WorldWideScience

Sample records for chiropractic working group

  1. Working Group Versus Team Work

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina-Vasilica Zaharia; Mirela-Mihaela Dogaru; Dan-Marin Boaja

    2014-01-01

    The cell organization is represented by the working group and not the individual, groups that are a major feature of life organization. Quality circles were designed as tools for building team spirit in Japanese companies as a tool to enhance group cohesion and the training of employees. The essential characteristic of human behavior and organizational performance is given by the working group and the influence on group members, so members of the group leader should use in order to achieve a ...

  2. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  3. American Chiropractic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Public Health Resources Practice Resource Center Public Relations Portal National Chiropractic Health Month 2016 Advocacy & Reimbursement ... Chiropractic in the Media ACA Radio Chiropractic Cares Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Advocacy Regulatory Policy ...

  4. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  5. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  6. What Is Chiropractic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACA News Digital Edition Archives: ACA News Articles Advertising Opportunities News Newsroom News Releases Letters to the Editor Facts About Chiropractic Chiropractic in the Media ACA Radio Chiropractic Cares Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Advocacy Regulatory Policy Issue ...

  7. History of Chiropractic Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACA News Digital Edition Archives: ACA News Articles Advertising Opportunities News Newsroom News Releases Letters to the Editor Facts About Chiropractic Chiropractic in the Media ACA Radio Chiropractic Cares Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Advocacy Regulatory Policy Issue ...

  8. Instructions to working groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foushee, H. Clayton

    1987-01-01

    The key to the success of this workshop is your active participation in the working group process. The goals of this workshop are to address four major questions regarding Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training. To some extent the working group topic areas parallel these issues, but in some cases they do not. However, it is important for all of the working groups to keep these general questions in mind during their deliberations: (1) What are the essential elements of an optimal CRM Training program; (2) What are the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches to CRM Training; (3) How can CRM Training best be implemented, and what barriers exist; and (4) Is CRM Training effective, do we know, and if not, how can we find out.

  9. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  10. Natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Natural Analogue Working Group was established by the Commission of the European Communities in 1985. The purpose of this group is to bring together modellers with earth scientists and others, so that maximum benefit can be obtained from natural analogue studies with a view to safe geological disposal of radioactive waste. The first meeting of this group was held in Brussels from November 5 to 7, 1985. The discussions mainly concerned the identification of the modellers' needs and of the earth scientists' capacity to provide for them. Following the debates, a written statement was produced by the Group; this document forms the core of the present Report. Notes and outlines of many of the presentations made are grouped in four appendixes. The valuable contribution of all those involved in the meeting is gratefully acknowledged

  11. Abandoning wells working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  12. ST Quality Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, S

    2000-01-01

    When CERN engages contractors or outside enterprises for supply and service contracts, a Quality certification is requested. CERN itself has no global certification. Nor are quality assurance systems well understood by the majority of CERN staff. This has not precluded successful activity but it is felt that a structured approach would have some benefits: elimination of occasional accelerator perturbations, improved documentation, efficient use of existing resources, enhanced sharing of experience and knowledge, avoidance of improper handover periods when staff leave CERN. In some cases talented staff spend too much time doing remedial jobs when they are capable of achieving much more. The ST quality working group was formed to address these problems. The goal of this quality working group is to help ST division maintain and continuously improve the quality of its services and operations, and give confidence to ST staff and clients that the requirements for quality are being fulfilled, maintained and improved...

  13. Multibunch working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this working group was to foment discussions about the use and limitations of multi-bunch, representatives from most operating or in-project synchrotron radiation sources (ALS, SPEAR, BESSY-2, SPRING-8, ANKA, DELTA, PEP-2, DIAMOND, ESRF...) have presented their experience. The discussions have been led around 3 topics: 1) resistive wall instabilities and ion instabilities, 2) higher harmonic cavities, and 3) multibunch feedback systems

  14. Working group 4: Terrestrial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working group at a Canada/USA symposium on climate change and the Arctic identified major concerns and issues related to terrestrial resources. The group examined the need for, and the means of, involving resource managers and users at local and territorial levels in the process of identifying and examining the impacts and consequences of climatic change. Climatic change will be important to the Arctic because of the magnitude of the change projected for northern latitudes; the apparent sensitivity of its terrestrial ecosystems, natural resources, and human support systems; and the dependence of the social, cultural, and economic welfare of Arctic communities, businesses, and industries on the health and quality of their environment. Impacts of climatic change on the physical, biological, and associated socio-economic environment are outlined. Gaps in knowledge needed to quantify these impacts are listed along with their relationships with resource management. Finally, potential actions for response and adaptation are presented

  15. Business working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop of 26-27 june 2000, on nuclear power Plant LIfe Management (PLIM), also included working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for nuclear power plants were identified and discussed. The third group was on Business. The discussion concerned the following points: There are concerns about retaining experienced/trained personnel, and maintaining a good working relationship among them, as well as about the closure of research facilities, the reduction in staff numbers under increasing economic pressure and the lack of new nuclear power plant constructions. The marginal cost of producing electricity is lower for most existing nuclear power plants than for almost all other energy sources. Refurbishment costs are usually relatively small compared with new investments. The ongoing regulatory reform of the electricity market will bring increasing competition. Although PLIM has been carried out in many countries with favourable results, there are still uncertainties which affect business decisions regarding financial and market risks in PLIM activities. Recommendations were made. (author)

  16. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  17. Oklo working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural analogue studies have been carried out for several years in the framework of the European Community's R and D programme on radioactive waste; and within its recent fourth five-year programme on 'Management and storage of radioactive waste (1990-94)' the Community is participating in the Oklo study, natural analogue for transfer processes in a geological repository. The Oklo project is coordinated by CEA-IPSN (F) and involves laboratories from several CEA directorates (IPSN, DTA and DCC) which collaborate with other institutions from France: CREGU, Nancy; CNRS, Strasbourg and ENSMD, Fontainebleau. Moreover, institutes from non-EC member States are also taking part in the Oklo study. The second joint CEC-CEA progress meeting of the Oklo Working Group was held in April 1992 in Brussels and gave the possibility of reviewing and discussing progress made since its first meeting in February 1991 at CEA in Fontenay-aux-Roses. About 40 participants from 15 laboratories and organizations coming from France, Canada, Gabon, Japan, Sweden and the USA underline the great interest in the ongoing research activities. The meeting focused on the different tasks within the CEC-CEA Oklo project concerning (i) field survey and sampling, (ii) characterization of the source term, (iii) studies of the petrographical and geochemical system, and (iv) studies of the hydrogeological system and hydrodynamic modelling. (author) 17 papers are presented

  18. A Chiropracticness Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlton Keith H

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little homogeneity of opinion in the chiropractic profession about its essence and identity. Matters compromising the establishment of a coherent identity include the issue of vertebral subluxation, philosophy, mercantilism, poverty of qualifications in some chiropractic college faculty, and lack of intellectual productivity in some chiropractic college faculty. Discussion The Chiropractic profession has mislabeled rhetoric, supposition and cant as philosophy, whilst showing sparse evidence for the existence of more than a few chiropractors writing in philosophy as a discipline. There is no evidence for "Chiropractic Philosophy". I propose, however, that a better use of the discipline of philosophy can be of great use to the Chiropractic profession. Various thinkers throughout the ages have written about deduction, induction and falsificationism as methods to discover more reliably the nature of things in the world about us. Each method has strengths and frailties, but some of the latter are insurmountable for our purposes. Summary Using a contrivance of that method which seems most suited, sui generis, for the purpose, I propose a Chiropracticness Test as a tool to assist the search for essence and identity in Chiropractic.

  19. Instrumentation Working Group Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Michelle; Miake-Lye, Richard

    1999-01-01

    The Instrumentation Working Group compiled a summary of measurement techniques applicable to gas turbine engine aerosol precursors and particulates. An assessment was made of the limits, accuracy, applicability, and technology readiness of the various techniques. Despite advances made in emissions characterization of aircraft engines, uncertainties still exist in the mechanisms by which aerosols and particulates are produced in the near-field engine exhaust. To adequately assess current understanding of the formation of sulfuric acid aerosols in the exhaust plumes of gas turbine engines, measurements are required to determine the degree and importance of sulfur oxidation in the turbine and at the engine exit. Ideally, concentrations of all sulfur species would be acquired, with emphasis on SO2 and SO3. Numerous options exist for extractive and non-extractive measurement of SO2 at the engine exit, most of which are well developed. SO2 measurements should be performed first to place an upper bound on the percentage of SO2 oxidation. If extractive and non-extractive techniques indicate that a large amount of the fuel sulfur is not detected as SO2, then efforts are needed to improve techniques for SO3 measurements. Additional work will be required to account for the fuel sulfur in the engine exhaust. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CI-MS) measurements need to be pursued, although a careful assessment needs to be made of the sampling line impact on the extracted sample composition. Efforts should also be placed on implementing non-intrusive techniques and extending their capabilities by maximizing exhaust coverage for line-of-sight measurements, as well as development of 2-D techniques, where feasible. Recommendations were made to continue engine exit and combustor measurements of particulates. Particulate measurements should include particle size distribution, mass fraction, hydration properties, and volatile fraction. However, methods to ensure that unaltered

  20. Democratic Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  1. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  2. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  3. Danish Chiropractic Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Cornelius; Boyle, Eleanor; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    Objectives: To develop a contemporary, patient-oriented perspective of chiropractic private practice, as reflected by the setting, practice models and clinical interactions observable in Denmark. Methods: A qualitative point-of-view investigation was conducted making use of participant observation...... value competence and professionalism in their clinical encounter with their chiropractor. Conclusion: Danish chiropractic practice is strongly influenced by modern consumer behaviour and team-oriented practice trends. Furthermore, the administrative hub plays an important role in operationalizing...

  4. The new chiropractic

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Bruce F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical manipulation and manual therapies are thousands of years old. The most popular western world iteration of these therapies is delivered by chiropractors. It can be argued that the collective public health benefit from chiropractic for spinal pain has been very substantial, however as chiropractic has transitioned from craft to profession it has encountered many internally and externally driven machinations that have retarded its progress to a fully accepted allied health pr...

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Chiropractic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACA News Digital Edition Archives: ACA News Articles Advertising Opportunities News Newsroom News Releases Letters to the Editor Facts About Chiropractic Chiropractic in the Media ACA Radio Chiropractic Cares Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Advocacy Regulatory Policy Issue ...

  6. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  7. Group Work in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Debbie; Tolmie, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article considers how students might work together in small groups, from two to eight, in either a primary or secondary science classroom. The nature of group work can vary widely and could include, for example, a pair carrying out an illustrative experiment, a trio or quad debating climate change, or six or seven rehearsing how they will…

  8. Challenges Facing Group Work Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Bo; Kang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Online group work can be complicated because of its asynchronous characteristics and lack of physical presence, and its requirements for skills in handling technology, human relationships, and content-related tasks. This study focuses on the administrative, logistical and relationship-related challenges in online group work. Challenges in areas…

  9. Second Anthropocene Working Group meeting

    OpenAIRE

    Edgeworth, Matt; Waters, Colin; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Stoddart, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The second meeting of the Anthropocene Working Group (AWG) was held at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge, on 24th and 25th November 2015. It took the form of a workshop with 12 members of the working group and numerous archaeologists from the Institute in lively conversation with each other. Dis...

  10. Working group report: Quantum chromodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Ravindra; Pankaj Agrawal; Rahul Basu; Satyaki Bhattacharya; J Blümlein; V Del Duca; R Harlander; D Kosower; Prakash Mathews; Anurag Tripathi

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of the subgroup QCD of Working Group-4 at WHEPP-9. We present the activities that had taken place in the subgroup and report some of the partial results arrived at following the discussion at the working group meetings.

  11. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre;

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues...... disorders? How can chiropractic use cognitive behavioral therapy to address chronic low back pain as a public health problem? What opportunities exist for doctors of chiropractic to more effectively serve the aging population? What is the role of ethics and the contribution of the chiropractic profession...

  12. Linac working group technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group looked at linac injectors for a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) or Hadron Facility. Discussion includes rf power, a possible strawman linac, ion source/injector, radio-frequency quadrupole, and coupled-cavity linac

  13. Metabolomics and Epidemiology Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Metabolomics and Epidemiology (MetEpi) Working Group promotes metabolomics analyses in population-based studies, as well as advancement in the field of metabolomics for broader biomedical and public health research.

  14. The perceptions, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapy and chiropractic students regarding each others’ professional practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Naidoo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The roles of physiotherapists and chiropractors demon-strate some overlap. Both are members of a multidisciplinary team and contributeto the holistic care of patients. Good understanding of each others’ professionalpractice may lead to good working relationships with effective referrals, inter -disciplinary and multidisciplinary management of patients. Purpose: To investigate the perceptions, attitudes and knowledge of undergraduatephysiotherapy and chiropractic students about each others’ professional roles inclinical practice. Methodology: Data was obtained using a questionnaire with closed and open-ended questions. First and final-yearphysiotherapy (n = 72 and chiropractic students (n = 49 participated. Results: First and final year physiotherapy students scored 58% and 62% respectively in the “test” on chiropractic;chiropractic students scored 52% and 68% respectively in the test on physiotherapy. Seventy percent of the chiropractic and 14% of the physiotherapy students had visited the practice of other profession. Sixty seven percent of the chiropractic and 38% of the physiotherapy students found it was effective. Forty seven percent chiropractic and 80% physiotherapy students considered physiotherapy and chiropractic to be in direct competition. Sixty six percentof the chiropractic students and 49% of the physiotherapy students expressed the intention of working together withthe other profession.  Discussion: The reason for the possible feelings of competitiveness could be because in South A frica there is vastoverlap of practice in both professions; Physiotherapists and chiropractors are seen to use modalities that are similar.This may be viewed as an indication of the importance in defining the roles, scope and characteristics of both physio-therapy and chiropractic.Conclusion: The knowledge of the physiotherapy and chiropractic students is equal, however, chiropractic studentshave more positive perceptions

  15. SOME IDEAS ON GROUP WORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Group work is a widely adopted activity in the oral English class, and certainly boasts a number of advantages. However, problems may occur in the organization of group discussions and the reports afterwards. This paper puts forward some suggestions for solving these problems.

  16. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunanda Banerjee; Rohini M Godbole; Sreerup Raychaudhuri; Ben Allanach; Sunanda Banerjee; Satyaki Bhattacharyya; Debajyoti Choudhury; Siba Prasad Das; Anindya Datta; Rohini M Godbole; Monoranjan Guchait; Sabine Kraml; Gobinda Majumdar; David Miller; Margarete Mühlleitner; Nobuchika Okada; Maxim Perelstein; Santosh K Rai; Sreerup Raychaudhuri; Saurabh D Rindani; D P Roy; K Sridhar; Rishikesh Vaidya; D Zeppenfeld

    2006-10-01

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is included in this report.

  17. Taxonomy Working Group Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie S.; Beil, Robert J.; Terrone, Mark; Barth, Timothy S.; Panontin, Tina L.; Wales, Roxana; Rackley, Michael W.; Milne, James S.; McPherson, John W.; Dutra, Jayne E.; Shaw, Larry C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Taxonomy Working Group was to develop a proposal for a common taxonomy to be used by all NASA projects in the classifying of nonconformances, anomalies, and problems. Specifically, the group developed a recommended list of data elements along with general suggestions for the development of a problem reporting system to better serve NASA's need for managing, reporting, and trending project aberrant events. The Group's recommendations are reported in this document.

  18. Children and chiropractic care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Hestbaek, Lise

    2009-01-01

    care profession has convincingly assumed the responsibility of spinal and musculoskeletal health for children. Considering the magnitude of the challenges ahead for both researchers and clinicians, this may be a good opportunity for doctors of chiropractic to take responsibility and engage...

  19. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  20. Perspectives of older adults on co-management of low back pain by doctors of chiropractic and family medicine physicians: a focus group study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyons, K. J.; Salsbury, S. A.; Hondras, M. A.;

    2013-01-01

    Background: While older adults may seek care for low back pain (LBP) from both medical doctors (MDs) and doctors of chiropractic (DCs), co-management between these providers is uncommon. The purposes of this study were to describe the preferences of older adults for LBP co-management by MDs and D...

  1. CEC natural analogue working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second meeting of the CEC Natural Analogue Working Group took place on June 17-19, 1986, hosted by the Swiss NAGRA in Interlaken (CH). A review of recent progress in natural analogue programmes was carried out, and complemented by detailed discussions about geomicrobiology, archaeological analogues, natural colloids, and use of analogues to increase confidence in safety assessments for radioactive waste disposal. A statement drafted by the Group, and the presentations made, are put together in this report

  2. Introduction to Working Group 7

    CERN Document Server

    Gueudet, Ghislaine; Giampaolo, Chiappini; Stephen, Hegedus; Hans-Georg, Weigand

    2010-01-01

    Technologies in mathematical education has been a theme present at CERME from the first edition. The available technologies have evolved a lot during these years. At CERME 5 conference, the conclusions of the technology Working Group (Kynigos et al. 2007), as well as Artigue's and Ruthven's interventions (Artigue 2007, Ruthven 2007), signal perspective evolutions towards more comprehensive studies, in several respects. Drawing on these previous works, CERME 6 WG7 intended to go further in the directions they have indicated.

  3. CEC Natural Analogue Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central theme for the third meeting of the CEC analogue working group was ''How can analogue data be used for performance assessments, both in support of the results and for presentation to the public''. This report puts together the most recent achievements in this field, together with a review of on-going natural analogue programmes

  4. Report for Working Group 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard Jensen, Lotte; Thompson, Mary Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The theme for the second working group was design education in civil and environmental engineering. Issues discussed during this meeting included the current state of the art of civil design education, the importance of civil design education, tools and techniques that can be used to build design...

  5. Heavy flavours: working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gladilin, Leonid [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Scobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Tonelli, Diego [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2009-07-15

    The talks presented in the working group ''Heavy flavours'' of the DIS 2009 workshop are summarised. New and recently updated results from theory, proton antiproton and heavy ion colliders, as well from HERA and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Australian chiropractic sports medicine: half way there or living on a prayer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragasevic George

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sports chiropractic within Australia has a chequered historical background of unorthodox individualistic displays of egocentric treatment approaches that emphasise specific technique preference and individual prowess rather than standardised evidence based management. This situation has changed in recent years with the acceptance of many within sports chiropractic to operate under an evidence informed banner and to embrace a research culture. Despite recent developments within the sports chiropractic movement, the profession is still plagued by a minority of practitioners continuing to espouse certain marginal and outlandish technique systems that beleaguer the mainstream core of sports chiropractic as a cohesive and homogeneous group. Modern chiropractic management is frequently multimodal in nature and incorporates components of passive and active care. Such management typically incorporates spinal and peripheral manipulation, mobilisation, soft tissue techniques, rehabilitation and therapeutic exercises. Externally, sports chiropractic has faced hurdles too, with a lack of recognition and acceptance by organized and orthodox sports medical groups. Whilst some arguments against the inclusion of chiropractic may be legitimate due to its historical baggage, much of the argument appears to be anti-competitive, insecure and driven by a closed-shop mentality.sequently, chiropractic as a profession still remains a pariah to the organised sports medicine world. Add to this an uncertain continuing education system, a lack of protection for the title 'sports chiropractor', a lack of a recognized specialist status and a lack of support from traditional chiropractic, the challenges for the growth and acceptance of the sports chiropractor are considerable. This article outlines the historical and current challenges, both internal and external, faced by sports chiropractic within Australia and proposes positive changes that will assist in

  7. Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    In 1979 a Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) was constituted within Buratom with the participation of all centers within the European Community at which neutron facilities were available. The main purpose of NRWG was to standardize methods and procedures used in neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel as well as establish standards for radiographic image quality of neutron radiographs. The NRWG meets once a year in each of the neutron radiography centers to review the progress made ...

  8. Euratom neutron radiography working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1979 a Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) was constituted within Euratom with the participation of all centers within the European Community at which neutron facilities were available. The main purpose of NRWG was to standardize methods and procedures used in neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel as well as establish standards for radiographic image quality of neutron radiographs. The NRWG meets once a year in each of the neutron radiography centers to review the progress made and draw plans for the future. Besides, ad-hoc sub-groups on different topics within the field of neutron radiography are constituted. This paper reviews the activities and achievements of the NRWG and its sub-groups. (author)

  9. Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    reactor fuel as well as establish standards for radiographic image quality of neutron radiographs. The NRWG meets once a year in each of the neutron radiography centers to review the progress made and draw plans for the future. Besides, ad-hoc sub-groups or. different topics within the field of neutron......In 1979 a Neutron Radiography Working Group (NRWG) was constituted within Buratom with the participation of all centers within the European Community at which neutron facilities were available. The main purpose of NRWG was to standardize methods and procedures used in neutron radiography of nuclear...... radiography are constituted. This paper reviews the activities and achievements of the NRWG and its sub-groups....

  10. Chiropractic & Osteopathy. A new journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both chiropractic and osteopathy are over a century old. They are now regarded as complementary health professions. There is an imperative for both professions to research the principles and claims that underpin them, and the new journal Chiropractic & Osteopathy provides a scientific forum for the publication of such research.

  11. Chiropractic & Osteopathy. A new journal

    OpenAIRE

    Walker Bruce F; French Simon D; Cameron Melainie

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Both chiropractic and osteopathy are over a century old. They are now regarded as complementary health professions. There is an imperative for both professions to research the principles and claims that underpin them, and the new journal Chiropractic & Osteopathy provides a scientific forum for the publication of such research.

  12. Working Group Summary - Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tolstoy, E; Beck, R; Brunthaler, A; Calamida, A; Fiorentino, G; van der Hulst, J M

    2010-01-01

    This is a summary of the discussions that took place in the working group dedicated to studies of the Local Universe. The authors are listed in alphabetical order, after the working group organiser, and are those who gave a presentation during the week in Crete; their contributions are incorporated here. During the group discussions we considered the various synergies that exist between future studies of individual stars and star formation regions at optical/IR wavelengths that will be possible with the E-ELT and those of the molecular and neutral gas in similar regions that will be possible with ALMA and SKA. The primary emphasise was on star formation; both on large and small scales. New facilities will allow more detailed insights into the properties of our own Galaxy and also allow us to make detailed comparisons with a range of more distant systems all forming stars at different rates from different initial conditions (e.g., metallicity) and with different spatial distributions.

  13. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  14. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country's most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country's largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation's mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE's earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies

  15. Making Cooperative Learning Groups Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, James; De Jong, Cherie

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of cooperative-learning groups with middle school students. Describes cooperative-learning techniques, including group roles, peer evaluation, and observation and monitoring. Considers grouping options, including group size and configuration, dyads, the think-pair-share lecture, student teams achievement divisions, jigsaw groups,…

  16. Chiropractic at the crossroads or are we just going around in circles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reggars John W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chiropractic in Australia has seen many changes over the past 30 years. Some of these changes have advanced the professional status of chiropractic, improved undergraduate training and paved the way for a research culture. Unfortunately, other changes or lack of changes, have hindered the growth, public utilisation and professional standing of chiropractic in Australia. This article explores what influences have impacted on the credibility, advancement and public utilisation of chiropractic in Australia. Discussion The 1970's and 1980's saw a dramatic change within the chiropractic profession in Australia. With the advent of government regulation, came government funded teaching institutions, quality research and increased public acceptance and utilisation of chiropractic services. However, since that time the profession appears to have taken a backward step, which in the author's opinion, is directly linked to a shift by sections of the profession to the fundamentalist approach to chiropractic and the vertebral subluxation complex. The abandonment, by some groups, of a scientific and evidenced based approach to practice for one founded on ideological dogma is beginning to take its toll. Summary The future of chiropractic in Australia is at a crossroads. For the profession to move forward it must base its future on science and not ideological dogma. The push by some for it to become a unique and all encompassing alternative system of healthcare is both misguided and irrational.

  17. Advantages of Group Work in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志真

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of group work in English teaching.It is argued that group work can be efficient in teaching English.This paper concludes that:1)group work is one of the greatest education reforms,2)group work has many advantages in English teaching.

  18. Six Considerations for Social Justice Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Salazar, Carmen F.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "courageous conversations" in social justice group work and a continuum of action for social justice interventions. It analyzes themes from 20 contributions to 2 consecutive special issues of "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" on social justice group work. Implications for future development in group leadership and…

  19. Group Work and Multicultural Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Globalization changes the composition of the adult classroom, increasing diversity and bringing new associated teaching and learning problems; problems with group work. Educators may have goals to teach transferable multicultural group working skills yet learners find such work more challenging, showing a propensity to form groups containing…

  20. Group Work in College English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘爱琳

    2008-01-01

    <正>In order to realize the communicative function of English and reduce the disadvantages of large-class teaching,group work can be adopted to achieve the goal to some extent with its practical significance.This paper aims to illustrate the advantages of group work and some reflections on the real application of group work activities in teaching.

  1. Hadron Colliders Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Peggs and M.J. Syphers

    2001-11-08

    The ''point design'' studied this year shows that a staged VLHC (40, {approx} 200 TeV) is feasible, with no insurmountable challenges. Further work can provide a more optimized design, by studying various alternative field strengths (e.g., superferric magnets for Stage 1) for improvements to vacuum, wall impedance, and other major performance parameters. It may be that a ''single-stage'' scenario for accessing higher energies sooner is the correct approach. A next-step design study should be considered to look at the two cases near to and complementary to the 2001 VLHC Design Study. The effectiveness of photon stops and their engineering design need to be addressed in the near future to truly determine if these devices can lead this effort to even higher luminosities and energies. The superbunch approach should continue to be studied, as well as IR designs, new instrumentation and diagnostics, and beam dynamics issues. Finally, a well organized VLHC-motivated beam studies effort should become part of the national program.

  2. How Much "Group" Is There in Online Group Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The ability to work in groups across time and space has become a frequent requirement for the workplace and is increasingly common in higher education, but there is a surprising lack of research on how online groups work. This research applies analytic approaches used in studies of face-to-face classroom "talk" to multiple groups in two…

  3. An educational campaign to increase chiropractic intern advising roles on patient smoking cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strasser Sheryl M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco use, particularly smoking, is the most preventable cause of death in the United States. More than 400,000 premature deaths are associated with its use and the health care costs are in the billions. All health care provider groups should be concerned with patients who continue to smoke and use tobacco. The US Preventive Services Taskforce and Health People 2010 guidelines encourage providers to counsel smokers on cessation. Current studies, though limited regarding chiropractic advising practices indicate a low engagement rate when it comes to providing cessation information. Objective To test a campaign regarding initial impact aimed at increasing chiropractic interns advising on cessation and delivery of information to smokers on cessation. Discussion Chiropractic interns do engage patients on smoking status and can be encouraged to provide more cessation messages and information to patients. The initial impact assessment of this campaign increased the provision of information to patients by about 25%. The prevalence of smoking among chiropractic patients, particularly at teaching clinics may be lower than the national averages. Conclusion Chiropractic interns can and should be encouraged to advise smokers about cessation. A systematic method of intake information on smoking status is needed and a standardized education protocol for chiropractic colleges is needed. Chiropractic colleges should assess the adequacy of their advising roles and implement changes to increase cessation messages to their patients as soon as possible.

  4. Supporting Working Mothers through Group Work: A Multimodal Psychoeducational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Barbara; Hensley, Laura

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the efficacy of a psychoeducational support group to help working mothers manage their roles. The goals of this pilot project were to assist working mothers in working toward achieving cognitive restructuring, behavioral changes to reduce stress, and a sense of social support from experiential sharing within the group process.…

  5. Post-Disaster Social Justice Group Work and Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses post-disaster group counseling and group supervision using a social justice orientation for working with post-disaster survivors from underserved populations. The Disaster Cross-Cultural Counseling model is a culturally responsive group counseling model that infuses social justice into post-disaster group counseling and…

  6. Working group report: Neutrino and astroparticle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Gandhi; Kamales Kar; S Uma Sankar; Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Rahul Basu; Pijushpani Bhattacharjee; Biswajoy Brahmachari; Debrupa Chakraborti; M Chaudhury; J Chaudhury; Sandhya Choubey; E J Chun; Atri Desmukhya; Anindya Datta; Gautam Dutta; Sukanta Dutta; Raj Gandhi; Anjan Giri; Sourendu Gupta; Srubabati Goswami; Kamales Kar; Namit Mahajan; H S Mani; A Mukherjee; Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya; S N Nayak; M Randhawa; Subhendu Rakshit; Asim K Ray; Amitava Raychaudhuri; D P Roy; Probir Roy; Suryadeep Roy; Shiv Sethi; G Sigl; Arunansu Sil; N Nimai Singh; S Uma Sankar; Mark Vagins; Urjit Yagnik

    2003-02-01

    This is the report of neutrino and astroparticle physics working group at WHEPP-7. Discussions and work on CP violation in long baseline neutrino experiments, ultra high energy neutrinos, supernova neutrinos and water Cerenkov detectors are discussed.

  7. PERSPECTIVES ON GROUP WORK IN DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Sarromaa HAUSSTÄTTER

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current distance education benefits greatly from educational software that makes group work possible for students who are separated in time and space. However, some students prefer distance education because they can work on their own. This paper explores how students react to expectations on behalf of the course provider to do their assignments in collaborative groups. They are seemingly both positively surprised by the challenges that group work offer, and they are less positive to the downsides of group work. The paper discusses both sides of the experiences and suggests why this might be a paradox to live with.

  8. The classroom group work for collaborative learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪珍

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues in the field of collaborative learning,and put its sDess on the c|agsroom group work for collaborative learning.The way to deal with group work and teacher's role in the process will also be discussed.

  9. The classroom group work for collaborative learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪珍

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues in the field of collaborative learning,and put its stress on the classroom group work for collaborative learning.The way to deal with group work and teacher's role in the process will also be discussed.

  10. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  11. Predicting Satisfaction with Group Work Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Jane; Hastie, Brianne

    2009-01-01

    Universities are increasingly using group based assessment tasks; however, as with work-place teams, such tasks often elicit mixed feelings from participants. This study investigated factors that may predict student satisfaction with group work at university. Final-year business students completed a questionnaire addressing experiences of group…

  12. Engaging and Informing Students through Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stella

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to explore the benefits of group work as a tool for engaging students with introductory material. It was the researcher's expectation that group work, would provide a means of reducing cognitive load (Kirschner, Sweller & Clark, 2006) and encouraging on task behaviour (Wentzel & Watkins, 2002). This would result…

  13. Group Work Management in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to provide a better understanding of teachers' managing roles when using group work in the classroom. Building on Granström's 2 concepts of leadership and teachership, a more specific aim is to investigate teachers' managing roles when using group work and how teachers' presumptions affect the way in which they…

  14. Ecological Group Work Applied to Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyne, Robert K.; Mazza, Jamie

    2007-01-01

    This article underscores the value of school counselors connecting their group work practice with ecological concepts of context, collaboration, interconnection, social system maintenance, meaning-making, and sustainability (Conyne & Cook, 2004; Conyne, Crowell, & Newmeyer, in press). The authors elaborate ecological group work (Bemak & Conyne,…

  15. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debajyoti Choudhury; Asesh K Datta; Anirban Kundu

    2009-01-01

    The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  16. School Counselors' Experiential Training in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Samuel K.; Armstrong, Stephen A.; Womack, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    School counselors' perceptions of the efficacy and satisfaction of their experiential training in group work were investigated. An exploratory factor analysis (n = 304) revealed four salient factors: leader characteristics, leader responsibilities, child/adolescent group leadership and adult group leadership. A majority of participants indicated…

  17. Chiropractic and self-care for back-related leg pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Craig A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back-related leg pain (BRLP is a common variation of low back pain (LBP, with lifetime prevalence estimates as high as 40%. Often disabling, BRLP accounts for greater work loss, recurrences, and higher costs than uncomplicated LBP and more often leads to surgery with a lifetime incidence of 10% for those with severe BRLP, compared to 1-2% for those with LBP. In the US, half of those with back-related conditions seek CAM treatments, the most common of which is chiropractic care. While there is preliminary evidence suggesting chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy is beneficial for patients with BRLP, there is insufficient evidence currently available to assess the effectiveness of this care. Methods/Design This study is a two-site, prospective, parallel group, observer-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT. A total of 192 study patients will be recruited from the Twin Cities, MN (n = 122 and Quad Cities area in Iowa and Illinois (n = 70 to the research clinics at WHCCS and PCCR, respectively. It compares two interventions: chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT plus home exercise program (HEP to HEP alone (minimal intervention comparison for patients with subacute or chronic back-related leg pain. Discussion Back-related leg pain (BRLP is a costly and often disabling variation of the ubiquitous back pain conditions. As health care costs continue to climb, the search for effective treatments with few side-effects is critical. While SMT is the most commonly sought CAM treatment for LBP sufferers, there is only a small, albeit promising, body of research to support its use for patients with BRLP. This study seeks to fill a critical gap in the LBP literature by performing the first full scale RCT assessing chiropractic SMT for patients with sub-acute or chronic BRLP using important patient-oriented and objective biomechanical outcome measures. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00494065

  18. Improving work group decision-making effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover-Shoffner, K

    1989-01-01

    Many of the decisions in complex health care organizations are made by small work groups. Nurse administrators often lead or are highly involved in these groups, where reaching quality decisions is a critical goal. This paper examines research and information from the communications field, presenting a model for making decisions in small groups. The author identifies common pitfalls of decision-making groups and presents strategies for problem solving and improved decision making.

  19. IGS Data Center Working Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Carey E.

    2004-01-01

    At its 18th meeting held December 09, 2001 in San Francisco, the IGS Governing Board recommended the formation of a working group to focus on data center issues. This working group will tackle many of the problems facing the IGS data centers as well as develop new ideas to aid users both internal and external to the IGS. The direction of the IGS has changed since its start in 1992 and many new working groups, projects, data sets, and products have been created and incorporated into the service since that time. Therefore, this may be an appropriate time to revisit the requirements of data centers within the IGS.

  20. Learning Vocabulary in Group Work in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Le Pham Hoai

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated learning vocabulary in group work at university in Vietnam. The students were studied in two kinds of group settings, "unassisted" and "assisted", the first consisting of five students from the same class level and the second of four from the same class and a student from a higher class. Differences were observed in both…

  1. Psychological Measurement for Specialists in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent articles in "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" have discussed credibility indicators for quantitative and qualitative studies (Asner-Self, 2009; Rubel & Villalba, 2009). This article extends upon these contributions by discussing measurement issues that are relevant to producers and consumers of quantitative group research. This…

  2. Teaching Group Work with "The Great Debaters"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffry; Autry, Linda; Olson, Joann S.; Johnson, Kaprea F.

    2014-01-01

    An experiential learning activity, based on the film "The Great Debaters" (Washington, D., 2007), was used during a group work class. Description and preliminary evaluation of the activity is provided, including analysis of participant scores on the group leader self-efficacy instrument at multiple points. Implications and future…

  3. Productive Group Work for Students. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    There is clear evidence that students who are involved in productive collaborative groups outperform their peers. Cooperative group work also results in improved self-esteem, improved relationships and enhanced social and decision-making skills. Johnson and Johnson (1993) identified the elements of a successful collaborative activity. They include…

  4. Job Design for Learning in Work Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Annika; Brav, Agneta

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--What is required of job design and production planning, if they are to result in a work group taking a self-starting approach and going beyond what is formally required of it? This paper aims to contribute to group research by testing a theoretical model of relations between job design on the one hand (captured as completeness, demand on…

  5. Self-reported recognition of undiagnosed life threatening conditions in chiropractic practice: a random survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dwain M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to identify the type and frequency of previously undiagnosed life threatening conditions (LTC, based on self-reports of chiropractic physicians, which were first recognized by the chiropractic physician. Additionally this information may have a preliminary role in determining whether chiropractic education provides the knowledge necessary to recognize these events. Methods The study design was a postal, cross-sectional, epidemiological self-administered survey. Two thousand Doctors of Chiropractic in the US were randomly selected from a list of 57878. The survey asked respondents to state the number of cases from the list where they were the first physician to recognize the condition over the course of their practice careers. Space was provided for unlisted conditions. Results The response rate was 29.9%. Respondents represented 11442 years in practice and included 3861 patients with a reported undiagnosed LTC. The most commonly presenting conditions were in rank order: carcinoma, abdominal aneurysm, deep vein thrombosis, stroke, myocardial infarction, subdural hematoma and a large group of other diagnoses. The occurrence of a previously undiagnosed LTC can be expected to present to the chiropractic physician every 2.5 years based on the responding doctors reports. Conclusion Based on this survey chiropractic physicians report encountering undiagnosed LTC’s in the normal course of practice. The findings of this study are of importance to the chiropractic profession and chiropractic education. Increased awareness and emphasis on recognition of LTC is a critical part of the education process and practice life.

  6. Diversity Competent Group Work Supervision: An Application of the Supervision of Group Work Model (SGW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This article emphasizes the need for concrete descriptions of supervision to promote diversity-competent group work and presents an application of the supervision of group work model (SGW) to this end. The SGW, a supervision model adapted from the discrimination model, is uniquely suited for promoting diversity competence in group work, since it…

  7. INMM Physical Protection Technical Working Group Workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) established the Physical Protection Technical Working Group to be a focal point for INMM activities related to the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. The Technical Working Group has sponsored workshops with major emphasis on intrusion detection systems, entry control systems, and security personnel training. The format for these workshops has consisted of a series of small informal group discussions on specific subject matter which allows direct participation by the attendees and the exchange of ideas, experiences, and insights. This paper will introduce the reader to the activities of the Physical Protection Technical Working Group, to identify the workshops which have been held, and to serve as an introduction to the following three papers of this session

  8. Working group report: Heavy ion physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jan-E Alam; K Assamagan; S Chattopadhyay; R Gavai; Sourendu Gupta; B Layek; S Mukherjee; R Ray; Pradip K Roy; A Srivastava

    2004-12-01

    The 8th workshop on high energy physics phenomenology (WHEPP-8) was held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India during January 5–16, 2004. One of the four working groups, group III was dedicated to QCD and heavy ion physics (HIC). The present manuscript gives a summary of the activities of group III during the workshop (see also [1] for completeness). The activities of group III were focused to understand the collective behaviours of the system formed after the collisions of two nuclei at ultra-relativistic energies from the interactions of the elementary degrees of freedom, i.e. quarks and gluons, governed by non-abelian gauge theory, i.e. QCD. This was initiated by two plenary talks on experimental overview of heavy ion collisions and lattice QCD and several working group talks and discussions.

  9. CHIROPRACTIC AND OSTEOPATHIC EDUCATION AT ROYAL MELBOURNE INSTITUTE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    French, Simon D.; Marshall, Simone J.; Webb, Michael; Tucker, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To assess the attitudes of undergraduate chiropractic and osteopathic students at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) in 1992 on the education they are receiving and on the effectiveness of chiropractic and osteopathic care. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive survey. Participants: Undergraduate chiropractic and osteopathic students enrolled at RMIT School of Chiropractic and Osteopathy in 1992. Results: This study surveyed 272 students, 196 who were chiropractic student...

  10. My understanding and practices of Group Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wenyue

    2010-01-01

    @@ Group work is different from traditional teaching because it is not centered on the teacher but on the students. It is a student-centered, team-formed and has the common learning aims "m order to learn and promote each other,It experiences a common sense of honor and achievement and develops a spirit of cooperation. Thus, group work in the English class has always been play-ing an active role, It can improve learning methods and teaching strategy. At the same time,it improves the ability of individual team members.

  11. Abandoned Mine Waste Working Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-10

    The Mine Waste Working Group discussed the nature and possible contributions to the solution of this class of waste problem at length. There was a consensus that the mine waste problem presented some fundamental differences from the other classes of waste addresses by the Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT) working groups. Contents of this report are: executive summary; stakeholders address the problems; the mine waste program; current technology development programs; problems and issues that need to be addressed; demonstration projects to test solutions; conclusion-next steps; and appendices.

  12. Abandoned Mine Waste Working Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mine Waste Working Group discussed the nature and possible contributions to the solution of this class of waste problem at length. There was a consensus that the mine waste problem presented some fundamental differences from the other classes of waste addresses by the Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT) working groups. Contents of this report are: executive summary; stakeholders address the problems; the mine waste program; current technology development programs; problems and issues that need to be addressed; demonstration projects to test solutions; conclusion-next steps; and appendices

  13. Group work as an incentive for learning – students’ experiences of group work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eHammar Chiriac

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Group work is used as a means for learning at all levels in educational systems. There is strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups. Nevertheless, studies about what occurs in groups during group work and which factors actually influence the students’ ability to learn is still lacking. Likewise, the question of why some group work is successful and other work results in the opposite is still unsolved. The aim of this article is to add to the current level of knowledge and understandings regarding the essence behind successful group work in higher education. This research is focused on the students’ experiences of group work and learning in groups, which is an almost non-existing aspect of research on group work prior to the beginning of the 21st century. A primary aim is to give university students a voice in the matter by elucidating the students’ positive and negative points of view and how the students assess learning when working in groups. Furthermore, the students’ explanations of why some group work ends up being a positive experience resulting in successful learning, while in other cases, the result is the reverse, are of interest. Data were collected through a study-specific questionnaire, with multiple choice and open-ended questions. The questionnaires were distributed to students in different study programs at two universities in Sweden. The present result is based on a reanalysis and qualitative analysis formed a key part of the study. The results indicate that most of the students’ experiences involved group work that facilitated learning, especially in the area of academic knowledge. Three important prerequisites (learning, study-social function and organization for group work that served as an effective pedagogy and as an incentive for learning were identified and discussed. All three abstractions facilitate or hamper students’ learning, as well as impact their

  14. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-30

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

  15. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices

  16. Far-field environment working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearcy, E.C. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States); Cady, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the potential impacts of underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes on the far-field environment.

  17. Working through a psychotherapy group's political cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettin, Mark F; Cohen, Bertram D

    2003-10-01

    Macropolitical evolution, starting with authoritarian monarchism, has moved through anarchistic transitions either to the totalitarianism of fascism and communism or to liberal and social democracy. We posit analogous micropolitical development in process-oriented therapy groups: "dependence" and "counterdependence" corresponding to monarchism and anarchism; and "independence" and "interdependence" to liberal and social democracy, respectively. Transition from counterdependence to independence and interdependence may be: (1) facilitated through group members' cooperative experience of rebellion, or (2) blocked by collective identification, the internalization of dystopian or utopian fantasies that coalesce as "group-self" perceptions. We explore how group therapists work clinically with and through these several "political cultures" in the service of group and self transformation. PMID:14562523

  18. Neutrino and astroparticle physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mohanty; U A Yajnik

    2000-07-01

    The contributions made to the Working Group activities on neutrinos and astrophysics are summarized in this article. The topics discussed were inflationary models in Raman–Sundrum scenarios, ultra high energy cosmic rays and neutrino oscillations in 4 flavour and decaying neutrino models

  19. Working group report: Astroparticle and neutrino physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Gandhi; Subhendra Mohanty; Tarun Souradeep; S Agarwalla; K Bhattacharya; B Brahmachari; R Crittenden; S Goswami; P Ghoshal; M Lindner; H S Mani; S Mitra; S Pascoli; S Panda; R Rangarajan; S Ray; T Roy Choudhury; R Saha; S Sarkar; A Srivastava; R Sheth; S Uma Sankar; U Yajnik

    2006-10-01

    The working group on astroparticle and neutrino physics at WHEPP-9 covered a wide range of topics. The main topics were neutrino physics at INO, neutrino astronomy and recent constraints on dark energy coming from cosmological observations of large scale structure and CMB anisotropy.

  20. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  1. S3T working group. Report 1: group aims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work group S3T which is aimed to designing and developing devices using unconventional holographic optics is presented. These devices find applications that are classified here in four items high resolution spectrometers, high definition imaging, high flux devices, metrology and interferometry. The problems to solve and the aims of the group in each of these cases are presented. Three synthesis of lectures are in this report. The main one concerns stigmatism conditions of concave holographic gratings used in normal incidence. This new process of focusing is very interesting for hot plasma diagnostics

  2. Beyond the Standard Model: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Bhattacharyya; Amitava Raychaudhuri

    2000-07-01

    This report summarises the work done in the ‘Beyond the Standard Model’ working group of the Sixth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-6) held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai, Jan 3–15, 2000. The participants in this working group were: R Adhikari, B Ananthanarayan, K P S Balaji, Gour Bhattacharya, Gautam Bhattacharyya, Chao-Hsi Chang (Zhang), D Choudhury, Amitava Datta, Anindya Datta, Asesh K Datta, A Dighe, N Gaur, D Ghosh, A Goyal, K Kar, S F King, Anirban Kundu, U Mahanta, R N Mohapatra, B Mukhopadhyaya, S Pakvasa, P N Pandita, M K Parida, P Poulose, G Raffelt, G Rajasekaran, S Rakshit, Asim K Ray, A Raychaudhuri, S Raychaudhuri, D P Roy, P Roy, S Roy, K Sridhar and S Vempati.

  3. PM of the Vuotos working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the program for the Finnish Government will study the premises of the Vuotos Basin Project in the light of the most recent environment studies. For this purpose the Ministry of Trade and Industry appointed a working group. The working group has studied the latest reports on the Vuotos Project which were available up to 30 9.1995. The working group also updated the projections of the energy significance of the project and how it would affect employment. The working group arrived at these conclusions: The Vuotos Project is still of energy economy significance because the need for domestic energy production capacity - and also capacity that can be regulated - is on the rise. The project will not cause any fatal diminishing of the abundance of any Finnish plant or animal species, but it will diminish the number of habitants for some threatened plants and birds. Thus it will diminish the diversity of Finnish nature and the possibilities to use the area for many purposes. The project will cause the weakening of water quality in the streams beneath the basin for the first few years. The project is important for employment reasons, because it will diminish unemployment during construction by 2-8 %-units, depending on the county, and it will make the creation of new jobs possible in the long run. The working group thinks that estimates of experts concerning the pros and cons of the project are quite different and that the final weighing of the considerable body of research and reports can best be made at the Water Court proceedings. (author)

  4. Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeker William C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

  5. 2016 World Federation of Chiropractic/Association of Chiropractic Colleges Education Conference proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In October 2016, the World Federation of Chiropractic and Association of Chiropractic Colleges Education Conference was held in Montreal, Canada. This summary provides the titles of the contributed presentations. The full set of abstracts for this meeting are published online at www.journalchiroed.com as an exclusively electronic publication that is part of volume 30, issue 2 (October 2016) of the Journal of Chiropractic Education. PMID:27749117

  6. Volcanism/tectonics working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, L.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Young, S.R. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the impacts of earthquakes, fault rupture, and volcanic eruption on the underground repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The tectonics and seismic history of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is discussed and geologic analogs to that site are described.

  7. Working group report: Quark gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradip Roy; Bedangadas Mohanty; A P Balchandran; A Bhattacharyya; A K Chaudhuri; S Datta; S Digal; F Flueret; S Gupta; P Jaikumar; S H Lee; N Mathur; A Mishra; A P Mishra; H Mishra; B Mohanty; P Roy; P S Somia; A M Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    The 10th Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-10) was held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai during January 2–13, 2008. One of our working grops (WG) is QCD and QGP. The discussions of QGP WG include matter at high density, lattice QCD, charmonium states in QGP, viscous hydrodynamics and jet quenching, colour factor in heavy ion collisions and RHIC results on photons, dileptons and heavy quark. There were two plenary talks and several working group talks with intense discussions regarding the future activities that are going to be persued.

  8. Meeting Summary, Credit Trading Work Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Bryan

    2000-12-07

    OAK-B135 Credit Trading Work Group Meeting Summary. The purpose of the meeting is to: (1) Provide an opportunity for NWCC Work Group Members, NWCC Members, and invited expert participants to hear an overview of the draft NWCC Credit Trading Report and to critically review and discuss the report's recommendations and principles. (2) Hear presentations from several perspectives of other experts on credit trading which provide: (a) a brief summary of credit trading activities they are involved in, and (b) critical responses to the NWCC draft report. (3) Identify how the report can be improved at the big picture level. Attempt to resolve issues or concerns if necessary. (4) Discuss the recommendations and credit trading principles in detail and attempt to reach consensus on these sections for presentation to the NWCC. (5) Discuss if any of the outreach and communication recommendations in the report should be conducted by the NWCC.

  9. Working group report: Cosmology and astroparticle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raghavan Rangarajan; Ajit Srivastava; A Bandyopadhyay; A Basak; M Bastero-Gil; A Berera; J Bhatt; K Bhattacharya; S Chakraborty; M Das; S Das; K Dutta; D Ghosh; S Goswami; U Gupta; P Jain; Y-Y Keum; E Masso; D Majumdar; A P Mishra; S Mohanty; R Mohapatra; A Nautiyal; T Prokopec; S Rao; D P Roy; N Sahu; A Sarkar; P Saumia; A Sen; A Shivaji

    2011-05-01

    This is the report of the cosmology and astroparticle physics working group at WHEPPXI. We present the discussions carried out during the workshop on selected topics in the above fields. The problems discussed concerned axions, infrared divergences in inflationary theories, supersonic bubbles in a first-order electroweak phase transition, dark matter, MOND, interacting dark energy, composite Higgs models and statistical anisotropy of the Universe.

  10. Innovation groups : Before innovation work is begun

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    This research project was begun during the financial crisis of 2009 with the objective of increasing the competiveness of SMEs’ (Small and Medium sized Enterprises) by developing their innovation-management capabilities. The research presented in this licentiate thesis (thesis) is a part of the project in which newly-formed innovation groups at two SMEs in Eskilstuna, Sweden have been studied before they began innovation work. Prior research has indicated a need to observe processes within on...

  11. Group in social work with the aged

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowy, L.

    1962-01-01

    Aspects of human behavior, including drives, needs, developmental tasks, aspirations, and wants, which are relevant for social work practice and for which the group is an indispensable instrumentality are discussed. Specific areas treated include common human needs, role and ego functioning, the roles of the social worker, and the differential impact of setting. Several ways in which groups can be used with the aged are outlined, including alleviation of isolation and aloneness and help in coping with the problem of loss of social identity, physical and mental loss, and the problem of lack of future. Groups can also be used to develop new social roles within the limits of present-day social instrumentalities, to develop a linkage of past, present, and future in relation to associational groups (e.g., family, peers) and to help create a new self-image of older adults which can be transmitted to society. It is pointed out that since most older persons who could benefit from group associations do not venture out on their own to join groups, social agencies have a responsibility to move out from their intramural confinement to the places where the elderly live.

  12. Chiropractic manipulation in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoline Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS remains the most common deforming orthopedic condition in children. Increasingly, both adults and children are seeking complementary and alternative therapy, including chiropractic treatment, for a wide variety of health concerns. The scientific evidence supporting the use chiropractic intervention is inadequate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot study and explore issues of safety, patient recruitment and compliance, treatment standardization, sham treatment refinement, inter-professional cooperation, quality assurance, and outcome measure selection. Methods Six patients participated in this 6-month study, 5 of whom were female. One female was braced. The mean age of these patients was 14 years, and the mean Cobb angle was 22.2 degrees. The study design was a randomized controlled clinical trial with two independent and blinded observers. Three patients were treated by standard medical care (observation or brace treatment, two were treated with standard medical care plus chiropractic manipulation, and one was treated with standard medical care plus sham manipulation. The primary outcome measure was Cobb, and the psychosocial measure was Scoliosis Quality of Life Index. Results Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors were easily recruited and worked cooperatively throughout the trial. Patient recruitment and compliance was good. Chiropractic treatments were safely employed, and research protocols were successful. Conclusion Overall, our pilot study showed the viability for a larger randomized trial. This pilot confirms the strength of existing protocols with amendments for use in a full randomized controlled trial. Trial registration This trial has been assigned an international standard randomized controlled trial number by Current Controlled Trials, Ltd. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/. The number is ISRCTN41221647.

  13. Group Organized Project Work in Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten; Jensen, Lars Peter;

    2001-01-01

    must communicate electronically, and that they are under a fierce time strain, studying part time and typically with a full time job and a family. In this paper, the main problems experienced with group organized project work in distance education are described, and some possible solutions are listed......Project organized problem based learning is a successful concept for on-campus education at Aalborg University. Recently this "Aalborg concept" has been used in networked distance education as well. This paper describes the experiences from two years of Internet-mediated project work in a new...... Master of Information Technology education. The main conclusions are, that the project work is a strong learning motivator, enhancing peer collaboration, for off-campus students as well. However, the concept cannot be directly transferred to off-campus learning. The main reasons are that the students...

  14. FAVL work group: report and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the works of a work group dedicated to the process of search for storage site for low activity and long life radioactive wastes. The authors recall the history of this process which started in the early 1990's, and resulted in the selection of two sites, in Auxon and in Pars-les-Chavanges, and finally in the withdrawal of both towns. Then, the authors analyse the whole process in terms of intervention or participation of local authorities, of information and participation of waste producers. They also discuss the roles of the ASN, IRSN, DGEC, ANDRA and ANDRA's Coesdic. They make recommendations regarding site selection, agenda, responsibilities, preferential representative at the local level, public information, consultation, and project support

  15. Reports from the Combined Performance Working Groups

    CERN Multimedia

    S. Haywood

    The main goal of the Combined Performance Groups is to study the detector performance for physics, as well as to monitor the effect of changes to the detector layout and the evolution of the software. The groups combine the expertise available in several different subdetectors. In addition, they are responsible for developing combined reconstruction algorithms and are involved in the calibration of energy scales and optimising resolutions. For the Workshop, the four groups made a real effort to compare the reconstruction in Athena (the "New" C++ software framework) and Atrecon (the "Old" software used for the TDR studies). b-tagging Working Group: Over the last few months, the description of the Inner Detector in the simulation has become more realistic, following the evolution of the detector design. This has caused the amount of material in the simulation to increase and the Pixel B-layer has been moved to a larger radius to allow for a wider beam-pipe. Nevertheless, the good performance of the b-tagging (...

  16. CPAFFC Working Group Visits the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>From April 13 to 21, a CPAFFC working group led by Yao Mingyu, director general of the Department of American and Oceanian Affairs of the CPAFFC, visited the United States, attended the 18th Forum on US-China Relations sponsored by the US-China Peoples Friendship Association (USCPFA) and had talks with the USCPFA, the Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace Foundation, the Richard Nixon Centre, the Sister Cities International of the U.S., the National Conference of State Legislatures, the Council of State

  17. Report of Working Group on Electromagnetic Corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Rusetsky, A G

    1999-01-01

    The talks delivered by M. Knecht, H. Neufeld, V.E. Lyubovitskij, A. Rusetskyand J. Soto during the session of the working group of electromagneticcorrections to hadronic processes at the Eight International Symposium MENU99,cover a wide range of problems. In particular, those include: construction ofthe effective Lagrangians that then are used for the evaluation ofelectromagnetic corrections to the decays of K mesons; evaluation of some ofthe low-energy constants in these Lagrangians, using sum rules and thelarge-N_c arguments; complete calculations of electromagnetic corrections tothe pi pi scattering amplitude at O(e^2p^2); the general theory ofelectromagnetic bound states of hadrons in the Standard Model.

  18. Outcomes of usual chiropractic, harm & efficacy, the ouch study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that adverse events occur during chiropractic treatment. However, because of these studies design we do not know the frequency and extent of these events when compared to sham treatment. The principal aims of this study are to establish the frequency and severity of adverse effects from short term usual chiropractic treatment of the spine when compared to a sham treatment group. The secondary aim of this study is to establish the efficacy of usual short term chiropractic care for spinal pain when compared to a sham intervention. Methods One hundred and eighty participants will be randomly allocated to either usual chiropractic care or a sham intervention group. To be considered for inclusion the participants must have experienced non-specific spinal pain for at least one week. The study will be conducted at the clinics of registered chiropractors in Western Australia. Participants in each group will receive two treatments at intervals no less than one week. For the usual chiropractic care group, the selection of therapeutic techniques will be left to the chiropractors' discretion. For the sham intervention group, de-tuned ultrasound and de-tuned activator treatment will be applied by the chiropractors to the regions where spinal pain is experienced. Adverse events will be assessed two days after each appointment using a questionnaire developed for this study. The efficacy of short term chiropractic care for spinal pain will be examined at two week follow-up by assessing pain, physical function, minimum acceptable outcome, and satisfaction with care, with the use of the following outcome measures: Numerical Rating Scale, Functional Rating Index, Neck Disability Index, Minimum Acceptable Outcome Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, and a global measure of treatment satisfaction. The statistician, outcome assessor, and participants will be blinded to treatment allocation. Trial

  19. Back problems. Chiropractic evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussler, K K

    1999-04-01

    A thorough knowledge of equine spinal anatomy, biomechanics, and potential pathology is required to understand the principles and theories behind chiropractic and to apply its techniques properly. Chiropractic provides additional diagnostic and therapeutic means that may help equine practitioners to identify and treat the primary cause of lameness or poor performance. Specialized training in the evaluation and treatment of vertebral joint dysfunction and neuromusculoskeletal disorders places chiropractic in the forefront of conservative treatment of spinal-related disorders. Nevertheless, limited research is currently available on equine chiropractic and other nontraditional modalities in veterinary medicine. In 1996, the American Veterinary Medicine Association's Committee on Alternative and Complementary Therapies suggested that the research community should be encouraged to prioritize avenues of research and to allocate research funds to projects that are designed to provide further scientific evaluation of these modalities. The future of equine chiropractic in veterinary medicine is dependent on future research into the clinical effects of chiropractic techniques and the basic pathophysiology of spinal-related disorders in horses. PMID:10218250

  20. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  1. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion [Fusion Working Group (FWG)] was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project

  2. Summary Report of Working Group 2: Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Tsung, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    The working group on computation addressed three physics areas: (i) plasma-based accelerators (laser-driven and beam-driven), (ii) high gradient structure-based accelerators, and (iii) electron beam sources and transport [1]. Highlights of the talks in these areas included new models of breakdown on the microscopic scale, new three-dimensional multipacting calculations with both finite difference and finite element codes, and detailed comparisons of new electron gun models with standard models such as PARMELA. The group also addressed two areas of advances in computation: (i) new algorithms, including simulation in a Lorentz-boosted frame that can reduce computation time orders of magnitude, and (ii) new hardware architectures, like graphics processing units and Cell processors that promise dramatic increases in computing power. Highlights of the talks in these areas included results from the first large-scale parallel finite element particle-in-cell code (PIC), many order-of-magnitude speedup of, and details of porting the VPIC code to the Roadrunner supercomputer. The working group featured two plenary talks, one by Brian Albright of Los Alamos National Laboratory on the performance of the VPIC code on the Roadrunner supercomputer, and one by David Bruhwiler of Tech-X Corporation on recent advances in computation for advanced accelerators. Highlights of the talk by Albright included the first one trillion particle simulations, a sustained performance of 0.3 petaflops, and an eight times speedup of science calculations, including back-scatter in laser-plasma interaction. Highlights of the talk by Bruhwiler included simulations of 10 GeV accelerator laser wakefield stages including external injection, new developments in electromagnetic simulations of electron guns using finite difference and finite element approaches.

  3. Summary Report of Working Group 2: Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group on computation addressed three physics areas: (i) plasma-based accelerators (laser-driven and beam-driven), (ii) high gradient structure-based accelerators, and (iii) electron beam sources and transport [1]. Highlights of the talks in these areas included new models of breakdown on the microscopic scale, new three-dimensional multipacting calculations with both finite difference and finite element codes, and detailed comparisons of new electron gun models with standard models such as PARMELA. The group also addressed two areas of advances in computation: (i) new algorithms, including simulation in a Lorentz-boosted frame that can reduce computation time orders of magnitude, and (ii) new hardware architectures, like graphics processing units and Cell processors that promise dramatic increases in computing power. Highlights of the talks in these areas included results from the first large-scale parallel finite element particle-in-cell code (PIC), many order-of-magnitude speedup of, and details of porting the VPIC code to the Roadrunner supercomputer. The working group featured two plenary talks, one by Brian Albright of Los Alamos National Laboratory on the performance of the VPIC code on the Roadrunner supercomputer, and one by David Bruhwiler of Tech-X Corporation on recent advances in computation for advanced accelerators. Highlights of the talk by Albright included the first one trillion particle simulations, a sustained performance of 0.3 petaflops, and an eight times speedup of science calculations, including back-scatter in laser-plasma interaction. Highlights of the talk by Bruhwiler included simulations of 10 GeV accelerator laser wakefield stages including external injection, new developments in electromagnetic simulations of electron guns using finite difference and finite element approaches.

  4. Case management of chiropractic patients with cervical brachialgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guenoun, Olivier; Debarle, Michel; Garnesson, Coralie;

    2011-01-01

    Not much is known about the French chiropractic profession on, for example, level of consensus on clinical issues.......Not much is known about the French chiropractic profession on, for example, level of consensus on clinical issues....

  5. Chiropractic practice in the Danish public health care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie

    2009-01-01

    This commentary offers preliminary considerations around a phenomenological investigation of chiropractic services in a Danish public sector setting. In this narrative description, the main venue for chiropractic public (secondary) sector practice in the Danish context is briefly described...

  6. Legislative approaches to the regulation of the chiropractic profession

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman-Smith, David A

    1996-01-01

    Traditional or complementary health care services have a growing and significant role in both developed and developing countries. In the United Kingdom there was new legislation to regulate the chiropractic and osteopathy professions in 1993 and 1994. This was supported by the British Medical Association. There is now legislation regulating chiropractic practice in many jurisdictions. In general chiropractic is regulated as a separate discipline, although chiropractic and osteopathy are joint...

  7. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  8. Working group written presentation: Solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.

    1989-01-01

    The members of the Solar Radiation Working Group arrived at two major solar radiation technology needs: (1) generation of a long term flight data base; and (2) development of a standardized UV testing methodology. The flight data base should include 1 to 5 year exposure of optical filters, windows, thermal control coatings, hardened coatings, polymeric films, and structural composites. The UV flux and wavelength distribution, as well as particulate radiation flux and energy, should be measured during this flight exposure. A standard testing methodology is needed to establish techniques for highly accelerated UV exposure which will correlate well with flight test data. Currently, UV can only be accelerated to about 3 solar constants and can correlate well with flight exposure data. With space missions to 30 years, acceleration rates of 30 to 100X are needed for efficient laboratory testing.

  9. Executive Committee Working Group: Women in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primas, Francesca; Maddison, Sarah; Primas, Francesca; Aerts, Conny; Clayton, Geoffrey; Combes, Françoise; Elmegreen, Debra; Feretti, Luigina; Jog, Chanda; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Lazzaro, Daniela; Liang, Yanchun; Mandrini, Cristina; Mathews, Brenda; Rovira, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The gender† dimension of science and technology has become one of the most important and debated issues worldwide, impacting society at every level. A variety of international initiatives on the subject have been undertaken, including the continued monitoring of the status of women in science by Unesco Institute for Statistics (UIS) or the annual reports ``Education at a Glance'' by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as well as field-related working groups and networking in order to collect data in a consistent manner. The majority of the international organizations have made clear statements about their discrimination policies (independently of their main field(s) of action), including the International Council for Science whose regulations are followed by the IAU. Gender equality at large is one of the eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which clearly calls for action related to science, technology and gender.

  10. Working group 7: pipeline risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariyawasam, Shahani; Weir, David

    2011-07-01

    This seventh working group of the Banff 2011 conference provided an understanding of risk management process in the pipeline industry, including system-wide risk assessment, risk based integrity systems and risk control techniques. The presentations furnished a basis on which to discuss programs, processes and procedures including reliability based decision support and performance measures that support a company's risk management policy. This workshop was divided into three sessions. The first session focused on the comparison between reliability methods and conventional deterministic methods in terms of accuracy, simplicity and sensitivity. Next, the importance of low probability high consequence events and the processes to prevent them were discussed. The last session discussed the consequences of management processes on failures and risks. The debates following these presentations tried to identify the best management practices to reduce risks, and the regulations and requirements to develop.

  11. Working group report: Neutrino and astroparticle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srubabati Goswami; Raghavan Rangarajan; K Agashe; A Bandyopadhyay; K Bhattacharya; B Brahmachari; C Burgess; E J Chun; D Choudhury; P K Das; A Dighe; A Godbole; S Goswami; N Gupta; M Kaplinghat; D Indumathi; J Forshaw; Y Y Keum; B Layek; D Majumdar; N Mahajan; P Mehta; R N Mohapatra; N Mondal; S More; N Nir; S Pakvasa; M K Parida; M Ravikumar; G Rajasekaran; P Ramadevi; R Rangarajan; S D Rindani; D P Roy; P Roy; N Sahu; A samanta; Y Shadmi; A M Srivastava; S Uma Sankar; R Vaidya; U Yajnik

    2004-12-01

    This is the report of neutrino and astroparticle physics working group at WHEPP-8. We present the discussions carried out during the workshop on selected topics in the above fields and also indicate progress made subsequently. The neutrino physics subgroup studied the possibilities of constraining neutrino masses, mixing and CPT violation in lepton sector from future experiments. Neutrino mass models in the context of Abelian horizontal symmetries, warped extra dimensions and in the presence of triplet Higgs were studied. Effect of threshold corrections on radiative magnification of mixing angles was investigated. The astroparticle physics subgroup focused on how various particle physics inputs affect the CMBR fluctuation spectrum, and on brane cosmology. This report also contains an introduction on how to use the publicly available code CMBFAST to calculate the CMBR fluctuations.

  12. [Working Group on Continuing Education in Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The deliberations are summarized of a working group on permanent education in health (EPS) that met in May 1995 in Washington, D.C. to propose theoretical, methodological, and operational instruments for improving the training practices of health services in the Latin America region. The region has had abundant and heterogeneous experiences with education in health services, frequently involving in-service training. This work traces development of Permanent Education in Health, beginning with the 1973 World Health Assembly, in which the problem of educating health personnel and the potential of continuing education were recognized. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has actively assisted in defining and expanding EPS and has published materials detailing the conceptual foundation and practical experiences in different countries of the region with the methodology. The major advantages of EPS are that it is oriented from the initial diagnosis to modification in practices and services; it integrates the individual, institutional, and social in the definition of problems; it considers intellectual and affective aspects jointly; it develops group consciousness and identity; and it permits generation of new knowledge. Controversy surrounding the definition and application of EPS helped to clarify its aims and objectives. Potential applications of EPS are numerous at this time of change in the health sector, with decentralization, institutional development with external funds, privatization, changes in service delivery, and other modifications of existing structures. Brief descriptions of experiences with EPS in Brazil, Argentina, the Dominican Republic, Central America, and in other PAHO programs illustrate the range of situations and contexts in which it may be usefully applied. PMID:8850126

  13. Charter for Systems Engineer Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffredini, Michael T.; Grissom, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This charter establishes the International Space Station Program (ISSP) Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Systems Engineering Working Group (SEWG). The MSS SEWG is established to provide a mechanism for Systems Engineering for the end-to-end MSS function. The MSS end-to-end function includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), the Mobile Remote Servicer (MRS) Base System (MBS), Robotic Work Station (RWS), Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM), Video Signal Converters (VSC), and Operations Control Software (OCS), the Mobile Transporter (MT), and by interfaces between and among these elements, and United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) distributed systems, and other International Space Station Elements and Payloads, (including the Power Data Grapple Fixtures (PDGFs), MSS Capture Attach System (MCAS) and the Mobile Transporter Capture Latch (MTCL)). This end-to-end function will be supported by the ISS and MSS ground segment facilities. This charter defines the scope and limits of the program authority and document control that is delegated to the SEWG and it also identifies the panel core membership and specific operating policies.

  14. Adding chiropractic to standard medical therapy for nonspecific low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Long, Cynthia R; Hondras, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Randomized controlled trial.Objective. To assess changes in pain levels and physical functioning in response to standard medical care (SMC) versus SMC plus chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) for the treatment of low back pain (LBP) among 18 to 35-year-old active-duty military....... The primary outcome measures were changes in back-related pain on the numerical rating scale and physical functioning at 4 weeks on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and back pain functional scale (BPFS).Results. Mean Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores decreased in both groups during...... personnel.Summary of Background Data. LBP is common, costly, and a significant cause of long-term sick leave and work loss. Many different interventions are available, but there exists no consensus on the best approach. One intervention often used is manipulative therapy. Current evidence from randomized...

  15. A description of children and adolescents in Danish chiropractic practice: results from a nationwide survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Jørgensen, Anette; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    . Infantile colic was the most common presenting complaint in this age group. For the older children, musculoskeletal problems were the most dominant complaint, ranging from 33% among the preschool children to 75% among the teenagers. These complaints were often chronic and about a third of the children older....... CONCLUSIONS: Babies made up most of the Danish chiropractic patients younger than 18 years. Among the older children and the adolescents, musculoskeletal complaints were most common and mostly of a chronic nature. The large number of pediatric patients in chiropractic practices and the paucity of evidence...

  16. The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era

    OpenAIRE

    Walker Bruce F; French Simon D; Cameron Melanie; Perle Stephen M; Lebouef-Yde Charlotte; Rubinstein Sidney M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsid...

  17. Effectiveness and Economic Evaluation of Chiropractic Care for the Treatment of Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review of Pragmatic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Marc-André; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Borges Da Silva, Roxane; Boruff, Jill; Harrison, Pamela; Bussières, André

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Low back pain (LBP) is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and among the most common reasons for seeking primary sector care. Chiropractors, physical therapists and general practitioners are among those providers that treat LBP patients, but there is only limited evidence regarding the effectiveness and economic evaluation of care offered by these provider groups. Purpose To estimate the clinical effectiveness and to systematically review the literature of full economic evaluation of chiropractic care compared to other commonly used care approaches among adult patients with non-specific LBP. Study Design Systematic reviews of interventions and economic evaluations. Methods A comprehensive search strategy was conducted to identify 1) pragmatic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and/or 2) full economic evaluations of chiropractic care for low back pain compared to standard care delivered by other healthcare providers. Studies published between 1990 and 4th June 2015 were considered. Primary outcomes included pain, functional status and global improvement. Study selection, critical quality appraisal and data extraction were conducted by two independent reviewers. Data from RCTs with low risk of bias were included in a meta-analysis to determine effect estimates. Cost estimates of full economic evaluations were converted to 2015 USD and results summarized using Slavin’s qualitative best-evidence synthesis. Results Six RCTs and three full economic evaluations were scientifically admissible. Five RCTs with low risk of bias compared chiropractic care to exercise therapy (n = 1), physical therapy (n = 3) and medical care (n = 1). Overall, we found similar effects for chiropractic care and the other types of care and no reports of serious adverse events. Three low to high quality full economic evaluations studies (one cost-effectiveness, one cost-minimization and one cost-benefit) compared chiropractic to medical care. Given the divergent

  18. Applying Group Work to Improve College Students' Oral English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongmei

    2009-01-01

    After a brief introduction, this paper dwells on the merits of group work, and then suggested the evaluation methods of group work. The author also mentioned the Demerits of group work and how to avoid them.

  19. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  20. Chiropractic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ice Electrical stimulation Relaxation techniques Rehabilitative and general exercise Counseling about diet, weight loss, and other lifestyle factors Dietary supplements Many people visit chiropractors for treatment of low back pain, neck pain, and headaches. NIH: National Center for ...

  1. The Higgs Working Group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Cavalli et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated the prospects for Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and LHC and, in particular, the potential of these colliders to determine the Higgs properties once these particles have been found. The analyses were done in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) and its supersymmetric extensions as the minimal (MSSM) and next-to-minimal (NMSSM) supersymmetric extensions. The work for the discovery potential of the LHC mainly concentrated on the difficult regions of previous analyses as those which are plagued by invisible Higgs decays and Higgs decays into supersymmetric particles. Moreover, the additional signatures provided by the weak vector-boson fusion process (WBF) have been addressed and found to confirm the results of previous analyses. A major experimental effort has been put onto charged Higgs boson analyses. The final outcome was a significant improvement of the discovery potential at the Tevatron and LHC than previous analyses suggested. For an accurate determination of Higgs boson couplings, the theoretical predictions for the signal and background processes have to be improved. A lot of progress has been made during and after this workshop for the gluon-fusion gg {yields} H + (0, 1, 2jets) and the associated t{bar t}H production process. A thorough study of the present theoretical uncertainties of signal and background processes has been initialized, culminating in a list of open theoretical problems. A problem of major experimental interest is the proper treatment of processes involving bottom quark densities, which is crucial for some important signal and background processes. Further theoretical improvements have been achieved for the MSSM Higgs boson masses and Higgs bosons in the NMSSM. This report summarizes our work. The first part deals with theoretical developments for the signal and background processes. The second part gives an overview of the present status of Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron. The

  2. Working group written presentation: Atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Lubert J.; Visentine, James T.

    1989-01-01

    Earlier Shuttle flight experiments have shown NASA and SDIO spacecraft designed for operation in low-Earth orbit (LEO) must take into consideration the highly oxidative characteristics of the ambient flight environment. Materials most adversely affected by atomic oxygen interactions include organic films, advanced (carbon-based) composites, thermal control coatings, organic-based paints, optical coatings, and thermal control blankets commonly used in spacecraft applications. Earlier results of NASA flight experiments have shown prolonged exposure of sensitive spacecraft materials to the LEO environment will result in degraded systems performance or, more importantly, lead to requirements for excessive on-orbit maintenance, with both conditions contributing significantly to increased mission costs and reduced mission objectives. Flight data obtained from previous Space Shuttle missions and results of the Solar Max recovery mission are limited in terms of atomic oxygen exposure and accuracy of fluence estimates. The results of laboratory studies to investigate the long-term (15 to 30 yrs) effects of AO exposure on spacecraft surfaces are only recently available, and qualitative correlations of laboratory results with flight results have been obtained for only a limited number of materials. The working group recommended the most promising ground-based laboratories now under development be made operational as soon as possible to study the full-life effects of atomic oxygen exposure on spacecraft systems.

  3. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  4. T2 working group summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Caspi et al.

    2002-11-19

    The T2 Working Group has reviewed and discussed the issues and challenges of a wide range of magnet technologies: superconducting magnets using NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Sn and HTS conductor with fields ranging from 2-15 T and permanent magnets up to 4 T. The development time of these technologies varies significantly, but all are considered viable, providing an unprecedented variety of choice that can be determined by a balance of cost and application requirements. One of the most significant advances since Snowmass '96 is the increased development and utilization of Nb{sub 3}Sn. All of the current US magnet programs (BNL, FNAL, LBNL, and Texas A and M) have programs using Nb{sub 3}Sn. There are also active programs in HTS development at BNL and LBNL. A DOE/HEP sponsored program to increase the performance and reduce the cost of Nb{sub 3}Sn is in its second year. The program has already made significant advances. The current funding for this program is $500k/year and an increase to $2M has been proposed for FY02.

  5. Neutron radiography working group test programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scope and results of the Euratom Neutron Radiography Working Group Test Program are described. Seven NR centers from six European Community countries have performed this investigation using eleven NR facilities. Four test items were neutron radiographed using 30 different film/converter combinations. From film density measurements neutron beam components were determined. Radiographic sensitivity was assessed from visual examinations of the radiographs. About 25,000 dimensional measurements were made and were used for the assessment of accuracies of dimensional measurements from neutron radiographs. The report gives a description of the test items used for the Test Program, the film density and dimensional measurements, and concentrates on the assessment of the measuring results. The usefulness of the beam purity and sensitivity indicators was assessed with the conclusion that they are not suitable for neutron radiography of nuclear reactor fuel. Ample information is included in the report about measuring accuracies which can be reached in dimensional measurements of fuel pins. After a general comparison of measuring accuracies is discussed. Results from different NR facilities are treated separately as are the different kinds of dimensions of the fuel pins. Finally human and instrument factors are discussed. After presenting final conclusions (which take into account the above-mentioned factors) results of other investigations about dimensional measurements are shortly reviewed

  6. TAP Report - Southwest Idaho Juniper Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gresham, Garold Linn [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    There is explicit need for characterization of the materials for possible commercialization as little characterization data exists. Pinyon-juniper woodlands are a major ecosystem type found in the Southwest and the Intermountain West regions of the United States including Nevada, Idaho and Oregon. These widespread ecosystems are characterized by the presence of several different species of pinyon and juniper as the dominant plant cover. Since the 1800s, pinyon-juniper woodlands have rapidly expanded their range at the expense of existing ecosystems. Additionally, existing woodlands have become denser, progressively creating potential fire hazards as seen in the Soda Fire, which burned more than 400 sq. miles. Land managers responsible for these areas often desire to reduce pinyon-juniper coverage on their lands for a variety of reasons, as stated in the Working Group objectives. However, the cost of clearing thinning pinyon-juniper stands can be prohibitive. One reason for this is the lack of utilization options for the resulting biomass that could help recover some of the cost of pinyon-juniper stand management. The goal of this TAP effort was to assess the feedstock characteristics of biomass from a juniper harvested from Owyhee County to evaluate possible fuel and conversion utilization options.

  7. The forgotten cousins : dental and chiropractic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection surveillance methods should be appropriate to the particular use of x-rays employed. Dentists use small fixed position radiation fields with low output machines, making frequent routine visits unnecessary. There are also large numbers of them. On the other hand chiropractors use large fields and potentially high doses as well as a wide variety of projections and filters, which makes routine visits necessary. These differences have not unsurprisingly led to the National Radiation Laboratory adopting quite different approaches to monitoring these domains. In dental radiography past surveys have shown that the x-ray units themselves to be very robust and stable. A simple postal test was developed for dentists. A small number of visits are also made to dental x-ray facilities per year. Because of the greater possible level of hazard involved routine visits are made to chiropractic establishments. Chiropractic radiation protection surveys have now been extended to include calculating patient doses. The wide variety of projections and the extensive use of beam shaping filters and diaphragms means that we had to develop a program (called Chirodos) to allow for these filters in calculating the chiropractic patient doses. Data collected during the radiation protection surveys includes technique factors, filter materials, positions, and shielding. A national database of chiropractic doses has led us to establish reference doses for chiropractic x-ray exams. (author)

  8. The chiropractic profession in Denmark 2010-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Orla Lund; Kongsted, Alice; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2015-01-01

    facilities, and 1 out of 4 employed a physiotherapist. Three out of 4 clinics employed a secretary, too. The average duration of a consultation was 40 min for a new patient and 13 min for a follow-up consultation. Virtually all Danish chiropractors working in the primary sector made use of manipulation...... as one of their treatment modalities. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to describe the state and latest development of the chiropractic profession in Denmark using repeated surveys. Displaying various characteristics of both clinics and individual chiropractors, the image emerging is one of a stable...

  9. Summary of working group on collective instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we summarize the efforts of the Working Group on Collective Instabilities at the Workshop on the RHIC Performance. Impedance estimates have been made for some of the main hardware in RHIC, including bellows, pickup electrodes, abort kicker, and transverse damper. In general, these impedances are not expected to limit the beam intensity for Au ions, but might limit the proton intensity. We have also calculated the higher-order modes of the standard 26.7-MHz rf cavity for use in estimating coupled-bunch instability growth rates. Predictions of intrabeam scattering confirm the results in the RHIC Conceptual Design Report. For the standard assumptions, there is a threefold growth in transverse emittance. Varying the initial transverse emittance by a factor of two changes the final emittance value (after 10 hours) by less than 20%. If a 214-MHz rf system is considered, the growth is more severe---about a factor of five---and a beam lifetime of 10 hours requires an rf voltage in excess of 32 MV. Coupled-bunch calculations show that the transverse instabilities are dominated by the resistive-wall impedance for either rf choice. A modest damping system should be adequate to deal with this. Longitudinal growth times of about 20 ms are expected for the low-frequency rf case; growth times for the high-frequency rf system are a factor of 10 longer and the instability is predicted to be Landau damped. Copper plating of the dipole vacuum chambers has been found to have no deleterious effects, provided the coating is uniform and not overly thick. 14 refs., 3 tabs

  10. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVocht, James W; Goertz, Christine M; Hondras, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    participants randomly into one of the following four groups, all of which included a comprehensive self-care program: reversible interocclusal splint therapy (RIST), Activator Method Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) (Activator Methods International, Phoenix), sham AMCT and self-care only. They made assessments...

  11. Chiropractic as spine care: a model for the profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metz R Douglas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 100 years after its inception the chiropractic profession has failed to define itself in a way that is understandable, credible and scientifically coherent. This failure has prevented the profession from establishing its cultural authority over any specific domain of health care. Objective To present a model for the chiropractic profession to establish cultural authority and increase market share of the public seeking chiropractic care. Discussion The continued failure by the chiropractic profession to remedy this state of affairs will pose a distinct threat to the future viability of the profession. Three specific characteristics of the profession are identified as impediments to the creation of a credible definition of chiropractic: Departures from accepted standards of professional ethics; reliance upon obsolete principles of chiropractic philosophy; and the promotion of chiropractors as primary care providers. A chiropractic professional identity should be based on spinal care as the defining clinical purpose of chiropractic, chiropractic as an integrated part of the healthcare mainstream, the rigorous implementation of accepted standards of professional ethics, chiropractors as portal-of-entry providers, the acceptance and promotion of evidence-based health care, and a conservative clinical approach. Conclusion This paper presents the spine care model as a means of developing chiropractic cultural authority and relevancy. The model is based on principles that would help integrate chiropractic care into the mainstream delivery system while still retaining self-identity for the profession.

  12. Information behavior in dynamic group work contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Pierce, Linda G.

    2000-01-01

    -specific information. The third theme is called `contested collaboration', a phenomenon where team members maintain an outward stance of cooperation but work to further their own interests, at times sabotaging the collaborative effort. These results provide insights to the complex nature of human information behavior......In many dynamic work situations, no single individual can acquire the varied and often rapidly expanding information needed for success. Individuals must work together to collect, analyze, synthesize and disseminate information throughout the work process. Perhaps one of the most dynamic work...... of the situation. Interwoven situational awareness appears to facilitate response to dynamic, constraint-bound situations. The second theme describes the need for dense social networks or frequent communication between participants about the work context and situation, the work process and domain...

  13. The Experiences of Expert Group Work Supervisors: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atieno Okech, Jane E.; Rubel, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of group work supervision literature suggests that description of expert group work supervisors' experiences could be useful for expanding existing group work supervision practices and models. This study provided a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. Results indicate…

  14. Group Work Learning In English Learning And Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晴霞

    2007-01-01

    Group work learning is one of the hot topics in English learning and teaching today. This discourse will probe the meaning and the advantages of group work learning, as well as its implementation. Also, the discourse discusses the proper time for group work learning. In addition to that, problems of group work learning are enclosed.

  15. Multicultural Group Work: A Force for Developing and Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Multicultural group work represents a powerful tool for helping and healing in the context of human diversity. This article summarizes multicultural group work, including task, psychoeducational, counseling, and psychotherapy groups, and describes a group work model for multicultural assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Group work…

  16. Chiropractic management of patients post-disc arthroplasty: eight case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Descarreaux Martin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When conservative therapies for low back pain (LBP are not effective, elective surgery may be proposed to these patients. Over the last 20 years, a new technology, disc replacement, has become increasingly popular because it is believed to maintain or restore the integrity of spinal movement and minimize the side-effects compared to fusion. Although disc replacement may relieve a patient from pain and related disability, soreness and stiffness of the lumbopelvic region seem to be common aftermaths of the surgery. This prospective case series was undertaken to identify and describe potential adverse events of lumbar spinal manipulation, a common therapy for low back pain, in a group of patients with symptoms after disc prostheses. Cases presentation Eight patients who underwent lumbar spine total disc replacement were referred by an orthopaedic surgeon for chiropractic treatments. These patients had 1 or 2 total lumbar disc replacements and were considered stable according to the surgical protocol but presented persistent, post-surgical, non-specific LBP or pelvic pain. They were treated with lumbar spine side posture manipulations only and received 8 to 10 chiropractic treatments based on the clinical evolution and the chiropractor's judgment. Outcome measures included benign, self-limiting, and serious adverse events after low back spinal manipulative therapy. The Oswestry Disability Index, a pain scale and the fear avoidance belief questionnaire were administered to respectively assess disability, pain and fear avoidance belief about work and physical activity. This prospective case series comprised 8 patients who all had at least 1 total disc replacement at the L4/L5 or L5/S1 level and described persistent post-surgical LBP interfering with their daily activities. Commonly-reported side-effects of a benign nature included increased pain and/or stiffness of short duration in nearly half of the chiropractic treatment period

  17. The Roots of Social Justice in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Salazar, Carmen F.

    2010-01-01

    This article revisits the history of group work, highlighting elements of empowerment and advocacy in the work of some key figures, and noting events and movements that nourished group work's social justice roots.

  18. Working with Cooperative Small Groups. Classroom Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diversified small groups in the classroom provide a good opportunity for students to share information and ideas with each other. The research on cooperative small groups points out the benefits of these interactions and describes the process as a powerful forum for developing students' critical thinking and higher-order skills: (1) Cooperative…

  19. Group Work: From Process to Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rosemarie Giroux

    1994-01-01

    Describes a step-by-step process for conducting a small-group activity for intermediate students of French as a Second Language in which the students are asked to create a print advertisement for a new, nutritious snack. The steps include contextualization, brainstorming, establishing criteria, planning the activity, language, and reflection on…

  20. Educational Equity in Ethnically Diverse Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Trish; Clark, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Educational research in cooperative learning suggests that inequity based on perceived status may be an issue with heterogeneous cooperative learning groups. This paper explores issues of status based on race, ethnicity and cultural background in the New Zealand tertiary classroom where there is a diverse mix of domestic and international…

  1. From the inside Out: Group Work with Women of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Ellen L.; Williams, Wendi S.

    2014-01-01

    This article will present two models for conducting group work with Women of Color (WOC): the SisterCircle Approach and the Group Relations Model. The authors contend that the models, when used together, combine an internal and external focus ("inside out") of group work that can assist group workers to conduct individual and group-level…

  2. Effective Implementing of Group Work in English Classrooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨克彦

    2015-01-01

    Group work can be an effective method to motivate students,encourage active learning,and develop key critical-thinking,communication,and decision-making skills.This article suggests ways to help implement group work successfully.

  3. Effective Implementing of Group Work in English Classrooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨克彦

    2015-01-01

    Group work can be an effective method to motivate students,encourage active learning,and develop key criticalthinking,communication,and decision-making skills.This article suggests ways to help implement group work successfully.

  4. Biomechanics/risk management (Working Group 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Mariano; Naert, Ignace; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The remit of this workgroup was to update the existing knowledge base in biomechanical factors, navigation systems and medications that may affect the outcome of implant therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The literature was systematically searched and critically reviewed. Five manuscrip...... of anticoagulants on patients undergoing oral implant therapy?...... in the following papers, together with the group consensus statements, clinical implications and directions for future research: * To what extent do cantilevers affect survival and complications of implant supported restorations in partially dentate patients? * To what extent does the crown-implant ratio affect...... survival and complications of implant supported restorations? * A systematic review on the accuracy and the clinical outcome of computer-guided template based implant dentistry. * What is the impact of systemic bisphosphonates on patients undergoing oral implant therapy? * What is the impact...

  5. Research on Group Work and Collaborative Work and Its Implications For Primary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin GÖDEK

    2004-01-01

    Group work is one of the teaching strategies used by teachers who attempt to make their teaching more effective. Collaborative work is an important aspect of group work. Even though group work is used by some teachers in their classrooms, there is a considerable variation in the extent and nature of such work. Therefore, it is necessary to examine group and collaborative work, to indicate their importance and the variable use of these techniques.In this study, firstly, collaborative work has ...

  6. 7 CFR 610.25 - Subcommittees and Local Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subcommittees and Local Working Groups. 610.25 Section... Committees § 610.25 Subcommittees and Local Working Groups. (a) Subcommittees. In some situations... notified and invited to attend. Decisions resulting from recommendations of Local Working Groups will...

  7. Strategies to Improve Student Reaction to Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriflik, Lynda; Mullan, Judy

    2007-01-01

    After receiving negative feedback from students and tutors about their group work experiences in a health subject, strategies to resolve these collaborative learning issues were considered. The objectives were to facilitate student ability to resolve group work issues, highlight group work as an important graduate attribute and to improve…

  8. 78 FR 21415 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group..., the AMWG, a technical work group, a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and...

  9. 77 FR 9265 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and...

  10. 77 FR 43117 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group... Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and...

  11. 76 FR 24516 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group...-575) of 1992. The AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work group (TWG),...

  12. 75 FR 34476 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... Interior (Secretary) is renewing the charter for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group is to advise and to provide recommendations to the...

  13. International Technical Working Group Round Robin Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudder, Gordon B.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Herbillion, Georges M.

    2003-02-01

    The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to support illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and accepted as credible. The principal objectives of the Round Robin Tests are to prioritize forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) Round Robin, and previous Plutonium Round Robin, have made tremendous contributions to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the nine participating internal laboratories. A prioritized list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Current work is focused on the extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The HEU Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability is combined with the appropriate knowledge/database, it results in a significant capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific process or facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in the current capabilities including procedures for non-nuclear forensics and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The results of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a ''recommended protocol'' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases.

  14. Designing and Assessing Productive Group Work in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca, Javier; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A history teacher examines what is successful and not successful in group work in his high school classroom and gives concrete suggestions for improving group practice. Topics discussed include preparing students for group work, supporting collaboration, inviting critical analysis, and assessing both group and individual performance. (Contains 2…

  15. Habitat planning, maintenance and management working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM), called {open_quotes}America`s Sea,{close_quotes} is actually a small ocean basin covering over 1.5 million square kilometers. Because of the multiple uses, diversity, and size of the Gulf`s resources, management is shared by a number of governmental agencies including the Minerals Management Service, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, National Marine Fisheries Service, the US Coast Guard, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the five Gulf states fisheries agencies. All of these entities share a common goal of achieving optimum sustainable yield to maximize geological, biological, social, and economic benefits from these resources. These entities also share a common theme that the successful management of the northern GOM requires maintenance and enhancement of both the quantity and quality of habitats. A closer look at the GOM shows the sediment to be clearly dominated by vast sand and mud plains. These soft bottom habitats are preferred by many groundfish and shrimp species and, thus, have given rise to large commercial fisheries on these stocks. Hard bottom and reef habitats, on the other hand, are limited to approximately 1.6% of the total area of the Gulf, so that, while there are high demands by commercial and recreational fishermen for reef associated species, the availability of habitat for these stocks is limited. The thousands of oil and gas structures placed in the Gulf have added significant amounts of new hard substrate. The rigs-to-reefs concept was a common sense idea with support from environmental user groups and the petroleum industry for preserving a limited but valuable habitat type. As long as maximizing long-term benefits from the Gulf s resources for the greatest number of users remains the goal, then programs such as Rigs-to-Reefs will remain an important tool for fisheries and habitat managers in the Gulf.

  16. Teaching Standards-Based Group Work Competencies to Social Work Students: An Empirical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Vakharia, Sheila P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Accreditation standards and challenges in group work education require competency-based approaches in teaching social work with groups. The Association for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups developed Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups, which serve as foundation competencies for professional practice. However, there…

  17. Learning rights, participation and toleration in student group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Group work in the context of higher education is a teaching and learning method which has the aim to facilitate learning processes due to students learning by cooperation and mutual feedback. At the same time group work might offer various challenges on a social, moral and intellectual level....... This article offers a moral perspective on group work by introducing a concept of ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work. The aim of the paper is theoretically to offer a vocabulary concerning ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work by applying John Dewey’s metaphor ‘the spectator versus...

  18. Drawing Boundaries: Boundary Arrangements of the IPCC Working Groups

    OpenAIRE

    van Eck, Christel

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates how the IPCC’s Working Groups safeguard their scientific character while communicating with policymakers. Due to the different nature of Working Groups’ assessments, all Working Groups make different boundary arrangements of how science is defined; what is considered as relevant knowledge; and what the division of labor is amongst Working Groups. The results show that science is a context-specific activity in a constantly changing landscape, which in turn aff...

  19. The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Bruce F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsidiary body of the European Chiropractors' Union. The title change should encourage submissions from all professionals interested in manual therapy including chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, medical doctors and scientists interested in this field.

  20. The journal 'chiropractic & osteopathy' changes its title to 'chiropractic & manual therapies'. a new name, a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bruce F; French, Simon D; Cameron, Melanie; Perle, Stephen M; Lebouef-Yde, Charlotte; Rubinstein, Sidney M

    2011-01-01

    Chiropractic & Osteopathy changes its title to Chiropractic & Manual Therapies in January 2011. This change reflects the expanding base of submissions from clinical scientists interested in the discipline of manual therapy. It is also in accord with the findings of a review of the journal content and a joint venture between the original parent organisation the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia and a new partner the European Academy of Chiropractic, which is a subsidiary body of the European Chiropractors' Union. The title change should encourage submissions from all professionals interested in manual therapy including chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, medical doctors and scientists interested in this field.

  1. The Preparation of Professional School Counselors for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Bauman, Sheri; Smith, Julie

    2008-01-01

    An online survey about the group work training experiences of school counselors was completed by 802 members of the American School Counseling Association (ASCA). Most respondents had one course in group work; a minority had the opportunity to observe or co-lead groups with children and/or adolescents as part of their training. Qualitative…

  2. Dealing with Slackers in College Classroom Work Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.; Smith, Nicole A.; Eidsness, Mary A.; Bogdan, Leah M.; Zackery, Brooke A.; Thompson, Michelle R.; Schoo, Meghan E.; Johnson, Angela N.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to probe the presence of slackers in college classroom work group, how students react to slackers, and the recommendations students would make for working with slackers in future group projects. Thirty-seven college students participated in one of five focus groups. Results indicate that (a) college students working…

  3. 78 FR 7810 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group.... L. 102-575) of 1992. The AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the AMWG, a technical work...

  4. Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group (PPWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI established the Trans-NCI Pharmacogenomics and Pharmacoepidemiology Working Group to support development of a comprehensive and interdisciplinary pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenomics cancer research program.

  5. Effects of Biofreeze and chiropractic adjustments on acute low back pain: a pilot study☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, John; Enix, Dennis; Snyder, Brian; Giggey, Kristan; Tepe, Rodger

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective This randomized controlled study was designed to determine the pain-relieving effect of Biofreeze (Performance Health Inc., Export, PA) body surface application and chiropractic adjustments on subjects with acute low back pain (LBP). Methods The data were collected at the baseline, 2 weeks after treatment, and 4 weeks after treatment for final analyses. Diversified manual adjustments were provided by licensed chiropractors twice a week for 4 weeks to both control and experimental groups. Biofreeze was applied to the lower back area 3 times a day for 4 weeks in the experimental group. Outcome assessments included visual analog scale, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, heart rate variability for stress, and electromyography for low back muscle activity. Results A total of 36 subjects were recruited in the study (25 male). The average age was 34 years. Significant pain reduction was found after each week of treatment in the experimental group (P .05) in the experimental group after 4 weeks of Biofreeze and chiropractic adjustments. There were no statistically significant changes in the electromyography readings between the 2 groups. Conclusion Biofreeze combined with chiropractic adjustment showed significant reduction in LBP. PMID:19674721

  6. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical...

  7. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  8. Influence of working conditions on overlapping of cutting and ground skidding in group work

    OpenAIRE

    Potočnik, Igor; Poje, Anton

    2007-01-01

    This research deals with the influence of working conditions on the duration of cutters participation in group work skidding. Two main theoretical assumptions were considered. First, working conditions that decrease the skidding efficiency increase the time of cutters assistance, because the group as a whole strives to improve efficiency, and second, the duration of assistance to the working group is specific regardless of working conditions. The research included 5 places of research (compar...

  9. Graduate Social Work Students' Experiences with Group Work in the Field and the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harriet; Knight, Carolyn; Khudododov, Khudodod

    2014-01-01

    For decades, group work scholars have described a discrepancy between student preparation for group work practice and opportunities to work with groups in the field practicum and professional practice. Educators in related disciplines such as counseling and psychology have expressed similar concerns. This article reports findings of a study of MSW…

  10. Has Group Work Education Lost Its Social Group Work Essence? A Content Analysis of MSW Course Syllabi in Search of Mutual Aid and Group Conflict Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweifach, Jay Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content analysis of MSW group work course syllabi in an effort to better understand the extent to which mutual aid and group conflict, two important dimensions of social group work, are included and featured as prominent elements in MSW-level group work instruction.

  11. Division X, XII / Commission 40, 41 / Working Group Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kellermann, Kenneth; Orchiston, Wayne; Davies, Rod; Gurvits, Leonid; Ishiguro, Masato; Lequeux, James; Swarup, Govind; Wall, Jasper; Wielebinski, Richard; van Woerden, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    The IAU Working Group on Historical Radio Astronomy (WGHRA) was formed at the 2003 General Assembly of the IAU as a Joint Working Group of Commissions 40 (Radio Astronomy) and 41 (History of Astronomy), in order to: a) assemble a master list of surviving historically-significant radio telescopes and

  12. Report of the Working Group on Publicity and Funding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peder

    2014-01-01

    The report highlights the activities of the working group in raising awareness of the need for geographical names standardization and the work of the Group of Experts, particularly in advancing the digital presence of UNGEGN, through web presence and updated Media Kit and Wikipedia presence. The ...

  13. Beyond Standard Model: Report of Working Group II

    OpenAIRE

    Joshipura, Anjan S.; Roy, Probir

    1995-01-01

    Working group II at WHEPP3 concentrated on issues related to the supersymmetric standard model as well as SUSY GUTS and neutrino properties. The projects identified by various working groups as well as progress made in them since WHEPP3 are briefly reviewed.

  14. Working group report: Flavor physics and model building

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Parida; Nita Sinha; B Adhikary; B Allanach; A Alok; K S Babu; B Brahmachari; D Choudhury; E J Chun; P K Das; A Ghosal; D Hitlin; W S Hou; S Kumar; H N Li; E Ma; S K Majee; G Majumdar; B Mishra; G Mohanty; S Nandi; H Pas; M K Parida; S D Rindani; J P Saha; N Sahu; Y Sakai; S Sen; C Sharma; C D Sharma; S Shalgar; N N Singh; S Uma Sankar; N Sinha; R Sinha; F Simonetto; R Srikanth; R Vaidya

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of flavor physics and model building working group at WHEPP-9. While activities in flavor physics have been mainly focused on -physics, those in model building have been primarily devoted to neutrino physics. We present summary of working group discussions carried out during the workshop in the above fields, and also briefly review the progress made in some projects subsequently

  15. The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Luke, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for…

  16. The Expert Group Work Supervision Process: Apperception, Actions, and Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Deborah; Atieno Okech, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    The researchers conducted a systematic exploration of the experiences of expert group work supervisors during the supervision process. This article's purpose is to report results that inform intentional practice and illustrate supervision interventions for group work supervisors. Results indicated that participants experienced an interactive…

  17. 77 FR 20789 - Work Group on Measuring Systems for Taxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Work Group on Measuring Systems for Taxis AGENCY: National... Standards and Technology (NIST) is forming a Work Group (WG) to develop proposals to revise the...

  18. Effects of Personality on Attitudes toward Academic Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, William R.; Tashchian, Armen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of personality on attitudes toward academic group work among a sample of 225 business students. Data were collected using pre-existing scales for measuring personality and attitudes toward academic group work. Specifically, the Neo-FFI scale was used to measure the five personality dimensions of openness,…

  19. Teachers' Leadership and Students' Experience of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva; Granstrom, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Group work is used as a means of learning at all levels of most educational systems. However, teachers often use group work without considering its "pros and cons." Such a mode of non-reflected application may sometimes end up in positive experiences and learning, but the likelihood is that the outcome will be the opposite. The aim of this…

  20. Integrating Social Justice in Group Work: The Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Danica G.; Arredondo, Patricia; Gladding, Samuel T.; Toporek, Rebecca L.

    2010-01-01

    Group work can be an effective outlet for facilitating client empowerment at individual and systemic levels. This article outlines strategies for increasing attention to social justice issues in group work over the next decade within education, training, supervision, practice, and research. Drawing from historical perspectives, current literature,…

  1. 78 FR 23329 - Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting Meeting Announcement... attend and participate in an Aircraft Access to SWIM Working Group Meeting scheduled for Thursday, May 16... to SWIM The FAA's Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) program is a...

  2. The Role of Work Group in Individual Sickness Absence Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaananen, Ari; Tordera, Nuria; Kivimaki, Mika; Kouvonen, Anne; Pentti, Jaana; Linna, Anne; Vahtera, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our two-year follow-up study was to examine the effect of the social components of the work group, such as group absence norms and cohesion, on sickness absence behavior among individuals with varying attitudes toward work attendance. The social components were measured using a questionnaire survey, and data on sickness absence…

  3. Group Work, Interlanguage Talk,and Second Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Michael H.; Porter, Patricia A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses both the pedagogical arguments and the psycholinguistic rationale for small-group work in the second language classroom. Claims that the negotiation work possible in group actiity makes it an attractive alternative to the teacher-led discussion. Reviews research findings on interlanguage which generally support the claims made for group…

  4. The perceptions, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapy and chiropractic students regarding each others’ professional practice

    OpenAIRE

    N. Naidoo; Bühler, L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The roles of physiotherapists and chiropractors demon-strate some overlap. Both are members of a multidisciplinary team and contributeto the holistic care of patients. Good understanding of each others’ professionalpractice may lead to good working relationships with effective referrals, inter -disciplinary and multidisciplinary management of patients. Purpose: To investigate the perceptions, attitudes and knowledge of undergraduatephysiotherapy and chiropractic students about e...

  5. Investigation on Roles in Group Work of College English Chassroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙倩; 张杨

    2009-01-01

    Group work has been being widely welcomed by scholars and college English teachers when it was introduced into Chinese college English classrooms which usually contain more than 60 students, probably because group discussions or cooperative work provide more chances for Chinese college students to involve in the class teaching and learning and get them more opportunities to practice their oral English so as to promote their English competent. However, little attention has been paid to what kind of group work arrangement is more effective on making students more engaged in the task as teachers expect in China. This investigation will help answer the question that whether students should be informed their roles in group work through longitudinal qualitative research, the class observation and interviews specifically. Comparison will be taken between two classes to figure out the better way of arranging group work in college English classes.

  6. The Council on Chiropractic Education's New Wellness Standard: A call to action for the chiropractic profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Ronald

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chiropractic profession has long considered itself to be a preventive science. Recently the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE has defined a set of standards that must be implemented at all US chiropractic colleges as of January of 2007. These are specific to wellness measures and health promoting efforts that should be performed by chiropractors. This will mandate traditional health promotion and prevention methods be taught to students at accredited colleges and to practicing chiropractors. Objective To present the idea of performing traditional health promotion and wellness-concepts in chiropractic practice as a call to action for clinicians and generate discussion on the topic. Discussion This manuscript discusses relevant topics of health promotion and prevention for chiropractors and other practicing clinicians that should be made priorities with patients in order to enhance both patient health and community and population health. Conclusion All practicing chiropractors, as well as other clinicians should take these new standards from the CCE as a call to action to begin helping patients address the removable causes of morbidity, disability and premature mortality where they exist, in addition to treating their painful spinal conditions.

  7. Collective Motivation Beliefs of Early Adolescents Working in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Krawchuk, Lindsey L.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined collective efficacy, group cohesion, and group performance in 125 randomly assigned groups of older (mean age 13.45 years) and younger (mean age 11.41 years) early adolescents working on three cooperative tasks. Collective motivation significantly predicted performance, even after controlling for past performance and…

  8. Group Work and Leadership: Perception of FCS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Susan W.; Gregoire, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    No known studies have examined the perception of family and consumer science (FCS) students related to group work in the classroom and its relationship to leadership. In this qualitative study, two groups of FCS students--hospitality management and dietetics--viewed group projects as exercises in leadership skills that had many barriers.…

  9. Investigating the Effectiveness of Group Work in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Sofroniou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Group work permits students to develop a range of critical thinking, analytical and communication skills; effective team work; appreciation and respect for other views, techniques and problem-solving methods, all of which promote active learning and enhance student learning. This paper presents an evaluation of employing the didactic and pedagogical customs of group work in mathematics with the aim of improving student performance as well as exploring students’ perceptions of working in groups. The evaluation of group work was carried out during tutorial time with first year civil engineering students undertaking a mathematics module in their second semester. The aim was to investigate whether group work learning can help students gain a deeper understanding of the module content, develop improved critical and analytical thinking skills and see if this method of pedagogy can produce higher performance levels. The group work sessions were conducted over four weeks whilst studying the topic of integration. Evaluation surveys were collected at the end of the intervention along with an investigation into the examination results from the end of semester examinations. In order to derive plausible and reasonable conclusions, these examination results were compared with an analogous cohort of first year mathematics students, also studying integration in their engineering-based degree. The investigation into the effectiveness of group work showed interesting and encouraging positive outcomes, supported by a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  10. Research on Group Work and Collaborative Work and Its Implications For Primary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin GÖDEK

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Group work is one of the teaching strategies used by teachers who attempt to make their teaching more effective. Collaborative work is an important aspect of group work. Even though group work is used by some teachers in their classrooms, there is a considerable variation in the extent and nature of such work. Therefore, it is necessary to examine group and collaborative work, to indicate their importance and the variable use of these techniques.In this study, firstly, collaborative work has been defined and then its importance, purposes, benefits for both students and teachers, and some problems that teachers confront in their classrooms have been discussed. Secondly, the variation between the teachers who are using group work, collaborative work, individual or whole class work have been explored and different kinds of group work have been described. Then, some research evidences on group work have been referenced and the consistency of results has been discussed. Finally, some recommendations for teachers in using group work and collaborative work have been made.

  11. Causal Relationships between Communication Confidence, Beliefs about Group Work, and Willingness to Communicate in Foreign Language Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushino, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the causal relationships between three factors in second language (L2) group work settings: communication confidence (i.e., confidence in one's ability to communicate), beliefs about group work, and willingness to communicate (WTC). A questionnaire was administered to 729 first-year university students in Japan. A model…

  12. Association for Specialists in Group Work: Multicultural and Social Justice Competence Principles for Group Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Merchant, Niloufer; Skudrzyk, Bogusia; Ingene, Daphne

    2012-01-01

    The Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) is committed to understanding how issues of multiculturalism and social justice affect all aspects of group work. This document reflects the updating and revision of a previous document entitled, "Principles for Diversity-Competent Group Workers," which was endorsed by ASGW in 1998 and published…

  13. Stress in chiropractic education: a student survey of a five-year course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Hilary; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objective : Stress encompasses academic issues, such as time management, increased work load, and new subject matter, but cannot be separated from stressors, such as social adjustment and financial pressure. Our study investigated whether perceived level of academic or practical attainment and the method of study were associated with the amount of perceived stress during students" studies. Methods : A semi-structured self-administered questionnaire was piloted and distributed to 134 students at a chiropractic college at the end of a lecture. Results : The survey had a response rate of 81%. Students in their fourth year consistently reported the highest perceived levels of stress, with 81% feeling that their ability to study was affected by their financial situation and 56% felt overwhelmed at their ability to cope with their college workload. All year groups were stressed during their course of studies, but the stressor varies depending on the year of study. Conclusions : Year 4 consistently demonstrated the highest levels of stress. All students, regardless of year group, experienced varying degrees of stress while studying and the central stressor changed depending on the time position within the course. PMID:23957319

  14. Cultural diversity and work-group performance: Detecting the rules

    OpenAIRE

    Girndt, T.

    2000-01-01

    With greater levels of international cooperation, work-groups are increasingly composed of members from different cultures. These groups often suffer from communication problems; however, research suggests that they also benefit from their members cultural diversity and generate higher ranges of problem perspectives. This thesis investigates two questions: first, when do diverse groups generate a higher range of perspectives; second, which skill do group members need to benefit from cultural ...

  15. Discussions of the uranium geology working groups IGC, Sydney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is divided into six working group discussions on the following subjects: 1) Chemical and physical mechanisms in the formation of uranium mineralization, geochronology, isotope geology and mineralogy; 2) Sedimentary basins and sandstone-type uranium deposits; 3) Uranium in quartz-pebble conglomerates; 4) Vein and similar type deposits (pitchblende); 5) Other uranium deposits; 6) Relation of metallogenic, tectonic and zoning factors to the origin of uranium deposits. Each working group paper contains a short introductory part followed by a discussion by the working group members

  16. Technical assistance for JCCCNRS working groups 3 and 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this task is to provide technical support for the efforts of the U.S.-Russian JCCCNRS Working Group 3 on radiation embrittlement and Working Group 12 on aging. Specific activities under this task are: (1) supply of materials and preparation of test specimens for collaborative IAR studies to be conducted in Russia; (2) capsule preparation and initiation of irradiation of Russian specimens within the United States; (3) preparation for, and participation in, working Groups 3 and 12 meetings; and (4) sponsoring of the assignment at ORNL of a scientist from the Russian National Research Center, Kurchatov Institute

  17. Chiropractic and children: Is more research enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboeuf-Yde Charlotte

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many health science research and review articles end with the words: "More research is needed". However, when it comes to research, it is not as much a question of quantity as of quality. There are a number of important prerequisites before research should be initiated. The three pillars, relevance, quality and ethics should be respected but for a project to be meaningful, it must also be based on plausible rationale. In evidence-based (informed practice, one takes into account not only research-based evidence but also clinical expertise and the patients' perspectives. In this paper, we briefly discuss how this should be handled in clinical practice is briefly discussed, using the concept of "traffic lights" (red, yellow, green. We explain how the combination of evidence and plausibility can be used to reach a decision as to whether a treatment or diagnostic procedure is suitable, possible, or unsuitable. In this thematic series of Chiropractic & Osteopathy a number of reviews are presented, in which the research status of pediatric chiropractic is scrutinized and found wanting. Two important aspects were studied in these reviews: the effect of treatment and safety issues. Two types of problems were identified: the lack of research in general and the lack of research using the appropriate study designs and methodology in particular. Therefore, we discuss the meager research noted in the areas of chiropractic care in children and the clinical consequences this should have. The prerequisites for "more research" are scrutinized and an example given of suitable research programs. Finally, the important issue of implementation of research findings is covered, emphasizing the responsibility of all stakeholders involved at both the undergraduate and the postgraduate level, within professional associations, and on an individual level.

  18. Robotic Measurement and Control for Chiropractic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Goldsmith

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The precision and programmability of robotic manipulators makes them suitable for biomechanics research, particularly when an experimental procedure must be accurately repeated multiple times. This paper describes a robotic system used to investigate biomechanical mechanisms of stroke in humans. A parallel robot manipulator is used to reproduce chiropractic manipulations on animal subjects using a 3-D vision system. An algorithm for calibrating the system is proposed and tested on the robot. An iterative learning control scheme is then introduced to improve positional accuracy. Experimental results demonstrate that the calibration procedure and learning scheme are both effective.

  19. 2016 Mission Operations Working Group: Earth Observing-1 (EO-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    EO-1 Mission Status for the Constellation Mission Operations Working Group to discuss the EO-1 flight systems, mission enhancements, debris avoidance maneuver, orbital information, 5-year outlook, and new ground stations.

  20. CAFIU Working Group Visited the U.S. and Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正At the invitation of the University of Mississippi, Friendship Force International and the North America Association for International Exchanges, Mr. Du Kening, Deputy Secretary-General of CAFIU, leading a 3-member working group visited

  1. Postgraduates’ Attitudes towards Group Works in Oral English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕思迪

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated four postgraduates’ attitudes towards group work in oral English class in Tianjin Foreign Studies University. Two sources of data were collected, including interviews and class observations.

  2. Environmental Working Group Arctic Meteorology and Climate Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Environmental Working Group (EWG) was established in June 1995 under the framework of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Economic and Technological...

  3. Linear Collider Working Group reports from Snowmass '88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a summary of the Linear Collider Working Group. Papers on the following topics are discussed: parameters; damping ring; bunch compressor; linac; final focus; and multibunch effects

  4. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  5. Prevalence of hip osteoarthritis in chiropractic practice in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Christensen, Henrik W; Overgaard, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered by the chiroprac......The purposes of this study were to measure the prevalence of clinical and radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA) and first-time diagnosis of hip OA in consecutive patients presenting to chiropractic practices in Denmark and to report the components of the initial treatment rendered...... by the chiropractic practitioner....

  6. Process versus outcome: challenges of the chiropractic wellness paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to discuss the term wellness in the context of the philosophy of chiropractic. Discussion PubMed and Index to Chiropractic Literature show an upward trend in use of the term wellness. Wellness may be used differently depending upon the profession and may be considered a process by some and an outcome by others. Conclusion There appears to be no consensus on the definition of wellness or how it is being used. Wellness is not exclusive to chiropractic, a...

  7. Physical Workload and Work Capacity across Occupational Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Brighenti-Zogg

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine physical performance criteria of different occupational groups by investigating physical activity and energy expenditure in healthy Swiss employees in real-life workplaces on workdays and non-working days in relation to their aerobic capacity (VO2max. In this cross-sectional study, 337 healthy and full-time employed adults were recruited. Participants were classified (nine categories according to the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988 and merged into three groups with low-, moderate- and high-intensity occupational activity. Daily steps, energy expenditure, metabolic equivalents and activity at different intensities were measured using the SenseWear Mini armband on seven consecutive days (23 hours/day. VO2max was determined by the 20-meter shuttle run test. Data of 303 subjects were considered for analysis (63% male, mean age: 33 yrs, SD 12, 101 from the low-, 102 from the moderate- and 100 from the high-intensity group. At work, the high-intensity group showed higher energy expenditure, metabolic equivalents, steps and activity at all intensities than the other groups (p<0.001. There were no significant differences in physical activity between the occupational groups on non-working days. VO2max did not differ across groups when stratified for gender. The upper workload limit was 21%, 29% and 44% of VO2max in the low-, moderate- and high-intensity group, respectively. Men had a lower limit than women due to their higher VO2max (26% vs. 37%, when all groups were combined. While this study did confirm that the average workload limit is one third of VO2max, it showed that the average is misrepresenting the actual physical work demands of specific occupational groups, and that it does not account for gender-related differences in relative workload. Therefore, clinical practice needs to consider these differences with regard to a safe return to work, particularly for the high-intensity group.

  8. Emotions in work groups as moral orientation guides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Brinkmann, Svend

    2010-01-01

    We argue that emotions in groups can best be studied qualitatively and act as moral orientation guides. This article argues first that the normativity of particular practices is at play in any rational empirical investigation of emotions in workgroups and second that moral values must be studied ...... in order to understand emotions in work groups...

  9. Cultural diversity and work-group performance : Detecting the rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girndt, T.

    2000-01-01

    With greater levels of international cooperation, work-groups are increasingly composed of members from different cultures. These groups often suffer from communication problems; however, research suggests that they also benefit from their members cultural diversity and generate higher ranges of pro

  10. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion…

  11. A Two-Fold Unveiling: Unmasking Classism in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    The pervasive myth of the United States as a "classless society" silences the reality of social class oppression in this country. This silencing has received little attention to date in group work training, research, and practice. Unmasking classism may generate anxiety for group workers and members alike, yet holds potential for significant…

  12. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  13. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  14. TMAP ad hoc Working Group Fish Progress report 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolle, L.J.; Damm, U.; Diederichs, B.; Jager, Z.; Overzee, van H.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Building on previous work done by the TMAP ad hoc Working Group Fish, a meeting and a workshop were held in Hamburg in June and October 2007. The most important aim of both was to come to an agreement on how to proceed with the data preparations and analyses, and to facilitate the exchange of data a

  15. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  16. WORK GROUP DEVELOPMENT MODELS – THE EVOLUTION FROM SIMPLE GROUP TO EFFECTIVE TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca ZOLTAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, work teams are increasingly studied by virtue of the advantages they have compared to the work groups. But a true team does not appear overnight but must complete several steps to overcome the initial stage of its existence as a group. The question that arises is at what point a simple group is turning into an effective team. Even though the development process of group into a team is not a linear process, the models found in the literature provides a rich framework for analyzing and identifying the features which group acquires over time till it become a team in the true sense of word. Thus, in this article we propose an analysis of the main models of group development in order to point out, even in a relative manner, the stage when the simple work group becomes an effective work team.

  17. Competition policy in the FTAA: progress in the working group

    OpenAIRE

    Aráoz F., Mercedes; Van Ginhoven R., Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) is to unite the thirty four economies of the Hemisphere into a single market. The negotiations are supposed to be completed by the year 2005. Though year 2000 is crucial since all the negotiated issues will be settle in the agenda. Initially, twelve working groups were established and, later, transformed into nine negotiation groups. Competition Policy is one these negotiation groups and it is probably the issue that would have long ...

  18. Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group has screened six prospective demonstration projects for consideration by the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT). These projects include the Kirtland Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the March Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the McClellan Air Force Base Demonstration Project, the Williams Air Force Base Demonstration Project, and two demonstration projects under the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. A seventh project (Port Hueneme Naval Construction Battalion Center) was added to list of prospective demonstrations after the September 1993 Working Group Meeting. This demonstration project has not been screened by the working group. Two additional Air Force remediation programs are also under consideration and are described in Section 6 of this document. The following information on prospective demonstrations was collected by the Waste Contaminants at Military Bases Working Group to assist the DOIT Committee in making Phase 1 Demonstration Project recommendations. The remainder of this report is organized into seven sections: Work Group Charter's mission and vision; contamination problems, current technology limitations, and institutional and regulatory barriers to technology development and commercialization, and work force issues; screening process for initial Phase 1 demonstration technologies and sites; demonstration descriptions -- good matches;demonstration descriptions -- close matches; additional candidate demonstration projects; and next steps

  19. Background and future activities of PBNCC's nuclear training working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a review of the background and activities of the nuclear training working group of the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee. The working group has examined various mechanisms for regional cooperation including the development of aregional catalog of training programs and the conceptualization of sharing training facilities among nuclear operators in the region. The working group has focused its attention on the exchange of information on the on-going training programs, operator training facilities, available resources for training assistance and proposed cooperative schemes. These activities are expected to continue and will provide invaluable information for nuclear power programs in the Pacific Basin region. The group also reviewed problems and issues associated with developing regional cooperation. (author)

  20. Working Group on Isotopes in Hydrology, Grenoble, October 1965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Working Group organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency, which met at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires in Grenoble by invitation of the French Atomic Energy Commission, was to provide an opportunity for the different groups engaged upon the use of isotope techniques in hydrology to discuss their present work and indicate the main lines of future work. In accordance with the decision of the meeting, members of the Section of Hydrology of the Agency have prepared this report based on written contributions submitted by participants of the meeting and on the discussions which took place. It is hoped that this report will be of interest not only to groups engaged in this work but also to hydrologists wishing to know what types of studies are in progress and where they are being carried

  1. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or

  2. Unity through Diversity: Value-in-Diversity Beliefs, Work Group Diversity, and Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L. van Knippenberg (Daan); S.A. Haslam (Alexander); M.J. Platow (Michael)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractResearch on work group diversity has more or less neglected the possibility that reactions to diversity may be informed by individuals' beliefs about the value of diversity (vs. homogeneity) for their work group. We studied the role of such diversity beliefs as a moderator of the relatio

  3. The role of chiropractic care in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Paul E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults.

  4. A feasibility study of work group monitoring for Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present Hanford internal dosimetry policy recommends placing a worker on a routine bioassay monitoring program if the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) in a single calendar year may exceed 100 mrem for all radionuclides. Nearly all Hanford workers who enter contamination zones are on routine bioassay programs. Site environmental restoration and remediation now require an even larger number of workers to enter contamination zones, therefore increasing the number of workers requiring routine bioassay monitoring. Work group bioassay is a method which demonstrates, at a reduced cost, that workers who are assumed to be essentially at no risk for incurring intakes are, in fact, not incurring intakes. For the proposed program, a work group will be identified by a letter to their exposure history file. The analytical result for a work group bioassay sample will be placed in the dosimetry record of the person actually providing the sample and will be identified as pertaining to a work group by an appropriate code. Any positive result will be followed up using the same procedure as for individual-specific bioassay, which limits false positives to less than 0.5%. Workers who (1) have radioactive material depositions that interfere with detecting and assessing additional intakes, (2) use any form of respiratory protection, or (3) enter airborne radioactivity areas will be excluded from a work group bioassay program and placed on an individual-specific bioassay program

  5. Nuclear Forensics: Report of the AAAS/APS Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Benn

    2008-04-01

    This report was produced by a Working Group of the American Physical Society's Program on Public Affairs in conjunction with the American Association for the Advancement of Science Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy. The primary purpose of this report is to provide the Congress, U.S. government agencies and other institutions involved in nuclear forensics with a clear unclassified statement of the state of the art of nuclear forensics; an assessment of its potential for preventing and identifying unattributed nuclear attacks; and identification of the policies, resources and human talent to fulfill that potential. In the course of its work, the Working Group observed that nuclear forensics was an essential part of the overall nuclear attribution process, which aims at identifying the origin of unidentified nuclear weapon material and, in the event, an unidentified nuclear explosion. A credible nuclear attribution capability and in particular nuclear forensics capability could deter essential participants in the chain of actors needed to smuggle nuclear weapon material or carry out a nuclear terrorist act and could also encourage states to better secure such materials and weapons. The Working Group also noted that nuclear forensics result would take some time to obtain and that neither internal coordination, nor international arrangements, nor the state of qualified personnel and needed equipment were currently enough to minimize the time needed to reach reliable results in an emergency such as would be caused by a nuclear detonation or the intercept of a weapon-size quantity of material. The Working Group assesses international cooperation to be crucial for forensics to work, since the material would likely come from inadequately documented foreign sources. In addition, international participation, if properly managed, could enhance the credibility of the deterrent effect of attribution. Finally the Working Group notes that the U.S. forensics

  6. The first research agenda for the chiropractic profession in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubinstein, Sidney M; Bolton, Jenni; Webb, Alexandra L;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research involving chiropractors is evolving and expanding in Europe while resources are limited. Therefore, we considered it timely to initiate a research agenda for the chiropractic profession in Europe. The aim was to identify and suggest priorities for future research in order to ...... for the chiropractic profession in Europe. Future discussion and study is necessary to determine whether the themes identified in this survey should be broadly implemented....

  7. Employee age and perceptions of work in self-managing and traditional work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayslip, B; Miller, C; Beyerlein, M M; Johnson, D; Metheny, W; Yeatts, D

    1996-01-01

    Self-managing work groups are a form of work design in which employees take responsibility for the group's tasks and have discretion over decisions which impact group performance. To explore the impact of age and work teams on job attitudes, data from 477 employees suggested that self-managed work group members differed from traditional job holders regarding perceived general job satisfaction, perceived control by supervisors, as well as a number of specific dimensions of the work environment. Moreover, while there was evidence of an age effect on attitudes toward supervisory control, there was no joint effect of age by work design on job attitudes, i.e., one's perceived general job satisfaction. Older employees who were members of self-managed work groups were however, more impacted by this form of work design in reporting more positive perceptions of their access to information essential to the performance of their work. These findings suggest that an "older" work force should not be considered a barrier to implementing a work teams approach to job design. PMID:8835612

  8. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Ghosh; A Nyffeler; V Ravindran

    2011-05-01

    This is a summary of the activities of the Physics at the LHC working group in the XIth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-XI) held at the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India in January 2010. We discuss the activities of each sub-working group on physics issues at colliders such as Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main issues discussed involve (1) results on W mass measurement and associated QCD uncertainties, (2) an attempt to understand the asymmetry measured at Tevatron in the top quark production, and (3) phenomenology of warped space dimension model.

  9. Working group 3 : Identification of non-linear systems

    OpenAIRE

    GOLINVAL, JC; G. Kerschen; V. Lenaerts; Thouverez, F.; Argoul, P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers in structural dynamics have long recognised the importance of diagnosing and modelling non-linearity. The last 20 years have witnessed a shift in emphasis from single degree-of-freedom (sdof) to multi-degree-of-freedom (mdof) non-linear structural dynamics. The main feature of the program of COST F3 Working Group 3 was to identify the behaviour of a structure which exhibits a localised non-linear component. Inside this working group, two benchmarks were defined and studied intensi...

  10. Group Work Tests for Context-Rich Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The group work test is an assessment strategy that promotes higher-order thinking skills for solving context-rich problems. With this format, teachers are able to pose challenging, nuanced questions on a test, while providing the support weaker students need to get started and show their understanding. The test begins with a group discussion phase, when students are given a "number-free" version of the problem. This phase allows students to digest the story-like problem, explore solution ideas, and alleviate some test anxiety. After 10-15 minutes of discussion, students inform the instructor of their readiness for the individual part of the test. What follows next is a pedagogical phase change from lively group discussion to quiet individual work. The group work test is a natural continuation of the group work in our daily physics classes and helps reinforce the importance of collaboration. This method has met with success at York Mills Collegiate Institute, in Toronto, Ontario, where it has been used consistently for unit tests and the final exam of the grade 12 university preparation physics course.

  11. Waste forms, packages, and seals working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridhar, N. [Center Antonio, TX (United States); McNeil, M.B. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of radioactive waste forms and packaging. Also included is a description of the use of natural analogs in waste packaging, container materials and waste forms.

  12. Introduction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Henry

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we presented the planned direction of the UNIX International Performance Management Work Group. This group consists of concerned system developers and users who have organized to synthesize recommendations for standard UNIX performance management subsystem interfaces and architectures. The purpose of these recommendations is to provide a core set of performance management functions and these functions can be used to build tools by hardware system developers, vertical application software developers, and performance application software developers.

  13. WHEPP-X: Report of the working group on cosmology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Kaplinghat; L Sriramkumar; A Berera; P Chingangbam; R K Jain; M Joy; J Martin; S Mohanty; A Nautiyal; R Rangarajan; S Ray; V H S Kumar

    2009-01-01

    This is a summary of the activities of the working group on cosmology at WHEPP-X. The three main problems that were discussed at some length by the group during the course of the workshop were (i) canceling a `large' cosmological constant, (ii) non-Gaussianities in inflationary models and (iii) stability of interacting models of dark energy and dark matter. We have briefly outlined these problems and have indicated the progress made.

  14. Near-field environment/processes working group summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, W.M. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the near-field environment to geologic repositories for high-level nuclear waste. The near-field environment may be affected by thermal perturbations from the waste, and by disturbances caused by the introduction of exotic materials during construction of the repository. This group also discussed the application of modelling of performance-related processes.

  15. Division X Working Group on Historic Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orchiston, Wayne; Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Davies, Rodney D.; Débarbat, Suzanne V.; Morimoto, Masaki; Slysh, Slava; Swarup, Govind; van Woerden, Hugo; Wall, Jasper V.; Wielebinski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    During the Rio General Assembly we held the following meetings of the Working Group: a Business Meeting, a Science Meeting on “The Development of Aperture Synthesis Imaging in Radio Astronomy”, and a Science Meeting on “Recent Research”.

  16. Big Data: Laying the Groundwork. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Hillegas, Curtis W.; Lance, Timothy; Lynch, Clifford A.; Monaco, Gregory E.; Mundrane, Michael R.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  17. WWW-based environments for collaborative group work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Since 1994, we have been involved in the design and use of a series of WWW-based environments to support collaborative group work for students in a technical university in The Netherlands. These environments, and the course re-design that accompanies each new environment, began in April 1994 and con

  18. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  19. ACPSEM brachytherapy working group recommendations for quality assurance in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendation papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews and have also been approved by the ACPSEM Council. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM Brachytherapy Working Group (BTWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendation papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendation papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  20. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice..., 2013 Vol. 78 No. 206. This new meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who...

  1. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government and DoD...

  2. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply...

  3. Group Development Phases as Working through Six Fundamental Human Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnand, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    Following Bennis and Shepard's work, groups are thought to become preoccupied with problems of gaining reassurance about six basic human tasks in turn. One can show that these problems, called focal problems, have two forms, inclusive and narrowed, and that progressing through the problems requires three subphases. (Author/ABL)

  4. 77 FR 30314 - Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Trinity Adaptive Management Working Group AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service..., BOR process for banking water. Completion of the agenda is dependent on the amount of time each...

  5. Summary of Working Group 4 - Intense Muon Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various topics of muon physics were discussed in the Working Group 4 (WG4) of the NuFact04 workshop. This summary will survey various lepton flavor violation (LFV) studies and high precision measurement that could be benefited from higher fluxes of muon beams. Also discussed were muon's applications and future prospects for intense muon beams

  6. The OMERACT Ultrasound Working Group 10 Years On

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyn, George A; Naredo, Esperanza; Iagnocco, Annamaria;

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) now thrives as an established imaging modality for the investigation and management of chronic inflammatory arthritis. We summarize here results of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) US working group (WG) projects of the last 2 years. These results were...

  7. 11th meeting of the working group on fracture processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the full text of the 29 papers read at the 11th meeting of the DVM working group on fracture processes. The first part discusses non-metallic materials (plastics, glasses, ceramics), the second part contains mostly theoretical investigations, and the third part discusses the fracture behaviour of metallic materials. (RW)

  8. Working Group 2 summary: Space charge effects in bending systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the start of the Workshop, the authors asked the Working Group 2 participants to concentrate on three basic goals: (1) survey the status of how comprehensively the physics concerning space-charge effects in bends is understood and how complete is the available ensemble of analytic and computational tools; (2) guided by data from experiments and operational experience, identify sources of, and cures for, beam degradation; and (3) review space-charge physics in rings and the limitations it introduces. As the Workshop unfolded, the third goal naturally folded into the other two goals, and these goals, they believe, were fulfilled in that the Working Group was able to compile an end product consisting of a set of recommendations for potentially fruitful future work. This summary constitutes an overview of the deliberations of the Working Group, and it is their hope that the summary clarifies the motivation for the recommended work listed at the end. The summary is organized according to the two aforementioned goals, and the prime topics of discussion appear as subsections under these goals

  9. Plastination: a modern approach to chiropractic teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Gilles

    1998-01-01

    Plastination is a unique method for the preservation of biological material for teaching and research. The plastinated specimens are dry, odorless, non-toxic and durable. They can be manipulated by teachers and students without protective equipment like gloves. Invented in 1978 by Doctor Gunther von Hagens from the University of Heidelberg, this technique, that involves the replacement of water by a curable polymer, has spread rapidly all around the world and is actually used in over 250 universities and colleges. To our knowledge, the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, is the first institution to use plastinated specimens for teaching anatomy, neuroanatomy, pathology and radiology to students in chiropractic. This paper describes the various steps of the method (fixation, dehydration, impregnation and curing) and presents some examples of the utilization of plastinated specimens. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  10. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  11. Use of the term subluxation in publications during the formative years of the chiropractic profession

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The term subluxation has come to have different meanings for different health care professions in the United States for over the past century. This controversy has resulted in some contention both internal and external to the chiropractic profession. Some current factions within the chiropractic profession hold the term subluxation to be synonymous with the identity of chiropractic itself; however, this term was not solely used by chiropractic during its formative years. The purpose of this a...

  12. Asian Students' Perceptions of Group Work and Group Assignments in a New Zealand Tertiary Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingsheng; Campbell, Jacqui

    2008-01-01

    This study, conducted in 2005 in a New Zealand tertiary institution, examines Asian students' perceptions of the much-promulgated cooperative learning concepts in the form of group work and group assignments. Twenty-two Asian students participated in one-hour individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. The study found that Asian students…

  13. Annual report to the working group on technology, growth and employment. Summit Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summit Working Group in Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982 (Appendix A), and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. Representatives appointed by the governments of the seven Economic Summit countries (Canada, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States) and a representative of the Commission of the European Communities met in Washington, DC on September 29 and 30, 1983 under the co-leadership of the United States and the European Communities. A report of the conclusions of this meeting has been published and a progress report was included in the TGE Working Group report to the 1984 London Summit (Appendix B). Following the London Summit, the fusion Working Group met in Brussels July 5 and 6 to consider the implementation of collaborative projects taking into account the conclusions issued in the Communique from London (Appendix C) and the recommendations of the TGE report

  14. PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION WORKING GROUP: METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari R. A.; Whitlock, J.; Therios, I.U.; Peterson, P.F.

    2012-11-14

    We summarize the technical progress and accomplishments on the evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR and PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. We intend the results of the evaluations performed with the methodology for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. The PR and PP Working Group developed the methodology through a series of demonstration and case studies. Over the past few years various national and international groups have applied the methodology to nuclear energy system designs as well as to developing approaches to advanced safeguards.

  15. An Analysis of Students’ Communication during Group Work in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelopi D. Vasileiadou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing observation grid and interview study methologies, this research examines the ways in which students communicate with each other while working in a team during problem solving in mathematics. The study focuses primarily on the language used for communication. Results suggest that participants make assumptions to solve mathematical problems and justify their individual opinions, and cooperate and help each other, rarely asking for their teacher’s help, while using both the ordinary, and the mathematical spoken and written language. The interview indicates that students, although not experienced in undertaking group work, are able to readily identify its benefits and positive aspects.

  16. HEP-FCE Working Group on Libraries and Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Borgland, Anders; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Viren, Brett; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This is a report from the Libraries and Tools Working Group of the High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence. It presents the vision of the working group for how the HEP software community may organize and be supported in order to more efficiently share and develop common software libraries and tools across the world's diverse set of HEP experiments. It gives prioritized recommendations for achieving this goal and provides a survey of a select number of areas in the current HEP software library and tools landscape. The survey identifies aspects which support this goal and areas with opportunities for improvements. The survey covers event processing software frameworks, software development, data management, workflow and workload management, geometry information management and conditions databases.

  17. Executive committee report: geotechnical instrumentation working group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responding to the widespread need for the geotechnical community to discuss instrumentation for nuclear waste repositories, a meeting was held December 2 and 3, 1981, in Denver, Colorado. This report gives the group's consensus recommendations to aid in making decisions for development of instrumentation for future repository work. The main conclusions of the working group meeting were as follows: (1) monitoring of geotechnical parameters in nuclear waste repositories will be necessary to meet licensing requirements; (2) currently available instruments are underdeveloped for this monitoring; (3) research and development to provide adequate instrumentation will need to be performed under federal sponsorship by national laboratories, universities, contractors, and consultants; and (4) a NASA-type reliability program is needed to meet the quality assurance, durability, calibration, and time schedule demands of geotechnical instrumentation development. This will require significant financial commitments from the federal sector

  18. Perceived discontinuities and continuities in transdisciplinary scientific working groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowston, Kevin; Specht, Alison; Hoover, Carol; Chudoba, Katherine M; Watson-Manheim, Mary Beth

    2015-11-15

    We examine the DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth) project, a transdisciplinary organization tasked with creating a cyberinfrastructure platform to ensure preservation of and access to environmental science and biological science data. Its objective was a difficult one to achieve, requiring innovative solutions. The DataONE project used a working group structure to organize its members. We use organizational discontinuity theory as our lens to understand the factors associated with success in such projects. Based on quantitative and qualitative data collected from DataONE members, we offer recommendations for the use of working groups in transdisciplinary synthesis. Recommendations include welcome diverse opinions and world views, establish shared communication practices, schedule periodic synchronous face-to-face meetings, and ensure the active participation of bridge builders or knowledge brokers such as librarians who know how to ask questions about disciplines not their own. PMID:25957788

  19. The Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG): An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is a multinational, informal association of official practitioners of nuclear forensics - laboratory scientists, law enforcement personnel, and regulatory officials - who share a common task in responding to nuclear security events involving nuclear or other radioactive materials out of regulatory control. The ITWG conducts its work through a combination of annual meetings, task group activities, and special exercises. Participation in the ITWG is open to competent and qualified Government participants from nations having, or wishing to have, a nuclear forensics capability. By coming together in an informal network, ITWG participants can fulfill the role of advancing best practices in nuclear forensic. The voluntary, informal nature of ITWG fosters cooperation and collaboration in a less restricted manner than might be possible for organizations having more formal structures. (author)

  20. Executive committee report: geotechnical instrumentation working group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, D.G.; Rogue, F.; Beloff, W.R.; Binnall, E.; Gregory, E.C.

    1982-04-26

    Responding to the widespread need for the geotechnical community to discuss instrumentation for nuclear waste repositories, a meeting was held December 2 and 3, 1981, in Denver, Colorado. This report gives the group's consensus recommendations to aid in making decisions for development of instrumentation for future repository work. The main conclusions of the working group meeting were as follows: (1) monitoring of geotechnical parameters in nuclear waste repositories will be necessary to meet licensing requirements; (2) currently available instruments are underdeveloped for this monitoring; (3) research and development to provide adequate instrumentation will need to be performed under federal sponsorship by national laboratories, universities, contractors, and consultants; and (4) a NASA-type reliability program is needed to meet the quality assurance, durability, calibration, and time schedule demands of geotechnical instrumentation development. This will require significant financial commitments from the federal sector.

  1. Report of the Snowmass 2013 energy frontier QCD working group

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, J M; Huston, J; Petriello, F; Andersen, J; Barze, L; Beauchemin, H; Becher, T; Begel, M; Blondel, A; Bodwin, G; Boughezal, R; Carrazza, S; Chiesa, M; Dissertori, G; Dittmaier, S; Ferrera, G; Forte, S; Glover, N; Hapola, T; Huss, A; Tormo, X Garcia i; Grazzini, M; Hoche, S; Janot, P; Kasprzik, T; Klein, M; Klein, U; Kosower, D; Li, Y; Liu, X; Mackenzie, P; Maitre, D; Meoni, E; Mishra, K; Montagna, G; Moretti, M; Nadolsky, P; Nicrosini, O; Piccinini, F; Reina, L; Radescu, V; Rojo, J; Russ, J; Sapeta, S; Schwartzman, A; Skands, P; Smillie, J; Stewart, I W; Tackmann, F J; Tramontano, F; Van de Water, R; Walsh, J R; Zuberi, S

    2013-01-01

    This is the summary report of the energy frontier QCD working group prepared for Snowmass 2013. We review the status of tools, both theoretical and experimental, for understanding the strong interactions at colliders. We attempt to prioritize important directions that future developments should take. Most of the efforts of the QCD working group concentrate on proton-proton colliders, at 14 TeV as planned for the next run of the LHC, and for 33 and 100 TeV, possible energies of the colliders that will be necessary to carry on the physics program started at 14 TeV. We also examine QCD predictions and measurements at lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron colliders, and in particular their ability to improve our knowledge of strong coupling constant and parton distribution functions.

  2. Using collaborative work groups to reduce O ampersand M costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commonwealth Edison Company (ComEd) entered the nineties burdened with external distractions from its core business of power generation. Its unresolved 1987 rate case continued to face intervention in the courts. Some of its largest industrial and municipal customers were exploring more economical alternatives. The new convention facility in Chicago actually engaged an independent energy supplier. Retail wheeling was the hot topic, and internal problems were present. Operations and Maintenance (O ampersand M) costs were steadily increasing. Two of their six nuclear stations were on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Watch List. Immediate changes had to occur if ComEd was to ensure its future competitiveness. At ComEd Braidwood Nuclear Power Station some untraditional work methodologies were embarked upon to help the parent company reduce its O ampersand M costs. Various types of collaborative work groups were formed, and have succeeded in lowering O ampersand M costs through shorter refueling outages and the use of fewer contracted personnel. These collaborative work groups are listed below and are described in detail in the remainder of this paper: (1) A core group of Maintenance Modification Contractor (MMC) supervision integrated into the Owner's Maintenance Staff, (2) A Corporate Outage Support Group of supervisory personnel which supplements the site's Maintenance Staff, (3) The Integrated Outage and Turbine Overhaul Contractor using a mixture of its own and Maintenance Staff supervisory personnel during outages with the Owner supplementing craft support using a third-party, (4) Six nuclear stations sharing key MMC personnel to insure experienced individuals are used effectively, and (5) Composite teams of maintenance personnel working across defined disciplines Braidwood Station has capitalized on the strategy of positive collaboration to become one of the lowest cost producers of nuclear power. Its use has enabled the Station to successfully complete the

  3. Report of the working group on W mass and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballestrero, A.; Maina, E. [University of Torino (Italy); Charlton, D.G.; Watson, N.K. [University of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Cowan, G. [University of Siegen (Germany); Dornan, P.; Moutoussi, A. [ICSTM, London (United Kingdom); Edgecock, R.; Miller, D.J.; Thompson, J.C. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United Kingdom); Ellis, J.; Thomson, M.; Watson, M.F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Glover, E.W.N.; Stirling, W.J. [University of Durham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, C.; Moretti, S.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, C.P.; Webber, B.R. [University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hwang, H.; Parkes, C.; Renton, P.B. [University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [University of Lancaster (United Kingdom); Kartvelishvili, V. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kunszt, Z. [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Ross, D.A. [University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Ward, J. [University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    The W mass and QCD working group discussed a wide variety of topics relating to present and future measurements of M{sub W} at LEP2, including QCD backgrounds to W{sup +}W{sup -} production. Particular attention was focused on experimental issues concerning the direct reconstruction and threshold mass measurements, and on theoretical and experimental issues concerning the 4-jet final state. This report summarizes the main conclusions. (author)

  4. CPAFFC Working Group Attends Sino-African Initiative Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan; Jun

    2013-01-01

    <正>A CPAFFC working group led by its Vice President Xie Yuan attended the 2013 Sino-African Initiative (SAI) Conference sponsored by Sister Cities International (SCI) of the United States and organized by the Eastern Africa Sister Cities (EASC) in Nairobi, Kenya, from January 31 to February 2. About 60 officials and representatives of sister cities associations from China, the United States, Kenya, Nigeria and

  5. Food Parenting Measurement Issues: Working Group Consensus Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Sheryl O; Leslie A. Frankel; Beltran, Alicia; Hodges, Eric; Hoerr, Sharon; Lumeng, Julie; Tovar, Alison; Kremers, Stef

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing problem. As more researchers become involved in the study of parenting influences on childhood obesity, there appears to be a lack of agreement regarding the most important parenting constructs of interest, definitions of those constructs, and measurement of those constructs in a consistent manner across studies. This article aims to summarize findings from a working group that convened specifically to discuss measurement issues related to parental influences on...

  6. Report of the Quark Flavor Physics Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, J N; Ritchie, J L; Cirigliano, V; Kettell, S; Briere, R; Petrov, A A; Schwartz, A; Skwarnicki, T; Zupan, J; Christ, N; Sharpe, S R; Van de Water, R S; Altmannshofer, W; Arkani-Hamed, N; Artuso, M; Asner, D M; Bernard, C; Bevan, A J; Blanke, M; Bonvicini, G; Browder, T E; Bryman, D A; Campana, P; Cenci, R; Cline, D; Comfort, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Datta, A; Dobbs, S; Duraisamy, M; El-Khadra, A X; Fast, J E; Forty, R; Flood, K T; Gershon, T; Grossman, Y; Hamilton, B; Hill, C T; Hill, R J; Hitlin, D G; Jaffe, D E; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Kagan, A L; Kaplan, D M; Kohl, M; Krizan, P; Kronfeld, A S; Lee, K; Littenberg, L S; MacFarlane, D B; Mackenzie, P B; Meadows, B T; Olsen, J; Papucci, M; Parsa, Z; Paz, G; Perez, G; Piilonen, L E; Pitts, K; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Ratcliff, B N; Roberts, D A; Rosner, J L; Rubin, P; Seeman, J; Seth, K K; Schmidt, B; Schopper, A; Sokoloff, M D; Soni, A; Stenson, K; Stone, S; Sundrum, R; Tschirhart, R; Vainshtein, A; Wah, Y W; Wilkinson, G; Wise, M B; Worcester, E; Xu, J; Yamanaka, T

    2013-01-01

    This report represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Quark Flavor Physics Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of quark flavor physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of strange, charm, and bottom quarks. The ability of these studies to reveal the effects of new physics at high mass scales make them an essential ingredient in a well-balanced experimental particle physics program.

  7. Efficiency of group work in harvesting mountainous broadleaf thinning stands

    OpenAIRE

    Legat, Nejc; Zečić, Željko; Krpan, Ante P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Group work was researched for felling, processing, skidding and quality inspection activities in mountainous broadleaf thinning stands with approximately the same terrain and stand conditions. The stands were 55 and 70years old. In the forest communities of the mountainous beech forest with dead nettle (Lamio orvale - Fagetum sylvaticae/Ht. 1938) and the forests of the sessile oak and horn beam with beech (Epimedio - Carpinetum betuli var. Fagus sylvatica/Ht. 1938/Borth.1963), the main tree s...

  8. Summary of “Future of DIS” Working Group Session

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamont M.; Guzey, V.; Polini, A.

    2011-04-11

    Despite the closure of the HERA accelerator in the past few years, much physics still remains to be understood, from the quark and gluon content of the nucleon/nucleus across all x to the still unknown spin structure of the proton. The 'Future of DIS' working group was dedicated to discussions on these and many other subjects. This paper represents a brief overview of the discussions. For further details, please refer to individual contributions.

  9. LHC Working Group on Forward Physics and Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The LHC Working Group on Forward Physics and Diffraction is a forum for: * interaction between theorists and experimentalists from the LHC experiments about forward physics * definition of a physics programme for diffraction either using the rapidity gap method or proton tagging * definition of a common strategy among the different LHC experiments (special runs ...) * discussion of the different forward detectors (roman pots, movable beam pipes, timing and position detectors) * application to cosmic ray physics

  10. The Exclusive Group - Expatriates Working against Corporate Goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    as destructive towards overall corporate aims to internationalise and develop managerial and organisational competencies. Specifically excluding behaviour and cultural boundary creation of the expatriate group hindered the necessary cross-cultural communication and thereby working against corporate strategy......Theories on expatriation have proposed international transfer as a mean to develop management capabilities and internationalise organisational communication networks. It has been argued that such developments are highly dependent on a sustained continual cross-cultural communication between...

  11. Development of web application for organizing work in smaller groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kerec, Žiga

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this bachelor thesis was the development of an web application that would enable a smoother organization and prosecution of team work. It is intended to be used by members of smaller groups and can be described as a tool of communication that will improve the group’s organization. The application offers services for direct communication through discussions, file sharing and the division of current tasks. The server part of the application was created in the framework Django in ...

  12. Conceptual change strategies and cooperative group work in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Patricia A.; Sanford, Julie P.

    This study conducted at a suburban community college tested a method of conceptual change in which treatment students worked in small cooperative groups on tasks aimed at eliciting their misconceptions so that they could then be discussed in contrast to the scientific conceptions that had been taught in direct instruction. Categorizations of student understanding of the target concepts of the laws of conservation of matter and energy and aspects of the particulate nature of gases, liquids, and solids were ascertained by pre- and posttesting. Audiotapes of student verbal interaction in the small groups provided quantitative and qualitative data concerning student engagement in behaviors suggestive of the conditions posited to be part of the conceptual change process (Posner, Strike, Hewson & Gertzog, 1982). Chi-square analysis of posttests indicated that students in treatment groups had significantly lower (p < 0.05) proportion of misconceptions than control students on four of the five target concepts. Students who exhibited no change in concept state had a higher frequency of verbal behaviors suggestive of impeding conceptual change when compared to students who did change. Three factors emerged from qualitative analysis of group interaction that appeared to influence learning: (a) many students had flawed understanding of concepts that supported the target concepts; (b) student views towards learning science affected their engagement in assigned tasks, (c) good and poor group leaders had a strong influence on group success.

  13. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  14. Improving tsunami resiliency: California's Tsunami Policy Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Charles R.; Johnson, Laurie; Jones, Lucile M.; Ross, Stephanie; Kontar, Y.A.; Santiago-Fandiño, V.; Takahashi, T.

    2014-01-01

    California has established a Tsunami Policy Working Group to facilitate development of policy recommendations for tsunami hazard mitigation. The Tsunami Policy Working Group brings together government and industry specialists from diverse fields including tsunami, seismic, and flood hazards, local and regional planning, structural engineering, natural hazard policy, and coastal engineering. The group is acting on findings from two parallel efforts: The USGS SAFRR Tsunami Scenario project, a comprehensive impact analysis of a large credible tsunami originating from an M 9.1 earthquake in the Aleutian Islands Subduction Zone striking California’s coastline, and the State’s Tsunami Preparedness and Hazard Mitigation Program. The unique dual-track approach provides a comprehensive assessment of vulnerability and risk within which the policy group can identify gaps and issues in current tsunami hazard mitigation and risk reduction, make recommendations that will help eliminate these impediments, and provide advice that will assist development and implementation of effective tsunami hazard risk communication products to improve community resiliency.

  15. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Work Groups and Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Steve W J; Ilgen, Daniel R

    2006-12-01

    Teams of people working together for a common purpose have been a centerpiece of human social organization ever since our ancient ancestors first banded together to hunt game, raise families, and defend their communities. Human history is largely a story of people working together in groups to explore, achieve, and conquer. Yet, the modern concept of work in large organizations that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries is largely a tale of work as a collection of individual jobs. A variety of global forces unfolding over the last two decades, however, has pushed organizations worldwide to restructure work around teams, to enable more rapid, flexible, and adaptive responses to the unexpected. This shift in the structure of work has made team effectiveness a salient organizational concern. Teams touch our lives everyday and their effectiveness is important to well-being across a wide range of societal functions. There is over 50 years of psychological research-literally thousands of studies-focused on understanding and influencing the processes that underlie team effectiveness. Our goal in this monograph is to sift through this voluminous literature to identify what we know, what we think we know, and what we need to know to improve the effectiveness of work groups and teams. We begin by defining team effectiveness and establishing the conceptual underpinnings of our approach to understanding it. We then turn to our review, which concentrates primarily on topics that have well-developed theoretical and empirical foundations, to ensure that our conclusions and recommendations are on firm footing. Our review begins by focusing on cognitive, motivational/affective, and behavioral team processes-processes that enable team members to combine their resources to resolve task demands and, in so doing, be effective. We then turn our attention to identifying interventions, or "levers," that can shape or align team processes and thereby provide tools and

  16. Activities of the ESARDA Working Group on Integrated Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: ESARDA, the European Safeguards Research and Development Association, pursues as a main objective to assist the European safeguards community with advancing progress in safeguards and enhancing the efficiency of systems and measures. Key bodies of ESARDA are standing Working Groups dealing with various technical subjects. The ESARDA Working Group on Integrated Safeguards was created in 2000 with the objective to provide the Safeguards Community with expert advice on methodologies and approaches to integrate INFCIRC/153 and INFCIRC/540 measures and to present a forum for the exchange of information, views and experiences in that regard. Its members represent inspectorates, national authorities, operators and research centres active in the field of safeguards. The Working Group very soon realized that a first milestone on the road to Integrated Safeguards is the successful and functional implementation of the Additional Protocol. Discussions and activities concentrated on actions necessary to reach this end thereby taking into account the specific situation in European States. Among the topics discussed were issues of: - how to establish a functional site definition for different types of installations, ranging from small locations with very small amounts of nuclear material to complex installations with a complex history; - how to deal with different and even conflicting requirements in the context of unannounced inspections; and - how to interpret and handle the requirements for R and D declarations considering the needs and interests of all parties involved; etc. The IAEA participated in most of the meetings as an observer and provided the group with valuable background information on Additional Protocol questions and received in turn a deep insight into our considerations, motivations and concerns. This procedure contributed much to a better mutual understanding that is not least reflected in the revised draft of the AP implementation guidelines

  17. Chiropractic of Recumbent Position Treating Cervical Vertigo%卧位整脊治疗颈性眩晕

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立志

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the curative effects in chiropractic of recumbent position treating cervical vertigo. Methods:64 cases of cervical ver-tigo were randomly divided into treatment group and control group, each of 32 cases, respectively with supine chiropractic and routine manipulation therapy, the effects were assessed after a course. Results:The total effective rate of treatment group was 93.75%, significantly higher than that of con-trol group by 75%(P<0.05). Conclusion:Chiropractic of recumbent position treating cervical vertigo is of favorable effects.%目的:观察卧位整脊治疗颈性眩晕的疗效。方法:64例颈性眩晕患者随机分为治疗组和对照组各32例,分别采用卧位整脊治疗和常规推拿治疗,1个疗程后评定疗效。结果:治疗组总有效率为93.75%,显著高于对照组的75%(P<0.05)。结论:卧位整脊治疗颈性眩晕效果良好。

  18. Feasibility of the STarT back screening tool in chiropractic clinics: a cross-sectional study of patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Johannesen, Else; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    ratios for having a risk profile on the psychological scales ranging from 3.8 (95% CI 2.3 - 6.3) for the MDI to 7.6 (95% CI 4.9 - 11.7) for the FABQ. The SBT questionnaire was feasible to use in chiropractic practice and risk groups were related to the presence of well-established psychological...

  19. Prevalence of pain-free weeks in chiropractic subjects with low back pain - a longitudinal study using data gathered with text messages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemeunier, Nadege; Kongsted, Alice; Axen, Iben

    2011-01-01

    percentages were reported for [greater than or equal to] 7 zero weeks in a row. There were no significant differences between the two study groups. CONCLUSION: It was uncommon that chiropractic subjects treated for non-specific LBP experienced an entire week without any LBP at all over 18 weeks. When...

  20. Attitudes towards chiropractic: an analysis of written comments from a survey of north american orthopaedic surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busse Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest by chiropractors in North America regarding integration into mainstream healthcare; however, there is limited information about attitudes towards the profession among conventional healthcare providers, including orthopaedic surgeons. Methods We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopaedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their attitudes towards chiropractic. Our survey included an option for respondants to include written comments, and our present analysis is restricted to these comments. Two reviewers, independantly and in duplicate, coded all written comments using thematic analysis. Results 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate 49%, and 174 provided written comments. Our analysis revealed 8 themes and 24 sub-themes represented in surgeons' comments. Reported themes were: variability amongst chiropractors (n = 55; concerns with chiropractic treatment (n = 54; areas where chiropractic is perceived as effective (n = 43; unethical behavior (n = 43; patient interaction (n = 36; the scientific basis of chiropractic (n = 26; personal experiences with chiropractic (n = 21; and chiropractic training (n = 18. Common sub-themes endorsed by surgeon's were diversity within the chiropractic profession as a barrier to increased interprofessional collaboration, endorsement for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal complaints, criticism for treatment of non-musculoskeletal complaints, and concern over whether chiropractic care was evidence-based. Conclusions Our analysis identified a number of issues that will have to be considered by the chiropractic profession as part of its efforts to further integrate chiropractic into mainstream healthcare.

  1. Introducing the AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    In response to two White Papers submitted to the Astro2010 Decadal Survey (1,2), a new AAS Working Group on Astroinformatics and Astrostatistics (WGAA) has been approved by the AAS Council at the 220th Meeting, June 2012, in Anchorage. The motivation for this WG is the growing importance of the interface between astronomy and various branches of applied mathematics, computer science and the emerging field of data science. With the new data-intensive projects envisioned for the coming decade, the need for advice derived from the focused attention of a group of AAS members who work in these areas is bound to increase. The Working Group is charged with spreading awareness of rapidly advancing computational techniques, sophsticated statistical methods, and highly capble software to further the goals of astronomical and astrophysical research. The three main strategic goals adopted by the WGAA Steering Committee for the next few years are to: (i) develop, organize and maintain methodological resources (such as software tools, papers, books, and lectures); (ii) enhance human resources (such as foster the creation of career paths, establish a Speakers' Bureau, establish and maintain an archived discussion forum, enable periodic news distribution); and (iii) organize topical meetings. The WGAA Steering Committee at this time includes twelve members: Kirk Borne, George Djorgovski, Eric Feigelson, Eric Ford, Alyssa Goodman, Joe Hilbe, Zeljko Ivezic (chair), Ashish Mahabal, Aneta Siemiginowska, Alex Szalay, Rick White, and Padma Yanamandra-Fisher. I will summarize our accomplishments since July 2012. (1) Astroinformatics: A 21st Century Approach to Astronomy (Borne & 90 coauthors), (2) The Astronomical Information Sciences: A Keystone for 21st-Century Astronomy (Loredo & 72 coauthors)

  2. Working group report on hadrons in the nuclear medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ent, R. [CEBAF, Newport News, VA (United States); Milner, R.G. [Masachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This working group focussed on the subject of hadrons in the nuclear medium. It encompassed both the understanding of the nucleus itself in terms of its binding and its structure, and the use of the nucleus as a medium to probe QCD and the structure of hadrons. Both aspects were addressed during the workshop, though the emphasis tended towards the latter. Almost inescapably this working group had some overlap with the other working groups, as the nucleus can also be used as a medium to probe the production and structure of vector mesons. Also, inclusive and semi-inclusive processes can be used as a probe of nuclear effects, for instance in the case of deep-inelastic scattering for x > 1. In this summary report the authors will try to restrict themselves to only those issues where the nuclear medium is important. To increase their understanding of the nucleus in terms of its binding and structure, they would like to know the effect of a dense nuclear medium on a nucleon, to know the non-nucleonic degrees of freedom needed to describe a nuclear system, and to understand the implications of the fact that a bound nucleon is necessarily off its mass-shell. The results of many lepton scattering experiments during the last two decades have raised these questions, but at this moment there are no definitive answers. The hope is that the well-known electron probe, with sufficient energy to probe the short-range properties of nuclei, can provide insight. Especially, the authors would like a conclusive answer to the question if, and to what extent, quark degrees of freedom are necessary to describe a nuclear system.

  3. Treatment optimization in MS: Canadian MS Working Group updated recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Mark S; Selchen, Daniel; Arnold, Douglas L; Prat, Alexandre; Banwell, Brenda; Yeung, Michael; Morgenthau, David; Lapierre, Yves

    2013-05-01

    The Canadian Multiple Sclerosis Working Group (CMSWG) developed practical recommendations in 2004 to assist clinicians in optimizing the use of disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. The CMSWG convened to review how disease activity is assessed, propose a more current approach for assessing suboptimal response, and to suggest a scheme for switching or escalating treatment. Practical criteria for relapses, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression and MRI were developed to classify the clinical level of concern as Low, Medium and High. The group concluded that a change in treatment may be considered in any RRMS patient if there is a high level of concern in any one domain (relapses, progression or MRI), a medium level of concern in any two domains, or a low level of concern in all three domains. These recommendations for assessing treatment response should assist clinicians in making more rational choices in their management of relapsing MS patients. PMID:23603165

  4. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Batavia; Begel, M; Bourilkov, D; Campanelli, M; Chlebana, F; Dittmann, J R; Ellis, S D; Field, B; Field, R; Gallinaro, M; Giele, W; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Hubacek, Z; Huston, J; Kilgore, W; Kluge, T; Lee, S W; Moraes, A; Mrenna, S; Olness, F; Proudfoot, J; Rabbertz, K; Royon, C; Sjöstrand, T; Skands, P Z; Smith, J; Tung, W K; Whalley, M R; Wobisch, M; Zielinski, M; de Roeck, A

    2006-01-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 inverse femtobarn of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focussed on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  5. Ionospheric effects on terrestrial communications :Working Group 3 overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bourdillon

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunications via ionospheric reflection of radio signals of ground-based transmitters are a traditional area. However, this technique is still in use in telecommunications, broadcasting, etc. Various problems have not yet been solved and some of them were studied in Working Group 3 (WG3. Structure of WG 3 and the terms of reference of its four working packages are described in the introductory paper by Zolesi and Cander (2004. Here we describe the main results achieved in COST 271 in the following areas: i large-scale fluctuations of planetary and gravity waves; ii development of a new type of HF channel simulator; iii geomagnetic storm effects on the F1-region ionosphere; iv the sporadic E-layer and spread-F phenomena; v the HF radio wave propagation over northerly paths; vi how to increase the bit rate in ionospheric radio links. In general, substantial progress was achieved but some problems remain open for future investigations.

  6. The AAS Working Group on Accessibility and Disability (WGAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.; Shanahan, J.; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; Gilbert, Lauren

    2016-06-01

    The Working Group on Accessibility and Disability (WGAD) was formed by the Council of the American Astronomical Society in late 2015 in order to monitor and addresses issues of inclusivity in the astronomical community related to disability. WGAD promotes of the principles of universal accessibility and disability justice in both professional astronomy and astronomy education. The short term goals of WGAD for the next two years include producing a set of guidelines for a wide range of activities including supporting improved access to journals, data, and conferences. We will provide information and training regarding universal design as a guiding principle. The longer term goals of WGAD include integrating universal design as primary design strategy across the board in our many aspects of daily work life.

  7. Tevatron-for-LHC Report of the QCD Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, Michael G.; Begel, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Campanelli, M.; Chlebana, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dittmann, J.R.; Ellis, S.D.; Field, B.; Field, R.; Gallinaro, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The experiments at Run 2 of the Tevatron have each accumulated over 1 fb{sup -1} of high-transverse momentum data. Such a dataset allows for the first precision (i.e. comparisons between theory and experiment at the few percent level) tests of QCD at a hadron collider. While the Large Hadron Collider has been designed as a discovery machine, basic QCD analyses will still need to be performed to understand the working environment. The Tevatron-for-LHC workshop was conceived as a communication link to pass on the expertise of the Tevatron and to test new analysis ideas coming from the LHC community. The TeV4LHC QCD Working Group focused on important aspects of QCD at hadron colliders: jet definitions, extraction and use of Parton Distribution Functions, the underlying event, Monte Carlo tunes, and diffractive physics. This report summarizes some of the results achieved during this workshop.

  8. China to Establish the Standardization Working Group of Social Accountability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ In 2002,on the proposition of ISO/COPOLCO,ISO/Council required ISO/TMB to consider whether ISO should make the international standard in the field of social accountability. At the beginning of 2003, ISO/TMB established the consulting group,studied the subject of social accountability standardization, and submitted the technology draft report about the latest development trend of social accountability at the end of April in 2004. On 21-22 of June in 2004, ISO held the workshop on the standardization of social accountability in Stockholm of Sweden. On the 31st ISO TMB Conference held on 13-14in September in Geneva, members participating in the conference have discussed and passed the proposed working project of social accountability standard (NWIP). It is estimated that the new working project of ISO will be finished in three years from the day of sanction.

  9. Report on the working group on critique of source concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Working Group on Critique of Source Concepts examined and evaluated the proposed reactor- and accelerator-based steady state neutron source concepts with regard to: performance and fit to user needs, technical feasibility and R and D requirements, capital and operating costs, and unique safety or siting issues. A more or less conventional, D2O cooled and moderated research reactor, utilizing evolutionary advances in aluminum plate-fuel technology, can produce the desired 1016 n/cm2s flux levels in a large, accessible, user-friendly environment, with a relatively modest and low-risk R and D program, and at the lowest cost

  10. Report on the working group on 'Critique of Source Concepts'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The working group on ''Critique of Source Concepts'' examined and evaluated the proposed reactor- and accelerator-based steady state neutron source concepts with regard to: performance and fit to user needs, technical feasibility and R and D requirements, capital and operating costs, and unique safety or siting issues. A more or less conventional, D2O cooled and moderated research reactor, utilizing evolutionary advances in aluminum plate-fuel technology, can produce the desired 1016 n/cm2s flux levels in a large, accessible, user-friendly environment, with a relatively modest and low-risk R and D program, and at the lowest cost. (orig.)

  11. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  12. Galois Groups in the work of Mira Fernandes

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Amaro José Rica

    2011-01-01

    In connection to a review of the writings on Galois Theory of the Portuguese mathematician Aureliano Mira Fernandes at turn of the XXth century a brief narrative is presented on how the group theory concepts discovered by Galois are connected to previous work that took centuries to evolve, and how fast they changed the landscape of theoretical and applied mathematics and physics since its publication. From the conference "Mira Fernandes and his age - An historical Conference in honour of Aureliano de Mira Fernandes (1884-1958)", IST Lisbon, June 2009

  13. SPARC Groups: A Model for Incorporating Spiritual Psychoeducation into Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmas, Christopher; Van Horn, Stacy M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of spirituality as a resource for clients within the counseling field is growing; however, the primary focus has been on individual therapy. The purpose of this article is to provide counseling practitioners, administrators, and researchers with an approach for incorporating spiritual psychoeducation into group work. The proposed model can…

  14. Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard G; Hansen, Johnni; Costa, Giovanni; Haus, Erhard; Kauppinen, Timo; Aronson, Kristan J; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Davis, Scott; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Fritschi, Lin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kogi, Kazutaka; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Lowden, Arne; Peplonska, Beata; Pesch, Beate; Pukkala, Eero; Schernhammer, Eva; Travis, Ruth C; Vermeulen, Roel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cogliano, Vincent; Straif, Kurt

    2011-02-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments.

  15. Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard G; Hansen, Johnni; Costa, Giovanni; Haus, Erhard; Kauppinen, Timo; Aronson, Kristan J; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Davis, Scott; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Fritschi, Lin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kogi, Kazutaka; Lie, Jenny-Anne; Lowden, Arne; Peplonska, Beata; Pesch, Beate; Pukkala, Eero; Schernhammer, Eva; Travis, Ruth C; Vermeulen, Roel; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cogliano, Vincent; Straif, Kurt

    2011-02-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments. PMID:20962033

  16. Working group on unbundling of electricity trade operations 2. A group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current unbundling of operations in accounts has proved inadequate. No formula or model that could be made binding by provisions have been defined for unbundled accounts. In addition, unbundling can draw a distinct line between commercial activities and network operations, which have assumed various authoritative functions. Against this background, the need for clearer unbundling has become more marked. The working group suggests that the current provisions on unbundling of trade operations should be tightened and that the unbundling should be made clearer especially in terms of allocation of joint costs. For this, the necessary preparations by the authorities should be initiated urgently. At the same time, the working group proposes that network operations should be unbundled from other operations by incorporation or by unbundling them into a separate public utility. The smallest electric utilities should be exempted from the obligation of incorporating network operations. According to the working group, the lower limit could be fixed e.g. at 70 GWh a year. The working group also suggests that the licensees must own the electricity networks they operate. The licensees could not rent their networks from the mother company nor lease them from a financing company. The model proposed by the working group would redress the major problems connected with the supervision of the electricity market. The monopoly, i.e. the electricity network operations, under the supervision of the Electricity Market Authority could thus be unbundled. This would improve the functioning of the market and facilitate the supervision. However, the model would not abolish the tax concession of municipal public utilities in competitive trade operations, production and sale of electricity. The tax concession may affect the competitive situation on the electricity market. (orig.)

  17. Plantar fasciitis: corticosteroid injection versus chiropractic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Raveendran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is usually clinical and rarely needs to be investigated further. The patient complains of pain in the medial side of the heel, most noticeable with initial steps after a period of inactivity and usually lessens with increasing level of activity during the day, but will tend to worsen toward the end of the day. Symptoms may become worse following prolonged weight bearing, and often precipitated by increase in weight bearing activities. Paresthesia is uncommon. It is usually unilateral, but up to 30% of cases have a bilateral presentation. In our study patients who received chiropractic therapy were treated by rest, heat, ice pack, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS, heel pads, magnetic insole, night splints, walking cast, taping, ultrasound, plantar and Achilles stretching for a period of 6 weeks scheduled accordingly. Patients receiving corticosteroid injection were administered 80mg methyl prednisolone locally at the heel. Each patient received 3 doses of methyl prednisolone injections on 1st day, 2nd week, and 4th week. The results with corticosteroid injection were better when analyzed with numeric rating scale over a period of 6 weeks. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 639-642

  18. An Update on the VAMOS Extremes Working Group Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Cavalcanti, Iracema

    2011-01-01

    We review here the progress of the Variability of the American MOnsoon Systems (VAMOS) extremes working group since it was formed in February of 2010. The goals of the working group are to 1) develop an atlas of warm-season extremes over the Americas, 2) evaluate existing and planned simulations, and 3) suggest new model runs to address mechanisms and predictability of extremes. Substantial progress has been made in the development of an extremes atlas based on gridded observations and several reanalysis products including Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR). The status of the atlas, remaining issues and plans for its expansion to include model data will be discussed. This includes the possibility of adding a companion atlas based on station observations based on the software developed under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Expert Team on Climate Change. Detection and Indices (ETCCDI) activity. We will also review progress on relevant research and plans for the use and validation of the atlas results.

  19. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports

  20. Group Work Experiences: Domestic MBA Student Experiences and Outcomes when Working with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    This article forms part of an exploration into the results of a single-case, embedded study that was conducted to explore how domestic part-time graduate business students in the United States experience group work for summative assessment. Multiple information collection methods were utilised, including open-ended and semi-structured interviews,…

  1. Collaborative Care for Older Adults with low back pain by family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic (COCOA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goertz, Christine M; Salsbury, Stacie A; Vining, Robert D;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a prevalent and debilitating condition that affects the health and quality of life of older adults. Older people often consult primary care physicians about back pain, with many also receiving concurrent care from complementary and alternative medicine providers, most...... commonly doctors of chiropractic. However, a collaborative model of treatment coordination between these two provider groups has yet to be tested. The primary aim of the Collaborative Care for Older Adults Clinical Trial is to develop and evaluate the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of a patient......-centered, collaborative care model with family medicine physicians and doctors of chiropractic for the treatment of low back pain in older adults. METHODS/DESIGN: This pragmatic, pilot randomized controlled trial will enroll 120 participants, age 65 years or older with subacute or chronic low back pain lasting at least...

  2. The work of the ICRP task group on internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few years the task group of committee 2 of ICRP on internal dosimetry (INDOS), in conjunction with the task group on dose calculations (DOCAL), has prepared a series of publications that have given dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by infants, children and adults. Most recently Publication 88 has been issued that gives doses to the embryo, fetus and newborn child from intakes of radionuclides by the mother. A document is presently being completed that will give doses to the child from intakes of radionuclides in mothers' milk (Publication 94). This document, to be published early in 2005, will complete the programme of work of committee 2 on dose coefficients for members of the public. The emphasis of work on internal dosimetry by Committee 2 has turned to occupational exposure. A comprehensive revision of advice on dose assessment and monitoring for occupational intakes of radionuclides is being prepared by INDOS and DOCAL. It is intended to replace Publications 30, 54, 68 and 78 by a series of publications that will cover both dosimetry and bioassay interpretation. The first report will cover radionuclides of the 31 elements covered in the series of publications on dose coefficients for members of the public. Subsequent publications will cover additional elements. This series of publications will be accompanied by a supporting Guidance Document that will give more comprehensive advice on the interpretation of bioassay data. The development of this document will draw from work carried out in an EC supported program, IDEAS that has examined how to improve the assessment of bioassay data. (orig.)

  3. Group Work in Spoken English Teaching in Vocational School%Group Work in Spoken English Teaching in Vocational School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金艳

    2011-01-01

    In English class, teachers are inclined to instruct linguistic knowledge, neglecting the training of students' linguistic behavior. Especially under the whole-class teaching mode, the opportunities for students to practice spoken English are rather limited in the class. Based on the theory of Cooperative Learning, group work, which is a kind of teaching method, will effectively solve this problem. My research is to study the influence of this activity on the students' English learning through questionnaire in vocational college and how to make this activity more effective.

  4. Work group diversity and group performance: an integrative model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Knippenberg, Daan; De Dreu, Carsten K W; Homan, Astrid C

    2004-12-01

    Research on the relationship between work group diversity and performance has yielded inconsistent results. To address this problem, the authors propose the categorization-elaboration model (CEM), which reconceptualizes and integrates information/decision making and social categorization perspectives on work-group diversity and performance. The CEM incorporates mediator and moderator variables that typically have been ignored in diversity research and incorporates the view that information/decision making and social categorization processes interact such that intergroup biases flowing from social categorization disrupt the elaboration (in-depth processing) of task-relevant information and perspectives. In addition, the authors propose that attempts to link the positive and negative effects of diversity to specific types of diversity should be abandoned in favor of the assumption that all dimensions of diversity may have positive as well as negative effects. The ways in which these propositions may set the agenda for future research in diversity are discussed.

  5. Working Group Report: Computing for the Intensity Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebel, B.; Sanchez, M. C.; Wolbers, S.

    2013-10-25

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  6. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  7. Psychodynamic groups as used to work through collective trauma memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomba, Jacek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Israeli-Polish Mental Health Association is a bi-national society of mental health professionals. Presentation of its twelve years’ experience in working through memories of traumatic past was rationale of the text. The traumatic past had been extermination of Jews, by Germans on Polish territory with witnessing Poles. Dynamic group technique had been employed in debate stimulated by theoretical lectures and research results presentations concerning background of anti-Semitism, hatred, Shoah, collective trauma consequences and intergenerational transmission of trauma. Obstacles in the process and suggested measures aiming to overcome these difficulties as described by participants were discussed. Author’s assessment of results of using therapeutic methods to solve mass trauma consequences in next generation of victims and witnesses conclude the essay.

  8. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms

  9. EPC is Developing-- Introduction to China EPC Working Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The year of 2004 is the first year for EPC (Electronic Product Code ) entering China. EPC brings the new opportunity for RFID (Radio Frequency Identification Hardware) technology and boundless imagining space and market chance, and provides an open platform for global logistics development. China EPC Working Group organized the first Chinese EPC forum on April 22nd, 2004. After June of last year, there were almost 2 or 3 forums on EPC/RFID every month. Over ten ministries and commissions, such as Ministry of Information and Industry, Ministry of Science and Technology, have been paying much attention to the EPC development. International retailers, such as Wal-Mart, Metro,Tesco and DOD all support the development of EPC. Especially,Wal-Mart gave the mandate to it's first 100 suppliers, and all the goods shipped to Wal-Mart distributor center should be tagged since January 2005.

  10. Nuclear disarmament: Efforts and problems. Report of working group I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key issues concerning nuclear disarmament efforts and problems were as follows: prospects for a comprehensive test-ban treaty (CTBT) by next year; prospects for a diplomatic resolution to the nuclear issue in the Democratic People's republic of Korea; prospects for the adoption of new and positive security assurances; prospects for global and multilateral efforts to deal with the nuclear issue in South Asia. The Working Group covered many very important issues related to nuclear arms control and disarmament. While it would have been too much to expect a complete agreement on all issues, the opportunity to have a frank and full exchange of views will no doubt contribute to a greater understanding of different positions on important issues. It is such an understanding that forms the basis of lasting agreements

  11. A working plan for working group 2 'enrichment' within the scope of INFCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A working plan for INFCE/WG.2 is presented, outlining the major questions which the group needs to answer under the headings: 1. Enrichment needs and supply, 2. Models for cross-investment, 3. Market situation, 4. Technical and economic assessment of the different enrichment technologies, and 5. Safeguards aspects. It is suggested that the group's assessment should include: 1. Future enrichment capacities, 2. Multinational or regional fuel cycle centres, 3. Possible patterns for guarantees of supply, and 4. Special needs of developing countries

  12. Bullying in work groups: the impact of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether and how laissez-faire, transformational, and authentic leadership styles are related to the occurrence of bullying in work groups. It is hypothesized that the investigated leadership styles have direct associations, as well as indirect associations through group cohesion and safety perceptions, with indicators of bullying among subordinates. Using a cross-sectional survey design, the variables were assessed in a randomly selected sample comprising 594 seafarers from two Norwegian shipping companies. Laissez-faire leadership was associated with an increased risk of exposure to bullying behavior, self-labeled victimization from bullying, and perpetrated bullying. Transformational leadership and authentic leadership were related to decreased risk of exposure to bullying behavior. Authentic leadership contributed to the variance in bullying beyond laissez-faire and transformational leadership. Analyses of indirect effects showed that the association between transformational leadership and bullying was fully mediated through safety perceptions, whereas a partial indirect association through safety perceptions was found for authentic leadership. This study makes a significant contribution to the literature by providing evidence for how leadership styles predict workplace bullying. The findings highlight the importance of recruiting, developing, and training leaders who promote both positive psychological capacities and positive perceptions among their subordinates.

  13. Report of the Joint Working Group on Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following representations by the two Central Fire Brigades Advisory Councils, the Home Secretary decided in January 1987 in consultation with the Secretary of State for Scotland to establish a joint working group to examine any fire fighting implications for the British fire services arising from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power installation in April 1986. The Group, under the chairmanship of HM Chief Inspector of Fire Services, was given the following terms of reference: 'To consider the implications of the Chernobyl accident of April 1986 for the fire services of Great Britain; to review in the light thereof the adequacy of the current national guidance on the role of the fire services at incidents involving radioactivity; to recommend what further guidance, if any, is desirable; and to report to the Central and the Scottish Central Fire Brigades Advisory Councils by 31 October 1987'. The report includes review of fire brigade plans for nuclear installations accidents, offsite emergency planning, acceptable dose limits for fire-fighters and medical surveillance

  14. Case management of chiropractic patients with cervical brachialgia: A survey of French chiropractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guenoun Olivier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Not much is known about the French chiropractic profession on, for example, level of consensus on clinical issues. Objectives The first objective was to investigate if French chiropractors' management choices appeared reasonable for various neck problem scenarios. The second objective was to investigate if there was agreement between chiropractors on the patient management. The third objective was to see to which degree and at what stages chiropractors would consider to interact with other health-care practitioners, such as physiotherapists, general practitioners and specialists. Method A questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected sample of all French chiropractors known to the national chiropractic college. It consisted of an invitation to participate in the study, a brief case description, and drawings of five stages of how a case of neck pain gradually evolves into a brachialgia to end up with a compromised spinal cord. Each stage offered five management choices. Participants were asked at what stages patients would be treated solely by the chiropractor and when patients would be referred out for second opinion or other care without chiropractic treatment, plus an open ended option, resulting in a "five-by-six" table. The percentages of respondents choosing the different management strategies were identified for the different scenarios and the 95% confidence intervals were calculated. There was a pre hoc agreement on when chiropractic care would or would not be suitable. Consensus was arbitrarily defined as "moderate" when 50- 69% of respondents agreed on the same management choice and as "excellent" when 70% or more provided the same answer. It was expected that inter professional contacts would be rare. Results The response rate was 53% out of 254 potential participants. The first two uncomplicated cases would generally have been treated by the chiropractors. As the patient worsened, the responses tended towards

  15. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Matt; Frixione, S.; Laenen, E.; De Roeck, A.; Tollefson, K.; Andersen, J.; Balazs, C.; Banfi, A.; Bernreuther, W.; Binoth, T.; Brandenburg, A.; Buttar, C.; Cao, C-H.; Cruz, A.; Dawson, I.; DelDuca, V.; Drollinger, V.; Dudko, L.; Eynck, T.; Field, R.; Grazzini, M.; Guillet, J.P.; Heinrich, G.; Huston, J.; Kauer, N.; Kidonakis, N.; Kulesza, A.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Magnea, L.; Mahmoudi, F.; Maina, E.; Maltoni, F.; Nolten, M.; Moraes, A.; Moretti, S.; Mrenna, S.; Nagy, Z.; Olness, F.; Puljak, I.; Ross, D.A.; Sabio-Vera, A.; Salam, G.P.; Sherstnev, A.; Si, Z.G.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, P.; Thome, E.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.; Yuan, C.P.; Zanderighi,G.; Zanderighi, G.

    2004-04-09

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  16. The QCD/SM Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Dobbs et al.

    2004-08-05

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  17. 75 FR 54871 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-09

    ... AGENCY National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting... Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council (NDWAC). The... Water Advisory Council that addresses the Working Group's charge. The report includes an...

  18. Chiropractic management of postpartum pubic symphysis diastasis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lucian

    2015-03-01

    This case report describes the chiropractic management of a 30-year-old female patient with severe postpartum pelvic pain secondary to pubic symphysis diastasis. No literature was found on the chiropractic management of postpartum symphysis pubis diastasis. The existing literature concerning chiropractic care for symphysis pubis dysfunction during pregnancy is limited and indicates a potential benefit. Separation of the pubic symphysis may include ligamentous injury to the sacroiliac joints and may lead to chronic pain. Pubic symphysis separation of 17 millimeters was present on digital radiograph. Management consisted of chiropractic adjustments, trigger point release, electrical stimulation, moist heat, sacroiliac belt, and specific stabilizing exercises. The patient's pain improved immediately following treatment on the initial visit. Pain was reduced from 8/10 VAS at the first visit to 2/10 at the fourth visit. She was able to resume normal activities and reached a final pain level of 1/10. The diastasis was reduced by 7 millimeters at 14-weeks post radiograph for a final separation of just under 10 millimeters. Collaboration between obstetricians, midwives and chiropractors may be warranted.

  19. Chiropractic management of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anette R; Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes and discusses the case of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) characterized by severe vertigo with dizziness, nausea, and nystagmus, treated without the use of spinal manipulation by a doctor of chiropractic. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 46-year-ol...

  20. The Use of Group Work in ESL Classrooms-Discourse Features and Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭奕奕

    2003-01-01

    Group work has many advantages from language acquisition point of view. However, some teachers are unwilling to introduce group work in their own classroom because group work is very difficult to manage. The author of this essay explores the discourse features of successful and unsuccessful group work using discourse analysis in the hope that the results of this language classroom research can help language teachers gain some insight into the use of group work and make more informed decisions about group work management.

  1. Final report of the tritium issues working group. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in 1985 the proposed sale of the isotope 'tritium' by Ontario Hydro became a public issue. A number of community groups claimed in public forum that tritium recovered from Ontario Hydro's nuclear reactors would be sold or diverted to American thermonuclear (fusion) weapons. Their position was based on the following presumptions: that tritium was a major component in American nuclear weapons, that the United States has a supply problem with or shortage of this material, and that Ontario Hydro would directly or indirectly support the American nuclear weapons program: a) by providing tritium directly to the U.S. Department of Energy for use in nuclear weapons, or b) by supplying tritium to certain buyers - either traditional commercial facilities or the developing fusion research agencies associated with the Department of Energy, thus allowing or making possible the diversion of this isotope to nuclear weapons purposes, or c) by answering the needs of the commercial market, at present supplied from production reactors dedicated to supplying U.S. military requirements, indirectly allowing the U.S. government to concentrate its efforts on the production of tritium for nuclear weapons. When members of what has become known as the 'Tritium Issues Working Group' were first approached by Dr. T.S. Drolet in mid-April 1985, we were asked if we would agree to participate in a study to assess whether Canadian tritium, which is to be produced only for commercial and research purposes, could be inadvertantly utilized, either directly or indirectly, in the American nuclear weapons program. Our discussion of these issues is covered in Volume 1 of this report and is supplemented by appropriate Appendices in Volume 2. We could find absolutely nothing of a factual nature to justify the hypothesis that Canadian tritium would find its way into the American weapons program

  2. Final report of the tritium issues working group. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of a series of appendices relating to the sociological and technical considerations of tritium and its related technology. It is intended as a supplement to Volume 1 of the Final Report of the Tritium Issues Working Group. The work will the cover the following specific areas: A) Development of an ethical framework related to technology, morality, weapons, politics, etc. B) Review the history of nuclear power in Canada, placement of this technology in context with other technologies, waste products and the CANDU reactor system. C) Assessment of tritium as a unique product, as a class of isotopes, waste by-product and physical properties, effects on human life and its place in the natural environment. D) Assessment of tritium and the environment, diffusion through commerical application, European and American experience, waste management and recycling. E) Assessment of commercial applications, including current experience, historical applications for commercial purposes, offshore revenue for Canada value-added component and role of Ontario Hydro. F) Assessment of tritium and weapons, including technology and the military, past and future role of tritium in weapons, proliferation theories, generic conclusions regarding linkages, dependence of Americans on foreign sources of strategic resources. G) Review of regulations in effect now with respect to nuclear and/or other products with potential to military application, and what is needed. H) Review of traditional Canadian postures in the area of technology perception and political culture, the role, mandate and responsibility of Ontario Hydro, growth of international economy, Canada's competitive position in this economy and the challenges and dilemmas that modern decision makers have in a highly interrelated technological world

  3. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  4. Offshore springs and seeps are focus of working group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Bill

    People have been curious about offshore springs and seeps since at least the days of the Romans. In spite of many centuries of both casual and serious observations, there has been relatively little scientific study concerning the magnitude and effects of groundwater flow into the sea. Rather, studies were performed mostly to address water resource issues. Investigations over the past decade or so have now shown that groundwater discharge, at least in some cases, may be important for geochemical budgets and ecological effects.The Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) and the Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) Project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program have recently established a working group of experts to examine questions relating specifically to groundwater discharge in the coastal zone. Direct groundwater flow into the ocean is known to occur as springs and seeps in near-shore areas in many parts of the world. Submarine springs, for example, are well known off both coasts of Florida; Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula; in several areas around the Pacific rim including Chile, Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, and Australia; in the Persian Gulf near Bahrain; in the Mediterranean Sea off Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, and Libya; and in many other locations.

  5. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site

  6. Summary of Working Group on Storage Ring Collective Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of this Workshop were to investigate the techniques available for the production of very low emittance electron beams, to explore the limitations of these techniques, and to consider new possibilities that might improve the present situation. Two uses for these low emittance beams are of interest here: to serve for a high energy linear collider, which requires very small beam sizes to achieve a suitable value for the luminosity; and to serve for a free-electron laser (FEL) in the short wavelength - say 40 A - regime, which requires both small transverse beam dimensions and a very low longitudinal emittance. This paper contains a brief summary of the main topics discussed by the Working Group on Storage Ring Collective Effects. In the case of the linear collider application, the use of a damping ring (DR) to reduce, by radiation damping, the emittance of an intermediate energy linac beam prior to its subsequent injection into the remaining high energy linac is considered. For FEL use, a high-gain device with a storage ring to damp the beam periodically between passages through a bypass section containing the long FEL undulator is considered. Such designs - at a longer wavelength of 400 A - are already available, but the shorter wavelength of interest here is much more of a challenge

  7. APTWG: 2nd Asia-Pacific Transport Working Group Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference report summarizes the contributions to and discussions at the 2nd Asia-Pacific Transport Working Group Meeting held in Chengdu, China, from 15 to 18 May 2012. The topics of the meeting were organized under five main headings: momentum transport, non-locality in transport, edge turbulence and L–H transition, three-dimensional effects on transport physics, and particle, momentum and heat pinches. It is found that lower hybrid wave and ion cyclotron wave induce co-current rotation while electron cyclotron wave induces counter-current rotation. A four-stage imaging for low (L) to high (H) confinement transition gradually emerges and a more detailed verification is urgently expected. The new edge-localized modes mitigation technique with supersonic molecular beam injection was approved to be effective to some extent on HL-2A and KSTAR. It is also found that low collisionality, trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient transition (or transition of higher to lower density and temperature gradients), fuelling and lithium coating are in favour of inward pinch of particles in tokamak plasmas. (paper)

  8. Energy-environment-development interactions. Report on working group 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural resources, including strategic resources as oil or fresh water, have been the cause of disputes and wars among nations. Natural resources have also been catalyzers of conflicts and objectives of military actions. In last decades, new potential sources of conflict have emerged, as high geographical concentration of fossil duels, acceleration of the depletion and pollution of otherwise renewable resources, and the increase of resource scarcity because of higher demands from population growth and larger consumption per capita. The potential change of climate threatens to become an important source of international tensions in the near future and to provoke the scarcity of vital resources in particular regions. If the world is to engage in a true process of sustainable development, radical changes in the present strategies and patterns of resources use are needed. This working group focused on the problems and potential solutions related to renewable energy sources. The topic of water and security were discussed as well as multilateral agreements and negotiations regarding global climate change

  9. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  10. Patterns of authorship in the IPCC Working Group III report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbera, Esteve; Calvet-Mir, Laura; Hughes, Hannah; Paterson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has completed its Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Here, we explore the social scientific networks informing Working Group III (WGIII) assessment of mitigation for the AR5. Identifying authors’ institutional pathways, we highlight the persistence and extent of North-South inequalities in the authorship of the report, revealing the dominance of US and UK institutions as training sites for WGIII authors. Examining patterns of co-authorship between WGIII authors, we identify the unevenness in co-authoring relations, with a small number of authors co-writing regularly and indicative of an epistemic community’s influence over the IPCC’s definition of mitigation. These co-authoring networks follow regional patterns, with significant EU-BRICS collaboration and authors from the US relatively insular. From a disciplinary perspective, economists, engineers, physicists and natural scientists remain central to the process, with insignificant participation of scholars from the humanities. The shared training and career paths made apparent through our analysis suggest that the idea that broader geographic participation may lead to a wider range of viewpoints and cultural understandings of climate change mitigation may not be as sound as previously thought.

  11. Chiropractic and geriatrics: a review of the training, role, and scope of chiropractic in caring for aging patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Lisa Zaynab

    2004-05-01

    Chiropractors may be well-positioned to play an important role in health promotion, injury and disease prevention, and on geriatric care teams, due to their practice style and holistic philosophy. The bottom line in aging care is that someone in the health-care world must provide health promotion and preventive services to older patients before the wave of aged patients profoundly overwhelms our health-care system. Chiropractic services are safe and relatively low-cost, and patient satisfaction with them is very high. In the managed-care environment, time pressures on allopathic providers may preclude them from spending sufficient time discussing health promotion and illness prevention with their patients. Chiropractic, when paid for out-of-pocket, is not as affected by these extreme pressures. With the hands-on nature of chiropractic care, a strong doctor-patient relationship is forged in which health and lifestyle recommendations may be comfortably and effectively discussed. Relative to musculoskeletal care in elderly patients, chiropractic adjustments (spinal manipulative therapy) are recommended by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research for the care of acute low back pain, and the American Geriatric Society Panel Guidelines for the Management of Chronic Pain state that non-pharmaceutical interventions such as chiropractic may be appropriate. Most geriatric health-care providers have a limited number of options to offer patients with these complaints. Various lower-force chiropractic techniques are available as safe alternatives to drugs and surgery for musculoskeletal complaints in the older patient. Due to the prevalence of these conditions in older patients, and the success of chiropractic in caring for these patients, interdisciplinary geriatric health care teams should include the doctor of chiropractic. Chiropractors, well trained in health assessment, diagnosis, radiographic studies, health promotion, and illness prevention, are well-positioned to

  12. The Beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Azuelos et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated a number of aspects of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the running or planned TeV-scale colliders. For the most part, we have considered hadron colliders, as they will define particle physics at the energy frontier for the next ten years at least. The variety of models for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics has grown immensely. It is clear that only future experiments can provide the needed direction to clarify the correct theory. Thus, our focus has been on exploring the extent to which hadron colliders can discover and study BSM physics in various models. We have placed special emphasis on scenarios in which the new signal might be difficult to find or of a very unexpected nature. For example, in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY), we have considered: how to make fully precise predictions for the Higgs bosons as well as the superparticles of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) (parts III and IV); MSSM scenarios in which most or all SUSY particles have rather large masses (parts V and VI); the ability to sort out the many parameters of the MSSM using a variety of signals and study channels (part VII); whether the no-lose theorem for MSSM Higgs discovery can be extended to the next-to-minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which an additional singlet superfield is added to the minimal collection of superfields, potentially providing a natural explanation of the electroweak value of the parameter {micro} (part VIII); sorting out the effects of CP violation using Higgs plus squark associate production (part IX); the impact of lepton flavor violation of various kinds (part X); experimental possibilities for the gravitino and its sgoldstino partner (part XI); what the implications for SUSY would be if the NuTeV signal for di-muon events were interpreted as a sign of R-parity violation (part XII). Our other main focus was on the phenomenological implications of extra

  13. Interprofessional education in Erlangen: A needs analysis and the conceptual work of a student working group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konietzko, Raffael

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Interprofessional education (IPE is receiving growing significance both nationally and internationally. Despite this, organizational and curricular changes are posing challenges. The level of need for IPE and how changes can be made to curricula and infrastructure were investigated at the University of Erlangen in Germany.Method: The student working group for interprofessional teaching (AGIL has turned its attention to these issues. This group is composed of students from medicine, dentistry, molecular medicine, medical technology and speech therapy. In June, 2015, a needs analysis was carried out among the students in the study programs represented in the working group to assess the actual and target situation concerning IPE (n=1,105. In the search for answers and to better measure any needs, contact was sought with instructors.Results: The majority of students feel that they are insufficiently educated in terms of interprofessional skills. A large proportion of the students wish to see expansion of the IPE offerings. Students also expressed a desire for additional spaces and welcomed the idea of an interprofessional learning center. AGIL began establishing interprofessional electives in October 2015. A concept for an interprofessional learning center was developed.Discussion: Based on the survey results, a need for improvements to curricula and infrastructure can be seen; however, the results are limited to the student point of view. AGIL would like to establish more interprofessional electives. These courses would then facilitate curricular implementation. Modern ideas about study environments could be applied to IPE, in particular to promote informal forms of learning. Contact with instructors was crucial for the project work and should be expanded. Realizing and financing the learning center in Erlangen are now the future goals of AGIL. The aim is to create a foundation for this purpose.

  14. Group Work for Bulimia: A Review of Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews descriptive and experimental research relating to the eating disorder known as bulimia nervosa. Reviews outcome studies of group treatment of bulimia to examine the effectiveness of group intervention. Provides recommendations for practice and future research. (Author/PVV)

  15. Food parenting measurement issues: working group consensus report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Sheryl O; Frankel, Leslie A; Beltran, Alicia; Hodges, Eric; Hoerr, Sharon; Lumeng, Julie; Tovar, Alison; Kremers, Stef

    2013-08-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing problem. As more researchers become involved in the study of parenting influences on childhood obesity, there appears to be a lack of agreement regarding the most important parenting constructs of interest, definitions of those constructs, and measurement of those constructs in a consistent manner across studies. This article aims to summarize findings from a working group that convened specifically to discuss measurement issues related to parental influences on childhood obesity. Six subgroups were formed to address key measurement issues. The conceptualization subgroup proposed to define and distinguish constructs of general parenting styles, feeding styles, and food parenting practices with the goal of understanding interrelating levels of parental influence on child eating behaviors. The observational subgroup identified the need to map constructs for use in coding direct observations and create observational measures that can capture the bidirectional effects of parent-child interactions. The self-regulation subgroup proposed an operational definition of child self-regulation of energy intake and suggested future measures of self-regulation across different stages of development. The translational/community involvement subgroup proposed the involvement of community in the development of surveys so that measures adequately reflect cultural understanding and practices of the community. The qualitative methods subgroup proposed qualitative methods as a way to better understand the breadth of food parenting practices and motivations for the use of such practices. The longitudinal subgroup stressed the importance of food parenting measures sensitive to change for use in longitudinal studies. In the creation of new measures, it is important to consider cultural sensitivity and context-specific food parenting domains. Moderating variables such as child temperament and child food preferences should be considered in models. PMID:23944928

  16. Citing Dynamic Data - Research Data Alliance working group recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, Ari; Rauber, Andreas; Pröll, Stefan; van Uytvanck, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Geosciences research data sets are typically dynamic: changing over time as new records are added, errors are corrected and obsolete records are deleted from the data sets. Researchers often use only parts of the data sets or data stream, creating specific subsets tailored to their experiments. In order to keep such experiments reproducible and to share and cite the particular data used in a study, researchers need means of identifying the exact version of a subset as it was used during a specific execution of a workflow, even if the data source is continuously evolving. Some geosciences data services have tried to approach this problem by creating static versions of their data sets, and some have simply ignored this issue. The RDA Working Group on Dynamic Data Citation (WGDC) has instead approached the issue with a set of recommendations based upon versioned data, timestamping and a query based subsetting mechanism. The 14 RDA WGDC recommendations on how to adapt a data source for providing identifiable subsets for the long term are: Preparing the Data and the Query Store R1 - Data Versioning R2 - Timestamping R3 - Query Store Facilities Persistently Identifying Specific Data Sets R4 - Query Uniqueness R5 - Stable Sorting R6 - Result Set Verification R7 - Query Timestamping R8 - Query PID R9 - Store the Query R10 - Automated Citation Texts Resolving PIDs and Retrieving the Data - R11 - Landing Page R12 - Machine Actionability Upon modifications to the Data Infrastructure R13 - Technology Migration R14 - Migration Verification We present a detailed discussion of the recommendations, the rationale behind them, and give examples of how to implement them.

  17. 治脊疗法与TENS治疗躯体性耳鸣%Effects of chiropractic vs.transcutaneous electrical stimulation treating somatic tinnitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶泉; 杜青; 周璇; 杨晓颜; 刘刚; 冯宇伟; 毛琳

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究治脊疗法与经皮神经电刺激(TENS)治疗头颈肌紧张引起躯体性耳鸣的差异性.方法:耳鸣患者28例,随机分为2组各14例,治脊组采用治脊疗法,TENS组采用TENS治疗.测定2组治疗前后双侧咀嚼肌、胸锁乳突肌和上斜方肌静态下电位及耳鸣程度.结果:治疗2周后,2组耳鸣侧静态下电位值及耳鸣响度VAS均值均降低(P<0.01,0.05),治脊组较TENS组下降更显著(P<0.05),治脊组总有效率明显高于TENS组(P<0.01).结论:治脊疗法和TENS对头颈肌紧张引起躯体性耳鸣具有治疗作用,且治脊疗法效果更佳.%Objective: To study the differences of chiropractic vs. transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) treating somatic tinnitus caused by muscular tension in the head and neck. Methods-. Twenty-eight cases of tinnitus were randomly divided into chiropractic group and TENS group with fourteen cases in each group. Bilateral static potential in masticatory muscles, sternocleidomastoid and superior trapezius by sEMG and tinnitus loudness were assessed before and after treatment. Results: After two weeks of treatment, static potential and VAS score of tinnitus loudness in both groups were decreased (P<0. 01 or P<0. 05), more significantly in chiropractic group than in TENS group (P<0. 05). The effective rates of chiropractic group was obviously higher than TENS group(P< 0. 01). Conclusion: Somatic tinnitus caused by muscular tension in the head and neck can be improved by chiropractic or TENS treatment, and chiropractic is more satisfactory.

  18. 75 FR 56055 - Advisory Committee and Species Working Group Technical Advisor Appointments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... of the four working groups is preferred. Placement on the requested species working group, however... soliciting nominations for technical advisors to the Advisory Committee's species working groups. DATES... of ATCA specifies that the U.S. Commissioners may establish species working groups for the purpose...

  19. 76 FR 584 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of... Management Work Group (AMWG), a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center... addition, there will be updates from the Charter Ad Hoc Group and a follow up report on the work done...

  20. 76 FR 54487 - Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of... the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group... of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group is in the public interest in connection...

  1. 75 FR 52355 - Draft National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... and Chemical Exposures Work Group Reports; Opportunity for Public Comment AGENCY: Centers for Disease... draft National Conversation work group reports for public review and comment. CDC/ATSDR has partnered... facilitating the work group process. DATES: Draft work group reports will be available on or about September...

  2. 78 FR 54482 - Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Charter Renewal, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group AGENCY: Bureau of... the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group. The purpose of the Adaptive Management Work Group... Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group is in the public interest in connection with the performance...

  3. Multimedia applications in LGBTIQ work: a self-expression group

    OpenAIRE

    Rontu, Joona

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project thesis was to create and implement an empowering, open photography group for sexual and gender minorities. The planning and creation was done in collaboration with a local LGBTIQ rights organisation, Pirkanmaan Seta ry, Tampere, Finland and a national support and help service Sinuiksi. The group consisted of five sessions where group members participated in different self-expressional exercises using photography as a method and an online-based photodiary which last...

  4. IMPACT OF GROUP DYNAMICS ON TEAMS WORKING IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

    OpenAIRE

    DOMMATA, SANDEEP KUMAR GOUD; KONAGALA, SAMARA CHANDRA HASON

    2014-01-01

    Context: Group dynamics play an important role in software projects. All of the existing software engineering methodologies (like Rational Unified Process, Microsoft Solutions Framework, Agile, etc.) use the concept of the teamwork and emphasize the necessity to manage them in order to organize the business processes in the best way. The application of group dynamic techniques is aimed at improvement of teamwork management to make it more efficient. The implementation of group dynamic techniq...

  5. Rotational Seismology: AGU Session, Working Group, and Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H.K.; Igel, Heiner; Todorovska, Maria I.; Evans, John R.

    2007-01-01

    . Igel, W.H.K. Lee, and M. Todorovska during the 2006 AGU Fall Meeting. The goal of this session was to discuss rotational sensors, observations, modeling, theoretical aspects, and potential applications of rotational ground motions. The session was accompanied by the inauguration of an International Working Group on Rotational Seismology (IWGoRS) which aims to promote investigations of all aspects of rotational motions in seismology and their implications for related fields such as earthquake engineering, geodesy, strong-motion seismology, and tectonics, as well as to share experience, data, software, and results in an open Web-based environment. The primary goal of this article is to make the Earth Science Community aware of the emergence of the field of rotational seismology.

  6. Supervision of Group Work: Infusing the Spirit of Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Delini M.; Herlihy, Barbara R.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore how supervisors may support the development of social justice consciousness for group leader supervisees, the role of the supervisor in generating social justice awareness and discussing social justice topics, and supervision that supports group leaders in addressing the challenges and opportunities related to social justice…

  7. Complications in Working with AIDS Patients in Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, Gil

    Numerous research studies have documented that for patients coping with chronic illness, social support is extremely important in facilitating adjustment to the illness. The support may come from organized therapy and self-help groups or from interpersonal relationships outside a group. However, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a…

  8. Cultivating and Benefiting from Member Familiarity in Temporary Work Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Shannon

    and tenure constraints. Finally, I propose a model for strategically composing limited-tenure project groups of enduring tenure sub-groups as one way to inject the benefits of member familiarity into temporary organizations, and I illustrate how this condition supported both task- and relationship...

  9. Nordic working group on CCF studies. Parameter estimation within the activities of the Nordic CCF Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a presentation of a project programme for assessment of CCF events and adoption of international data derived in the ICDE project to conditions in Sweden and Finland. The overall objective with the working group is to: - Support safety by studying potential and real CCF events and report conclusions and recommendations that can improve the understanding of these events eventually resulting in increased safety; - The result is intended for application in NPP operation, maintenance, inspection and risk assessments. The work is divided into one quantitative and one qualitative part with the following specific objectives: Qualitative objectives: Compile experiences data and generate insights in terms of relevant failure mechanisms and effective CCF protection measures. The results shall be presented as a guide with checklists and recommendations on how to identify current CCF protection standard and improvement possibilities regarding CCF defenses decreasing the CCF vulnerability. Quantitative objectives: Prepare a Nordic C-book where quantitative insights as Impact Vectors and CCF parameters for different redundancy levels are presented. Uncertainties in CCF data shall be reduced as much as possible. The high redundancy systems sensitivity to CCF events demand a well structured quantitative analysis in support of best possible and realistic CCF parameter estimates, if possible, plant specific. Model survey and review: This survey shah examine available models and their applicability for use on the data. Several models exist and are used in the Nordic PSAs. Data survey and review: This survey shall examine available data sources and their applicability. The survey shah review ICDE and other sources and Provide a background for the decision on what data to be used. A possible outcome is of course that the ICDE data are shown to cover all other sources, but there are possibilities the ICDE data shall be combined with some other source. The situation also differs

  10. Trilogy of LHC Higgs Cross Section Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Slide shown at Aspen 2013 - Higgs Quo Vadis, March 10-15, 2013, Aspen, CO, USA. The activity of LHC Higgs Cross Section Woking Group was reported putting emphasis on current theoretical issues in Higgs physics towards precision Higgs measurements.

  11. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Giele et al.

    2004-01-12

    Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), and more generally the physics of the Standard Model (SM), enter in many ways in high energy processes at TeV Colliders, and especially in hadron colliders (the Tevatron at Fermilab and the forthcoming LHC at CERN), First of all, at hadron colliders, QCD controls the parton luminosity, which rules the production rates of any particle or system with large invariant mass and/or large transverse momentum. Accurate predictions for any signal of possible ''New Physics'' sought at hadron colliders, as well as the corresponding backgrounds, require an improvement in the control of uncertainties on the determination of PDF and of the propagation of these uncertainties in the predictions. Furthermore, to fully exploit these new types of PDF with uncertainties, uniform tools (computer interfaces, standardization of the PDF evolution codes used by the various groups fitting PDF's) need to be proposed and developed. The dynamics of colour also affects, both in normalization and shape, various observables of the signals of any possible ''New Physics'' sought at the TeV scale, such as, e.g. the production rate, or the distributions in transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. Last, but not least, QCD governs many backgrounds to the searches for this ''New Physics''. Large and important QCD corrections may come from extra hard parton emission (and the corresponding virtual corrections), involving multi-leg and/or multi-loop amplitudes. This requires complex higher order calculations, and new methods have to be designed to compute the required multi-legs and/or multi-loop corrections in a tractable form. In the case of semi-inclusive observables, logarithmically enhanced contributions coming from multiple soft and collinear gluon emission require sophisticated QCD resummation techniques. Resummation is a catch-all name for efforts to extend the predictive power of QCD by summing the large

  12. Horizontal integration of the basic sciences in the chiropractic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Basic science curricula at most chiropractic colleges consist of courses (eg, general anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc) that are taught as stand-alone content domains. The lack of integration between basic science disciplines causes difficulties for students who need to understand how the parts function together as an integrated whole and apply this understanding to solving clinical problems. More horizontally integrated basic science curricula could be achieved by several means: integrated Part I National Board of Chiropractic Examiners questions, a broader education for future professors, an increased emphasis on integration within the current model, linked courses, and an integrated, thematic basic science curriculum. Horizontally integrating basic science curricula would require significant efforts from administrators, curriculum committees, and instructional faculty. Once in place this curriculum would promote more clinically relevant learning, improved learning outcomes, and superior vertical integration.

  13. The present use of guinea pigs for chiropractic research *

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Marion; Wiles, Michael R.; Grice, Adrian S.

    1980-01-01

    The necessity for an animal model in chiropractic research is considered and a short review of previous experimentation of manipulation on animals is presented. The guinea pig is proposed as a suitable animal model, and research into its suitability is presented. Analysis includes the animal’s physical characteristics, the choice of anesthetic and parametric and roentgenographic evaluation. A device for supporting the anesthetized animal during standard and motion roentgenographic examination...

  14. THE JOURNAL OF THE CHIROPRACTIC & OSTEOPATHIC COLLEGE OF AUSTRALASIA

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Bruce F.

    1998-01-01

    The first edition of the Journal of the Chiropractic and Osteopathic College of Australasia was known as COMSIG Review and was published in November, 1992 to coincide with a large conference that COCA had organised in Melbourne. In the first few years the majority of articles were magazine style reviews, similar to these found in the Australian Family Physician. The first Editor was Bruce Walker and subsequent Editors have included John Drinkwater, Stephanie Campbell and John Reggars. The cur...

  15. Improvements in The Journal of Chiropractic Education for 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Bart N.

    2013-01-01

    This editorial introduces new developments with the Journal of Chiropractic Education that will help the journal fulfill its mission more effectively. Recent improvements include a website upgrade, early online posting of accepted and edited papers, “in press” citations in PubMed, a new electronic web-based manuscript submission and peer-review system, cross linking of references, a new appearance for the journal cover, and improved page format. Improvements in publication processes with the ...

  16. Potential unique causes of burnout for chiropractic professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this narrative review is to discuss the potential for burnout in chiropractic practitioners. This discussion is grounded in the job demands-resource model, the conservation of resources model, the unique profession-specific stressors experienced by chiropractors, and information from similar health care professions. Methods A search using both the indexed (PubMed and PsychLit) and nonindexed psychosocial literature was used. Other resources included the Cochrane Lib...

  17. Improvement in hearing after chiropractic care: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Duro Joseph O

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first chiropractic adjustment given in 1895 was reported to have cured deafness. This study examined the effects of a single, initial chiropractic visit on the central nervous system by documenting clinical changes of audiometry in patients after chiropractic care. Case presentation Fifteen patients are presented (9 male, 6 female with a mean age of 54.3 (range 34–71. A Welch Allyn AudioScope 3 was used to screen frequencies of 1000, 2000, 4000 and 500 Hz respectively at three standard decibel levels 20 decibels (dB, 25 dB and 40 dB, respectively, before and immediately after the first chiropractic intervention. Several criteria were used to determine hearing impairment. Ventry & Weinstein criteria of missing one or more tones in either ear at 40 dB and Speech-frequency criteria of missing one or more tones in either ear at 25 dB. All patients were classified as hearing impaired though greater on the right. At 40 dB using the Ventry & Weinstein criteria, 6 had hearing restored, 7 improved and 2 had no change. At 25 dB using the Speech-frequency criteria, none were restored, 11 improved, 4 had no change and 3 missed a tone. Conclusion A percentage of patients presenting to the chiropractor have a mild to moderate hearing loss, most notably in the right ear. The clinical progress documented in this report suggests that manipulation delivered to the neuromusculoskeletal system may create central plastic changes in the auditory system.

  18. The pernicious effects of unstable work group membership : How work group changes undermine unique task contributions and newcomer acceptance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rink, Floor; Ellemers, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    This research demonstrates that group membership instability tends to raise self-related concerns that make it less likely that people value and accept constructive task contributions offered by newcomers. In Study 1 (N = 88), unstable group membership heightened self-related concerns. Participants

  19. Supporting awareness in creative group work by exposing design rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Farooq

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When creativity is taken as a long-term, complex, and collaborative activity, support for awareness is required for group members to monitor the development of ideas, track how these ideas became narrowed, and understand how alternatives are being implemented and integrated by colleagues. In this paper, we investigate the effects of exposing design rationale to convey awareness, specifically activity awareness, in group creativity. Through evaluating a prototype, we investigate status updates that convey design rationale, and to what consequences, in small groups in fully distributed collaboration. We found that status updates are used for a variety of purposes and that participants’ comments on their collaborators’ status updates provided feedback. Overall, results suggest that participants’ awareness about their collaborators’ future plans increased over time. Majority of participants found the status updates useful, particularly those with higher metacognitive knowledge. Based on our results, two design strategies for activity awareness are proposed.

  20. 77 FR 43808 - Advisory Committee and Species Working Group Technical Advisor Appointment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... species working groups is preferred, although placement on the requested group is not guaranteed. Dated... nominations for technical advisors to the Advisory Committee's species working groups. DATES: Nominations must... working groups for the purpose of providing advice and recommendations to the U.S. Commissioners and...

  1. Emotions in Group Work: Insights from an Appraisal-Oriented Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Karen; Wosnitza, Marold; Bürger, Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Small group work is common practice in higher education. However, empirical research on students' emotions related to group work is still relatively scarce. Particularly, little is known about students' appraisals of a group task as antecedents of emotions arising in the context of group work. This paper provides a first attempt to systematically…

  2. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing.

  3. Polycomb group protein bodybuilding: working out the routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Cem; Paro, Renato

    2013-09-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate gene expression by modifying chemical and structural properties of chromatin. Isono et al. (2013) now report in Developmental Cell a polymerization-dependent mechanism used by PcG proteins to form higher-order chromatin structures, referred to as Polycomb bodies, and demonstrate its necessity for gene silencing. PMID:24091008

  4. Working in the Cafe: Lessons in Group Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Vana

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to report on findings related to the use of a large group intervention method known as The World Cafe. Design/methodology/approach: The intervention method and its philosophical genesis are described along with lessons learned from observation, personal use, and interviews with cafe participants. Findings: While…

  5. Crossing the Line: Collusion or Collaboration in University Group Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    "Almost everyone has difficulty identifying where collaboration stops and collusion begins." (Carroll & Appleton, 2001, p.15) In both policy and practice, collusion is a perplexing area of academic integrity. Students are expected to learn to work collaboratively in university courses, yet are often required to submit assessment tasks as…

  6. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Mark,; Giles POLGLASE; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more ‘balanced.’ Results show slight improvement in group performance compared with that of previous years, with a significant increase in first-class grades. No evidence was found linking group balance to perfor...

  7. Teacher’s Role in Students’Group Work in College English Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊绘新

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of group work in China is aroused by the teaching reform and proposal of the New Curriculum Standard, in order to improve the language teaching and learning. However, in many cases group work is far less effective and de⁃sirable than it should have been. The effectiveness of group work depends on many factors in real language classroom setting. This paper mainly focuses on the factor of teacher’s role. The main implication of this paper is to suggest the appropriate teacher role in students’group work and put forward some skills in organizing group work in order to make group work more effective and significant.

  8. Working Group Reports and Presentations: Mars Settlement and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The long-term implications of space exploration must be considered early in the process. With this in mind, the Mars Settlement and Society Group focused on five key areas: Philosophical Framework, Community Infrastructure and Government, Creating Stakeholders, Human Subsystems, and Habitat Design. The team proposes long and short term goals to support getting to and then staying long-term on Mars. All objectives shared the theme that they should engage, inspire, and educate the public with the intent of fostering stakeholders in the exploration of Mars. The objectives of long-term settlement on Mars should not neglect group dynamics, issues of reproduction, and a strong philosophical framework for the establishment of a society.

  9. Group mentoring: a transition-to-work strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine S; Smith, Sherry D

    2008-01-01

    Current financial constraints and workplace staffing shortages challenge the viability of using one-on-one mentoring models to support new graduate nurses. This article describes an innovative strategy for mentoring a large cohort of new nurses. Using a Group Mentoring Team, education specialists in a small rural hospital implemented a cost-effective program to help new nurses gain confidence and competence in the first year of nursing practice. PMID:18838903

  10. Evidence-Based Chiropractic Education: Are We Equipping Graduates for Clinical Practice with Improved Patient Outcomes?

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeve, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice has emerged as a driving factor in current curriculum development in chiropractic education. This commentary discusses educational strategies incorporating evidence-based practices in the doctor of chiropractic curriculum and explores whether all five steps of the evidence-based process and patient outcomes from evidence-based practice are being assessed.

  11. Work Personality, Work Engagement, and Academic Effort in a Group of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between the variables of work engagement, developmental work personality, and academic effort in a sample of college students. This study provides evidence for the hypothesized positive relationship between academic effort, engagement, and work personality. When gender was controlled, the Work Tasks…

  12. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  13. Civilian Agency Industry Working Group EVM World Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Jerald

    2013-01-01

    Objectives include: Promote the use of standards ]based, objective, and quantitative systems for managing projects and programs in the federal government. Understand how civilian agencies in general, manage their projects and programs. Project management survey expected to go out soon to civilian agencies. Describe how EVM and other best practices can be applied by the government to better manage its project and programs irrespective of whether work is contracted out or the types of contracts employed. Develop model policies aimed at project and program managers that are transportable across the government.

  14. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Collision Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.; Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    Since our last report (Peach & Dimitrijević 2012), a large number of new publications on the results of research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening have been published. Due to the limited space available, we have only included work of importance for astrophysics. Additional relevant papers, not included in this report, can be found in the databases at the web addresses provided in Section 6. Elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included, as well as charge transfer in collisions between heavy particles which can be very important.

  15. Division XII / Commission 14 / Working Group Collision Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Peach, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening has been very active since our last report, Peach, Dimitrijevic & Stancil 2009. Given the large volume of the published literature and the limited space available, we have attempted to identify work most relevant to astrophysics. Since our report can not be comprehensive, additional publications can be found in the databases at the web addresses listed in the final section. Elastic and inelastic collisions among electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included and charge transfer can be very important in collisions between heavy particles.

  16. Review of the anisotropy working group at UHECR-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has recently experienced a jump in statistics as well as improved instrumentation. This has allowed a better sensitivity in searching for anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays. In this written version of the presentation given by the inter-collaborative “Anisotropy Working Group” at the International Symposium on Future Directions in UHECR physics at CERN in February 2012, we report on the current status for anisotropy searches in the arrival directions of UHECRs.

  17. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark; Polglase, Giles; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more "balanced." Results show slight improvement in group…

  18. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic: Results of a Delphi Consensus Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-04-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical education. These statements were distributed to the Delphi panel, reaching consensus when 80% of the panelists approved each segment. The panel consisted of 23 specialists in chiropractic pediatrics (14 females) from across the broad spectrum of the chiropractic profession. Sixty-one percent of panelists had postgraduate pediatric certifications or degrees, 39% had additional graduate degrees, and 74% were faculty at a chiropractic institution and/or in a postgraduate pediatrics program. The panel were initially given 10 statements with related substatements formulated by the study's steering committee. On all 3 rounds of the Delphi process the panelists reached consensus; however, multiple rounds occurred to incorporate the valuable qualitative feedback received. PMID:26739669

  19. Influence of chiropractic therapy on the growth and intellectual development of 6 months infants%捏脊疗法对6个月婴儿生长及智能发育的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨捏脊疗法对6个月婴儿生长和智能发育的影响.方法 将160例1月龄足月正常婴儿分为捏脊组与对照组,每组各80例.对捏脊组婴儿每天进行捏脊疗法,观察2组婴儿6个月时体质量、身长、头围的增长情况,并对其智能发育进行测评.结果 捏脊组婴儿6个月时体质量、身长的增长均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义,同时捏脊组的智能发育水平也显著高于对照组.结论 捏脊疗法对6个月婴儿的体格发育及智能发育具有明显的促进作用,值得推广.%Objective To investigate the influence of chiropractic therapy on the growth and intellectual development of 6 months infants.Methods 160 cases of 1-month-old full-term normal infants were divided into the chiropractic therapy group and the control group,each group contained 80 samples.Chiropractic therapy was given to the chiropractic therapy group daily.The development of weight,length,head circumference were observed,and the intelligent development for two groups were evaluated at the age of 6 months.Results The weight,body length in the chiropractic therapy group at the sixth month were higher than those in the control group.The intellectual development in the chiropractic therapy group was also higher than that in the control group.Conclusions Chiropractic therapy plays a significant role in promoting the physical and mental development of babies of 6 months,which is worth being promoted.

  20. Future Research Directions in Asthma. An NHLBI Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce D; Noel, Patricia J; Freemer, Michelle M; Cloutier, Michelle M; Georas, Steve N; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ober, Carole; Woodruff, Prescott G; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bender, Bruce G; Camargo, Carlos A; Chupp, Geoff L; Denlinger, Loren C; Fahy, John V; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Gaston, Ben M; Hartert, Tina V; Kolls, Jay K; Lynch, Susan V; Moore, Wendy C; Morgan, Wayne J; Nadeau, Kari C; Ownby, Dennis R; Solway, Julian; Szefler, Stanley J; Wenzel, Sally E; Wright, Rosalind J; Smith, Robert A; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease without cure. Our understanding of asthma onset, pathobiology, classification, and management has evolved substantially over the past decade; however, significant asthma-related morbidity and excess healthcare use and costs persist. To address this important clinical condition, the NHLBI convened a group of extramural investigators for an Asthma Research Strategic Planning workshop on September 18-19, 2014, to accelerate discoveries and their translation to patients. The workshop focused on (1) in utero and early-life origins of asthma, (2) the use of phenotypes and endotypes to classify disease, (3) defining disease modification, (4) disease management, and (5) implementation research. This report summarizes the workshop and produces recommendations to guide future research in asthma. PMID:26305520

  1. Danish Report: Work Stream 3: Fokus Group Interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Larsen, Jeppe Fuglsang; Meret, Susi

    2014-01-01

    Executive Summary The purpose of this national report is to analyze the role of social movements/organizations/initiatives in the struggle against racism, discrimination, hate speech and behavior from the Danish context. The first part briefly presents the Danish political landscape focusing...... on the participatory model of democracy, the shift towards a restrictive citizenship model in 2001 and the long tradition for social movements and voluntary associations. The political institutions and political culture form the context for the potentials and barriers for democratic antibodies and grass root...... initiatives to combat hate speech hate crimes. The mapping of voluntary movements/groups/organizations presents an overview of the diverse policies and strategies towards racism, discrimination and hates speech and hate behavior. It looks at the kind of activities, campaigns and demonstrations...

  2. Molecular Data: Division B / Commission 14 / Working Group Molecular Data

    CERN Document Server

    Federman, Steven R; Mueller, Holger S P

    2015-01-01

    The current report covers the period from the second half of 2011 to late 2014. It is divided into three areas covering rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectroscopy. A signifcant amount of experimental and theoretical work has been accomplished over the past three years, leading to the development and expansion of a number of databases whose links are provided below. Two notable publications have appeared recently: An issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A in 2013 honoring the many contributions of Takeshi Oka (J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, pp. 9305-10143); and IAU Symposium 297 on Diffuse Interstellar Bands. A number of the relevant papers from these volumes are cited. Related research on collisions, reactions on grain surfaces, and astrochemistry are not included here.

  3. Report of the work-group on oil price volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes a detailed analysis of the past and possible evolution of oil markets in terms of price volatility, financial strategies and pricing. It discusses current reflections and actions aiming at improving oil market operation: the Joint Oil Data Initiative or JODI for oil data transparency, the works of the International Energy Forum (IEF), and the conceivable reforms of the oil financial markets. Then, it proposes and discusses four main strategic orientations for a better knowledge of oil markets by France and the improvement of their operation and transparency: to support IEF initiatives, to apply to oil financial markets the global orientations defined by the G20, to set additional specific rules, and to propose a true oil strategy for the European Union. These orientations are then broken up in 22 propositions

  4. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Molecular Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federman, Steven R.; Bernath, Peter F.; Müller, Holger S. P.

    2016-04-01

    The current report covers the period from the second half of 2011 to late 2014. It is divided into three areas covering rotational, vibrational, and electronic spectroscopy. A signifcant amount of experimental and theoretical work has been accomplished over the past three years, leading to the development and expansion of a number of databases whose links are provided below. Two notable publications have appeared recently: An issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A in 2013 honoring the many contributions of Takeshi Oka (J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, pp. 9305-10143); and IAU Symposium 297 on Diffuse Interstellar Bands (Cami & Cox 2014). A number of the relevant papers from these volumes are cited in what follows. Related research on collisions, reactions on grain surfaces, and astrochemistry are not included here.

  5. The Nordic back pain subpopulation program: predicting outcome among chiropractic patients in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekkarinen Harri

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous Swedish study it was shown that it is possible to predict which chiropractic patients with persistent LBP will not report definite improvement early in the course of treatment, namely those with LBP for altogether at least 30 days in the past year, who had leg pain, and who did not report definite general improvement by the second treatment. The objectives of this study were to investigate if the predictive value of this set of variables could be reproduced among chiropractic patients in Finland, and if the model could be improved by adding some new potential predictor variables. Methods The study was a multi-centre prospective outcome study with internal control groups, carried out in private chiropractic practices in Finland. Chiropractors collected data at the 1st, 2nd and 4th visits using standardized questionnaires on new patients with LBP and/or radiating leg pain. Status at base-line was identified in relation to pain and disability, at the 2nd visit in relation to disability, and "definitely better" at the 4th visit in relation to a global assessment. The Swedish questionnaire was used including three new questions on general health, pain in other parts of the spine, and body mass index. Results The Swedish model was reproduced in this study sample. An alternative model including leg pain (yes/no, improvement at 2nd visit (yes/no and BMI (underweight/normal/overweight or obese was also identified with similar predictive values. Common throughout the testing of various models was that improvement at the 2nd visit had an odds ratio of approximately 5. Additional analyses revealed a dose-response in that 84% of those patients who fulfilled none of these (bad criteria were classified as "definitely better" at the 4th visit, vs. 75%, 60% and 34% of those who fulfilled 1, 2 or all 3 of the criteria, respectively. Conclusion When treating patients with LBP, at the first visits, the treatment strategy should be

  6. The positive group affect spiral : a dynamic model of the emergence of positive affective similarity in work groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, F.; Bruch, H.

    2008-01-01

    This conceptual paper seeks to clarify the process of the emergence of positive collective affect. Specifically, it develops a dynamic model of the emergence of positive affective similarity in work groups. It is suggested that positive group affective similarity and within-group relationship qualit

  7. 77 FR 74827 - Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container Labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Working Group on Access to Information on Prescription Drug Container... container labels accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired. The working group will hold its... working group to develop best practices for making information on prescription drug container...

  8. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  9. Positioning during Group Work on a Novel Task in Algebra II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; González, Gloriana

    2015-01-01

    Given the prominence of group work in mathematics education policy and curricular materials, it is important to understand how students make sense of mathematics during group work. We applied techniques from Systemic Functional Linguistics to examine how students positioned themselves during group work on a novel task in Algebra II classes. We…

  10. 78 FR 42799 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group Meetings AGENCY: Bureau of... AMWG, a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, and independent.... Dated: July 11, 2013. Glen Knowles, Chief, Adaptive Management Work Group, Upper Colorado...

  11. Exploring Students' Group Work Needs in the Context of Internationalisation Using a Creative Visual Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Chiles, Prue; Care, Leo

    2012-01-01

    While UK universities see group work as essential to building higher order intellectual and team skills, many international students are unfamiliar with this way of studying. Group work is also a focus of home students' concerns. Cultural differences in the interpretation of space for learning or how spatial issues affect group work processes has…

  12. 75 FR 44809 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation.... L. 102-575) of 1992. The AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG), a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center,...

  13. 75 FR 439 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation.... L. 102-575) of 1992. The AMP includes a Federal advisory committee, the Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG), a Technical Work Group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center,...

  14. Association for Specialists in Group Work: Best Practice Guidelines 2007 Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. Valorie; Pender, Debra A.

    2008-01-01

    The Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) supports the practice of ethical and effective group work through the publication of guiding principles in planning, performing and processing group work. Originally prepared, approved and published in 1998 (ASGW; Rapin and Keel), the current revision addresses changes in the American Counseling…

  15. 49 CFR 214.335 - On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups... Protection § 214.335 On-track safety procedures for roadway work groups. (a) No employer subject to the provisions of this part shall require or permit a roadway worker who is a member of a roadway work group...

  16. HEP-FCE Working Group on Libraries and Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgland, Anders [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Elmer, Peter [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kirby, Michael [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Patton, Simon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Potekhin, Maxim [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Viren, Brett [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yanny, Brian [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-12-19

    The High-Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) was formed by the Department of Energy as a follow-up to a recent report from the Topical Panel on Computing[1] and the associated P5 recommendation[2]. It is a pilot project distributed across the DOE Labs. During this initial incubation period the Forum is to develop a plan for a robust, long-term organization structure and a functioning web presence for forum activities and outreach, and a study of hardware and software needs across the HEP program. In the following sections we give this working group’s “vision” for aspects and qualities we wish to see in a future HEP-FCE. We then give a prioritized list of technical activities with suggested scoping and deliverables that can be expected to provide cross-experiment benefits. The remaining bulk of the report gives a technical survey of some specific “areas of opportunity” for cross-experiment benefit in the realm of software libs/tools. This survey serves as support for the vision and prioritized list. For each area we describe the ways that cross-experiment benefit is achieved today, as well as describe known failings or pitfalls where such benefit has failed to be achieved and which should be avoided in the future. For both cases, we try to give concrete examples. Each area then ends with an examination of what opportunities exist for improvements in that particular area.

  17. Childhood Memories and Receptivity to Corrective Feedback in Group Supervision: Implications for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Angela; Hulse-Killacky, Diana

    2005-01-01

    This article presents findings from an exploration into supervisees' perspectives on childhood memories and receptivity to corrective feedback in group supervision. Historically, students' receptivity to corrective feedback has not been explored relative to their childhood memories. Ten graduate students from four practicum groups participated in…

  18. Report of the APS Neutrino Study Reactor Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouzaid, E.; Anderson, K.; Barenboim, G.; Berger, B.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Formaggio, J.; Freedman, S.; Finely, D.; Fisher, P.; Fujikawa, B.; Gai, M.; Goodman, M.; de Goueva, A.; Hadley, N.; Hahn, R.; Horton-Smith, G.; Kadel, R.; Kayser, B.; Heeger, K.; Klein, J.; Learned, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Luk, K.-B.; McKeown, R.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohapatra, R.; Naples, D.; Peng, J.; Petcov, S.; Pilcher, J.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Stanton, N.; Stefanski, R.; Yamamoto, R.; Worcester, M.

    2004-10-28

    The worldwide program to understand neutrino oscillations and determine the neutrino mixing parameters, CP violating effects, and mass hierarchy will require a broad combination of measurements. The group believes that a key element of this future neutrino program is a multi-detector neutrino experiment (with baselines of {approx} 200 m and {approx} 1.5 km) with a sensitivity of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} = 0.01. In addition to oscillation physics, the reactor experiment may provide interesting measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} at Q{sup 2} = 0, neutrino couplings, magnetic moments, and mixing with sterile neutrino states. {theta}{sub 13} is one of the twenty-six parameters of the standard model, the best model of electroweak interactions for energies below 100 GeV and, as such, is worthy of a precision measurement independent of other considerations. A reactor experiment of the proposed sensitivity will allow a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} with no ambiguities and significantly better precision than any other proposed experiment, or will set limits indicating the scale of future experiments required to make progress. Figure 1 shows a comparison of the sensitivity of reactor experiments of different scales with accelerator experiments for setting limits on sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the mixing angle is very small, or for making a measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} if the angle is observable. A reactor experiment with a 1% precision may also resolve the degeneracy in the {theta}{sub 23} parameter when combined with long-baseline accelerator experiments. In combination with long-baseline measurements, a reactor experiment may give early indications of CP violation and the mass hierarchy. The combination of the T2K and Nova long-baseline experiments will be able to make significant measurements of these effects if sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.05 and with enhanced beam rates can improve their reach to the sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} > 0.02 level

  19. Clinical Observation on Chiropractic Techniques and Specific Acupoint Therapy on 30 Cases of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy%整脊手法与特定穴疗法治疗神经根型颈椎病30例疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏裕涛; 葛恒; 邵瑛; 魏静妍; 魏佳娜; 陈贤芝

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe the curative effects of chiropractic techniques and specific acupoint treating cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Methods:30 cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were randomly divided into chiropractic group and the specific group, respectively with chi-ropractic techniques and specific acupoint therapy, the clinical efficacy was compared between the two groups. Results:The total effective rate of chi-ropractic group was 93.3%, higher than that of specific group by 80%(P<0.05). Conclusion:The curative effects of chiropractic techniques treating cervical spondylotic radiculopathy are better than that of specific acupoint therapy in short term.%目的:观察整脊手法与特定穴疗法治疗神经根型颈椎病的疗效。方法:将30例神经根型颈椎病患者随机分为整脊组和特定穴组,分别施以整脊手法和特定穴疗法,比较两组临床疗效。结果:整脊组总有效率为93.3%,高于特定穴组的80.0%(P<0.05)。结论:整脊手法在短期内治疗神经根型颈椎病疗效优于特定穴疗法。

  20. A descriptive report of management strategies used by chiropractors, as reviewed by a single independent chiropractic consultant in the Australian workers compensation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luca Katie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In New South Wales, Australia, an injured worker enters the workers compensation system with the case often managed by a pre-determined insurer. The goal of the treating practitioner is to facilitate the claimant to return to suitable duties and progress to their pre-injury status, job and quality of life. Currently, there is very little documentation on the management of injured workers by chiropractors in the Australian healthcare setting. This study aims to examine treatment protocols and recommendations given to chiropractic practitioners by one independent chiropractic reviewer in the state of New South Wales, and to discuss management strategies recommended for the injured worker. Methods A total of 146 consecutive Independent Chiropractic Consultant reports were collated into a database. Pain information and management recommendations made by the Independent Chiropractic Consultant were tabulated and analysed for trends. The data formulated from the reports is purely descriptive in nature. Results The Independent Chiropractic Consultant determined the current treatment plan to be "reasonable" (80.1% or "unreasonable" (23.6%. The consultant recommended to "phase out" treatment in 74.6% of cases, with an average of six remaining treatments. In eight cases treatment was unreasonable with no further treatment; in five cases treatment was reasonable with no further treatment. In 78.6% of cases, injured workers were to be discharged from treatment and 21.4% were to be reassessed for the need of a further treatment plan. Additional recommendations for treatment included an active care program (95.2%, general fitness program (77.4%, flexibility/range of movement exercises (54.1%, referral to a chronic pain specialist (50.7% and work hardening program (22.6%. Conclusion It is essential chiropractic practitioners perform 'reasonably necessary treatment' to reduce dependency on passive treatment, increase compliance to active

  1. A longitudinal study of chiropractic use among older adults in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Michael P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Longitudinal patterns of chiropractic use in the United States, particularly among Medicare beneficiaries, are not well documented. Using a nationally representative sample of older Medicare beneficiaries we describe the use of chiropractic over fifteen years, and classify chiropractic users by annual visit volume. We assess the characteristics that are associated with chiropractic use versus nonuse, as well as between different levels of use. Methods We analyzed data from two linked sources: the baseline (1993-1994 interview responses of 5,510 self-respondents in the Survey on Assets and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD, and their Medicare claims from 1993 to 2007. Binomial logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with chiropractic use versus nonuse, and conditional upon use, to identify factors associated with high volume relative to lower volume use. Results There were 806 users of chiropractic in the AHEAD sample yielding a full period prevalence for 1993-2007 of 14.6%. Average annual prevalence between 1993 and 2007 was 4.8% with a range from 4.1% to 5.4%. Approximately 42% of the users consumed chiropractic services only in a single calendar year while 38% used chiropractic in three or more calendar years. Chiropractic users were more likely to be women, white, overweight, have pain, have multiple comorbid conditions, better self-rated health, access to transportation, higher physician utilization levels, live in the Midwest, and live in an area with fewer physicians per capita. Among chiropractic users, 16% had at least one year in which they exceeded Medicare's "soft cap" of 12 visits per calendar year. These over-the-cap users were more likely to have arthritis and mobility limitations, but were less likely to have a high school education. Additionally, these over-the-cap individuals accounted for 58% of total chiropractic claim volume. High volume users saw chiropractors the most among

  2. A Classroom-based Research Project on the Use of Group Work in ESL Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王希

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the use of group work in the ESL classroom through the observation of four classes in the language centre of a British university. It is believed that most ESL classroom activities ask for the use of group work. Compared with lockstep teaching, pair or group work show more benefits in a language class. While some researchers argue that group work has a useful but somewhat restricted role in classroom second language acquisition The present study aims to illustrated both the positive impact and the shortage of group work through the analyses and discussion of the data collected.

  3. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005

  4. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

    2012-04-10

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005

  5. Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Stevens; J. Hansen; G. Costa; E. Haus; T. Kauppinen; K.J. Aronson; G. Castaño-Vinyals; S. Davis; M.H.W. Frings-Dresen; L. Fritschi; M. Kogevinas; K. Kogi; J.A. Lie; A. Lowden; B. Peplonska; B. Pesch; E. Pukkala; E. Schernhammer; R.C. Travis; R. Vermeulen; T. Zheng; V. Cogliano; K. Straif

    2011-01-01

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to

  6. Spinal cord injury following chiropractic manipulation to the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, Julian; Curtis, Olivia; Hughes, Tom; Hourihan, Margaret

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is a rare complication of chiropractic treatment. This case report describes a 50-year-old man who developed neurological symptoms a few hours after manipulation (high velocity low amplitude [HVLA] technique) of the cervical spine. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spine revealed intramedullary high signal at the C2/3 level of the right side of the cervical cord on the T2-weighted images. The potential mechanism of injury and causes of the radiological appearance are discussed.

  7. Case-based model of emotional expression influence on work group socialization and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, L.; Gilbert, N.

    2006-01-01

    An agent-based computational model, based on longitudinal ethnographic data about the dynamics of intra-group behaviour and work group performance, has been developed from observing an organizational group in the service sector. The model, in which the agents represent workers and tasks, is used to assess the effect of emotional expressions on the dynamics of interpersonal behaviour in work groups, particularly for groups that have recent newcomers. The model simulates the gradual socializati...

  8. Interactive affective sharing versus non-interactive affective sharing in work groups : Comparative effects of group affect on work group performance and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klep, Annefloor; Wisse, Barbara; Van Der Flier, Henk

    2011-01-01

    This study explores whether the dynamic path to group affect, which is characterized by interactive affective sharing processes, yields different effects on task performance and group dynamics than the static path to group affect, which arises from non-interactive affective sharing. The results of o

  9. Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader…

  10. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  11. 75 FR 66125 - Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... National Park Service Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) AGENCY: National...' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) was formed (1) to develop a more consistent and objective... constituencies (e.g., State air regulatory agencies, concerned citizens, environmental groups,...

  12. A Review of the Creative Group Work Training Program for Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Kevin; Blatch, Chris; Toh, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the first review of the Creative Group Work (CGW) training program for facilitators who provide group-based intervention programs to offenders in Corrective Services New South Wales, Australia. The program emphasizes the interpersonal aspects of group work and seeks to equip facilitators to engage with participants in a way…

  13. Keep It Positive: Using Student Goals and Appraisals to Inform Small Group Work in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Donetta, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    In teaching science, small group work is often recommended and frequently used. In this study, we asked 130 students about their personal goals and views (appraisals) of small group work in science. We found significant relationships between students' personal goals and their views of doing science in small groups. We discuss the practical…

  14. Group Work with Survivors of the 2004 Asian Tsunami: Reflections of an American-Trained Counselor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Delini M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a support group for Sri Lankan women survivors of the 2004 Asian Tsunami. The article discusses unique leader challenges in doing group work in a diverse and foreign setting, and presents leader reflections, recommendations, and implications for group workers who may work with disaster survivors.

  15. What Do the Participants Gain? Group Counselling to Enhance Agency at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhalakka-Ruoho, Marjatta; Ruponen, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    Group counselling was carried out in an IT enterprise. The task was to study structured group counselling as a space for enhancing participants' agency at work. The first research question concerned changes the participants reported regarding the group and their collaborative and individual work. The second research question asked what kinds…

  16. 76 FR 72997 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... result in an accident/incident or a near miss. The task force has been formed and will begin work after... announcement of working group activities and status reports of December 7, 2010 (75 FR 76070). The 44th full..., 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23, 2006. The working group agreed...

  17. 75 FR 20381 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... technical work group (TWG), a monitoring and research center, and independent review panels. The AMWG makes.... (PDT) to ensure that the connections work properly. The one hour test Web site is:...

  18. Forming identities in residential care for children: Manoeuvring between social work and peer groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Anja

    2009-01-01

    in the pedagogical work. This article challenges the implicit understanding that social work is the primary source of identity transformation and that peer group interaction is mainly an obstacle to overcome. On the contrary, this article argues that learning about the social dynamics of the children's group...... is a precondition for understanding how social work influences individual children. © The Author(s), 2009....

  19. 77 FR 1778 - U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... competitiveness. The Leaders also asked the Working Group to work closely with public and private sector... transatlantic trade and investment, the Working Group plans to consult extensively with business...: ] the short- and medium-term impact on economic growth, job creation, and competitiveness;...

  20. Chiropractic and social justice: a view from the perspective of Beauchamp's principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N; Johnson, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Social justice in public health involves the process and product of a community acting to fairly distribute advantages and burdens to improve the health of its population and to reasonably take care of the disadvantaged. Although publications are available about chiropractic public health history, programs, and policy, the potential role of chiropractic in social justice has received little attention. This article discusses Beauchamp's 4 principles of social justice and suggests actions that the chiropractic profession may consider to participate in the practice of social justice in the field of public health.

  1. AQSIQ Sends Working Groups to Implement the Spirit of National Quality Working Conference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On August 1st, the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine (AQSIQ) convened a conference to transmit the spirit of national quality work and study an important speech regarding standards from Wen Jiabao,Premier of the State Council.

  2. Joint Working Group-39, Manufacturing Technology Subworking Group-F, remote handling and automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    The terms of reference were reviewed and continue to encompass the scope of activities of the SUBWOG. No revisions to the terms of reference were proposed. The list of site contacts who should receive copies of SUBWOG correspondence and meeting minutes was reviewed and updated. Documents exchanged related to the meeting include: Minutes of the sixth SUBOG 39F meeting; transactions of the fifth topical meeting on robotics and remote handling; data on manipulators was forwarded to LLNL from the robotics group at AEA Harwell; and the specifications of the duct remediation robot from the Rocky Flats Plant.

  3. Corporate ethical values, group creativity, job commitment and performance: The effect of work response on work context

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Nadia; Waheed Akbar BHATTI; Arshad ZAHEER

    2013-01-01

    A business culture supported by positive practices and strong ethical values will produce productive employee work response. Positive work environment encourages ethical decision making and employees feel comfortable in an environment where they have freedom to make ethical decisions. It becomes difficult for employees to make ethical decisions in an unethical work environment. This research studied the relationship between group creativity, corporate ethical values, job commitment and perfor...

  4. Preliminary study into the components of the fear-avoidance model of LBP: change after an initial chiropractic visit and influence on outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newell Dave

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decade the sub grouping of low back pain (LBP patients according to their likely response to treatment has been identified as a research priority. As with other patient groups, researchers have found few if any factors from the case history or physical examination that are helpful in predicting the outcome of chiropractic care. However, in the wider LBP population psychosocial factors have been identified that are significantly prognostic. This study investigated changes in the components of the LBP fear-avoidance beliefs model in patients pre- and post- their initial visit with a chiropractor to determine if there was a relationship with outcomes at 1 month. Methods Seventy one new patients with lower back pain as their primary complaint presenting for chiropractic care to one of five clinics (nine chiropractors completed questionnaires before their initial visit (pre-visit and again just before their second appointment (post-visit. One month after the initial consultation, patient global impression of change (PGIC scores were collected. Pre visit and post visit psychological domain scores were analysed for any association with outcomes at 1 month. Results Group mean scores for Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB, catastrophisation and self-efficacy were all improved significantly within a few days of a patient's initial chiropractic consultation. Pre-visit catastrophisation as well as post-visit scores for catastrophisation, back beliefs (inevitability and self-efficacy were weakly correlated with patient's global impression of change (PGIC at 1 month. However when the four assessed psychological variables were dichotomised about pre-visit group medians those individuals with 2 or more high variables post-visit had a substantially increased risk (OR 36.4 (95% CI 6.2-213.0 of poor recovery at 1 month. Seven percent of patients with 1 or fewer adverse psychological variables described poor benefit compared to 73% of those

  5. Group Work as a Strategy to Improve the Effectiveness of the Learning Process

    OpenAIRE

    Tsankov, Svetozar; Voynohovska, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Report published in the Proceedings of the National Conference on "Education in the Information Society", Plovdiv, May, 2013 This article introduces group work as a teaching and learning strategy. It considers the process planning of group work, the role of the teacher and the process assessment of learners. Group work is a form of cooperative learning. It aims to handle individual differences, develop students' knowledge, generic skills (communication skills, collaborative skills...

  6. Do chiropractic college faculty understand informed consent: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hondras Maria A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to survey full-time faculty at a single chiropractic college concerning their knowledge of Institutional Review Board (IRB policies in their institution as they pertain to educational research. Methods All full-time faculty were invited to participate in an anonymous survey. Four scenarios involving educational research were described and respondents were asked to select from three possible courses of action for each. In addition, respondents were queried about their knowledge of IRB policies, how they learned of these policies and about their years of service and departmental assignments. Results The response rate was 55%. In no scenario did the level of correct answers by all respondents score higher than 41% and in most, the scores were closer to just under 1 in 3. Sixty-five percent of respondents indicated they were unsure whether Palmer had any policies in place at all, while 4% felt that no such policies were in place. Just over one-quarter (27% were correct in noting that students can decline consent, while more than half (54% did not know whether there were any procedures governing student consent. Conclusion Palmer faculty have only modest understanding about institutional policies regarding the IRB and human subject research, especially pertaining to educational research. The institution needs to develop methods to provide knowledge and training to faculty. The results from this pilot study will be instrumental in developing better protocols for a study designed to survey the entire chiropractic academic community.

  7. Emotion Regulation: Processes, Strategies, and Applications to Group Work Training and Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    The complex group work environment can be overwhelming and anxiety provoking, particularly for novice group leaders. Effectively accessing and managing one's own emotions are tasks central to effective group leadership and should be primary learning objectives of group workers in training. This article provides an overview of Gross's…

  8. When values (do not) converge : Cultural diversity and value convergence in work groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, Loes; Schaafsma, J.; Phalet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Culturally diverse work groups do not always reach their full potential compared with less diverse groups. As shared values facilitate group functioning, we examined whether constructing shared values among group members is constrained by high degrees of cultural diversity. Following 33 real-life wo

  9. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, Mike; /Fermilab; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  10. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Church, Mike; 10.1063/1.3520295

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  11. Working Group 1: Software System Design and Implementation for Environmental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISCMEM Working Group One Presentation, presentation with the purpose of fostering the exchange of information about environmental modeling tools, modeling frameworks, and environmental monitoring databases.

  12. 40 CFR 35.4140 - What must be included in my group's work plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... work plan? 35.4140 Section 35.4140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Tag § 35.4140 What must be included in my group's work plan? (a) Your scope of work must clearly... community. (b) Your scope of work must also clearly explain your project's milestones and the schedule...

  13. Dissecting the journey: nursing student experiences with collaboration during the group work process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Lissa L; Roberge, Ginette D

    2012-11-01

    Since the outset of nursing care, group work processes have evolved into essential components of a nurse's role and responsibilities within the health care system. To reflect this trend, group work is often utilized as a medium to promote professional socialization in undergraduate nursing curricula. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the ways undergraduate nursing students experience collaboration during group work activities. Braun and Clarke's (2006) theoretical thematic analysis combined with Pollio et al.'s (2006) interpretive framework was utilized to capture the students' lived experiences regarding group work. The participants of this study consisted of 96 undergraduate students enrolled in a nursing program in Canada. Written descriptions of their perceptions of their group work practices were analyzed to determine the extent to which these adhere to the collaborative practice essential elements (Jones and Way, 2006). Analysis of the results revealed an unexpected element of collaboration that of the psychosocial element in group work. The results from this study expose advantages and disadvantages of group work processes during group work in nursing education. This type of insight is valuable for educators to prepare nursing students for the complex demands of working with interdisciplinary teams.

  14. Quantitative corpus-based analysis of the chiropractic literature - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Neil; Budgell, Brian S; Kwong, Alice

    2011-03-01

    In this pilot study, a collection of peer-reviewed articles from the Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association was analyzed by computer to identify the more commonly occurring words and phrases. The results were compared to a reference collection of general English in order to identify the vocabulary which is distinctive of chiropractic. From texts with a combined word count in excess of 280,000, it was possible to identify almost 2,500 words which were over-represented in the chiropractic literature and therefore likely to hold special importance within this domain. Additionally, readability statistics were calculated and suggest that the peer-reviewed chiropractic literature is approximately as challenging to read as that of nursing, public health and midwifery. Certain words widely considered to be of importance to the profession, for example "subluxation and adjustment," were not particularly prevalent in the literature surveyed. PMID:21403783

  15. Stomacare nurses and their share in the work with self-help groups of patiens.

    OpenAIRE

    ŠŤASTNÁ, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Stoma nurses and their contribution to work with self-help groups of patients. The diploma thesis dealt with the cooperation of stoma nurses with self-help groups of stoma patients in ten regions of the Czech Republic. The aim was to find out if stoma nurses recognize the importance of self-help groups for stoma patients, how their work contributes to self-help groups, if stoma nurses cooperate with self-help groups and if they inform stoma patients about the existence of self-help groups. An...

  16. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site's self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy

  17. Development of disease-specific quality indicators for danish chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line P; Krog, Birgitte R; Kongsted, Alice;

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop disease-specific quality indicators for Danish chiropractic patients with low back pain (LBP) as an initial effort to include chiropractors in the Danish Health Care Quality Programme.......The purpose of this study is to develop disease-specific quality indicators for Danish chiropractic patients with low back pain (LBP) as an initial effort to include chiropractors in the Danish Health Care Quality Programme....

  18. Supporting Group Work in Scottish Primary Classrooms: Improving the Quality of Collaborative Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Donald; Tolmie, Andrew; Thurston, Allen; Howe, Christine; Topping, Keith

    2009-01-01

    A large body of research has demonstrated the value of fostering peer interaction in the context of collaborative group work as an effective strategy to facilitate learning. The present study attempted to enable teachers in a varied sample of 24 Scottish primary classrooms to improve the quality of collaborative group work interaction among their…

  19. Using Student Group Work in Higher Education to Emulate Professional Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Colm; McLaughlin, Heather; Eng, Tan Yoke

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the value of social learning from group work that emulates a professional community of practice. Design/methodology/approach: A thought piece that first, examines the role of group-work projects as part of social learning, then outlines key arguments for social learning based upon applying a…

  20. Drama and Role Playing in Teaching Practice: The Role of Group Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çerkez, Yagmur; Altinay, Zehra; Altinay, Fahriye; Bashirova, Elnara

    2012-01-01

    The research study aims to explore the essence of group work in drama and role playing for teaching practice inline with the nature of collaborative learning process. This research study has qualitative nature by capturing experiences of volunteer ninety pre-service teachers about group works, gained skills from drama and role playing in their…

  1. Instructor Training and Instructional Design in Online Courses Using Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory multi-case study was to examine the role of instructional design and instructor training on student learning outcomes and student satisfaction within the online class using group work, a form of collaborative learning. Group work has been strongly recommended for online classes. Data allowing insight into…

  2. 77 FR 17457 - Work Group on Alternative Test Methods for Commercial Measuring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Work Group on Alternative Test Methods for Commercial...: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is forming a Work Group (WG) to...

  3. Understanding Students' Attitudes about Group Work: What Does This Suggest for Instructors of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Melanie Beth; O'Connor, Abigail H.

    2013-01-01

    A survey was administered to college students to gain insight into their attitudes about classroom group work. Students responded that group work is generally a positive experience; however, they do not necessarily prefer it to individual assignments. Students' responses also indicated concerns about instructors' motivations for using…

  4. Effect of Group Work on EFL Students' Attitudes and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqi, Hanan A.; Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of group work in classroom activities is a method used for motivating learning and increasing the idea of pleasure through learning. The current study investigates the advantages of group work in exams in the English department, in the College of Basic Education. 40 students in two classes of "The Introduction of Phonetics and…

  5. Teacher Interventions in Small Group Work in Secondary Mathematics and Science Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, R.; Mercer, N.

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative problem solving, when students work in pairs or small groups on a curriculum-related task, has become an increasingly common feature of classroom education. This paper reports a study of a topic which has received relatively little attention: how teachers can most usefully intervene when students are working in a group, but have…

  6. Analyzing Effective Communication in Mathematics Group Work: The Role of Visual Mediators and Technical Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryve, Andreas; Nilsson, Per; Pettersson, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing and designing productive group work and effective communication constitute ongoing research interests in mathematics education. In this article we contribute to this research by using and developing a newly introduced analytical approach for examining effective communication within group work in mathematics education. By using data from…

  7. Overcoming Student Resistance to Group Work: Online Versus Face-to-Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Sorensen, Chris; Gump, Andrew; Heindel, Allen J.; Caris, Mieke; Martinez, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared student group work experiences in online (OL) versus face-to-face (f2f) sections of the same graduate course, over three years, to determine what factors influence student group work experiences and how do these factors play out in f2f versus OL environments. Surveys and student journals suggest that communication issues,…

  8. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.;

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings, ...

  9. Work characteristics and determinants of job satisfaction in four age groups: university employees' point of view.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.T.; Donders, N.C.G.M.; Bouwman-Brouwer, K.M.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate (a) differences in work characteristics and (b) determinants of job satisfaction among employees in different age groups. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire was filled in by 1,112 university employees, classified into four age groups. (a) Work characteristics were analy

  10. Capitalising on Learner Agency and Group Work in Learning Writing in English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the roles of learner agency and group work in learning writing in English as a foreign language (EFL). Through exploratory and participatory action research, this study examines how learner agency and group work function amidst the activity system of task-based EFL writing, especially how they influence and are influenced…

  11. 77 FR 23668 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States... Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate will be hosting an open GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group (SSWG) meeting for manufacturers of GPS constellation simulators utilized by the...

  12. 77 FR 25150 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... under 77 FR 23668. The date of the meeting will now be 15 May 2012 from 0730-1600 (Pacific Standard Time... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Amending GPS Simulator Working group Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: We...

  13. Effects of the School-to-Work Group Method among Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vuori, Jukka; Nykyri, Elina

    2007-01-01

    This study examines effects of the School-to-Work Group Method among 17-25-year-old young people facing the transition from vocational college to work. After baseline measurement (N=416) participants were randomized into experimental and control groups. The results of ten month follow-up (N=334) showed notable beneficial impacts of the group…

  14. 75 FR 20352 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... AGENCY National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting... Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) is announcing the third in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council (NDWAC). The purpose of...

  15. 75 FR 35458 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... AGENCY National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting... Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) is announcing the fourth in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council (NDWAC). The purpose of...

  16. 75 FR 1380 - National Drinking Water Advisory Council's Climate Ready Water Utilities Working Group Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) is announcing the second in-person meeting of the Climate Ready Water Utilities (CRWU) Working Group of the National Drinking Water Advisory Council (NDWAC). The purpose of this meeting is for the Working Group to discuss the attributes and enabling environment of climate ready water utilities and to identify climate-related tools, training,......

  17. Student Attitudes towards Group Work among Undergraduates in Business Administration, Education and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschall, Holli; Garcia-Bayonas, Mariche

    2008-01-01

    Group work is a widely used teaching technique in higher education. Faculty find themselves utilizing this method in their classes more and more, yet few studies examine what students actually think about group work. The current study surveyed Mathematics, Education, and Business Administration majors at a mid-sized southeastern university in…

  18. Innovations Applied to the Classroom for Involuntary Groups: Implications for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovanec, Michael

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for social work students to be prepared to work with a wide range of involuntary groups including the more traditional court-ordered programs in domestic abuse and chemical dependency, as well as groups in mental health and schools that provide outreach to high-risk client populations. This paper introduces three…

  19. Effectiveness and economic evaluation of chiropractic care for the treatment of low back pain: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchette, Marc-André; Bussières, André; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Boruff, Jill; Harrison, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Background Chiropractic care is a common treatment for low back pain (LBP). Previous studies have failed to clarify the relative cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care in comparison with other commonly used approaches because previous attempts to synthetize the economic literature has only included partial economic evaluations. The objective of this project is to estimate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care compared to other commonly used care approaches am...

  20. Chiropractic: Is it Efficient in Treatment of Diseases? Review of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Salehi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chiropractic is a complementary medicine that has been growing increasingly in different countries over recent decades. It addresses the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the neuromusculoskeletal system disorders and their effects on the whole body health. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of chiropractic in the treatment of different diseases. To gather data, scientific electronic databases, such as Cochrane, Medline, Google Scholar, and Scirus were searched and all systematic reviews in the field of chiropractic were obtained. Reviews were included if they were specifically concerned with the effectiveness of chiropractic treatment, included evidence from at least one clinical trial, included randomized studies and focused on a specific disease. The research data including the article’s first author’s name, type of disease, intervention type, number and types of research used, meta-analysis, number of participants, and overall results of the study, were extracted, studied and analyzed. Totally, 23 chiropractic systematic reviews were found, and 11 articles met the defined criteria. The results showed the influence of chiropractic on improvement of neck pain, shoulder and neck trigger points, and sport injuries. In the cases of asthma, infant colic, autism spectrum disorder, gastrointestinal problems, fibromyalgia, back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome, there was no conclusive scientific evidence. There is heterogeneity in some of the studies and also limited number of clinical trials in the assessed systematic reviews. Thus, conducting comprehensive studies based on more reliable study designs are highly recommended.

  1. Report of a Working Group on Solanaceae : first meeting of the Working group and ad hoc meeting of the database managers, 14-17 Februari 2012, Menemen, Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dooijeweert, van W.; Maggioni, L.; Daunay, M.C.; Lipman, E.

    2012-01-01

    The Solanaceae Working Group (WG) of the European Cooperative Programme for Plant Genetic Resources (ECPGR) has established six databases for the crops that form its mandate. These include three major crops (Eggplant, Pepper and Tomato) and three minor crops (Cyphomandra, Pepino and Physalis). The a

  2. Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Allison

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA, was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location. The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality.

  3. The Influence of Collaborative Group Work on Students' Development of Critical Thinking: The Teacher's Role in Facilitating Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis Chun-Lok; To, Helen; Leung, Kit

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the incorporation of group work in a teaching intervention can effectively foster students' critical thinking skills. Building upon Kuhn's critical thinking model, the research involved comparison of pretest and post-test results for 140 secondary four (10th grade) students in Hong Kong on two…

  4. Sports chiropractic management at the World Ice Hockey Championships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitiello Andrew L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ice hockey is an international sport. Injuries occur in a full body fashion, to a number of tissues, commonly through body contact. There is a lack of literature documenting the scope of sports chiropractic practice. Thus, it was the aim to document the type, scope and severity of conditions presenting to, and the treatment provided by, the New Zealand team chiropractor acting as a primary health provider for the duration of the 2007 World Ice Hockey Championships. Methods All conditions presenting were recorded. Diagnosis was recorded along with clinical parameters of injury: injury type, severity, mechanism and whether referral or advanced imaging was required. All treatment provided was continuously recorded, including information on the number of treatments required and the reason, duration, type and location of treatment. Results Players presented for diagnosis of injury 50 times. Muscle (34%, joint (24% and tendon injuries (18% were most common. Players presented with a new injury 76% of the time. Most injuries had been present for less than one week (84%, with 53% occurring through a contact mechanism. Injuries were common at training and match locations. Only two injuries required the player to stop playing or training, both of which were referred for advanced imaging. During the study, 134 treatment consultations were rendered to 45 player injuries. Eighty per-cent of injuries were managed with four or less treatments. Three quarters of treatment was provided at training locations with treatment duration predominantly being between 11-15 minutes (71% and 16-20 minutes (27%. Most treatment delivered was passive in nature (71% although combination active and passive care was provided (27%. Treatment typically involved joint (81% and soft tissue based therapies (81% and was delivered in a full body manner. Conclusions This study documented the injury profile of ice hockey at an international level of competition. It

  5. The Irish Working Group on Information Literacy - edging towards a national policy

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Terry; Russell, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The authors of this paper provide an overview of the activities of the Irish Working Group on Information Literacy (WGIL) and its role in advancing a national policy for information literacy in the Republic of Ireland. The study focuses on the work of the group during its lifetime including the various activities, marketing and advocacy initiatives and some of the challenges and issues the group faced, in particular, the diversity of the Irish library and information sector and the lack o...

  6. The Irish ‘Working Group on Information Literacy’ e Edging towards a national policy

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Terry; Russell, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The authors of this paper provide an overview of the activities of the Irish Working Group on Information Literacy (WGIL) and its role in advancing a national policy for information literacy in the Republic of Ireland. The study focuses on the work of the group during its lifetime including the various activities, marketing and advocacy initiatives and some of the challenges and issues the group faced, in particular, the diversity of the Irish library and information sector and the lack of an...

  7. Simulation innovation in Naval Special Warfare by utilizing small working groups

    OpenAIRE

    Rainville, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Naval Special Warfare has produced successful innovation by using small working groups. Naval Special Warfare deems an innovation successful if it results in a more efficient, less risky, more cost effective method to conduct special operations. The Quantum Leap program is an example of successful innovation in Naval Special Warfare produced by a small working group. How have these small groups been able to produce successful innovations? Michael McCaskey's Theory offers an explanation of how...

  8. ‘Knowing Yourself Through Others’: peer assessment in popular music group work

    OpenAIRE

    Pulman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This enquiry investigates the experiences and responses to peer assessment of group work involving cohorts of undergraduate popular music students over a five-year period. Working within the context of band rehearsing and performing, the enquiry focuses on how intra-peer assessment impact on students’ personal attributes and their learning. The literature review presents an overview of peer learning, group work, peer assessment processes, and a survey of the peer assessment lit...

  9. Progress report on the TCC INFCE working group 2 enrichment availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of working group 2 and the initial meetings of sub-groups 1A/2A and 2B are described. Primary activities of the sub-groups included the development and distribution of questionnaires. Future plans are also noted

  10. Mindfulness Group Work: Preventing Stress and Increasing Self-Compassion among Helping Professionals in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Sandy; Waldo, Michael; Gruszka, Clare

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects a 6-week mindfulness group had on 31 college students who were intending to enter helping professions (e.g., nursing, social work, counseling, psychology, and teaching). Group activities included meditation, yoga, a body scan exercise, and qi gong. The group members completed the Perceived Stress Scale, the…

  11. Globalisation in the Lecture Room? Gender and Cultural Diversity in Work Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umans, Timurs

    2011-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates the relationship between cultural and gender diversity and performance in groups of business students working on complex assignments. The study finds that gender diversity in student groups has a positive influence on group outcomes, while cultural diversity, irrespective of its conceptualisation, leads to…

  12. Clinical observation on treating infantile anorexia by the chiropractic therapy%捏脊疗法对婴幼儿厌食的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾运娥; 李连娣; 温晓寰; 文秋红; 杨红英

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinical efficacy of chiropractic therapy on infantile anorexia.Methods: 75 patients were randomly divided into two groups,the control group was given routine western medicine treatment,the treatment group was given the chiropractic treatment,clinical effects in two groups were compared.Results: The efficacy in the treatment group was better (P<0.05),after treatment,The hemoglobin was improved in the treatment group better than control group (P<0.05).Conclusion: The chiropractic therapy for infantile anorexiawas effective,safe and reliable,and was worthy of application.%目的:探讨捏脊疗法对婴幼儿厌食的临床疗效.方法:本组全部患者均为我社区收治的75例婴幼儿厌食患者,随机将其分两组,对照组采取西医治疗,治疗组采取捏脊疗法治疗,比较两组患者的效果.结果:治疗组总有效率显著优于对照组,差异有显著性(P<0.05),治疗后,治疗组患者的血红蛋白改善情况显著优于对照组,差异有显著性(P<0.05).结论:捏脊疗法对婴幼儿厌食临床疗效确实有效,且操作简单、安全可靠,值得推广应用.

  13. The chiropractic profession in Norway 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvammen, O. C.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.

    2014-01-01

    : Response rates were 61% (Survey 1, N = 320) and 71% (Survey 2, N = 217). More than two-thirds of the chiropractors in Norway had been in practice for under a decade. Only one in four chiropractors worked in solo practice and the majority shared premises with at least one colleague, typically at least one...... techniques on most patients, with soft tissue techniques and exercise modalities being almost as common. More than 3/4 of the profession reported that their clinical practice was in accordance with available clinical guidelines and about one third were positive about participating in future clinical research...... seems to follow the modern trends in evidence-based practice by using X-rays more sparingly than previously, adhering to guidelines and being positive about research....

  14. Changes in electrical activity in muscles resulting from chiropractic adjustment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, P

    1987-12-01

    This study examines the effects of chiropractic adjustment on the muscles of the back. Vertebrae that are hypomobile may be held in that state by the erector spinae muscle group; adjusting such vertebrae should result in less muscle tension. By measuring the change in electrical activity, such relaxation can be observed. Hypomobile vertebrae were found by motion palpation. The patient was then placed prone and surface electrodes were placed over the upper trapezius, upper erector spinae (T3-T5), and lumbar erector spinae (L1-L3) muscle groups on both sides of the body. The patient was adjusted using full spine toggle recoil thrusts, and postadjustment readings were taken. Results from this study show that significant changes in muscle electrical activity occur as a consequence of adjusting. On average, a 25% reduction in muscle activity was observed across the 20 subjects tested, while no significant reductions were observed with the control group of 14 subjects. Significant reductions in side-to-side imbalances were also observed.

  15. Constructing a philosophy of chiropractic: evolving worldviews and postmodern core☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzon, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article is to explore the postmodern, postrational, and postconventional core of DD Palmer's self-sense and philosophy. Discussion DD Palmer's self and philosophy can be viewed as a reaction to the self of modernity and its challenges of a fracture between mind and body, spirit, and nature. It is argued that Palmer's solution to these vexing problems facing the modern self was to use postrational and postconventional logic to overcome the dualisms. His philosophy resonates with similar postrational approaches, most notably, the German idealist Schelling. Conclusion It is argued that Palmer was one of the first postrational individuals in America and that chiropractic was an attempt at the first postrational health profession. PMID:22693480

  16. Is Consultation Everything? The Influence of Interest Groups on Parliamentary Working Bodies in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Krasovec, Alenka; Fink-Hafner, Danica

    2005-01-01

    Empirical data gathered from surveys of MPs & interest groups in Slovenia reveal that the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia is a relatively powerful & accessible political institution. Parliamentary working bodies are perceived by MPs & interest groups as the focal point of their contacts. While MPs find interest groups to be both valuable sources of input into the legislative process & relatively influential policy actors, interest groups are relatively happy with how accessible ...

  17. The geography and human cultural resources working group of the EROS program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The functions, activities, and objectives of the Geography and Human-Cultural Resources Working Group of the EROS program are outlined. The Group's primary function is to coordinate remote sensing experiments of physical scientists and the needs of socioeconomic and culturally orientated planners, policy makers, administrators, and other user groups. Other functions of the Group include land use analysis, resource mapping, and development of an operational automatic information system receptive to land use and environmental data.

  18. Psychosocial factors and their predictive value in chiropractic patients with low back pain: a prospective inception cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breen Alan C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being able to estimate the likelihood of poor recovery from episodes of back pain is important for care. Studies of psychosocial factors in inception cohorts in general practice and occupational populations have begun to make inroads to these problems. However, no studies have yet investigated this in chiropractic patients. Methods A prospective inception cohort study of patients presenting to a UK chiropractic practice for new episodes of non-specific low back pain (LBP was conducted. Baseline questionnaires asked about age, gender, occupation, work status, duration of current episode, chronicity, aggravating features and bothersomeness using Deyo's 'Core Set'. Psychological factors (fear-avoidance beliefs, inevitability, anxiety/distress and coping, and co-morbidity were also assessed at baseline. Satisfaction with care, number of attendances and pain impact were determined at 6 weeks. Predictors of poor outcome were sought by the calculation of relative risk ratios. Results Most patients presented within 4 weeks of onset. Of 158 eligible and willing patients, 130 completed both baseline and 6-week follow-up questionnaires. Greatest improvements at 6 weeks were in interference with normal work (ES 1.12 and LBP bothersomeness (ES 1.37. Although most patients began with moderate-high back pain bothersomeness scores, few had high psychometric ones. Co-morbidity was a risk for high-moderate interference with normal work at 6 weeks (RR 2.37; 95% C.I. 1.15–4.74. An episode duration of >4 weeks was associated with moderate to high bothersomeness at 6 weeks (RR 2.07; 95% C.I. 1.19 – 3.38 and negative outlook (inevitability with moderate to high interference with normal work (RR 2.56; 95% C.I. 1.08 – 5.08. Conclusion Patients attending a private UK chiropractic clinic for new episodes of non-specific LBP exhibited few psychosocial predictors of poor outcome, unlike other patient populations that have been studied. Despite

  19. The Influence of tolerance on the Learning Processes in Project Group Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    This paper presents a moral perspective on group work in higher education by addressing tolerance as a moral value of practice which is intertwined with learning of disciplinary knowledge. The relevance of tolerance among students is discussed in relation to Dewey's ideas of learning through...... of the concept. Project group work is an example of a social setting in an educational context where collaboration between students on the one hand is seen as a way to stimulate processes of learning  and on the other hand to strengthen social and moral competences. To be discussed in the paper is how group work...

  20. Regional cooperation-activities of the working group on waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Working Group on Waste Management was formally established by the Pacific Basin Nuclear Cooperation Committee at its meeting on November 19, 1986. Co-chairmen are Dr. Kunihiko Uematsu of Japan and the author, Gordon L. Brooks of Canada. Since the Working Group is newly formed, a consensus program has not yet been developed. In lieu of this, the author suggests a series of basic issues and possible areas of future collaboration which could serve as a starting point for the Working Group in developing an appropriate cooperative program. (author)