Specific Stable Isotopes of Organic Compounds From Lake Sediments Track Recent Environmental Changes in an Alpine Ecosystem, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado (United States of America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, S. K.; Pagani, M.; Pantoja, S.; Baron, J. S.; Wolfe, A. P.; Pedentchouk, N.; Nuñez, L.

    2007-12-01

    Sediments from high altitude lakes in the North American Cordillera reveal rapid changes in both the composition of diatom communities and bulk organic δ15N over the past c. 60 years. In this study, compound- specific nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen isotope records from Sky Pond, an alpine lake in Rocky Mountain National Park (Colorado, United States of America), were used to identify the factors contributing to ecological change. Our results from the nitrogen isotopic compositions of purified algal chlorins indicate that the magnitude of isotopic change is larger than implied from bulk organic δ15N, and support a substantial shift in nitrogen (N)-cycling in the region. Temporal changes in the growth characteristics of lichen surrounding Sky Pond, as well as a -60‰ excursion in δD values of algal-derived palmitic acid, are coincident with changes in N-cycling, indicating alterations in catchment hydrology and nutrient delivery. The confluence of these trends is attributed to an increase in anthropogenic N deposition caused by both expansion anthropogenic influences and temporal changes in regional hydrology associated with snow, glacier, and permafrost melt.

  13. Controlled Burning of Forest Detritus Altering Spectroscopic Characteristics and Chlorine Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter: Effects of Temperature and Oxygen Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jian; Dahlgren, Randy A; Chow, Alex T

    2015-12-15

    Forest fires occur with increasing frequency and severity in the western United States, potentially altering the chemistry and quantity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors exported from forested watersheds. However, little is known concerning effects of the fire triangle (heat, oxygen, and fuel) on DOM alteration. Using detritus from Pinus ponderosa and Abies concolor (dominant species in forests in the western United States), we prepared DOM from unburned and burned detritus under hypoxic (pyrolysis) and oxic conditions (thermal oxidation) at 250 and 400 °C. DOM characteristics and chlorine reactivity were evaluated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and chlorination-based DBP formation potential tests. Spectroscopic results suggest that burned-detritus extracts had lower molecular weight (reflected by increased E2:E3 and fluorescence index) and divergent aromaticity (reflected by SUVA254) depending on oxygen availability. Temperature and oxygen availability interacted to alter the chlorine reactivity of fire-affected DOM. Increasing temperature from 50 to 400 °C resulted in decreased reactivities for trihalomethane and chloral hydrate formation and divergent reactivities for haloacetonitrile formation (unchanged for pyrolysis and increased for oxidation) and haloketone formation (increased for pyrolysis and decreased for oxidation). We demonstrate that DBP precursors in fire-affected forest detritus are highly dependent on temperature and oxygen availability. PMID:26496434

  14. Effects of trace volatile organic compounds on methane oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiemchaisri Wilai

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs on methane oxidation in landfill cover soils were examined. The batch experiments were conducted using single and mixed VOCs, such as, dichloromethane (DCM, trichloroethylene (TCE, tetrachloroethylene (PCE, and benzene. The results from all combinations showed a decrease in methane oxidation rate with increase in VOC concentrations. Moreover, inhibition effects of TCE and DCM were found higher than benzene and PCE. The reduction of methane oxidation by benzene and PCE could be attributed to the toxicity effect, whereas TCE and DCM were found to exhibit the competitive-inhibition effect. When the soil was mixed with DCM, no methane oxidation was found. Damage to the cell's internal membrane was found in a methanotrophic culture exposed to VOC gases which is the attachment site of a key enzyme needed for methane oxidation

  15. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  16. Fruit tree model for uptake of organic compounds from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rasmussen, D.; Samsoe-Petersen, L.

    2003-01-01

    rences: 20 [ view related records ] Citation Map Abstract: Apples and other fruits are frequently cultivated in gardens and are part of our daily diet. Uptake of pollutants into apples may therefore contribute to the human daily intake of toxic substances. In current risk assessment of polluted s...... soils, regressions or models are in use, which were not intended to be used for tree fruits. A simple model for uptake of neutral organic contaminants into fruits is developed. It considers xylem and phloem transport to fruits through the stem. The mass balance is solved for the steady......-state, and an example calculation is given. The Fruit Tree Model is compared to the empirical equation of Travis and Arms (T&A), and to results from fruits, collected in contaminated areas. For polar compounds, both T&A and the Fruit Tree Model predict bioconcentration factors fruit to soil (BCF, wet weight based...

  17. Catabolism of volatile organic compounds influences plant survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Patricia Y; Lerdau, Manuel T

    2013-12-01

    Plants emit a diverse array of phytogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The production and emission of VOCs has been an important area of research for decades. However, recent research has revealed the importance of VOC catabolism by plants and VOC degradation in the atmosphere for plant growth and survival. Specifically, VOC catabolism and degradation have implications for plant C balance, tolerance to environmental stress, plant signaling, and plant-atmosphere interactions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of VOC catabolism and degradation, propose experiments for investigating VOC catabolism, and suggest ways to incorporate catabolism into VOC emission models. Improving our knowledge of VOC catabolism and degradation is crucial for understanding plant metabolism and predicting plant survival in polluted environments.

  18. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  19. Multifunctional slow-release organic-inorganic compound fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2010-12-01

    Multifunctional slow-release organic-inorganic compound fertilizer (MSOF) has been investigated to improve fertilizer use efficiency and reduce environmental pollution derived from fertilizer overdosage. The special fertilizer is based on natural attapulgite (APT) clay used as a matrix, sodium alginate used as an inner coating and sodium alginate-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/humic acid (SA-g-P(AA-co-AM)/HA) superabsorbent polymer used as an outer coating. The coated multielement compound fertilizer granules were produced in a pan granulator, and the diameter of the prills was in the range of 2.5-3.5 mm. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product, as well as its efficiency in slowing the nutrients release, were examined. In addition, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D of nutrients in MSOF. The degradation of the SA-g-P(AA-co-AM)/HA coating was assessed by examining the weight loss with incubation time in soil. It is demonstrated that the product prepared by a simple route with good slow-release property may be expected to have wide potential applications in modern agriculture and horticulture. PMID:21058723

  20. Multifunctional slow-release organic-inorganic compound fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2010-12-01

    Multifunctional slow-release organic-inorganic compound fertilizer (MSOF) has been investigated to improve fertilizer use efficiency and reduce environmental pollution derived from fertilizer overdosage. The special fertilizer is based on natural attapulgite (APT) clay used as a matrix, sodium alginate used as an inner coating and sodium alginate-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/humic acid (SA-g-P(AA-co-AM)/HA) superabsorbent polymer used as an outer coating. The coated multielement compound fertilizer granules were produced in a pan granulator, and the diameter of the prills was in the range of 2.5-3.5 mm. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product, as well as its efficiency in slowing the nutrients release, were examined. In addition, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D of nutrients in MSOF. The degradation of the SA-g-P(AA-co-AM)/HA coating was assessed by examining the weight loss with incubation time in soil. It is demonstrated that the product prepared by a simple route with good slow-release property may be expected to have wide potential applications in modern agriculture and horticulture.

  1. Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2009-12-01

    Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ≈ rosemary > tea tree ≈ lemon ≈ lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  2. Biogenic Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds by Urban Forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CENTRITTOMauro; LIUShirong; LORETOFrancesco

    2005-01-01

    All plants emit a wide range of volatile compounds, the so-called biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). BVOC emissions have received increased scientific attention in the last two decades because they may profoundly influence the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere, and may modulate plant tolerance to heat, pollutants, oxidative stress and abiotic stresses, and affect plant-plant and plant-insect interactions. Urban forestry may have a high impact on atmospheric composition, air quality, environment,and quality of life in urban areas. However, few studies have been carried out where the emission of BVOC could have important consequence for the quality of air and contribute to pollution episodes. A screening of BVOC emission by the mixed stand constituting urban forests is therefore required if emissions are to be reliably predicted. Monitoring the emission rates simultaneously with measurements of air quality, plant physiology and micrometeorology on selected urban forests, will allow detailed quantitative information on the inventory of BVOC emissions by urban vegetation to be compiled. This information will make it possible to propose an innovative management of urban vegetation in cities characterised by heavy emissions of anthropogenic pollutants, aiming at the abatement of BVOC emissions through the introduction or selection of non-BVOC emitting species in urban areas subjected to pollution episodes and in the new afforestation areas covering peri-urban parks, green belts and green corridors between peri-urban rural areas and the conurbations.

  3. Organically modified hydrotalcite for compounding and spinning of polyethylene nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fambri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Organically modified hydrotalcite is a recent class of organoclay based on layered double hydroxides (LDH, which is anionically modified with environmental friendly ligands such as fatty acids. In this paper the influence of hydrotalcite compounded/dispersed by means of two different processes for production of plates and fibers of polyolefin nanocomposites will be compared. A polyethylene matrix, suitable for fiber production, was firstly compounded with various amounts of hydrotalcite in the range of 0.5–5% by weight, and then compression moulded in plates whose thermomechanical properties were evaluated. Similar compositions were processed by using a co-rotating twin screw extruder in order to directly produce melt-spun fibers. The incorporation of clay into both bulk and fiber nanocomposites enhanced the thermal stability and induced heterogeneous nucleation of polyethylene crystals. Hydrotalcite manifested a satisfactory dispersion into the polymer matrix, and hence positively affected the mechanical properties in term of an increase of both Young’s modulus and tensile strength. Tenacity of nanocomposite as spun fibers was increased up to 30% with respect to the neat polymer. Moreover, the addition of LDH filler induced an increase of the tensile modulus of drawn fibers from 5.0 GPa (neat HDPE up to 5.6–5.8 GPa.

  4. APPLICATION OF ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS FOR PETROLEUM REFINING PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of sulfur compound PTMP and metal naphthenates on the conversion of the atmospheric residue to light oil and on the coke formation were investigated by carrying out thermal decomposition in a tubular type reactor. When 100 μg/g of PTMP was added to residue, gas oil yield increased, but the effect was not significant. However, the coke deposition in the reactor was reduced by the addition of PTMP. When 100 μg/g of ferric naphthenate was added, the significant effect was observed on the gas oil increase. However, the coke deposition was enhanced with the increase of gas oil yield by the addition of ferric naphthenate. Both of the increase in gas oil yield and the reduction of coke formation were observed when PTMP (1000 μg/g) and ferric naphthenate (100 μg/g) were simultaneously used. By the addition of the organic sulfur compound, the formation of the coke produced by the recombination of hydrocarbon redicals yielded by thermal decomposition was suppressed. The advantage of this method is that the construction of new equipment is not required and it enables the increase in the light oil fraction of residual oil by using the existing units.

  5. Cytotoxic Compounds from Aerial Organs of Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Janet Piloto; Zampini, Iris Catiana; Cuello, Ana Soledad; Francisco, Marbelis; Romero, Aylema; Valdivia, Dayana; Gonzalez, Maria; Carlos Salas; Lamar, Angel Sanchez; Isla, Maria Inés

    2016-03-01

    Xanthium strumarium L., the main species of the genus Xanthium, is ubiquitously distributed. The aim of this study was to determine the cytotoxic effect of aerial organs of X strumarium, grown in Cuba, against cancer cell lines and the isolation of compounds potentially responsible for this activity. Initially, an ethanol partitioning procedure yielded the XSE extract that was subsequently fractionated with chloroform resulting in a XSCF fraction. Both, XSE and XSCF fractions exhibited cytotoxic effects on MDA MB-23 1, MCF7, A549 and CT26 cell lines by using the MTT assay. Above all, the XSCF fraction was more active than XSE. For this reason, XSCF was subsequently fractionated by silica gel chromatography and the active fractions submitted to semi-preparative HPLC for isolation of bioactive compounds. Six sub-fractions (SF1 to SF6) were recovered. Sub-fractions 3 and 6 were the most active on each assayed cell line, while sub-fractions 4 and 5 were only active against A549 and CT26 cell lines. In each case, sub-fraction 6 showed the strongest inhibitory effect. The HPLC-DAD fingerprint of sub-fraction 6 showed a single peak that was identified by GC-MS as (-) spathulenol, a sesquiterpene with reported antitumor activity. PMID:27169184

  6. Organic nitrate aerosol formation via NO3 + biogenic volatile organic compounds in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, B. R.; Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Brown, S. S.; Wild, R. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Day, D. A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Hu, W.; de Gouw, J.; Koss, A.; Cohen, R. C.; Duffey, K. C.; Romer, P.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Takahama, S.; Thornton, J. A.; Lee, B. H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Nguyen, T. B.; Teng, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Olson, K.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Gas- and aerosol-phase measurements of oxidants, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and organic nitrates made during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS campaign, Summer 2013) in central Alabama show that a nitrate radical (NO3) reaction with monoterpenes leads to significant secondary aerosol formation. Cumulative losses of NO3 to terpenes are correlated with increase in gas- and aerosol-organic nitrate concentrations made during the campaign. Correlation of NO3 radical consumption to organic nitrate aerosol formation as measured by aerosol mass spectrometry and thermal dissociation laser-induced fluorescence suggests a molar yield of aerosol-phase monoterpene nitrates of 23-44 %. Compounds observed via chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) are correlated to predicted nitrate loss to BVOCs and show C10H17NO5, likely a hydroperoxy nitrate, is a major nitrate-oxidized terpene product being incorporated into aerosols. The comparable isoprene product C5H9NO5 was observed to contribute less than 1 % of the total organic nitrate in the aerosol phase and correlations show that it is principally a gas-phase product from nitrate oxidation of isoprene. Organic nitrates comprise between 30 and 45 % of the NOy budget during SOAS. Inorganic nitrates were also monitored and showed that during incidents of increased coarse-mode mineral dust, HNO3 uptake produced nitrate aerosol mass loading at a rate comparable to that of organic nitrate produced via NO3 + BVOCs.

  7. Measurement of loss rates of organic compounds in snow using in situ experiments and isotopically labelled compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika von Schneidemesser

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular marker compounds are widely used to identify emissions from anthropogenic and biogenic air pollution sources in atmospheric samples and in deposition. Specific organic compounds have been detected in polar regions, but their fate after deposition to snow is poorly characterized. Within this context, a series of exposure experiments were carried out to observe the post-depositional processing of organic compounds under real-world conditions in snow on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet, at the Summit research station. Snow was prepared from water spiked with isotopically labelled organic compounds, representative of typical molecular marker compounds emitted from anthropogenic activities. Reaction rate constants and reaction order were determined based on a decrease in concentration to a stable, non-zero, threshold concentration. Fluoranthene-d10, docosane-d46, hexadecanoic acid-d31, docosanoic acid-d43 and azelaic acid-d14 were estimated to have first order loss rates within surface snow with reaction rate constants of 0.068, 0.040, 0.070, 0.067 and 0.047 h−1, respectively. No loss of heptadecane-d36 was observed. Overall, these results suggest that organic contaminants are archived in polar snow, although significant post-depositional losses of specific organic compounds occur. This has implications for the environmental fate of organic contaminants, as well as for ice-core studies that seek to use organic molecular markers to infer past atmospheric loadings, and source emissions.

  8. Modeling secondary organic aerosol formation through cloud processing of organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the potential formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA through reactions of organic compounds in condensed aqueous phases is growing. In this study, the potential formation of SOA from irreversible aqueous-phase reactions of organic species in clouds was investigated. A new proposed aqueous-phase chemistry mechanism (AqChem is coupled with the existing gas-phase Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (CACM and the Model to Predict the Multiphase Partitioning of Organics (MPMPO that simulate SOA formation. AqChem treats irreversible organic reactions that lead mainly to the formation of carboxylic acids, which are usually less volatile than the corresponding aldehydic compounds. Zero-dimensional model simulations were performed for tropospheric conditions with clouds present for three consecutive hours per day. Zero-dimensional model simulations show that 48-h averaged SOA formation are increased by 27% for a rural scenario with strong monoterpene emissions and 7% for an urban scenario with strong emissions of aromatic compounds, respectively, when irreversible organic reactions in clouds are considered. AqChem was also incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ version 4.4 with CACM/MPMPO and applied to a previously studied photochemical episode (3–4 August 2004 focusing on the eastern United States. The CMAQ study indicates that the maximum contribution of SOA formation from irreversible reactions of organics in clouds is 0.28 μg m−3 for 24-h average concentrations and 0.60 μg m−3 for one-hour average concentrations at certain locations. On average, domain-wide surface SOA predictions for the episode are increased by 8.6% when irreversible, in-cloud processing of organics is considered.

  9. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds & their photochemical transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhujun; Hohaus, Thorsten; Tillmann, Ralf; Andres, Stefanie; Kuhn, Uwe; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) into the atmosphere. While it is known that land vegetation accounts for 90% of the global VOC emissions, only a few molecules' emission factors are understood. Through VOCs atmospheric oxidation intermediate products are formed. The detailed chemical mechanisms involved are insufficiently known to date and need to be understood for air quality management and climate change predictions. In an experiment using a PTR-ToF-MS with the new-built plant chamber SAPHIR-PLUS in Forschungszentrum Juelich, biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from Quercus ilex trees were measured. The BVOC emissions were dominated by monoterpenes, minor emissions of isoprene and methanol were also observed with the overall emission pattern typical for Quercus ilex trees in the growing season. Monoterpenes and isoprene emissions showed to be triggered by light. Additionally, their emissions showed clear exponential temperature dependence under constant light condition as reported in literature. As a tracer for leaf growth, methanol emission showed an abrupt increase at the beginning of light exposure. This is explained as instantaneous release of methanol produced during the night once stomata of leaves open upon light exposure. Emission of methanol showed a near linear increase with temperature in the range of 10 to 35 °C. BVOC were transferred from the plant chamber PLUS to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR, where their oxidation products from O3 oxidation were measured with PTR-ToF-MS. Gas phase oxidation products such as acetone and acetaldehyde were detected. A quantitative analysis of the data will be presented, including comparison of observations to the Master Chemical Mechanism model.

  10. Assessing the Impact of Chlorinated-Solvent Sites on Metropolitan Groundwater Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Narter, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated-solvent compounds are among the most common groundwater contaminants in the U.S.A. The majority of the many sites contaminated by chlorinated-solvent compounds are located in metropolitan areas, and most such areas have one or more chlorinated-solvent contaminated sites. Thus, contamination of groundwater by chlorinated-solvent compounds may pose a potential risk to the sustainability of potable water supplies for many metropolitan areas. The impact of chlorinated-solvent sites on...

  11. The effect of surfactants on the distribution of organic compounds in the soil solid/water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of soil remediation by surfactant washing was evaluated via the measured distribution coefficients of a number of nonpolar compounds in several soil-water mixtures. The studied compounds (contaminants) are BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-xylene) and three chlorinated pesticides (lindane, α-BHC, and heptachlor epoxide), which span several orders of magnitude in water solubility (Sw). A peat, and two natural soils were used that comprise a wide range in soil organic matter (SOM) content. The surfactants tested included cationic, anionic and nonionic types, with concentrations up to five to six times the critical micelle concentration (CMC). The Kd*/Kd, values were used to evaluate the remediation efficiency under various operation conditions. For relatively water soluble BTEX compounds, the surfactant adsorption on the soil surface is the deciding factor on contaminant desorption from soil. For the less-soluble pesticides, surfactant micelles in solution influence the contaminant desorption more. The contaminants partitioning to SOM or adsorbed surfactants lowers the desorption efficiency. Anionic surfactants are found to be a better choice on soil remediation because they do not form admicelle on soil surface that enhances the SOM content. Cationic surfactant, which adsorb onto soil surfaces, leads to poor remediation efficiency. An improper selection of surfactant would result in inefficiency in soil remediation by surfactant washing

  12. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes.

  13. The Search for Organic Compounds of Martian Origin in Gale Crater by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument on Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel; Freissinet, Caroline; Mahaffy, Paul; Miller, Kristen; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Summons, Roger; Archer, Douglas, Jr.; Brunner, Anna; Martin, Mildred; Buch, Arrnaud; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason; Grotzinger, John; Ming, Douglas; Navarro-Gonzales, Rafael; Steele, Andrew; Szopa, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    One of the key objectives of the Mars Science Laboratory rover and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite is to determine the inventory of organic and inorganic volatiles in the atmosphere and surface regolith and rocks to help assess the habitability potential of Gale Crater. The SAM instrument on the Curiosity rover can detect volatile organic compounds thermally evolved from solid samples using a combination of evolved gas analysis (EGA) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) (Mahaffy et al. 2012). The first solid samples analyzed by SAM, a scoop of windblown dust and sand at Rocknest, revealed several chloromethanes and a C4-chlorinated hydrocarbon derived primarily from reactions between a martian oxychlorine phase (e.g. perchlorate) and terrestrial carbon from N-methyl-N-(tertbutyldimethylsilyl)- trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) vapor present in the SAM instrument background (Glavin et al. 2013). After the analyses at Rocknest, Curiosity traveled to Yellowknife Bay and drilled two separate holes in a fluvio-lacustrine sediment (the Sheepbed unit) designated John Klein and Cumberland. Analyses of the drilled materials by both SAM and the CheMin X-Ray Diffraction instrument revealed a mudstone consisting of 20 wt% smectite clays (Ming et al. 2013; Vaniman et al. 2013), which on Earth are known to aid the concentration and preservation of organic matter. Oxychlorine compounds were also detected in the Sheepbed mudstone during pyrolysis; however, in contrast to Rocknest, much higher levels of chloromethanes were released from the Sheepbed materials, suggesting an additional, possibly martian source of organic carbon (Ming et al. 2013). In addition, elevated abundances of chlorobenzene and a more diverse suite of chlorinated alkanes including dichloropropane and dichlorobutane detected in Cumberland compared to Rocknest suggest that martian or meteoritic organic carbon sources may be preserved in the mudstone (Freissinet et al. 2013

  14. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from furniture and electrical appliances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Jinno, Hideto; Furukawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemicals are widely used as ingredients in household products. Therefore, furniture and other household products as well as building products may influence the indoor air quality. This study was performed to estimate quantitatively influence of household products on indoor air quality. Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions were investigated for 10 products including furniture (chest, desk, dining table, sofa, cupboard) and electrical appliances (refrigerator, electric heater, desktop personal computer, liquid crystal display television and audio) by the large chamber test method (JIS A 1912) under the standard conditions of 28 degrees C, 50% relative humidity and 0.5 times/h ventilation. Emission rate of total VOC (TVOC) from the sofa showed the highest; over 7900 microg toluene-equivalent/unit/h. Relatively high TVOC emissions were observed also from desk and chest. Based on the emission rates, the impacts on the indoor TVOC were estimated by the simple model with a volume of 17.4 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated TVOC increment for the sofa was 911 microg/m3, accounting for almost 230% of the provisional target value, 400 microg/m3. The values of estimated increment of toluene emitted from cupboard and styrene emitted from refrigerator were 10% and 16% of guideline values, respectively. These results revealed that VOC emissions from household products may influence significantly indoor air quality. PMID:21381398

  15. Polymer Production by Plasma Polymerization of Oxygenated Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio P. Nascimento Filho

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at producing new polymeric materials using oxygenated organic compounds as main reactants and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD as a production technique. The films obtained were analyzed by profilometry, in order to determine the deposition rate, by Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR to identify the species deposited and by contact angle measurements to determine the polarity of the surface. For the reactants used, namely ethanol, acetone and 2-propanol, the plasma deposition process was least efficient with ethanol followed by acetone and 2-propanol. With the latter, reproducible thin films were obtained with a high deposition rate (up to 400 Å/min. These films had a high amount of OH and could be wetted by common organic solvents, such as 2-propanol or acetone. The contact angle formed by drops of 2-propanol or acetone aqueous solution on the film produced from 2-propanol varied significantly with the concentration, from 0.9% to 50% by vol., indicating that the film is sensitive to polar solutions.

  16. Emerging site characterization technologies for volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) expedited response action (ERA) has been initiated at Hanford Site's 200 West Area for the removal of carbon tetrachloride from the unsaturated soils. In coordination with the ERA, innovative technology demonstrations are being conducted as part of DOE's Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration in an effort to improve upon baseline technologies. Improved methods for accessing, sampling, and analyzing soil and soil-vapor contaminants is a high priority. Sonic drilling is being evaluated as an alternative to cable-tool drilling, while still providing the advantages of reliability, containment, and waste minimization. Applied Research Associates, Inc. used their cone penetrometer in the 200 West Area to install a permanent soil-gas monitoring probe and to collect soil-gas profile data. However, successful application of this technology will require the development of an improved ability to penetrate coarse gravel units. A Science and Engineering Associates Membrane Instrumentation and Sampling Technique (SEAMIST) system designed for collecting in situ soil samples and air permeability data in between drilling runs at variable depths is being tested in 200 West Area boreholes. Analytical technologies scheduled for testing include supercritical fluid extraction and analysis for non- and semi-volatile organic co-contaminants and an unsaturated flow apparatus developed by Washington State University for the measurement of transport parameters

  17. Volatile organic compound emissions from wastewater treatment plants in Taiwan: legal regulations and costs of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi; Hsu, Shu-Kang; Chou, Ming-Shean

    2008-09-01

    This study assessed volatile organic compound (VOC) emission characteristics from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in five Taiwanese industrial districts engaged in numerous manufacturing processes, including petrochemical, science-based industry (primarily semiconductors, photo-electronics, electronic products and biological technology), as well as multiple manufacturing processes (primarily pharmaceuticals and paint manufacturing). The most aqueous hydrocarbons dissolved in the wastewater of Taiwanese WWTPs were acetone, acrylonitrile, methylene chloride, and chloroform for the petrochemical districts; acetone, chloroform, and toluene for the science-based districts; and chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons for the multiple industrial districts. The aqueous pollutants in the united WWTPs were closely related to the characteristics of the manufacturing plants in the districts. To effectively prevent VOC emissions from the primary treatment section of petrochemical WWTPs, the updated regulations governing VOC emissions were issued by the Taiwanese Environmental Protection Administration in September 2005, legally mandating a seal cover system incorporating venting and air purification equipment. Cost analysis indicates that incinerators with regenerative heat recovery are optimal for treating high VOC concentrations, exceeding 10,000 ppm as CH(4), from the oil separation basins. However, the emission concentrations, ranging from 100 to 1,000 ppm as CH(4) from the other primary treatment facilities and bio-treatment stages, should be collected and then injected into the biological oxidation basins via existing or new blowers. The additional capital and operating costs required to treat the VOC emissions of 1,000 ppm as CH(4) from primary treatment facilities are less than USD 0.1 for per m(3) wastewater treatment capacity.

  18. Estimation of indoor and outdoor ratios of selected volatile organic compounds in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw; Jovic, Branka; Cakmak, Sabit; Austin, Claire C.; Zhu, Jiping

    2016-09-01

    Indoor air and outdoor air concentration (I/O) ratio can be used to identify the origins of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). I/O ratios of 25 VOCs in Canada were estimated based on the data collected in various areas in Canada between September 2009 and December 2011. The indoor VOC data were extracted from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Outdoor VOC data were obtained from Canada's National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) Network. The sampling locations covered nine areas in six provinces in Canada. Indoor air concentrations were found higher than outdoor air for all studied VOCs, except for carbon tetrachloride. Two different approaches were employed to estimate the I/O ratios; both approaches produced similar I/O values. The I/O ratios obtained from this study were similar to two other Canadian studies where indoor air and outdoor air of individual dwellings were measured. However, the I/O ratios found in Canada were higher than those in European cities and in two large USA cities, possibly due to the fact that the outdoor air concentrations recorded in the Canadian studies were lower. Possible source origins identified for the studied VOCs based on their I/O ratios were similar to those reported by others. In general, chlorinated hydrocarbons, short-chain (C5, C6) n-alkanes and benzene had significant outdoor sources, while long-chain (C10sbnd C12) n-alkanes, terpenes, naphthalene and styrene had significant indoor sources. The remaining VOCs had mixed indoor and outdoor sources.

  19. Arctic springtime observations of volatile organic compounds during the OASIS-2009 campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Hills, Alan J.; Riemer, Daniel D.; Abdelhamid, Aroob; Flocke, Frank M.; Hall, Samuel R.; Huey, L. Gregory; Knapp, David J.; Liao, Jin; Mauldin, Roy L.; Montzka, Denise D.; Orlando, John J.; Shepson, Paul B.; Sive, Barkley; Staebler, Ralf M.; Tanner, David. J.; Thompson, Chelsea R.; Turnipseed, Andrew; Ullmann, Kirk; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Apel, Eric C.

    2016-08-01

    Gas-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured at three vertical levels between 0.6 m and 5.4 m in the Arctic boundary layer in Barrow, Alaska, for the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS)-2009 field campaign during March-April 2009. C4-C8 nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), including alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones, were quantified multiple times per hour, day and night, during the campaign using in situ fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three canister samples were also collected daily and subsequently analyzed for C2-C5 NMHCs. The NMHCs and aldehydes demonstrated an overall decrease in mixing ratios during the experiment, whereas acetone and 2-butanone showed increases. Calculations of time-integrated concentrations of Br atoms, ∫[Br]dt, yielded values as high as (1.34 ± 0.27) × 1014 cm-3 s during the longest observed ozone depletion event (ODE) of the campaign and were correlated with the steady state Br calculated at the site during this time. Both chlorine and bromine chemistry contributed to the large perturbations on the production and losses of VOCs. Notably, acetaldehyde, propanal, and butanal mixing ratios dropped below the detection limit of the instrument (3 parts per trillion by volume (pptv) for acetaldehyde and propanal, 2 pptv for butanal) during several ODEs due to Br chemistry. Chemical flux calculations of OVOC production and loss are consistent with localized high Cl-atom concentrations either regionally or within a very shallow surface layer, while the deeper Arctic boundary layer provides a continuous source of precursor alkanes to maintain the OVOC mixing ratios.

  20. Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (echo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppmann, R.; Hoffmann, T.; Kesselmeier, J.; Schatzmann, M.

    Forests are complex sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the planetary boundary layer. The impact of biogenic VOC on tropospheric photochem- istry, air quality, and the formation of secondary products affects our climate on a regional and global scale but is far from being understood. A considerable lack of knowledge exists concerning a forest stand as a net source of reactive trace com- pounds, which are transported directly into the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In particular, little is known about the amounts of VOC which are processed within the canopy. The goal of ECHO, which is presented in this poster, is to investigate these questions and to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere interactions and their effects on the PBL. The investigation of emissions, chemical processing and vertical transport of biogenic VOC will be carried out in and above a mixed forest stand in Jülich, Germany. A large set of trace gases, free radicals and meteorologi- cal parameters will be measured at different heights in and above the canopy, covering concentrations of VOC, CO, O3, organic nitrates und NOx as well as organic aerosols. For the first time concentration profiles of OH, HO2, RO2 und NO3 radicals will be measured as well together with the actinic UV radiation field and photolysis frequen- cies of all relevant radical precursors (O3, NO2, peroxides, oxygenated VOC). The different tasks of the field experiments will be supported by simulation experiments investigating the primary emission and the uptake of VOC by the plants in stirred tank reactors, soil parameters and soil emissions in lysimeter experiments, and the chem- ical processing of the trace gases as observed in and above the forest stand in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. The planning and interpretation of the field experiments is supported by simulations of the field site in a wind tunnel.

  1. On the homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of some organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hienola, A.

    2008-07-01

    The conversion of a metastable phase into a thermodynamically stable phase takes place via the formation of clusters. Clusters of different sizes are formed spontaneously within the metastable mother phase, but only those larger than a certain size, called the critical size, will end up growing into a new phase. There are two types of nucleation: homogeneous, where the clusters appear in a uniform phase, and heterogeneous, when pre-existing surfaces are available and clusters form on them. The nucleation of aerosol particles from gas-phase molecules is connected not only with inorganic compounds, but also with nonvolatile organic substances found in atmosphere. The question is which ones of the myriad of organic species have the right properties and are able to participate in nucleation phenomena. This thesis discusses both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, having as theoretical tool the classical nucleation theory (CNT) based on thermodynamics. Different classes of organics are investigated. The members of the first class are four dicarboxylic acids (succinic, glutaric, malonic and adipic). They can be found in both the gas and particulate phases, and represent good candidates for the aerosol formation due to their low vapor pressure and solubility. Their influence on the nucleation process has not been largely investigated in the literature and it is not fully established. The accuracy of the CNT predictions for binary water-dicarboxylic acid systems depends significantly on the good knowledge of the thermophysical properties of the organics and their aqueous solutions. A large part of the thesis is dedicated to this issue. We have shown that homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of succinic, glutaric and malonic acids in combination with water is unlikely to happen in atmospheric conditions. However, it seems that adipic acid could participate in the nucleation process in conditions occurring in the upper troposphere. The second class of organics is

  2. Inactivation of Chironomid Larvae with Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xin-bin; CUI Fu-yi

    2008-01-01

    Chironomid larvae propagate prolifically in eutrophic water body and they cannot be exterminated by conventional disinfection process.The inactivation effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on Chironomid larvae were investigated and some boundary values in practice were determined under conditions of various oxidant dosage,organic precursor concentration and pH value.In addition,removal effect of differmt pre-oxidation combined with coagulation process on Chironomid larvae in law water was evaluated.It was found that chlorine dioxide possessed better inactivation effect than chlorine.Complete inactivation of Chironomid larvae in raw water was resulted by 1.5mg/L of chlorine dioxide with 30min of contact time. Additionally,the ocgallic precursor concentration,pH value had little influence on the inactivation effect.The coagulation jar test showed that Chironomid larvae in the raw water could be completely ronxwed by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation in combination with the omgulation process at chlorine dioxide dosage of 0.8 mg/L.

  3. Chlorination byproducts, their toxicodynamics and removal from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Krishna; Tripathy, Sushree Swarupa; Bersillon, Jean Luc; Dubey, Shashi Prabha

    2007-02-01

    No doubt that chlorination has been successfully used for the control of water borne infections diseases for more than a century. However identification of chlorination byproducts (CBPs) and incidences of potential health hazards created a major issue on the balancing of the toxicodynamics of the chemical species and risk from pathogenic microbes in the supply of drinking water. There have been epidemiological evidences of close relationship between its exposure and adverse outcomes particularly the cancers of vital organs in human beings. Halogenated trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are two major classes of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) commonly found in waters disinfected with chlorine. The total concentration of trihalomethanes and the formation of individual THM species in chlorinated water strongly depend on the composition of the raw water, on operational parameters and on the occurrence of residual chlorine in the distribution system. Attempts have been made to develop predictive models to establish the production and kinetics of THM formations. These models may be useful for operational purposes during water treatment and water quality management. It is also suggested to explore some biomarkers for determination of DBP production. Various methods have been suggested which include adsorption on activated carbons, coagulation with polymer, alum, lime or iron, sulfates, ion exchange and membrane process for the removal of DBPs. Thus in order to reduce the public health risk from these toxic compounds regulation must be inforced for the implementation of guideline values to lower the allowable concentrations or exposure.

  4. Urinary Volatile Organic Compounds for the Detection of Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzeela Khalid

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate volatile organic compounds (VOCs emanating from urine samples to determine whether they can be used to classify samples into those from prostate cancer and non-cancer groups. Participants were men referred for a trans-rectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy because of an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA level or abnormal findings on digital rectal examination. Urine samples were collected from patients with prostate cancer (n = 59 and cancer-free controls (n = 43, on the day of their biopsy, prior to their procedure. VOCs from the headspace of basified urine samples were extracted using solid-phase micro-extraction and analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Classifiers were developed using Random Forest (RF and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA classification techniques. PSA alone had an accuracy of 62-64% in these samples. A model based on 4 VOCs, 2,6-dimethyl-7-octen-2-ol, pentanal, 3-octanone, and 2-octanone, was marginally more accurate 63-65%. When combined, PSA level and these four VOCs had mean accuracies of 74% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. With repeated double cross-validation, the mean accuracies fell to 71% and 65%, using RF and LDA, respectively. Results from VOC profiling of urine headspace are encouraging and suggest that there are other metabolomic avenues worth exploring which could help improve the stratification of men at risk of prostate cancer. This study also adds to our knowledge on the profile of compounds found in basified urine, from controls and cancer patients, which is useful information for future studies comparing the urine from patients with other disease states.

  5. Attenuation of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) inbioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Werner, Craig M.

    2015-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are two types of microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) that use microorganisms to convert chemical energy in wastewaters into useful energy products such as (bio)electricity (MFC) or hydrogen gas (MEC). These two systems were evaluated for their capacity to attenuate trace organic compounds (TOrCs), commonly found in municipal wastewater, under closed circuit (current generation) and open circuit (no current generation) conditions, using acetate as the carbon source. A biocide was used to evaluate attenuation in terms of biotransformation versus sorption. The difference in attenuation observed before and after addition of the biocide represented biotransformation, while attenuation after addition of a biocide primarily indicated sorption. Attenuation of TOrCs was similar in MFCs and MECs for eight different TOrCs, except for caffeine and trimethoprim where slightly higher attenuation was observed in MECs. Electric current generation did not enhance attenuation of the TOrCs except for caffeine, which showed slightly higher attenuation under closed circuit conditions in both MFCs and MECs. Substantial sorption of the TOrCs occurred to the biofilm-covered electrodes, but no consistent trend could be identified regarding the physico-chemical properties of the TOrCs tested and the extent of sorption. The octanol-water distribution coefficient at pH 7.4 (log DpH 7.4) appeared to be a reasonable predictor for sorption of some of the compounds (carbamazepine, atrazine, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and diphenhydramine) but not for others (N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide). Atenolol also showed high levels of sorption despite being the most hydrophilic in the suite of compounds studied (log DpH 7.4=-1.99). Though BESs do not show any inherent advantages over conventional wastewater treatment, with respect to TOrC removal, overall removals in BESs are similar to that reported for conventional wastewater

  6. Secondary organic aerosol formation from a large number of reactive man-made organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photochemical trajectory model has been used to examine the relative propensities of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by human activities to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under one set of highly idealised conditions representing northwest Europe. This study applied a detailed speciated VOC emission inventory and the Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.1 (MCM v3.1) gas phase chemistry, coupled with an optimised representation of gas-aerosol absorptive partitioning of 365 oxygenated chemical reaction product species. In all, SOA formation was estimated from the atmospheric oxidation of 113 emitted VOCs. A number of aromatic compounds, together with some alkanes and terpenes, showed significant propensities to form SOA. When these propensities were folded into a detailed speciated emission inventory, 15 organic compounds together accounted for 97% of the SOA formation potential of UK man made VOC emissions and 30 emission source categories accounted for 87% of this potential. After road transport and the chemical industry, SOA formation was dominated by the solvents sector which accounted for 28% of the SOA formation potential.

  7. 水中氯代烃单体碳同位素分析中预富集方法进展%Review on Pre-enrichment Methods in Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌媛; 黄毅; 尚文郁; 谢曼曼; 刘舒波; 孙青

    2011-01-01

    Highly accurate determination of Compound Specific Carbon Isotope Analysis ( CSIA ) of chlorinated hydrocarbons is of great significance in tracing the source and revealing the biodegradating progress of pollutants. The isotopic composition of organic contaminations may be stable or varied in the process of environmental transformation. We can trace the source of contaminations if the composition is stable and can evaluate the probability and degree of degradation of contaminations. This paper summarizes solid-phase microextraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method and compound specific isotope analyses of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water, using combinations of these pretreatment methods, Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry ( GC-C-IRMS ), and comparesthe three methods. Compared with liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase micro extraction, static headspace analysis, purge and trap method are all solvent-free enrichment techniques, producing no secondary pollution, less interference, and the resolution and accuracy of the analysis of GC-C-IRMS is improved. No, or little, isotopic mass fractionation occurred during the isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in water by combining these solvent-free enrichment techniques with GC-C-IRMS, of which the precision of the analysis is less than l%e. The detection limit decreased along with the methods of static headspace analysis, solid-phase micro extraction, purge and trap method. Purge and trap is the most popular method because of its good reproducibility and low detection limit for the compound specific isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbon in Water. The combinations of in-needle microextraction, in-tube microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction or headspace sorptive extraction with GC-C-IRMS have a bright future.%高精度准确测定氯代烃单体碳同位素对示踪污染物来源,了解污染物的生物降解过程具有重要意义.在环境转化过程中,

  8. Volatile Organic Compounds in the Global Atmosphere (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, D.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Galbally, I.; Lewis, A. C.; Masarie, K.; Milton, M.; Penkett, S.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Reimann, S.; Steinbrecher, R.; Tans, P. P.; Thiel, S.

    2010-12-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) - Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) has been guiding the implementation of a global program for the monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC). Essential features are 1. regular, in-situ, high temporal resolution measurements of VOC at surface stations, 2. VOC analyses in samples collected within flask sampling networks for wide geographical coverage, and 3. a concerted calibration and data quality control effort. A centerpiece of the flask sampling component builds upon the US NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory - Global Cooperative Air Sampling Network. Nine non-methane hydrocarbon species (NMHC; ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane, n-pentane, isoprene, benzene, toluene) are currently analyzed by an automated gas chromatography system at the University of Colorado’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) in pairs of samples collected bi-weekly at 41 global background monitoring sites. Since the implementation of this program in 2004 more than 7000 measurements have been obtained. The obtained data allow elucidating the geographical and seasonal behavior of atmospheric NMHC, as well as interannual variations. Results show a wide dynamic range of mixing ratio changes. Concentration maxima and seasonal cycles are most pronounced in regions of highest emission sources and highest changes in the seasonal OH radical sink, i.e. the northern high and mid-latitudes. Seasonal southern hemisphere (SH) maxima are ~7 times and ~20 times lower for ethane and propane than in the northern hemisphere, which mainly reflects the smaller source strength of these gases in the SH. The richness of information in these data will help constraining the variability in global atmospheric oxidation chemistry and regional budgets of greenhouse gases, such as of methane and CO2, and most certainly stimulate further interests and applications in many fields of atmospheric chemistry and climate research

  9. Factors affecting the volatilization of volatile organic compounds from wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Intamanee

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to understand the influence of the wind speed (U10cm, water depth (h and suspended solids (SS on mass transfer coefficient (KOLa of volatile organic compounds (VOCs volatilized from wastewater. The novelty of this work is not the method used to determine KOLa but rather the use of actual wastewater instead of pure water as previously reported. The influence of U10cm, h, and SS on KOLa was performed using a volatilization tank with the volume of 100-350 L. Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK was selected as a representative of VOCs investigated here in. The results revealed that the relationship between KOLa and the wind speeds falls into two regimes with a break at the wind speed of 2.4 m/s. At U10cm 2.4 m/s, KOLa increased more rapidly. The relationship between KOLa and U10cm was also linear but has a distinctly higher slope. For the KOLa dependency on water depth, the KOLa decreased significantly with increasing water depth up to a certain water depth after that the increase in water depth had small effect on KOLa. The suspended solids in wastewater also played an important role on KOLa. Increased SS resulted in a significant reduction of KOLa over the investigated range of SS. Finally, the comparison between KOLa obtained from wastewater and that of pure water revealed that KOLa from wastewater were much lower than that of pure water which was pronounced at high wind speed and at small water depth. This was due the presence of organic mass in wastewater which provided a barrier to mass transfer and reduced the degree of turbulence in the water body resulting in low volatilization rate and thus KOLa. From these results, the mass transfer model for predicting VOCs emission from wastewater should be developed based on the volatilization of VOCs from wastewater rather than that from pure water.

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekacs, Daniel; Drollette, Brian D; Brooker, Michael; Plata, Desiree L; Mouser, Paula J

    2015-07-01

    Little is known of the attenuation of chemical mixtures created for hydraulic fracturing within the natural environment. A synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid was developed from disclosed industry formulas and produced for laboratory experiments using commercial additives in use by Marcellus shale field crews. The experiments employed an internationally accepted standard method (OECD 301A) to evaluate aerobic biodegradation potential of the fluid mixture by monitoring the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from an aqueous solution by activated sludge and lake water microbial consortia for two substrate concentrations and four salinities. Microbial degradation removed from 57 % to more than 90 % of added DOC within 6.5 days, with higher removal efficiency at more dilute concentrations and little difference in overall removal extent between sludge and lake microbe treatments. The alcohols isopropanol and octanol were degraded to levels below detection limits while the solvent acetone accumulated in biological treatments through time. Salinity concentrations of 40 g/L or more completely inhibited degradation during the first 6.5 days of incubation with the synthetic hydraulic fracturing fluid even though communities were pre-acclimated to salt. Initially diverse microbial communities became dominated by 16S rRNA sequences affiliated with Pseudomonas and other Pseudomonadaceae after incubation with the synthetic fracturing fluid, taxa which may be involved in acetone production. These data expand our understanding of constraints on the biodegradation potential of organic compounds in hydraulic fracturing fluids under aerobic conditions in the event that they are accidentally released to surface waters and shallow soils. PMID:26037076

  11. Factors controlling volatile organic compounds in dwellings in Melbourne, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, M; Galbally, I E; Molloy, S B; Selleck, P W; Keywood, M D; Lawson, S J; Powell, J C; Gillett, R W; Dunne, E

    2016-04-01

    This study characterized indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and investigated the effects of the dwelling characteristics, building materials, occupant activities, and environmental conditions on indoor VOC concentrations in 40 dwellings located in Melbourne, Australia, in 2008 and 2009. A total of 97 VOCs were identified. Nine VOCs, n-butane, 2-methylbutane, toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, d-limonene, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetic acid, accounted for 68% of the sum of all VOCs. The median indoor concentrations of all VOCs were greater than those measured outdoors. The occupant density was positively associated with indoor VOC concentrations via occupant activities, including respiration and combustion. Terpenes were associated with the use of household cleaning and laundry products. A petroleum-like indoor VOC signature of alkanes and aromatics was associated with the proximity of major roads. The indoor VOC concentrations were negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with ventilation. Levels of VOCs in these Australian dwellings were lower than those from previous studies in North America and Europe, probably due to a combination of an ongoing temporal decrease in indoor VOC concentrations and the leakier nature of Australian dwellings. PMID:25788118

  12. Volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere of Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Jessica P.; Huertas, José I.; Magaña, Miguel; Huertas, María E.; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Watanabe, Takuro; Maeda, Tsuneaki; Wakamatsu, Shinji; Blanco, Salvador

    2015-10-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) is one of the most polluted megacities in North America. Therefore, it is an excellent benchmark city to understand atmospheric chemistry and to implement pilot countermeasures. Air quality in the MCMA is not within acceptable levels, mainly due to high ground levels of ozone (O3). Tropospheric O3 is a secondary pollutant formed from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides and sunlight. To gain a better understanding of O3 formation in megacities, evaluate the effectiveness of already-implemented countermeasures, and identify new cost-effective alternatives to reduce tropospheric O3 concentrations, researchers and environmental authorities require updated concentrations for a broader range of VOCs. Moreover, in an effort to protect human health and the environment, it is important to understand which VOCs exceed reference safe values or most contribute to O3 formation, as well as to identify the most probable emission sources of those VOCs. In this work, 64 VOCs, including 36 toxic VOCs, were measured at four sites in the MCMA during 2011-2012. VOCs related to liquefied petroleum gas leakages exhibited the highest concentrations. Toxic VOCs with the highest average concentrations were acetone and ethanol. The toxic VOC benzene represented the highest risk to Mexican citizens, and toluene contributed the most to O3 formation. Correlation analysis indicated that the measured VOCs come from vehicular emissions and solvent-related industrial sources.

  13. Production of volatile organic compounds by cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraiwa, M.; Abe, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Phytoplankton are known to produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which contribute to environmental problems such as global warming and decomposition of stratospheric ozone. For example, picophytoplankton, such as Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, are distributed in freshwater and oceans worldwide, accounting for a large proportion of biomass and primary production in the open ocean. However, to date, little is known about the production of VOCs by picophytoplankton. In this study, VOCs production by cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. (NIES-981) was investigated. Synechococcus sp. was obtained from the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Japan, and cultured at 24°C in autoclaved f/2-Si medium under 54 ± 3 µE m-2 s-1 (1 E = 1 mol of photons) with a 12-h light and 12-h dark cycle. VOCs concentrations were determined using a purge-and-trap gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Agilent 5973). The concentrations of chlorophyll a (Chl a) were also determined using a fluorometer (Turner TD-700). Bromomethane (CH3Br) and isoprene were produced by Synechococcus sp. Isoprene production was similar to those of other phytoplankton species reported earlier. Isoprene was produced when Chl a was increasing in the early stage of the incubation period (5-15 days of incubation time, exponential phase), but CH3Br was produced when Chl a was reduced in the late stage of the incubation period (30-40 days of incubation time, death phase).

  14. A biogenic volatile organic compounds emission inventory for Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-hui; BAI Yu-hua; ZHANG Shu-yu

    2005-01-01

    The first detailed inventory for volatile organic compounds(VOC) emissions from vegetation over Yunnan Province, China was presented. The spatially and temporally resolved inventory was developed based on a geographic information system (GIS), remote sensing(RS) data and field measurement data, such as digitized land-use data, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVl) and temperature data from direct real-time measurement. The inventory has a spatial resolution of 5 km × 5 km and a time resolution of 1 h.Urban, agriculture, and natural land-use distributions in Yunnan Province were combined with biomass factors for each land-use category to produce a spatially resolved biomass inventory. A biogenic emission inventory was developed by combining the biomass inventory with hourly emission rates for tree, shrub and ground cover species of the study area. Correcting for environmental factors, including light intensity and temperature, a value of 1.1 × 1012 gC for total annual biogenic VOC emissions from Yunnan Province, including 6.1 × 1011 gCfor isoprene, 2.1 × 1011 gC for monoterpenes, and 2.6 × 1011 gC for OVOC was obtained. The highest VOC emissions occurred in the northwestern, southwestern and north region of Yunnan Province. Some uncertainties were also discussed in this study.

  15. Enhanced Volatile Organic Compounds emissions and organic aerosol mass increase the oligomer content of atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Giorio, Chiara; Manninen, Antti; Wilson, Eoin; Mahon, Brendan; Aalto, Juho; Kajos, Maija; Venables, Dean; Ruuskanen, Taina; Levula, Janne; Loponen, Matti; Connors, Sarah; Harris, Neil; Zhao, Defeng; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas; Rudich, Yinon; Hallquist, Mattias; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Maenhaut, Willy; Bäck, Jaana; Petäjä, Tuukka; Wenger, John; Kulmala, Markku; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) accounts for a dominant fraction of the submicron atmospheric particle mass, but knowledge of the formation, composition and climate effects of SOA is incomplete and limits our understanding of overall aerosol effects in the atmosphere. Organic oligomers were discovered as dominant components in SOA over a decade ago in laboratory experiments and have since been proposed to play a dominant role in many aerosol processes. However, it remains unclear whether oligomers are relevant under ambient atmospheric conditions because they are often not clearly observed in field samples. Here we resolve this long-standing discrepancy by showing that elevated SOA mass is one of the key drivers of oligomer formation in the ambient atmosphere and laboratory experiments. We show for the first time that a specific organic compound class in aerosols, oligomers, is strongly correlated with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of SOA particles. These findings might have important implications for future climate scenarios where increased temperatures cause higher biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which in turn lead to higher SOA mass formation and significant changes in SOA composition. Such processes would need to be considered in climate models for a realistic representation of future aerosol-climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  16. Sorption to soil of hydrophobic and ionic organic compounds: measurement and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laak, Thomas Laurens ter

    2005-01-01

    The sorption of organic compounds to soil, sediments and dissolved organic matter affects the fate of organic compounds. Given the central role of this process in environmental transport, distribution, and (bio)degradation processes, it needs to be well-understood and represented in risk assessment

  17. Organic compounds in PM1 in Mlada Boleslav 2013 and Ostrava 2014 in winter season

    OpenAIRE

    Křůmal, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    In this work the organic compounds and organic markers used for the identification of sources of aerosols were measured. Monosaccharide anhydrides and resin acids (emissions from biomass combustion) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (emissions from traffic and incomplete combustion) were observed especially. Hopanes, steranes (traffic, coal combustion) and alkanes were next groups of analysed organic compounds.

  18. Organic compounds in PM1 in Ostrava and Mlada Boleslav in winter season

    OpenAIRE

    Křůmal, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    In this work the organic compounds and organic markers used for the identification of sources of aerosols were measured. Monosaccharide anhydrides and resin acids (emissions from biomass combustion) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (emissions from traffic and incomplete combustion) were observed especially. Hopanes, steranes (traffic, coal combustion) and alkanes were next groups of analysed organic compounds.

  19. Modeling secondary organic aerosol formation through cloud processing of organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the potential formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA through reactions of organic compounds in condensed aqueous phases is growing. In this study, the potential formation of SOA from irreversible aqueous-phase reactions of organic species in clouds was investigated. A new proposed aqueous-phase chemistry mechanism (AqChem is coupled with the existing gas-phase Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (CACM and the Model to Predict the Multiphase Partitioning of Organics (MPMPO that simulate SOA formation. AqChem treats irreversible organic reactions that lead mainly to the formation of carboxylic acids, which are usually less volatile than the corresponding aldehydic compounds. Zero-dimensional model simulations were performed for tropospheric conditions with clouds present for three consecutive hours per day. Zero-dimensional model simulations show that 48-h average SOA formation is increased by 27% for a rural scenario with strong monoterpene emissions and 7% for an urban scenario with strong emissions of aromatic compounds, respectively, when irreversible organic reactions in clouds are considered. AqChem was also incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ version 4.4 with CACM/MPMPO and applied to a previously studied photochemical episode (3–4 August 2004 focusing on the eastern United States. The CMAQ study indicates that the maximum contribution of SOA formation from irreversible reactions of organics in clouds is 0.28 μg m−3 for 24-h average concentrations and 0.60 μg m−3 for one-hour average concentrations at certain locations. On average, domain-wide surface SOA predictions for the episode are increased by 9% when irreversible, in-cloud processing of organics is considered. Because aldehydes of carbon number greater than four are assumed to convert fully to the corresponding carboxylic acids upon reaction with OH in cloud droplets and this assumption may overestimate

  20. Emission of volatile organic compounds from silage: Compounds, sources, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Sasha D.; Howard, Cody; Muck, Richard E.; Franco, Roberta B.; Montes, Felipe; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Trabue, Steven L.; Rotz, C. Alan

    2013-10-01

    Silage, fermented cattle feed, has recently been identified as a significant source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. A small number of studies have measured VOC emission from silage, but not enough is known about the processes involved to accurately quantify emission rates and identify practices that could reduce emissions. Through a literature review, we have focused on identifying the most important compounds emitted from corn silage (the most common type of silage in the US) and the sources of these compounds by quantifying their production and emission potential in silage and describing production pathways. We reviewed measurements of VOC emission from silage and assessed the importance of individual silage VOCs through a quantitative analysis of VOC concentrations within silage. Measurements of VOC emission from silage and VOCs present within silage indicated that alcohols generally make the largest contribution to emission from corn silage, in terms of mass emitted and potential ozone formation. Ethanol is the dominant alcohol in corn silage; excluding acids, it makes up more than half of the mean mass of VOCs present. Acids, primarily acetic acid, may be important when emission is high and all VOCs are nearly depleted by emission. Aldehydes and esters, which are more volatile than acids and alcohols, are important when exposure is short, limiting emission of more abundant but less volatile compounds. Variability in silage VOC concentrations is very high; for most alcohols and acids, tolerance intervals indicate that 25% of silages have concentrations a factor of two away from median values, and possibly much further. This observation suggests that management practices can significantly influence VOC concentrations. Variability also makes prediction of emissions difficult. The most important acids, alcohols, and aldehydes present in silage are probably produced by bacteria (and, in the case of ethanol, yeasts) during fermentation and

  1. Delivery of complex organic compounds from evolved stars to the solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Sun

    2011-12-01

    Stars in the late stages of evolution are able to synthesize complex organic compounds with aromatic and aliphatic structures over very short time scales. These compounds are ejected into the interstellar medium and distributed throughout the Galaxy. The structures of these compounds are similar to the insoluble organic matter found in meteorites. In this paper, we discuss to what extent stellar organics has enriched the primordial Solar System and possibly the early Earth.

  2. Simultaneous treatment of chlorinated organics and removal of metals and radionuclides with bimetals and complexing acids - application to surfactant solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.; Gu, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Currently available methods for separation and treatment of radioactive mixed waste are typically energy-intensive, and often require high temperatures. Passive methods that operate at ambient temperatures are needed. The purpose of this task is to develop bimetallic substrates, using a base metal such as iron and a promoter metal such as palladium (Pd), to provide a passive, low-energy solution to a substantial portion of DOE`s mixed-waste problem. This technology consists of a porous medium that can simultaneously dechlorinate hazardous organics such as TCE and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the same time that it removes metallic and hazardous wastes from a solvent/surfactant solution. The porous medium consists of a bimetallic substrate such as palladized iron (Pd/Fe). Palladium is readily chemically plated on iron and preliminary studies suggest that only 0.05 to 0.1% Pd is needed for an efficient reaction. Thus, the cost of the material is reasonable especially is it is long-lived or can be regenerated. Field implementation would consist of the passage of a surfactant-laden, mixed waste through a column or bed of the bimetallic substrate. The organic component of this mixed waste may contain semivolatile compounds such as PCBs or pesticides and herbicides. The bimetal simultaneously removes radionuclides and metals and degrades halogenated hydrocarbons. Virtually any concentration can be treated. Following reaction of the bimetal with the waste stream, the resulting effluent will consist of an uncontaminated aqueous solution of surfactant or solvent that can be reused. The bimetal would then be rinsed with a dilute mineral acid or a mild complexing acid (e.g., oxalic or citric acid) to regenerate the surface and to remove sorbed metals and non-hazardous organic residue. The latter effluent would be low-level radioactive waste in some cases, but it would now be much easier to manage and be of a lower volume than the original mixed waste.

  3. Simultaneous treatment of chlorinated organics and removal of metals and radionuclides with bimetals and complexing acids - application to surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently available methods for separation and treatment of radioactive mixed waste are typically energy-intensive, and often require high temperatures. Passive methods that operate at ambient temperatures are needed. The purpose of this task is to develop bimetallic substrates, using a base metal such as iron and a promoter metal such as palladium (Pd), to provide a passive, low-energy solution to a substantial portion of DOE's mixed-waste problem. This technology consists of a porous medium that can simultaneously dechlorinate hazardous organics such as TCE and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at the same time that it removes metallic and hazardous wastes from a solvent/surfactant solution. The porous medium consists of a bimetallic substrate such as palladized iron (Pd/Fe). Palladium is readily chemically plated on iron and preliminary studies suggest that only 0.05 to 0.1% Pd is needed for an efficient reaction. Thus, the cost of the material is reasonable especially is it is long-lived or can be regenerated. Field implementation would consist of the passage of a surfactant-laden, mixed waste through a column or bed of the bimetallic substrate. The organic component of this mixed waste may contain semivolatile compounds such as PCBs or pesticides and herbicides. The bimetal simultaneously removes radionuclides and metals and degrades halogenated hydrocarbons. Virtually any concentration can be treated. Following reaction of the bimetal with the waste stream, the resulting effluent will consist of an uncontaminated aqueous solution of surfactant or solvent that can be reused. The bimetal would then be rinsed with a dilute mineral acid or a mild complexing acid (e.g., oxalic or citric acid) to regenerate the surface and to remove sorbed metals and non-hazardous organic residue. The latter effluent would be low-level radioactive waste in some cases, but it would now be much easier to manage and be of a lower volume than the original mixed waste

  4. Interactions between volatile organic compounds and reactive halogen in the tropical marine atmosphere using WRF-Chem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Reeves, Claire E.; Baker, Alex; Volkamer, Rainer; von Glasow, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Halogen species (chlorine, bromine and iodine) are known to play an important role in the chemistry and oxidizing capacity of the troposphere, particularly in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Reactive halogens cause ozone (O3) destruction, change the HOx and NOX partitioning, affect the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mercury, reduce the lifetime of methane, and take part in new particle formation. Numerical models predicted that reactive halogen compounds account for 30% of O3 destruction in the MBL and 5-20% globally. There are indications that the chemistry of reactive halogens and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) in the tropics are inter-related. Moreover, the presence of aldehydes, such as glyoxal (CHOCHO), has a potential impact on radical cycling and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the MBL and free troposphere (FT). Model calculations suggest aldehydes to be an important sink for bromine atoms and hence competition for their reaction with O3 forming BrO and so illustrating a link between the cycles of halogens and OVOCs in the marine atmosphere. The main objective of this contribution is to investigate the atmospheric chemistry in the tropical East Pacific with a focus on reactive halogens and OVOCs and their links using the latest version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and field data from the TORERO campaign. WRF-Chem is a highly flexible community model for atmospheric research where aerosol-radiation-cloud feedback processes are taken into account. Our current reaction mechanism in WRF-Chem is based on the MOZART mechanism and has been extended to include bromine, chlorine and iodine chemistry. The MOZART mechanism includes detailed gas-phase chemistry of CHOCHO formation as well as state-of-the-science pathways to form SOA. Oceanic emissions of aldehydes, including CHOCHO, and of organic halogens based on measurements from the TORERO campaign have been added into the model. Sea

  5. Tratamento de água subterrânea contaminada com compostos organoclorados usando ferro elementar e o reagente de Fenton Treatment of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated compounds using elemental iron and Fenton's reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Langbeck de Arruda

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The remediation of groundwater containing organochlorine compounds was evaluated using a reductive system with zero-valent iron, and the reductive process coupled with Fenton's reagent. The concentration of the individual target compounds reached up to 400 mg L-1 in the sample. Marked reductions in the chlorinated compounds were observed in the reductive process. The degradation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics in terms of the contaminant and was dependent on the sample contact time with the solid reducing agent. An oxidative test with Fenton's reagent, followed by the reductive assay, showed that tetrachloroethylene was further reduced up to three times the initial concentration. The destruction of chloroform, however, demands an additional treatment.

  6. Comparison of direct injection nebulizer and desolvating microconcentric nebulizer for analysis of chlorine-, bromine- and iodine-containing compounds by reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.P.; Gammelgaard, Bente; Hansen, S.H.;

    2003-01-01

    With the purpose of finding ways to combine micro-bore reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection for analysis of drug substances containing chlorine, bromine and iodine, the suitability of a direct injection nebulizer and an Aridus desolvating microconcentric nebulizer was compared. Using the...

  7. Photodegradation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles as a Source of Small, Oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecha, Kurtis T; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2016-09-20

    We investigated the photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles by near-UV radiation and photoproduction of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) from various types of SOA. We used a smog chamber to generate SOA from α-pinene, guaiacol, isoprene, tetradecane, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene under high-NOx, low-NOx, or ozone oxidation conditions. The SOA particles were collected on a substrate, and the resulting material was exposed to several mW of near-UV radiation (λ ∼ 300 nm) from a light-emitting diode. Various OVOCs, including acetic acid, formic acid, acetaldehyde, and acetone were observed during photodegradation, and their SOA-mass-normalized fluxes were estimated with a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS). All the SOA, with the exception of guaiacol SOA, emitted OVOCs upon irradiation. Based on the measured OVOC emission rates, we estimate that SOA particles would lose at least ∼1% of their mass over a 24 h period during summertime conditions in Los Angeles, California. This condensed-phase photochemical process may produce a few Tg/year of gaseous formic acid, the amount comparable to its primary sources. The condensed-phase SOA photodegradation processes could therefore measurably affect the budgets of both particulate and gaseous atmospheric organic compounds on a global scale. PMID:27547987

  8. Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the UAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric; Lootah, Nadia

    The gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system has been used to identify major volatile organic compounds (VOCs) sources in the UAE (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E). VOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the VOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. UAE is located at the edge of the Persian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in neighbouring Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Iran. VOCs emerging from these industries can be transported to the UAE with jet streams. The analysis of the collected air samples at three locations in Sharjah, UAE during the autumn and winter seasons indicates the presence of more than 100 VOC species. The concentrations of these species vary in magnitudes but the most prominent are: acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. The possible tracers for various emission sources have also been identified such as 2-methylpentane, 1, 3-butadiene and 2, 2-dimethlybutane for vehicle exhaust, the light hydrocarbons, namely n-butane, trans-2-butene, and n-pentane for gasoline vapor, and n-nonane, n-decane, and n-undecane for diesel vapor and asphalt application processes. As various emission sources are characterized by overlapping VOC species, the ratio of possible VOC tracers are used to quantify the contribution of different sources. Our aim in this paper is to explore and discuss possible impacts of transported emissions on the local VOC emission inventory from various sources for the UAE. This work is partially supported by Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at the American University of Sharjah, U.A.E.

  9. Measuring concentrations of volatile organic compounds in vinyl flooring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S S; Little, J C; Hodgson, A T

    2001-08-01

    The initial solid-phase concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a key parameter influencing the emission characteristics of many indoor materials. Solid-phase measurements are typically made using solvent extraction or thermal headspace analysis. The high temperatures and chemical solvents associated with these methods can modify the physical structure of polymeric materials and, consequently, affect mass transfer characteristics. To measure solid-phase concentrations under conditions resembling those in which the material would be installed in an indoor environment, a new technique was developed for measuring VOC concentrations in vinyl flooring (VF) and similar materials. A 0.09-m2 section of new VF was punched randomly to produce -200 0.78-cm2 disks. The disks were milled to a powder at -140 degrees C to simultaneously homogenize the material and reduce the diffusion path length without loss of VOCs. VOCs were extracted from the VF particles at room temperature by fluidized-bed desorption (FBD) and by direct thermal desorption (DTD) at elevated temperatures. The VOCs in the extraction gas from FBD and DTD were collected on sorbent tubes and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven VOCs emitted by VF were quantified. Concentration measurements by FBD ranged from 5.1 microg/g VF for n-hexadecane to 130 microg/g VF for phenol. Concentrations measured by DTD were higher than concentrations measured by FBD. Differences between FBD and DTD results may be explained using free-volume and dual-mobility sorption theory, but further research is necessary to more completely characterize the complex nature of a diffusant in a polymer matrix. PMID:11518293

  10. Assessment of volatile organic compound emissions from ecosystems of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, L. F.; Li, Q.-J.; Guenther, A. B.; Greenberg, J. P.; Baker, B.; Bai, J.-H.

    2002-11-01

    Isoprene, monoterpene, and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from grasslands, shrublands, forests, and peatlands in China were characterized to estimate their regional magnitudes and to compare these emissions with those from landscapes of North America, Europe, and Africa. Ecological and VOC emission sampling was conducted at 52 sites centered in and around major research stations located in seven different regions of China: Inner Mongolia (temperate), Changbai Mountain (boreal-temperate), Beijing Mountain (temperate), Dinghu Mountain (subtropical), Ailao Mountain (subtropical), Kunming (subtropical), and Xishuangbanna (tropical). Transects were used to sample plant species and growth form composition, leafy (green) biomass, and leaf area in forests representing nearly all the major forest types of China. Leafy biomass was determined using generic algorithms based on tree diameter, canopy structure, and absolute cover. Measurements of VOC emissions were made on 386 of the 541 recorded species using a portable photo-ionization detector method. For 105 species, VOC emissions were also measured using a flow-through leaf cuvette sampling/gas chromatography analysis method. Results indicate that isoprene and monoterpene emissions, as well as leafy biomass, vary systematically along gradients of ecological succession in the same manner found in previous studies in the United States, Canada, and Africa. Applying these results to a regional VOC emissions model, we arrive at a value of 21 Tg C for total annual biogenic VOC emissions from China, compared to 5 Tg C of VOCs released annually from anthropogenic sources there. The isoprene and monoterpene emissions are nearly the same as those reported for Europe, which is comparable in size to China.

  11. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, ∫ [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that ∫ [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for ∫ [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for ∫ [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine ∫ [OH]dt would result in values for ∫ [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform ∫ [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average ∫ [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  12. The fate of atmospheric phosgene and the stratospheric chlorine loadings of its parent compounds: CCl4, C2Cl4, C2HCL3, CH3CCl3, and CHCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, T. P.; Chameides, W. L.; Wine, P. H.; Cunnold, D. M.; Alyea, F. N.; Franklin, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the tropospheric and stratospheric cycles of phosgene is carried out to determine its fate and ultimate role in controlling the ozone depletion potentials of its parent compounds. Tropospheric phosgene is produced from the OH-initiated oxidation of C2Cl4, CH3CCl3, CHCl3, and C2HCl3. Simulations using a two-dimensional model indicate that these processes produce about 90 pptv/yr of tropospheric phosgene with an average concentration of about 18 pptv, in reasonable agreement with observations. We estimate a residence time of about 70 days for tropospheric phosgene, with the vast majority being removed by hydrolysis in cloudwater. Only about 0.4% of the phosgene produced in the troposphere avoids wet removal and is transported to the stratosphere, where its chlorine can be released to participate in the catalytic destruction of ozone. Stratospheric phosgene is produced from the photochemical degradation of CCl4, C2Cl4, CHCl3, and CH3CCl3 and is removed by photolysis and downward transport to the troposphere. Model calculations, in good agreement with observations, indicate that these processes produce a peak stratospheric concentration of about 25-30 pptv at an altitude of about 25 km. In contrast to tropospheric phosgene, stratospheric phosgene is found to have a lifetime against photochemical removal of the order of years. As a result, a significant portion of the phosgene that is produced in the stratosphere is ultimately returned to the troposphere, where it is rapidly removed by clouds. This phenomenon effectively decreases the amount of reactive chlorine injected into the stratosphere and available for ozone depletion from phosgene's parent compounds. A similar phenomenon due to the downward transport of stratospheric COFCl produced from CFC-11 is estimated to cause a 7% decrease in the amount of reactive chlorine injected into the stratosphere from this compound. Our results are potentially sensitive to a variety of parameters, most notably the rate

  13. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION AND CONFIRMATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WASTEWATER EXTRACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of multispectral identification techniques to samples from industrial and POTW wastewaters revealed identities of 63 compounds that had not been identified by empirical matching of mass spectra with spectral libraries. wenty-five of the compounds had not been found in...

  14. Change in haloacetic acid formation potential during UV and UV/H2O2 treatment of model organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Autin, Olivier; Parsons, Simon

    2013-07-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products produced by the chlorination of organic matter, including amino acids. Advanced oxidation processes are expected to be effective for the destruction of HAA precursors; however, recent studies have reported the possible failure of these processes to reduce HAA formation potential. This study examined HAA formation potential during the course of UV or UV/H2O2 treatment of three organic compounds: leucine, serine, and resorcinol. HAA formation potential decreased in the treatment of resorcinol, while the potential increased slightly in the treatment of serine and greatly increased for leucine. The chemical structure required for HAA formation was assumed to be produced during the course of UV/H2O2 treatment of leucine and serine. Also, H abstraction from the δ carbon was assumed to result from the initial degradation of leucine by the hydroxyl radical during the UV/H2O2 treatment. The hydroxyl radical may have further reacted with leucine moiety to shorten its carbon chain. This would have produced a chemical structure capable of forming HAA, thus increasing HAA formation potential. PMID:23415308

  15. Occurrence of volatile organic compounds in shallow alluvial aquifers of a Mediterranean region: Baseline scenario and ecological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, T; Borgoni, R; Ambrosini, R; Cifoni, M; Galassi, D M P; Petitta, M

    2015-12-15

    A regional survey of eight volatile organic compounds (VOCs), namely BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene) and four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs: chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene), was carried out at 174 sites, in 17 alluvial aquifers of Abruzzo, a Mediterranean region of southern Italy, from 2004 to 2009. Frequency of detection, concentration range, spatial distribution pattern, and temporal trend of contaminant concentration in each aquifer were analyzed as well as the relationships between VOC concentrations and the total amount of precipitation during the 90days preceding each sampling date. A review of published ecotoxicological data, providing an indication of the biological risk associated with the observed levels of VOC contamination, was presented and discussed. BTEX concentrations were under detection limits in all the investigated aquifers, indicating absence of contamination. In contrast, CAH contamination occurred in 14 out of 17 aquifers. The two most frequently detected compounds were chloroform and tetrachloroethene. No significant temporal trend was observed for chloroform and tetrachloroethene concentrations during the six years of observation, indicating the persistence of stable contaminations, except for some slightly decreasing trends observed in three out of 17 aquifers. In four aquifers chloroform and tetrachloroethene concentrations increased with precipitations in the preceding months. Spatial patterns of contamination differed among aquifers, indicating highly complex contaminant distributions at aquifer scale not related to single-plume geometries. Patterns of contamination by chloroform and tetrachloroethene in the most urbanized aquifers were likely associated with multiple sources of VOCs not clearly detectable at the scale used in this study. In five out of 17 aquifers, chloroform and tetrachloroethene co-occurred at concentrations that are lethal to groundwater

  16. RT-MATRIX: Measuring Total Organic Carbon by Photocatalytic Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inevitably accumulate in enclosed habitats such as the International Space Station and the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as a result of human metabolism, material off-gassing, and leaking equipment. Some VOCs can negatively affect the quality of the crew's life, health, and performance; and consequently, the success of the mission. Air quality must be closely monitored to ensure a safe living and working environment. Currently, there is no reliable air quality monitoring system that meets NASA's stringent requirements for power, mass, volume, or performance. The ultimate objective of the project -- the development of a Real-Time, Miniaturized, Autonomous Total Risk Indicator System (RT.MATRIX).is to provide a portable, dual-function sensing system that simultaneously determines total organic carbon (TOC) and individual contaminants in air streams.

  17. Increased formation of halomethanes during chlorination of chloramphenicol in drinking water by UV irradiation, persulfate oxidation, and combined UV/persulfate pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenhai, Chu; Tengfei, Chu; Erdeng, Du; Deng, Yang; Yingqing, Guo; Naiyun, Gao

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet/persulfate (UV/PS) has been widely used to generate sulfate radicals for degradation of water organic pollutants in previous studies. However, its impacts on disinfection byproduct formation during post-chlorination of degraded compounds is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and the combined UV/PS advanced oxidation process (AOP) pre-treatments on halomethane formation during the following chlorination of chloramphenicol (CAP), a model antibiotic commonly found in wastewater-impacted water. Results showed that CAP could be transformed to more trichloromethane (TCM) than monochloromethane (MCM) and dichloromethane (DCM) in the presence of excess chlorine. UV photolysis, PS oxidation and UV/PS AOP all directly decomposed CAP to produce halomethanes (HMs) before post-chlorination. Moreover, UV and UV/PS pre-treatments both enhanced the formation of all the HMs in the subsequent chlorination. PS pre-oxidation decreased the TCM formation during post-chlorination, but increased the yields of MCM, DCM and total HMs. UV pre-irradiation significantly increased the bromide utilization of HMs, whereas UV/PS pre-oxidation decreased the bromine incorporation and utilization of HMs from the chlorination of CAP in a low-bromide water. UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and UV/PS AOP can inactivate pathogens and degrade organic pollutants, but this benefit should be weighed against a potential risk of the increased halomethane formation from degraded organic pollutants with and without post-chlorination.

  18. Transformation of iopamidol during chlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Friedrich M; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Machek, Edward J; Duirk, Stephen E; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-11-01

    The transformation of the iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol, and diatrizoate was examined in purified water over the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 in the presence of sodium hypochlorite, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide. In the presence of aqueous chlorine, only iopamidol was transformed. All other ICM did not show significant reactivity, regardless of the oxidant used. Chlorination of iopamidol followed a second order reaction, with an observed rate constant of up to 0.87 M(-1) s(-1) (±0.021 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8.5. The hypochlorite anion was identified to be the reactive chlorine species. Iodine was released during the transformation of iopamidol, and was mainly oxidized to iodate. Only a small percentage (less than 2% after 24 h) was transformed to known organic iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of low molecular weight. Some of the iodine was still present in high-molecular weight DBPs. The chemical structures of these DBPs were elucidated via MSn fragmentation and NMR. Side chain cleavage was observed as well as the exchange of iodine by chlorine. An overall transformation pathway was proposed for the degradation of iopamidol. CHO cell chronic cytotoxicity tests indicate that chlorination of iopamidol generates a toxic mixture of high molecular weight DBPs (LC50 332 ng/μL).

  19. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misztal, P. K.; Karl, T.; Weber, R.; Jonsson, H. H.; Guenther, A. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-03-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET) campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC) approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT) approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi). Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l.) altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF) landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC) emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m-2 h-1) above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions, shrublands, and

  20. Study on the Characteristic Organic Compounds in Red Tide by Factor Analysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明桥; 李攻科; 张展霞

    2004-01-01

    Factor analysis is used to study the organic compounds that have high degree of correlation with biomass in algal blooming. Based on this correlation, they are named characteristic organic compounds. The compounds found are sequalene (SQU), cedrol (CED), 2, 5-cyclohexadiene-1, 4-dione, 2, 6-bis(1, 1-dimthylethyl )(PBQ), phenol, 2, 6-bis (1, 1-dimethylethy-4-methyl) (BHT), 3-t-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole ( BHA ), 1, 2-benzenedicarboxylie acid, bis-( 2-methyl propyl ) ester (DIBP), dibutyl phthalate (DNBP), respectively. Monitoring the variations of concentration of these characteristic organic compounds in seawater may provide scientific basis for studying and forecasting red tides.

  1. End-group-directed self-assembly of organic compounds useful for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.; Lee, Olivia P.; Yiu, Alan T.; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2016-05-31

    The present invention provides for an organic compound comprising electron deficient unit covalently linked to two or more electron rich units. The present invention also provides for a device comprising the organic compound, such as a light-emitting diode, thin-film transistor, chemical biosensor, non-emissive electrochromic, memory device, photovoltaic cells, or the like.

  2. Study on the local atomic structure of germanium in organic germanium compounds by EXAFS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Organic germanium compounds have been extensively applied in medicine as tonics,In this paper,the local structures of two organic germanium compounds,carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide and polymeric germanium glutamate,were determined by EXAFS.The structure parameters including coordination numbers and bond lengths were reported,and possible structure patterns were discussed.

  3. 78 FR 24990 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...), several volatile organic compound (VOC) rules that were submitted by the Ohio Environmental Protection..., 2012 (77 FR 31265), and received no comments. II. What action is EPA taking today and what is...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 266 - Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed VIII Appendix VIII to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...—Organic Compounds for Which Residues Must Be Analyzed Volatiles Semivolatiles Benzene...

  5. 40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Rubber Tire Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a)...

  6. 75 FR 24404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Organic Compound Automobile Refinishing Rules for Indiana AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons in Indiana who sell or... references to control technology requirements. In EPA's January 14, 2010, proposal (75 FR 2090), we present...

  7. 76 FR 18893 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for Lithographic and Letterpress Printing in Cleveland AGENCY... volatile organic compound (VOC) rule. These rule revisions specify compliance dates for subject facilities... solution. In EPA's December 30, 2010, proposal (75 FR 82363), we present a detailed legal and...

  8. 75 FR 82363 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound... printing volatile organic compound (VOC) rule for approval into the Ohio State Implementation Plan (SIP... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  9. 40 CFR 60.312 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.312 Section 60.312 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.312 Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). (a) On...

  10. 40 CFR 60.112 - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112 Section 60.112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... After June 11, 1973, and Prior to May 19, 1978 § 60.112 Standard for volatile organic compounds...

  11. 77 FR 31265 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound... (Ohio EPA) submitted several volatile organic compound (VOC) rules for approval into its State... review by the Office of Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4,...

  12. Oxidative treatment of bromide-containing waters: formation of bromine and its reactions with inorganic and organic compounds--a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Michèle B; Criquet, Justine; Zimmermann-Steffens, Saskia G; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-01-01

    Bromide (Br(-)) is present in all water sources at concentrations ranging from ≈ 10 to >1000 μg L(-1) in fresh waters and about 67 mg L(-1) in seawater. During oxidative water treatment bromide is oxidized to hypobromous acid/hypobromite (HOBr/OBr(-)) and other bromine species. A systematic and critical literature review has been conducted on the reactivity of HOBr/OBr(-) and other bromine species with inorganic and organic compounds, including micropollutants. The speciation of bromine in the absence and presence of chloride and chlorine has been calculated and it could be shown that HOBr/OBr(-) are the dominant species in fresh waters. In ocean waters, other bromine species such as Br2, BrCl, and Br2O gain importance and may have to be considered under certain conditions. HOBr reacts fast with many inorganic compounds such as ammonia, iodide, sulfite, nitrite, cyanide and thiocyanide with apparent second-order rate constants in the order of 10(4)-10(9)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7. No rate constants for the reactions with Fe(II) and As(III) are available. Mn(II) oxidation by bromine is controlled by a Mn(III,IV) oxide-catalyzed process involving Br2O and BrCl. Bromine shows a very high reactivity toward phenolic groups (apparent second-order rate constants kapp ≈ 10(3)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7), amines and sulfamides (kapp ≈ 10(5)-10(6)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7) and S-containing compounds (kapp ≈ 10(5)-10(7)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7). For phenolic moieties, it is possible to derive second-order rate constants with a Hammett-σ-based QSAR approach with [Formula in text]. A negative slope is typical for electrophilic substitution reactions. In general, kapp of bromine reactions at pH 7 are up to three orders of magnitude greater than for chlorine. In the case of amines, these rate constants are even higher than for ozone. Model calculations show that depending on the bromide concentration and the pH, the high reactivity of bromine may outweigh the reactions of chlorine during

  13. Removal of volatile organic compounds using amphiphilic cyclodextrin-coated polypropylene

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmilla Lumholdt; Sophie Fourmentin; Nielsen, Thorbjørn T; Larsen, Kim L.

    2014-01-01

    Polypropylene nonwovens were functionalised using a self-assembled, amphiphilic cyclodextrin coating and the potential for water purification by removal of pollutants was studied. As benzene is one of the problematic compounds in the Water Framework Directive, six volatile organic compounds (benzene and five benzene-based substances) were chosen as model compounds. The compounds were tested as a mixture in order to provide a more realistic situation since the wastewater will be a complex mixt...

  14. Organochlorine Turnover in Forest Ecosystems: The Missing Link in the Terrestrial Chlorine Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Leri; S Myneni

    2011-12-31

    Research in the last 20 years has shown that chlorine undergoes transformations between inorganic and organic forms as part of a complex biogeochemical cycle in terrestrial systems. Natural organochlorine production appears to be associated with the decomposition of plant material on the soil surface, though the chlorine cycle budget implies that a proportion of natural organochlorine enters soil through plant litter and atmospheric deposition as well. Organochlorine compounds may form through biotic and abiotic pathways, but the rates and magnitude of production in the field remain undefined. We have performed a time-dependent trace of chlorine concentration through forest ecosystems, revealing distinct fractions of naturally produced organochlorine in plant biomass. Aliphatic organochlorine constitutes an intrinsic component of healthy leaves that persists through senescence and humification of the plant material, making a substantial contribution to the pool of soil organochlorine. Plant leaves also contain soluble aromatic organochlorine compounds that leach from leaf litter during early decay stages. As decay progresses, high concentrations of insoluble aromatic organochlorine accrue in the humus, through de novo production as well as adsorption. The rates of aromatic organochlorine production and degradation vary seasonally and conversely. This study presents the first unambiguous evidence that there exist multiple pools of chlorinated organic matter in the soil environment and that leaf litter deposition makes a significant and refractory contribution to the soil organochlorine pool, providing key insights into the biogeochemical chlorine cycle.

  15. Organochlorine turnover in forest ecosystems: The missing link in the terrestrial chlorine cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2010-12-01

    Research in the last 20 years has shown that chlorine undergoes transformations between inorganic and organic forms as part of a complex biogeochemical cycle in terrestrial systems. Natural organochlorine production appears to be associated with the decomposition of plant material on the soil surface, though the chlorine cycle budget implies that a proportion of natural organochlorine enters soil through plant litter and atmospheric deposition as well. Organochlorine compounds may form through biotic and abiotic pathways, but the rates and magnitude of production in the field remain undefined. We have performed a time-dependent trace of chlorine concentration through forest ecosystems, revealing distinct fractions of naturally produced organochlorine in plant biomass. Aliphatic organochlorine constitutes an intrinsic component of healthy leaves that persists through senescence and humification of the plant material, making a substantial contribution to the pool of soil organochlorine. Plant leaves also contain soluble aromatic organochlorine compounds that leach from leaf litter during early decay stages. As decay progresses, high concentrations of insoluble aromatic organochlorine accrue in the humus, through de novo production as well as adsorption. The rates of aromatic organochlorine production and degradation vary seasonally and conversely. This study presents the first unambiguous evidence that there exist multiple pools of chlorinated organic matter in the soil environment and that leaf litter deposition makes a significant and refractory contribution to the soil organochlorine pool, providing key insights into the biogeochemical chlorine cycle.

  16. Application of in situ chemical oxidation technique with potassium permanganate for the remediation of a shallow aquifer contaminated with chlorinated solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Alaine Santos da Cunha; Reginaldo Antonio Bertolo

    2012-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a method that is frequently being used for the remediation of contaminated areas, since it presents an adequate efficiency in the reduction of the contaminant mass, particularly chlorinated ethenes, in a relatively short period of time. This manuscript presents the results of the application of this method, using the injection of potassium permanganate as the remediation agent, in an impacted area with chlorinated organic compounds, especially 1,1-dichloroethene....

  17. Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

    2013-01-08

    The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

  18. Offline oxygen isotope analysis of organic compounds with high N:O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsinger, Glendon B; Hagopian, William M; Jahren, A Hope

    2010-11-15

    Although the advantages of online δ(18)O analysis of organic compounds make its broad application desirable, researchers have encountered NO(+) isobaric interference with CO(+) at m/z 30 (e.g. (14)N(16)O(+), (12)C(18)O(+)) when analyzing nitrogenous substrates. If the δ(18)O value of inter-laboratory standards for substrates with high N:O value could be confirmed offline, these materials could be analyzed periodically and used to evaluate δ(18)O data produced online for nitrogenous unknowns. To this end, we present an offline method based on modifications of the methods of Schimmelmann and Deniro (Anal. Chem. 1985; 57: 2644) and Sauer and Sternberg (Anal. Chem. 1994; 66: 2409), whereby all the N(2) from the gas products of a chlorinated pyrolysis was eliminated, resulting in purified CO(2) for analysis via a dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry system. We evaluated our method by comparing observed δ(18)O values with previously published or inter-laboratory calibrated δ(18)O values for five nitrogen-free working reference materials; finding isotopic agreement to within ±0.2‰ for SIGMA® cellulose, IAEA-CH3 cellulose (C(6)H(10)O(5)) and IAEA-CH6 sucrose (C(12)H(22)O(11)), and within ±1.8‰ for IAEA-601 and IAEA-602 benzoic acids (C(7)H(6)O(2)). We also compared the δ(18)O values of IAEA-CH3 cellulose and IAEA-CH6 sucrose that was nitrogen-'doped' with adenine (C(5)H(5)N(5)), imidazole (C(3)H(4)N(2)) and 2-aminopyrimidine (C(4)H(5)N(3)) with the undoped δ(18)O values for the same substrates; yielding isotopic agreement to within ±0.7‰. Finally, we provide an independent analysis of the δ(18)O value of IAEA-600 caffeine (C(8)H(10)N(4)O(2)), previously characterized using online systems exclusively, and discuss the reasons for an average 1.4‰ enrichment in δ(18)O observed offline relative to the consensus online δ(18)O value. PMID:20941766

  19. Chlorinated indium tin oxide electrode by InCl3 aqueous solution for high-performance organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun; Zhou, Dong-Ying; Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhao-Kui; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The authors develop a facile and effective method to produce the chlorinated indium tin oxide (Cl-ITO) treated by InCl3 aqueous solution and UV/ozone. The work function of the Cl-ITO achieved by this treatment is as high as 5.69 eV, which is increased by 1.09 eV compared with that of the regular ITO without any treatment. Further investigation proved that the enhancement of the work function is attributed to the formation of In-Cl bonds on the Cl-ITO surface. Green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices based on the Cl-ITO electrodes exhibit excellent electroluminescence performance, elongating lifetime due to the improvement in hole injection.

  20. The effect of chlorine dioxide on the formation of trihalomethanes; Dioxido de cloro y su efecto en la formacion de trihalometanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciurana de Gay, C.

    2000-07-01

    The chlorine dioxide presents a high reactivity with certain organic and inorganic compounds. In the process of making water fit to drink, one of the most valued characteristics of the chlorine dioxide is the oxidation of the precursors of trihalomethanes, that allows their decrease in the drinking water. The generation of the chlorine dioxide is the oxidation of the precursors of trihalomethanes, that allows their decrease in the drinking water. The generation of the chlorine dioxide must be made at the dosage point. Both, the generation and its control can be made in an easy way. Since a few years ago, in the ETAP, in Montfulla, some researches are being carried out in order to decrease the concentration of trihalomethanes. In this work it is exposed the generation the dosage control and the reduction of trihalomethanes obtained through the dosage of the chlorine dioxide at different doses. (Author) 8 refs.

  1. Quantum chemical calculations for polymers and organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J.; Yang, C.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic effects of the orbiting electrons on a model compound were calculated. The computational method used was based on 'Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap' (MNDO). The compound tetracyanoplatinate was used since empirical measurement and calculations along "classical" lines had yielded many known properties. The purpose was to show that for large molecules relativity effects could not be ignored and that these effects could be calculated and yield data in closer agreement to empirical measurements. Both the energy band structure and molecular orbitals are depicted.

  2. The removal of phenols from oily wastewater by chlorine dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Chung-Jung

    1988-01-01

    Treatability studies were performed on oily wastewaters produced by petroleum and canning industries. Chlorine dioxide was used for the removal of phenolic compounds from these oily wastewaters. Most of phenolic compounds can be destroyed by chlorine dioxide within 15 minutes if CI02-to-phenol ratios of higher than 5.0 are provided. Factors such as pH, temperature, and COD have little effect on phenol removal. The effectiveness of chlorine dioxide treatment depends critic...

  3. Applications of information theory and pattern recognition to gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of toxic organic compounds in ambient air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    The number of information channels contained in the gas-chromatographic, mass-spectrometric, and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of 78 toxic organic compounds was determined. The toxic compounds are those routinely monitored in ambient air samples using Tenax collection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. The Shannon information content of the binary encoded and full-intensity mass spectra, of the gas-chromatographic retention times, and of the combined gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric spectra of the 78 compounds was calculated. The maximum binary information contents of the 35 channel gas chromatographic, 17 key channel mass spectral, and the 595 channel gas chromatographic-mass spectral methods were 6.4, 15.4, and < 21.8 bits, respectively. The 17 masses with the highest binary information content with regard to the 78 compounds were used with SIMCA pattern recognition to determine four classes among the 78 compounds. These included aromatics without chlorine substitution, chloroaromatics, bromoalkanes and alkenes, and chloroalkanes and alkenes.

  4. Airborne flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds over California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Misztal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC fluxes were measured onboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft as part of the California Airborne BVOC Emission Research in Natural Ecosystem Transects (CABERNET campaign during June 2011. The airborne virtual disjunct eddy covariance (AvDEC approach used measurements from a PTR-MS and a wind radome probe to directly determine fluxes of isoprene, MVK + MAC, methanol, monoterpenes, and MBO over ∼10 000 km of flight paths focusing on areas of California predicted to have the largest emissions of isoprene. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT approach was used to calculate fluxes over long transects of more than 15 km, most commonly between 50 and 150 km. The Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT approach was used over the same transects to also calculate "instantaneous" fluxes with localization of both frequency and time independent of non-stationarities. Vertical flux divergence of isoprene is expected due to its relatively short lifetime and was measured directly using "racetrack" profiles at multiple altitudes. It was found to be linear and in the range 5% to 30% depending on the ratio of aircraft altitude to PBL height (z / zi. Fluxes were generally measured by flying consistently at 400 ± 50 m (a.g.l. altitude, and extrapolated to the surface according to the determined flux divergence. The wavelet-derived surface fluxes of isoprene averaged to 2 km spatial resolution showed good correspondence to Basal Emission Factor (BEF landcover datasets used to drive biogenic VOC (BVOC emission models. The surface flux of isoprene was close to zero over Central Valley crops and desert shrublands, but was very high (up to 15 mg m−2 h−1 above oak woodlands, with clear dependence of emissions on temperature and oak density. Isoprene concentrations of up to 8 ppb were observed at aircraft height on the hottest days and over the dominant source regions. While isoprene emissions from agricultural crop regions

  5. Modeling of RO/NF membrane rejections of PhACs and organic compounds: a statistical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yangali-Quintanilla, V.; Kim, T.-U.; Kennedy, M.; Amy, G.

    2008-01-01

    Rejections of pharmaceutical compounds (Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Clofibric acid, Naproxen, Primidone, Phenacetin) and organic compounds (Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Chloroform, Bromoform, Trichloroethene, Perchloroethene, Carbontetrachloride, Carbontetrabromide) by NF (Filmtec, Saehan)

  6. Treatment of Organic Compounds in Reclaimed Wastewater for Groundwater Recharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮运正; 胡俊; 云桂春

    2004-01-01

    To study water quality problems associated with groundwater recharge,a tertiary treatment process,consisting of coagulation,sand filtration,and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption,was used in combination with a simulated soil aquifer treatment.The process significantly improved secondary effluent quality.GAC adsorption reduced organic substances expressed by UV-254,dissolved organic carbon as well as partially adsorbable organic halogens.The results of the Ames test show that the secondary effluent contains a high concentration of mutagens.GAC filtration removed adsorbable organic bromine slightly whereas GAC adsorption removed mutagens effectively.The simulated soil aquifer treatment was able to further reduce UV-254,dissolved organic carbon,and adsorbable organic halogens through biodegradation.Adsorbable organic bromine levels were also reduced by the soil aquifer treatment process.The given reclamation technology used for groundwater recharge is of benefit to the removal of dissolved organic carbon,UV-254,adsorbable organic halogens,and mutagenicity.

  7. 藻有机物在含溴离子条件下氯化消毒HAAs的生成种类%Haloacetic acids species from the chlorination of algal organic matter in the presence of bromide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏源源; 刘燕; 刘翔; 代瑞华

    2011-01-01

    藻类污染和溴离子存在是影响沿海地区水库水源消毒副产物形成的重要因素。在和无溴离子存在条件下,以藻细胞模拟生化成分(BSA、鱼油和淀粉),铜绿微囊藻细胞及其胞外有机物为前躯物进行氯化消毒对比实验,从藻细胞生化成分的角度探究藻有机物作为消毒副产物前躯物时,且水中存在溴离子的条件下,氯化消毒形成卤乙酸(HAAs)的种类情况。结果表明,3种模拟生化成分在溴离子存在条件下,形成的溴代HAAs仅为溴氯乙酸或二溴乙酸的1种或2种。与BSA和淀粉为前躯物时形成溴代HAAs的产物种类相比,溴离子对鱼油为前躯物时形成溴代HAAs产物种类的影响更大。模拟生化成分预测NHaAs副产物种类与具体藻种形成的HAAs副产物种类之间具有较好的吻合度。%Bromide and algal pollution are important factors influencing disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formation and speciation in reservoir water in coastal areas. The chlorination of model algal cellular compounds (bovine serum albumin, fish oil and starch), Microcystis aeruginosa and its extra-cellular organic matters (EOMs) were conducted in the absence and presence of bromide. The main aim of the present study is to explore their potential as precursors for haloacetic acids (HAAs) speciation upon chlorination in the presence of bromide. The results showed that bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) or/and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) was/were produced as for brominated HAAs (Br-HAAs) from the three model compounds in the presence of bromide. The effect of bromide on Br-HAAs speciation upon fish oil chlorination was more evident than with BSA and starch. There was a good correlation between the species predicted from the model compounds and those obtained from specific algal species.

  8. Remotion of organic compounds of actual industrial effluents by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampa, M. H. O.; Duarte, C. L.; Rela, P. R.; Somessari, E. S. R.; Silveira, C. G.; Azevedo, A. L.

    1998-06-01

    Organic compounds has been a great problem of environmental pollution, the traditional methods are not effecient on removing these compounds and most of them are deposited to ambient and stay there for long time causing problems to the environment. Ionizing radiation has been used with success to destroy organic molecules. Actual industrial effluents were irradiated using IPEN's electron beam wastewater pilot plant to study organic compounds degradation. The samples were irradiated with and without air mixture by different doses. Irradiation treatment efficiency was evaluated by the Cromatography Gas Analyses of the samples before and after irradiation. The studied organic compounds were: phenol, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, benzene, toluene and xilene. A degradation superior to 80% was achieved for the majority of the compounds with air addition and 2kGy delivered dose condition. For the samples that were irradiated without air addition the degradation was higher.

  9. Remotion of organic compounds of actual industrial effluents by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Duarte, C.L.; Rela, P.R.; Somessari, E.S.R.; Silveira, C.G.; Azevedo, A.L

    1998-06-01

    Organic compounds has been a great problem of environmental pollution, the traditional methods are not efficient on removing these compounds and most of them are deposited to ambient and stay there for long time causing problems to the environment. Ionizing radiation has been used with success to destroy organic molecules. Actual industrial effluents were irradiated using IPEN's electron beam wastewater pilot plant to study organic compounds degradation. The samples were irradiated with and without air mixture by different doses. Irradiation treatment efficiency was evaluated by the Cromatography Gas Analyses of the samples before and after irradiation. The studied organic compounds were: phenol, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, benzene, toluene and xilene. A degradation superior to 80% was achieved for the majority of the compounds with air addition and 2kGy delivered dose condition. For the samples that were irradiated without air addition the degradation was higher.

  10. Remotion of organic compounds of actual industrial effluents by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic compounds has been a great problem of environmental pollution, the traditional methods are not efficient on removing these compounds and most of them are deposited to ambient and stay there for long time causing problems to the environment. Ionizing radiation has been used with success to destroy organic molecules. Actual industrial effluents were irradiated using IPEN's electron beam wastewater pilot plant to study organic compounds degradation. The samples were irradiated with and without air mixture by different doses. Irradiation treatment efficiency was evaluated by the Cromatography Gas Analyses of the samples before and after irradiation. The studied organic compounds were: phenol, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, benzene, toluene and xilene. A degradation superior to 80% was achieved for the majority of the compounds with air addition and 2kGy delivered dose condition. For the samples that were irradiated without air addition the degradation was higher

  11. Incremental Reactivity Effects of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacarab, M.; Li, L.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Two surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were developed to create a controlled reactivity environment simulating different urban atmospheres with varying levels of anthropogenic (e.g. Los Angeles reactivity) and biogenic (e.g. Atlanta reactivity) influences. Traditional chamber experiments focus on the oxidation of one or two volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors, allowing the reactivity of the system to be dictated by those compounds. Surrogate ROG mixtures control the overall reactivity of the system, allowing for the incremental aerosol formation from an added VOC to be observed. The surrogate ROG mixtures were developed based on that used to determine maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for O3 formation from VOC precursors in a Los Angeles smog environment. Environmental chamber experiments were designed to highlight the incremental aerosol formation in the simulated environment due to the addition of an added anthropogenic (aromatic) or biogenic (terpene) VOC. All experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers. It was found that the aerosol precursors behaved differently under the two altered reactivity conditions, with more incremental aerosol being formed in the anthropogenic ROG system than in the biogenic ROG system. Further, the biogenic reactivity condition inhibited the oxidation of added anthropogenic aerosol precursors, such as m-xylene. Data will be presented on aerosol properties (density, volatility, hygroscopicity) and bulk chemical composition in the gas and particle phases (from a SYFT Technologies selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer, SIFT-MS, and Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS, respectively) comparing the two controlled reactivity systems and single precursor VOC/NOx studies. Incremental aerosol yield data at different controlled reactivities provide a novel and valuable insight in the attempt to extrapolate environmental chamber

  12. Comparative evaluation of effects of ozonated and chlorinated thermal discharges on estuarine and fresh water organisms. First quarterly progress report, April 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, C.R.; DelMonaco, J.L.; Singletary, J.H.; Sugam, R.J.; Meldrim, J.W.; Holmstrom, E.R.; Balog, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    The biological evaluation program incorporates three types of experimental tests: acute (96 hour) toxicity studies; behavioral (avoidance) response studies; and physiological (cough) response studies. In addition, specimens used in testing are examined for physical damage resulting from exposure to chlorine or ozoen. The objective of the acute (96 hour) toxicity study is to determine the respective lethal levels (LC/sub 50/) of chlorinated and ozonated waters. The objective of the behavioral (avoidance) response study is to determine what (if any) concentrations of ozone and of chlorine will be avoided. The objective of physiological (cough) response study is to determine what concentrations of ozone and of chlorine are physiologically detected. Ozonated and chlorinated waters were evaluated in all studies for both the addition of increased temperature and without it. Results indicate that ozone is less toxic than chlorine under the test conditions used. The lethal levels vary according to species of water quality measurements at Bergen Generating Station, New York are tabulated. (JBG)

  13. Performance of rotating drum biofilter for volatile organic compound removal at high organic loading rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chunping; CHEN Hong; ZENG Guangming; ZHU Xueqing; SUIDAN Makram T

    2008-01-01

    Uneven distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and biomass,and excess biomass accumulation in some biofilters hinder the application of biofiltration technology.An innovative multilayer rotating drum biofilter (RDB) was developed to correct these problems.The RDB was operated at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 30 s and a rotational rate of 1.0 r/rain.Diethyl ether was chosen as the model VOC.Performance of the RDB was evaluated at organic loading rates of 32.1,64.2,128,and 256 g ether/(m3·h) (16.06 g ether/(m3·h) ≈1.0 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/(m3·d)).The EBCT and organic loading rates were recorded on the basis of the medium volume.Results show that the ether removal efficiency decreased with an increased VOC loading rate.Ether removal efficiencies exceeding 99% were achieved without biomass control even at a high VOC loading rate of 128 g ether/(m3·h). However,when the VOC loading rate was increased to 256 g ether/(m3·h),the average removal efficiency dropped to 43%.Nutrient limitation possibly contributed to the drop in ether removal efficiency.High biomass accumulation rate was also observed in the medium at the two higher ether loading rates,and removal of the excess biomass in the media was necessary to maintain stable performance. This work showed that the RDB is effective in the removal of diethyl ether from waste gas streams even at high organic loading rates. The results might help establish criteria for designing and operating RDBs.

  14. Pollution characteristics and health risk assessment of volatile organic compounds emitted from different plastic solid waste recycling workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhigui; Li, Guiying; Chen, Jiangyao; Huang, Yong; An, Taicheng; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2015-04-01

    The pollution profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from different recycling workshops processing different types of plastic solid waste (PSW) and their health risks were investigated. A total of 64 VOCs including alkanes, alkenes, monoaromatics, oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), chlorinated VOCs (ClVOCs) and acrylonitrile during the melting extrusion procedure were identified and quantified. The highest concentration of total VOCs (TVOC) occurred in the poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene) (ABS) recycling workshop, followed by the polystyrene (PS), polypropylene (PP), polyamide (PA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE) and polycarbonate (PC) workshops. Monoaromatics were found as the major component emitted from the ABS and PS recycling workshops, while alkanes were mainly emitted from the PE and PP recycling processes, and OVOCs from the PVC and PA recycling workshops. According to the occupational exposure limits' (OEL) assessment, the workers suffered acute and chronic health risks in the ABS and PS recycling workshops. Meanwhile, it was found that most VOCs in the indoor microenvironments were originated from the melting extrusion process, while the highest TVOC concentration was observed in the PS rather than in the ABS recycling workshop. Non-cancer hazard indices (HIs) of all individual VOCs were recycling workshop was 1.9, posing an adverse chronic health threat. Lifetime cancer risk assessment suggested that the residents also suffered from definite cancer risk in the PS, PA, ABS and PVC recycling workshops.

  15. EMISSION RATES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM PAPER

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalho, Olivier; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; Egasse, Céline; Lattuati-Derieux, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    International audience Emissions of VOCs from model papers aged in closed tubes for various periods of time were quantified using an emission cell (FLEC) placed directly on the paper surface. This sampling technique is entirely non-invasive for the artefact. At the outlet of the cell, the VOCs were accumulated during24 h on two types of sorbent packings, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatised silica and Tenax TA. Carbonyl compounds collected on DNPH/silica cartridges were analysed b...

  16. Binary systems solubilities of inorganic and organic compounds, v.1 pt.2

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen, H

    2013-01-01

    Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds, Volume 1: Binary Systems, Part 1 is part of an approximately 5,500-page manual containing a selection from the International Chemical Literature on the Solubilities of Elements, Inorganic Compounds, Metallo-organic and Organic Compounds in Binary, Ternary and Multi-component Systems. A careful survey of the literature in all languages by a panel of scientists specially appointed for the task by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, Moscow, has made the compilation of this work possible. The complete English edition in five separately bound volumes w

  17. Prediction of Partition Coefficients of Organic Compounds for SPME/PDMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Hsuan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The partition coefficients of 51 organic compounds between SPME/PDMS and gas were compiled from the literature sources in this study. The effect of physicochemical properties and descriptors on the partitioning process of partition coefficients was explicated by the correlation analysis. The PDMS-gas partition coefficients were well correlated to the molecular weight of organic compounds (r = 0.832, p < 0.05. An empirical model, consisting of the molecular weight and the polarizability, was developed to appropriately predict the partition coefficients of organic compounds. The empirical model for estimating the PDMS-gas partition coefficient will contribute to the practical applications of the SPME technique.

  18. Chains, clusters, inclusion compounds, paramagnetic labels, and organic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zanello, P

    1994-01-01

    The role of stereochemistry to elucidate reaction patterns and physico-chemical properties in topical subjects ranging from inorganic to organic chemistry are treated in the fifth and final volume of this series. Detailed accounts are given to study: chaining in polyphosphates, electron-transfers in carbonyl clusters, inclusion of organometallic molecules in cyclodextrins, stereochemistry of paramagnetic metal complexes by labeling with nitroxyl radicals, stereocontrol in organic syntheses assisted by inorganic complexes.

  19. Acidic organic compounds in beverage, food, and feed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitmann, Hendrich; Fan, Rong; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Organic acids and their derivatives are frequently used in beverage, food, and feed production. Acidic additives may act as buffers to regulate acidity, antioxidants, preservatives, flavor enhancers, and sequestrants. Beneficial effects on animal health and growth performance have been observed when using acidic substances as feed additives. Organic acids could be classified in groups according to their chemical structure. Each group of organic acids has its own specific properties and is used for different applications. Organic acids with low molecular weight (e.g. acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid), which are part of the primary metabolism, are often produced by fermentation. Others are produced more economically by chemical synthesis based on petrochemical raw materials on an industrial scale (e.g. formic acid, propionic and benzoic acid). Biotechnology-based production is of interest due to legislation, consumer demand for natural ingredients, and increasing environmental awareness. In the United States, for example, biocatalytically produced esters for food applications can be labeled as "natural," whereas identical conventional acid catalyst-based molecules cannot. Natural esters command a price several times that of non-natural esters. Biotechnological routes need to be optimized regarding raw materials and yield, microorganisms, and recovery methods. New bioprocesses are being developed for organic acids, which are at this time commercially produced by chemical synthesis. Moreover, new organic acids that could be produced with biotechnological methods are under investigation for food applications. PMID:24275825

  20. Advantages and disadvantages of chemical oxidation and disinfection by ozone and chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiessinger, F.; Richard, Y.; Montiel, A.; Musquere, P.

    1981-04-01

    Ozone and chlorine dioxide present definite advantages and disadvantages over chlorination. Chlorination, particularly for the removal of ammonia and the maintenance of a disinfectant residual in the distribution system has decisive advantages and will be difficult to replace. Ozone and chlorine dioxide seem to produce fewer carcinogenic by-products but the risk for acute toxicity, especially from the chlorites which follow chlorine dioxide, is higher than with chlorine. Chlorine dioxide and more particularly ozone should be considered as useful complements to chlorination, but no strong oxidative treatment should be applied before most of the organic matter has been removed.

  1. Removal of organic nitrogen compounds in LCO reduce hydrodesulfurization severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, H.; Chen, J.; Ring, Z. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    This paper presented practical information for achieving ultra-low sulphur diesel fuel in response to the new rule that petroleum refineries in Canada and the United States will be required to reduce the sulphur content in diesel fuel from 500 ppm to 15 ppm in the very near future. Hydrotreating is the main process to reduce the sulphur content in diesel fuel. When the sulphur content is reduced from the current 500 ppm to 15 ppm, refractory sulphur compounds such as dibenzothiophenes (DBT, 4-MDBT and 4,6-DMDBT) will become key targets in the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) process. This study was conducted to examine the inhibition effect of nitrogen compounds on the hydrodesulphurization of dibenzothiophenes using 5 light cycle oil-derived feedstocks with varied nitrogen contents. The objective was to guide refineries in selecting the right feed or feed pre-treatment options for existing HDS units to achieve the required sulphur level at minimum cost. Experiments were performed under conditions close to industrial HDS processes. It was shown that reducing the nitrogen content from 744.9 mg/L to 16.5 mg/L greatly improved the HDS reactivity of 4-MDBT, 4,6-DMDBT, and to a lesser degree, that of DBT. The study also showed that the hydrodenitrogenation rate decreased as the nitrogen content in the feed increased, which may suggest self-inhibition of the nitrogen compounds. New catalysts are under development because commercialized Ni-Mo catalysts do not meet the ultra-low sulphur requirement without increasing HDS severity. The HDS results were analyzed using a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood type equation, assuming the inhibition only affected the hydrogenation pathway. Experimental data correlated well with predicted data. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  2. Chlorinated organic compound removal by gas phase pulsed streamer corona electrical discharge with reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and vinyl chloride removal by pulsed corona discharge was investigated with attention to energy efficiency and byproduct identification. Approximately, 50 to 95 percent removal of TCE and vinyl chloride was observed depending on the energy density applied to the gas. Water vapor had no significant effect on TCE removal. Evidence was found for post-corona reactions leading to removal of vinyl chloride downstream of the plasma discharge. Energy efficiencies of 100-900 g/kw-hr in the case of 1000 ppm feed of TCE and efficiencies of 2-24 g/kw-hr for a 100 ppm feed of vinyl chloride were found. In TCE experiments, the formation of dichloroacetyl chloride was observed, while chloro-ethane formation was found for vinyl chloride. In both cases, Cl- was measured downstream of the pulsed corona reactor in a water trap using an ion-selective electrode, although measured amounts varied widely due to condensation in the gas lines between the reactor and the water trap. The addition of a platinum-rhodium coated electrode was found only to reduce the downstream removal of vinyl chloride at low energy density. (author)

  3. EXTRACTION OF SEDIMENT-BOUND CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: IMPLICATIONS ON FATE AND HAZARD ASSESSMENT. (R825513C007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five methods were used for the extraction of hexachlorobutadiene and chlorobenzenes from a contaminated estuarine sediment. The following extraction methods were used: Soxhlet extraction, sonication and solvent extraction, sequential solvent extraction, saponification and solv...

  4. FATE OF VOLATILE CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN A LABORATORY CHAMBER WITH ALFALFA PLANTS. (R825549C034)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. FATE OF YOLATILE CHLORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN A LABORATORY CHAMBER WITH ALFALFA PLANTS. (R825549C062)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Toxic effects of chlorinated organic compounds and potassium dichromate on growth rate and photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Kresten Ole; Nyholm, Niels

    1992-01-01

    The toxic effects of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) on the photosynthesis of natural marine phytoplankton and five species of marine microalgae were investigated. Effect concentrations corresponding to a 50 % depression of photosynthesis (6h...... EC50) were found within relatively narrow ranges of 3.3–7.2 mg/l and 1.5–12 mg/l for DCA and DCP respectively, whereas the sensitivities towards K2Cr2O7 varied much more. The effects of DCA and DCP on the growth rate of some species were also investigated. EC50 values for DCP and DCA were found...

  7. Atmospheric chemistry of organic sulfur and nitrogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work carried out during the first year of a four year Danish-Irish contract with the European Economic Community is described. The reactions of OH radicals with dialkyl sulfides and nitroalkanes have been studied applying both an absolute technique of pulse radiolysis with kinetic spectroscopy and a relative rate method using conventional smog chamber facilities. The reactions of OH with dimethyl sulfide and nitromethane have been investigated in special detail. Rate constants for reaction of Cl atoms with the same compounds have been determing using the relative rate method. (author)

  8. Methodologies to assess the fate of polar organic compounds in aquatic environments

    OpenAIRE

    Magnér, Jörgen

    2010-01-01

    Polar organic compounds (POCs) are chemicals with polar functional groups in their structure. The functional groups make the compounds hydrophilic and less prone to partition with biota. However, the knowledge of their fate is limited due to difficulties associated with their measurements. Although, the persistence of POCs in the environment is generally low, they are considered to be semi-persistent compounds due to their continuous introduction to the environment via wastewater. Studies hav...

  9. Lignin Peroxidase Oxidation of Aromatic Compounds in Systems Containing Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Westlake, Donald W. S.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hy...

  10. AQUATIC PHOTOLYSIS OF OXY-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOETHITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Marvin C.

    1985-01-01

    Organic materials that will not absorb light at wavelengths longer than 295 nanometers (the solar wavelength cutoff) may nevertheless, undergo electron transfer reactions initiated by light. These reactions occur when the organic materials are adsorbed as ligand complexes to the surface of iron oxy-hydroxide (goethite). The adsorbed materials can be either inner or outer coordination sphere complexes. Goethite was chosen as the iron oxyhydroxide surface because it has the highest thermodynamic stability of any of the oxyhydroxides in water and it can be synthesized easily, with high purity.

  11. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Differential effects of organic compounds on cucumber damping-off and biocontrol activity of antagonistic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Ravnskov, Sabine; Guanlin, X.;

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the organic compounds tryptic soy broth, cellulose, glucose and chitosan on cucumber damping-off caused by Pythium aphanidermatum and biocontrol efficacy of the biocontrol agents (BCAs) Paenibacillus macerans and P. polymyxa were examined in a seedling emergence bioassay. Results...... showed that the organic compounds differentially affected both pathogen and BCAs. Tryptic soy broth, glucose and chitosan increased Pythium damping-off of cucumber, compared to the control treatment without organic compounds, whereas cellulose had no effect. Both Paenibacillus species had biocontrol...... effects against Pythium damping-off compared with the corresponding treatments with P. aphanidermatum alone, but the biocontrol efficacy depended on the type of organic compounds added. Both BCAs counteracted damping-off in treatments with TSB and chitosan. However, P. polymyxa counteracted damping...

  13. PREDICTION OF THE VAPOR PRESSURE, BOILING POINT, HEAT OF VAPORIZATION AND DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prototype computer program SPARC has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC solute-solute physical process models have been developed and tested...

  14. PATTERN RECOGNITION STUDIES OF HALOGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING CONDUCTING POLYMER SENSOR ARRAYS. (R825323)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct measurement of volatile and semivolatile halogenated organic compounds of environmental interest was carried out using arrays of conducting polymer sensors. Mathematical expressions of the sensor arrays using microscopic polymer network model is described. A classical, non...

  15. Plant-associated bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds in soil.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuinness, Martina

    2009-08-01

    A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

  16. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS INHIBIT HUMAN AND RAT NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN XENOPUS OOCYTES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript provides evidence to indicate that rats and humans are equally sensitive at the pharmacodynamic level to effects of volatile organic compounds.? This manuscript also presents novel data that provides a plausible mechanism, disruption of ion channel functi...

  17. HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

  18. Predicting partitioning of volatile organic compounds from air into plant cuticular matrix by quantum chemical descriptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on theoretical linear solvation energy relationship and quantum chemical descriptors computed by AM1 Hamiltonian, a new model is developed to predict the partitioning of some volatile organic compounds between the plant cuticular matrix and air.

  19. Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOC) at a remote tropical forest site in central Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessermeier, J.; Kuhn, U.; Wolf, A.; Andreae, P.; Ciccioli, P.; Brancaleoni, E.; Frattoni, M.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Guenther, J.; Greenberg, J.P.; Castro Vasconcellos, De P.; Tavares, T.; Artaxo, P.

    2000-01-01

    According to recent assessments, tropical woodlands contribute about half of all global natural non-methane volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Large uncertainties exist especially about fluxes of compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. During the Large-Scale Biosphere/Atmosphere Expe

  20. Organic compounds downstream from a treated-wastewater discharge near Dallas, Texas, March 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buszka, P.M.; Barber, L.B., II; Schroeder, M.P.; Becker, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water and streambed-sediment samples were collected on March 9 and 10,1987 from one site upstream and three sites downstream of the discharge from a municipal wastewater-treatment plant on Rowlett Creek near Dallas, Texas. To extract and separate organic compounds, purgeand-trap, closed-loop stripping, and pH-adjusted solvent extraction methods were used for water samples; and a Soxhlet-solvent extraction method was used for streambed sediment. These methods were combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify organic compounds in Rowlett Creek. Results from this study confirm the persistence of many organic compounds in water as far as 13.5 kilometers downstream of the wastewater discharge. These include: (1) the volatile organic compounds chloroform, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethene, and trichloroethene; (2) several linear alkylbenzene compounds, octyl phenol, and a tetramethylbutyl phenol isomer that are related to detergent use; (3) 9-phenyl-9H-carbazole, a compound related to coal tars and coal combustion residues; and (4) caffeine. The only compound present in water in concentrations greater than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels for drinking water was tetrachloroethene (6.0 micrograms per liter) in a sample collected 13.5 kilometers downstream from the waste water discharge. Compounds identified from the streambed-sediment samples include a xylene isomer at 7.7 kilometers downstream and chrysene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and a xylene isomer at 13.5 kilometers downstream from the wastewater discharge.

  1. 77 FR 14324 - National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings-Addition of Dimethyl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ...The EPA is proposing to amend the National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings final rule, which is a rule that establishes national reactivity-based emission standards for the aerosol coatings category (aerosol spray paints) under the Clean Air Act. This proposed action adds three compounds: dimethyl carbonate, benzotrifluoride, and hexamethyldisiloxane and their......

  2. Predicting soil water repellency using hydrophobic organic compounds and their vegetation origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, J.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Rietkerk, M.; Dekker, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that soil water repellency (SWR) is mainly caused by plant-derived hydrophobic organic compounds in soils; such hydrophobic compounds are defined as SWR markers. However, the detailed influence of SWR markers on SWR is yet unclear and the knowledge of their original sources is

  3. 75 FR 57412 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ...EPA is proposing to approve a revision to the Alabama State Implementation Plan (SIP) submitted by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) on March 3, 2010. The proposed revision would modify the definition of ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code section 335-3-1-.02(gggg). Specifically, the revision would add two compounds (propylene......

  4. 75 FR 57390 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Alabama: Volatile Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to approve a revision to the Alabama State Implementation Plan (SIP) submitted by the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) on March 3, 2010. The revision modifies the definition of ``volatile organic compounds'' (VOCs) found at Alabama Administrative Code (AAC) section 335-3- 1-.02(gggg). Specifically, the revision adds two compounds......

  5. 75 FR 8246 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Board, Article 8: Volatile Organic Compound Rules, Rule 2: Surface Coating Emission Limitations, Section... Compound Rules, Rule 2: Surface Coating Emission Limitations, Section 2: Automobile and light duty truck... the Internet and will be publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available...

  6. Application of Genetic Programming in Predicting Infinite Dilution Activity Coefficients of Organic Compounds in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Lin CAO; Huan Ying LI

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we calculated 37 structural descriptors of 174 organic compounds. The154 molecules were used to derive quantitative structure-infinite dilution activity coefficientrelationship by genetic programming, the other 20 compounds were used to test the model. Theresult showed that molecular partition property and three-dimensional structural descriptors havesignificant influence on the infinite dilution activity coefficients.

  7. Kinetics of aqueous chlorination of some pharmaceuticals and their elimination from water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan L; Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria

    2010-07-01

    Apparent rate constants for the reactions of four selected pharmaceutical compounds (metoprolol, naproxen, amoxicillin, and phenacetin) with chlorine in ultra-pure (UP) water were determined as a function of the pH. It was found that amoxicillin (in the whole pH range 3-12), and naproxen (in the low pH range 2-4) presented high reaction rates, while naproxen (in the pH range 5-9), and phenacetin and metoprolol (in the pH range 2.5-12 for phenacetin, and 3-10 for metoprolol) followed intermediate and slow reaction rates. A mechanism is proposed for the chlorination reaction, which allowed the evaluation of the intrinsic rate constants for the elementary reactions of the ionized and un-ionized species of each selected pharmaceutical with chlorine. An excellent agreement is obtained between experimental and calculated rate constants by this mechanism.The elimination of these substances in several waters (a groundwater, a surface water from a public reservoir, and two effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants) was also investigated at neutral pH. The efficiency of the chlorination process with respect to the pharmaceuticals elimination and the formation THMs was also established. It is generally observed that the increasing presence of organic and inorganic matter in the water matrices demand more oxidant agent (chlorine), and therefore, less chlorine is available for the oxidation of these compounds. Finally, half-life times and oxidant exposures (CT) required for the removal of 99% of the four pharmaceuticals are also evaluated. These parameters are useful for the establishment of safety chlorine doses in oxidation or disinfection stages of pharmaceuticals in treatment plants.

  8. Measurement of volatile organic compounds and total OH reactivity in the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Vinayak

    2007-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds play a critical role in ozone formation and drive the chemistry of the atmosphere, together with OH radicals. The simplest volatile organic compound methane is a climatologically important greenhouse gas, and plays a key role in regulating water vapour in the stratosphere and hydroxyl radicals in the troposphere. The OH radical is the most important atmospheric oxidant and knowledge of the atmospheric OH sink, together with the OH source and ambient OH concentration...

  9. Nature of Electronically Excited States of Organic Compounds and Processes of Nonradiative Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, G. V.; Plotnikov, V. G.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.

    2016-08-01

    Models of quantum-chemical calculation of rate constants for internal processes and intersystem crossing in polyatomic molecules are considered. The influence of the nature of electronically excited states in organic compounds is investigated. It is shown that the explicit allowance for the nature of wave functions of electronic states for estimation of electronic matrix elements of nonadiabaticity operators and spin-orbit interaction allows photophysical processes in organic compounds to be considered in detail.

  10. Volatile organic compounds from native potato-associated Pseudomonas as potential anti-oomycete agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Mout eDeVrieze; Piyush ePandey; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Adithi Ravikumar Varadarajan; Christian H Ahrens; Laure eWeisskopf; Aurélien eBailly

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC...

  11. Organic carbon compounds detected by the SAM instrument suite on Curiosity: results of the first year of exploration at Gale Crater (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Miller, K.; Glavin, D. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Martin, M. G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    from organic carbon compounds on Mars. Two of these were also identified by the GC-MS instruments on the 1976 Viking missions. Oxychlorine compounds, possibly hydrated Ca or Mg perchlorate, in Mars surface sediments appear to be the source of the chlorine as supported by laboratory experiments with perchlorate-doped olivine sand as a Mars-analog sediment. However the source of the carbon remains enigmatic. Laboratory experiments also show that C1 organics including methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid can yield chlorinated organic compounds when pyrolysed with perchlorate-doped olivine sand. Thus, along with methane, these are potential martian sources of the organic compounds identified by SAM. Ongoing laboratory analog studies and further SAM analyses of martian soils will allow us to discriminate between the possible sources of the chlorohydrocarbons identified so far. 1. Leshin, L. A., et al. (2013), Science, in press. 2. Glavin D.P. et al. (2013) JGR Planets, submitted.

  12. Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Na [Berkeley Analytical Associates, Richmond, CA (United States); Hodgson, Alfred [Berkeley Analytical Associates, Richmond, CA (United States); Offermann, Francis [Indoor Environmental Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States); Singer, Brett [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Continually changing materials used in home construction and finishing can introduce new chemicals or changes in the VOC profile in residential air and the trend towards tighter homes can lead to higher exposure concentrations for many indoor sources. However, the complex mixture of VOCs in residential air makes it difficult to discover emerging contaminants and/or trends in pollutant profiles. The purpose of this study is to prepare a comprehensive library of chemicals found in homes, along with a semi-quantitative approach to maximize the information gained from VOC measurements. We carefully reviewed data from 108 new California homes and identified 238 individual compounds. The majority of the identified VOCs originated indoors. Only 31% were found to have relevant health based exposure guidelines and less than 10% had a chronic reference exposure level (CREL). The finding highlights the importance of extending IAQ studies to include a wider range of VOCs

  13. Rapid changes of induced volatile organic compounds in Pinus massoniana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Qin; JIN Youju; HU Yongiian; CHEN Huajun; LI Zhenyu

    2007-01-01

    Using the thermal-desorption cold trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometer(TCT-GC-MS)technique,the composition and relative contents of volatile compounds were analyzed in undamaged(control),insect-damaged(ID)and artificially-damaged(AD)leaves ofPinus massoniana in field at different times and levels of damage.Results showed that although volatile substances were highly released earlier in AD leaves plants,they were significantly less abundant in AD than in ID leaves treatments.Also,the damage level considerably influenced the changes of induced volatile products from leaves.Compared with the control,the emission rate of camphene,β-pinene,phellandrene,caryophyllene and(E)farnesene was high after 1 h in 25%-40% ID-affected leaves,whereas that of tricyclene,myrcene,camphene,β-Pinene,phellandrene and caryophyllene reached its maximum after 24 h in 60%-75% D-affected leaves.In the same manner,some volatile compounds in the AD leaves treatment displayed their peaks just after 1 h,but others after 24 h.The AD and ID leaves at the damage level of 25%-40% did not exhibit an obvious regularity with time;however,in 60%- 75% AD leaves,peaks of volatile substances were attained after 1 or 2 h.Our results also showed that the relative content ofβ-pinene increased and was higher in damaged than control plants,β-pinene plays an important role in inducing the insect resistance of P.massoniana trees.

  14. Project Summary. IN-SITU AQUIFER RESTORATION OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATICS BY METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluated the potential of an innovative approach to aquifer restoration: enhanced in-situ biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic solvents by a bacterial community grown on methane under aerobic conditions. The target chlorinated compounds were trichloroethene (...

  15. Method for Spiking Soil Samples with Organic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Brinch, Ulla C.; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2002-01-01

    We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either the whole soil sample or 25% of the soil volume, which was subsequently mixed with 75% untreated soil. For dichloromethane, we included a third protocol, which involved application to 80% of the so...

  16. Evaluating the effects of granular and membrane filtrations on chlorine demand in drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Veeriah Jegatheesan; Seung Hyun Kim; C. K. Joo; GAO Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, chlorine decay experiments were conducted for the raw water from Nakdong river that is treated by Chilseo Water Treatment Plant (CWTP) situated in Haman, Korea as well as the effluents from sand and granular activated carbon (GAC) filters of CWTP and fitted using a chlorine decay model. The model estimated the fast and slow reacting nitrogenous as well as organic/inorganic compounds that were present in the water. It was found that the chlorine demand due to fast and slow reacting (FRA and SRA) organic/inorganic substances was not reduced significantly by sand as well as GAC filters. However, the treated effluents from those filters contained FRA and SRA that are less reactive and had small reaction rate constants. For the effluents from microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and nanofiltration the chlorine demand due to FRA and SRA were further reduced but the reaction rate constants were larger compared to those of sand and GAC filter effluents. This has implications in the formation of disinfection by products (DBPs). If DBPs are assumed to form due to the interactions between chlorine and SRA, then it is possible that the DBP formation potential in the effluents from membrane filtrations could be higher than that in the effluents from granular media filters.

  17. Analysis Of Names Of Organic Chemical Compounds By Using Parser Combinators And The Generative Lexicon Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio de Souza Dias

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes OCLAS (Organic Chemistry Language Ambiguity Solver, an automatic system to analyze syntactically and semantically Organic Chemistry compound names and to generate the pictures of their chemical structures. If both parses detect that the input name corresponds to a theoreticallypossible organic chemical compound, the system generates its molecular structure picture, whether or not the name respects the current official nomenclature. This capacity of treating even names which, in spite of do not respect the constraints of the official nomenclatures, correspond to theoretically possible organic compound, represents an advance of OCLAS compared to other existing systems. OCLAS counts on the following tools: Generative Lexicon Theory (GLT, Parser Combinators and the Language Clean and an extension of the Xymtec package of Latex. The implemented system represents a helpful and friendly utilitarian as an automatic Organic Chemistry instructor.

  18. Analysis Of Names Of Organic Chemical Compounds By Using Parser Combinators And The Generative Lexicon Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio de Souza Dias

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes OCLAS (Organic Chemistry Language Ambiguity Solver, an automatic system to analyze syntactically and semantically Organic Chemistry compound names and to generate the pictures of their chemical structures. If both parses detect that the input name corresponds to a theoretically possible organic chemical compound, the system generates its molecular structure picture, whether or not the name respects the current official nomenclature. This capacity of treating even names which, in spite of do not respect the constraints of the official nomenclatures, correspond to theoretically possible organic compound, represents an advance of OCLAS compared to other existing systems. OCLAS counts on the following tools: Generative Lexicon Theory (GLT, Parser Combinators and the Language Clean and an extension of the Xymtec package of Latex. The implemented system represents a helpful and friendly utilitarian as an automatic Organic Chemistry instructor.

  19. Bioactivity of volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas tolaasii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eLo Cantore

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas tolaasii is the main bacterial pathogen of several mushroom species. In this paper we report that strains of P. tolaasii produce volatile substances inducing in vitro mycelia growth inhibition of Pleurotus ostreatus and P. eryngii, and Agaricus bisporus and P. ostreatus basidiome tissue blocks brown discoloration. P. tolaasii strains produced the volatile ammonia but not hydrogen cyanide. Among the volatiles detected by GC-MS, methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-undecene were identified. The latter, when assayed individually as pure compounds, led to similar effects noticed when P. tolaasii volatiles natural blend was used on mushrooms mycelia and basidiome tissue blocks. Furthermore, the natural volatile mixture, resulted toxic toward lettuce and broccoli seedling growth. In contrast, pure volatiles showed different activity according to their nature and/or doses applied. Indeed, methanethiol resulted toxic at all the doses used, while dimethyl disulfide toxicity was assessed till a quantity of 1.25 µg, below which it caused, together with 1-undecene ( 10 µg, broccoli growth increase.

  20. Structural Characterization and Toxicity Prediction of Some Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Li-Mia; LI Jian-Feng; WANG Bi

    2011-01-01

    A new molecular structural characterization(MSC)method called molecular vertexes correlative index(MVCI)was constructed in this paper.The index was used to describe the structures of 45 compounds and a quantitative structure-activity relationship(QSAR)model of toxicity(–lgEC50)was obtained through multiple linear regression(MLR)and stepwise multiple regression(SMR).The correlation coefficient(R)of the model was 0.912,and the standard deviation(SD)of the model was 0.525.The estimation stability and prediction ability of the model were strictly analyzed by both internal and external validations.The Leave-One-Out(LOO)Cross-Validation(CV)correlation coefficient(RCV)was 0.816 and the standard deviation(SDCV)was 0.739,respectively.For the external validation,the correlation coefficient(Rtest)was 0.905 and the standard deviation(SDtest)was 0.520,respectively.The results showed that the index was superior in molecular structural representation.The stability and predictability of the model were good.

  1. Remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with membrane separation techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Membrane separation, a new technology for removing VOCs including pervaporation, vapor permeation, membrane contactor, and membrane bioreactor was presented. Comparing with traditional techniques, these special techniques are an efficient and energy-saving technology. Vapor permeation can be applied to recovery of organic solvents from exhaust streams. Membrane contactor could be used for removing or recovering VOCs from air or wastewater. Pervaporation and vapor permeation are viable methods for removing VOCs from wastewater to yield a VOC concentrate which could either be destroyed by conventional means, or be recycled for reuse.

  2. Detecting and Eliminating Interfering Organic Compounds in Waters Analyzed for Isotopic Composition by Crds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, B. A.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rella, C.

    2010-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy based CRDS technology for isotopic analysis of δD and δ18O directly from liquid water has greatly increased the number and type of liquid samples analyzed. This increase has also revealed a previously unrecognized sample contamination problem. Recently West[1] and Brand[2] identified samples containing ethanol, methanol, plant extracts and other organic compounds analyzed by CRDS and other spectroscopy based techniques as yielding erroneous results for δD and δ18O (especially δD) due to spectroscopic interference. Not all organic compounds generate interference. Thus, identifying which samples are contaminated by which organic compounds is of key importance for data credibility and correction. To address this problem a new approach in the form of a software suite, ChemCorrect™, has been developed. A chemometrics component uses a spectral library of water isotopologues and interfering organic compounds to best fit the measured spectra. The best fit values provide a quantitative assay of the actual concentrations of the various species and are then evaluated to generate a visual flag indicating samples affected by organic contamination. Laboratory testing of samples spiked with known quantities of interfering organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and terpenes was performed. The software correctly flagged and identified type of contamination for all the spiked samples without any false positives. Furthermore the reported values were a linear function of actual concentration with an R^2>0.99 even for samples which contained multiple organic compounds. Further testing was carried out against a range of industrial chemical compounds which can contaminate ground water as well as a variety of plant derived waters and juices which were also analyzed by IRMS. The excellent results obtained give good insight into which organic compounds cause interference and which classes of plants are likely to contain interfering compounds. Finally

  3. Removal of volatile organic compounds using amphiphilic cyclodextrin-coated polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumholdt, Ludmilla; Fourmentin, Sophie; Nielsen, Thorbjørn T; Larsen, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    Polypropylene nonwovens were functionalised using a self-assembled, amphiphilic cyclodextrin coating and the potential for water purification by removal of pollutants was studied. As benzene is one of the problematic compounds in the Water Framework Directive, six volatile organic compounds (benzene and five benzene-based substances) were chosen as model compounds. The compounds were tested as a mixture in order to provide a more realistic situation since the wastewater will be a complex mixture containing multiple pollutants. The volatile organic compounds are known to form stable inclusion complexes with cyclodextrins. Six different amphiphilic cyclodextrin derivatives were synthesised in order to elucidate whether or not the uptake abilities of the coating depend on the structure of the derivative. Headspace gas chromatography was used for quantification of the uptake exploiting the volatile nature of benzene and its derivatives. The capacity was shown to increase beyond the expected stoichiometries of guest-host complexes with ratios of up to 16:1. PMID:25550739

  4. Assessment of synthetic organic compounds, and endocrinology and histology of carp in Lake Mead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevans, H.; Goodbred, S.; Miesner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This study investigated the presence and biologic effects of synthetic organic compounds transported by Las Vegas Wash to Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Water, bottom sediment, and carp (Cyprinus carpio) were analyzed for synthetic organic compounds. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used to sample the water column. Blood samples were collected from Carp for analysis of sex steroid hormones and vitellogenin. Samples of external abnormalities and organs (liver, gill, kidney, small intestine, and gonad) were collected for histologic analysis. Compounds known to affect endocrine systems (PAHs, phthalate esters, PCBs, dioxins and furans) were detected in SPMD, bottom-sediment, and/or carp samples. The number and concentrations of compounds generally were greater in samples from Las Vegas Wash and Bay, than in samples from Callville Bay, a reference site in Lake Mead. High levels of PAHs detected in SPMDs from Callville Bay could indicate the existence of contaminant sources other than Las Vegas Wash.

  5. Lignin peroxidase oxidation of aromatic compounds in systems containing organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Duhalt, R; Westlake, D W; Fedorak, P M

    1994-02-01

    Lignin peroxidase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was used to study the oxidation of aromatic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds, that are models of moieties of asphaltene molecules. The oxidations were done in systems containing water-miscible organic solvents, including methanol, isopropanol, N, N-dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, and tetrahydrofuran. Of the 20 aromatic compounds tested, 9 were oxidized by lignin peroxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These included anthracene, 1-, 2-, and 9-methylanthracenes, acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, carbazole, and dibenzothiophene. Of the compounds studied, lignin peroxidase was able to oxidize those with ionization potentials of stability characteristics of lignin peroxidase were determined by using pyrene as the substrate in systems containing different amounts of organic solvent. Benzyl alkylation of lignin peroxidase improved its activity in a system containing water-miscible organic solvent but did not increase its resistance to inactivation at high solvent concentrations. PMID:16349176

  6. HS-SPME analysis of volatile organic compounds of coniferous needle litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidorov, V. A.; Vinogorova, V. T.; Rafałowski, K.

    The composition of volatile emission of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) and spruce ( Picea exelsa) litter was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and samples were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method. The list of identified compounds includes over 60 organic substances of different classes. It was established that volatile emission contain not only components of essential oils of pine and spruce needles but also a large number of organic compounds which are probably secondary metabolites of litter-decomposing fungi. They include lower carbonyl compounds and alcohols as well as products of terpene dehydration and oxidation. These data show that the processes of litter decomposition are an important source of reactive organic compounds under canopy of coniferous forests.

  7. Indoor/outdoor connections exemplified by processes that depend on an organic compound's saturation vapor pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    , sorbs on surfaces, sorbs on particles collected on a filter or activates trigeminal nerve receptors. It also defines a new equilibrium coefficient for the partitioning of organic compounds between an airstream and particles collected by a filter in that airstream. Gas/particle partitioning has been...... studied extensively outdoors, but sparingly indoors. Gas/surface partitioning occurs primarily indoors while gas/filter partitioning occurs at the interface between outdoors and indoors. Activation of trigeminal nerve receptors occurs at the human interface. The logarithm of an organic compound......'s saturation vapor pressure correlates in a linear fashion with the logarithms of equilibrium coefficients characteristic of each of these four phenomena. Since, to a rough approximation, the log of an organic compound's vapor pressure scales with its molecular weight, molecular weight can be used to make...

  8. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  9. Cooperative water-SOM interactions derived from the organic compound effect on SOM hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisover, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of water molecules with soil organic matter (SOM) may affect the ability of SOM to participate in multiple physical, chemical and biological processes. Specifically, water-SOM interactions may have a profound effect on interactions of organic compounds with SOM which is often considered as a major natural sorbent controlling the environmental fate of organic pollutants in the soil environment. Quantification of water - SOM interactions may be carried out by using water vapor sorption isotherms. However, water sorption isotherms providing macroscopic thermodynamic data do not allow examining water-SOM interactions on a microenvironment scale. The examination of water-SOM interactions in a local SOM environment may be carried out by determining the response of the SOM hydration to sorption of probe organic compounds. Recently, the model-free approach was proposed which allows quantifying effects of sorbing organic molecules on water - SOM interactions, by using relatively more available data on the effect of water activity on organic compound - SOM interactions. Therefore, this thermodynamic approach was applied to the experimental data describing sorption of organic compounds by SOM, both from the vapor and liquid phases, at various water activities. Hence, the response of water interactions with the model SOM materials such as a humic acid and an organic matter-rich peat soil to the presence of various organic sorbates was evaluated. Depending on a molecular structure of organic sorbates probing various molecular environments in SOM, the SOM-bound water may be driven in or out of the SOM sorbents. Organic compounds containing the atoms of oxygen, nitrogen or sulfur and preferring a relatively "polar" SOM microenvironment demonstrate the distinct enhancing effect on water-SOM interactions. In contrast, the "low-polarity" organic compounds, e.g., hydrocarbons or their halogen-substituted derivatives, produce a weakening effect on water-SOM interactions

  10. New Conditions for Intercalation of Organic Compounds into Semiconductor Nanomaterial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.A.El-Meligi

    2009-01-01

    The intercalation of organic guests, 2-methyl pyridine (2-picoline) and 3-methyl pyridine (3-picoline) into semiconductor layered nanomaterial (MnPS3) was investigated. New conditions were applied. New phases appeared and lattice expansions were 0.36 nm for 2-picoline intercalation and 0.728 nm for 3-picoline intercalation. The XRD (X- ray diffraction) patterns exhibit sharp hkl reflections confirming that the material is highly crystalline. The interlayer gap (0.64 nm) of the host plays a role for the arrangement of the guest in the interlayer region. The crystal structure of the MnPS3 was indexed in the monoclinic system before intercalation. After intercalation, the crystal system was indexed in the trigonal unit cell. The lattice parameters were obtained and c-axis value was related to the (001) reflections.

  11. Remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of groundwater by volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) is widespread at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. This problem is also encountered at other Federal sites listed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priority List (NPL), and private sector sites. These sites represent a variety of geologic, geophysical, climatic, and water-quality conditions. Since DOE sites are scattered across the country, dissimilarity in climatic conditions, such as aridity, becomes significant. The remediation of these sites by conventional pump-and-treat techniques based on extraction of contaminants through vertical wells or boreholes, is a costly and time consuming process. Although a number of technologies for remediation of subsurface contamination are available, it was found that more efficient and cost-effective technologies are needed to address the widespread problem of contamination of groundwater by VOCs. (author)

  12. Method for spiking soil samples with organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Ulla C; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2002-01-01

    We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either...... the whole soil sample or 25% of the soil volume, which was subsequently mixed with 75% untreated soil. For dichloromethane, we included a third protocol, which involved application to 80% of the soil volume with or without phenanthrene and introduction of Pseudomonas fluorescens VKI171 SJ132 genetically...... tagged with luxAB::Tn5. For both solvents, application to the whole sample resulted in severe side effects on both indigenous protozoa and bacteria. Application of dichloromethane to the whole soil volume immediately reduced the number of protozoa to below the detection limit. In one of the soils...

  13. From energy-rich phosphate compounds to warfare agents: A review on the chemistry of organic phosphate compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Albino Giusti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry of the phosphorus-oxygen bond is widely used in biological systems in many processes, such as energy transduction and the storage, transmission and expression of genetic information, which are essential to living beings in relation to a wide variety of functions. Compounds containing this bond have been designed for many purposes, ranging from agricultural defense systems, in order to increase food production, to nerve agents, for complaining use in warfare. In this review, features related to the chemistry of organic phosphate compounds are discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of phosphate compounds in biochemical events and in nerve agents. To this aim, the energy-rich phosphate compounds are focused, particularly the mode of their use as energy currency in cells. Historical and recent studies carried out by research groups have tried to elucidate the mechanism of action of enzymes responsible for energy transduction through the use of biochemical studies, enzyme models, and artificial enzymes. Finally, recent studies on the detoxification of nerve agents based on phosphorous esters are presented, and on the utilization of chromogenic and fluorogenic chemosensors for the detection of these phosphate species.

  14. N-doping of organic semiconductors by bis-metallosandwich compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephen; Qi, Yabing; Kahn, Antoine; Marder, Seth; Kim, Sang Bok; Mohapatra, Swagat K.; Guo, Song

    2016-01-05

    The various inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to the field of methods for n-doping organic semiconductors with certain bis-metallosandwich compounds, the doped compositions produced, and the uses of the doped compositions in organic electronic devices. Metals can be manganese, rhenium, iron, ruthenium, osmium, rhodium, or iridium. Stable and efficient doping can be achieved.

  15. 40 CFR 60.112a - Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds (VOC). 60.112a Section 60.112a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Commenced After May 18, 1978, and Prior to July 23, 1984 § 60.112a Standard for volatile organic...

  16. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  17. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds without H2 Supply: An Electrochemical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Navarro, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    An experiment developed for an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course that can be used to introduce the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, catalysis electrochemical principles and gas chromatography is presented. The organic compounds hydrogenated by the electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) process were styrene, benzaldehyde and…

  18. Extraction of interesting organic compounds from olive oil waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez, Ana

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In the olive fruits there is a large amount of bioactive compounds and substances of high interest. Many of them are known by owing health beneficial properties that contribute to protective effect of the virgin olive oil. During olive oil processing, most of them remain in the olive oil wastes. Although, olive-mill wastewater (OMWW or “alpechin”, olive oil cake (OOC, and the new by-product, known as “alperujo” in Spain and generated by the two-phase extraction process, represent a major disposal and potentially severe pollution problem for the industry, they are also promising source of substances of high value. This review summarises the last knowledge on the utilisation of residual products, with more than 90 references including articles and patents, which are promising with regard to future application. All these investigations have been classified into two options, the recovery of valuable natural constituents and the bioconversion into useful products.Existe una gran cantidad de compuestos bioactivos y de alto interés presentes en la aceituna. Muchos de ellos se conocen por las cualidades beneficiosas que aportan al aceite de oliva virgen. La mayoría permanecen en mayor cantidad en el subproducto de la extracción del aceite. Aunque, el alpechín, el orujo y el nuevo subproducto de extracción del aceite en dos fases, alperujo, representan un problema potencial de vertido y contaminación, también son una prometedora fuente de compuestos de alto valor. Esta revisión resume lo último que se conoce sobre la utilización de estos residuos en el campo anteriormente mencionado, con más de 90 referencias que incluyen artículos y patentes. Todas estas investigaciones han sido clasificadas en cuanto a la recuperación de constituyentes naturalmente presentes o en cuanto a la bioconversión de los residuos en sustancias de interés.

  19. Technology assessment: Chlorine chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorine is not just one of many chemical feedstocks which is used in a few definitely harmful products like PVC or CFC but is irrelevant in all other respects. Just the opposite is true: There is hardly any product line of the chemical industry that can do without chlorine, from herbicides and pesticides to dyes, plastics, pharmaceuticals, photographic atricles, and cosmetics. Chlorine is not only a key element of chemical production but also an ubiquitous element of everyday life in civilisation. There are even many who would agree that the volume of chlorine production is an indicator of the competitive strength and national wealth of a modern society. By now, however, it has become evident that the unreflected use of chlorine is no longer ecologically acceptable. The consequences of a chlorine phase-out as compared to the continued chlorine production at the present level were investigated scientifically by a PROGNOS team. They are presented in this book. (orig.)

  20. The role of organic compounds of a river with respect to radioactive pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants discharge a limited amount of radioelements in rivers with their effluents. These radionuclides can combine with organic compounds contained in water and contaminate sediments. Organic compounds are approximately the sames in water and sediments of the Rhone river. Complexation of an element and organic substances of molecular mass above 700 is fonction of its position in the periodic classification of atoms. Results can be extrapolated to chemical pollution. Results concerning water-sediments interactions can be extrapolated to other rivers although composition and distribution of constituents are not identical

  1. Production and distribution of chlorination by-products in the cooling water system of a coastal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing chlorination as antifouling agent in cooling water circuits of coastal power plants can lead to the production of chlorination by-products (CBP), mainly due to chlorine's reactions with the organic compounds present in natural seawater. Important among the by products are trihalomethane, haloacetonitriles, halo acetic acids, halo phenols etc., with trihalomethanes (THM) generally being the predominant compounds. The THM species that are commonly observed are chloroform, mono bromodichloromethane, dibromochloro-methane and bromoform. The present work was carried out to understand the production and distribution of chlorination by products (mainly trihalomethanes) in the cooling water systems of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Field studies were carried out in which samples collected from the intake, forebay pump house, out fall point and mixing point were analysed for THM using gas chromatograph with electron capture detector. The results showed that bromoform was the dominant THM formed as a result of chlorination, followed by dibromochloromethane. Mono bromodichloromethane and chloroform were not observed in seawater throughout the study period. Moreover, no THM could be detected at the intake point. The total THM values at other stations ranged between 25-250 μgL-1, the highest values were observed at the process seawater pump outlet and the lowest at the mixing point. The concentrations of CBP's formed were found to be related to the chlorine residuals measured. In addition, laboratory experiments were carried out to understand CBP formation as a function of chlorine dose and contact time. Chlorine doses ranging from 1 to 10 mgL-1 were added to unfiltered seawater and the various THMs formed were analysed after different time intervals. The results confirmed that bromoform was the dominant THM species, followed by dibromochloromethane, as observed in the field studies. As the chlorine doses increased, the other THMs, namely, mono

  2. Chemical behavior of organic compounds in the interface ofwater/dual-cation organobentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of polar or ionizable organiccompounds, such as p-nitrophenol, phenol and aniline, in thewater/organobentonite systems is investigated. Both adsorption andpartition occur to the sorption of organic compounds to dual-cationorganobentonites. The separate contributions of adsorption andpartition to the total sorption of organic compounds to dual-cationorganobentonites are analyzed mathematically in the first time. The factors to the contributions are also discussed. The results indicated that the contribution of adsorption and partition is related to the composition and ratio of dual-cation surfactants exchanging onto the bentonite. The sorption of organic compounds to dual-cation organobentonite is dominated by adsorption at low concentrations and by partition at high concentrations, making the organobentonites powerful sorbents for organic contaminants over wide range of concentrations.

  3. Photosynthesis of organic compounds in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Chen, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    An efficient conversion of CH4 to hydrocarbons and HCN takes place when NH3 is photolysed in the presence of CH4, H2, and He using a 184.9 nm light source. The extent of NH3 decomposition after a 1 hr exposure was determined spectrophotometrically; CH4, N2, and C2 and C3 hydrocarbons were detected and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Photolysis of one molar equivalent of NH3 results in the loss of 0.84 molar equivalent of CH4, which apparently reacts with hot hydrogen atoms produced by photolysis. The 8% of the NH3 which is not converted to N2 probably is converted to organic amines and nitrile derivatives. The results indicate that NH3 photolysis is a highly probable mechanism for the conversion of methane to more complex hydrocarbons in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, and predict the occurrence of HCN, NH2NH2, and higher hydrocarbons in the Jovian atmosphere above the NH3 clouds.

  4. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  5. Sorption interactions of organic compounds with soils affected by agricultural olive mill wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Yonatan; Borisover, Mikhail; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda

    2015-11-01

    The organic compound-soil interactions may be strongly influenced by changes in soil organic matter (OM) which affects the environmental fate of multiple organic pollutants. The soil OM changes may be caused by land disposal of various OM-containing wastes. One unique type of OM-rich waste is olive mill-related wastewater (OMW) characterized by high levels of OM, the presence of fatty aliphatics and polyphenolic aromatics. The systematic data on effects of the land-applied OMW on organic compound-soil interactions is lacking. Therefore, aqueous sorption of simazine and diuron, two herbicides, was examined in batch experiments onto three soils, including untreated and OMW-affected samples. Typically, the organic compound-soil interactions increased following the prior land application of OMW. This increase is associated with the changes in sorption mechanisms and cannot be attributed solely to the increase in soil organic carbon content. A novel observation is that the OMW application changes the soil-sorbent matrix in such a way that the solute uptake may become cooperative or the existing ability of a soil sorbent to cooperatively sorb organic molecules from water may become characterized by a larger affinity. The remarkable finding of this study was that in some cases a cooperative uptake of organic molecules by soils makes itself evident in distinct sigmoidal sorption isotherms rarely observed in soil sorption of non-ionized organic compounds; the cooperative herbicide-soil interactions may be characterized by the Hill model coefficients. However, no single trend was found for the effect of applied OMW on the mechanisms of organic compound-soil interactions. PMID:26183941

  6. Simultaneous removal of metals and organic compounds from a heavily polluted soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpyrkowicz, L. [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy)]. E-mail: lidia@unive.it; Radaelli, M. [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Bertini, S. [University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Daniele, S. [University of Venice, Department of Physical Chemistry, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Casarin, F. [Via S. Trentin 5A, 30171 Mestre-Venice (Italy)

    2007-02-25

    The paper describes the results of treatment of soil samples, deriving from a dismissed industrial site, contaminated with several metals: Hg, Ni, Co, Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, As and organic substances. The soil was subjected to remediation based on a process in which an oxidising leaching agent was produced electrochemically in-line in an undivided electrochemical cell reactor equipped with a Ti/Pt-Ir anode and a stainless steel cathode. Leaching of the soil samples was performed under dynamic conditions using a leaching column. A subsequent regeneration of the leaching solution, which consisted in electrodeposition of metals and electro-oxidation of organic substances, was carried out in a packed-bed reactor equipped with a centrally positioned graphite rod, serving as an anode, and stainless steel three-dimensional filling as a cathode. The study was focused on how and to which extent the metals present in the soil, as organic complexes, can be solubilised and how the process rates are impacted by the solution pH and other process variables. Data obtained under non-oxidising conditions, typically adopted for leaching of metals, are compared with the performance of chlorine-enriched leaching solutions. The results obtained under various conditions are also discussed in terms of the total organic carbon (TOC) removal from the water phase.

  7. Sulfate Minerals: A Problem for the Detection of Organic Compounds on Mars?

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, James M.T.; Watson, Jonathan S.; Najorka, Jens; Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for in situ organic matter on Mars involves encounters with minerals and requires an understanding of their influence on lander and rover experiments. Inorganic host materials can be helpful by aiding the preservation of organic compounds or unhelpful by causing the destruction of organic matter during thermal extraction steps. Perchlorates are recognized as confounding minerals for thermal degradation studies. On heating, perchlorates can decompose to produce oxygen, whic...

  8. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is considerable interest in the ''unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ''unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the 218PoO2+ ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the 218PoO2+ ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the 218PoO2+ ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos)

  9. Ozone depletion and chlorine loading potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John A.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Solomon, Susan; Zvenigorodsky, Sergei; Connell, Peter; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Fisher, Donald A.; Stordal, Frode; Weisenstein, Debra

    1991-01-01

    The recognition of the roles of chlorine and bromine compounds in ozone depletion has led to the regulation or their source gases. Some source gases are expected to be more damaging to the ozone layer than others, so that scientific guidance regarding their relative impacts is needed for regulatory purposes. Parameters used for this purpose include the steady-state and time-dependent chlorine loading potential (CLP) and the ozone depletion potential (ODP). Chlorine loading potentials depend upon the estimated value and accuracy of atmospheric lifetimes and are subject to significant (approximately 20-50 percent) uncertainties for many gases. Ozone depletion potentials depend on the same factors, as well as the evaluation of the release of reactive chlorine and bromine from each source gas and corresponding ozone destruction within the stratosphere.

  10. Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Paul R.; Coleman, Sabre J.; Reynolds, John G.

    2006-12-12

    Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

  11. Significance of investigating allelopathic interactions of marine organisms in the discovery and development of cytotoxic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anshika; Thakur, Narsinh L

    2016-01-01

    Marine sessile organisms often inhabit rocky substrata, which are crowded by other sessile organisms. They acquire living space via growth interactions and/or by allelopathy. They are known to secrete toxic compounds having multiple roles. These compounds have been explored for their possible applications in cancer chemotherapy, because of their ability to kill rapidly dividing cells of competitor organisms. As compared to the therapeutic applications of these compounds, their possible ecological role in competition for space has received little attention. To select the potential candidate organisms for the isolation of lead cytotoxic molecules, it is important to understand their chemical ecology with special emphasis on their allelopathic interactions with their competitors. Knowledge of the ecological role of allelopathic compounds will contribute significantly to an understanding of their natural variability and help us to plan effective and sustainable wild harvests to obtain novel cytotoxic chemicals. This review highlights the significance of studying allelopathic interactions of marine invertebrates in the discovery of cytotoxic compounds, by selecting sponge as a model organism. PMID:26362501

  12. Negative effect of dissolved organic compounds on settling behavior of synthetic monominerals in red mud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梦; 胡慧萍; 刘锦伟; 陈启元

    2016-01-01

    Hydration grossular and hematite monominerals were synthesized. The effects of dissolved organic compounds (including sodium formate, sodium acetate, sodium oxalate, sodium salicylate or disodium phthalate) on the settling performance of hydration grossular or hematite slurries were studied. The settling of the slurries was also investigated with the addition of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) or hydroxamated polyacrylamide flocculant (HCPAM). The adsorption mechanism of organic compounds on monominerals surfaces was studied by FT-IR and XPS, respectively. A deterioration in settling is observed in order of disodium phthalate>sodium salicylate>sodium oxalate>sodium formate (or sodium acetate). Moreover, PAAS can efficiently eliminate the negative effects of organic compounds on the settling performance of the hydration grossular slurry. HCPAM can efficiently eliminate the negative effects of sodium formate, sodium acetate and sodium oxalate on the settling performance of the hematite slurry, but it only partially improves the settling performance of hematite slurry containing sodium salicylate or disodium phthalate. FT-IR and XPS results show that organic compounds are physically adsorbed on hydration grossular surface, and chemisorptions of organic compounds occur on hematite surface with a bidentate chelating complex.

  13. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  14. Volatile Halogenated Organic Compounds Released to Seawater from Temperate Marine Macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, Philip M.; Macfarlane, John K.; Newman, Kathleen A.

    1985-03-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds synthesized by various industrial processes are troublesome pollutants because they are persistent in terrestrial ecosystems and because they may be present in sufficient quantities to alter the natural atmospheric cycles of the halogens. Certain of these compounds, including polybromomethanes and several previously unobserved alkyl monohalides and dihalides, appear to be natural products of the marine environment. A variety of temperate marine macroalgae (the brown algae Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosis, the green algae Enteromorpha linza and Ulva lacta, and the red alga Gigartina stellata) not only contain volatile halogenated organic compounds but also release them to seawater at rates of nanograms to micrograms of each compound per gram of dry algae per day. The macroalgae may be an important source of bromine-containing material released to the atmosphere.

  15. Neural Network Based on Quantum Chemistry for Predicting Melting Point of Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan A. Lazzús

    2009-01-01

    The melting points of organic compounds were estimated using a combined method that includes a backpropagation neural network and quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) parameters in quantum chemistry. Eleven descriptors that reflect the intermolec-ular forces and molecular symmetry were used as input variables. QSPR parameters were calculated using molecular modeling and PM3 semi-empirical molecular orbital theories. A total of 260 compounds were used to train the network, which was developed using MatLab. Then, the melting points of 73 other compounds were predicted and results were compared to experimental data from the literature. The study shows that the chosen artificial neural network and the quantitative structure property relationships method present an excellent alternative for the estimation of the melting point of an organic compound, with average absolute deviation of 5%.

  16. Influence of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Character on the Distribution of Chlorinated and Chloraminated Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) at Rand Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Savia S.; Ncube, Esper J.; Haarhoff, Johannes; Msagati, Titus AM; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Nkambule, Thabo I.

    2016-04-01

    Certain disinfection by-products (DBPs) are likely human carcinogens or present mutagenic effects while many DBPs are unidentified. Considering the possibility of DBPs being harmful to human health and the fact that trihalomethanes (THMs) are the only regulated DBP in the South African National Standard (SANS:241) for drinking water, special interest in the precursors to these DBPs' formation is created. It is essential to understand the reactivity and character of the precursors responsible for the formation of DBPs in order to enhance precursor removal strategies during the treatment of drinking water. In this study the character of NOM within surface water and the subsequent distribution of THMs formed in the drinking water from Rand Waters' full scale treatment plant were investigated. Molecular size distribution (MSD) of NOM within the surface water was determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and UV254 measurements formed part of the NOM character study as they provide an indication of the aromaticity of organic matter. The four THMs; bromoform, chloroform, dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM)were measured by gas chromatography. The sum of these four THMs was expressed as total trihalomethane (TTHM). On average the chloroform constituted 76.2% of the total TTHM, BDCM 22.5% while DBCM and bromoform measured below the detection limit. THM speciation after chlorination and chloramination concentrations increased in the sequence bromoform water in summer when high temperatures and rainfall occurred. The results displayed are an indication that aromatic NOM were the main precursor to TTHM formation, more prominently during summer. Keywords: disinfection by-products, molecular size distribution, natural organic matter, UV254

  17. Organic compounds in produced waters from coalbed natural gas wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orem, W.H.; Tatu, C.A.; Lerch, H.E.; Rice, C.A.; Bartos, T.T.; Bates, A.L.; Tewalt, S.; Corum, M.D. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The organic composition of produced water samples from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells in the Powder River Basin, WY, sampled in 2001 and 2002 are reported as part of a larger study of the potential health and environmental effects of organic compounds derived from coal. The quality of CBNG produced waters is a potential environmental concern and disposal problem for CBNG producers, and no previous studies of organic compounds in CBNG produced water have been published. Organic compounds identified in the produced water samples included: phenols, biphenyls, N-, O-, and S-containing heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic amines, various non-aromatic compounds, and phthalates. Many of the identified organic compounds (phenols, heterocyclic compounds, PAHs) are probably coal-derived. PAHs represented the group of organic compounds most commonly observed. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged up to 23 {mu} g/L. Concentrations of individual compounds ranged from about 18 to {lt}0.01 {mu} g/L. Temporal variability of organic compound concentrations was documented, as two wells with relatively high organic compound contents in produced water in 2001 had much lower concentrations in 2002. In many areas, including the PRB, coal strata provide aquifers for drinking water wells. Organic compounds observed in produced water are also likely present in drinking water supplied from wells in the coal. Some of the organic compounds identified in the produced water samples are potentially toxic, but at the levels measured in these samples are unlikely to have acute health effects. The human health effects of low-level, chronic exposure to coal-derived organic compounds in drinking water are currently unknown. Continuing studies will evaluate possible toxic effects from low level, chronic exposure to coal-derived organic compounds in drinking water supplies.

  18. Biodegradation kinetic of organic compounds of acrylic fiber wastewater in biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ya-lei; ZHAO Jian-fu; GU Guo-wei

    2003-01-01

    A group function relation curve between flux (J) and bulk phase concentration of substrate ( S ) was set up. The biodegradation kinetic of organic compounds of acrylic fiber wastewater in biofilm is studied ( the treatment technology is coagulation/sedimentation-anoxic/aerobic biofilm process), and the results showed that the concentration of non-degradation pollutants in effluent is 77 mg/L. In aerobic zone,corresponds to the fact that there are some biorefractory compounds in the wastewater.

  19. A methodology for ranking and hazard identification of xenobiotic organic compounds in urban stormwater

    OpenAIRE

    Baun, Anders.; Eriksson, Eva; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology (RICH, Ranking and Identification of Chemical Hazards) for ranking and identification ofxenobiotic organic compounds of environmental concern in stormwater discharged to surface water. The RICHmethod is illustrated as afunnel fitted with different filters that sort out problematic and hazardous compounds based on inherent physico-chemical and biologicalproperties. The outcomes of the RICH procedure are separate lists for both water phase and solid phase ...

  20. Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of volatile organic compound fluxes using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Taipale, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources, vegetation being the dominant source on a global scale. Some of these reactive compounds are deemed major contributors or inhibitors to aerosol particle formation and growth, thus making VOC measurements essential for current climate change research. This thesis discusses ecosystem scale VOC fluxes measured above a boreal Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland. The flux measureme...