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Sample records for chimeric alphavirus vaccine

  1. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication...

  2. Alphavirus-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2014-06-16

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  3. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  4. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus.

  5. Alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, Ryan L; Harris, D L Hank; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2012-06-01

    The alphavirus replicon technology has been utilized for many years to develop vaccines for both veterinary and human applications. Many developments have been made to the replicon platform recently, resulting in improved safety and efficacy of replicon particle (RP) vaccines. This review provides a broad overview of the replicon technology and safety features of the system and discusses the current literature on RP and replicon-based vaccines.

  6. Immune Interference After Sequential Alphavirus Vaccine Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    biological weapons by adversary governments and/or terrorists [4–9]. For veterinary use, there are live, attenuated and inactivated VEE vaccines as...Alphaviruses. In: Knife DM, Howley PM, editors. Fields virology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007. p. 1023–67. [2] Kuhn RJ...Togaviridae: the viruses and their replication. In: Knife DM, Howley PM, editors. Fields virology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams

  7. Self-replicating alphavirus RNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Karl; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant nucleic acids are considered as promising next-generation vaccines. These vaccines express the native antigen upon delivery into tissue, thus mimicking live attenuated vaccines without having the risk of reversion to pathogenicity. They also stimulate the innate immune system, thus potentiating responses. Nucleic acid vaccines are easy to produce at reasonable cost and are stable. During the past years, focus has been on the use of plasmid DNA for vaccination. Now mRNA and replicon vaccines have come into focus as promising technology platforms for vaccine development. This review discusses self-replicating RNA vaccines developed from alphavirus expression vectors. These replicon vaccines can be delivered as RNA, DNA or as recombinant virus particles. All three platforms have been pre-clinically evaluated as vaccines against a number of infectious diseases and cancer. Results have been very encouraging and propelled the first human clinical trials, the results of which have been promising.

  8. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  9. Next-generation salmonid alphavirus vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquaculture is essential to meet the current and future demands for seafood to feed the world population. Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are two of the most cultured aquaculture species. A pathogen that threatens these species is salmonid alphavirus (SAV). A current inactivated virus vac

  10. Next-generation salmonid alphavirus vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquaculture is essential to meet the current and future demands for seafood to feed the world population. Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout are two of the most cultured aquaculture species. A pathogen that threatens these species is salmonid alphavirus (SAV). A current inactivated virus

  11. Alphavirus vectors for vaccine production and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2003-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors demonstrate high expression of heterologous proteins in a broad range of host cells. Replication-deficient as well as replication-competent variants exist. Systemic delivery of many viral antigens has elicited strong antibody responses in immunized mice and primates, and protection against challenges with lethal viruses was obtained. Similarly, prophylactic vaccination was established against tumor challenges. Attention has been paid to the engineering of improved targeting to immunologically active cells, such as dendritic cells. In the area of gene therapy, intratumoral injections of alphavirus vectors have resulted in potentially promising tumor rejection. Moreover, encapsulation of alphavirus particles into liposomes demonstrated efficient tumor targeting in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency, which permitted the initiation of clinical trials for patients with advanced kidney carcinoma and melanoma.

  12. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon particle vaccine for cytomegalovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A Reap; Morris, John; Dryga, Sergey A.; Maughan, Maureen; Talarico, Todd; Esch, Robert E.; Negri, Sarah; Burnett,Bruce; Graham, Andrew; Olmsted, Robert A.; Jeffrey D. Chulay

    2007-01-01

    We used a replication-incompetent, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the extracellular domain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B or a pp65/IE1 fusion protein. Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots and clinical lots of each alphavirus replicon vaccine component. The vaccine induced high-titered antibody responses in mice and rabbits, as measured by ELISA and CMV neutralization assays, an...

  13. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved to be aviru......A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup......' and horizontal transmission of challenge virus to sentinel pigs was not observed. A supplementary figure is available in JGV Online...

  14. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon particle vaccine for cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reap, Elizabeth A; Morris, John; Dryga, Sergey A; Maughan, Maureen; Talarico, Todd; Esch, Robert E; Negri, Sarah; Burnett, Bruce; Graham, Andrew; Olmsted, Robert A; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2007-10-16

    We used a replication-incompetent, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the extracellular domain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B or a pp65/IE1 fusion protein. Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots and clinical lots of each alphavirus replicon vaccine component. The vaccine induced high-titered antibody responses in mice and rabbits, as measured by ELISA and CMV neutralization assays, and robust T-cell responses in mice, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. A toxicity study in rabbits showed no adverse effects in any toxicology parameter. These studies support clinical testing of this novel CMV alphavirus replicon vaccine in humans.

  15. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of a novel chimeric pestivirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Reimann, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    A chimeric pestivirus of border disease virus Gifhorn and bovine viral diarrhea virus CP7 (Meyers et al., 1996) was constructed. Virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of the chimeric virus were studied in a vaccination–challenge experiment in pigs. The chimeric virus proved...... to be avirulent and neither chimeric virus nor viral RNA was detected in serum after vaccination. The safety of the vaccine was tested by horizontal transmission to sentinel pigs, which remained uninfected. The vaccine efficacy was examined by challenge infection with classical swine fever virus (CSFV) Eystrup....... In ‘challenge controls’, the viral load of CSFV coincided with the development of pronounced clinical symptoms. In contrast, the vaccinated pigs showed transient and weak clinical signs. Analysis of the viral load in these pigs showed 1000-fold lower viral RNA levels compared to ‘challenge controls...

  16. Salmonid alphavirus replication in mosquito cells: towards a novel vaccine production system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.; Verest, M.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and confers a major burden to the aquaculture industry. A commercial inactivated whole virus vaccine propagated in a salmon cell line at low temperature pro

  17. An E2-Substituted Chimeric Pestivirus With DIVA Vaccine Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Uttenthal, Åse; Nielsen, Jens

    An advantage of the use of chimeric pestiviruses as modified live vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) resides in their capacity to be manipulated to achieve the characteristics desired for safe and efficacious DIVA vaccines. We have recently generated a new chimeric virus, Riems26_E2gif...... engineered specifically for this purpose. The E2-substituted Riems26_E2gif was derived by homologues recombination of the complete E2 protein encoding genome region from Border disease strain Gifhorn into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) harbouring the genome of the CSFV vaccine strain C......-Riems. The virulence, immunogenicity and vaccine properties of Riems26_E2gif were tested in a vaccine-challenge experiment in pigs. Riems26_E2gif vaccinated pigs could be differentiated from infected pigs using a CSFV-E2 specific ELISA. Following challenge infection with highly virulent CSFV strain Koslov, all...

  18. Salmonid alphavirus replication in mosquito cells: towards a novel vaccine production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikke, Mia C; Verest, Marjan; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2014-09-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and confers a major burden to the aquaculture industry. A commercial inactivated whole virus vaccine propagated in a salmon cell line at low temperature provides effective protection against SAV infections. Alphaviruses (family Togaviridae) are generally transmitted between vertebrate hosts via blood-sucking arthropod vectors, typically mosquitoes. SAV is unique in this respect because it can be transmitted directly from fish to fish and has no known invertebrate vector. Here, we show for the first time that SAV is able to complete a full infectious cycle within arthropod cells derived from the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus. Progeny virus is produced in C6/36 and U4.4. cells in a temperature-dependent manner (at 15 °C but not at 18 °C), can be serially passaged and remains infectious to salmonid Chinook salmon embryo cells. This suggests that SAV is not a vertebrate-restricted alphavirus after all and may have the potential to replicate in invertebrates. The current study also shows the ability of SAV to be propagated in mosquito cells, thereby possibly providing an alternative SAV production system for vaccine applications.

  19. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon vaccine for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubby, Bolyn; Talarico, Todd; Maughan, Maureen; Reap, Elizabeth A; Berglund, Peter; Kamrud, Kurt I; Copp, Laura; Lewis, Whitney; Cecil, Chad; Norberg, Pamela; Wagner, Jordan; Watson, Aubrey; Negri, Sarah; Burnett, Bruce K; Graham, Andrew; Smith, Jonathan F; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2007-11-23

    We used a propagation-defective, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins from influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 (H3N2). Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots of HA VRP and NA VRP and clinical lots of HA VRP. HA VRP-induced high-titered antibody responses in mice, rabbits and rhesus macaques, as measured by ELISA or hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, and robust cellular immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. NA VRP also induced cellular immune responses in mice. A toxicology study with HA VRP and NA VRP in rabbits showed no adverse effects in any parameter. These studies support clinical testing of alphavirus replicon vaccines for influenza.

  20. The contribution of type I interferon signaling to immunity induced by alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the antiviral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate alphavirus-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and (2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors.

  1. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed.

  2. Immunogenicity of candidate chimeric DNA vaccine against tuberculosis and leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ayan; Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2009-08-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Leishmania donovani are important intracellular pathogens, especially in Indian context. In India and other South East Asian countries, both these infections are highly endemic and in about 20% cases co-infection of these pathogens is reported. For both these pathogens cell mediated immunity plays most important role. The available treatment of these infections is either prolonged or cumbersome or it is ineffective in controlling the outbreaks and spread. Therefore, potentiation of a common host defense mechanism can be used to prevent both the infections simultaneously. In this study we have developed a novel chimeric DNA vaccine candidate comprising the esat-6 gene of M. tuberculosis and kinesin motor domain gene of L. donovani. After developing this novel chimera, its immunogenicity was studied in mouse model. The immune response was compared with individual constructs of esat-6 and kinesin motor domain. The results showed that immunization with chimeric DNA vaccine construct resulted in stronger IFN-gamma and IL-2 response against kinesin (3012+/-102 and 367.5+/-8.92pg/ml) and ESAT-6 (1334+/-46.5 and 245.1+/-7.72pg/ml) in comparison to the individual vaccine constructs. The reciprocal immune response (IFN-gamma and IL-2) against individual construct was lower (kinesin motor domain: 1788+/-36.48 and 341.8+/-9.801pg/ml and ESAT-6: 867.0+/-47.23 and 170.8+/-4.578pg/ml, respectively). The results also suggest that using the chimeric construct both proteins yielded a reciprocal adjuvant affect over each other as the IFN-gamma production against chimera vaccination is statistically significant (pleishmaniasis and tuberculosis and have important implication in future vaccine design.

  3. An alphavirus replicon-derived candidate vaccine against Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, M T; Whitmore, A; Thompson, J; Parsons, M; Grobbelaar, A A; Kemp, A; Paweska, J T; Madric, K; White, L J; Swanepoel, R; Burt, F J

    2009-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted bunyavirus (genus Phlebovirus) associated with severe disease in livestock and fatal encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever in a proportion of infected humans. Although live attenuated and inactivated vaccines have been used in livestock, and on a limited scale in humans, there is a need for improved anti-RVFV vaccines. Towards this goal, Sindbis virus replicon vectors expressing the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins, as well as the non-structural nsM protein, were constructed and evaluated for their ability to induce protective immune responses against RVFV. These replicon vectors were shown to produce the RVFV glycoproteins to high levels in vitro and to induce systemic anti-RVFV antibody responses in immunized mice, as determined by RVFV-specific ELISA, fluorescent antibody tests, and demonstration of a neutralizing antibody response. Replicon vaccination also provided 100% protection against lethal RVFV challenge by either the intraperitoneal or intranasal route. Furthermore, preliminary results indicate that the replicon vectors elicit RVFV-specific neutralizing antibody responses in vaccinated sheep. These results suggest that alphavirus-based replicon vectors can induce protective immunity against RVFV, and that this approach merits further investigation into its potential utility as a RVFV vaccine.

  4. Deinococcus Mn(2+)-peptide complex: A novel approach to alphavirus vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Manoshi; Gupta, Paridhi; Morazzani, Elaine M; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2017-06-22

    Over the last ten years, Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an Old World alphavirus has caused numerous outbreaks in Asian and European countries and the Americas, making it an emerging pathogen of great global health importance. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a New World alphavirus, on the other hand, has been developed as a bioweapon in the past due to its ease of preparation, aerosol dispersion and high lethality in aerosolized form. Currently, there are no FDA approved vaccines against these viruses. In this study, we used a novel approach to develop inactivated vaccines for VEEV and CHIKV by applying gamma-radiation together with a synthetic Mn-decapeptide-phosphate complex (MnDpPi), based on manganous-peptide-orthophosphate antioxidants accumulated in the extremely radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Classical gamma-irradiated vaccine development approaches are limited by immunogenicity-loss due to oxidative damage to the surface proteins at the high doses of radiation required for complete virus-inactivation. However, addition of MnDpPi during irradiation process selectively protects proteins, but not the nucleic acids, from the radiation-induced oxidative damage, as required for safe and efficacious vaccine development. Previously, this approach was used to develop a bacterial vaccine. In the present study, we show that this approach can successfully be applied to protecting mice against viral infections. Irradiation of VEEV and CHIKV in the presence of MnDpPi resulted in substantial epitope preservation even at supra-lethal doses of gamma-rays (50,000Gy). Irradiated viruses were found to be completely inactivated and safe in vivo (neonatal mice). Upon immunization, VEEV inactivated in the presence of MnDpPi resulted in drastically improved protective efficacy. Thus, the MnDpPi-based gamma-inactivation approach described here can readily be applied to developing vaccines against any pathogen of interest in a fast and cost

  5. Development of a recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Partidos, Charalambos D; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2015-12-10

    Dengue is a significant threat to public health worldwide. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines available for dengue. Takeda Vaccines Inc. is developing a live, attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) that consists of an attenuated DENV-2 strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the prM and E protein genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 expressed in the context of the attenuated TDV-2 genome backbone (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4, respectively). TDV has been shown to be immunogenic and efficacious in nonclinical animal models. In interferon-receptor deficient mice, the vaccine induces humoral neutralizing antibody responses and cellular immune responses that are sufficient to protect from lethal challenge with DENV-1, DENV-2 or DENV-4. In non-human primates, administration of TDV induces innate immune responses as well as long lasting antibody and cellular immunity. In Phase 1 clinical trials, the safety and immunogenicity of two different formulations were assessed after intradermal or subcutaneous administration to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. TDV administration was generally well-tolerated independent of dose and route. The vaccine induced neutralizing antibody responses to all four DENV serotypes: after a single administration of the higher formulation, 24-67%% of the subjects seroconverted to all four DENV and >80% seroconverted to three or more viruses. In addition, TDV induced CD8(+) T cell responses to the non-structural NS1, NS3 and NS5 proteins of DENV. TDV has been also shown to be generally well tolerated and immunogenic in a Phase 2 clinical trial in dengue endemic countries in adults and children as young as 18 months. Additional clinical studies are ongoing in preparation for a Phase 3 safety and efficacy study.

  6. Combined alphavirus replicon particle vaccine induces durable and cross-protective immune responses against equine encephalitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Douglas S; Glass, Pamela J; Bakken, Russell R; Barth, James F; Lind, Cathleen M; da Silva, Luis; Hart, Mary Kate; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Dudek, Jeanne; Owens, Gary; Kamrud, Kurt I; Parker, Michael D; Smith, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    Alphavirus replicons were evaluated as potential vaccine candidates for Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) when given individually or in combination (V/W/E) to mice or cynomolgus macaques. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in mice to their respective alphavirus. Protection from either subcutaneous or aerosol challenge with VEEV, WEEV, or EEEV was demonstrated out to 12 months after vaccination in mice. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in macaques and demonstrated good protection against aerosol challenge with an epizootic VEEV-IAB virus, Trinidad donkey. Similarly, the EEEV replicon and V/W/E combination vaccine elicited neutralizing antibodies against EEEV and protected against aerosol exposure to a North American variety of EEEV. Both the WEEV replicon and combination V/W/E vaccination, however, elicited poor neutralizing antibodies to WEEV in macaques, and the protection conferred was not as strong. These results demonstrate that a combination V/W/E vaccine is possible for protection against aerosol challenge and that cross-interference between the vaccines is minimal. Importance: Three related viruses belonging to the genus Alphavirus cause severe encephalitis in humans: Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Normally transmitted by mosquitoes, these viruses can cause disease when inhaled, so there is concern that these viruses could be used as biological weapons. Prior reports have suggested that vaccines for these three viruses might interfere with one another. We have developed a combined vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis expressing the surface

  7. Superior protection conferred by inactivated whole virus vaccine over subunit and DNA vaccines against salmonid alphavirus infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2012-06-06

    Salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV-3) is an emerging pathogen in Norwegian salmon farming and causes severe annual losses. We studied the immunogenicity and protective ability of subunit and DNA vaccines based on E1 and E2 spike proteins of salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3), and compared these to an experimental inactivated, whole virus (IWV) vaccine in Atlantic salmon. The antigens were delivered as water-in-oil emulsions for the subunit and inactivated vaccines and non-formulated for the DNA vaccines. The IWV and the E2 subunit prime-boost groups had circulating neutralizing antibodies at challenge, correlating with high protection against lethal challenge and 3-log(10) reduction of virus titer in heart for the IWV group. Prime-boost with E1 subunit vaccine also conferred significant protection against mortality, but did not correlate with neutralizing antibody levels. Protection against pathology in internal organs was only seen for the IWV group. Prime-boost with E1 and E2 DNA vaccines showed marginal protection in terms of reduction of viral replication in target organs and protection against mortality was not different from controls. The IWV group showed significant upregulation of IFNγ and IL2 mRNA expression at 4 weeks post challenge possibly indicating that other mechanisms in addition to antibody responses play a role in mediating protection against infection. This is the first report comparing the immunogenicity and protection against mortality for IWV vaccines and spike protein subunit and DNA vaccines against salmonid alphavirus infection in Atlantic salmon. The IWV vaccine has superior immunogenicity over sub-unit and DNA vaccines.

  8. DIVA vaccine properties of the live chimeric pestivirus strain CP7_E2gif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Rosen, Tanya; Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Live modified vaccines to protect against classical swine fever virus (CSFV), based on chimeric pestiviruses, have been developed to enable serological Differentiation of Infected from Vaccinated Animals (DIVA). In this context, the chimeric virus CP7_E2gif vaccine candidate is unique as it does...... not include any CSFV components. In the present study, the DIVA vaccine properties of CP7_E2gif were evaluated in comparison to the conventional live attenuated Riemser C-strain vaccine. Sera and tonsil samples obtained from pigs immunised with these two vaccines were analysed. No viral RNA was found in serum...... after vaccination with CP7_E2gif, whereas some serum samples from C-strain vaccinated animals were positive. In both vaccinated groups, individual viral RNA-positive tonsil samples were detected in animals euthanised between 7 and 21 days post vaccination. Furthermore, serum samples from these animals...

  9. Individual and bivalent vaccines based on alphavirus replicons protect guinea pigs against infection with Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushko, P; Geisbert, J; Parker, M; Jahrling, P; Smith, J

    2001-12-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccines for Lassa and Ebola viruses that are based on an RNA replicon vector derived from an attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. The Lassa and Ebola virus genes were expressed from recombinant replicon RNAs that also encoded the replicase function and were capable of efficient intracellular self-amplification. For vaccinations, the recombinant replicons were incorporated into virus-like replicon particles. Guinea pigs vaccinated with particles expressing Lassa virus nucleoprotein or glycoprotein genes were protected from lethal challenge with Lassa virus. Vaccination with particles expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein gene also protected the animals from lethal challenge with Ebola virus. In order to evaluate a single vaccine protecting against both Lassa and Ebola viruses, we developed dual-expression particles that expressed glycoprotein genes of both Ebola and Lassa viruses. Vaccination of guinea pigs with either dual-expression particles or with a mixture of particles expressing Ebola and Lassa virus glycoprotein genes protected the animals against challenges with Ebola and Lassa viruses. The results showed that immune responses can be induced against multiple vaccine antigens coexpressed from an alphavirus replicon and suggested the possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines based upon alphavirus vectors for arenaviruses, filoviruses, and possibly other emerging pathogens.

  10. Induction of pluripotent protective immunity following immunisation with a chimeric vaccine against human cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhong

    Full Text Available Based on the life-time cost to the health care system, the Institute of Medicine has assigned the highest priority for a vaccine to control human cytomegalovirus (HCMV disease in transplant patients and new born babies. In spite of numerous attempts successful licensure of a HCMV vaccine formulation remains elusive. Here we have developed a novel chimeric vaccine strategy based on a replication-deficient adenovirus which encodes the extracellular domain of gB protein and multiple HLA class I & II-restricted CTL epitopes from HCMV as a contiguous polypeptide. Immunisation with this chimeric vaccine consistently generated strong HCMV-specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells which co-expressed IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, while the humoral response induced by this vaccine showed strong virus neutralizing capacity. More importantly, immunization with adenoviral chimeric vaccine also afforded protection against challenge with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding HCMV antigens and this protection was associated with the induction of a pluripotent antigen-specific cellular and antibody response. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation with this adenoviral chimeric vaccine rapidly expanded multiple antigen-specific human CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells from healthy virus carriers. These studies demonstrate that the adenovirus chimeric HCMV vaccine provides an excellent platform for reconstituting protective immunity to prevent HCMV diseases in different clinical settings.

  11. Molecular Smallpox Vaccine Delivered by Alphavirus Replicons Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice and Non-human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W.; Ferro, Anthony M.; Golden, Joseph W.; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F.; Kamrud, Kurt I.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 70s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 × 106 PFU of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine. PMID:19833247

  12. Molecular smallpox vaccine delivered by alphavirus replicons elicits protective immunity in mice and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W; Ferro, Anthony M; Golden, Joseph W; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2009-12-11

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 1970s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 x 10(6)pfu of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine.

  13. QA prime-boost vaccination strategy in prevent serotype O FMDV infection using a "single-cycle" alphavirus vector and empty capsid particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette

    alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Purified O1 Manisa empty capsid particles (ECs) have been prepared using a recombinant vaccinia virus expression system. Cattle have been vaccinated with the SFV-FMDV vectors and boosted subsequently with the ECs and then challenged...

  14. Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidates generated by chimerization with dengue virus type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2014-05-23

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide and vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent disease. A suitable live-attenuated JEV vaccine could be formulated with a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine for the control of these viruses in endemic areas. Toward this goal, we generated chimeric virus vaccine candidates by replacing the precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein structural genes of recombinant dengue virus type 4 (rDEN4) or attenuated vaccine candidate rDEN4Δ30 with those of wild-type JEV strain India/78. Mutations were engineered in E, NS3 and NS4B protein genes to improve replication in Vero cells. The chimeric viruses were attenuated in mice and some elicited modest but protective levels of immunity after a single dose. One particular chimeric virus, bearing E protein mutation Q264H, replicated to higher titer in tissue culture and was significantly more immunogenic in mice. The results are compared with live-attenuated JEV vaccine strain SA14-14-2. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Alphaviruses in Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are enveloped single stranded RNA viruses, which as gene therapy vectors provide high-level transient gene expression. Semliki Forest virus (SFV, Sindbis virus (SIN and Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE virus have been engineered as efficient replication-deficient and -competent expression vectors. Alphavirus vectors have frequently been used as vehicles for tumor vaccine generation. Moreover, SFV and SIN vectors have been applied for intratumoral injections in animals implanted with tumor xenografts. SIN vectors have demonstrated natural tumor targeting, which might permit systemic vector administration. Another approach for systemic delivery of SFV has been to encapsulate replication-deficient viral particles in liposomes, which can provide passive targeting to tumors and allow repeated administration without host immune responses. This approach has demonstrated safe delivery of encapsulated SFV particles to melanoma and kidney carcinoma patients in a phase I trial. Finally, the prominent neurotropism of alphaviruses make them attractive for the treatment of CNS-related diseases.

  16. Alphavirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fros, Jelke J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to t

  17. Alphavirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fros, Jelke J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to t

  18. Intra-serotype SAT2 chimeric foot-and-mouth disease vaccine protects cattle against FMDV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F; Nsamba, Peninah; Mutowembwa, Paidamwoyo; Rotherham, Lia S; Esterhuysen, Jan; Scott, Katherine

    2015-06-09

    The genetic diversity of the three Southern African Territories (SAT) types of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) reflects high antigenic variation, and indications are that vaccines targeting each SAT-specific topotype may be needed. This has serious implications for control of FMD using vaccines as well as the choice of strains to include in regional antigen banks. Here, we investigated an intra-serotype chimeric virus, vSAT2(ZIM14)-SAT2, which was engineered by replacing the surface-exposed capsid-coding region (1B-1D/2A) of a SAT2 genome-length clone, pSAT2, with that of the field isolate, SAT2/ZIM/14/90. The chimeric FMDV produced by this technique was viable, grew to high titres and stably maintained the 1B-1D/2A sequence upon passage. Chemically inactivated, oil adjuvanted vaccines of both the chimeric and parental immunogens were used to vaccinate cattle. The serological response to vaccination showed the production of strong neutralizing antibody titres that correlated with protection against homologous FMDV challenge. We also predicted a good likelihood that cattle vaccinated with an intra-serotype chimeric vaccine would be protected against challenge with viruses that caused recent outbreaks in southern Africa. These results provide support that chimeric vaccines containing the external capsid of field isolates induce protective immune responses in FMD host species similar to the parental vaccine.

  19. A novel chimeric Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Paldurai, Anandan; Samal, Siba K

    2017-03-01

    Avian influenza (AI) is an economically-important disease of poultry worldwide. The use of vaccines to control AI has increased because of frequent outbreaks of the disease in endemic countries. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vectored vaccine has shown to be effective in protecting chickens against a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection. However, preexisting antibodies to NDV vector might affect protective efficacy of the vaccine in the field. As an alternative strategy, we evaluated vaccine efficacy of a chimeric NDV vectored vaccine in which the ectodomains of F and HN proteins were replaced by those of avian paramyxovirus serotype-2. The chimeric NDV vector stably expressed the HA protein in vivo, did not cross-react with NDV, was attenuated to be used as a safe vaccine, and provided a partial protection of 1-day-old immunized chickens against HPAIV subtype H5N1challenge, indicating its potential use for early protection of chickens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Purification and concentration of alphavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-07-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have showed reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. Membrane proteins (which are generally difficult to express at high levels in recombinant systems) have generated high yields and facilitate applications in structural biology. Alphaviruses have also been applied in vaccine development and gene therapy. Generally, purification or concentration of alphaviruses is not necessary. However, for instance, the medium derived from baby hamster kidney cells is toxic to primary neurons in culture. Including a purification step substantially improves the survival of the transduced neurons. Viral concentration and purification may also be advantageous for in vivo studies in animal models and are mandatory for clinical applications. This protocol describes three methods for purification and concentration of alphavirus.

  1. Induction of partial protection against infection with Toxoplasma gondii genotype II by DNA vaccination with recombinant chimeric tachyzoite antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Carina Agerbo; De Craeye, S.; Jongert, E.

    2009-01-01

    complications. Although several strategies have been suggested for making a vaccine, none is currently available. Here, we investigate the protection conferred by DNA vaccination with two constructs, pcEC2 (MIC2-MIC3-SAG1) and pcEC3 (GRA3-GRA7-M2AP), encoding chimeric proteins containing multiple antigenic...

  2. Understanding Zika Virus Stability and Developing a Chimeric Vaccine through Functional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuping Xie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared with other flaviviruses, Zika virus (ZIKV is uniquely associated with congenital diseases in pregnant women. One recent study reported that (i ZIKV has higher thermostability than dengue virus (DENV [a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV], which might contribute to the disease outcome; (ii the higher thermostability of ZIKV could arise from an extended loop structure in domain III of the viral envelope (E protein and an extra hydrogen-bond interaction between E molecules (V. A. Kostyuchenko, E. X. Y. Lim, S. Zhang, G. Fibriansah, T.-S. Ng, J. S. G. Ooi, J. Shi, and S.-M. Lok, Nature 533:425–428, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17994. Here we report the functional analysis of the structural information in the context of complete ZIKV and DENV-2 virions. Swapping the prM-E genes between ZIKV and DENV-2 switched the thermostability of the chimeric viruses, identifying the prM-E proteins as the major determinants for virion thermostability. Shortening the extended loop of the E protein by 1 amino acid was lethal for ZIKV assembly/release. Mutations (Q350I and T351V that abolished the extra hydrogen-bond interaction between the E proteins did not reduce ZIKV thermostability, indicating that the extra interaction does not increase the thermostability. Interestingly, mutant T351V was attenuated in A129 mice defective in type I interferon receptors, even though the virus retained the wild-type thermostability. Furthermore, we found that a chimeric ZIKV with the DENV-2 prM-E and a chimeric DENV-2 with the ZIKV prM-E were highly attenuated in A129 mice; these chimeric viruses were highly immunogenic and protective against DENV-2 and ZIKV challenge, respectively. These results indicate the potential of these chimeric viruses for vaccine development.

  3. Understanding Zika Virus Stability and Developing a Chimeric Vaccine through Functional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yujiao; Muruato, Antonio E.; Zou, Jing; Shan, Chao; Nunes, Bruno T. D.; Medeiros, Daniele B. A.; Vasconcelos, Pedro F. C.; Weaver, Scott C.; Rossi, Shannan L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compared with other flaviviruses, Zika virus (ZIKV) is uniquely associated with congenital diseases in pregnant women. One recent study reported that (i) ZIKV has higher thermostability than dengue virus (DENV [a flavivirus closely related to ZIKV]), which might contribute to the disease outcome; (ii) the higher thermostability of ZIKV could arise from an extended loop structure in domain III of the viral envelope (E) protein and an extra hydrogen-bond interaction between E molecules (V. A. Kostyuchenko, E. X. Y. Lim, S. Zhang, G. Fibriansah, T.-S. Ng, J. S. G. Ooi, J. Shi, and S.-M. Lok, Nature 533:425–428, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1038/nature17994). Here we report the functional analysis of the structural information in the context of complete ZIKV and DENV-2 virions. Swapping the prM-E genes between ZIKV and DENV-2 switched the thermostability of the chimeric viruses, identifying the prM-E proteins as the major determinants for virion thermostability. Shortening the extended loop of the E protein by 1 amino acid was lethal for ZIKV assembly/release. Mutations (Q350I and T351V) that abolished the extra hydrogen-bond interaction between the E proteins did not reduce ZIKV thermostability, indicating that the extra interaction does not increase the thermostability. Interestingly, mutant T351V was attenuated in A129 mice defective in type I interferon receptors, even though the virus retained the wild-type thermostability. Furthermore, we found that a chimeric ZIKV with the DENV-2 prM-E and a chimeric DENV-2 with the ZIKV prM-E were highly attenuated in A129 mice; these chimeric viruses were highly immunogenic and protective against DENV-2 and ZIKV challenge, respectively. These results indicate the potential of these chimeric viruses for vaccine development. PMID:28174309

  4. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  5. Augmenting the efficacy of anti-cocaine catalytic antibodies through chimeric hapten design and combinatorial vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenthur, Cody J; Cai, Xiaoqing; Ellis, Beverly A; Janda, Kim D

    2017-08-15

    Given the need for further improvements in anti-cocaine vaccination strategies, a chimeric hapten (GNET) was developed that combines chemically-stable structural features from steady-state haptens with the hydrolytic functionality present in transition-state mimetic haptens. Additionally, as a further investigation into the generation of an improved bifunctional antibody pool, sequential vaccination with steady-state and transition-state mimetic haptens was undertaken. While GNET induced the formation of catalytically-active antibodies, it did not improve overall behavioral efficacy. In contrast, the resulting pool of antibodies from GNE/GNT co-administration demonstrated intermediate efficacy as compared to antibodies developed from either hapten alone. Overall, improved antibody catalytic efficiency appears necessary to achieve the synergistic benefits of combining cocaine hydrolysis with peripheral sequestration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  7. Immunogenicity and efficacy of chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax) formulations in interferon-deficient AG129 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewoo, Joseph N; Kinney, Richard M; Powell, Tim D; Arguello, John J; Silengo, Shawn J; Partidos, Charalambos D; Huang, Claire Y-H; Stinchcomb, Dan T; Osorio, Jorge E

    2012-02-14

    Formulations of chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax) viruses containing the pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes of serotypes 1-4 expressed in the context of the attenuated DENV-2 PDK-53 genome were tested for safety, immunogenicity and efficacy in interferon receptor knock-out mice (AG129). Monovalent formulations were safe and elicited robust neutralizing antibody responses to the homologous virus and only limited cross-reactivity to other serotypes. A single dose of monovalent DENVax-1, -2, or -3 vaccine provided eighty or greater percent protection against both wild-type (wt) DENV-1 (Mochizuki strain) and DENV-2 (New Guinea C strain) challenge viruses. A single dose of monovalent DENVax-4 also provided complete protection against wt DENV-1 challenge and significantly increased the survival times after challenge with wt DENV-2. In studies using tetravalent mixtures, DENVax ratios were identified that: (i) caused limited viremia, (ii) induced serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies to all four DENV serotypes with different hierarchies, and (iii) conferred full protection against clinical signs of disease following challenge with either wt DENV-1 or DENV-2 viruses. Overall, these data highlight the immunogenic profile of DENVax, a novel candidate tetravalent dengue vaccine and the advantage of sharing a common attenuated genomic backbone among the DENVax monovalent vaccines that confer protection against homologous or heterologous virus challenge.

  8. EspA-Intimin chimeric protein, a candidate vaccine against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Sedighian Rad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC O157:H7 is an important enteric pathogen in human causing bloody or nonbloody diarrhea, which may be complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Cattle are an important reservoir of EHEC. This research aims at vaccination with a divalent chimer protein composed of EspA120 and Intimin 282 and its preventive effect of EHEC O157 colonization in mice rectal epithelium.A divalent recombinant EspA-Intimin (EI protein containing EspA120 and Intimin280 attached with a linker was amplified from a trivalent construct and cloned in pET-28a (+ vector. The immunization was conducted in mice after expression and purification of the recombinant EI (rEI.Mice subcutaneously immunized with rEI, elicited significant rEI specific serum IgG antibodies and showed significantly decreased E.coli O157:H7 shedding compared to the control group.The chimeric recombinant protein induced strong humoral response as well as protection against oral challenges with live E.coli O157:H7.

  9. Salmonid alphavirus-based replicon vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA): impact of immunization route and interactions of the replicon vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Astrid; Hodneland, Kjartan; Frost, Petter; Hoeijmakers, Mathieu; Rimstad, Espen

    2014-02-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV)-based replicon encoding the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) hemagglutinin-esterase (HE), pSAV/HE, is an efficacious vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA). Delivered intramuscularly (i.m.), the replicon vaccine provides high protection against subsequent ISAV challenge in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and induces a strong innate response locally at the injection site. This may be beneficial and could warrant reduced doses and improved efficacy compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In the present study, we found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the pSAV/HE replicon vaccine did not induce protection, neither alone or in combination with a sub-potent, inactivated low-dose ISAV vaccine given i.p. No significant differences between the two immunization routes regarding systemic immune responses could be observed. I.m. injection of the replicon vector encoding a non-viral gene or the protective glycoprotein (G protein) from the heterologous viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) induced no protection against ISA. Although the replicons without the ISAV HE did induce IFN-signaling pathways at the muscle injection site similar to the pSAV/HE replicon they did not improve the efficacy of a sub-potent inactivated low-dose ISAV vaccine delivered i.p. Moreover, there was a tendency for reduced efficacy of the pSAV/HE replicon vaccine injected i.m. when co-injected with the replicon encoding the VHSV G protein, which previously, after DNA vaccination, have been reported to induce cross-protection against heterologous virus challenge in fish.

  10. Dose-Dependent Protection against or Exacerbation of Disease by a Polylactide Glycolide Microparticle-Adsorbed, Alphavirus-Based Measles Virus DNA Vaccine in Rhesus Macaques▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Nair, Nitya; Adams, Robert J.; Zink, M. Christine; Lee, Eun-Young; Polack, Fernando P.; Singh, Manmohan; O'Hagan, Derek T.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    Measles remains an important cause of vaccine-preventable child mortality. Development of a low-cost, heat-stable vaccine for infants under the age of 6 months could improve measles control by facilitating delivery at the time of other vaccines and by closing a window of susceptibility prior to immunization at 9 months of age. DNA vaccines hold promise for development, but achieving protective levels of antibody has been difficult and there is an incomplete understanding of protective immunity. In the current study, we evaluated the use of a layered alphavirus DNA/RNA vector encoding measles virus H (SINCP-H) adsorbed onto polylactide glycolide (PLG) microparticles. In mice, antibody and T-cell responses to PLG-formulated DNA were substantially improved compared to those to naked DNA. Rhesus macaques received two doses of PLG/SINCP-H delivered either intramuscularly (0.5 mg) or intradermally (0.5 or 0.1 mg). Antibody and T-cell responses were induced but not sustained. On challenge, the intramuscularly vaccinated monkeys did not develop rashes and had lower viremias than vector-treated control monkeys. Monkeys vaccinated with the same dose intradermally developed rashes and viremia. Monkeys vaccinated intradermally with the low dose developed more severe rashes, with histopathologic evidence of syncytia and intense dermal and epidermal inflammation, eosinophilia, and higher viremia compared to vector-treated control monkeys. Protection after challenge correlated with gamma interferon-producing T cells and with early production of high-avidity antibody that bound wild-type H protein. We conclude that PLG/SINCP-H is most efficacious when delivered intramuscularly but does not provide an advantage over standard DNA vaccines for protection against measles. PMID:18287579

  11. Novel in-ovo chimeric recombinant Newcastle disease vaccine protects against both Newcastle disease and infectious bursal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinying; Wang, Xijun; Tian, Meijie; Wen, Zhiyuan; Feng, Qiulin; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Honglei; Wang, Xiaomei; Bu, Zhigao

    2014-03-14

    Development of a safe and efficient in-ovo vaccine against Newcastle disease (NDV) and very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) is of great importance. In this study, a chimeric NDV LaSota virus with the L gene of Clone-30 (rLaC30L) was used to generate a recombinant chimeric virus expressing the VP2 protein of vvIBDV (rLaC30L-VP2). The safety and efficacy of rLaC30L-VP2 in-ovo vaccination was then evaluated in 18-day-old special pathogen free (SPF) chicken embryos and commercial broiler embryos for prevention of NDV and vvIBDV. Hatchability and global survival rate of the hatched birds was not affected by in-ovo rLaC30L-VP2 vaccination. However, rLaC30L-VP2 in-ovo vaccination induced significant anti-IBDV and anti-NDV antibodies in SPF birds and commercial broilers, and 100% of vaccinated chickens were protected against a lethal NDV challenge. In-ovo rLaC30L-VP2 vaccination also provided resistance against vvIBDV challenge in a significant amount of animals. These results suggest that rLaC30L-VP2 is a safe and efficient bivalent live in-ovo vaccine against NDV and vvIBDV.

  12. Chimeric DNA Vaccines against ErbB2{sup +} Carcinomas: From Mice to Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaglino, Elena; Riccardo, Federica; Macagno, Marco; Bandini, Silvio; Cojoca, Rodica; Ercole, Elisabetta [Molecular Biotechnology Center, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, 10126 Turin (Italy); Amici, Augusto [Department of Molecular Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy); Cavallo, Federica, E-mail: federica.cavallo@unito.it [2 Department of Molecular Cellular and Animal Biology, University of Camerino, 62032 Camerino (Italy)

    2011-08-10

    DNA vaccination exploits a relatively simple and flexible technique to generate an immune response against microbial and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Its effectiveness is enhanced by the application of an electrical shock in the area of plasmid injection (electroporation). In our studies we exploited a sophisticated electroporation device approved for clinical use (Cliniporator, IGEA, Carpi, Italy). As the target antigen is an additional factor that dramatically modulates the efficacy of a vaccine, we selected ErbB2 receptor as a target since it is an ideal oncoantigen. It is overexpressed on the cell membrane by several carcinomas for which it plays an essential role in driving their progression. Most oncoantigens are self-tolerated molecules. To circumvent immune tolerance we generated two plasmids (RHuT and HuRT) coding for chimeric rat/human ErbB2 proteins. Their immunogenicity was compared in wild type mice naturally tolerant for mouse ErbB2, and in transgenic mice that are also tolerant for rat or human ErbB2. In several of these mice, RHuT and HuRT elicited a stronger anti-tumor response than plasmids coding for fully human or fully rat ErbB2. The ability of heterologous moiety to blunt immune tolerance could be exploited to elicit a significant immune response in patients. A clinical trial to delay the recurrence of ErbB2{sup +} carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx and hypopharynx is awaiting the approval of the Italian authorities.

  13. Chimeric L2-Based Virus-Like Particle (VLP) Vaccines Targeting Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Jindra, Christoph; Christensen, Neil; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Common cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) types induce skin warts, whereas species beta HPV are implicated, together with UV-radiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in immunosuppressed patients. Licensed HPV vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLP) self-assembled from L1 major capsid proteins that provide type-restricted protection against mucosal HPV infections causing cervical and other ano-genital and oro-pharyngeal carcinomas and warts (condylomas), but do not target heterologous HPV. Experimental papillomavirus vaccines have been designed based on L2 minor capsid proteins that contain type-common neutralization epitopes, to broaden protection to heterologous mucosal and cutaneous HPV types. Repetitive display of the HPV16 L2 cross-neutralization epitope RG1 (amino acids (aa) 17-36) on the surface of HPV16 L1 VLP has greatly enhanced immunogenicity of the L2 peptide. To more directly target cutaneous HPV, L1 fusion proteins were designed that incorporate the RG1 homolog of beta HPV17, the beta HPV5 L2 peptide aa53-72, or the common cutaneous HPV4 RG1 homolog, inserted into DE surface loops of HPV1, 5, 16 or 18 L1 VLP scaffolds. Baculovirus expressed chimeric proteins self-assembled into VLP and VLP-raised NZW rabbit immune sera were evaluated by ELISA and L1- and L2-based pseudovirion (PsV) neutralizing assays, including 12 novel beta PsV types. Chimeric VLP displaying the HPV17 RG1 epitope, but not the HPV5L2 aa53-72 epitope, induced cross-neutralizing humoral immune responses to beta HPV. In vivo cross-protection was evaluated by passive serum transfer in a murine PsV challenge model. Immune sera to HPV16L1-17RG1 VLP (cross-) protected against beta HPV5/20/24/38/96/16 (but not type 76), while antisera to HPV5L1-17RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV20/24/96 only, and sera to HPV1L1-4RG1 VLP cross-protected against HPV4 challenge. In conclusion, RG1-based VLP are promising next generation vaccine candidates to target cutaneous HPV

  14. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluations of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, M; Gilbert, P; Russell, N; Hural, J; Allen, M; Pensiero, M; Chulay, J; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Abdool Karim, S S; Burke, D S

    2012-10-01

    On the basis of positive preclinical data, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine (AVX101), expressing a nonmyristoylated form of Gag, in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults. Escalating doses of AVX101 or placebo were administered subcutaneously to participants in the United States and Southern Africa. Because of vaccine stability issues, the first trial was halted prior to completion of all dose levels and a second trial was implemented. The second trial was also stopped prematurely due to documentation issues with the contract manufacturer. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated through assessments of reactogenicity, reports of adverse events, and assessment of replication-competent and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viremia. Immunogenicity was measured using the following assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-release cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISpot, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and lymphoproliferation assay (LPA). Anti-vector antibodies were also measured. AVX101 was well tolerated and exhibited only modest local reactogenicity. There were 5 serious adverse events reported during the trials; none were considered related to the study vaccine. In contrast to the preclinical data, immune responses in humans were limited. Only low levels of binding antibodies and T-cell responses were seen at the highest doses. This trial also highlighted the difficulties in developing a novel vector for HIV.

  15. Vaccine Development for Biothreat Alpha Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-25

    virus (IV) BeAr35645 Cassabou virus (V) Rio Negro virus (VI) EEEV EEEV NA Lineage I FL93-939 EEEV SA Lineage II-IV BeAr436087 WEEV WEEV CBA87 WEEV ON41...Bioterr Biodef ISSN:2157-2526 JBTBD an open access journal 17. Fauquet CM, Mayo MA, Maniloff J, Desselberger U, Ball LA (2005) Virus Taxonomy:Eighth...vaccinated with chimeric SIN/VEE viruses. J Virol 80: 2784-2796. 33. Atasheva S, Wang E, Adams AP, Plante KS, Ni S, et al. (2009) Chimeric alphavirus

  16. Alphavirus RNA synthesis and non-structural protein functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Jonathan C; Sokoloski, Kevin J; Gebhart, Natasha N; Hardy, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    The members of the genus Alphavirus are positive-sense RNA viruses, which are predominantly transmitted to vertebrates by a mosquito vector. Alphavirus disease in humans can be severely debilitating, and depending on the particular viral species, infection may result in encephalitis and possibly death. In recent years, alphaviruses have received significant attention from public health authorities as a consequence of the dramatic emergence of chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean islands and the Caribbean. Currently, no safe, approved or effective vaccine or antiviral intervention exists for human alphavirus infection. The molecular biology of alphavirus RNA synthesis has been well studied in a few species of the genus and represents a general target for antiviral drug development. This review describes what is currently understood about the regulation of alphavirus RNA synthesis, the roles of the viral non-structural proteins in this process and the functions of cis-acting RNA elements in replication, and points to open questions within the field.

  17. Construction and preliminary investigation of a novel dengue serotype 4 chimeric virus using Japanese encephalitis vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhushi; Yang, Huiqiang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lina; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Li; Zeng, Xianwu; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2014-10-13

    For the purpose of developing a novel dengue vaccine candidate, recombinant plasmids were constructed which contained the full length cDNA clone of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 with its premembrane (PreM) and envelope (E) genes replaced by the counterparts of dengue virus type 4 (DENV4). By transfecting the in vitro transcription products of the recombinant plasmids into BHK-21 cells, a chimeric virus JEV/DENV4 was successfully recovered. The chimeric virus was identified by complete genome sequencing, Western blot and immunofluorescent staining. Growth characteristics revealed it was well adapted to primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells. Its genetic stability was investigated and only one unintentional mutation in 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) was found after 20 passages in PHK cells. Neurotropism, neurovirulence and immunogenicity of the chimeric virus were tested in mice. Besides, the influence of JE vaccine pre-immunization on the neutralizing antibody level induced by the chimeric virus was illuminated. To our knowledge, this is the first chimeric virus incorporating the JE vaccine stain SA14-14-2 and DENV4. It is probably a potential candidate to compose a tetravalent dengue chimeric vaccine.

  18. Enhanced immunity against classical swine fever in pigs induced by prime-boost immunization using an alphavirus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine and a recombinant adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Na; Li, Hong-Yu; Li, Miao; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2010-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) - caused by the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) - is a fatal disease of pigs that is responsible for extensive losses to the swine industry worldwide. We had demonstrated previously that a prime-boost vaccination strategy using an alphavirus (Semliki Forest virus, SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine (pSFV1CS-E2) and a recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-E2) expressing the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV induced enhanced immune responses in a mouse model. In this study, we evaluated further the efficacy of the heterologous prime-boost immunization approach in pigs, the natural host of CSFV. The results showed that the pigs (n=5) receiving pSFV1CS-E2/rAdV-E2 heterologous prime-boost immunization developed significantly higher titers of CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies and comparable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, compared to the pigs receiving double immunizations with rAdV-E2 alone. When challenged with virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the pigs of the heterologous prime-boost group did not show clinical symptoms or viremia, which were observed in one of the 5 pigs immunized with rAdV-E2 alone and all the 5 control pigs immunized with an empty adenovirus. The results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA prime and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy can induce solid protective immunity.

  19. Characterization of NoV P particle-based chimeric protein vaccines developed from two different expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lu; Jin, Hao; Yu, Yongjiao; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Jiaxin; Yin, Yuhe; Yu, Xianghui; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The Norovirus (NoV) P domain, with three surface loops for foreign antigen insertion, has been demonstrated as an excellent platform for antigen presentation and novel vaccine development. The P domain alone can self-assemble into a P dimer, 12-mer small particle or 24-mer P particle, and vaccines based on those particles may elicit different levels of immunogenicity. Currently, P particles are generally produced in soluble expression systems in Escherichia coli, mainly in the 24-mer form. However, the low yield of the soluble protein has hindered further clinical applications of P particle-based protein vaccines. In this study, we inserted the Alzheimer's disease (AD) immunogen Aβ1-6 into the three loops of the P particle to generate an AD protein vaccine. To increase the yield of this chimeric protein, we tested the generation of proteins in a soluble expression system and an inclusion body expression system separately in E. coli. The result showed that the inclusion body expression system could greatly enhance the product yield of the chimeric protein compared with the soluble expression system. The refolded protein from the inclusion bodies was mainly in the 12-mer form, while the protein generated from the soluble supernatant was mainly in the 24-mer form. Moreover, the immunogenicity of soluble proteins was significantly stronger than that of the refolded proteins. Thus, comparisons between the two expression methods suggested that the soluble expression system generated chimeric P particles with better immunogenicity, while inclusion body expression system yielded more P particle proteins.

  20. Evaluation of a chimeric multi-epitope-based DNA vaccine against subgroup J avian leukosis virus in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqing; Cui, Ning; Ma, Xingjiang; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-07-19

    The prokaryotic expressed recombinant chimeric multi-epitope protein X (rCMEPX) had been evaluated with good immunogenicity and protective efficacy against subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in our previous study. In the present research, we cloned the chimeric multi-epitope gene X into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 to evaluate its potency as a DNA vaccine. The purified recombinant gp85 protein and rCMEPX were used as positive controls and a DNA prime-protein boost strategy was also studied. Six experimental groups of 7-day-old chickens (20 per group) were immunized intramuscularly three times at 2weeks interval with PBS, gp85, rCMEPX, pVAX1, pVAX-X and pVAX-X+rCMEPX respectively. The antibody titers and cellular immune responses were assayed after immunization. The efficacy of immunoprotection against the challenge of ALV-J NX0101 strain was also examined. The results showed that the DNA vaccine could elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses. Immune-challenge experiments showed good protection efficacy against ALV-J infection. Particularly, the regimen involving one priming pVAX-X and twice recombinant rCMEPX boosting, induced the highest antibody titers in all immunized groups. Our results suggest that the constructed chimeric multi-epitope DNA has potential for a candidate vaccine against ALV-J when used in proper prime-boost combinations. The data presented here may provide an alternative strategy for vaccine design in chicken ALV-J prevention.

  1. Immunogenicity and therapeutic effects of Ag85A/B chimeric DNA vaccine in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Wu, Xueqiong; Zhang, Junxian; Xiao, Li; Yang, Yourong; Bai, Xuejuan; Yu, Qi; Li, Zhongming; Bi, Lan; Li, Ning; Wu, Xiaoli

    2012-12-01

    The situation of tuberculosis (TB) is very severe in China. New therapeutic agents or regimens to treat TB are urgently needed. In this study, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mice were given immunotherapy intramuscularly with Ag85A/B chimeric DNA or saline, plasmid vector pVAX1, or Mycobacterium vaccae vaccine. The mice treated with Ag85A/B chimeric DNA showed significantly higher numbers of T cells secreting interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), more IFN-γ in splenocyte culture supernatant, more Th1 and Tc1 cells, and higher ratios of Th1/Th2 and Tc1/Tc2 cells in whole blood, indicating a predominant Th1 immune response to treatment. Infected mice treated with doses of 100 μg Ag85A/B chimeric DNA had an extended time until death of 50% of the animals that was markedly longer than the saline and vector control groups, and the death rate at 1 month after the last dose was lower than that in the other groups. Compared with the saline group, 100 μg Ag85A/B chimeric DNA and 100 μg Ag85A DNA reduced the pulmonary bacterial loads by 0.79 and 0.45 logs, and the liver bacterial loads by 0.52 and 0.50 logs, respectively. Pathological changes in the lungs were less, and the lesions were more limited. These results show that Ag85A/B chimeric DNA was effective for the treatment of TB, significantly increasing the cellular immune response and inhibiting the growth of M. tuberculosis.

  2. Individual and Bivalent Vaccines Based on Alphavirus Replicons Protect Guinea Pigs against Infection with Lassa and Ebola Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Pushko, Peter; Geisbert, Joan; Parker, Michael; Jahrling, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccin...

  3. Structure-based approach to rationally design a chimeric protein for an effective vaccine against Group B Streptococcus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Cozzi, Roberta; Gourlay, Louise J.; Donnarumma, Danilo; Necchi, Francesca; Norais, Nathalie; Telford, John L.; Rappuoli, Rino; Bolognesi, Martino; Maione, Domenico; Grandi, Guido; Rinaudo, C. Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Structural vaccinology is an emerging strategy for the rational design of vaccine candidates. We successfully applied structural vaccinology to design a fully synthetic protein with multivalent protection activity. In Group B Streptococcus, cell-surface pili have aroused great interest because of their direct roles in virulence and importance as protective antigens. The backbone subunit of type 2a pilus (BP-2a) is present in six immunogenically different but structurally similar variants. We determined the 3D structure of one of the variants, and experimentally demonstrated that protective antibodies specifically recognize one of the four domains that comprise the protein. We therefore constructed a synthetic protein constituted by the protective domain of each one of the six variants and showed that the chimeric protein protects mice against the challenge with all of the type 2a pilus-carrying strains. This work demonstrates the power of structural vaccinology and will facilitate the development of an optimized, broadly protective pilus-based vaccine against Group B Streptococcus by combining the uniquely generated chimeric protein with protective pilin subunits from two other previously identified pilus types. In addition, this work describes a template procedure that can be followed to develop vaccines against other bacterial pathogens. PMID:21593422

  4. Generation and preclinical evaluation of a DENV-1/2 prM+E chimeric live attenuated vaccine candidate with enhanced prM cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelapang, Poonsook; Nitatpattana, Narong; Suphatrakul, Amporn; Punyahathaikul, Surat; Sriburi, Rungtawan; Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Pichyangkul, Sathit; Malasit, Prida; Yoksan, Sutee; Sittisombut, Nopporn

    2013-10-17

    In the absence of a vaccine or sustainable vector control measures, illnesses caused by dengue virus infection remain an important public health problem in many tropical countries. During the export of dengue virus particles, furin-mediated cleavage of the prM envelope protein is usually incomplete, thus generating a mixture of immature, partially mature and mature extracellular particles. Variations in the arrangement and conformation of the envelope proteins among these particles may be associated with their different roles in shaping the antibody response. In an attempt to improve upon live, attenuated dengue vaccine approaches, a mutant chimeric virus, with enhanced prM cleavage, was generated by introducing a cleavage-enhancing substitution into a chimeric DENV-1/2 virus genome, encoding the prM+E sequence of a recent DENV-1 isolate under an attenuated DENV-2 genetic background. A modest increase in virus specific infectivity observed in the mutant chimeric virus affected neither the attenuation phenotype, when assessed in the suckling mouse neurovirulence model, nor multiplication in mosquitoes. The two chimeric viruses induced similar levels of anti-DENV-1 neutralizing antibody response in mice and rhesus macaques, but more efficient control of viremia during viral challenge was observed in macaques immunized with the mutant chimeric virus. These results indicate that the DENV-1/2 chimeric virus, with enhanced prM cleavage, could be useful as an alternative live, attenuated vaccine candidate for further tests in humans.

  5. Preclinical and Clinical Development of a YFV 17 D-Based Chimeric Vaccine against West Nile Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo H. Dayan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Substantial success has been achieved in the development and implementation of West Nile (WN vaccines for horses; however, no human WN vaccines are approved. This review focuses on the construction, pre-clinical and clinical characterization of ChimeriVax-WN02 for humans, a live chimeric vaccine composed of a yellow fever (YF 17D virus in which the prM-E envelope protein genes are replaced with the corresponding genes of the WN NY99 virus. Pre-clinical studies demonstrated that ChimeriVax-WN02 was significantly less neurovirulent than YF 17D in mice and rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. The vaccine elicited neutralizing antibody titers after inoculation in hamsters and monkeys and protected immunized animals from lethal challenge including intracerebral inoculation of high dose of WN NY99 virus. Safety, viremia and immunogenicity of ChimeriVax-WN02 were assessed in one phase I study and in two phase II clinical trials. No safety signals were detected in the three clinical trials with no remarkable differences in incidence of adverse events (AEs between vaccine and placebo recipients. Viremia was transient and the mean viremia levels were low. The vaccine elicited strong and durable neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T cell responses. WN epidemiology impedes a classical licensure pathway; therefore, innovative licensure strategies should be explored.

  6. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  7. Immunogenicity of a Live Attenuated Chimeric Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine as a Booster Dose After Primary Vaccination With Live Attenuated SA14-14-2 Vaccine: A Phase IV Study in Thai Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharoenchai, Sirintip; Lapphra, Keswadee; Chuenkitmongkol, Sunate; Phongsamart, Wanatpreeya; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Rungmaitree, Supattra; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2017-02-01

    This single-group study investigated the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of the recently licensed live attenuated chimeric Japanese encephalitis vaccine in 50 healthy children (1-5 years old) who were primed with the live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine. A strong anamnestic response was induced 28 days postbooster: geometric mean titer, 9144 (95% confidence interval: 7365-11353); and seroprotection rate, 49 of 49 (100%) children.

  8. An immunogenic and protective alphavirus replicon particle-based dengue vaccine overcomes maternal antibody interference in weanling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Parsons, Melissa M; Whitmore, Alan C; Williams, Brandon M; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    A candidate pediatric dengue virus (DENV) vaccine based on nonpropagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) was tested for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in weanling mice in the presence and absence of potentially interfering maternal antibodies. A gene cassette encoding envelope proteins prM and E from mouse-adapted DENV type 2 (DENV2) strain NGC was cloned into a VEE replicon vector and packaged into VRP, which programmed proper in vitro expression and processing of DENV2 envelope proteins upon infection of Vero cells. Primary immunization of 3-week-old weanling BALB/c mice in the footpad with DENV2 VRP resulted in high levels of DENV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinates. A booster immunization 12 weeks after the prime immunization resulted in increased neutralizing antibodies that were sustained for at least 30 weeks. Immunization at a range of doses of DENV2 VRP protected mice from an otherwise-lethal intracranial DENV2 challenge. To model vaccination in the presence of maternal antibodies, weanling pups born to DENV2-immune or DENV2-naïve dams were immunized with either DENV2 VRP or live DENV2 given peripherally. The DENV2 VRP vaccine induced neutralizing-antibody responses in young mice regardless of the maternal immune status. In contrast, live-DENV2 vaccination performed poorly in the presence of preexisting anti-DENV2 antibodies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a VRP vaccine approach as an early-life DENV vaccine in populations with high levels of circulating DENV antibodies and suggests the utility of VRP-based vaccines in other instances where maternal antibodies make early vaccination problematic.

  9. A tetravalent alphavirus-vector based dengue vaccine provides effective immunity in an early life mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Syed Muaz; Tonkin, Daniel R; Mattocks, Melissa D; Snead, Andrew T; Johnston, Robert E; White, Laura J

    2014-07-07

    Dengue viruses (DENV1-4) cause 390 million clinical infections every year, several hundred thousand of which progress to severe hemorrhagic and shock syndromes. Preexisting immunity resulting from a previous DENV infection is the major risk factor for severe dengue during secondary heterologous infections. During primary infections in infants, maternal antibodies pose an analogous risk. At the same time, maternal antibodies are likely to prevent induction of endogenous anti-DENV antibodies in response to current live, attenuated virus (LAV) vaccine candidates. Any effective early life dengue vaccine has to overcome maternal antibody interference (leading to ineffective vaccination) and poor induction of antibody responses (increasing the risk of severe dengue disease upon primary infection). In a previous study, we demonstrated that a non-propagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon expression vector (VRP), expressing the ectodomain of DENV E protein (E85), overcomes maternal interference in a BALB/c mouse model. We report here that a single immunization with a tetravalent VRP vaccine induced NAb and T-cell responses to each serotype at a level equivalent to the monovalent vaccine components, suggesting that this vaccine modality can overcome serotype interference. Furthermore, neonatal immunization was durable and could be boosted later in life to further increase NAb and T-cell responses. Although the neonatal immune response was lower in magnitude than responses in adult BALB/c mice, we demonstrate that VRP vaccines generated protective immunity from a lethal challenge after a single neonatal immunization. In summary, VRP vaccines expressing DENV antigens were immunogenic and protective in neonates, and hence are promising candidates for safe and effective vaccination in early life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunogenicity and efficacy of alphavirus-derived replicon vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, John T; Pickens, Jennifer A; Schuster, Jennifer E; Johnson, Monika; Tollefson, Sharon J; Williams, John V; Davis, Nancy L; Johnston, Robert E; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Slaughter, James C; Smith-House, Frances; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-10

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of illness among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. No vaccine has been licensed for protection against either of these viruses. We tested the ability of two Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based viral replicon particle (VEE-VRP) vaccines that express the hRSV or hMPV fusion (F) protein to confer protection against hRSV or hMPV in African green monkeys. Animals immunized with VEE-VRP vaccines developed RSV or MPV F-specific antibodies and serum neutralizing activity. Compared to control animals, immunized animals were better able to control viral load in the respiratory mucosa following challenge and had lower levels of viral genome in nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. The high level of immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by these vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates suggest that they hold promise for further development.

  11. A Novel Contraceptive Vaccine:Design and Synthesis of the Chimeric Peptide Containing Multivalent Sperm-Specific Epitopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何畏; 梁志清; 史常旭; 李玉清

    2001-01-01

    Objective To develop a novel multivalent chimeric peptide vaccine for bisexual fertility regulation Materials & Methods On the basis of the amino acid sequence of the two peptides respectively selected from the mouse sperm/testis-specific proteins SP17 and Cyritestin, and one T cell epitope in bovine ribonuclease (RNase), a novel chimeric peptide consisting of 35 amino acid was designed and subsequently synthesized on the 430A peptide synthesizer. After being emulified with the equivalence Freund's adjuvant, the peptide with 35 amino acid residues was used to immunogenity the female BALB/c mice to investigate its immunity.Results The peptide was successfully synthesized, after being purified in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), its purity reached 95%. The specific antisera collected from the immunogenity mice could identify the corresponding proteins of testis tissues of mice, rats and human. The highest specific IgG titer in serum was 1:6 000, while the IgA titer in the washing of vaginal mucous membrane was 1:300.Conclusion The antibodies from the peptide with specific amino acid sequence can identify the original antigens, and stimulate powerful specific humoral immunity in mice. It provides a experimental bases for polyvalent contraceptive vaccine study.

  12. Exploiting chimeric human antibodies to characterize a protective epitope of Neisseria adhesin A, one of the Bexsero vaccine components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Galli, Barbara; Lo Surdo, Paola; Liguori, Alessia; Norais, Nathalie; Santini, Laura; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria adhesin A (NadA) is one of the antigens of Bexsero, the recently licensed multicomponent vaccine against serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB). NadA belongs to the class of oligomeric coiled-coil adhesins and is able to mediate adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells. As a vaccine antigen, NadA has been shown to induce high levels of bactericidal antibodies; however, the domains important for protective response are still unknown. In order to further investigate its immunogenic properties, we have characterized the murine IgG1 mAb (6E3) that was able to recognize the 2 main antigenic variants of NadA on the surface of MenB strains. The epitope targeted by mAb 6E3 was mapped by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and shown to be located on the coiled-coil stalk region of NadA (aa 206-249). Although no serum bactericidal activity was observed for murine IgG1 mAb 6E3, functional activity was restored when using chimeric antibodies in which the variable regions of the murine mAb 6E3 were fused to human IgG3 constant regions, thus confirming the protective nature of the mAb 6E3 epitope. The use of chimeric antibody molecules will enable future investigations of complement-mediated antibody functionality independently of the Fc-mediated differences in complement activation.

  13. In silico analysis of chimeric TF, Omp31 and BP26 fragments of Brucella melitensis for development of a multi subunit vaccine candidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ghasemi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Brucellosis, especially caused by Brucella melitensis, remains one of the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide with more than 500,000 human cases reported annually. The commonly used live attenuated vaccine in ovine brucellosis prophylaxis is B. melitensis Rev1. But due to different problems caused by the administration of this vaccine, a protective subunit vaccine against B. melitensis is strongly demanded. Brucella BP26, Omp31 and TF proteins have shown a considerable potential as protective antigens for brucellosis. Chimeric proteins carrying epitopes or adjuvant sequences increase the possibility of eliciting a broad cellular or humoral immune response. In silico tools are highly suited to study, design and evaluate vaccine strategies. Materials and Methods: In this study, a synthetic chimeric gene, encoding TF, BP26 93-111 and Omp3148-74 was designed.In order to predict the 3D structure of protein, modeling was carried out. Results:Validation results showed that 91.1% of residues lie in favored or additional allowed region of Ramachandran plot. The epitopes in the chimeric protein are likely to induce both the B-cell and T-cell mediated immune responses. Conclusion: The chimeric protein may be used as multi subunit for development of Brucella vaccine candidates.

  14. Vaccination of dogs with six different candidate leishmaniasis vaccines composed of a chimerical recombinant protein containing ribosomal and histone protein epitopes in combination with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, J; Janssen, L H M; van Kasteren-Westerneng, T J; van der Heijden-Liefkens, K H A; Schijns, V E J C; Heckeroth, A

    2009-07-16

    Chimerical protein "Q", composed of antigenic ribosomal and histone sequences, in combination with live BCG is a promising canine leishmaniasis vaccine candidate; one of the few vaccine candidates that have been tested successfully in dogs. Unfortunately, live BCG is not an appropriate adjuvant for commercial application due to safety problems in dogs. In order to find a safe adjuvant with similar efficacy to live BCG, muramyl dipeptide, aluminium hydroxide, Matrix C and killed Propionibacterium acnes in combination with either E. coli- or baculovirus-produced recombinant JPCM5_Q protein were tested. Groups of five or seven dogs were vaccinated with six different adjuvant-antigen combinations and challenged with a high dose intravenous injection of Leishmania infantum JPC strain promastigotes. All candidate vaccines proved to be safe, and both humoral and cellular responses to the recombinant proteins were detected at the end of the prime-boost vaccination scheme. However, clinical and parasitological data obtained during the 10 month follow-up period indicated that protection was not induced by either of the six candidate vaccines. Although no direct evidence was obtained, our data suggest that live BCG may have a significant protective effect against challenge with L. infantum in dogs.

  15. Preconceptual administration of an alphavirus replicon UL83 (pp65 homolog) vaccine induces humoral and cellular immunity and improves pregnancy outcome in the guinea pig model of congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiss, Mark R; Lacayo, Juan C; Belkaid, Yasmine; McGregor, Alistair; Stroup, Greg; Rayner, Jon; Alterson, Kimberly; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Smith, Jonathan F

    2007-03-15

    Development of a vaccine against congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major public health priority. We report the use of a propagation-defective, single-cycle, RNA replicon vector system, derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing GP83, the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) homolog of the human CMV pp65 phosphoprotein. Vaccination with VRP-GP83 induced antibodies and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in GPCMV-seronegative female guinea pigs. Guinea pigs immunized with VRP-GP83 vaccine or with a VRP vaccine expressing influenza hemagglutinin (VRP-HA) were bred for pregnancy and subsequent GPCMV challenge during the early third trimester. Dams vaccinated with VRP-GP83 had improved pregnancy outcomes, compared with dams vaccinated with the VRP-HA control. For VRP-GP83-vaccinated dams, there were 28 live pups and 4 dead pups (13% mortality) among 10 evaluable litters, compared with 9 live pups and 12 dead pups (57% mortality) among 8 evaluable litters in the VRP-HA-vaccinated group (P<.001, Fisher's exact test). Improved pregnancy outcome was accompanied by reductions in maternal blood viral load, measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses directed against a CMV matrix protein can protect against congenital CMV infection and disease.

  16. Development of a Novel Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Platform That Mimics the Immature Form of Alphavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakami, Akane; Sakurai, Atsuko; Ishikawa, Momoko; Yap, Moh Lan; Flores-Garcia, Yevel; Haseda, Yasunari; Aoshi, Taiki; Zavala, Fidel P.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Kuno, Sachiko; Ueno, Ryuji

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus-like particles (VLPs) are noninfectious multiprotein structures that are engineered to self-assemble from viral structural proteins. Here, we developed a novel VLP-based vaccine platform utilizing VLPs from the chikungunya virus. We identified two regions within the envelope protein, a structural component of chikungunya, where foreign antigens can be inserted without compromising VLP structure. Our VLP displays 480 copious copies of an inserted antigen on the VLP surface in a highly symmetric manner and is thus capable of inducing strong immune responses against any inserted antigen. Furthermore, by mimicking the structure of the immature form of the virus, we altered our VLP's in vivo dynamics and enhanced its immunogenicity. We used the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite as an antigen and demonstrated that our VLP-based vaccine elicits strong immune responses against CSP in animals. The sera from immunized monkeys protected mice from malaria infection. Likewise, mice vaccinated with P. yoelii CSP-containing VLPs were protected from an infectious sporozoite challenge. Hence, our uniquely engineered VLP platform can serve as a blueprint for the development of vaccines against other pathogens and diseases. PMID:28515133

  17. Cell-mediated immunity induced by chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine in naive or flavivirus-primed subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Bruno; Nougarede, Nolwenn; Begue, Sarah; Sanchez, Violette; Souag, Nadia; Carre, Murielle; Chambonneau, Laurent; Morrisson, Dennis N; Shaw, David; Qiao, Ming; Dumas, Rafaele; Lang, Jean; Forrat, Remi

    2008-10-23

    Three independent, phase 1 clinical trials were conducted in Australia and in USA to assess the safety and immunogenicity of sanofi pasteur dengue vaccine candidates. In this context, Dengue 1-4 and Yellow Fever 17D-204 (YF 17D)-specific CD4 and CD8 cellular responses induced by tetravalent chimeric dengue vaccines (CYD) were analyzed in flavivirus-naive or flavivirus-immune patients. Tetravalent CYD vaccine did not trigger detectable changes in serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, whatever the vaccinees immune status, while inducing significant YF 17D NS3-specific CD8 responses and dengue serotype-specific T helper responses. These responses were dominated by serotype 4 in naive individuals, but a booster vaccination (dose #2) performed 4 months following dose #1 broadened serotype-specific responses. A similar, broader response was seen after primary tetravalent immunization in subjects with pre-existing dengue 1 or 2 immunity caused by prior monovalent live-attenuated dengue vaccination. In all three trials, the profile of induced response was similar, whatever the subjects' immune status, i.e. an absence of Th2 response, and an IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha ratio dominated by IFN-gamma, for both CD4 and CD8 responses. Our results also showed an absence of cross-reactivity between YF 17D or Dengue NS3-specific CD8 responses, and allowed the identification of 3 new CD8 epitopes in the YF 17D NS3 antigen. These data are consistent with the previously demonstrated excellent safety of these dengue vaccines in flavivirus-naive and primed individuals.

  18. SAT Type Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) Chimeric Vaccine Elicits Protection in Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent development of infectious cDNA clone technology for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Southern African Territories (SAT) viruses has provided a valuable tool for genetic and biological characterization of field and laboratory strains. Recombinant chimeric viruses, containing the capsid-coding...

  19. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF A NOVEL HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPE 16 L1/E6-E7 CHIMERIC RECOMBINANT DNA VACCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑瑾; 马军; 张福萍; 杨筱凤; 董小平; 司履生; 王一理

    2004-01-01

    Objective Preparations of HPV16 L1/E6 and L1/E7 prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines. Methods The nucleotides within HPV16 E6 and E7 genes, which are responsible for viral transforming activity, were mutated by mage primer site-directed mutagenesis method. The correctly mutated E6 and E7 fragments were separately cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1, together with HPV16 L1 gene, generating chimeric recombinants plasmids 1MpVAX1-L1E6, 2MpVAX1-L1E6, 1MpVAX1-L1E7, 2MpVAX1-L1E7 and 3MpVAX1-L1E7. CHO cells were transiently transfected with the individual DNA vaccines by calcium phosphate method. Target protein expressions in the extracts of the transfected cell lines were measured by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, with HPV16 L1 and E6 specific monoclonal antibodies. Results ELISA assays showed the P/N ratios in the cell extracts transfected with L1E6 and L1E7 plasmids were more than 2.1. Immunohistochemistry revealed brownish precipitant signal in cytoplasm and nuclei of the transfected cells. Conclusion Successful constructions of prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccine plasmids lay solid foundation for future animal experiment and clinical trial.

  20. Boosting BCG-primed mice with chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A induces potent multifunctional T cell responses and enhanced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Hu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Han; Yuan, Qin; Ma, Hui; Wen, Han-Li; Wu, Juan; Li, Zhong-Ming; Lowrie, Douglas B; Fan, Xiao-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The tuberculosis pandemic continues to rampage despite widespread use of the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. Because DNA vaccines can elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses, including potent T cell-mediated immunity, they are promising vehicles for antigen delivery. In a prime-boost approach, they can supplement the inadequate anti-TB immunological memory induced by BCG. Based on this, a chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A encoding Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) immunodominant antigen Ag85A plus two copies of ESAT-6 was constructed. Potent humoral immune responses, as well as therapeutic effects induced by this DNA vaccine, were observed previously in M. tuberculosis-infected mice. In this study, we further evaluated the antigen-specific T cell immune responses and showed that repeated immunization with HG856A gave modest protection against M. tuberculosis challenge infection and significantly boosted the immune protection primed by BCG vaccination. Enhanced protection was accompanied by increased multifunctional Th1 CD4(+) T cell responses, most notably by an elevated frequency of M. tuberculosis antigen-specific IL-2-producing CD4(+) T cells post-vaccination. These data confirm the potential of chimeric DNA vaccine HG856A as an anti-TB vaccine candidate.

  1. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana S Azevedo

    Full Text Available The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2 and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2. The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  2. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Adriana S; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M B

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  3. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein) Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian; Christie, Karen Elina; Grove, Søren; Frost, Petter; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2014-03-25

    Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag) formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions) can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV) as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) glycoprotein (G) was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs) before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing receptor (PRR

  4. Vaccine Adjuvants in Fish Vaccines Make a Difference: Comparing Three Adjuvants (Montanide ISA763A Oil, CpG/Poly I:C Combo and VHSV Glycoprotein Alone or in Combination Formulated with an Inactivated Whole Salmonid Alphavirus Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna L. Thim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Most commercial vaccines offered to the aquaculture industry include inactivated antigens (Ag formulated in oil adjuvants. Safety concerns are related to the use of oil adjuvants in multivalent vaccines for fish, since adverse side effects (e.g., adhesions can appear. Therefore, there is a request for vaccine formulations for which protection will be maintained or improved, while the risk of side effects is reduced. Here, by using an inactivated salmonid alphavirus (SAV as the test Ag, the combined use of two Toll-like receptor (TLR ligand adjuvants, CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs and poly I:C, as well as a genetic adjuvant consisting of a DNA plasmid vector expressing the viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV glycoprotein (G was explored. VHSV-G DNA vaccine was intramuscularly injected in combination with intraperitoneal injection of either SAV Ag alone or combined with the oil adjuvant, Montanide ISA763, or the CpG/polyI:C combo. Adjuvant formulations were evaluated for their ability to boost immune responses and induce protection against SAV in Atlantic salmon, following cohabitation challenge. It was observed that CpG/polyI:C-based formulations generated the highest neutralizing antibody titres (nAbs before challenge, which endured post challenge. nAb responses for VHSV G-DNA- and oil-adjuvanted formulations were marginal compared to the CpG/poly I:C treatment. Interestingly, heat-inactivated sera showed reduced nAb titres compared to their non-heated counterparts, which suggests a role of complement-mediated neutralization against SAV. Consistently elevated levels of innate antiviral immune genes in the CpG/polyI:C injected groups suggested a role of IFN-mediated responses. Co-delivery of the VHSV-G DNA construct with either CpG/polyI:C or oil-adjuvanted SAV vaccine generated higher CD4 responses in head kidney at 48 h compared to injection of this vector or SAV Ag alone. The results demonstrate that a combination of pattern recognizing

  5. A Prime-Boost Vaccination Strategy in Cattle to Prevent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Using a "Single-Cycle" Alphavirus Vector and Empty Capsid Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Lohse, Louise; Bøtner, Anette

    2016-01-01

    in large-scale mammalian cell culture under high containment conditions. Here, we have expressed the FMDV capsid protein precursor (P1-2A) of strain O1 Manisa alone or with the FMDV 3C protease (3Cpro) using a "single cycle" packaged alphavirus self-replicating RNA based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). When...

  6. A novel non-integrative single-cycle chimeric HIV lentivector DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Maha; Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Manoylov, Iliyan; Malogolovkin, Alexander; Mompelat, Dimitri; Ishimwe, Honorine; Smaoune, Amel; Ouzrout, Bilel; Gagnon, Jean; Chebloune, Yahia

    2015-05-05

    Novel HIV vaccine vectors and strategies are needed to control HIV/AIDS epidemic in humans and eradicate the infection. DNA vaccines alone failed to induce immune responses robust enough to control HIV-1. Development of lentivirus-based DNA vaccines deficient for integration and with a limited replication capacity is an innovative and promising approach. This type of vaccine mimics the early stages of virus infection/replication like the live-attenuated viruses but lacks the inconvenient integration and persistence associated with disease. We developed a novel lentivector DNA vaccine "CAL-SHIV-IN(-)" that undergoes a single round of replication in the absence of integration resulting in augmented expression of vaccine antigens in vivo. Vaccine gene expression is under control of the LTRs of a naturally attenuated lentivirus, Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) the natural goat lentivirus. The safety of this vaccine prototype was increased by the removal of the integrase coding sequences from the pol gene. We examined the functional properties of this lentivector DNA in cell culture and the immunogenicity in mouse models. Viral proteins were expressed in transfected cells, assembled into viral particles that were able to transduce once target permissive cells. Unlike the parental replication-competent SHIV-KU2 that was detected in DNA samples from any of the serial passage infected cells, CAL-SHIV-IN(-) DNA was detected only in target cells of the first round of infection, hence demonstrating the single cycle replication of the vaccine. A single dose DNA immunization of humanized NOD/SCID/β2 mice showed a substantial increase of IFN-γ-ELISPOT in splenocytes compared to the former replication and integration defective Δ4SHIV-KU2 DNA vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (IMOJEV®) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokephaibulkit, K; Houillon, G; Feroldi, E; Bouckenooghe, A

    2016-01-01

    JE-CV (IMOJEV®, Sanofi Pasteur, France) is a live attenuated virus vaccine constructed by inserting coding sequences of the prM and E structural proteins of the Japanese encephalitis SA14-14-2 virus into the genome of yellow fever 17D virus. Primary immunization with JE-CV requires a single dose of the vaccine. This article reviews clinical trials of JE-CV in children aged up to 6 years conducted in countries across South-East Asia. Strong and persistent antibody responses were observed after single primary and booster doses, with 97% of children seroprotected up to five years after booster vaccination. Models of long-term antibody persistence predict a median duration of protection of approximately 30 years after a booster dose. The safety and reactogenicity profiles of JE-CV primary and booster doses are comparable to other widely used childhood vaccines.

  8. Vaccine efficacy of live-attenuated virus, whole inactivated virus and alphavirus vectored subunit vaccines against antigenically distinct H3N2 swine influenza A viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Influenza A virus (IAV) is an important pathogen in swine, and the main intervention strategy is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA). Three major antigenic clusters, cyan, red, and green, were identified among H3N2 viruses circulating in pigs in ...

  9. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The protective efficacy of chimeric SO7/IL-2 DNA vaccine against coccidiosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongyan; Qiu, Baofeng; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui

    2013-06-01

    The protective efficacy of recombinant vaccines encoding an Eimeria refractile body antigen SO7 was assessed in broiler chickens following oral infection with Eimeria tenella. The SO7 and chicken IL-2 genes were cloned into the expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-SO7 and pVAX-SO7-IL-2. Expression of SO7 and IL-2 gene transcripts and proteins encoded by the plasmid DNAs in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Chickens were inoculated with 100 μg of plasmids pVAX-SO7 or pVAX-SO7-IL-2, or 200 μg of recombinant SO7 protein or chicken IL-2 protein by leg intramuscular injection. At 28days of age, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5×10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. All chickens were euthanized to determine the effects of immunization on the 7th day post-challenge. The results showed that both DNA vaccines containing the SO7 gene and the recombinant SO7 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions compared with unvaccinated and challenged control. These findings also suggested that chicken IL-2 could effectively enhance the immunity of SO7 against E. tenella challenge compared with vaccination using pVAX-SO7 alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Luciana A F; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P; Moreira, Gustavo M S G; Salvarani, Felipe M; Assis, Ronnie A; Lobato, Francisco Carlos F; Mendonça, Marcelo; Dellagostin, Odir A; Conceição, Fabricio R

    2013-01-01

    Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC) are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB), a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH)3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL) and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL), as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH)3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle.

  12. Production and evaluation of a recombinant chimeric vaccine against clostridium botulinum neurotoxin types C and D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana A F Gil

    Full Text Available Bovine botulism is a fatal disease that is caused by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs produced by Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D and that causes great economic losses, with nearly 100% lethality during outbreaks. It has also been considered a potential source of human food-borne illness in many countries. Vaccination has been reported to be the most effective way to control bovine botulism. However, the commercially available toxoid-based vaccines are difficult and hazardous to produce. Neutralizing antibodies targeted against the C-terminal fragment of the BoNT heavy chain (HC are known to confer efficient protection against lethal doses of BoNTs. In this study, a novel recombinant chimera, consisting of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB, a strong adjuvant of the humoral immune response, fused to the HC of BoNT serotypes C and D, was produced in E. coli. Mice vaccinated with the chimera containing LTB and an equivalent molar ratio of the chimera without LTB plus aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH3 developed 2 IU/mL of antitoxins for both serotypes. Guinea pigs immunized with the recombinant chimera with LTB plus Al(OH3 developed a protective immune response against both BoNT/C (5 IU/mL and BoNT/D (10 IU/mL, as determined by a mouse neutralization bioassay with pooled sera. The results achieved with guinea pig sera fulfilled the requirements of commercial vaccines for prevention of botulism, as determined by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food, Supply. The presence of LTB was essential for the development of a strong humoral immune response, as it acted in synergism with Al(OH3. Thus, the vaccine described in this study is a strong candidate for the control of botulism in cattle.

  13. Generation of a recombinant chimeric Newcastle disease virus vaccine that allows serological differentiation between vaccinated and infected animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, B.P.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Verstegen, I.; Koch, G.; Gielkens, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Using a recently developed reverse genetics system, we have generated a recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine in which the gene encoding the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) has been replaced by a hybrid HN gene consisting of the cytoplasmic domain, transmembrane region, and stalk region

  14. Immunoprotective activity of a Salmonid Alphavirus Vaccine: comparison of the immune responses induced by inactivated whole virus antigen formulations based on CpG class B oligonucleotides and poly I:C alone or combined with an oil adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thim, Hanna L; Iliev, Dimitar B; Christie, Karen E; Villoing, Stéphane; McLoughlin, Marian F; Strandskog, Guro; Jørgensen, Jorunn B

    2012-07-06

    CpG oligonucleotides and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) are toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that mimic the immunostimulatory properties of bacterial DNA and double-stranded viral RNA respectively, and which have exhibited potential to serve as vaccine adjuvants in previous experiments. Here, a combination of CpGs and poly I:C together with water- or oil-formulated Salmonid Alphavirus (SAV) antigen preparations has been used for a vaccine in Atlantic salmon and tested for protection in SAV challenge trial. The results demonstrate that vaccination with a high dose of the SAV antigen induced protection against challenge with SAV which correlated with production of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). As the high antigen dose alone induced full protection, no beneficial effect from the addition of CpG and poly I:C could be observed. Nevertheless, these TLR ligands significantly enhanced the levels of NAbs in serum of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, gene expression analysis demonstrated that while addition of oil suppressed the CpG/poly I:C-induced expression of IFN-γ, the upregulation of IFNa1 was substantially enhanced. A low dose of the SAV antigen combined with oil did not induce any detectable levels of NAbs either with or without TLR ligands present, however the addition of CpG and poly I:C to the low SAV antigen dose formulation significantly enhanced the protection against SAV suggesting that CpG/poly I:C may have enhanced a cytotoxic response - a process which is dependent on the up-regulation of type I IFN. These results highlight the immunostimulatory properties of the tested TLR ligands and will serve as a ground for further, more detailed studies aimed to investigate their capacity to serve as adjuvants in vaccine formulations for Atlantic salmon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Solution structure of a Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1/MSP 1 chimeric protein vaccine candidate (PfCP-2.9 for malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Changwen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium falciparum chimeric protein PfCP-2.9 is a promising asexual-stage malaria vaccine evaluated in clinical trials. This chimeric protein consists of two cysteine-rich domains: domain III of the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1 [III] and the C-terminal region of the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1-19. It has been reported that the fusion of these two antigens enhanced their immunogenicity and antibody-mediated inhibition of parasite growth in vitro. Methods The 15N-labeled and 13C/15N-labeled PfCP-2.9 was produced in Pichia pastoris for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR structure analysis. The chemical shift assignments of PfCP-2.9 were compared with those previously reported for the individual domains (i.e., PfAMA-1(III or PfMSP 1-19. The two-dimensional spectra and transverse relaxation rates (R2 of the PfMSP1-19 alone were compared with that of the PfCP-2.9. Results Confident backbone assignments were obtained for 122 out of 241 residues of PfCP-2.9. The assigned residues in PfCP-2.9 were very similar to those previously reported for the individual domains. The conformation of the PfMSP1-19 in different constructs is essentially the same. Comparison of transverse relaxation rates (R2 strongly suggests no weak interaction between the domains. Conclusions These data indicate that the fusion of AMA-1(III and MSP1-19 as chimeric protein did not change their structures, supporting the use of the chimeric protein as a potential malaria vaccine.

  16. Role of regulatory T-cells in immunization strategies involving a recombinant alphavirus vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walczak, Mateusz; Regts, Joke; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Boon, Louis; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T-cells (Treg) hamper immune responses elicited by cancer vaccines. Therefore, depletion of Treg is being used to improve the outcome of vaccinations. Methods: We studied whether an alphavirus vector-based immunotherapeutic vaccine changes the number and/or activity of Treg an

  17. In vitro and in vivo characterization of chimeric duck Tembusu virus based on Japanese encephalitis live vaccine strain SA14-14-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Liu, Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV), a newly identified flavivirus, has rapidly spread to China, Malaysia and Thailand. The potential threats to public health have been well-highlighted; however its virulence and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, by using reverse genetics, a recombinant chimeric DTMUV based on Japanese encephalitis live vaccine strain SA14-14-2 was obtained by substituting the corresponding prM and E genes (named ChinDTMUV). In vitro characterization demonstrated that ChinDTMUV replicated efficiently in mammalian cells with small-plaque phenotype in comparison with its parental viruses. Mouse tests showed ChinDTMUV exhibited avirulent phenotype in terms of neuroinvasiveness, while it retained neurovirulence from its parental virus DTMUV. Furthermore, immunization with ChinDTMUV was evidenced to elicit robust IgG and neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Overall, we successfully developed a viable chimeric DTMUV, and these results provide a useful platform for further investigation of the pathogenesis of DTMUV and development of a live attenuated DTMUV vaccine candidate.

  18. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans,...

  19. Reduction of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 viremia by a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immunity after experimental PCV2 challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hwi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the present study was to elucidate the humoral and cellular immune response mechanisms by which a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine reduces the PCV2 viremia. Forty PCV2 seronegative 3-week-old pigs were randomly divided into the following four groups: vaccinated challenged (T01, vaccinated non-challenged (T02, non-vaccinated challenged (T03, and non-vaccinated non-challenged (T04 animals. The pigs in groups T01 and T02 were immunized with a reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine (Fostera™ PCV; Pfizer Animal Health administered as a 2.0 ml dose at 21 days of age. At 35 days of age (0 days post-challenge, the pigs in groups T01 and T03 were inoculated intranasally with 2 ml each of PCV2b. Results A reduction of PCV2 viremia coincided with the appearance of both PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA and interferon-γ-secreting cells (IFN-γ-SCs in the vaccinated animals. However, the presence of anti-PCV2 IgG antibodies did not correlate with the reduction of PCV2 viremia. Lymphocyte subset analysis indicated that the numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ cells increased in vaccinated animals but the numbers of CD4+ cells decreased transiently in non-vaccinated animals. The observation of a delayed type hypersensitivity response in only the vaccinated animals also supports a CD4+ cell-associated protective cellular immune response induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine. Conclusions The induction of PCV2-specific NA and IFN-γ-SCs, and CD4+ cells by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine is the important protective immune response leading to reduction of the PCV2 viremia and control of the PCV2 infection. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of protective humoral and cellular immunity induced by the reformulated inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccine and its effect on reduction of PCV2 viremia by vaccination.

  20. Memory immune response and safety of a booster dose of Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) in JE-CV-primed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroldi, Emmanuel; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Boaz, Mark; Gailhardou, Sophia; Meric, Claude; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2013-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) is a licensed vaccine indicated in a single dose administration for primary immunization. This controlled phase III comparative trial enrolled children aged 36-42 mo in the Philippines. 345 children who had received one dose of JE-CV in a study two years earlier, received a JE-CV booster dose. 105 JE-vaccine-naïve children in general good health were randomized to receive JE-CV (JE-vaccine naïve group; 46 children) or varicella vaccine (safety control group; 59 children). JE neutralizing antibody titers were assessed using PRNT50. Immunological memory was observed in children who had received the primary dose of JE-CV before. Seven days after the JE-CV booster dose administration, 96.2% and 66.8% of children were seroprotected and had seroconverted, respectively, and the geometric mean titer (GMT) was 231 1/dil. Twenty-eight days after the JE-CV booster dose seroprotection and seroconversion were achieved in 100% and 95.3% of children, respectively, and the GMT was 2,242 1/dil. In contrast, only 15.4% of JE-CV-vaccine naïve children who had not received any prior JE vaccine were seroprotected seven days after they received JE-CV. One year after receiving the JE-CV booster dose, 99.4% of children remained seroprotected. We conclude that JE-CV is effective and safe, both as a single dose and when administrated as a booster dose. A booster dose increases the peak GMT above the peak level reached after primary immunization and the antibody persistence is maintained at least one year after the JE-CV booster dose administration. Five year follow up is ongoing.

  1. Long-term Immunogenicity of a Single Dose of Japanese Encephalitis Chimeric Virus Vaccine in Toddlers and Booster Response 5 Years After Primary Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosalaraksa, Pope; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Feroldi, Emmanuel; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2017-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an important mosquito-borne viral disease that is endemic in Asia, Western Pacific countries and Northern Australia. Although there is no antiviral treatment, vaccination is effective in preventing this disease. We followed a cohort of 596 children for 5 years after primary vaccination at 12-18 months of age with JE chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV; IMOJEV) in a multicenter, phase III trial in Thailand and the Philippines to assess antibody persistence and safety. At the end of the 5 years, a subgroup of 85 participants, at 1 site in Thailand, was followed after administration of a JE-CV booster vaccination. JE antibody titers were measured annually after primary vaccination and 28 days after booster vaccination using a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test. Seroprotection was defined as a JE-CV neutralizing antibody titer ≥10 (1/dil). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the proportion of participants maintaining protective JE-CV neutralizing antibody titers. At 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years after vaccination with JE-CV, 88.5%, 82.9%, 78.2%, 74.0% and 68.6% of the participants followed remained seroprotected. Geometric mean titers in the subgroup assessed after receipt of a booster dose increased from 61.2 (95% confidence interval: 43.8-85.7) pre-booster to 4951 (95% confidence interval: 3928-6241) 28 days post-booster, with all participants seroprotected. There were no safety concerns identified. Protective immune responses persisted for at least 5 years after a JE-CV primary immunization in the majority of participants. JE-CV booster induced a robust immune response even after a 5-year interval.

  2. Tropical arthritogenic alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Carla-Ruth; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2017-03-29

    Tropical alphaviruses have special tropism for bone and joint tissue. Patients can develop chronic rheumatic disorders similar to rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The prototype is Chikungunya virus, although other lesser known viruses in our environment such as Sindbis, Ross River, Mayaro, O'nyong nyong and Barmah Forest viruses have the potential to be sped through vectors and cause chronic rheumatic disease. International population movements have increased the numbers of patients diagnosed with these tropical viruses in areas in which they are not endemic. Since they can leave persistent symptoms and affect the quality of life of the patients, it is important that we be aware of them. Changes in ecosystems have favored the expansion of competent mosquitoes, making fears of local transmission in southern Europe a reality. The objective of this review is to provide a clinical approach to the different arthritogenic tropical alphaviruses, especially those in which chronic rheumatic disease is more frequent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Vaccine-induced protection from infection of mice by chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1, EcoHIV/NL4-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Manisha; Hadas, Eran; Volsky, David J; Potash, Mary Jane

    2007-12-17

    EcoHIV/NL4-3 is a chimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that can productively infect mice. This study tests the utility of EcoHIV/NL4-3 infection to reveal protective immune responses to an HIV-1 vaccine. Immunocompetent mice were first immunized with VRC 4306 which encodes subtype B consensus sequences of gag, pol, and nef and then were infected by EcoHIV/NL4-3. Anti-Gag antibodies were sampled during immunization and infection. The extent of EcoHIV/NL4-3 infection in spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR). Although antibody titres were not significantly different in control and vaccinated groups, VRC 4306 immunization induced protective responses that significantly reduced virus burden in both lymphocyte and macrophage compartments. These results indicate that EcoHIV/NL4-3 infection can be controlled by HIV-1 vaccine-induced responses, introducing a small animal model to test vaccine efficacy against HIV-1 infection.

  4. A novel chimeric flagellum fused with the multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui; Lv, Xiaobo; Yang, Jue; Liu, Wei; Yang, Huan; Xi, Tao; Xing, Yingying

    2015-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The eradication of H. pylori might be an effective means of preventing gastric cancer. A dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant vaccine called CTB-UE-CF (CCF) was constructed by combining a multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE with a novel chimeric flagellum (CF) to simultaneously activate Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist activity and preserve the immunogenicity of H. pylori flagellum FlaA. The evaluation of efficacy to reduce H. pylori colonization was performed using BALB/c mice by oral immunization with a triple dose of this vaccine strain. Two weeks after the last immunization, mice were sacrificed to determine specific antibody levels and proinflammatory cytokine production. To determine the presence of H. pylori, we detected the number of H. pylori by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and measured the urease activity in the gastric tissue. The results showed that the immunogenicity and mucosal immune responses of CCF performed significantly better than those of CTB-UE. This dual-antigen epitope and dual-adjuvant system might greatly contribute to the development of a safe and efficient therapeutic vaccine for humans against H. pylori infection.

  5. Antibody-mediated protection against mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge of macaques immunized with alphavirus replicon particles and boosted with trimeric envelope glycoprotein in MF59 adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Sun, Yide; Kan, Elaine; Legg, Harold; Lian, Ying; Bost, Kristen; Zhou, Fengmin; Goodsell, Amanda; Zur Megede, Jan; Polo, John; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Otten, Gillis R; Miller, Christopher J; Vajdy, Michael; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2010-06-01

    We have previously shown that rhesus macaques were partially protected against high-dose intravenous challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162P4) following sequential immunization with alphavirus replicon particles (VRP) of a chimeric recombinant VEE/SIN alphavirus (derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEE] and the Sindbis virus [SIN]) encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1(SF162) gp140DeltaV2 envelope (Env) and trimeric Env protein in MF59 adjuvant (R. Xu, I. K. Srivastava, C. E. Greer, I. Zarkikh, Z. Kraft, L. Kuller, J. M. Polo, S. W. Barnett, and L. Stamatatos, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 22:1022-1030, 2006). The protection did not require T-cell immune responses directed toward simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag. We extend those findings here to demonstrate antibody-mediated protection against mucosal challenge in macaques using prime-boost regimens incorporating both intramuscular and mucosal routes of delivery. The macaques in the vaccination groups were primed with VRP and then boosted with Env protein in MF59 adjuvant, or they were given VRP intramuscular immunizations alone and then challenged with SHIV(SF162P4) (intrarectal challenge). The results demonstrated that these vaccines were able to effectively protect the macaques to different degrees against subsequent mucosal SHIV challenge, but most noteworthy, all macaques that received the intramuscular VRP prime plus Env protein boost were completely protected. A statistically significant association was observed between the titer of virus neutralizing and binding antibodies as well as the avidity of anti-Env antibodies measured prechallenge and protection from infection. These results highlight the merit of the alphavirus replicon vector prime plus Env protein boost vaccine approach for the induction of protective antibody responses and are of particular relevance to advancing our understanding of the potential correlates of immune protection against

  6. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  7. Alphavirus Entry and Membrane Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kielian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of enveloped animal viruses has greatly advanced our understanding of the general properties of membrane fusion and of the specific pathways that viruses use to infect the host cell. The membrane fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses have many similarities in structure and function. As reviewed here, alphaviruses use receptor-mediated endocytic uptake and low pH-triggered membrane fusion to deliver their RNA genomes into the cytoplasm. Recent advances in understanding the biochemistry and structure of the alphavirus membrane fusion protein provide a clearer picture of this fusion reaction, including the protein’s conformational changes during fusion and the identification of key domains. These insights into the alphavirus fusion mechanism suggest new areas for experimental investigation and potential inhibitor strategies for anti-viral therapy.

  8. Next-generation dengue vaccines: novel strategies currently under development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2011-10-01

    Dengue has become the most important arboviral infection worldwide with more than 30 million cases of dengue fever estimated to occur each year. The need for a dengue vaccine is great and several live attenuated dengue candidate vaccines are proceeding through clinical evaluation. The need to induce a balanced immune response against all four DENV serotypes with a single vaccine has been a challenge for dengue vaccine developers. A live attenuated DENV chimeric vaccine produced by Sanofi Pasteur has recently entered Phase III evaluation in numerous dengue-endemic regions of the world. Viral interference between serotypes contained in live vaccines has required up to three doses of the vaccine be given over a 12-month period of time. For this reason, novel DENV candidate vaccines are being developed with the goal of achieving a protective immune response with an immunization schedule that can be given over the course of a few months. These next-generation candidates include DNA vaccines, recombinant adenovirus vectored vaccines, alphavirus replicons, and sub-unit protein vaccines. Several of these novel candidates will be discussed.

  9. Evaluation of cellular responses for a chimeric HBsAg-HCV core DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yazdanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Fusion of HBsAg to HCVcp in the context of a DNA vaccine modality could augment Th1-oriented cellular and CTL responses toward a protective epitope, comparable to that of HCVcp (subunit HCV vaccine immunization.

  10. Exploiting the yeast L-A viral capsid for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs as platform in vaccine development and foreign protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Powilleit

    Full Text Available A novel expression system based on engineered variants of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae dsRNA virus L-A was developed allowing the in vivo assembly of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs as a unique platform for a wide range of applications. We show that polypeptides fused to the viral capsid protein Gag self-assemble into isometric VLP chimeras carrying their cargo inside the capsid, thereby not only effectively preventing proteolytic degradation in the host cell cytosol, but also allowing the expression of a per se cytotoxic protein. Carboxyterminal extension of Gag by T cell epitopes from human cytomegalovirus pp65 resulted in the formation of hybrid VLPs that strongly activated antigen-specific CD8(+ memory T cells ex vivo. Besides being a carrier for polypeptides inducing antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, VLP chimeras were also shown to be effective in the expression and purification of (i a heterologous model protein (GFP, (ii a per se toxic protein (K28 alpha-subunit, and (iii a particle-associated and fully recyclable biotechnologically relevant enzyme (esterase A. Thus, yeast viral Gag represents a unique platform for the in vivo assembly of chimeric VLPs, equally attractive and useful in vaccine development and recombinant protein production.

  11. Chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus as a candidate dengue vaccine: quantitation of the dengue virus-specific CD8 T-cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Der Most, R G; Murali-Krishna, K; Ahmed, R; Strauss, J H

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against DEN-2 virus challenge, indicating that protection was mediated by the DEN-2 virus prM- and E-specific immune responses. YF/DEN vaccine-primed CD8 T cells expanded and were efficiently recruited into the central nervous systems of DEN-2 virus challenged mice. At 5 days after challenge, 3 to 4% of CD8 T cells in the spleen were specific for the prM and E proteins, and 34% of CD8 T cells in the central nervous system recognized these proteins. Depletion of either CD4 or CD8 T cells, or both, strongly reduced the protective efficacy of the YF/DEN virus, stressing the key role of the antiviral T-cell response.

  12. Therapeutic and prophylactic applications of alphavirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Gregory J; Fleeton, Marina N; Sheahan, Brian J

    2008-11-11

    Alphavirus vectors are high-level, transient expression vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic use. These positive-stranded RNA vectors, derived from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, multiply and are expressed in the cytoplasm of most vertebrate cells, including human cells. Part of the genome encoding the structural protein genes, which is amplified during a normal infection, is replaced by a transgene. Three types of vector have been developed: virus-like particles, layered DNA-RNA vectors and replication-competent vectors. Virus-like particles contain replicon RNA that is defective since it contains a cloned gene in place of the structural protein genes, and thus are able to undergo only one cycle of expression. They are produced by transfection of vector RNA, and helper RNAs encoding the structural proteins. Layered DNA-RNA vectors express the Semliki Forest virus replicon from a cDNA copy via a cytomegalovirus promoter. Replication-competent vectors contain a transgene in addition to the structural protein genes. Alphavirus vectors are used for three main applications: vaccine construction, therapy of central nervous system disease, and cancer therapy.

  13. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

  14. Dissecting Antibodies Induced by a Chimeric Yellow Fever-Dengue, Live-Attenuated, Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Naive and Dengue-Exposed Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henein, Sandra; Swanstrom, Jesica; Byers, Anthony M; Moser, Janice M; Shaik, S Farzana; Bonaparte, Matthew; Jackson, Nicholas; Guy, Bruno; Baric, Ralph; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-02-01

    Sanofi Pasteur has developed a chimeric yellow fever-dengue, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) that is currently approved for use in several countries. In clinical trials, CYD-TDV was efficacious at reducing laboratory-confirmed cases of dengue disease. Efficacy varied by dengue virus (DENV) serotype and prevaccination dengue immune status. We compared the properties of antibodies in naive and DENV-exposed individuals who received CYD-TDV. We depleted specific populations of DENV-reactive antibodies from immune serum samples to estimate the contribution of serotype-cross-reactive and type-specific antibodies to neutralization. Subjects with no preexisting immunity to DENV developed neutralizing antibodies to all 4 serotypes of DENV. Further analysis demonstrated that DENV4 was mainly neutralized by type-specific antibodies whereas DENV1, DENV2, and DENV3 were mainly neutralized by serotype cross-reactive antibodies. When subjects with preexisting immunity to DENV were vaccinated, they developed higher levels of neutralizing antibodies than naive subjects who were vaccinated. In preimmune subjects, CYD-TDV boosted cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies while maintaining type-specific neutralizing antibodies acquired before vaccination. Our results demonstrate that the quality of neutralizing antibodies induced by CYD-TDV varies depending on DENV serotype and previous immune status. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding vaccine efficacy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Development of a novel adenovirus-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features for malignant hematopoietic cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xiao, F; Lu, Z; Li, Z; Zuo, H; Zhang, Q; Li, Q; Wang, H; Wang, L-S

    2013-08-01

    To improve the expression levels of transgenes in malignant hematopoietic cells, we developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP that contains a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon and chimeric fibers of Ad5 and Ad11p. Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP infected >95% of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells and 23.65% of HL-60 cells, and led to moderate Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) transgene expression intensity. The infection efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary human leukemia cells ranged from 9.34-89.63% (median, 28.58%) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100, compared with only 3.37-44.54% (median, 10.42%) in cells infected by Ad5/F11p-GFP. Importantly, Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP led to a significantly higher transgene expression level in primary leukemia cells, as indicated by the relative fluorescence intensity, compared to cells infected with Ad5/F11p-GFP. The increased expression of EGFP in Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP-infected cells was associated with the accumulation of abundant subgenomic mRNA. Additionally, infection of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells by Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP was significantly inhibited by blocking CD46 receptor; however, other factors may affect the gene-transfer efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary leukemia cells. In conclusion, we successfully developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features, which represents a promising vector for gene modifications during the production of cell-based vaccines for leukemia patients.

  16. A randomized study of the immunogenicity and safety of Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) in comparison with SA14-14-2 vaccine in children in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Houillon, Guy; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Cha, Sung-Ho; Choi, Soo-Han; Lee, Jin; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hee Soo; Bang, Joon; Naimi, Zulaikha; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Boaz, Mark; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A new live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) has been developed based on innovative technology to give protection against JE with an improved immunogenicity and safety profile. In this phase 3, observer-blind study, 274 children aged 12-24 months were randomized 1:1 to receive one dose of JE-CV (Group JE-CV) or the SA14-14-2 vaccine currently used to vaccinate against JE in the Republic of Korea (Group SA14-14-2). JE neutralizing antibody titers were assessed using PRNT50 before and 28 days after vaccination. The primary endpoint of non-inferiority of seroconversion rates on D28 was demonstrated in the Per Protocol analysis set as the difference between Group JE-CV and Group SA14-14-2 was 0.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI]: -2.35; 4.68), which was above the required -10%. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates 28 days after administration of a single vaccine dose were 100% in Group JE-CV and 99.1% in Group SA14-14-2; all children except one (Group SA14-14-2) were seroprotected. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) increased in both groups from D0 to D28; GM of titer ratios were slightly higher in Group JE-CV (182 [95% CI: 131; 251]) than Group SA14-14-2 (116 [95% CI: 85.5, 157]). A single dose of JE-CV was well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. In conclusion, a single dose of JE-CV or SA14-14-2 vaccine elicited a comparable immune response with a good safety profile. Results obtained in healthy Korean children aged 12-24 months vaccinated with JE-CV are consistent with those obtained in previous studies conducted with JE-CV in toddlers.

  17. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  18. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  19. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  20. Efficacy of chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella 5401 and chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 against coccidiosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaokai; Huang, Xinmei; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-09-01

    Chimeric DNA vaccines encoding Eimeria tenella (E. tenella) surface antigen 5401 were constructed and their efficacies against E. tenella challenge were studied. The open reading frame (ORF) of 5401 was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T2 to express the recombinant protein and the expressed recombinant protein was identified by Western blot. The ORF of 5401 and chicken cytokine gene IFN-γ or IL-2 were cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-5401-IFN-γ, pVAX-5401-IL-2 and pVAX-5401. The expression of aim genes in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Fourteen-day-old chickens were inoculated twice at an interval of 7 days with 100 µg of plasmids pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ and pVAX-5401-IL-2 or 200 µg of recombinant 5401 protein by leg intramuscular injection, respectively. Seven days after the second inoculation, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5 × 10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. Seven days after challenge, all chickens were weighted and slaughtered to determine the effects of immunization. The results showed the recombinant protein was about 90 kDa and reacted with antiserum against soluble sporozoites. The animal experiment showed that all the DNA vaccines pVAX-5401, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 and the recombinant 5401 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions as compared with non-vaccinated challenged control and empty vector pVAX1control. Furthermore, pVAX-5401-IFN-γ or pVAX-5401-IL-2 induced anti-coccidial index (ACI) of 180.01 or 177.24 which were significantly higher than that of pVAX-5401. The results suggested that 5401 was an effective candidate antigen for vaccine. This finding also suggested that chicken IFN-γ or IL-2 could effectively improve the efficacies of DNA vaccines against avian coccidiosis.

  1. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC, a subset of cervical cancer (CxC. Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7 includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18 targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1 of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1. Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent

  2. Immunogenicity of a virosomally-formulated Plasmodium falciparum GLURP-MSP3 chimeric protein-based malaria vaccine candidate in comparison to adjuvanted formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamborrini Marco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical trials, immunopotentiating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs have shown great potential as a versatile antigen delivery platform for synthetic peptides derived from Plasmodium falciparum antigens. This study describes the immunogenicity of a virosomally-formulated recombinant fusion protein comprising domains of the two malaria vaccine candidate antigens MSP3 and GLURP. Methods The highly purified recombinant protein GMZ2 was coupled to phosphatidylethanolamine and the conjugates incorporated into the membrane of IRIVs. The immunogenicity of this adjuvant-free virosomal formulation was compared to GMZ2 formulated with the adjuvants Montanide ISA 720 and Alum in three mouse strains with different genetic backgrounds. Results Intramuscular injections of all three candidate vaccine formulations induced GMZ2-specific antibody responses in all mice tested. In general, the humoral immune response in outbred NMRI mice was stronger than that in inbred BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. ELISA with the recombinant antigens demonstrated immunodominance of the GLURP component over the MSP3 component. However, compared to the Al(OH3-adjuvanted formulation the two other formulations elicited in NMRI mice a larger proportion of anti-MSP3 antibodies. Analyses of the induced GMZ2-specific IgG subclass profiles showed for all three formulations a predominance of the IgG1 isotype. Immune sera against all three formulations exhibited cross-reactivity with in vitro cultivated blood-stage parasites. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot competition experiments showed that both components of the hybrid protein induced IgG cross-reactive with the corresponding native proteins. Conclusion A virosomal formulation of the chimeric protein GMZ2 induced P. falciparum blood stage parasite cross-reactive IgG responses specific for both MSP3 and GLURP. GMZ2 thus represents a candidate component suitable for inclusion into a multi-valent virosomal

  3. Evaluation of chimeric DNA vaccines consisting of premembrane and envelope genes of Japanese encephalitis and dengue viruses as a strategy for reducing induction of dengue virus infection-enhancing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Kuwahara, Miwa; Sudiro, T Mirawati; Kameoka, Masanori; Konishi, Eiji

    2014-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies induced by dengue virus (DENV) infection show viral infection-enhancing activities at sub-neutralizing doses. On the other hand, preimmunity against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a congener of DENV, does not increase the severity of DENV infection. Several studies have demonstrated that neutralizing epitopes in the genus Flavivirus are mainly located in domain III (DIII) of the envelope (E) protein. In this study, chimeric premembrane and envelope (prM-E) gene-based expression plasmids of JEV and DENV1 with DIII substitution of each virus were constructed for use as DNA vaccines and their immunogenicity evaluated. Sera from C3H/He and ICR mice immunized with a chimeric gene containing DENV1 DIII on a JEV prM-E gene backbone showed high neutralizing antibody titers with less DENV infection-enhancing activity. Our results confirm the applicability of this approach as a new dengue vaccine development strategy.

  4. Supplementation of inactivated influenza vaccine with norovirus P particle-M2e chimeric vaccine enhances protection against heterologous virus challenge in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaish, Mohamed; Ali, Ahmed; Xia, Ming; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Jang, Hyesun; Hiremath, Jagadish; Dhakal, Santosh; Helmy, Yosra A.; Jiang, Xi; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Lee, Chang-Won

    2017-01-01

    The current inactivated influenza vaccines provide satisfactory protection against homologous viruses but limited cross-protection against antigenically divergent strains. Consequently, there is a need to develop more broadly protective vaccines. The highly conserved extracellular domain of the matrix protein 2 (M2e) has shown promising results as one of the components of a universal influenza vaccine in different animal models. As an approach to overcome the limited, strain specific, protective efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV), a combination of recombinant M2e expressed on the surface of norovirus P particle (M2eP) and IIV was tested in chickens. Co-immunization of birds with both vaccines did not affect the production of M2e-specific IgG antibodies compared to the group vaccinated with M2eP alone. However, the co-immunized birds developed significantly higher pre-challenge hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers against the homologous IIV antigen and heterologous challenge virus. These combined vaccine groups also had cross reactive antibody responses against different viruses (H5, H6, and H7 subtypes) compared to the IIV alone vaccinated group. Upon intranasal challenge with homologous and heterologous viruses, the combined vaccine groups showed greater reduction in viral shedding in tracheal swabs compared to those groups receiving IIV alone. Moreover, M2eP antisera from vaccinated birds were able to bind to the native M2 expressed on the surface of whole virus particles and infected cells, and inhibit virus replication in vitro. Our results support the potential benefit of supplementing IIV with M2eP, to expand the vaccine cross protective efficacy. PMID:28151964

  5. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  6. Inactivated chimeric porcine circovirus (PCV) 1-2 vaccines based on genotypes 2b and 2d exhibit similar immunological effectiveness in protecting pigs against challenge with PCV2b strain 0233.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jizong; Yu, Tianqi; Zhang, Feipeng; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhou, Jinzhu; Gao, Xing; Gao, Song; Liu, Xiufan

    2017-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is subdivided into four genotypes: PCV2a, PCV2b, PCV2c and PCV2d. Here, for the first time, we compared the efficacy of two experimental inactivated chimeric PCV1-2 vaccines based on genotypes 2b and 2d. Seventeen 3-week-old pigs were divided randomly into four groups. Group 1 and 2 pigs were inoculated with genotype 2b- and 2d-based inactivated vaccines, respectively. At 28 days post-vaccination (DPV), pigs in groups 1-3 were challenged with the PCV2b 0233 strain. All experimental pigs were necropsied at 21 days post-challenge (DPC). Pigs vaccinated with the genotype 2b- or 2d-based vaccine had high antibody titres and lower PCV2b copy numbers in samples of sera, faeces and nasal secretions compared with pigs in the unvaccinated challenge group. Interestingly, we detected no DNA from the challenge strain in the superficial inguinal lymph nodes of the pigs immunized with the PCV2b vaccine, while one pig in the PCV2d- immunized group had detectable DNA from the challenge strain at 21 DPC. We found no significant differences in the humoral immune response, PCV2b load, or PCV-related microscopic lesions between the two vaccinated groups post-challenge. Therefore, both vaccines were equally effective at inducing immunity against challenge with PCV2b strain 0233.

  7. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies.

  8. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, K I; Alterson, K; Custer, M; Dudek, J; Goodman, C; Owens, G; Smith, J F

    2010-07-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans, the latter providing the viral structural proteins necessary to package the replicon RNA into VRP. Current helper RNA designs incorporate the alphavirus 26S promoter to direct the transcription of high levels of structural gene mRNAs. We demonstrate here that the 26S promoter is not required on helper RNAs to produce VRP and propose that such promoterless helper RNAs, by design, reduce the probability of generating replication-competent virus that may otherwise result from RNA recombination.

  9. Clinical significance of chimerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Dianne

    2009-05-15

    Twins have been previously classified as either monozygotic or dizygotic. In recent years, fascinating, non-traditional mechanisms of twinning have been uncovered. We define chimerism versus mosaicism, touch on chimerism in the animal world, and explain timing of chimerism in humans. In addition, we discuss when to suspect chimerism in patients, and how to proceed with diagnostic evaluation and confirmation.

  10. Arthritogenic alphaviruses--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrbier, Andreas; Jaffar-Bandjee, Marie-Christine; Gasque, Philippe

    2012-05-08

    Mosquito-transmitted alphaviruses causing human rheumatic disease are globally distributed and include chikungunya virus, Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, Sindbis virus, o'nyong-nyong virus and Mayaro virus. These viruses cause endemic disease and, occasionally, large epidemics; for instance, the 2004-2011 chikungunya epidemic resulted in 1.4-6.5 million cases, with imported cases reported in nearly 40 countries. The disease is usually self-limiting and characterized by acute and chronic symmetrical peripheral polyarthralgia-polyarthritis, with acute disease usually including fever, myalgia and/or rash. Arthropathy can be debilitating, usually lasts weeks to months and can be protracted; although adequate attention to differential diagnoses is recommended. The latest chikungunya virus epidemic was also associated with some severe disease manifestations and mortality, primarily in elderly patients with comorbidities and the young. Chronic alphaviral rheumatic disease probably arises from inflammatory responses stimulated by the virus persisting in joint tissues, despite robust antiviral immune responses. Serodiagnosis by ELISA is the standard; although international standardization is often lacking. Treatment usually involves simple analgesics and/or NSAIDs, which can provide relief, but better drug treatments are clearly needed. However, the small market size and/or the unpredictable and rapid nature of epidemics present major hurdles for development and deployment of new alphavirus-specific interventions.

  11. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-01-01

    .... Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating...

  12. BST2/Tetherin Inhibition of Alphavirus Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses such as chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Semliki Forest virus (SFV are small enveloped RNA viruses that bud from the plasma membrane. Tetherin/BST2 is an interferon-induced host membrane protein that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses via direct tethering of budded particles to the cell surface. Alphaviruses have highly organized structures and exclude host membrane proteins from the site of budding, suggesting that their release might be insensitive to tetherin inhibition. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously-expressed tetherin efficiently inhibited the release of SFV and CHIKV particles from host cells without affecting virus entry and infection. Alphavirus release was also inhibited by the endogenous levels of tetherin in HeLa cells. While rubella virus (RuV and dengue virus (DENV have structural similarities to alphaviruses, tetherin inhibited the release of RuV but not DENV. We found that two recently identified tetherin isoforms differing in length at the N-terminus exhibited distinct capabilities in restricting alphavirus release. SFV exit was efficiently inhibited by the long isoform but not the short isoform of tetherin, while both isoforms inhibited vesicular stomatitis virus exit. Thus, in spite of the organized structure of the virus particle, tetherin specifically blocks alphavirus release and shows an interesting isoform requirement.

  13. Chimeric Yellow Fever/Dengue Virus as a Candidate Dengue Vaccine: Quantitation of the Dengue Virus-Specific CD8 T-Cell Response

    OpenAIRE

    van der Most, Robbert G.; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Ahmed, Rafi; Strauss, James H.

    2000-01-01

    We have constructed a chimeric yellow fever/dengue (YF/DEN) virus, which expresses the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes from DEN type 2 (DEN-2) virus in a YF virus (YFV-17D) genetic background. Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric virus induced a CD8 T-cell response specific for the DEN-2 virus prM and E proteins. This response protected YF/DEN virus-immunized mice against lethal dengue encephalitis. Control mice immunized with the parental YFV-17D were not protected against...

  14. Alphaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    15incldendprohng11ni- the ompetegenme f WE vius avereslte in in adults, 1:58 in children, and approaching 1:1 in in-the complete genome of EE ir s have...Yellow fever and Zika virus epi- Strauss JH. Molecular basis of Sindbis virus neurovirulence in zootics and enzootics in Uganda, Trans R Soc Trop Med

  15. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  16. A chikungunya fever vaccine utilizing an insect-specific virus platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Jesse H; Auguste, Albert J; Kaelber, Jason T; Luo, Huanle; Rossi, Shannan L; Fenton, Karla; Leal, Grace; Kim, Dal Y; Chiu, Wah; Wang, Tian; Frolov, Ilya; Nasar, Farooq; Weaver, Scott C

    2017-02-01

    Traditionally, vaccine development involves tradeoffs between immunogenicity and safety. Live-attenuated vaccines typically offer rapid and durable immunity but have reduced safety when compared to inactivated vaccines. In contrast, the inability of inactivated vaccines to replicate enhances safety at the expense of immunogenicity, often necessitating multiple doses and boosters. To overcome these tradeoffs, we developed the insect-specific alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), as a vaccine platform. To address the chikungunya fever (CHIKF) pandemic, we used an EILV cDNA clone to design a chimeric virus containing the chikungunya virus (CHIKV) structural proteins. The recombinant EILV/CHIKV was structurally identical at 10 Å to wild-type CHIKV, as determined by single-particle cryo-electron microscopy, and it mimicked the early stages of CHIKV replication in vertebrate cells from attachment and entry to viral RNA delivery. Yet the recombinant virus remained completely defective for productive replication, providing a high degree of safety. A single dose of EILV/CHIKV produced in mosquito cells elicited rapid (within 4 d) and long-lasting (>290 d) neutralizing antibodies that provided complete protection in two different mouse models. In nonhuman primates, EILV/CHIKV elicited rapid and robust immunity that protected against viremia and telemetrically monitored fever. Our EILV platform represents the first structurally native application of an insect-specific virus in preclinical vaccine development and highlights the potential application of such viruses in vaccinology.

  17. Improved humoral and cellular immune responses against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatitis B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A; Nielsen, H V; Bryder, K

    1998-01-01

    with the HIV MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...... response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V3/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL......-2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2 + S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...

  18. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    MN gp160 envelope plasmid induced a slow and low titred anti-MN V3 antibody response at 12 weeks post-inoculation (p.i.) and a late appearing (7 weeks), weak and variable CTL response. In contrast, DNA vaccination with the HBsAg-encoding plasmid induced a rapid and high titred anti-HBsAg antibody...... response and a uniform strong anti-HBs CTL response already 1 week p.i. in all mice. DNA vaccination with the chimeric MN V2/HBsAg plasmid elicited humoral responses against both viruses within 3-6 weeks which peaked at 6-12 weeks and remained stable for at least 25 weeks. In addition, specific CTL......-2d-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope. In an attempt to improve the immunogenicity of V3 in DNA vaccines, a plasmid expressing MN V3 as a fusion protein with the highly immunogenic middle (pre-S2+S) surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) was constructed. Epidermal inoculation...

  19. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  20. A Chikungunya Fever Vaccine Utilizing an Insect-Specific Virus Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Jesse H.; Auguste, Albert J.; Kaelber, Jason T.; Luo, Huanle; Rossi, Shannan L.; Fenton, Karla; Leal, Grace; Kim, Dal Y.; Chiu, Wah; Wang, Tian; Frolov, Ilya; Nasar, Farooq; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccine development involves tradeoffs between immunogenicity and safety. Live-attenuated vaccines typically offer rapid and durable immunity but reduced safety, while the inability of inactivated vaccines to replicate enhances safety at the expense of immunogenicity, often necessitating multiple doses and boosters. To overcome these tradeoffs, we developed the insect-specific alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), as a vaccine platform. To address the chikungunya virus (CHIKV) pandemic, we used an EILV cDNA clone to design a chimeric virus containing the CHIKV structural proteins. The recombinant EILV/CHIKV virus was structurally identical at 10Å to wild-type CHIKV by single particle cryoelectron microscopy, mimicked the early stages of CHIKV replication in vertebrate cells from attachment and entry to viral RNA delivery, yet remained completely defective for productive replication, providing a high degree of safety. A single dose of EILV/CHIKV produced in mosquito cells elicited rapid (within 4 days) and long-lasting (>290 days) neutralizing antibodies that provided complete protection in two different mouse models. In nonhuman primates, EILV/CHIKV elicited rapid and robust immunity that protected against viremia and telemetrically-monitored fever. Our EILV platform represents the first structurally native application of an insect-specific virus in preclinical vaccine development and highlights the potential application of such viruses in vaccinology. PMID:27991917

  1. Assessment of plaque assay methods for alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Diana; Long, Kanya C; Aguilar, Patricia; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses from the Alphavirus genus are responsible for numerous arboviral diseases impacting human health throughout the world. Confirmation of acute alphavirus infection is based on viral isolation, identification of viral RNA, or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titers between acute and convalescent samples. In convalescence, the specificity of antibodies to an alphavirus may be confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization test. To identify the best method for alphavirus and neutralizing antibody recognition, the standard solid method using a cell monolayer overlay with 0.4% agarose and the semisolid method using a cell suspension overlay with 0.6% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) overlay were evaluated. Mayaro virus, Una virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) were selected to be tested by both methods. The results indicate that the solid method showed consistently greater sensitivity than the semisolid method. Also, a "semisolid-variant method" using a 0.6% CMC overlay on a cell monolayer was assayed for virus titration. This method provided the same sensitivity as the solid method for VEEV and also had greater sensitivity for WEEV titration. Modifications in plaque assay conditions affect significantly results and therefore evaluation of the performance of each new assay is needed.

  2. Functional characterization of the alphavirus TF protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jonathan E; Kulcsar, Kirsten A; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Riley, Catherine P; Neary, Jacob T; Marr, Scott; Jose, Joyce; Griffin, Diane E; Kuhn, Richard J

    2013-08-01

    Alphavirus dogma has long dictated the production of a discrete set of structural proteins during infection of a cell: capsid, pE2, 6K, and E1. However, bioinformatic analyses of alphavirus genomes (A. E. Firth, B. Y. Chung, M. N. Fleeton, and J. F. Atkins, Virol. J. 5:108, 2008) suggested that a ribosomal frameshifting event occurs during translation of the alphavirus structural polyprotein. Specifically, a frameshift event is suggested to occur during translation of the 6K gene, yielding production of a novel protein, termed transframe (TF), comprised of a C-terminal extension of the 6K protein in the -1 open reading frame (ORF). Here, we validate the findings of Firth and colleagues with respect to the production of the TF protein and begin to characterize the function of TF. Using a mass spectrometry-based approach, we identified TF in purified preparations of both Sindbis and Chikungunya virus particles. We next constructed a panel of Sindbis virus mutants with mutations which alter the production, size, or sequence of TF. We demonstrate that TF is not absolutely required in culture, although disrupting TF production leads to a decrease in virus particle release in both mammalian and insect cells. In a mouse neuropathogenesis model, mortality was replication, particle infectivity, or envelope protein transit to the cell surface. The TF protein therefore represents a previously uncharacterized factor important for alphavirus assembly.

  3. DENGUE VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    The uniqueness of the dengue viruses (DENVs) and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on the chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV), has progressed to Phase 3 efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA, and purified inactivated vaccine candidates are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and Virus-Like Particles (VLP)-based vaccines are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

  4. 甲病毒载体的研究进展%Review on Alphavirus-based Vectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚文芝; 刘灿; 张东东; 宁宜宝

    2015-01-01

    Alphaviruses belong to the family of Togaviridae, which are encapsulated by a capsid protein and possess single strand plus RNA. In recent years, the domestic and foreign research on alphavirus-based vectors is active and the alphavirus-based vectors have been used for vaccine research, gene therapy and molecular biology research. Based on the structural principle, the alphavirus vectors are classified into three main types:replication-competent vector, replication-deficient vectors and DNA-layered vector. In this review, the transformation, characteristics and application of three different alphavirus-based vectors are discussed in order to provide references for the development of safer, more effective alphavirus-based vectors.%甲病毒属于披膜病毒科,是一类有包膜的单股正链RNA病毒。近些年来,国内外有关甲病毒载体的研究非常活跃,其已被用于疫苗研究、基因治疗以及分子生物学等研究领域。基于甲病毒载体的构造原理,将其分为三类,分别为复制完全型载体、复制缺陷型载体和DNA/RNA载体。就这三类载体的改造过程进行了探讨,并对这三类载体的特点及其应用研究进展等方面进行了阐述,以期为开发出更安全、更有效的甲病毒载体提供参考。

  5. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine M Reynaud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5'UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5'UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5'end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5'UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates.

  6. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Josephine M; Kim, Dal Young; Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P; Diamond, Michael S; Weaver, Scott C; Frolova, Elena I; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5'UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5'UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5'end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5'UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates.

  7. Alphavirus RNA synthesis and non-structural protein functions

    OpenAIRE

    Rupp, Jonathan C.; Sokoloski, Kevin J.; Gebhart, Natasha N.; Hardy, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    The members of the genus Alphavirus are positive-sense RNA viruses, which are predominantly transmitted to vertebrates by a mosquito vector. Alphavirus disease in humans can be severely debilitating, and depending on the particular viral species, infection may result in encephalitis and possibly death. In recent years, alphaviruses have received significant attention from public health authorities as a consequence of the dramatic emergence of chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean islands and ...

  8. Alphavirus-based expression vectors: strategies and applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Frolov, I; Hoffman, T A; Prágai, B M; Dryga, S A; Huang, H V; Schlesinger, S.; Rice, C M

    1996-01-01

    Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in insect and vertebrate cells. Through recombinant DNA technology, the alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high-level expression of heterologous RNAs and proteins. Amplification of replication-competent alpha-virus RNAs (replicons) can be initiated by RNA or DNA transfection and a variety of packaging systems have been developed for producing high titers of infectious ...

  9. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-02

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models.

  10. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern.

  11. In vitro and in vivo characterization of microRNA-targeted alphavirus replicon and helper RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Coffield, V McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans.

  12. Replication of Alphaviruses: A Review on the Entry Process of Alphaviruses into Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Yat-Sing Leung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are small, enveloped viruses, ~70 nm in diameter, containing a single-stranded, positive-sense, RNA genome. Viruses belonging to this genus are predominantly arthropod-borne viruses, known to cause disease in humans. Their potential threat to human health was most recently exemplified by the 2005 Chikungunya virus outbreak in La Reunion, highlighting the necessity to understand events in the life-cycle of these medically important human pathogens. The replication and propagation of viruses is dependent on entry into permissive cells. Viral entry is initiated by attachment of virions to cells, leading to internalization, and uncoating to release genetic material for replication and propagation. Studies on alphaviruses have revealed entry via a receptor-mediated, endocytic pathway. In this paper, the different stages of alphavirus entry are examined, with examples from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, Chikungunya virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus described.

  13. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  14. Immunogenicity of a virosomally-formulated Plasmodium falciparum GLURP-MSP3 chimeric protein-based malaria vaccine candidate in comparison to adjuvanted formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrini, Marco; Stoffel, Sabine A; Westerfeld, Nicole;

    2011-01-01

    In clinical trials, immunopotentiating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) have shown great potential as a versatile antigen delivery platform for synthetic peptides derived from Plasmodium falciparum antigens. This study describes the immunogenicity of a virosomally-formulated recombinant...... fusion protein comprising domains of the two malaria vaccine candidate antigens MSP3 and GLURP....

  15. A Multi-Agent Alphavirus DNA Vaccine Delivered by Intramuscular Electroporation Elicits Robust and Durable Virus Specific Immune Responses in Mice and Rabbits and Completely Protects Mice against Lethal Venezuelan, Western, and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    and 44 eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) are recognized as significant biological defense threats . 45 There are currently no licensed human...stable (4). 75 Consequently, VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV represent significant potential biological defense 76 threats and are classified as Category B...obtained from vaccinated mice using 223 BD Falcon 100 µM nylon cell strainers ( Corning , Catalog # 352360) were resuspended in 224 complete RPMI 1640

  16. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  17. Status and Challenges of Filovirus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    an RNA transcript from such a plasmid, hen introduced into cells, will then replicate and express he heterologous genes. Because the RNA transcript...does not ontain the structural genes of VEE virus, it is single-cycle, ropagation-defective RNA and replicates only in the cells o which it is...vaccination with VRP- ased vaccines as has been seen with VEE vaccines given to ersonnel receiving vaccines for other alphaviruses [85]. .2.2

  18. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce Jose; Aaron B. Taylor; Kuhn, Richard J.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2017-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and ...

  19. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jose, Joyce; Aaron B. Taylor; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replica...

  20. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  1. Molecular determinants of alphavirus neuropathogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Gregory J; Sheahan, Brian J

    2016-06-01

    Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses with a positive-stranded RNA genome, of the family Togaviridae. In mammals and birds they are mosquito-transmitted and are of veterinary and medical importance. They cause primarily two types of disease: encephalitis and polyarthritis. Here we review attempts to understand the molecular basis of encephalitis and virulence for the central nervous system (CNS) in mouse models. Sindbis virus (SINV) was the first virus to be studied in this way. Other viruses analysed are Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Eastern equine encephalitis virus and Western equine encephalitis virus. Neurovirulence was found to be associated with damage to neurons in the CNS. It mapped mainly to the E2 region of the genome, and to the nsP3 gene. Also, avirulent natural isolates of both SINV and SFV have been found to have more rapid cleavage of nonstructural proteins due to mutations in the nsP1-nsP2 cleavage site. Immune-mediated demyelination for avirulent SFV has been shown to be associated with infection of oligodendrocytes. For Chikungunya virus, an emerging alphavirus that uncommonly causes encephalitis, analysis of the molecular basis of CNS pathogenicity is beginning. Experiments on SINV and SFV have indicated that virulence may be related to the resistance of virulent virus to interferon action. Although the E2 protein may be involved in tropism for neurons and passage across the blood-brain barrier, the role of the nsP3 protein during infection of neurons is unknown. More information in these areas may help to further explain the neurovirulence of alphaviruses.

  2. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Wesula Lwande

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  3. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Obanda, Vincent; Bucht, Göran; Mosomtai, Gladys; Otieno, Viola; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  4. A structural and functional perspective of alphavirus replication and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Snyder, Jonathan E; Kuhn, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    Alphaviruses are small, spherical, enveloped, positive-sense ssRNA viruses responsible for a considerable number of human and animal diseases. Alphavirus members include Chikungunya virus, Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, the western, eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, and the Ross River virus. Alphaviruses can cause arthritic diseases and encephalitis in humans and animals and continue to be a worldwide threat. The viruses are transmitted by blood-sucking arthropods, and replicate in both arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Alphaviruses form spherical particles (65-70 nm in diameter) with icosahedral symmetry and a triangulation number of four. The icosahedral structures of alphaviruses have been defined to very high resolutions by cryo-electron microscopy and crystallographic studies. In this review, we summarize the major events in alphavirus infection: entry, replication, assembly and budding. We focus on data acquired from structural and functional studies of the alphaviruses. These structural and functional data provide a broader perspective of the virus lifecycle and structure, and allow additional insight into these important viruses.

  5. Vaccine to Confer to Nonhuman Primates Complete Protection Against Multistrain Ebola and Marburg Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Therefore, much progress has been made using alternative vaccine platforms, such as recombinant viral vec- tors. For example, alphavirus replicons...immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys of DNA plas- mid, recombinant vaccinia virus, and replication -defective adenovirus vec- tors expressing a human...recombinants. Virology 239:206–216. 14. Hevey, M., D. Negley, P. Pushko, J. Smith, and A. Schmaljohn. 1998. Mar- burg virus vaccines based upon alphavirus

  6. Ultrastructural morphogenesis of salmonid alphavirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, T K; Ferguson, H W; Thompson, K D; Adams, A; Richards, R H

    2012-11-01

    Studies on the ultrastructural morphogenesis of viruses give an insight into how the host cell mechanisms are utilized for new virion synthesis. A time course examining salmonid alphavirus 1 (SAV 1) assembly was performed by culturing the virus on Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214). Different stages of viral replication were observed under electron microscopy. Virus-like particles were observed inside membrane-bound vesicles as early as 1 h following contact of the virus with the cells. Membrane-dependent replication complexes were observed in the cytoplasm of the cells, with spherules found at the periphery of late endosome-like vacuoles. The use of intracellular membranes for RNA replication is similar to other positive-sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses. The number of Golgi apparatus and associated vacuoles characterized by 'fuzzy'-coated membranes was greater in virus-infected cells. The mature enveloped virions started to bud out from the cells at approximately 24 h post-infection. These observations suggest that the pathway used by SAV 1 for the generation of new virus particles in vitro is comparable to viral replication observed with mammalian alphaviruses but with some interesting differences.

  7. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bingxin; Zhao; Xiaoxia; Pan; Yumei; Teng; Wenyue; Xia; Jing; Wang; Yuling; Wen; Yuanding; Chen

    2015-01-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus(RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector,three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains.Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6 F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  8. Rotavirus VP7 epitope chimeric proteins elicit cross-immunoreactivity in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingxin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Teng, Yumei; Xia, Wenyue; Wang, Jing; Wen, Yuling; Chen, Yuanding

    2015-10-01

    VP7 of group A rotavirus (RVA) contains major neutralizing epitopes. Using the antigenic protein VP6 as the vector, chimeric proteins carrying foreign epitopes have been shown to possess good immunoreactivity and immunogenicity. In the present study, using modified VP6 as the vector, three chimeric proteins carrying epitopes derived from VP7 of RVA were constructed. The results showed that the chimeric proteins reacted with anti-VP6 and with SA11 and Wa virus strains. Antibodies from guinea pigs inoculated with the chimeric proteins recognized VP6 and VP7 of RVA and protected mammalian cells from SA11 and Wa infection in vitro. The neutralizing activities of the antibodies against the chimeric proteins were significantly higher than those against the vector protein VP6F. Thus, development of chimeric vaccines carrying VP7 epitopes using VP6 as a vector could be a promising alternative to enhance immunization against RVAs.

  9. Alphavirus replicon particles acting as adjuvants promote CD8+ T cell responses to co-delivered antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert E

    2008-08-05

    Alphavirus replicon particles induce strong antibody and CD8+ T cell responses to expressed antigens in numerous experimental systems. We have recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) possess adjuvant activity for systemic and mucosal antibody responses. In this report, we demonstrate that VRP induced an increased and balanced serum IgG subtype response to co-delivered antigen, with simultaneous induction of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies, and increased both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as measured by an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Additionally, VRP further increased antigen-specific T cell immunity in an additive fashion following co-delivery with the TLR ligand, CpG DNA. VRP infection led to recruitment of CD8+ T cells into the mucosal compartment, possibly utilizing the mucosal homing receptor, as this integrin was upregulated on CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node of VRP-infected animals, where VRP-infected dendritic cells reside. This newly recognized ability of VRP to mediate increased T cell response towards co-delivered antigen provides the potential to both define the molecular basis of alphavirus-induced immunity, and improve alphavirus-based vaccines.

  10. Alphavirus protease inhibitors from natural sources: A homology modeling and molecular docking investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byler, Kendall G; Collins, Jasmine T; Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Setzer, William N

    2016-10-01

    Alphaviruses such as Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), O'Nyong-Nyong virus (ONNV), Ross River virus (RRV), Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), are mosquito-transmitted viruses that can cause fevers, rash, and rheumatic diseases (CHIKV, ONNV, RRV) or potentially fatal encephalitis (EEEV, VEEV, WEEV) in humans. These diseases are considered neglected tropical diseases for which there are no current antiviral therapies or vaccines available. The alphavirus non-structural protein 2 (nsP2) contains a papain-like protease, which is considered to be a promising target for antiviral drug discovery. In this work, molecular docking analyses have been carried out on a library of 2174 plant-derived natural products (290 alkaloids, 664 terpenoids, 1060 polyphenolics, and 160 miscellaneous phytochemicals) with the nsP2 proteases of CHIKV, ONNV, RRV, EEEV, VEEV, WEEV, as well as Aura virus (AURV), Barmah Forest Virus (BFV), Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and Sindbis virus (SINV) in order to identity structural scaffolds for inhibitor design or discovery. Of the 2174 phytochemicals examined, a total of 127 showed promising docking affinities and poses to one or more of the nsP2 proteases, and this knowledge can be used to guide experimental investigation of potential inhibitors.

  11. Low temperature-dependent salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein processing and recombinant virus-like particle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Metz

    Full Text Available Pancreas disease (PD and sleeping disease (SD are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV, an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus. SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Outbreaks of SAV are associated with large economic losses of ~17 to 50 million $/year. Current control strategies rely on vaccination with inactivated virus formulations that are cumbersome to obtain and have intrinsic safety risks. In this research we were able to obtain non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs of SAV via expression of recombinant baculoviruses encoding SAV capsid protein and two major immunodominant viral glycoproteins, E1 and E2 in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells. However, this was only achieved when a temperature shift from 27°C to lower temperatures was applied. At 27°C, precursor E2 (PE2 was misfolded and not processed by host furin into mature E2. Hence, E2 was detected neither on the surface of infected cells nor as VLPs in the culture fluid. However, when temperatures during protein expression were lowered, PE2 was processed into mature E2 in a temperature-dependent manner and VLPs were abundantly produced. So, temperature shift-down during synthesis is a prerequisite for correct SAV glycoprotein processing and recombinant VLP production.

  12. Discovery of anthranilamides as a novel class of inhibitors of neurotropic alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Scott J; Delekta, Philip C; Sindac, Janice A; Dobry, Craig J; Xiang, Jianming; Keep, Richard F; Miller, David J; Larsen, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Neurotropic alphaviruses are debilitating pathogens that infect the central nervous system (CNS) and are transmitted to humans via mosquitoes. There exist no effective human vaccines against these viruses, underlining the need for effective antivirals, but no antiviral drugs are available for treating infection once the viruses have invaded the CNS. Previously, we reported the development of novel indole-2-carboxamide-based inhibitors of alphavirus replication that demonstrate significant reduction of viral titer and achieve measurable brain permeation in a pharmacokinetic mouse model. Herein we report our continued efforts to improve physicochemical properties predictive of in vivo blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability through reduction of overall molecular weight, replacing the indole core with a variety of aromatic and non-aromatic monocyclics. These studies culminated in the identification of simple anthranilamides that retain excellent potency with improved metabolic stability and significantly greater aqueous solubility. Furthermore, in a live virus study, we showed that two new compounds were capable of reducing viral titer by two orders of magnitude and that these compounds likely exert their effects through a mechanism similar to that of our indole-2-carboxamide inhibitors.

  13. Recombinant alphaviruses as vectors for anti-tumour and anti-microbial immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, A; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; Huckriede, A; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2006-01-01

    Background: Vectors derived from alphaviruses are gaining interest for their high transfection potency and strong immunogenicity. Objectives: After a brief introduction on alphaviruses and their vectors, an overview is given on current preclinical immunotherapy studies using vector systems based on

  14. Delivery of recombinant alphavirus into hippocampal slice tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes gene delivery of recombinant alphavirus to hippocampal slice cultures. Organotypic slices are covered by a layer of glial cells that impedes the penetration of viral particles to the neurons. Thus, viral particles should be injected manually into the extracellular space of the tissue.

  15. In vivo administration of recombinant alphavirus into rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2012-08-01

    The alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) have been used frequently as expression vectors in vitro and in vivo. Usually, these systems consist of replication-deficient vectors that require a helper vector for packaging of recombinant particles. Replication-proficient vectors have also been engineered. Alphaviral vectors can be used as nucleic-acid-based vectors (DNA and RNA) or infectious particles. High-titer viral production is achieved in alphaviruses facilitates studies in mammalian and nonmammalian cell lines, primary cells in culture, and in vivo. The strong preference for expression in neuronal cells has made alphaviruses particularly useful in neurobiological studies. Unfortunately, their strong cytotoxic effect on host cells, relatively short-term transient expression patterns, and the reasonably high cost of viral production remain drawbacks. However, novel mutant alphaviruses have shown reduced cytotoxicity and prolonged expression. This protocol describes stereotactic microinjection of recombinant alphavirus into rodents. Administration can be performed without any purification or concentration of viral stocks. However, filter-sterilization is recommended to ensure that cell debris or other contaminants are not present.

  16. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  17. Virus-specific thermostability and heat inactivation profiles of alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Lee; Huang, Yan-Jang S; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hettenbach, Susan M; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2016-08-01

    Serological diagnosis is a critical component for disease surveillance and is important to address the increase in incidence and disease burden of alphaviruses, such as the chikungunya (CHIKV) and Ross River (RRV) viruses. The gold standard for serological diagnosis is the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), which demonstrates the neutralizing capacity of serum samples after the removal of complement activity and adventitious viruses. This procedure is normally performed following inactivation of the virus at 56°C for 30min. Although this protocol has been widely accepted for the inactivation of envelope RNA viruses, recent studies have demonstrated that prolonged heat inactivation is required to completely inactivate two alphaviruses, Western equine encephalitis virus and CHIKV. Incomplete inactivation of viruses poses a laboratory biosafety risk and can also lead to spurious test results. Despite its importance in ensuring the safety of laboratory personnel as well as test integrity, systematic investigation on the thermostability of alphaviruses has not been performed. In this study, the temperature tolerance and heat inactivation profiles of RRV, Barmah Forest, and o'nyong-nyong viruses were determined. Variations in thermostability were observed within the Semliki forest serocomplex. Therefore, evidence-based heat inactivation procedures for alphaviruses are recommended.

  18. Alphavirus transducing system: tools for visualizing infection in mosquito vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Aaron; Mossel, Eric; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma; Foy, Brian; Olson, Ken

    2010-11-24

    Alphavirus transducing systems (ATSs) are important tools for expressing genes of interest (GOI) during infection. ATSs are derived from cDNA clones of mosquito-borne RNA viruses (genus Alphavirus; family Togaviridae). The Alphavirus genus contains about 30 different mosquito-borne virus species. Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses and contain single-stranded RNA genomes (~11.7 Kb). Alphaviruses transcribe a subgenomic mRNA that encodes the structural proteins of the virus required for encapsidation of the genome and maturation of the virus. Alphaviruses are usually highly lytic in vertebrate cells, but persistently infect susceptible mosquito cells with minimal cytopathology. These attributes make them excellent tools for gene expression in mosquito vectors. The most common ATSs in use are derived from Sindbis virus (SINV). The broad species tropism of SINV allows for infection of insect, avian, and mammalian cells8. However, ATSs have been derived from other alphaviruses as well. Foreign gene expression is made possible by the insertion of an additional viral subgenomic RNA initiation site or promoter. ATSs in which an exogenous gene sequence is positioned 5' to the viral structural genes is used for stable protein expression in insects. ATSs, in which a gene sequence is positioned 3' to the structural genes, is used to trigger RNAi and silence expression of that gene in the insect. ATSs have proven to be valuable tools for understanding vector-pathogen interactions, molecular details of viral replication and maintenance infectious cycles. In particular, the expression of fluorescent and bioluminescent reporters has been instrumental tracking the viral infection in the vector and virus transmission. Additionally, the vector immune response has been described using two strains of SINV engineered to express GFP(2,9). Here, we present a method for the production of SINV containing a fluorescent reporter (GFP) from the cDNA infectious clone. Infectious, full

  19. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Sali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3. A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10, which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses.

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of MicroRNA-Targeted Alphavirus Replicon and Helper RNAs ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I.; Coffield, V. McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A.; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans. PMID:20504925

  1. Both RIG-I and MDA5 detect alphavirus replication in concentration-dependent mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I., E-mail: evfrolova@UAB.edu

    2016-01-15

    Alphaviruses are a family of positive-strand RNA viruses that circulate on all continents between mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. Despite a significant public health threat, their biology is not sufficiently investigated, and the mechanisms of alphavirus replication and virus–host interaction are insufficiently understood. In this study, we have applied a variety of experimental systems to further understand the mechanism by which infected cells detect replicating alphaviruses. Our new data strongly suggest that activation of the antiviral response by alphavirus-infected cells is determined by the integrity of viral genes encoding proteins with nuclear functions, and by the presence of two cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), RIG-I and MDA5. No type I IFN response is induced in their absence. The presence of either of these PRRs is sufficient for detecting virus replication. However, type I IFN activation in response to pathogenic alphaviruses depends on the basal levels of RIG-I or MDA5. - Highlights: • Both RIG-I and MDA5 detect alphavirus replication. • Alphavirus-induced transcriptional shutoff affects type I IFN induction. • Sensing of alphavirus replication by RIG-I and MDA5 depends on their concentrations. • High basal level of RIG-I and MDA5 allows IFN induction by pathogenic alphaviruses. • This dependence determines the discrepancy between the in vivo and in vitro data.

  2. Chimeric SV40 virus-like particles induce specific cytotoxicity and protective immunity against influenza A virus without the need of adjuvants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Masaaki [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Morikawa, Katsuma [Department of Biological Information, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Suda, Tatsuya [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Ohno, Naohito [Laboratory for Immunopharmacology of Microbial Products, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Matsushita, Sho [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Allergy Center, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Akatsuka, Toshitaka [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi, E-mail: handa.h.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Solutions Research Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsui, Masanori, E-mail: mmatsui@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2014-01-05

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a promising vaccine platform due to the safety and efficiency. However, it is still unclear whether polyomavirus-based VLPs are useful for this purpose. Here, we attempted to evaluate the potential of polyomavirus VLPs for the antiviral vaccine using simian virus 40 (SV40). We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope derived from influenza A virus. HLA-A{sup ⁎}02:01-transgenic mice were then immunized with the chimeric SV40-VLPs. The chimeric SV40-VLPs effectively induced influenza-specific CTLs and heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses without the need of adjuvants. Because DNase I treatment of the chimeric SV40-VLPs did not disrupt CTL induction, the intrinsic adjuvant property may not result from DNA contaminants in the VLP preparation. In addition, immunization with the chimeric SV40-VLPs generated long-lasting memory CTLs. We here propose that the chimeric SV40-VLPs harboring an epitope may be a promising CTL-based vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties. - Highlights: • We constructed chimeric SV40-VLPs carrying an influenza virus-derived CTL epitope. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce influenza-specific CTLs in mice without adjuvants. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce heterosubtypic protection against influenza A viruses. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs induce long-lasting memory CTLs. • Chimeric SV40-VLPs is a promising vaccine platform with self-adjuvant properties.

  3. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  4. Liver transplantation : chimerism, complications and matrix metalloproteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, Willem Rogier ten

    2011-01-01

    Chimerism after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the main focus of the studies described in this thesis. The first study showed that chimerism of different cell lineages within the liver graft does occur after OLT. Subsequently, in allogeneic blood stem cell recipients, chimerism was demons

  5. A hemagglutinin-esterase-expressing salmonid alphavirus replicon protects Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) against infectious salmon anemia (ISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Astrid; Hodneland, Kjartan; Frost, Petter; Braaen, Stine; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-01-11

    A replicon expression system based on the salmonid alphavirus (SAV) that encodes the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) was constructed and found to be an efficacious vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA). Following a single intramuscular immunization, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were effectively protected against subsequent ISAV challenge. Additional replicons coding for the ISAV fusion glycoprotein (F) or the ISAV matrix protein (M) were created and tested in combination with the replicon that encodes the HE. The ISAV HE was confirmed as a potent antigen, but neither the F nor the M proteins were found to be essential for immunization-induced protection. Innate immune response induced at the site of vaccination illustrated the immunogenicity of the SAV-based replicon and its ability to activate antiviral responses in Atlantic salmon. The successful testing of the SAV-based replicon as a vaccine model against ISA showed that the replicon approach may represent a novel immunization technology for the aquaculture industry. It offers potential benefits in terms of safety, efficacy, flexibility, and vaccine production complexity.

  6. Low Temperature-Dependent Salmonid Alphavirus Glycoprotein Processing and Recombinant Virus-Like Particle Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.W.H.; Feenstra, F.; Villoing, S.; Hulten, van M.C.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Koumans, J.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and sleeping disease (SD) are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV), an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus). SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish.

  7. Low Temperature-Dependent Salmonid Alphavirus Glycoprotein Processing and Recombinant Virus-Like Particle Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.W.H.; Feenstra, F.; Villoing, S.; Hulten, van M.C.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Koumans, J.; Vlak, J.M.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) and sleeping disease (SD) are important viral scourges in aquaculture of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout. The etiological agent of PD and SD is salmonid alphavirus (SAV), an unusual member of the Togaviridae (genus Alphavirus). SAV replicates at lower temperatures in fish. Ou

  8. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Jose

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae] is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels. PMID:28196962

  10. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fros, Jelke J; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-06-11

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus-host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly.

  11. Both RIG-I and MDA5 detect alphavirus replication in concentration-dependent mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a family of positive-strand RNA viruses that circulate on all continents between mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. Despite a significant public health threat, their biology is not sufficiently investigated, and the mechanisms of alphavirus replication and virus-host interaction are insufficiently understood. In this study, we have applied a variety of experimental systems to further understand the mechanism by which infected cells detect replicating alphaviruses. Our new data strongly suggest that activation of the antiviral response by alphavirus-infected cells is determined by the integrity of viral genes encoding proteins with nuclear functions, and by the presence of two cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), RIG-I and MDA5. No type I IFN response is induced in their absence. The presence of either of these PRRs is sufficient for detecting virus replication. However, type I IFN activation in response to pathogenic alphaviruses depends on the basal levels of RIG-I or MDA5.

  12. Placental chimerism in early human pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Halder

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background0 : Human chimerism is rare and usually uncovered through investigations of ambiguous genitalia or blood grouping or prenatal diagnosis. Most of the publications on placental chimerism are mainly case reports. There is no systematic search with sensitive techniques for placental chimerism in human. Aim0 : This study was aimed to asses placental chimerism through two sensitive molecular techniques i.e., interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative fluorescent PCR. Material and methods0 : Placental chimerism was analyzed using X & Y dual color fluorescent in-situ hybridization onto 154 placentae from natural conceptions, obtained at termination of pregnancy between 7 to 16 weeks of gestation. Results0 : Three cases of placental sex chromosome chimerism were observed (1.95%. Exclusion of maternal contamination and diagnosis was confirmed later by quantitative fluorescent PCR. Conclusion0 : This finding indicates that placental chimerism in early human pregnancy is not rare.

  13. Expression of H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin protein fused with protein transduction domain in an alphavirus replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-gui; Wo, Jian-er; Li, Min-wei; Mi, Fen-fang; Yu, Cheng-bo; Lv, Guo-liang; Cao, Hong-Cui; Lu, Hai-feng; Wang, Bao-hong; Zhu, Hanping; Li, Lan-Juan

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus replicons, in which structural protein genes are replaced by heterologous genes, express high levels of the heterologous proteins. On the basis of the potencies of replicons to self-replicate and express foreign proteins and the remarkable intercellular transport property of VP22, a novel alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon system of VP22 fused with a model antigen, hemagglutinin (HA), of the human-avian H5N1 influenza virus, was explored in this study. Further, replicon particles expressing HA, VP22, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) individually were used as controls. By flow cytometry based on the analysis of transfection efficiency, SFV-EGFP replicon particle titer was 1.13 x 10(7)transducing units (TU)/ml. The titers of SFV-HA, SFV-VP22 and SFV-VP22-HA replicon particles, which were titrated by using SFV-EGFP replicon particles, were 1.42 x 10(7), 3.23 x 10(7), and 1.01 x 10(7)TU/ml, respectively. HA and VP22-HA expression was observed in SFV-HA- and SFV-VP22-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the fluorescence intensity in the SFV-VP22-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells was more than that in the SFV-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells. Both SFV-VP22-HA and SFV-HA replicon particles presented a promising approach for developing vaccines against human-avian influenza. VP22-HA fusion protein with similar trafficking properties may also enhance vaccine potency.

  14. Improved humoral and cellular immune response against the gp120 V3 loop of HIV-1 following genetic immunization with a chimeric DNA vaccine encoding the V3 inserted into the hepatites B surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, A.; Nielsen, H.V.; Bryder, K.

    1998-01-01

    The gp120-derived V3 loop of HIV-1 is involved in co-receptor interaction, it guides cell tropism, and contains an epitope for antibody neutralization. Thus, HIV-1 V3 is an attractive vaccine candidate. The V3 of the MN strain (MN V3) contains both B- and T-cell epitopes, including a known mouse ...

  15. Growth characteristics of the chimeric Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidate, ChimeriVax-JE (YF/JE SA14--14--2), in Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes albopictus, and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, T R; Crabtree, M B; Guirakhoo, F; Monath, T P; Miller, B R

    2000-04-01

    The Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus vaccine candidate, ChimeriVax-JE, which consists of a yellow fever (YF) 17D virus backbone containing the prM and E genes from the JE vaccine strain JE SA14--14--2, exhibits restricted replication in non-human primates, producing only a low-level viremia following peripheral inoculation. Although this reduces the likelihood that hematophagous insects could become infected by feeding on a vaccinated host, it is prudent to investigate the replication kinetics of the vaccine virus in mosquito species that are known to vector the viruses from which the chimera is derived. In this study ChimeriVax-JE virus was compared to its parent viruses, as well as to wild-type JE virus, for its ability to replicate in Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes albopictus, and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Individual mosquitoes were exposed to the viruses by oral ingestion of a virus-laden blood meal or by intrathoracic (IT) virus inoculation. ChimeriVax-JE virus did not replicate following ingestion by any of the three mosquito species. Additionally, replication was not detected after IT inoculation of ChimeriVax-JE in the primary JE virus vector, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. ChimeriVax-JE exhibited moderate growth following IT inoculation into Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, reaching titers of 3.6-5.0 log(10) PFU/mosquito. There was no change in the virus genotype associated with replication in mosquitoes. Similar results were observed in mosquitoes of all three species that were IT inoculated or had orally ingested the YF 17D vaccine virus. In contrast, all mosquitoes either IT inoculated with or orally fed wild-type and vaccine JE viruses became infected, reaching maximum titers of 5.4-7.3 log(10) PFU/mosquito. These results indicate that ChimeriVax-JE virus is restricted in its ability to infect and replicate in these mosquito vectors. The low viremia caused by ChimeriVax-JE in primates and poor infectivity for mosquitoes are safeguards against secondary spread

  16. A novel chimeric Hepatitis B virus S/preS1 antigen produced in mammalian and plant cells elicits stronger humoral and cellular immune response than the standard vaccine-constituent, S protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrica, Mihaela-Olivia; Lazar, Catalin; Paruch, Lisa; Skomedal, Hanne; Steen, Hege; Haugslien, Sissel; Tucureanu, Catalin; Caras, Iuliana; Onu, Adrian; Ciulean, Sonya; Branzan, Alexandru; Clarke, Jihong Liu; Stavaru, Crina; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2017-08-01

    Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection leads to severe liver pathogenesis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As no curable medication is yet available, vaccination remains the most cost-effective approach to limit HBV spreading and control the infection. Although safe and efficient, the standard vaccine based on production of the small (S) envelope protein in yeast fails to elicit an effective immune response in about 10% of vaccinated individuals, which are at risk of infection. One strategy to address this issue is the development of more immunogenic antigens. Here we describe a novel HBV antigen obtained by combining relevant immunogenic determinants of S and large (L) envelope proteins. Our approach was based on the insertion of residues 21-47 of the preS1 domain of the L protein (nomenclature according to genotype D), involved in virus attachment to hepatocytes, within the external antigenic loop of S. The resulting S/preS1(21-47) chimera was successfully produced in HEK293T and Nicotiana benthamiana plants, as a more economical recombinant protein production platform. Comparative biochemical, functional and electron microscopy analysis indicated assembly of the novel antigen into subviral particles in mammalian and plant cells. Importantly, these particles preserve both S- and preS1-specific epitopes and elicit significantly stronger humoral and cellular immune responses than the S protein, in both expression systems used. Our data promote this antigen as a promising vaccine candidate to overcome poor responsiveness to the conventional, S protein-based, HBV vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stable, high-level expression of reporter proteins from improved alphavirus expression vectors to track replication and dissemination during encephalitic and arthritogenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengqun; Gardner, Christina L; Watson, Alan M; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2014-02-01

    Engineered alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have been used for a number of years due to their relatively low costs for analysis of virus replication and the capacity to utilize imaging systems for longitudinal measurements of growth within single animals. In general, these vectors have been derived from Old World alphaviruses using a second viral subgenomic promoter to express the transgenes, placed either immediately after the nonstructural proteins or at the 3' end of the viral coding sequences. However, the relevance of these vectors to natural infections is questionable, as they have not been rigorously tested for virulence in vivo in comparison with parental viruses or for the retention of the reporter during replication. Here, we report construction of new expression vectors for two Old World arthritogenic alphaviruses (Sindbis and Chikungunya viruses) and two New World encephalitic alphaviruses (eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses) based upon either fusion of the reporter protein in frame within nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) or insertion of the reporter as a cleavable element between the capsid and PE2 structural proteins. We have compared these with a traditional 3' double subgenomic promoter virus expressing either a large, firefly luciferase (fLuc; 1,650 nucleotides), or small, NanoLuc (nLuc; 513 nucleotides), luminescent reporter protein. Results indicate that the nLuc is substantially more stable than fLuc during repeated rounds of infection regardless of the transgene location. However, the capsid-PE2 insertion and nsP3 fusion viruses exhibit the most authentic mimicking of parental virus infection regardless of expressed protein. IMPORTANCE As more antiviral therapeutics and vaccines are developed, rapid and accurate in vivo modeling of their efficacy will be required. However, current alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have not been extensively tested for accurate mimicking of the infection

  18. Early events in alphavirus replication determine the outcome of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Ilya; Akhrymuk, Maryna; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Atasheva, Svetlana; Frolova, Elena I

    2012-05-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of important human and animal pathogens. They efficiently replicate to high titers in vivo and in many commonly used cell lines of vertebrate origin. They have also evolved effective means of interfering with development of the innate immune response. Nevertheless, most of the alphaviruses are known to induce a type I interferon (IFN) response in vivo. The results of this study demonstrate that the first hours postinfection play a critical role in infection spread and development of the antiviral response. During this window, a balance is struck between virus replication and spread in vertebrate cells and IFN response development. The most important findings are as follows: (i) within the first 2 to 4 h postinfection, alphavirus-infected cells become unable to respond to IFN-β, and this occurs before the virus-induced decrease in STAT1 phosphorylation in response to IFN treatment. (ii) Most importantly, very low, subprotective doses of IFN-β, which do not induce the antiviral response in uninfected cells, have a very strong stimulatory effect on the cells' ability to express type I IFN and activate interferon-stimulated genes during subsequent infection with Sindbis virus (SINV). (iii) Small changes in SINV nsP2 protein affect its ability to inhibit cellular transcription and IFN release. Thus, the balance between type I IFN induction and the ability of the virus to develop further rounds of infection is determined in the first few hours of virus replication, when only low numbers of cells and infectious virus are involved.

  19. Imaging of the alphavirus capsid protein during virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Kielian, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses with highly organized structures. The nucleocapsid (NC) core contains a capsid protein lattice enclosing the plus-sense RNA genome, and it is surrounded by a lipid bilayer containing a lattice of the E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins. Capsid protein is synthesized in the cytoplasm and particle budding occurs at the plasma membrane (PM), but the traffic and assembly of viral components and the exit of virions from host cells are not well understood. To visualize the dynamics of capsid protein during infection, we developed a Sindbis virus infectious clone tagged with a tetracysteine motif. Tagged capsid protein could be fluorescently labeled with biarsenical dyes in living cells without effects on virus growth, morphology, or protein distribution. Live cell imaging and colocalization experiments defined distinct groups of capsid foci in infected cells. We observed highly motile internal puncta that colocalized with E2 protein, which may represent the transport machinery that capsid protein uses to reach the PM. Capsid was also found in larger nonmotile internal structures that colocalized with cellular G3BP and viral nsP3. Thus, capsid may play an unforeseen role in these previously observed G3BP-positive foci, such as regulation of cellular stress granules. Capsid puncta were also observed at the PM. These puncta colocalized with E2 and recruited newly synthesized capsid protein; thus, they may be sites of virus assembly and egress. Together, our studies provide the first dynamic views of the alphavirus capsid protein in living cells and a system to define detailed mechanisms during alphavirus infection.

  20. Generation of chimeric rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Masahito; Sparman, Michelle; Ramsey, Cathy; Ma, Hong; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2012-01-20

    Totipotent cells in early embryos are progenitors of all stem cells and are capable of developing into a whole organism, including extraembryonic tissues such as placenta. Pluripotent cells in the inner cell mass (ICM) are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into any cell type of a body except extraembryonic tissues. The ability to contribute to chimeric animals upon reintroduction into host embryos is the key feature of murine totipotent and pluripotent cells. Here, we demonstrate that rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolated ICMs fail to incorporate into host embryos and develop into chimeras. However, chimeric offspring were produced following aggregation of totipotent cells of the four-cell embryos. These results provide insights into the species-specific nature of primate embryos and suggest that a chimera assay using pluripotent cells may not be feasible.

  1. Emerging alphaviruses in the Americas: Chikungunya and Mayaro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Mario Luis Garcia de; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) and Mayaro virus (MAYV) are emergent arthropod-borne viruses that produce outbreaks of acute febrile illness with arthropathy. Despite their different continental origins, CHIKV and MAYV are closely related and are components of the Semliki Forest Complex of the Alphavirus (Togaviridae). MAYV and, more recently, CHIKV, which are both transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, have resulted in severe public health problems in the Americas, including Brazil. In this review, we present aspects of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of febrile illnesses produced by CHIKV and MAYV. We also discuss the epidemiological aspects and effects related to the prophylaxis of infections by both viruses.

  2. Emerging alphaviruses in the Americas: Chikungunya and Mayaro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Luis Garcia de Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Mayaro virus (MAYV are emergent arthropod-borne viruses that produce outbreaks of acute febrile illness with arthropathy. Despite their different continental origins, CHIKV and MAYV are closely related and are components of the Semliki Forest Complex of the Alphavirus (Togaviridae. MAYV and, more recently, CHIKV, which are both transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, have resulted in severe public health problems in the Americas, including Brazil. In this review, we present aspects of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment of febrile illnesses produced by CHIKV and MAYV. We also discuss the epidemiological aspects and effects related to the prophylaxis of infections by both viruses.

  3. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  4. Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasar, Farooq; Palacios, Gustavo; Gorchakov, Rodion V; Guzman, Hilda; Da Rosa, Amelia P Travassos; Savji, Nazir; Popov, Vsevolod L; Sherman, Michael B; Lipkin, W Ian; Tesh, Robert B; Weaver, Scott C

    2012-09-04

    Most alphaviruses and many other arboviruses are mosquito-borne and exhibit a broad host range, infecting many different vertebrates including birds, rodents, equids, humans, and nonhuman primates. Consequently, they can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability of arboviruses to infect arthropods and vertebrates is usually essential for their maintenance in nature. However, several flaviviruses have recently been described that infect mosquitoes but not vertebrates, although the mechanism of their host restriction has not been determined. Here we describe a unique alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), isolated from a pool of Anopheles coustani mosquitoes from the Negev desert of Israel. Phylogenetic analyses placed EILV as a sister to the Western equine encephalitis antigenic complex within the main clade of mosquito-borne alphaviruses. Electron microscopy revealed that, like other alphaviruses, EILV virions were spherical, 70 nm in diameter, and budded from the plasma membrane of mosquito cells in culture. EILV readily infected a variety of insect cells with little overt cytopathic effect. However, in contrast to typical mosquito-borne alphaviruses, EILV could not infect mammalian or avian cell lines, and viral as well as RNA replication could not be detected at 37 °C or 28 °C. Evolutionarily, these findings suggest that EILV lost its ability to infect vertebrate cells. Thus, EILV seems to be mosquito-specific and represents a previously undescribed complex within the genus Alphavirus. Reverse genetic studies of EILV may facilitate the discovery of determinants of alphavirus host range that mediate disease emergence.

  5. Salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein E2 requires low temperature and E1 for virion formation and induction of protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikke, Mia C; Braaen, Stine; Villoing, Stephane; Hodneland, Kjartan; Geertsema, Corinne; Verhagen, Lisa; Frost, Petter; Vlak, Just M; Rimstad, Espen; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2014-10-29

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV; also known as Salmon pancreas disease virus; family Togaviridae) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, respectively, and poses a major burden to the aquaculture industry. SAV infection in vivo is temperature-restricted and progeny virus is only produced at low temperatures (10-15 °C). Using engineered SAV replicons we show that viral RNA replication is not temperature-restricted suggesting that the viral structural proteins determine low-temperature dependency. The processing/trafficking of SAV glycoproteins E1 and E2 as a function of temperature was investigated via baculovirus vectors in Sf9 insect cells and by transfection of CHSE-214 fish cells with DNA constructs expressing E1 and E2. We identified SAV E2 as the temperature determinant by demonstrating that membrane trafficking and surface expression of E2 occurs only at low temperature and only in the presence of E1. Finally, a vaccination-challenge model in Atlantic salmon demonstrates the biological significance of our findings and shows that SAV replicon DNA vaccines encoding E2 elicit protective immunity only when E1 is co-expressed. This is the first study that identifies E2 as the critical determinant of SAV low-temperature dependent virion formation and defines the prerequisites for induction of a potent immune response in Atlantic salmon by DNA vaccination.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B; Kuhn, Richard J

    2017-02-14

    Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.IMPORTANCE Reemerging mosquito-borne alphaviruses cause serious human epidemics worldwide. Several structural and imaging studies have helped to define the life cycle of alphaviruses in mammalian cells, but the mode of virus replication and

  7. Peptide motif analysis predicts alphaviruses as triggers for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeboom, Charissa

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops in response to both genetic and environmental factors. The strongest genetic determinant is HLA-DR, where polymorphisms within the P4 and P6 binding pockets confer elevated risk. However, low disease concordance across monozygotic twin pairs underscores the importance of an environmental factor, probably infectious. The goal of this investigation was to predict the microorganism most likely to interact with HLA-DR to trigger RA under the molecular mimicry hypothesis. A set of 185 structural proteins from viruses or intracellular bacteria was scanned for regions of sequence homology with a collagen peptide that binds preferentially to DR4; candidates were then evaluated against a motif required for T cell cross-reactivity. The plausibility of the predicted agent was evaluated by comparison of microbial prevalence patterns to epidemiological characteristics of RA. Peptides from alphavirus capsid proteins provided the closest fit. Variations in the P6 position suggest that the HLA binding preference may vary by species, with Ross River virus, Chikungunya virus, and Mayaro virus peptides binding preferentially to DR4, and peptides from Sindbis/Ockelbo virus showing stronger affinity to DR1. The predicted HLA preference is supported by epidemiological studies of post-infection chronic arthralgia. Parallels between the cytokine profiles of RA and chronic alphavirus infection are discussed.

  8. Mayaro virus: complete nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic relationships with other alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Anne; de Thoisy, Benoît; Lacoste, Vincent; Pascalis, Hervé; Pouliquen, Jean-François; Mercier, Véronique; Tolou, Hugues; Dussart, Philippe; Morvan, Jacques; Talarmin, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2006-05-01

    Mayaro (MAY) virus is a member of the genus Alphavirus in the family Togaviridae. Alphaviruses are distributed throughout the world and cause a wide range of diseases in humans and animals. Here, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of MAY from a viral strain isolated from a French Guianese patient. The deduced MAY genome was 11,429 nucleotides in length, excluding the 5' cap nucleotide and 3' poly(A) tail. Nucleotide and amino acid homologies, as well as phylogenetic analyses of the obtained sequence confirmed that MAY is not a recombinant virus and belongs to the Semliki Forest complex according to the antigenic complex classification. Furthermore, analyses based on the E1 region revealed that MAY is closely related to Una virus, the only other South American virus clustering with the Old World viruses. On the basis of our results and of the alphaviruses diversity and pathogenicity, we suggest that alphaviruses may have an Old World origin.

  9. Detection of All Species of the Genus Alphavirus by Reverse Transcription-PCR with Diagnostic Sensitivity▿

    OpenAIRE

    Grywna, K.; Kupfer, B.; Panning, M.; Drexler, J. F.; Emmerich, P.; Drosten, C.; Kummerer, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical arbovirus screening requires exclusion of a broad range of viruses with as few assays as possible. We present a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for the detection of all species of the genus Alphavirus qualified for exclusion screening (limit of detection [LOD], 5 to 100 RNA copies per reaction across all Alphavirus species; detection of viremia down to ca. 10,000 copies per ml).

  10. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G.V. Fernandes

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Although a complete characterization of the immune response elicited by rChi/adjuvant in hamsters is required, it is believed that the construction of chimeric genes is an important attempt towards the generation of an effective vaccine against leptospirosis.

  11. Mouse Model of Neurological Complications Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Smith, Jeanon; Koma, Takaaki; Miller, Magda M.; Yun, Nadezhda; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Long-term neurological complications, termed sequelae, can result from viral encephalitis, which are not well understood. In human survivors, alphavirus encephalitis can cause severe neurobehavioral changes, in the most extreme cases, a schizophrenic-like syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to adapt an animal model of alphavirus infection survival to study the development of these long-term neurological complications. Upon low-dose infection of wild-type C57B/6 mice, asymptomatic and symptomatic groups were established and compared to mock-infected mice to measure general health and baseline neurological function, including the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition paradigm. Prepulse inhibition is a robust operational measure of sensorimotor gating, a fundamental form of information processing. Deficits in prepulse inhibition manifest as the inability to filter out extraneous sensory stimuli. Sensory gating is disrupted in schizophrenia and other mental disorders, as well as neurodegenerative diseases. Symptomatic mice developed deficits in prepulse inhibition that lasted through 6 months post infection; these deficits were absent in asymptomatic or mock-infected groups. Accompanying prepulse inhibition deficits, symptomatic animals exhibited thalamus damage as visualized with H&E staining, as well as increased GFAP expression in the posterior complex of the thalamus and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These histological changes and increased GFAP expression were absent in the asymptomatic and mock-infected animals, indicating that glial scarring could have contributed to the prepulse inhibition phenotype observed in the symptomatic animals. This model provides a tool to test mechanisms of and treatments for the neurological sequelae of viral encephalitis and begins to delineate potential explanations for the development of such sequelae post infection.

  12. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  13. Effects of co-administered pseudorabies Bartha-K61 vaccine on the efficacy of an adenovirus/alphavirus replicon chimeric vectored vaccine rAdV-SFV-E2%同时接种伪狂犬病活疫苗Bartha-K61株对嵌合载体猪瘟疫苗rAdV-SFV-E2免疫效力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏水利; 孙元; 雷建林; 杜明亮; 丛鑫; 杜恩岐; 仇华吉

    2016-01-01

    本实验室前期研究中构建了一种新型的猪瘟标记疫苗—腺病毒/甲病毒复制子嵌合载体猪瘟疫苗(rAdV-SFV-E2),并证实该疫苗具有与C株猪瘟疫苗相同的免疫效力.为评价该疫苗与伪狂犬病疫苗(Bartha-K61)联合免疫是否存在相互干扰现象,本研究将这两种疫苗联合免疫健康仔猪(n=5),同时设立单独免疫对照和阴性对照,免疫后利用CSFV强毒石门株进行攻击,并通过抗体反应、临床症状、病毒血症、病理学及组织病理学变化等指标对疫苗免疫效果进行评价.结果显示,rAdV-SFV-E2和Bartha-K61联合免疫后与单独免疫rAdV-SFV-E2均能够对致死性CSFV强毒的攻击提供完全保护(5/5存活),表现为无猪瘟特异性临床症状、无病毒血症、无病理变化和组织病理学变化.该研究证实,rAdV-SFV-E2和伪狂犬病疫苗Bartha-K61同时免疫对rAdV-SFV-E2的免疫效果无干扰现象.

  14. Issues Related to Recent Dengue Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Konishi, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are mosquito-transmitted diseases of global importance. Despite significant research efforts, no approved vaccines or antiviral drugs against these diseases are currently available. This brief article reviews the status of dengue vaccine development, with particular emphasis on the vaccine strategies in more advanced stages of evaluation; these include traditional attenuation, chimerization and engineered attenuation. Several aspects of the...

  15. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Avogadri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2, which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  16. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogadri, Francesca; Merghoub, Taha; Maughan, Maureen F; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Morris, John; Ritter, Erika; Olmsted, Robert; Houghton, Alan N; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2010-09-10

    Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP) simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA) tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2), which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  17. Progress in Chimeric Vector and Chimeric Gene Based Cardiovascular Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chun-Song; YOON Young-sup; ISNER Jeffrey M.; LOSORDO Douglas W.

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy for cardiovascular diseases has developed from preliminary animal experiments to clinical trials. However, vectors and target genes used currently in gene therapy are mainly focused on viral, nonviral vector and single target gene or monogene. Each vector system has a series of advantages and limitations. Chimeric vectors which combine the advantages of viral and nonviral vector,chimeric target genes which combine two or more target genes and novel gene delivery modes are being developed. In this article, we summarized the progress in chimeric vectors and chimeric genes based cardiovascular gene therapy, which including proliferative or occlusive vascular diseases such as atheroslerosis and restenosis, hypertonic vascular disease such as hypertension and cardiac diseases such as myocardium ischemia, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure, even heart transplantation. The development of chimeric vector, chimeric gene and their cardiovascular gene therapy is promising.

  18. Manufacture of diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T Y; Markert, C L

    1980-01-01

    Tetraploid mouse embryos were produced by cytochalasin B treatment. These embryos usually die before completion of embryonic development and are abnormal morphologically and physiologically. The tetraploid embryos can be rescued to develop to maturity by aggregating them with normal diploid embryos to produce diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice. The diploid/tetraploid chimeric embryos are frequently abnormal: the larger the proportion of tetraploid cells, the greater the abnormality. By karyotyp...

  19. Outlook for a dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, R

    2014-05-01

    Dengue is an increasing medical problem in subtropical and tropical countries. The search for a safe and effective vaccine is complicated by the fact that there are four types of dengue virus and that, if a vaccine is live attenuated, it should be proven not to cause the life-threatening form of dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever. So far one vaccine candidate, a four-valent chimeric vaccine constructed from a yellow fever vaccine strain, has reached large clinical trials and has been shown to offer protection against dengue types 1, 3 and 54 but not against dengue type 2. It is highly likely that an effective vaccine will be available in the next decade.

  20. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Chī, Xi Olì; D Ng, Lián; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Jozwick, Lucas; Clester, Jeremiah C; Cooper, Christopher L; Courier, Duane; Langan, David P; Underwood, Knashka; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Sun, Mei G; Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shu Qìng; Burk, Robin; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kota, Krishna; Kuhn, Jens H; Bavari, Sina

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2) expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1-PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling.

  1. Structural basis for substrate specificity of alphavirus nsP2 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Andrew T; Malmstrom, Robert D; White, Mark A; Watowich, Stanley J

    2010-08-24

    The alphavirus nsP2 protease is essential for correct processing of the alphavirus nonstructural polyprotein (nsP1234) and replication of the viral genome. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations with our structural studies to reveal features of the nsP2 protease catalytic site and S1'-S4 subsites that regulate the specificity of the protease. The catalytic mechanism of the nsP2 protease appears similar to the papain-like cysteine proteases, with the conserved catalytic dyad forming a thiolate-imidazolium ion pair in the nsP2-activated state. Substrate binding likely stabilizes this ion pair. Analysis of bimolecular complexes of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nsP2 protease with each of the nsP1234 cleavage sites identified protease residues His(510), Ser(511), His(546) and Lys(706) as critical for cleavage site recognition. Homology modelling and molecular dynamics simulations of diverse alphaviruses and their cognate cleavage site sequences revealed general features of substrate recognition that operate across alphavirus strains as well as strain specific covariance between binding site and cleavage site residues. For instance, compensatory changes occurred in the P3 and S3 subsite residues to maintain energetically favourable complementary binding surfaces. These results help explain how alphavirus nsP2 proteases recognize different cleavage sites within the nonstructural polyprotein and discriminate between closely related cleavage targets.

  2. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheli R Radoshitzky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the repertoire of cellular factors involved in the replication of pathogenic alphaviruses. To uncover molecular regulators of alphavirus infection, and to identify candidate drug targets, we performed a high-content imaging-based siRNA screen. We revealed an actin-remodeling pathway involving Rac1, PIP5K1- α, and Arp3, as essential for infection by pathogenic alphaviruses. Infection causes cellular actin rearrangements into large bundles of actin filaments termed actin foci. Actin foci are generated late in infection concomitantly with alphavirus envelope (E2 expression and are dependent on the activities of Rac1 and Arp3. E2 associates with actin in alphavirus-infected cells and co-localizes with Rac1-PIP5K1-α along actin filaments in the context of actin foci. Finally, Rac1, Arp3, and actin polymerization inhibitors interfere with E2 trafficking from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface, suggesting a plausible model in which transport of E2 to the cell surface is mediated via Rac1- and Arp3-dependent actin remodeling.

  3. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus (HMPV are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1 is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections.

  4. A Chimeric Pneumovirus Fusion Protein Carrying Neutralizing Epitopes of Both MPV and RSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaolin; Pickens, Jennifer; Mousa, Jarrod J.; Leser, George P.; Lamb, Robert A.; Crowe, James E.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are paramyxoviruses that are responsible for substantial human health burden, particularly in children and the elderly. The fusion (F) glycoproteins are major targets of the neutralizing antibody response and studies have mapped dominant antigenic sites in F. Here we grafted a major neutralizing site of RSV F, recognized by the prophylactic monoclonal antibody palivizumab, onto HMPV F, generating a chimeric protein displaying epitopes of both viruses. We demonstrate that the resulting chimeric protein (RPM-1) is recognized by both anti-RSV and anti-HMPV F neutralizing antibodies indicating that it can be used to map the epitope specificity of antibodies raised against both viruses. Mice immunized with the RPM-1 chimeric antigen generate robust neutralizing antibody responses to MPV but weak or no cross-reactive recognition of RSV F, suggesting that grafting of the single palivizumab epitope stimulates a comparatively limited antibody response. The RPM-1 protein provides a new tool for characterizing the immune responses resulting from RSV and HMPV infections and provides insights into the requirements for developing a chimeric subunit vaccine that could induce robust and balanced immunity to both virus infections. PMID:27224013

  5. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine : A Review of the Human Antibody Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipse, Jacky; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vac

  6. Chimerism and xenotransplantation. New concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, T E; Rao, A S; Murase, N; Demetris, A J; Thomson, A; Fung, J J

    1999-02-01

    In both transplant and infectious circumstances, the immune response is governed by migration and localization of the antigen. If the antigenic epitopes of transgenic xenografts are sufficiently altered to avoid evoking the destructive force of innate immunity, the mechanisms of engraftment should be the same as those that permit the chimerism-dependent immunologic confrontation and resolution that is the basis of allograft acceptance. In addition to "humanizing" the epitopes, one of the unanswered questions is whether the species restriction of complement described in 1994 by Valdivia and colleagues also necessitates the introduction of human complement regulatory genes in animal donors. Because the liver is the principal or sole source of most complement components, the complement quickly is transformed to that of the donor after hepatic transplantation. Thus, the need for complementary regulatory transgenes may vary according to the kind of xenograft used. Much evidence shows that physiologically important peptides produced by xenografts (e.g., insulin, clotting factors, and enzymes) are incorporated into the metabolic machinery of the recipient body. To the extent that this is not true, xenotransplantation could result in the production of diseases that are analogous to inborn errors of metabolism. In the climate of pessimism that followed the failures of baboon to human liver xenotransplantation in 1992-1993, it seemed inconceivable that the use of even more discordant donors, such as the pig, could ever be seriously entertained; however, this preceded insight into the xenogeneic and allogeneic barriers that has brought transplantation infectious immunity to common ground. With this new insight and the increasing ease of producing transgenic donors, the goal of clinical xenotransplantation may not be so distant.

  7. Immunoreactivity evaluation of a new recombinant chimeric protein against Brucella in the murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Abdollahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Brucellosis is an important health problem in developing countries and no vaccine is available for the prevention of infection in humans. Because of clinically infectious diseases and their economic consequences in human and animals, designing a proper vaccine against Brucella is desirable. In this study, we evaluated the immune responses induced by a designed recombinant chimera protein in murine model.Materials and Methods: Three immunodominant antigens of Brucella have been characterized as potential immunogenic and protective antigens including: trigger factor (TF, Omp31 and Bp26 were fused together by EAAAK linkers to produce a chimera (structure were designed in silico, which was synthesized, cloned, and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3. The purification of recombinant protein was performed using Ni-NTA agarose. SDS-PAGE and anti-His antibody was used for confirmation purified protein (Western blot. BALB/c immunization was performed by purified protein and adjuvant, and sera antibody levels were measured by ELISA. otted.Results: SDS-PAGE and Western blotting results indicated the similarity of in silico designing and in vitro experiments. ELISA result proved that the immunized sera of mice contain high levels of antibodies (IgG against recombinant chimeric protein.Conclusion: The recombinant chimeric protein could be a potential antigen candidate for the development of a subunit vaccine against Brucella. Keywords: Brucella, Vaccine, Immunity, Recombinant

  8. Chimeric rhinoviruses displaying MPER epitopes elicit anti-HIV neutralizing responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of an effective AIDS vaccine has been a formidable task, but remains a critical necessity. The well conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER of the HIV-1 gp41 glycoprotein is one of the crucial targets for AIDS vaccine development, as it has the necessary attribute of being able to elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse isolates of HIV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Guided by X-ray crystallography, molecular modeling, combinatorial chemistry, and powerful selection techniques, we designed and produced six combinatorial libraries of chimeric human rhinoviruses (HRV displaying the MPER epitopes corresponding to mAbs 2F5, 4E10, and/or Z13e1, connected to an immunogenic surface loop of HRV via linkers of varying lengths and sequences. Not all libraries led to viable chimeric viruses with the desired sequences, but the combinatorial approach allowed us to examine large numbers of MPER-displaying chimeras. Among the chimeras were five that elicited antibodies capable of significantly neutralizing HIV-1 pseudoviruses from at least three subtypes, in one case leading to neutralization of 10 pseudoviruses from all six subtypes tested. CONCLUSIONS: Optimization of these chimeras or closely related chimeras could conceivably lead to useful components of an effective AIDS vaccine. While the MPER of HIV may not be immunodominant in natural infection by HIV-1, its presence in a vaccine cocktail could provide critical breadth of protection.

  9. Dengue vaccine: hypotheses to understand CYD-TDV-induced protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a human pathogen with a large impact on public health. Although no vaccine against DENV is currently licensed, a recombinant vaccine - chimeric yellow fever virus-DENV tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) - has shown efficacy against symptomatic dengue disease in two recent Phase III clinical trials. Safety observations were also recently reported for these trials. In this Opinion article, we review the data from recent vaccine clinical trials and discuss the putative mechanisms behind the observed efficacy of the vaccine against different forms of the disease, focusing on the interactions between the infecting virus, pre-existing host immunity and vaccine-induced immune responses.

  10. Structural and functional insights into alphavirus polyprotein processing and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Gyehwa; Yost, Samantha A; Miller, Matthew T; Elrod, Elizabeth J; Grakoui, Arash; Marcotrigiano, Joseph

    2012-10-09

    Alphaviruses, a group of positive-sense RNA viruses, are globally distributed arboviruses capable of causing rash, arthritis, encephalitis, and death in humans. The viral replication machinery consists of four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4) produced as a single polyprotein. Processing of the polyprotein occurs in a highly regulated manner, with cleavage at the P2/3 junction influencing RNA template use during genome replication. Here, we report the structure of P23 in a precleavage form. The proteins form an extensive interface and nsP3 creates a ring structure that encircles nsP2. The P2/3 cleavage site is located at the base of a narrow cleft and is not readily accessible, suggesting a highly regulated cleavage. The nsP2 protease active site is over 40 Å away from the P2/3 cleavage site, supporting a trans cleavage mechanism. nsP3 contains a previously uncharacterized protein fold with a zinc-coordination site. Known mutations in nsP2 that result in formation of noncytopathic viruses or a temperature sensitive phenotype cluster at the nsP2/nsP3 interface. Structure-based mutations in nsP3 opposite the location of the nsP2 noncytopathic mutations prevent efficient cleavage of P23, affect RNA infectivity, and alter viral RNA production levels, highlighting the importance of the nsP2/nsP3 interaction in pathogenesis. A potential RNA-binding surface, spanning both nsP2 and nsP3, is proposed based on the location of ion-binding sites and adaptive mutations. These results offer unexpected insights into viral protein processing and pathogenesis that may be applicable to other polyprotein-encoding viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Dengue virus.

  11. A novel live-attenuated vaccine candidate for mayaro Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, William J; Hermance, Meghan E; Forrester, Naomi; Adams, A Paige; Langsjoen, Rose; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Alcorn, Maria D H; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Weaver, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Mayaro virus (MAYV) is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease.

  12. A novel live-attenuated vaccine candidate for mayaro Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Weise

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus (MAYV is an emerging, mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a dengue-like illness in many regions of South America, and which has the potential to urbanize. Because no specific treatment or vaccine is available for MAYV infection, we capitalized on an IRES-based approach to develop a live-attenuated MAYV vaccine candidate. Testing in infant, immunocompetent as well as interferon receptor-deficient mice demonstrated a high degree of attenuation, strong induction of neutralizing antibodies, and efficacy against lethal challenge. This vaccine strain was also unable to infect mosquito cells, a major safety feature for a live vaccine derived from a mosquito-borne virus. Further preclinical development of this vaccine candidate is warranted to protect against this important emerging disease.

  13. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelke J. Fros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus–host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly.

  14. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Julie M.; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A.; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Fong, Rachel H.; Kahle, Kristen M.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Fremont, Daved H.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphav

  15. Sindbis and Middelburg Old World Alphaviruses Associated with Neurologic Disease in Horses, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Stephanie; Human, Stacey; Williams, June; van Wilpe, Erna; Pretorius, Marthi; Swanepoel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Old World alphaviruses were identified in 52 of 623 horses with febrile or neurologic disease in South Africa. Five of 8 Sindbis virus infections were mild; 2 of 3 fatal cases involved co-infections. Of 44 Middelburg virus infections, 28 caused neurologic disease; 12 were fatal. Middelburg virus likely has zoonotic potential. PMID:26583836

  16. Functional dissection of the alphavirus capsid protease: sequence requirements for activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pützer Brigitte M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alphavirus capsid is multifunctional and plays a key role in the viral life cycle. The nucleocapsid domain is released by the self-cleavage activity of the serine protease domain within the capsid. All alphaviruses analyzed to date show this autocatalytic cleavage. Here we have analyzed the sequence requirements for the cleavage activity of Chikungunya virus capsid protease of genus alphavirus. Results Amongst alphaviruses, the C-terminal amino acid tryptophan (W261 is conserved and found to be important for the cleavage. Mutating tryptophan to alanine (W261A completely inactivated the protease. Other amino acids near W261 were not having any effect on the activity of this protease. However, serine protease inhibitor AEBSF did not inhibit the activity. Through error-prone PCR we found that isoleucine 227 is important for the effective activity. The loss of activity was analyzed further by molecular modelling and comparison of WT and mutant structures. It was found that lysine introduced at position 227 is spatially very close to the catalytic triad and may disrupt electrostatic interactions in the catalytic site and thus inactivate the enzyme. We are also examining other sequence requirements for this protease activity. Conclusions We analyzed various amino acid sequence requirements for the activity of ChikV capsid protease and found that amino acids outside the catalytic triads are important for the activity.

  17. Antiviral activity of human lactoferrin : Inhibition of alphavirus interaction with heparan sulfate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, Barry-Lee; Aneke, Onwuchekwa J.C.; Smit, Jolanda; Kimata, Koji; Bittman, Robert; Meijer, Dirk K.F.; Wilschut, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Human lactoferrin is a component of the non-specific immune system with distinct antiviral properties. We used alphaviruses, adapted to interaction with heparan sulfate (HS), as a tool to investigate the mechanism of lactoferrin's antiviral activity. Lactoferrin inhibited infection of BHK-21 cells b

  18. Adaptive changes in alphavirus mRNA translation allowed colonization of vertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventoso, Iván

    2012-09-01

    Members of the Alphavirus genus are arboviruses that alternate replication in mosquitoes and vertebrate hosts. In vertebrate cells, the alphavirus resists the activation of antiviral RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) by the presence of a prominent RNA structure (downstream loop [DLP]) located in viral 26S transcripts, which allows an eIF2-independent translation initiation of these mRNAs. This article shows that DLP structure is essential for replication of Sindbis virus (SINV) in vertebrate cell lines and animals but is dispensable for replication in insect cells, where no ortholog of the vertebrate PKR gene has been found. Sequence comparisons and structural RNA analysis revealed the evolutionary conservation of DLP in SINV and predicted the existence of equivalent DLP structures in many members of the Alphavirus genus. A mutant SINV lacking the DLP structure evolved in murine cells to recover a wild-type phenotype by creating an alternative structure in the RNA that restored the translational independence for eIF2. Genetic, phylogenetic, and biochemical data presented here support an evolutionary scenario for the natural history of alphaviruses, in which the acquisition of DLP structure in their mRNAs probably allowed the colonization of vertebrate host and the consequent geographic expansion of some of these viruses worldwide.

  19. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Julie M.; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A.; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Fong, Rachel H.; Kahle, Kristen M.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Fremont, Daved H.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphav

  20. Novel chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus-like particles harboring serotype O VP1 protect guinea pigs against challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Li, Zhiyong; Xie, Yinli; Qin, Xiaodong; Qi, Xingcai; Sun, Peng; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Youji; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is a highly contagious, acute viral disease of cloven-hoofed animal species causing severe economic losses worldwide. Among the seven serotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), serotype O is predominant, but its viral capsid is more acid sensitive than other serotypes, making it more difficult to produce empty serotype O VLPs in the low pH insect hemolymph. Therefore, a novel chimeric virus-like particle (VLP)-based candidate vaccine for serotype O FMDV was developed and characterized in the present study. The chimeric VLPs were composed of antigenic VP1 from serotype O and segments of viral capsid proteins from serotype Asia1. These VLPs elicited significantly higher FMDV-specific antibody levels in immunized mice than did the inactivated vaccine. Furthermore, the chimeric VLPs protected guinea pigs from FMDV challenge with an efficacy similar to that of the inactivated vaccine. These results suggest that chimeric VLPs have the potential for use in vaccines against serotype O FMDV infection.

  1. Enhancement of protein expression by alphavirus replicons by designing self-replicating subgenomic RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Atasheva, Svetlana; McAuley, Alexander J; Plante, Jessica A; Frolova, Elena I; Beasley, David W C; Frolov, Ilya

    2014-07-22

    Since the development of infectious cDNA clones of viral RNA genomes and the means of delivery of the in vitro-synthesized RNA into cells, alphaviruses have become an attractive system for expression of heterologous genetic information. Alphaviruses replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm, and their genetic material cannot recombine with cellular DNA. Alphavirus genome-based, self-replicating RNAs (replicons) are widely used vectors for expression of heterologous proteins. Their current design relies on replacement of structural genes, encoded by subgenomic RNAs (SG RNA), with heterologous sequences of interest. The SG RNA is transcribed from a promoter located in the alphavirus-specific RNA replication intermediate and is not further amplified. In this study, we have applied the accumulated knowledge of the mechanism of alphavirus replication and promoter structures, in particular, to increase the expression level of heterologous proteins from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-based replicons. During VEEV infection, replication enzymes are produced in excess to RNA replication intermediates, and a large fraction of them are not involved in RNA synthesis. The newly designed constructs encode SG RNAs, which are not only transcribed from the SG promoter, but are additionally amplified by the previously underused VEEV replication enzymes. These replicons produce SG RNAs and encoded proteins of interest 10- to 50-fold more efficiently than those using a traditional design. A modified replicon encoding West Nile virus (WNV) premembrane and envelope proteins efficiently produced subviral particles and, after a single immunization, elicited high titers of neutralizing antibodies, which protected mice from lethal challenge with WNV.

  2. Chimerism in health, transplantation and autoimmunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Marije; Kremer Hovinga, Idske Cornelia Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The term “chimerism” originates from Greek mythology and refers to the creature Chimaera, whose body was in front a lion, the back a serpent and the midsection a goat. In medicine, the term chimerism refers to an individual, organ or part consisting of tissues of diverse genetic constitution. Pregna

  3. Molecular epidemiology of salmonid alphavirus (SAV subtype 3 in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Mona D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreas disease (PD is a viral fish disease which in recent years has significantly affected Norwegian salmonid aquaculture. In Norway, the aetiological agent salmonid alphavirus (SAV has been found to be represented by the subtype 3 only. SAV subtype 3 has in previous analyses been found to show a lower genetic divergence than the subtypes found to cause PD in Ireland and Scotland. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nucleotide (nt and amino acid divergence and the phylogenetic relationship of 33 recent SAV subtype 3 sequences. The samples from which the sequences were obtained originated from both PD endemic and non-endemic regions in an attempt to investigate agent origin/spread. Multiple samples throughout the seawater production phase from several salmonid populations were included to investigate genetic variation during an outbreak. The analyses were mainly based on partial sequences from the E2 gene. For some samples, additional partial 6 K and nsP3 gene sequences were available. Results The nucleotide divergence for all gene fragments ranged from total identity (0.0% divergence to 0.45% (1103 nt fragment of E2, 1.11% (451 nt fragment of E2, 0.94% (6 K and 0.28% (nsP3. This low nucleotide divergence corresponded well to previous reports on SAV 3 sequences; however the observed divergence for the short E2 fragment was higher than that previously reported. When compared to SAVH20/03 (AY604235, amino acid substitutions were detected in all assessed gene fragments however the in vivo significance of these on for example disease outbreak mortality could not be concluded on. The phylogenetic tree based on the 451 nt E2 fragment showed that the sequences divided into two clusters with low genetic divergence, representing only a single SAV subtype. Conclusions The analysed sequences represented two clusters of a single SAV subtype; however some of the observed sequence divergence was higher than that previously reported

  4. Tetravalent neutralizing antibody response against four dengue serotypes by a single chimeric dengue envelope antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apt, Doris; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Brinkman, Alice; Semyonov, Andrey; Yang, Shumin; Skinner, Craig; Diehl, Lori; Lyons, Richard; Porter, Kevin; Punnonen, Juha

    2006-01-16

    We employed DNA shuffling and screening technologies to develop a single recombinant dengue envelope (E) antigen capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies against all four antigenically distinct dengue serotypes. By DNA shuffling of codon-optimized dengue 1-4 E genes, we created a panel of novel chimeric clones expressing C-terminal truncated E antigens that combined epitopes from all four dengue serotypes. DNA vaccines encoding these novel chimeras induced multivalent T cell and neutralizing antibody responses against all four dengue serotypes in mice. By contrast, a mixture of four unshuffled, parental DNA vaccines failed to produce tetravalent neutralizing antibodies in mice. The neutralizing antibody titers for some of these antigens could be further improved by extending the sequences to express full-length pre-membrane and envelope proteins. The chimeric antigens also protected mice against a lethal dengue-2 virus challenge. These data demonstrate that DNA shuffling and associated screening can lead to the selection of multi-epitope antigens against closely related dengue virus serotypes and suggest a broad utility for these technologies in optimizing vaccine antigens.

  5. Seroprevalence of Alphavirus Antibodies in a Cross-Sectional Study in Southwestern Tanzania Suggests Endemic Circulation of Chikungunya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobler, Gerhard; Saathoff, Elmar; Kroidl, Inge; Ntinginya, Nyanda Elias; Maboko, Leonard; Löscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Heinrich, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, Alphavirus infections and their most prominent member, chikungunya fever, a viral disease which first became apparent in Tanzania in 1953, have been very little investigated in regions without epidemic occurrence. Few data exist on burden of disease and socio-economic and environmental covariates disposing to infection. Methods A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was undertaken in 1,215 persons from Mbeya region, South-Western Tanzania, to determine the seroprevalence of anti-Alphavirus IgG antibodies, and to investigate associated risk factors. Results 18% of 1,215 samples were positive for Alphavirus IgG. Seropositivity was associated with participant age, low to intermediate elevation, flat terrain and with IgG positivity for Rift Valley fever, Flaviviridae, and rickettsiae of the spotted fever group. When comparing the geographical distribution of Alphavirus seropositivity to that of Rift Valley fever, it was obvious that Alphaviruses had spread more widely throughout the study area, while Rift Valley fever was concentrated along the shore of Lake Malawi. Conclusion Alphavirus infections may contribute significantly to the febrile disease burden in the study area, and are associated with several arthropod-borne infections. Their spread seems only limited by factors affecting mosquitoes, and seems less restricted than that of Rift Valley fever. PMID:25079964

  6. Seroprevalence of alphavirus antibodies in a cross-sectional study in southwestern Tanzania suggests endemic circulation of chikungunya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Weller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, Alphavirus infections and their most prominent member, chikungunya fever, a viral disease which first became apparent in Tanzania in 1953, have been very little investigated in regions without epidemic occurrence. Few data exist on burden of disease and socio-economic and environmental covariates disposing to infection. METHODS: A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was undertaken in 1,215 persons from Mbeya region, South-Western Tanzania, to determine the seroprevalence of anti-Alphavirus IgG antibodies, and to investigate associated risk factors. RESULTS: 18% of 1,215 samples were positive for Alphavirus IgG. Seropositivity was associated with participant age, low to intermediate elevation, flat terrain and with IgG positivity for Rift Valley fever, Flaviviridae, and rickettsiae of the spotted fever group. When comparing the geographical distribution of Alphavirus seropositivity to that of Rift Valley fever, it was obvious that Alphaviruses had spread more widely throughout the study area, while Rift Valley fever was concentrated along the shore of Lake Malawi. CONCLUSION: Alphavirus infections may contribute significantly to the febrile disease burden in the study area, and are associated with several arthropod-borne infections. Their spread seems only limited by factors affecting mosquitoes, and seems less restricted than that of Rift Valley fever.

  7. Vaccines and immunization strategies for dengue prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Jianying; Cheng, Gong

    2016-07-20

    Dengue is currently the most significant arboviral disease afflicting tropical and sub-tropical countries worldwide. Dengue vaccines, such as the multivalent attenuated, chimeric, DNA and inactivated vaccines, have been developed to prevent dengue infection in humans, and they function predominantly by stimulating immune responses against the dengue virus (DENV) envelope (E) and nonstructural-1 proteins (NS1). Of these vaccines, a live attenuated chimeric tetravalent DENV vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur has been licensed in several countries. However, this vaccine renders only partial protection against the DENV2 infection and is associated with an unexplained increased incidence of hospitalization for severe dengue disease among children younger than nine years old. In addition to the virus-based vaccines, several mosquito-based dengue immunization strategies have been developed to interrupt the vector competence and effectively reduce the number of infected mosquito vectors, thus controlling the transmission of DENV in nature. Here we summarize the recent progress in the development of dengue vaccines and novel immunization strategies and propose some prospective vaccine strategies for disease prevention in the future.

  8. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  9. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Maria L; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  10. Deinococcus Mn2+ -Peptide Complex: A Novel Approach to Alphavirus Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-05

    Island, NY) and transferred to nitrocellulose membranes (Amersham Biosciences, Pittsburgh, PA). Membranes were blocked with 6% non-fat dry milk ...MO) and 5% nonfat dry milk (Becton Dickinson and Co., Sparks, MD) (PBSTM) for 2 hours at 37oC. The plates were washed 3 times with PBST using the...polyclonal rabbit anti-VEEV antibody (kindly provided by Dr. Franziska B. Grieder, USUHS, Bethesda, MD) (1:200) or CHIKV immune ascititc fluid (1:100) (ATCC

  11. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal Pap smear - HPV vaccine; Vaccination - HPV vaccine ... and Gynecologists. Committee opinion No. 641: human papillomavirus vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2015;126(3):e38-e43. PMID: ...

  12. Modification of a salmonid alphavirus replicon vector for enhanced expression of heterologous antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein; Haugland, Øyvind

    2015-03-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV) replicon has been developed to express heterologous antigens but protein production was low to modest compared with terrestrial alphavirus replicons. In this study, we have compared several modifications to a SAV replicon construct and analysed their influence on foreign gene expression. We found that an insertion of a translational enhancer consisting of the N-terminal 102 nt of the capsid gene, together with a nucleotide sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A peptide, caused a significant increase in EGFP reporter gene expression. The importance of fusing a hammerhead (HH) ribozyme sequence at the 5' end of the viral genome was also demonstrated. In contrast, a hepatitis D virus ribozyme (HDV-RZ) sequence placed at the 3' end did not augment expression of inserted genes. Taken together, we have developed a platform for optimized antigen production, which can be applied for immunization of salmonid fish in the future.

  13. siRNA Screen Identifies Trafficking Host Factors that Modulate Alphavirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    pools targeting each of 140 human trafficking genes were 89 TR-16-094 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is...remodeling in alphavirus-infected cells might 492 be important for trafficking of E1/E2. To test this hypothesis, primary human astrocytes were 493...An arrayed library targeting 140 trafficking genes (Dharmacon Human ON-TARGETplus 620 siRNA Library - Membrane Trafficking - SMARTpool, G-105500-05

  14. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Geiss Brian J; Phillips Aaron T; Scott Jaclyn C; Cirimotich Chris M; Olson Ken E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus) that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus), a pr...

  15. RNA Replication and Membrane Modification Require the Same Functions of Alphavirus Nonstructural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Katri; Hellström, Kirsi; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2015-11-18

    The alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations known as spherules as their RNA replication sites. Here, we show that inactivation of any function (polymerase, helicase, protease, or membrane association) essential for RNA synthesis also prevents the generation of spherule structures in a Semliki Forest virus trans-replication system. Mutants capable of negative-strand synthesis, including those defective in RNA capping, gave rise to spherules. Recruitment of RNA to membranes in the absence of spherule formation was not detected.

  16. Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Most alphaviruses and many other arboviruses are mosquito-borne and exhibit a broad host range, infecting many different vertebrates including birds, rodents, equids, humans, and nonhuman primates. Consequently, they can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability of arboviruses to infect arthropods and vertebrates is usually essential for their maintenance in nature. However, several flaviviruses have recently been described that infect mosquitoes but not vertebra...

  17. Mouse x pig chimeric antibodies expressed in Baculovirus retain the same properties of their parent antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jar, Ana M; Osorio, Fernando A; López, Osvaldo J

    2009-01-01

    The development of hybridoma and recombinant DNA technologies has made it possible to use antibodies against cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases in humans. These advances in therapy, as well as immunoprophylaxis, could also make it possible to use these technologies in agricultural species of economic importance such as pigs. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an arterivirus causing very important economic losses to the industry. Passive transfer of antibodies obtained by biotechnology could be used in the future to complement or replace vaccination against this and other pig pathogens. To this end, we constructed and studied the properties of chimeric mouse x pig anti-PRRSV antibodies. We cloned the constant regions of gamma-1 and gamma-2 heavy chains and the lambda light chain of pig antibodies in frame with the variable regions of heavy and light chains of mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1, which has neutralizing activity against PRRSV. The coding regions for chimeric IgG1 and IgG2 were expressed in a baculovirus expression system. Both chimeric antibodies recognized PRRSV in ELISA as well as in a Western-blot format and, more importantly, were able to neutralize PRRSV in the same fashion as the parent mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1. In addition, we show that both pig IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies could bind complement component C1q, with IgG2 being more efficient than IgG1 in binding C1q. Expressing chimeric pig antibodies with protective capabilities offers a new alternative strategy for infectious disease control in domestic pigs.

  18. Interactions involved in pH protection of the alphavirus fusion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Whitney; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-12-15

    The alphavirus membrane protein E1 mediates low pH-triggered fusion of the viral and endosome membranes during virus entry. During virus biogenesis E1 associates as a heterodimer with the transmembrane protein p62. Late in the secretory pathway, cellular furin cleaves p62 to the mature E2 protein and a peripheral protein E3. E3 remains bound to E2 at low pH, stabilizing the heterodimer and thus protecting E1 from the acidic pH of the secretory pathway. Release of E3 at neutral pH then primes the virus for fusion during entry. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis and revertant analysis to define residues important for the interactions at the E3–E2 interface. Our data identified a key residue, E2 W235, which was required for E1 pH protection and alphavirus production. Our data also suggest additional residues on E3 and E2 that affect their interacting surfaces and thus influence the pH protection of E1 during alphavirus exit.

  19. Interactions involved in pH protection of the alphavirus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Whitney; Kielian, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    The alphavirus membrane protein E1 mediates low pH-triggered fusion of the viral and endosome membranes during virus entry. During virus biogenesis E1 associates as a heterodimer with the transmembrane protein p62. Late in the secretory pathway, cellular furin cleaves p62 to the mature E2 protein and a peripheral protein E3. E3 remains bound to E2 at low pH, stabilizing the heterodimer and thus protecting E1 from the acidic pH of the secretory pathway. Release of E3 at neutral pH then primes the virus for fusion during entry. Here we used site-directed mutagenesis and revertant analysis to define residues important for the interactions at the E3-E2 interface. Our data identified a key residue, E2 W235, which was required for E1 pH protection and alphavirus production. Our data also suggest additional residues on E3 and E2 that affect their interacting surfaces and thus influence the pH protection of E1 during alphavirus exit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of alphavirus-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Cruz-Oliveira, Christine; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2013-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Sindbis virus (SINV), Mayaro virus (MAYV), O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), and Barmah Forest virus (BFV), cause incapacitating and long lasting articular disease/myalgia. Outbreaks of viral arthritis and the global distribution of these diseases point to the emergence of arthritogenic alphaviruses as an important public health problem. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in alphavirus-induced arthritis, exploring the recent data obtained with in vitro systems and in vivo studies using animal models and samples from patients. The factors associated to the extension and persistence of symptoms are highlighted, focusing on (a) virus replication in target cells, and tissues, including macrophages and muscle cells; (b) the inflammatory and immune responses with recruitment and activation of macrophage, NK cells and T lymphocytes to the lesion focus and the increase of inflammatory mediators levels; and (c) the persistence of virus or viral products in joint and muscle tissues. We also discuss the importance of the establishment of novel animal models to test new molecular targets and to develop more efficient and selective drugs to treat these diseases.

  1. An antiviral role for antimicrobial peptides during the arthropod response to alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhijing; Kingsolver, Megan B; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Hardy, Richard W

    2013-04-01

    Alphaviruses establish a persistent infection in arthropod vectors which is essential for the effective transmission of the virus to vertebrate hosts. The development of persistence in insects is not well understood, although it is thought to involve the innate immune response. Using a transgenic fly system expressing a self-replicating viral RNA genome analog, we have previously demonstrated antiviral roles of the Drosophila Imd (immune deficiency) and Jak-STAT innate immunity pathways in response to alphavirus replication. In the present study, comparative microarray analysis of flies harboring an alphavirus replicon and control green fluorescent protein flies identified 95 SINrep-sensitive genes. Furthermore, a subset of these genes is regulated by Rel or STAT transcription factors of the Imd and Jak-STAT pathways, respectively. We identified two antimicrobial peptide genes, attC and dptB, which are SINrep sensitive and regulated by STAT and Rel, respectively. SINrep flies heterozygous for attC had an increased viral RNA level, while knocking down dptB in SINrep flies resulted in impaired development. When injected with whole virus, the double-stranded RNA knockdowns of either attC or dptB showed a significant increase in virus titers. Our data demonstrate an antiviral response involving the Imd and Jak-STAT mediated expression of dptB and attC.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Pathogenesis of Alphavirus-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iranaia Assunção-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV, Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, Sindbis virus (SINV, Mayaro virus (MAYV, O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV, and Barmah Forest virus (BFV, cause incapacitating and long lasting articular disease/myalgia. Outbreaks of viral arthritis and the global distribution of these diseases point to the emergence of arthritogenic alphaviruses as an important public health problem. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in alphavirus-induced arthritis, exploring the recent data obtained with in vitro systems and in vivo studies using animal models and samples from patients. The factors associated to the extension and persistence of symptoms are highlighted, focusing on (a virus replication in target cells, and tissues, including macrophages and muscle cells; (b the inflammatory and immune responses with recruitment and activation of macrophage, NK cells and T lymphocytes to the lesion focus and the increase of inflammatory mediators levels; and (c the persistence of virus or viral products in joint and muscle tissues. We also discuss the importance of the establishment of novel animal models to test new molecular targets and to develop more efficient and selective drugs to treat these diseases.

  3. Interleukin 10 modulation of pathogenic Th17 cells during fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcsar, Kirsten A; Baxter, Victoria K; Greene, Ivorlyne P; Griffin, Diane E

    2014-11-11

    Mosquito-borne alphaviruses are important causes of epidemic encephalomyelitis. Neuronal cell death during fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis is immune-mediated; however, the types of cells involved and their regulation have not been determined. We show that the virus-induced inflammatory response was accompanied by production of the regulatory cytokine IL-10, and in the absence of IL-10, paralytic disease occurred earlier and mice died faster. To determine the reason for accelerated disease in the absence of IL-10, immune responses in the CNS of IL-10(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were compared. There were no differences in the amounts of brain inflammation or peak virus replication; however, IL-10(-/-) animals had accelerated and increased infiltration of CD4(+)IL-17A(+) and CD4(+)IL-17A(+)IFNγ(+) cells compared with WT animals. Th17 cells infiltrating the brain demonstrated a pathogenic phenotype with the expression of the transcription factor, Tbet, and the production of granzyme B, IL-22, and GM-CSF, with greater production of GM-CSF in IL-10(-/-) mice. Therefore, in fatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis, pathogenic Th17 cells enter the CNS at the onset of neurologic disease and, in the absence of IL-10, appear earlier, develop into Th1/Th17 cells more often, and have greater production of GM-CSF. This study demonstrates a role for pathogenic Th17 cells in fatal viral encephalitis.

  4. Inhibition of alphavirus infection in cell culture and in mice with antisense morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paessler, Slobodan; Rijnbrand, Rene; Stein, David A; Ni, Haolin; Yun, Nadezhda E; Dziuba, Natallia; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Seregin, Alexey; Ma, Yinghong; Blouch, Robert; Iversen, Patrick L; Zacks, Michele A

    2008-07-05

    The genus Alphavirus contains members that threaten human health, both as natural pathogens and as potential biological weapons. Peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMO) enter cells readily and can inhibit viral replication through sequence-specific steric blockade of viral RNA. Sindbis virus (SINV) has low pathogenicity in humans and is regularly utilized as a model alphavirus. PPMO targeting the 5'-terminal and AUG translation start site regions of the SINV genome blocked the production of infectious SINV in tissue culture. PPMO designed against corresponding regions in Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) were likewise found to be effective in vitro against several strains of VEEV. Mice treated with PPMO before and after VEEV infection were completely protected from lethal outcome while mice receiving only post-infection PPMO treatment were partially protected. Levels of virus in tissue samples correlated with animal survival. Uninfected mice suffered no apparent ill-effects from PPMO treatment. Thus, PPMO appear promising as candidates for therapeutic development against alphaviruses.

  5. The adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicons is enhanced by incorporating the microbial molecule flagellin into the replicon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Ligands of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses and are considered as potent adjuvants. Combinations of ligands might act in synergy to induce stronger and broader immune responses compared to stand-alone ligands. Alphaviruses stimulate endosomal TLRs 3, 7 and 8 as well as the cytoplasmic PRR MDA-5, resulting in induction of a strong type I interferon (IFN response. Bacterial flagellin stimulates TLR5 and when delivered intracellularly the cytosolic PRR NLRC4, leading to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Both alphaviruses and flagellin have independently been shown to act as adjuvants for antigen-specific antibody responses. Here, we hypothesized that alphavirus and flagellin would act in synergy when combined. We therefore cloned the Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin (FliC gene into an alphavirus replicon and assessed its adjuvant activity on the antibody response against co-administered antigen. In mice immunized with recombinant alphavirus, antibody responses were greatly enhanced compared to soluble FliC or control alphavirus. Both IgG1 and IgG2a/c responses were increased, indicating an enhancement of both Th1 and Th2 type responses. The adjuvant activity of FliC-expressing alphavirus was diminished but not abolished in the absence of TLR5 or type I IFN signaling, suggesting the contribution of several signaling pathways and some synergistic and redundant activity of its components. Thus, we have created a recombinant adjuvant that stimulates multiple signaling pathways of innate immunity resulting in a strong and broad antibody response.

  6. Chimeric virus-like particles for the delivery of an inserted conserved influenza A-specific CTL epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Reiseger, Jessica; Turner, Stephen John; Boyd, Richard; Netter, Hans-Jürgen

    2009-02-01

    The small hepatitis B virus surface antigens (HBsAg-S) have the ability to self-assemble with host-derived lipids into empty non-infectious virus-like particles (VLPs). HBsAg-S VLPs are the sole component of the licensed hepatitis B vaccine, and they are a useful delivery platform for foreign epitopes. To develop VLPs capable of transporting foreign cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, HBsAg-S specific CTL epitopes at various sites were substituted with a conserved CTL epitope derived from the influenza matrix protein. Depending on the insertion site, the introduction of the MHC class I A2.1-restricted influenza epitope was compatible with the secretion competence of HBsAg-S indicating that chimeric VLPs were assembled. Immunizations of transgenic HHDII mice with chimeric VLPs induced anti-influenza CTL responses proving that the inserted foreign epitope can be correctly processed and cross-presented. Chimeric VLPs in the absence of adjuvant were able to induce memory T cell responses, which could be recalled by influenza virus infections in the mouse model system. The ability of chimeric HBsAg-S VLPs to induce anti-foreign CTL responses and also with the proven ability to induce humoral immune responses constitute a highly versatile platform for the delivery of selected multiple epitopes to target disease associated infectious agents.

  7. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine Safety Smallpox Vaccine Safety Common Concerns Adjuvants Autism CDC Statement: 2004 Pediatrics Paper on MMR and Autism Fainting (Syncope) Febrile ...

  8. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Mueller, Claudius [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Roberts, Brian [Leidos Health Life Sciences, 5202 Presidents Court, Suite 110, Frederick, MD (United States); Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Petricoin, Emanuel [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Narayanan, Aarthi, E-mail: anaraya1@gmu.edu [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  9. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menut, L.; Bessagnet, B.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Beekmann, M.; Colette, A.; Coll, I.; Curci, G.; Foret, G.; Hodzic, A.; Mailler, S.; Meleux, F.; Monge, J.-L.; Pison, I.; Turquety, S.; Valari, M.; Vautard, R.; Vivanco, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources), stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM). The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  10. Regional atmospheric composition modeling with CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, velocity and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative importance to the pollutants budgets can be quantified within a chemistry-transport models (CTM. The offline CTM CHIMERE model uses meteorological model fields and emissions fluxes and calculates deterministically their behavior in the troposphere. The calculated three-dimensional fields of chemical concentrations can be compared to measurements to analyze past periods or used to make air quality forecasts and CHIMERE has enabled a fine understanding of pollutants transport during numerous measurements campaigns. It is a part of the PREVAIR french national forecast platform, delivering pollutant concentrations up to three days in advance. The model also allows scenario studies and long term simulations for pollution trends. The modelling of photochemical air pollution has reached a good level of maturity, and the latest projects involving CHIMERE now aim at increasing our understanding of pollution impact on health at the urban scale or at the other end of the spectrum for long term air quality and climate change interlinkage studies, quantifying the emissions and transport of pollen, but also, at a larger scale, analyzing the transport of pollutants plumes emitted by volcanic eruptions and forest fires.

  11. Reverse genetics generation of chimeric infectious Junin/Lassa virus is dependent on interaction of homologous glycoprotein stable signal peptide and G2 cytoplasmic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albariño, César G; Bird, Brian H; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Dodd, Kimberly A; White, David M; Bergeron, Eric; Shrivastava-Ranjan, Punya; Nichol, Stuart T

    2011-01-01

    The Arenaviridae are a diverse and globally distributed collection of viruses that are maintained primarily by rodent reservoirs. Junin virus (JUNV) and Lassa virus (LASV) can both cause significant outbreaks of severe and often fatal human disease throughout their respective areas of endemicity. In an effort to improve upon the existing live attenuated JUNV Candid1 vaccine, we generated a genetically homogenous stock of this virus from cDNA copies of the virus S and L segments by using a reverse genetics system. Further, these cDNAs were used in combination with LASV cDNAs to successfully generate two recombinant Candid1 JUNV/LASV chimeric viruses (via envelope glycoprotein [GPC] exchange). It was found that while the GPC extravirion domains were readily exchangeable, homologous stable signal peptide (SSP) and G2 transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail domains were essential for correct GPC maturation and production of infectious chimeric viruses. The switching of the JUNV and LASV G1/G2 ectodomains within the Candid1 vaccine background did not alter the attenuated phenotype of the vaccine strain in a lethal mouse model. These recombinant chimeric viruses shed light on the fundamental requirements of arenavirus GPC maturation and may serve as a strategy for the development of bivalent JUNV and LASV vaccine candidates.

  12. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  13. Pregnancy, chimerism and lupus nephritis: a multi-centre study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovinga, I.C. Kremer; Koopmans, M.; Grootscholten, C.; Wal, A.M. van der; Bijl, M. van der; Derksen, R.H.; Voskuyl, A.E.; Heer, E. de; Bruijn, J.A.; Berden, J.H.M.; Bajema, I.M.

    2008-01-01

    Chimerism occurs twice as often in the kidneys of women with lupus nephritis as in normal kidneys and may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Pregnancy is considered the most important source of chimerism, but the exact relationship between pregnancy, the persistence of

  14. Pregnancy, chimerism and lupus nephritis : a multi-centre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovinga, I. C. L. Kremer; Koopmans, M.; Grootscholten, C.; van der Wal, A. M.; Bijl, M.; Derksen, R. H. W. M.; Voslcuyl, A. E.; de Heer, E.; Bruijn, J. A.; Berden, J. H. M.; Rajema, I. M.

    2008-01-01

    Chimerism occurs twice as often in the kidneys of women with lupus nephritis as in normal kidneys and may he involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Pregnancy is considered the most important source of chimerism, but the exact relationship between pregnancy, the persistence of

  15. Design and characterization of a chimeric multiepitope construct containing CfaB, heat-stable toxoid, CssA, CssB, and heat-labile toxin subunit B of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: a bioinformatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinalzadeh, Narges; Salmanian, Ali Hatef; Ahangari, Ghasem; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Amani, Jafar; Bathaie, S Zahra; Jafari, Mahyat

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhea in children in developing countries and travelers to these areas. Enterotoxins and colonization factors (CFs) are two key virulence factors in ETEC pathogenesis, and the heterogeneity of the CFs is the bottleneck in reaching an effective vaccine. In this study, a candidate subunit vaccine, which is composed of CfaB, CssA and CssB, structural subunits of colonization factor antigen I and CS6 CFs, labile toxin subunit B, and the binding subunit of heat-labile and heat-stable toxoid, was designed to provide broad-spectrum protection against ETEC. The different features of chimeric gene, its mRNA stability, and chimeric protein properties were analyzed by using bioinformatic tools. The optimized chimeric gene was chemically synthesized and expressed successfully in a prokaryotic host. The purified protein was used for assessment of bioinformatic data by experimental methods.

  16. Interspecies Chimerism with Mammalian Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Sakurai, Masahiro; Sugawara, Atsushi; Gil, Maria Antonia; Yamauchi, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Bogliotti, Yanina Soledad; Cuello, Cristina; Morales Valencia, Mariana; Okumura, Daiji; Luo, Jingping; Vilariño, Marcela; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Soto, Delia Alba; Martinez, Cristina A; Hishida, Tomoaki; Sánchez-Bautista, Sonia; Martinez-Martinez, M Llanos; Wang, Huili; Nohalez, Alicia; Aizawa, Emi; Martinez-Redondo, Paloma; Ocampo, Alejandro; Reddy, Pradeep; Roca, Jordi; Maga, Elizabeth A; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Berggren, W Travis; Nuñez Delicado, Estrella; Lajara, Jeronimo; Guillen, Isabel; Guillen, Pedro; Campistol, Josep M; Martinez, Emilio A; Ross, Pablo Juan; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-26

    Interspecies blastocyst complementation enables organ-specific enrichment of xenogenic pluripotent stem cell (PSC) derivatives. Here, we establish a versatile blastocyst complementation platform based on CRISPR-Cas9-mediated zygote genome editing and show enrichment of rat PSC-derivatives in several tissues of gene-edited organogenesis-disabled mice. Besides gaining insights into species evolution, embryogenesis, and human disease, interspecies blastocyst complementation might allow human organ generation in animals whose organ size, anatomy, and physiology are closer to humans. To date, however, whether human PSCs (hPSCs) can contribute to chimera formation in non-rodent species remains unknown. We systematically evaluate the chimeric competency of several types of hPSCs using a more diversified clade of mammals, the ungulates. We find that naïve hPSCs robustly engraft in both pig and cattle pre-implantation blastocysts but show limited contribution to post-implantation pig embryos. Instead, an intermediate hPSC type exhibits higher degree of chimerism and is able to generate differentiated progenies in post-implantation pig embryos.

  17. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  18. Chikungunya Virus Vaccines: Viral Vector-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsauer, Katrin; Tangy, Frédéric

    2016-12-15

    In 2013, a major chikungunya virus (CHIKV) epidemic reached the Americas. In the past 2 years, >1.7 million people have been infected. In light of the current epidemic, with millions of people in North and South America at risk, efforts to rapidly develop effective vaccines have increased. Here, we focus on CHIKV vaccines that use viral-vector technologies. This group of vaccine candidates shares an ability to potently induce humoral and cellular immune responses by use of highly attenuated and safe vaccine backbones. So far, well-described vectors such as modified vaccinia virus Ankara, complex adenovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, alphavirus-based chimeras, and measles vaccine Schwarz strain (MV/Schw) have been described as potential vaccines. We summarize here the recent data on these experimental vaccines, with a focus on the preclinical and clinical activities on the MV/Schw-based candidate, which is the first CHIKV-vectored vaccine that has completed a clinical trial. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins; analysis of protein processing, assembly and utility as vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham

    precursor enhances the yield of processed capsid proteins and their assembly into empty capsid particles within mammalian cells. Such particles can potentially form the basis of a vaccine but they may only have the same properties as the current inactivated vaccines. We have expressed the FMDV P1-2A alone...... or with FMDV 3Cpro using a “single cycle” alphavirus vector based on Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Cattle vaccinated with these rSFV-FMDV vectors alone, produced anti-FMDV antibodies but the immune response was insufficient to give protection against FMDV challenge. However, vaccination with these vectors primed...... a much stronger immune response against FMDV post-challenge. In subsequent experiments, cattle were sequentially vaccinated with a rSFV-FMDV followed by recombinant FMDV empty capsid particles, or vice versa, prior to challenge. Animals given a primary vaccination with the rSFV-FMDV vector...

  20. Current recommendations for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Lan; Chang, Jia-Kan; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2015-05-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus infection and an important cause of encephalitis in most of Asia and parts of the western Pacific. Most people infected with the JE virus (JEV) are asymptomatic or seemingly suffer from a nonspecific, flu-like illness; in others, JE can cause illness ranging from fever and headache to severe encephalitis. Although it can cause significant morbidity and mortality, JE is a vaccine-preventable disease, and vaccination programs have proven most effective in preventing and diminishing the burden of disease. Such JE vaccines have been available for decades with four types of JE vaccines-live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine, inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccine (JE-MB), inactivated Vero cell culture vaccine (JE-VC), and live attenuated chimeric vaccine (IMOJEV)-and are currently used in most countries. In some Asian countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, and Thailand, immunization programs have been conducted for children and so the ongoing incidence of JE has declined considerably in recent decades. Until quite recently, the primary JE vaccine in use internationally has been the JE-MB, which is now commonly replaced by cell culture-based vaccines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  1. Gene expression studies of host response to Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 experimental infections in Atlantic salmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus subtype-3 (SAV-3 infection in Atlantic salmon is exclusively found in Norway. The salmonid alphaviruses have been well characterized at the genome level but there is limited information about the host-pathogen interaction phenomena. This study was undertaken to characterize the replication and spread of SAV-3 in internal organs of experimentally infected Atlantic salmon and the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, suitability of a cohabitation challenge model for this virus was also examined. Groups of fish were infected by intramuscular injection (IM, cohabited (CO or kept uninfected in a separate tank. Samples of pancreas, kidney, spleen, heart and skeletal muscles were collected at 2, 4 and 8 weeks post infection (wpi. Pathological changes were assessed by histology concurrently with viral loads and mRNA expression of immune genes by real time RT-PCR. Pathological changes were only observed in the pancreas and heart (target organs of both IM and CO groups, with changes appearing first in the pancreas (2 wpi in the former. Lesions with increasing severity over time coincided with high viral loads despite significant induction of IFN-α, Mx and ISG15. IFN-γ and MHC-I were expressed in all tissues examined and their induction appeared in parallel with that of IL-10. Inflammatory genes TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-8 were only induced in the heart during pathology while T cell-related genes CD3ε, CD4, CD8, TCR-α and MHC-II were expressed in target organs at 8 wpi. These findings suggest that the onset of innate responses came too late to limit virus replication. Furthermore, SAV-3 infections in Atlantic salmon induce Th1/cytotoxic responses in common with other alphaviruses infecting higher vertebrates. Our findings demonstrate that SAV-3 can be transmitted via the water making it suitable for a cohabitation challenge model.

  2. Gene expression studies of host response to Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 experimental infections in Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Guo, Tz-Chun; Mutoloki, Stephen; Haugland, Oyvind; Evensen, Oystein

    2012-11-01

    Salmonid alphavirus subtype-3 (SAV-3) infection in Atlantic salmon is exclusively found in Norway. The salmonid alphaviruses have been well characterized at the genome level but there is limited information about the host-pathogen interaction phenomena. This study was undertaken to characterize the replication and spread of SAV-3 in internal organs of experimentally infected Atlantic salmon and the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, suitability of a cohabitation challenge model for this virus was also examined. Groups of fish were infected by intramuscular injection (IM), cohabited (CO) or kept uninfected in a separate tank. Samples of pancreas, kidney, spleen, heart and skeletal muscles were collected at 2, 4 and 8 weeks post infection (wpi). Pathological changes were assessed by histology concurrently with viral loads and mRNA expression of immune genes by real time RT-PCR. Pathological changes were only observed in the pancreas and heart (target organs) of both IM and CO groups, with changes appearing first in the pancreas (2 wpi) in the former. Lesions with increasing severity over time coincided with high viral loads despite significant induction of IFN-α, Mx and ISG15. IFN-γ and MHC-I were expressed in all tissues examined and their induction appeared in parallel with that of IL-10. Inflammatory genes TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-8 were only induced in the heart during pathology while T cell-related genes CD3ε, CD4, CD8, TCR-α and MHC-II were expressed in target organs at 8 wpi. These findings suggest that the onset of innate responses came too late to limit virus replication. Furthermore, SAV-3 infections in Atlantic salmon induce Th1/cytotoxic responses in common with other alphaviruses infecting higher vertebrates. Our findings demonstrate that SAV-3 can be transmitted via the water making it suitable for a cohabitation challenge model.

  3. Current status and future prospects of yellow fever vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew S; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever 17D vaccine is one of the oldest live-attenuated vaccines in current use that is recognized historically for its immunogenic and safe properties. These unique properties of 17D are presently exploited in rationally designed recombinant vaccines targeting not only flaviviral antigens but also other pathogens of public health concern. Several candidate vaccines based on 17D have advanced to human trials, and a chimeric recombinant Japanese encephalitis vaccine utilizing the 17D backbone has been licensed. The mechanism(s) of attenuation for 17D are poorly understood; however, recent insights from large in silico studies have indicated particular host genetic determinants contributing to the immune response to the vaccine, which presumably influences the considerable durability of protection, now in many cases considered to be lifelong. The very rare occurrence of severe adverse events for 17D is discussed, including a recent fatal case of vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease.

  4. Vaccines licensed and in clinical trials for the prevention of dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, J; Ebert, G; Pellegrini, M

    2017-02-14

    Dengue has become a major global public health threat with almost half of the world's population living in at-risk areas. Vaccination would likely represent an effective strategy for the management of dengue disease in endemic regions, however to date there is only one licensed preventative vaccine for dengue infection. The development of a vaccine against dengue virus (DENV) has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of protective immune responses against DENV. The most clinically advanced dengue vaccine is the chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccine (CYD) that employs the yellow fever virus 17D strain as the replication backbone (Chimerivax-DEN; CYD-TDV). This vaccine had an overall pooled protective efficacy of 65.6% but was substantially more effective against severe dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Several other vaccine approaches have been developed including live attenuated chimeric dengue vaccines (DENVax and LAV Delta 30), DEN protein subunit V180 vaccine (DEN1-80E) and DENV DNA vaccines. These vaccines have been shown to be immunogenic in animals and also safe and immunogenic in humans. However, these vaccines are yet to progress to phase III trials to determine their protective efficacy against dengue. This review will summarize the details of vaccines that have progressed to clinical trials in humans.

  5. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loy John Dustin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating, DIVA compatible, and can induce both humoral and cell mediated immune responses. This is the first experiment to demonstrate that Alphavirus-based replicon particles can be utilized in a standard prime/boost vaccination strategy in calves against a commercially significant bovine pathogen. Findings Replicon particles that express bovine viral diarrhea virus sub-genotype 1b E2 glycoprotein were generated and expression was confirmed in vitro using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific to E2. Vaccine made from particles was generated in Vero cells and administered to BVDV free calves in a prime/boost regimen at two dosage levels. Vaccination resulted in neutralizing antibody titers that cross-neutralized both type 1 and type 2 BVD genotypes following booster vaccination. Additionally, high dose vaccine administration demonstrated some protection from clinical disease and significantly reduced the degree of leukopenia caused by viral infection. Conclusions Replicon particle vaccines administered in a prime/boost regimen expressing BVDV E2 glycoprotein can induce cross-neutralizing titers, reduce leukopenia post challenge, and mitigate clinical disease in calves. This strategy holds promise for a safe and effective vaccine to BVDV.

  6. Construction and Immunogenicity Evaluation of Recombinant Influenza A Viruses Containing Chimeric Hemagglutinin Genes Derived from Genetically Divergent Influenza A H1N1 Subtype Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Kara; Jiang, Zhiyong; Zhu, Longchao; Lawson, Steven R; Langenhorst, Robert; Ransburgh, Russell; Brunick, Colin; Tracy, Miranda C; Hurtig, Heather R; Mabee, Leah M; Mingo, Mark; Li, Yanhua; Webby, Richard J; Huber, Victor C; Fang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause highly contagious diseases in a variety of hosts, including humans and pigs. To develop a vaccine that can be broadly effective against genetically divergent strains of the virus, in this study we employed molecular breeding (DNA shuffling) technology to create a panel of chimeric HA genes. Each chimeric HA gene contained genetic elements from parental swine influenza A viruses that had a history of zoonotic transmission, and also from a 2009 pandemic virus. Each parental virus represents a major phylogenetic clade of influenza A H1N1 viruses. Nine shuffled HA constructs were initially screened for immunogenicity in mice by DNA immunization, and one chimeric HA (HA-129) was expressed on both a A/Puerto Rico/8/34 backbone with mutations associated with a live, attenuated phenotype (PR8LAIV-129) and a A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 backbone (TX98-129). When delivered to mice, the PR8LAIV-129 induced antibodies against all four parental viruses, which was similar to the breadth of immunity observed when HA-129 was delivered as a DNA vaccine. This chimeric HA was then tested as a candidate vaccine in a nursery pig model, using inactivated TX98-129 virus as the backbone. The results demonstrate that pigs immunized with HA-129 developed antibodies against all four parental viruses, as well as additional primary swine H1N1 influenza virus field isolates. This study established a platform for creating novel genes of influenza viruses using a molecular breeding approach, which will have important applications toward future development of broadly protective influenza virus vaccines.

  7. chimeraviz: a tool for visualizing chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lågstad, Stian; Zhao, Sen; Hoff, Andreas M; Johannessen, Bjarne; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2017-09-15

    Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing have enabled more efficient detection of fusion transcripts, but the technology and associated software used for fusion detection from sequencing data often yield a high false discovery rate. Good prioritization of the results is important, and this can be helped by a visualization framework that automatically integrates RNA data with known genomic features. Here we present chimeraviz , a Bioconductor package that automates the creation of chimeric RNA visualizations. The package supports input from nine different fusion-finder tools: deFuse, EricScript, InFusion, JAFFA, FusionCatcher, FusionMap, PRADA, SOAPfuse and STAR-FUSION. chimeraviz is an R package available via Bioconductor ( https://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/chimeraviz.html ) under Artistic-2.0. Source code and support is available at GitHub ( https://github.com/stianlagstad/chimeraviz ). rolf.i.skotheim@rr-research.no. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Evaluation of the protective immunity of a novel subunit fusion vaccine in a murine model of systemic MRSA infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Fei Zuo

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common commensal organism in humans and a major cause of bacteremia and hospital acquired infection. Because of the spread of strains resistant to antibiotics, these infections are becoming more difficult to treat. Therefore, exploration of anti-staphylococcal vaccines is currently a high priority. Iron surface determinant B (IsdB is an iron-regulated cell wall-anchored surface protein of S. aureus. Alpha-toxin (Hla is a secreted cytolytic pore-forming toxin. Previous studies reported that immunization with IsdB or Hla protected animals against S. aureus infection. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we constructed chimeric vaccines based on IsdB and Hla. Immunization with the chimeric bivalent vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses. When the protective efficacy of the chimeric bivalent vaccine was compared to that of individual proteins in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection, the bivalent vaccine showed a stronger protective immune response than the individual proteins (IsdB or Hla. Based on the results presented here, the chimeric bivalent vaccine affords higher levels of protection against S. aureus and has potential as a more effective candidate vaccine.

  9. Evaluation of the protective immunity of a novel subunit fusion vaccine in a murine model of systemic MRSA infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Qian-Fei; Yang, Liu-Yang; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Dong-Shui; Dong, Yan-Dong; Cai, Chang-Zhi; Wu, Yi; Guo, Ying; Gu, Jiang; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common commensal organism in humans and a major cause of bacteremia and hospital acquired infection. Because of the spread of strains resistant to antibiotics, these infections are becoming more difficult to treat. Therefore, exploration of anti-staphylococcal vaccines is currently a high priority. Iron surface determinant B (IsdB) is an iron-regulated cell wall-anchored surface protein of S. aureus. Alpha-toxin (Hla) is a secreted cytolytic pore-forming toxin. Previous studies reported that immunization with IsdB or Hla protected animals against S. aureus infection. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we constructed chimeric vaccines based on IsdB and Hla. Immunization with the chimeric bivalent vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses. When the protective efficacy of the chimeric bivalent vaccine was compared to that of individual proteins in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection, the bivalent vaccine showed a stronger protective immune response than the individual proteins (IsdB or Hla). Based on the results presented here, the chimeric bivalent vaccine affords higher levels of protection against S. aureus and has potential as a more effective candidate vaccine.

  10. Dengue vaccine: local decisions, global consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gatell, Hugo; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia M; Santos-Preciado, José I; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio

    2016-11-01

    As new vaccines against diseases that are prevalent in low- and middle-income countries gradually become available, national health authorities are presented with new regulatory and policy challenges. The use of CYD-TDV - a chimeric tetravalent, live-attenuated dengue vaccine - was recently approved in five countries. Although promising for public health, this vaccine has only partial and heterogeneous efficacy and may have substantial adverse effects. In trials, children who were aged 2-5 years when first given CYD-TDV were seven times more likely to be hospitalized for dengue, in the third year post-vaccination, than their counterparts in the control group. As it has not been clarified whether this adverse effect is only a function of age or is determined by dengue serostatus, doubts have been cast over the long-term safety of this vaccine in seronegative individuals of any age. Any deployment of the vaccine, which should be very cautious and only considered after a rigorous evaluation of the vaccine's risk-benefit ratio in explicit national and subnational scenarios, needs to be followed by a long-term assessment of the vaccine's effects. Furthermore, any implementation of dengue vaccines must not weaken the political and financial support of preventive measures that can simultaneously limit the impacts of dengue and several other mosquito-borne pathogens.

  11. Expression of the zinc-finger antiviral protein inhibits alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Matthew J; Carroll, John-William N; Gao, Guangxia; Goff, Stephen P; Rice, Charles M; MacDonald, Margaret R

    2003-11-01

    The rat zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP) was recently identified as a host protein conferring resistance to retroviral infection. We analyzed ZAP's ability to inhibit viruses from other families and found that ZAP potently inhibits the replication of multiple members of the Alphavirus genus within the Togaviridae, including Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, Ross River virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. However, expression of ZAP did not induce a broad-spectrum antiviral state as some viruses, including vesicular stomatitis virus, poliovirus, yellow fever virus, and herpes simplex virus type 1, replicated to normal levels in ZAP-expressing cells. We determined that ZAP expression inhibits Sindbis virus replication after virus penetration and entry, but before the amplification of newly synthesized plus strand genomic RNA. Using a temperature-sensitive Sindbis virus mutant expressing luciferase, we further showed that translation of incoming viral RNA is blocked by ZAP expression. Elucidation of the antiviral mechanism by which ZAP inhibits Sindbis virus translation may lead to the development of agents with broad activity against alphaviruses.

  12. Effect of host cell lipid metabolism on alphavirus replication, virion morphogenesis, and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ching G; Coppens, Isabelle; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Pisciotta, John; Shulaev, Vladimir; Griffin, Diane E

    2008-10-21

    The alphavirus Sindbis virus (SINV) causes encephalomyelitis in mice. Lipid-containing membranes, particularly cholesterol and sphingomyelin (SM), play important roles in virus entry, RNA replication, glycoprotein transport, and budding. Levels of SM are regulated by sphingomyelinases (SMases). Acid SMase (ASMase) deficiency results in the lipid storage disease type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD-A), mimicked in mice by interruption of the ASMase gene. We previously demonstrated that ASMase-deficient mice are more susceptible to fatal SINV encephalomyelitis, with increased viral replication, spread, and neuronal death. To determine the mechanisms by which ASMase deficiency enhances SINV replication, we compared NPD-A fibroblasts (NPAF) to normal human fibroblasts (NHF). NPAF accumulated cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich late endosomes/lysosomes in the perinuclear region. SINV replication was faster and reached higher titer in NPAF than in NHF, and NPAF died more quickly. SINV RNA and protein synthesis was greater in NHF than in NPAF, but virions budding from NPAF were 26 times more infectious and were regular dense particles whereas virions from NHF were larger particles containing substantial amounts of CD63. Cellular regulation of alphavirus morphogenesis is a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of virus replication and spread.

  13. The 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus RNAs--Non-coding is not non-functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jennifer L; Chen, Rubing; Trobaugh, Derek W; Diamond, Michael S; Weaver, Scott C; Klimstra, William B; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-08-03

    The non-coding regions found at the 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus genomes regulate viral gene expression, replication, translation and virus-host interactions, which have significant implications for viral evolution, host range, and pathogenesis. The functions of these non-coding regions are mediated by a combination of linear sequence and structural elements. The capped 5' untranslated region (UTR) contains promoter elements, translational regulatory sequences that modulate dependence on cellular translation factors, and structures that help to avoid innate immune defenses. The polyadenylated 3' UTR contains highly conserved sequence elements for viral replication, binding sites for cellular miRNAs that determine cell tropism, host range, and pathogenesis, and conserved binding regions for a cellular protein that influences viral RNA stability. Nonetheless, there are additional conserved elements in non-coding regions of the virus (e.g., the repeated sequence elements in the 3' UTR) whose function remains obscure. Thus, key questions remain as to the function of these short yet influential untranslated segments of alphavirus RNAs.

  14. A luciferase-based screening method for inhibitors of alphavirus replication applied to nucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Barai, Vladimir; Azhayev, Alex; Lapinjoki, Seppo; Ahola, Tero

    2008-06-01

    Several members of the widespread alphavirus group are pathogenic, but no therapy is available to treat these RNA virus infections. We report here a quantitative assay to screen for inhibitors of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replication, and demonstrate the effects of 29 nucleosides on SFV and Sindbis virus replication. The anti-SFV assay developed is based on a SFV strain containing Renilla luciferase inserted after the nsP3 coding region, yielding a marker virus in which the luciferase is cleaved out during polyprotein processing. The reporter-gene assay was miniaturized, automated and validated, resulting in a Z' value of 0.52. [3H]uridine labeling for 1 h at the maximal viral RNA synthesis time point was used as a comparative method. Anti-SFV screening and counter-screening for cell viability led to the discovery of several new SFV inhibitors. 3'-amino-3'-deoxyadenosine was the most potent inhibitor in this set, with an IC50 value of 18 microM in the reporter-gene assay and 2 microM in RNA synthesis rate detection. Besides the 3'-substituted analogues, certain N6-substituted nucleosides had similar IC50 values for both SFV and Sindbis replication, suggesting the applicability of this methodology to alphaviruses in general.

  15. Optimization of novel indole-2-carboxamide inhibitors of neurotropic alphavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindac, Janice A; Barraza, Scott J; Dobry, Craig J; Xiang, Jianming; Blakely, Pennelope K; Irani, David N; Keep, Richard F; Miller, David J; Larsen, Scott D

    2013-11-27

    Neurotropic alphaviruses, which include western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) and Fort Morgan virus, are mosquito-borne pathogens that infect the central nervous system causing acute and potentially fatal encephalitis. We previously reported a novel series of indole-2-carboxamides as alphavirus replication inhibitors, one of which conferred protection against neuroadapted Sindbis virus infection in mice. We describe here further development of this series, resulting in 10-fold improvement in potency in a WEEV replicon assay and up to 40-fold increases in half-lives in mouse liver microsomes. Using a rhodamine123 uptake assay in MDR1-MDCKII cells, we were able to identify structural modifications that markedly reduce recognition by P-glycoprotein, the key efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier. In a preliminary mouse PK study, we were able to demonstrate that two new analogues could achieve higher and/or longer plasma drug exposures than our previous lead and that one compound achieved measurable drug levels in the brain.

  16. Discovery of berberine, abamectin and ivermectin as antivirals against chikungunya and other alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Finny S; Kaukinen, Pasi; Gläsker, Sabine; Bespalov, Maxim; Hanski, Leena; Wennerberg, Krister; Kümmerer, Beate M; Ahola, Tero

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic arbovirus of the Alphavirus genus, which has infected millions of people after its re-emergence in the last decade. In this study, a BHK cell line containing a stable CHIKV replicon with a luciferase reporter was used in a high-throughput platform to screen approximately 3000 compounds. Following initial validation, 25 compounds were chosen as primary hits for secondary validation with wild type and reporter CHIKV infection, which identified three promising compounds. Abamectin (EC50 = 1.5 μM) and ivermectin (EC50 = 0.6 μM) are fermentation products generated by a soil dwelling actinomycete, Streptomyces avermitilis, whereas berberine (EC50 = 1.8 μM) is a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid. They inhibited CHIKV replication in a dose-dependent manner and had broad antiviral activity against other alphaviruses--Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. Abamectin and ivermectin were also active against yellow fever virus, a flavivirus. These compounds caused reduced synthesis of CHIKV genomic and antigenomic viral RNA as well as downregulation of viral protein expression. Time of addition experiments also suggested that they act on the replication phase of the viral infectious cycle.

  17. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  18. Salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein E2 requires low temperature and E1 for virion formation and induction of protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.; Braaen, S.; Villoing, S.; Hodneland, K.; Geertsema, C.; Verhagen, L.; Frost, P.; Vlak, J.M.; Rimstad, E.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV; also known as Salmon pancreas disease virus; family Togaviridae) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, respectively, and poses a major burden to the aquaculture industry. SAV infection in vivo is temperature-restricted and

  19. Salmonid alphavirus glycoprotein E2 requires low temperature and E1 for virion formation and induction of protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, M.C.; Braaen, S.; Villoing, S.; Hodneland, K.; Geertsema, C.; Verhagen, L.; Frost, P.; Vlak, J.M.; Rimstad, E.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV; also known as Salmon pancreas disease virus; family Togaviridae) causes pancreas disease and sleeping disease in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, respectively, and poses a major burden to the aquaculture industry. SAV infection in vivo is temperature-restricted and progen

  20. The combined use of alphavirus replicons and pseudoinfectious particles for the discovery of antivirals derived from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delekta, Phillip C; Raveh, Avi; Larsen, Martha J; Schultz, Pamela J; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2015-06-01

    Alphaviruses are a prominent class of reemergent pathogens due to their globally expanding ranges, potential for lethality, and possible use as bioweapons. The absence of effective treatments for alphaviruses highlights the need for innovative strategies to identify antiviral agents. Primary screens that use noninfectious self-replicating RNAs, termed replicons, have been used to identify potential antiviral compounds for alphaviruses. Only inhibitors of viral genome replication, however, will be identified using replicons, which excludes many other druggable steps in the viral life cycle. To address this limitation, we developed a western equine encephalitis virus pseudoinfectious particle system that reproduces several crucial viral life cycle steps in addition to genome replication. We used this system to screen a library containing ~26,000 extracts derived from marine microbes, and we identified multiple bacterial strains that produce compounds with potential antiviral activity. We subsequently used pseudoinfectious particle and replicon assays in parallel to counterscreen candidate extracts, and followed antiviral activity during biochemical fractionation and purification to differentiate between inhibitors of viral entry and genome replication. This novel process led to the isolation of a known alphavirus entry inhibitor, bafilomycin, thereby validating the approach for the screening and identification of potential antiviral compounds.

  1. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  2. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions. PMID:27827980

  3. Nonstructural Protein 2 (nsP2) of Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV) Enhances Protective Immunity Mediated by a CHIKV Envelope Protein Expressing DNA Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Huihui; Ramanathan, Aarti A.; Kawalakar, Omkar; Sundaram, Senthil G.; Tingey, Colleen; Bian, Charoran B.; Muruganandam, Nagarajan; Vijayachari, Paluru; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.; Ugen, Kenneth E; Muthumani, Karuppiah

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an important emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus, indigenous to tropical Africa and Asia. It can cause epidemic fever and acute illness characterized by fever and arthralgias. The epidemic cycle of this infection is similar to dengue and urban yellow fever viral infections. The generation of an efficient vaccine against CHIKV is necessary to prevent and/or control the disease manifestations of the infection. In this report, we studied immune response against a CHIK...

  4. Rapid, non-invasive imaging of alphaviral brain infection: Reducing animal numbers and morbidity to identify efficacy of potential vaccines and antivirals

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Michael; Poussard, Allison; Taylor, Katherine; Seregin, Alexey; Smith, Jeanon; Peng, Bi-Hung; Walker, Aida; Linde, Jenna; Smith, Jennifer; Salazar, Milagros; Paessler, Slobodan

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of disease progression are key factors in testing novel vaccines and antivirals against encephalitic alphaviruses. Typical efficacy studies utilize a large number of animals and severe morbidity or mortality as an endpoint. New technologies provide a means to reduce and refine the animal use as proposed in Hume’s 3Rs (replacement, reduction, refinement) described by Russel and Burch. In vivo imaging systems (IVIS) and bioluminescent enzyme technologies accomp...

  5. Chimeric alignment by dynamic programming: Algorithm and biological uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsoulis, G.A.; Waterman, M.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A new nearest-neighbor method for detecting chimeric 16S rRNA artifacts generated during PCR amplification from mixed populations has been developed. The method uses dynamic programming to generate an optimal chimeric alignment, defined as the highest scoring alignment between a query and a concatenation of a 5{prime} and a 3{prime} segment from two separate entries from a database of related sequences. Chimeras are detected by studying the scores and form of the chimeric and global sequence alignments. The chimeric alignment method was found to be marginally more effective than k-tuple based nearest-neighbor methods in simulation studies, but its most effective use is in concert with k-tuple methods. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Human papillomavirus 16 L1-E7 chimeric virus like particles show prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in murine model of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandresh; Dey, Bindu; Wahiduzzaman, Mohammed; Singh, Neeta

    2012-08-03

    Cervical cancer is found to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with HPV16 being the most prevalent. An effective vaccine against HPV can thus, be instrumental in controlling cervical cancer. An ideal HPV vaccine should aim to generate both humoral immune response to prevent new infection as well as cell-mediated immunity to eliminate established infection. In this study, we have generated a potential preventive and therapeutic candidate vaccine against HPV16. We expressed and purified recombinant HPV16 L1(ΔN26)-E7(ΔC38) protein in E. coli which was assembled into chimeric virus like particles (CVLPs) in vitro. These CVLPs were able to induce neutralizing antibodies and trigger cell-mediated immune response, in murine model of cervical cancer, exhibiting antitumor efficacy. Hence, this study has aimed to provide a vaccine candidate possessing both, prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against HPV16 associated cervical cancer.

  7. Newcastle disease virus fusion protein is the major contributor to protective immunity of genotype-matched vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Wanasen, Nanchaya; Paldurai, Anandan; Xiao, Sa; Collins, Peter L; Samal, Siba K

    2013-01-01

    Virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) can cause devastating disease in chickens worldwide. Although the current vaccines are substantially effective, they do not completely prevent infection, virus shedding and disease. To produce genotype-matched vaccines, a full-genome reverse genetics system has been used to generate a recombinant virus in which the F protein cleavage site has been changed to that of avirulent vaccine virus. In the other strategy, the vaccines have been generated by replacing the F and HN genes of a commercial vaccine strain with those from a genotype-matched virus. However, the protective efficacy of a chimeric virus vaccine has not been directly compared with that of a full-genome virus vaccine developed by reverse genetics. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of genotype VII matched chimeric vaccines by generating three recombinant viruses based on avirulent LaSota (genotype II) strain in which the open reading frames (ORFs) encoding the F and HN proteins were replaced, individually or together, with those of the circulating and highly virulent Indonesian NDV strain Ban/010. The cleavage site of the Ban/010 F protein was mutated to the avirulent motif found in strain LaSota. In vitro growth characteristics and a pathogenicity test indicated that all three chimeric viruses retained the highly attenuated phenotype of the parental viruses. Immunization of chickens with chimeric and full-length genome VII vaccines followed by challenge with virulent Ban/010 or Texas GB (genotype II) virus demonstrated protection against clinical disease and death. However, only those chickens immunized with chimeric rLaSota expressing the F or F plus HN proteins of the Indonesian strain were efficiently protected against shedding of Ban/010 virus. Our findings showed that genotype-matched vaccines can provide protection to chickens by efficiently preventing spread of virus, primarily due to the F protein.

  8. Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Vaccines On This Page What is the immune system? ... cells recognized by the immune system? What are vaccines? What are cancer vaccines? How do cancer preventive ...

  9. Leptospirosis vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the recent advancements of recombinant outer membrane protein (OMP vaccines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS vaccines, inactivated vaccines, attenuated vaccines and DNA vaccines against leptospirosis are reviewed. A comparison of these vaccines may lead to development of new potential methods to combat leptospirosis and facilitate the leptospirosis vaccine research. Moreover, a vaccine ontology database was built for the scientists working on the leptospirosis vaccines as a starting tool.

  10. T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism in the marmoset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niblack, G.D.; Kateley, J.R.; Gengozian, N.

    1977-01-01

    Marmosets are natural blood chimeras, this condition resulting from the high frequency of fraternal twinning and the consistent development of placental vascular anastomoses between the two embryos. Identification of chimerism by sex-chromosome analysis of cultured blood lymphocytes provided a means of determining the proportion of chimerism among T and B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were enriched for T or B cells by filtration through a nylon column (yields >95% T-cells) or inactivation of T lymphocytes by treatment with a goat anti-marmoset thymocyte antiserum in the presence of complement (yields >95% B cells). Mitogenic stimulation of these separated, enriched cell populations yielded metaphase plates which could be scored for percentage male and female cells. Tests on five different blood chimeras showed the T- and B-lymphocyte chimerism to be the same. Stimulation of blood lymphocytes with cells from another species of marmoset in a mixed lymphocyte culture test revealed the chimeric T-cell response (i.e., host and co-twin cells) to be similar to that obtained with a mitogenic lectin. The demonstration of equivalent T- and B-cell chimerism in these animals suggests derivation of these cells from a common stem cell pool and the response of both T-cell populations to an antigenic stimulus in proportions similar to their percentage chimerism suggests complete immunologic tolerance exists in this species for co-twin histocompatibility antigens.

  11. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A, multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200× rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000. Among 186 peptides with >8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  12. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human mitochondrial proteomic analyses assuming abrupt switches between regular and swinger transcriptions, detect chimeric peptides, encoded by part regular, part swinger RNA. Contiguous regular- and swinger-encoded residues within single peptides are stronger evidence for translation of swinger RNA than previously detected, entirely swinger-encoded peptides: regular parts are positive controls matched with contiguous swinger parts, increasing confidence in results. Chimeric peptides are 200 × rarer than swinger peptides (3/100,000 versus 6/1000). Among 186 peptides with > 8 residues for each regular and swinger parts, regular parts of eleven chimeric peptides correspond to six among the thirteen recognized, mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Chimeric peptides matching partly regular proteins are rarer and less expressed than chimeric peptides matching non-coding sequences, suggesting targeted degradation of misfolded proteins. Present results strengthen hypotheses that the short mitogenome encodes far more proteins than hitherto assumed. Entirely swinger-encoded proteins could exist.

  13. Quantification of mixed chimerism allows early therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jóice Merzoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the curative option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome; however, it requires a long post-transplantation follow-up. A 53-year-old woman with a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome underwent related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in July 2006. Three months after transplantation, a comparative short tandem repeat analysis between donor and recipient revealed full chimerism, indicating complete, healthy bone marrow reconstitution. Three years and ten months after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the patient developed leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. Another short tandem repeat analysis was carried out which showed mixed chimerism (52.62%, indicating relapsed disease. A donor lymphocyte infusion was administered. The purpose of donor lymphocyte infusion is to induce a graft-versus-leukemia effect; in fact, this donor's lymphocyte infusion induced full chimerism. Successive short tandem repeat analyses were performed as part of post-transplantation follow-up, and in July 2010, one such analysis again showed mixed chimerism (64.25%. Based on this finding, a second donor lymphocyte infusion was administered, but failed to eradicate the disease. In September 2011, the patient presented with relapsed disease, and a second related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed. Subsequent short tandem repeat analyses revealed full chimerism, indicating complete bone marrow reconstitution. We conclude that quantitative detection of mixed chimerism is an important diagnostic tool that can guide early therapeutic intervention.

  14. Molecular evolutionary dynamics of Ross River virus and implications for vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anita; Lowry, Kym; Aaskov, John; Holmes, Edward C; Kitchen, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV) is a mosquito-borne member of the genus Alphavirus that causes epidemic polyarthritis in humans, costing the Australian health system at least US$10 million annually. Recent progress in RRV vaccine development requires accurate assessment of RRV genetic diversity and evolution, particularly as they may affect the utility of future vaccination. In this study, we provide novel RRV genome sequences and investigate the evolutionary dynamics of RRV from time-structured E2 gene datasets. Our analysis indicates that, although RRV evolves at a similar rate to other alphaviruses (mean evolutionary rate of approx. 8x10(-4) nucleotide substitutions per site year(-1)), the relative genetic diversity of RRV has been continuously low through time, possibly as a result of purifying selection imposed by replication in a wide range of natural host and vector species. Together, these findings suggest that vaccination against RRV is unlikely to result in the rapid antigenic evolution that could compromise the future efficacy of current RRV vaccines.

  15. Dengue vaccine: a valuable asset for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir Singh; S K, Shashikantha

    2014-01-01

    Dengue has emerged as one of the major global public health problems. The disease has broken out of its shell and has spread due to increased international travel and climatic changes. Globally, over 2.5 billion people accounting for >40% of the world's population are at risk from dengue. Since the 1940s, dengue vaccines have been under investigation. A live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV) has progressed to phase III efficacy studies. Dengue vaccine has been found to be a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality. Current dengue vaccine candidates aim to protect against the 4 dengue serotypes, but the recent discovery of a fifth serotype could complicate vaccine development. In recent years, an urgent need has been felt for a vaccine to prevent the morbidity and mortality from this disease in a cost-effective way.

  16. Live attenuated chimeric yellow fever dengue type 2 (ChimeriVax-DEN2) vaccine: Phase I clinical trial for safety and immunogenicity: effect of yellow fever pre-immunity in induction of cross neutralizing antibody responses to all 4 dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirakhoo, Farshad; Kitchener, Scott; Morrison, Dennis; Forrat, Remi; McCarthy, Karen; Nichols, Richard; Yoksan, Sutee; Duan, Xiaochu; Ermak, Thomas H; Kanesa-Thasan, Niranjan; Bedford, Philip; Lang, Jean; Quentin-Millet, Marie-Jose; Monath, Thomas P

    2006-01-01

    A randomized double-blind Phase I Trial was conducted to evaluate safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a yellow fever (YF)-dengue 2 (DEN2) chimera (ChimeriVax-DEN2) in comparison to that of YF vaccine (YF-VAX). Forty-two healthy YF naïve adults randomly received a single dose of either ChimeriVax-DEN2 (high dose, 5 log plaque forming units [PFU] or low dose, 3 log PFU) or YF-VAX by the subcutaneous route (SC). To determine the effect of YF preimmunity on the ChimeriVax-DEN2 vaccine, 14 subjects previously vaccinated against YF received a high dose of ChimeriVax-DEN2 as an open-label vaccine. Most adverse events were similar to YF-VAX and of mild to moderate intensity, with no serious side-effects. One hundred percent and 92.3% of YF naïve subjects inoculated with 5.0 and 3.0 log10 PFU of ChimeriVax-DEN2, respectively, seroconverted to wt DEN2 (strain 16681); 92% of subjects inoculated with YF-VAX seroconverted to YF 17D virus but none of YF naïve subjects inoculated with ChimeriVax-DEN2 seroconverted to YF 17D virus. Low seroconversion rates to heterologous DEN serotypes 1, 3 and 4 were observed in YF naïve subjects inoculated with either ChimeriVax-DEN2 or YF-VAX. In contrast, 100% of YF immune subjects inoculated with ChimeriVax-DEN2 seroconverted to all 4 DEN serotypes. Surprisingly, levels of neutralizing antibodies to DEN 1, 2 and 3 viruses in YF immune subjects persisted after 1 year. These data demonstrated that (1) the safety and immunogenicity profile of the ChimeriVax-DEN2 vaccine is consistent with that of YF-VAX, and (2) preimmunity to YF virus does not interfere with ChimeriVax-DEN2 immunization, but induces a long lasting and cross neutralizing antibody response to all 4 DEN serotypes. The latter observation can have practical implications toward development of a dengue vaccine.

  17. ADVERSE REACTIONS TO VACCINES AND WAYS OF ITS PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelyseyeva I. V

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The overview concerns allergic reaction on vaccines and possible ways of increasing safety of immunization on basis of use of local specific immunotherapies (SIT experience, particularly the sublingual route. The use of chemically altered allergens, allergoids; alternative routes of administration, particularly the sublingual route; use of novel adjuvants, such as CpG oligonucleotides and mycobacterial vaccines; other approaches, such as allergenic peptides, relevant T-cell epitope peptide immunotherapy; DNA vaccination, recombinant and engineered allergens, chimeric molecules and combined therapy are all approaches that have yielded positive results to increase safety of SIT and improve its efficacy.

  18. A novel dengue virus serotype 1 vaccine candidate based on Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiqiang; Li, Zhushi; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xianwu; Wu, Yonglin; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    To develop a potential dengue vaccine candidate, a full-length cDNA clone of a novel chimeric virus was constructed using recombinant DNA technology, with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone, with its premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes substituted by their counterparts from dengue virus type 1 (DENV1). The chimeric virus (JEV/DENV1) was successfully recovered from primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells by transfection with the in vitro transcription products of JEV/DENV1 cDNA and was identified by complete genome sequencing and immunofluorescent staining. No neuroinvasiveness of this chimeric virus was observed in mice inoculated by the subcutaneous route (s.c.) or by the intraperitoneal route (i.p.), while some neurovirulence was displayed in mice that were inoculated directly by the intracerebral route (i.c.). The chimeric virus was able to stimulate high-titer production of antibodies against DENV1 and provided protection against lethal challenge with neuroadapted dengue virus in mice. These results suggest that the chimeric virus is a promising dengue vaccine candidate.

  19. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact.

  20. A recombinant measles vaccine expressing chikungunya virus-like particles is strongly immunogenic and protects mice from lethal challenge with chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandler, Samantha; Ruffié, Claude; Combredet, Chantal; Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Najburg, Valérie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Habel, André; Tauber, Erich; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric

    2013-08-12

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, recently reemerged in the Indian Ocean, India and Southeast Asia, causing millions of cases of severe polyarthralgia. No specific treatment to prevent disease or vaccine to limit epidemics is currently available. Here we describe a recombinant live-attenuated measles vaccine (MV) expressing CHIKV virus-like particles comprising capsid and envelope structural proteins from the recent CHIKV strain La Reunion. Immunization of mice susceptible to measles virus induced high titers of CHIKV antibodies that neutralized several primary isolates. Specific cellular immune responses were also elicited. A single immunization with this vaccine candidate protected all mice from a lethal CHIKV challenge, and passive transfer of immune sera conferred protection to naïve mice. Measles vaccine is one of the safest and most effective human vaccines. A recombinant MV-CHIKV virus could make a safe and effective vaccine against chikungunya that deserves to be further tested in human trials.

  1. Generating chimeric zebrafish embryos by transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Hilary A; Carmany-Rampey, Amanda; Moens, Cecilia

    2009-07-17

    One of the most powerful tools used to gain insight into complex developmental processes is the analysis of chimeric embryos. A chimera is defined as an organism that contains cells from more than one animal; mosaics are one type of chimera in which cells from more than one genotype are mixed, usually wild-type and mutant. In the zebrafish, chimeras can be readily made by transplantation of cells from a donor embryo into a host embryo at the appropriate embryonic stage. Labeled donor cells are generated by injection of a lineage marker, such as a fluorescent dye, into the one-cell stage embryo. Labeled donor cells are removed from donor embryos and introduced into unlabeled host embryos using an oil-controlled glass pipette mounted on either a compound or dissecting microscope. Donor cells can in some cases be targeted to a specific region or tissue of the developing blastula or gastrula stage host embryo by choosing a transplantation site in the host embryo based on well-established fate maps.

  2. Dengue vaccine development: strategies and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Lakshmy; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Nair, Radhakrishnan R

    2015-03-01

    Infection with dengue virus may result in dengue fever or a more severe outcome, such as dengue hemorrhagic syndrome/shock. Dengue virus infection poses a threat to endemic regions for four reasons: the presence of four serotypes, each with the ability to cause a similar disease outcome, including fatality; difficulties related to vector control; the lack of specific treatment; and the nonavailability of a suitable vaccine. Vaccine development is considered challenging due to the severity of the disease observed in individuals who have acquired dengue-specific immunity, either passively or actively. Therefore, the presence of vaccine-induced immunity against a particular serotype may prime an individual to severe disease on exposure to dengue virus. Vaccine development strategies include live attenuated vaccines, chimeric, DNA-based, subunit, and inactivated vaccines. Each of the candidates is in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. Issues pertaining to selection pressures, viral interaction, and safety still need to be evaluated in order to induce a complete protective immune response against all four serotypes. This review highlights the various strategies that have been employed in vaccine development, and identifies the obstacles to producing a safe and effective vaccine.

  3. Evasion of the Innate Immune Response: the Old World Alphavirus nsP2 Protein Induces Rapid Degradation of Rpb1, a Catalytic Subunit of RNA Polymerase II

    OpenAIRE

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Kulemzin, Sergey V.; Frolova, Elena I.

    2012-01-01

    The Old World alphaviruses are emerging human pathogens with an ability to cause widespread epidemics. The latest epidemic of Chikungunya virus, from 2005 to 2007, affected over 40 countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The Old World alphaviruses are highly cytopathic and known to evade the cellular antiviral response by inducing global inhibition of transcription in vertebrate cells. This function was shown to be mediated by their nonstructural nsP2 protein; however, the detailed mechanism o...

  4. Myelin sheaths and autoimmune response induced by myelin proteins and alphaviruses. I. Physicochemical background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedzik, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Myelin proteins of the central and peripheral nervous system range from very hydrophilic to extremely hydrophobic proteins. Their biological function and involvement in various clinically defined neurological diseases are well documented. In this review the myelin proteins will be compared with proteins of alphaviruses with emphasis on Semliki Forest Virus (strain pSP6-SFV4), to elucidate better the multiple function and the potential role in several neurological diseases. The main purpose of this review is to assist neuroscientists, neurochemists, neurologists, and other interested scientists in developing a better understanding on the information relating to myelin proteins referred in autoimmune diseases. Therefore, this review is focused on simple physiochemical background of proteins and structural aspect, which may be involved in autoimmunity. It is very unusual that few different a.a. sequences (epitops) induce indeed the same autoimmune reaction.

  5. Persistence in darkness of virulent alphaviruses, Ebola virus, and Lassa virus deposited on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagripanti, Jose-Luis; Rom, Amanda M; Holland, Louis E

    2010-12-01

    Ebola, Lassa, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, and Sindbis viruses were dried onto solid surfaces, incubated for various time periods under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity, and quantitatively eluted from surfaces, and viral titers in the recovered samples were determined. The viral inactivation kinetics that were obtained indicated that viral resistance to natural inactivation in the dark follows (in decreasing order of stability) alphavirus > Lassa virus > Ebola virus. The findings reported in this study on the natural decay in the dark should assist in understanding the biophysical properties of enveloped RNA viruses outside the host and in estimating the persistence of viruses in the environment during epidemics or after an accidental or intentional release.

  6. The next generation recombinant human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates-beyond gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Anders E; Mason, Peter W

    2012-11-19

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects the majority of the global population and persists within the infected host for life; infection of healthy adults rarely leads to severe acute clinical symptoms. In contrast, HCMV is a leading infectious cause of congenital disease and a common cause of complications in transplant recipients. A vaccine to prevent HCMV disease in these populations is a widely recognized medical need. We review recent advances in our understanding of the candidate vaccine antigens and published clinical trial data for the four most recent HCMV vaccine candidates: a gB subunit adjuvanted with MF59, a DNA vaccine expressing gB and pp65, alphavirus replicon particles (VRPs) expressing gB and a pp65-IE1 fusion protein, and a pp65 peptide vaccine. The candidates are safe, although some adverse events were reported for an adjuvanted variant of the pp65 peptide vaccine. The gB/MF59 vaccine elicited strong humoral responses with limited durability. The gB/pp65 DNA vaccine elicited cellular immunity, and the pp65 peptide vaccine elicited modest cellular immunity, but only when formulated with an adjuvant. Only the VRP vaccine expressing gB and pp65-IE1 elicited both humoral and cellular immunity. The gB/MF59 vaccine showed a short-term 50% efficacy at preventing infection of seronegative women and significantly reduced viremia and need for antivirals in solid organ transplant recipients, and the gB/pp65 DNA vaccine showed signs of clinical benefit in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Importantly, the partial efficacy of the subunit and DNA vaccines is new evidence that both humoral and cellular immunity contribute to controlling HCMV-related disease. These data show the clinical feasibility of a recombinant HCMV vaccine. We discuss areas for potential improvements in the next generation of vaccine candidates.

  7. Subgenomic reporter RNA system for detection of alphavirus infection in mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jordan Steel

    Full Text Available Current methods for detecting real-time alphavirus (Family Togaviridae infection in mosquitoes require the use of recombinant viruses engineered to express a visibly detectable reporter protein. These altered viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, usually from a duplicated viral subgenomic reporter, are effective at marking infection but tend to be attenuated due to the modification of the genome. Additionally, field strains of viruses cannot be visualized using this approach unless infectious clones can be developed to insert a reporter protein. To circumvent these issues, we have developed an insect cell-based system for detecting wild-type sindbis virus infection that uses a virus inducible promoter to express a fluorescent reporter gene only upon active virus infection. We have developed an insect expression system that produces sindbis virus minigenomes containing a subgenomic promoter sequence, which produces a translatable RNA species only when infectious virus is present and providing viral replication proteins. This subgenomic reporter RNA system is able to detect wild-type Sindbis infection in cultured mosquito cells. The detection system is relatively species specific and only detects closely related viruses, but can detect low levels of alphavirus specific replication early during infection. A chikungunya virus detection system was also developed that specifically detects chikungunya virus infection. Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquito families were established that constitutively express the sindbis virus reporter RNA and were found to only express fluorescent proteins during virus infection. This virus inducible reporter system demonstrates a novel approach for detecting non-recombinant virus infection in mosquito cell culture and in live transgenic mosquitoes.

  8. Subgenomic reporter RNA system for detection of alphavirus infection in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, J Jordan; Franz, Alexander W E; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma; Olson, Ken E; Geiss, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for detecting real-time alphavirus (Family Togaviridae) infection in mosquitoes require the use of recombinant viruses engineered to express a visibly detectable reporter protein. These altered viruses expressing fluorescent proteins, usually from a duplicated viral subgenomic reporter, are effective at marking infection but tend to be attenuated due to the modification of the genome. Additionally, field strains of viruses cannot be visualized using this approach unless infectious clones can be developed to insert a reporter protein. To circumvent these issues, we have developed an insect cell-based system for detecting wild-type sindbis virus infection that uses a virus inducible promoter to express a fluorescent reporter gene only upon active virus infection. We have developed an insect expression system that produces sindbis virus minigenomes containing a subgenomic promoter sequence, which produces a translatable RNA species only when infectious virus is present and providing viral replication proteins. This subgenomic reporter RNA system is able to detect wild-type Sindbis infection in cultured mosquito cells. The detection system is relatively species specific and only detects closely related viruses, but can detect low levels of alphavirus specific replication early during infection. A chikungunya virus detection system was also developed that specifically detects chikungunya virus infection. Transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquito families were established that constitutively express the sindbis virus reporter RNA and were found to only express fluorescent proteins during virus infection. This virus inducible reporter system demonstrates a novel approach for detecting non-recombinant virus infection in mosquito cell culture and in live transgenic mosquitoes.

  9. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Stapleford, Kenneth A; Mongelli, Vanesa; Blanc, Hervé; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Saleh, Maria-Carla; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator) polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp) fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV), which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  10. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) muscle satellite cells are targets of salmonid alphavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacchesi, Stéphane; Jouvion, Grégory; Mérour, Emilie; Boukadiri, Abdelhak; Desdouits, Marion; Ozden, Simona; Huerre, Michel; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel; Brémont, Michel

    2016-01-08

    Sleeping disease in rainbow trout is characterized by an abnormal swimming behaviour of the fish which stay on their side at the bottom of the tanks. This sign is due to extensive necrosis and atrophy of red skeletal muscle induced by the sleeping disease virus (SDV), also called salmonid alphavirus 2. Infections of humans with arthritogenic alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are global causes of debilitating musculoskeletal diseases. The mechanisms by which the virus causes these pathologies are poorly understood due to the restrictive availability of animal models capable of reproducing the full spectrum of the disease. Nevertheless, it has been shown that CHIKV exhibits a particular tropism for muscle stem cells also known as satellite cells. Thus, SDV and its host constitute a relevant model to study in details the virus-induced muscle atrophy, the pathophysiological consequences of the infection of a particular cell-type in the skeletal muscle, and the regeneration of the muscle tissue in survivors together with the possible virus persistence. To study a putative SDV tropism for that particular cell type, we established an in vivo and ex vivo rainbow trout model of SDV-induced atrophy of the skeletal muscle. This experimental model allows reproducing the full panel of clinical signs observed during a natural infection since the transmission of the virus is arthropod-borne independent. The virus tropism in the muscle tissue was studied by immunohistochemistry together with the kinetics of the muscle atrophy, and the muscle regeneration post-infection was observed. In parallel, an ex vivo model of SDV infection of rainbow trout satellite cells was developed and virus replication and persistence in that particular cell type was followed up to 73 days post-infection. These results constitute the first observation of a specific SDV tropism for the muscle satellite cells.

  11. Alphavirus mutator variants present host-specific defects and attenuation in mammalian and insect models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Rozen-Gagnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arboviruses cycle through both vertebrates and invertebrates, which requires them to adapt to disparate hosts while maintaining genetic integrity during genome replication. To study the genetic mechanisms and determinants of these processes, we use chikungunya virus (CHIKV, a re-emerging human pathogen transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. We previously isolated a high fidelity (or antimutator polymerase variant, C483Y, which had decreased fitness in both mammalian and mosquito hosts, suggesting this residue may be a key molecular determinant. To further investigate effects of position 483 on RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp fidelity, we substituted every amino acid at this position. We isolated novel mutators with decreased replication fidelity and higher mutation frequencies, allowing us to examine the fitness of error-prone arbovirus variants. Although CHIKV mutators displayed no major replication defects in mammalian cell culture, they had reduced specific infectivity and were attenuated in vivo. Unexpectedly, mutator phenotypes were suppressed in mosquito cells and the variants exhibited significant defects in RNA synthesis. Consequently, these replication defects resulted in strong selection for reversion during infection of mosquitoes. Since residue 483 is conserved among alphaviruses, we examined the analogous mutations in Sindbis virus (SINV, which also reduced polymerase fidelity and generated replication defects in mosquito cells. However, replication defects were mosquito cell-specific and were not observed in Drosophila S2 cells, allowing us to evaluate the potential attenuation of mutators in insect models where pressure for reversion was absent. Indeed, the SINV mutator variant was attenuated in fruit flies. These findings confirm that residue 483 is a determinant regulating alphavirus polymerase fidelity and demonstrate proof of principle that arboviruses can be attenuated in mammalian and insect hosts by reducing fidelity.

  12. Chimeric severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S glycoprotein and influenza matrix 1 efficiently form virus-like particles (VLPs) that protect mice against challenge with SARS-CoV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye V.; Massare, Michael J.; Barnard, Dale L.; Kort, Thomas; Nathan, Margret; Wang, Lei; Smith, Gale

    2011-01-01

    SARS-CoV was the cause of the global pandemic in 2003 that infected over 8000 people in 8 months. Vaccines against SARS are still not available. We developed a novel method to produce high levels of a recombinant SARS virus-like particles (VLPs) vaccine containing the SARS spike (S) protein and the influenza M1 protein using the baculovirus insect cell expression system. These chimeric SARS VLPs have a similar size and morphology to the wild type SARS-CoV. We tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of purified chimeric SARS VLPs and full length SARS S protein vaccines in a mouse lethal challenge model. The SARS VLP vaccine, containing 0.8 μg of SARS S protein, completely protected mice from death when administered intramuscular (IM) or intranasal (IN) routes in the absence of an adjuvant. Likewise, the SARS VLP vaccine, containing 4 μg of S protein without adjuvant, reduced lung virus titer to below detectable level, protected mice from weight loss, and elicited a high level of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV. Sf9 cell-produced full length purified SARS S protein was also an effective vaccine against SARS-CoV but only when co-administered IM with aluminum hydroxide. SARS-CoV VLPs are highly immunogenic and induce neutralizing antibodies and provide protection against lethal challenge. Sf9 cell-based VLP vaccines are a potential tool to provide protection against novel pandemic agents. PMID:21762752

  13. A Schistosoma japonicum chimeric protein with a novel adjuvant induced a polarized Th1 immune response and protection against liver egg burdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiangyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schitosomiasis japonica is still a significant public health problem in China. A protective vaccine for human or animal use represents an important strategy for long-term control of this disease. Due to the complex life cycle of schistosomes, different vaccine design approaches may be necessary, including polyvalent subunit vaccines. In this study, we constructed four chimeric proteins (designated SjGP-1~4 via fusion of Sj26GST and four individual paramyosin fragments. We tested these four proteins as vaccine candidates, and investigated the effect of deviating immune response on protection roles in mice. Methods The immunogencity and protection efficacy of chimeric proteins were evaluated in mice. Next, the chimeric protein SjGP-3 was selected and formulated in various adjuvants, including CFA, ISA 206, IMS 1312 and ISA 70M. The titers of antigen-specific IgG, IgE and IgG subclass were measured. The effect of adjuvant on cytokine production and percentages of CD3+CD8-IFN-γ+ cells and CD3+CD8-IL-4+ cells were analyzed at different time points. Worm burdens and liver egg counts in different adjuvant groups were counted to evaluate the protection efficacy against cercarial challenge. Results Immunization of mice with chimeric proteins provided various levels of protection. Among the four proteins, SjGP-3 induced the highest level of protection, and showed enhanced protective efficacy compared with its individual component Sj26GST. Because of this, SjGP-3 was further formulated in various adjuvants to investigate the effect of adjuvant on immune deviation. The results revealed that SjGP-3 formulated in veterinary adjuvant ISA 70M induced a lasting polarized Th1 immune response, whereas the other adjuvants, including CFA, ISA 206 and IMS 1312, generated a moderate mixed Th1/Th2 response after immunization but all except for IMS 1312 shifted to Th2 response after onset of eggs. More importantly, the SjGP-3/70M formulation induced

  14. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Zaid, Ali; Goh, Lucas Y. H.; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Hall, Roy A.; Merits, Andres

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS) in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS) attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT)-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design. PMID:28223458

  15. Mutation of the N-Terminal Region of Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Taylor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito-transmitted chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthritogenic alphavirus of the Togaviridae family responsible for frequent outbreaks of arthritic disease in humans. Capsid protein, a structural protein encoded by the CHIKV RNA genome, is able to translocate to the host cell nucleolus. In encephalitic alphaviruses, nuclear translocation induces host cell transcriptional shutoff; however, the role of capsid protein nucleolar localization in arthritogenic alphaviruses remains unclear. Using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-tagged expression constructs and CHIKV infectious clones, we describe a nucleolar localization sequence (NoLS in the N-terminal region of capsid protein, previously uncharacterized in CHIKV. Mutation of the NoLS by site-directed mutagenesis reduced efficiency of nuclear import of CHIKV capsid protein. In the virus, mutation of the capsid protein NoLS (CHIKV-NoLS attenuated replication in mammalian and mosquito cells, producing a small-plaque phenotype. Attenuation of CHIKV-NoLS is likely due to disruption of the viral replication cycle downstream of viral RNA synthesis. In mice, CHIKV-NoLS infection caused no disease signs compared to wild-type CHIKV (CHIKV-WT-infected mice; lack of disease signs correlated with significantly reduced viremia and decreased expression of proinflammatory factors. Mice immunized with CHIKV-NoLS, challenged with CHIKV-WT at 30 days postimmunization, develop no disease signs and no detectable viremia. Serum from CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice is able to efficiently neutralize CHIKV infection in vitro. Additionally, CHIKV-NoLS-immunized mice challenged with the related alphavirus Ross River virus showed reduced early and peak viremia postchallenge, indicating a cross-protective effect. The high degree of CHIKV-NoLS attenuation may improve CHIKV antiviral and rational vaccine design.

  16. Genetic diversity of Venezuelan alphaviruses and circulation of a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus subtype IAB strain during an interepizootic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Gladys; Garzaro, Domingo J; Barrios, Miguel; Auguste, Albert J; Weaver, Scott C; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-07-01

    Several species of alphaviruses have been previously described in the Americas, some of which are associated with encephalitis and others are associated with arthralgia. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) are endemic to Venezuela, with the former being responsible for major outbreaks of severe and often fatal disease in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of Venezuelan alphaviruses isolated during two decades (1973-1999) of surveillance in northern Venezuela. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the circulation of a VEEV subtype IAB strain 8 years after the last reported outbreak. Thirteen strains within two subclades of South American lineage III of EEEV were also found in Venezuela. Considerable genetic variability was observed among Venezuelan Una virus strains, which were widely distributed among the clades. The first Venezuelan Mayaro sequence was also characterized.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Venezuelan Alphaviruses and Circulation of a Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Subtype IAB Strain During an Interepizootic Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Gladys; Garzaro, Domingo J.; Barrios, Miguel; Auguste, Albert J.; Weaver, Scott C.; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    Several species of alphaviruses have been previously described in the Americas, some of which are associated with encephalitis and others are associated with arthralgia. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) are endemic to Venezuela, with the former being responsible for major outbreaks of severe and often fatal disease in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of Venezuelan alphaviruses isolated during two decades (1973–1999) of surveillance in northern Venezuela. Phylogenetic analysis indicated the circulation of a VEEV subtype IAB strain 8 years after the last reported outbreak. Thirteen strains within two subclades of South American lineage III of EEEV were also found in Venezuela. Considerable genetic variability was observed among Venezuelan Una virus strains, which were widely distributed among the clades. The first Venezuelan Mayaro sequence was also characterized. PMID:25940191

  18. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  19. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...... either by parthenogenetic activation (PA) or handmade cloning (HMC). Results showed that the developmental competence of chimeric embryos, evaluated based on their blastocyst rate and total cell number per blastocyst, was increased when two whole 2-cell stage embryos (PA or HMC) were aggregated....... In comparison, when two blastomeres were aggregated, the developmental competence of the chimeric embryos decreased if the blastomeres were either from PA or from HMC embryos, but not if they were from different sources, i.e. one PA and one HMC blastomere. To evaluate the cell contribution in embryo formation...

  20. Dengue vaccines: Challenges, development, current status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with dengue virus (DENV is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. The clinical spectrum of dengue, caused by any of the four serotypes of DENV, ranges from mild self-limiting dengue fever to severe dengue, in the form dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS. Increased rates of hospitalization due to severe dengue, during outbreaks, result in massive economic losses and strained health services. In the absence of specific antiviral therapy, control of transmission of DENV by vector management is the sole method available for decreasing dengue-associated morbidity. Since vector control strategies alone have not been able to satisfactorily achieve reduction in viral transmission, the implementation of a safe, efficacious and cost-effective dengue vaccine as a supplementary measure is a high public health priority. However, the unique and complex immunopathology of dengue has complicated vaccine development. Dengue vaccines have also been challenged by critical issues like lack of animal models for the disease and absence of suitable markers of protective immunity. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under phases of development, including live attenuated virus vaccines, live chimeric virus vaccines, inactivated virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, DNA vaccines and viral-vectored vaccines. Although some vaccine candidates have progressed from animal trials to phase II and III in humans, a number of issues regarding implementation of dengue vaccine in countries like India still need to be addressed. Despite the current limitations, collaborative effects of regulatory bodies like World Health Organization with vaccine manufacturers and policy makers, to facilitate vaccine development and standardize field trials can make a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine a reality in near future.

  1. Dengue vaccines: challenges, development, current status and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A; Dar, L

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. The clinical spectrum of dengue, caused by any of the four serotypes of DENV, ranges from mild self-limiting dengue fever to severe dengue, in the form dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Increased rates of hospitalization due to severe dengue, during outbreaks, result in massive economic losses and strained health services. In the absence of specific antiviral therapy, control of transmission of DENV by vector management is the sole method available for decreasing dengue-associated morbidity. Since vector control strategies alone have not been able to satisfactorily achieve reduction in viral transmission, the implementation of a safe, efficacious and cost-effective dengue vaccine as a supplementary measure is a high public health priority. However, the unique and complex immunopathology of dengue has complicated vaccine development. Dengue vaccines have also been challenged by critical issues like lack of animal models for the disease and absence of suitable markers of protective immunity. Although no licensed dengue vaccine is yet available, several vaccine candidates are under phases of development, including live attenuated virus vaccines, live chimeric virus vaccines, inactivated virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, DNA vaccines and viral-vectored vaccines. Although some vaccine candidates have progressed from animal trials to phase II and III in humans, a number of issues regarding implementation of dengue vaccine in countries like India still need to be addressed. Despite the current limitations, collaborative effects of regulatory bodies like World Health Organization with vaccine manufacturers and policy makers, to facilitate vaccine development and standardize field trials can make a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine a reality in near future.

  2. Salmonid alphavirus replicon is functional in fish, mammalian and insect cells and in vivo in shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christel M; Pemula, Anand Kumar; Braaen, Stine; Sankaran, Krishnan; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-11-19

    The Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is the etiological agent of pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Sleeping disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). SAV differs from alphaviruses infecting terrestrial animals in that it infects salmonid fish at low temperatures and does not use an arthropod vector for transmission. In this study we have shown that a SAVbased replicon could express proteins when driven by the subgenomic promoter in vitro in cells from fish, mammals and insects, as well as in vivo in shrimps (Litopanaeus vannamei). The SAV-replicon was found to be functional at temperatures ranging from 4 to 37°C. Protein expression was slow and moderate compared to that reported from terrestrial alphavirus replicons or from vectors where protein expression was under control of the immediate early CMV-promoter. No cytopathic effect was visually observable in cells transfected with SAV-replicon vectors. Double stranded RNA was present for several days after transfection of the SAV-replicon in fish cell lines and its presence was indicated also in shrimp. The combination of prolonged dsRNA production, low toxicity, and wide temperature range for expression, may potentially be advantageous for the use of the SAV replicon to induce immune responses in aquaculture of fish and shrimp.

  3. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Kazlauskas, Arunas; Martikainen, Miika; Hinkkanen, Ari; Ahola, Tero; Saksela, Kalle

    2011-11-01

    Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains of amphiphysin-1 and -2. Nsp3 proteins of Semliki Forest (SFV), Sindbis (SINV), and Chikungunya viruses all showed avid and SH3-dependent binding to amphiphysins. Upon alphavirus infection the intracellular distribution of amphiphysin was dramatically altered and colocalized with nsP3. Mutations in nsP3 disrupting the amphiphysin SH3 binding motif as well as RNAi-mediated silencing of amphiphysin-2 expression resulted in impaired viral RNA replication in HeLa cells infected with SINV or SFV. Infection of Balb/c mice with SFV carrying an SH3 binding-defective nsP3 was associated with significantly decreased mortality. These data establish SH3 domain-mediated binding of nsP3 with amphiphysin as an important host cell interaction promoting alphavirus replication.

  4. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Neuvonen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homology 3 (SH3 domains of amphiphysin-1 and -2. Nsp3 proteins of Semliki Forest (SFV, Sindbis (SINV, and Chikungunya viruses all showed avid and SH3-dependent binding to amphiphysins. Upon alphavirus infection the intracellular distribution of amphiphysin was dramatically altered and colocalized with nsP3. Mutations in nsP3 disrupting the amphiphysin SH3 binding motif as well as RNAi-mediated silencing of amphiphysin-2 expression resulted in impaired viral RNA replication in HeLa cells infected with SINV or SFV. Infection of Balb/c mice with SFV carrying an SH3 binding-defective nsP3 was associated with significantly decreased mortality. These data establish SH3 domain-mediated binding of nsP3 with amphiphysin as an important host cell interaction promoting alphavirus replication.

  5. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3 genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimstad Espen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus (SAV causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE. Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  6. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3) genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Marius; Villoing, Stephane; Rimstad, Espen; Nylund, Are

    2009-10-27

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6). Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR) of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE). Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  7. 肉毒中毒症疫苗的研究现状%Current Status of Research on Botulism Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭国瑞; 彭小兵; 李旭妮; 杜吉革; 蒋玉文

    2016-01-01

    用于预防肉毒中毒症的传统疫苗有灭活菌苗和类毒素疫苗,近年来对于重组亚单位疫苗、重组嵌合体疫苗和 DNA 疫苗等研究成为热点,文章着重对这些新型疫苗的发展现状进行了综述,以期为相关研究提供借鉴。%The traditional vaccines included inactivated vaccines and toxoid vaccines,and the new types of vaccines included recombinant subunit vaccines,recombinant chimeric vaccines and DNA vaccines.In order to provide reference for development on botulism vaccines,this paper reviewed the current status of research on these vaccines which had been developed rapidly in recent years.

  8. Prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy by mucosal treatment with multi-allergen-chimers in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Hoflehner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery or Dau c 1 (carrot, termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy. METHODOLOGY: BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization. RESULTS: Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy.

  9. Expression and purification of chimeric peptide comprising EGFR B-cell epitope and measles virus fusion protein T-cell epitope in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meizhi; Zhao, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Chen, Zhange; Li, Huangjin

    2013-03-01

    Chimeric peptide MVF-EGFR(237-267), comprising a B-cell epitope from the dimerization interface of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and a promiscuous T-cell epitope from measles virus fusion protein (MVF), is a promising candidate antigen peptide for therapeutic vaccine. To establish a high-efficiency preparation process of this small peptide, the coding sequence was cloned into pET-21b and pET-32a respectively, to be expressed alone or in the form of fusion protein with thioredoxin (Trx) and His(6)-tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The chimeric peptide failed to be expressed alone, but over-expressed in the fusion form, which presented as soluble protein and took up more than 30% of total proteins of host cells. The fusion protein was seriously degraded during the cell disruption, in which endogenous metalloproteinase played a key role. Degradation of target peptide was inhibited by combined application of EDTA in the cell disruption buffer and a step of Source 30Q anion exchange chromatography (AEC) before metal-chelating chromatography (MCAC) for purifying His(6)-tagged fusion protein. The chimeric peptide was recovered from the purified fusion protein by enterokinase digestion at a yield of 3.0 mg/L bacteria culture with a purity of more than 95%. Immunogenicity analysis showed that the recombinant chimeric peptide was able to arouse more than 1×10(4) titers of specific antibody in BALB/c mice. Present work laid a solid foundation for the development of therapeutic peptide vaccine targeting EGFR dimerization and provided a convenient and low-cost preparation method for small peptides.

  10. Chikungunya, Influenza, Nipah, and Semliki Forest Chimeric Viruses with Vesicular Stomatitis Virus: Actions in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, Anthony N; Mao, Guochao; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Rose, John K; Davis, John N

    2017-03-15

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based chimeric viruses that include genes from other viruses show promise as vaccines and oncolytic viruses. However, the critical safety concern is the neurotropic nature conveyed by the VSV glycoprotein. VSVs that include the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene, even in most recombinant attenuated strains, can still show substantial adverse or lethal actions in the brain. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses in the brain, including those in which glycoprotein genes from Nipah, chikungunya (CHIKV), and influenza H5N1 viruses were substituted for the VSV glycoprotein gene. We also test a virus-like vesicle (VLV) in which the VSV glycoprotein gene is expressed from a replicon encoding the nonstructural proteins of Semliki Forest virus. VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV were all safe in the adult mouse brain, as were VSVΔG viruses expressing either the Nipah F or G glycoprotein. In contrast, a complementing pair of VSVΔG viruses expressing Nipah G and F glycoproteins were lethal within the brain within a surprisingly short time frame of 2 days. Intranasal inoculation in postnatal day 14 mice with VSVΔG-CHIKV or VLV evoked no adverse response, whereas VSVΔG-H5N1 by this route was lethal in most mice. A key immune mechanism underlying the safety of VSVΔG-CHIKV, VSVΔG-H5N1, and VLV in the adult brain was the type I interferon response; all three viruses were lethal in the brains of adult mice lacking the interferon receptor, suggesting that the viruses can infect and replicate and spread in brain cells if not blocked by interferon-stimulated genes within the brain.IMPORTANCE Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) shows considerable promise both as a vaccine vector and as an oncolytic virus. The greatest limitation of VSV is that it is highly neurotropic and can be lethal within the brain. The neurotropism can be mostly attributed to the VSV G glycoprotein. Here, we test 4 chimeric viruses of VSV with glycoprotein genes from Nipah

  11. 78 FR 43219 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Live Attenuated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... means for prevention of dengue infection and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) by immunization with... Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a Common 30 Nucleotide Deletion in the 3'-UTR of Dengue Types 1, 2... et al., ``Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating Dengue Viruses and Chimeric Dengue...

  12. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalsgaard, K.; Uttenthal, A.; Jones, T.D.; Xu, F.; Merrywater, A.; Hamilton, W.D.O.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Kamstrup, S.; Lomonos, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucleoti

  13. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalsgaard, K.; Uttenthal, A.; Jones, T.D.; Xu, F.; Merrywater, A.; Hamilton, W.D.O.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Kamstrup, S.; Lomonos, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucleoti

  14. Envelope Determinants of Equine Lentiviral Vaccine Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Cook, Sheila J.; Chong, Liu; Horohov, David; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Lentiviral envelope (Env) antigenic variation and associated immune evasion present major obstacles to vaccine development. The concept that Env is a critical determinant for vaccine efficacy is well accepted, however defined correlates of protection associated with Env variation have yet to be determined. We reported an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine study that directly examined the effect of lentiviral Env sequence variation on vaccine efficacy. The study identified a significant, inverse, linear correlation between vaccine efficacy and increasing divergence of the challenge virus Env gp90 protein compared to the vaccine virus gp90. The report demonstrated approximately 100% protection of immunized ponies from disease after challenge by virus with a homologous gp90 (EV0), and roughly 40% protection against challenge by virus (EV13) with a gp90 13% divergent from the vaccine strain. In the current study we examine whether the protection observed when challenging with the EV0 strain could be conferred to animals via chimeric challenge viruses between the EV0 and EV13 strains, allowing for mapping of protection to specific Env sequences. Viruses containing the EV13 proviral backbone and selected domains of the EV0 gp90 were constructed and in vitro and in vivo infectivity examined. Vaccine efficacy studies indicated that homology between the vaccine strain gp90 and the N-terminus of the challenge strain gp90 was capable of inducing immunity that resulted in significantly lower levels of post-challenge virus and significantly delayed the onset of disease. However, a homologous N-terminal region alone inserted in the EV13 backbone could not impart the 100% protection observed with the EV0 strain. Data presented here denote the complicated and potentially contradictory relationship between in vitro virulence and in vivo pathogenicity. The study highlights the importance of structural conformation for immunogens and emphasizes the need for

  15. Envelope determinants of equine lentiviral vaccine protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi K Craigo

    Full Text Available Lentiviral envelope (Env antigenic variation and associated immune evasion present major obstacles to vaccine development. The concept that Env is a critical determinant for vaccine efficacy is well accepted, however defined correlates of protection associated with Env variation have yet to be determined. We reported an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV vaccine study that directly examined the effect of lentiviral Env sequence variation on vaccine efficacy. The study identified a significant, inverse, linear correlation between vaccine efficacy and increasing divergence of the challenge virus Env gp90 protein compared to the vaccine virus gp90. The report demonstrated approximately 100% protection of immunized ponies from disease after challenge by virus with a homologous gp90 (EV0, and roughly 40% protection against challenge by virus (EV13 with a gp90 13% divergent from the vaccine strain. In the current study we examine whether the protection observed when challenging with the EV0 strain could be conferred to animals via chimeric challenge viruses between the EV0 and EV13 strains, allowing for mapping of protection to specific Env sequences. Viruses containing the EV13 proviral backbone and selected domains of the EV0 gp90 were constructed and in vitro and in vivo infectivity examined. Vaccine efficacy studies indicated that homology between the vaccine strain gp90 and the N-terminus of the challenge strain gp90 was capable of inducing immunity that resulted in significantly lower levels of post-challenge virus and significantly delayed the onset of disease. However, a homologous N-terminal region alone inserted in the EV13 backbone could not impart the 100% protection observed with the EV0 strain. Data presented here denote the complicated and potentially contradictory relationship between in vitro virulence and in vivo pathogenicity. The study highlights the importance of structural conformation for immunogens and emphasizes

  16. The isolation of the ectodomain of the alphavirus E1 protein as a soluble hemagglutinin and its crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengler, G; Wengler, G; Rey, F A

    1999-05-10

    Alphaviruses are isometric enveloped viruses approximately 70 nm in diameter. The viral surface contains 80 glycoprotein spikes arranged in a T = 4 lattice. Each of these spikes consists of three heterodimers of the viral membrane proteins E1 (approximately 49 kDa) and E2 (approximately 51 kDa). Cryoelectron microscopic analyses have shown that the spikes form a protein shell on the viral surface. We have made an attempt to isolate biologically active protein fragments from this surface and to grow crystals from such fragments. To this end membrane proteins were extracted with Nonidet-P40 from the Semliki Forest alphavirus and the proteins were separated from detergent by centrifugation. A protein complex containing the E1 and E2 molecules in quantitative yield was obtained by this procedure. This complex has the following properties: It sediments at approximately 30S, it chromatographs with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 580,000 Da during gel filtration, it cannot be dissociated by either nonionic detergents or 6 M urea, and at acid pH it is a highly active hemagglutinin. The data indicate that this 30S hemagglutinin complex, which has not been hitherto described for alphaviruses, may represent a variant form of the protein lattice present on the alphavirus surface. Cleavage of this complex by subtilisin selectively removes carboxy-terminal sequences from the E1 and E2 proteins, which contain the cytoplasmic and transmembrane segments of the proteins and a small part of their ectodomain. The remaining ectodomains are called E1DeltaS and E2DeltaS. This proteolysis also leads to dissociation of the 30S complex. The cleavage products accumulate in the form of a heterodimer of the E1DeltaS and E2DeltaS proteins. Treatment of the heterodimer with PNGase F leads to rapid removal of carbohydrate from the E2DeltaS protein and a dissociation of the complex into the constituent molecules, which can be separated by chromatography. The finding that the

  17. Rabies Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high risk of exposure to rabies, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, rabies laboratory workers, spelunkers, and rabies biologics production workers should be offered rabies vaccine. The vaccine should also be considered for: (1) ...

  18. Envelope lipid-packing as a critical factor for the biological activity and stability of alphavirus particles isolated from mammalian and mosquito cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ivanildo P; Carvalho, Carlos A M; Ferreira, Davis F; Weissmüller, Gilberto; Rocha, Gustavo M; Silva, Jerson L; Gomes, Andre M O

    2011-01-21

    Alphaviruses are enveloped arboviruses. The viral envelope is derived from the host cell and is positioned between two icosahedral protein shells (T = 4). Because the viral envelope contains glycoproteins involved in cell recognition and entry, the integrity of the envelope is critical for the success of the early events of infection. Differing levels of cholesterol in different hosts leads to the production of alphaviruses with distinct levels of this sterol loaded in the envelope. Using Mayaro virus, a New World alphavirus, we investigated the role of cholesterol on the envelope of alphavirus particles assembled in either mammalian or mosquito cells. Our results show that although quite different in their cholesterol content, Mayaro virus particles obtained from both cells share a similar high level of lateral organization in their envelopes. This organization, as well as viral stability and infectivity, is severely compromised when cholesterol is depleted from the envelope of virus particles isolated from mammalian cells, but virus particles isolated from mosquito cells are relatively unaffected by cholesterol depletion. We suggest that it is not cholesterol itself, but rather the organization of the viral envelope, that is critical for the biological activity of alphaviruses.

  19. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Flipse

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  20. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  1. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  2. Chimera: construction of chimeric sequences for phylogenetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunissen, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Chimera allows the construction of chimeric protein or nucleic acid sequence files by concatenating sequences from two or more sequence files in PHYLIP formats. It allows the user to interactively select genes and species from the input files. The concatenated result is stored to one single output

  3. Developmental competence of porcine chimeric embryos produced by aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Juan; Jakobsen, Jannik E.; Xiong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the developmental competence and blastomere allocation of porcine chimeric embryos formed by micro-well aggregation. Chimeras were created by aggregating either two blastomeres originating from 2-cell embryos or two whole embryos, where embryos were produced...

  4. Blood chimerism in dizygotic monochorionic twins during five years observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Haedersdal, Sofie

    2017-01-01

    and again at five years. We found an increase in the proportion of allogeneic cells from 63% to 89% in one twin, and a similar increase in autologous cells in the other twin from 57% to 84%. A paradigm for stem cell therapy could be modelled on this case: induction of tolerance and chimerism by antenatal...

  5. Edible vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Artnzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vaccines were the result of trial and error research until molecular biology and genetic engineering made possible the creation of of many new and improved vaccines. New vaccines need to be inexpensive, easily administered, and capable of being stored and transported without refrigeration; without these characteristics, developing countries find it difficult to adopt vaccination as the central strategy for preventing their most devastating diseases. The authors describe a promising approach t...

  6. Periodontal vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjan Malhotra; Anoop Kapoor; Vishakha Grover; Aaswin Kaur Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Vaccine is the name applied generally to a substance of the nature of dead or attenuated living infectious material introduced into the body with the object of increasing its power to resist or get rid of a disease. Vaccines are generally prophylactic, i.e. they ameliorate the effects of future infection. One such vaccine considered here is the "Periodontal vaccine". Till date, no preventive modality exists for periodontal disease and treatment rendered is palliative. Thus, availability of pe...

  7. HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HPV Vaccine KidsHealth > For Teens > HPV Vaccine Print A A A What's in this article? ... 11 or 12 through age 21 If needed, kids can get the vaccine starting at age 9. continue How Does the ...

  8. Structural Differences Observed in Arboviruses of the Alphavirus and Flavivirus Genera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod borne viruses have developed a complex life cycle adapted to alternate between insect and vertebrate hosts. These arthropod-borne viruses belong mainly to the families Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, and Bunyaviridae. This group of viruses contains many pathogens that cause febrile, hemorrhagic, and encephalitic disease or arthritic symptoms which can be persistent. It has been appreciated for many years that these viruses were evolutionarily adapted to function in the highly divergent cellular environments of both insect and mammalian phyla. These viruses are hybrid in nature, containing viral-encoded RNA and proteins which are glycosylated by the host and encapsulate viral nucleocapsids in the context of a host-derived membrane. From a structural perspective, these virus particles are macromolecular machines adapted in design to assemble into a packaging and delivery system for the virus genome and, only when associated with the conditions appropriate for a productive infection, to disassemble and deliver the RNA cargo. It was initially assumed that the structures of the virus from both hosts were equivalent. New evidence that alphaviruses and flaviviruses can exist in more than one conformation postenvelopment will be discussed in this review. The data are limited but should refocus the field of structural biology on the metastable nature of these viruses.

  9. Salmonid alphavirus infection causes skin dysbiosis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) post-smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kristin M.; Patel, Sonal; Robinson, Aaron J.; Bu, Lijing; Jarungsriapisit, Jiraporn; Moore, Lindsey J.; Salinas, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Interactions among host, microbiota and viral pathogens are complex and poorly understood. The goal of the present study is to assess the changes in the skin microbial community of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in response to experimental infection with salmonid alphavirus (SAV). The salmon skin microbial community was determined using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing in five different experimental groups: control, 7 days after infection with low-dose SAV, 14 days after infection with low-dose SAV, 7 days after infection with high-dose SAV, and 14 days after infection with high-dose SAV. Both infection treatment and time after infection were strong predictors of the skin microbial community composition. Skin samples from SAV3 infected fish showed an unbalanced microbiota characterized by a decreased abundance of Proteobacteria such as Oleispira sp. and increased abundances of opportunistic taxa including Flavobacteriaceae, Streptococcaceae and Tenacibaculum sp. These results demonstrate that viral infections can result in skin dysbiosis likely rendering the host more susceptible to secondary bacterial infections. PMID:28264056

  10. Pathogenesis of experimental salmonid alphavirus infection in vivo: an ultrastructural insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Tharangani K; Ferguson, Hugh W; Weidmann, Manfred W; Bron, James E; Thompson, Kimberly D; Adams, Alexandra; Muir, Katherine F; Richards, Randolph H

    2016-01-08

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is an enveloped, single-stranded, positive sense RNA virus belonging to the family Togaviridae. It causes economically devastating disease in cultured salmonids. The characteristic features of SAV infection include severe histopathological changes in the heart, pancreas and skeletal muscles of diseased fish. Although the presence of virus has been reported in a wider range of tissues, the mechanisms responsible for viral tissue tropism and for lesion development during the disease are not clearly described or understood. Previously, we have described membrane-dependent morphogenesis of SAV and associated apoptosis-mediated cell death in vitro. The aims of the present study were to explore ultrastructural changes associated with SAV infection in vivo. Cytolytic changes were observed in heart, but not in gill and head-kidney of virus-infected fish, although they still exhibited signs of SAV morphogenesis. Ultrastructural changes associated with virus replication were also noted in leukocytes in the head kidney of virus-infected fish. These results further describe the presence of degenerative lesions in the heart as expected, but not in the gills and in the kidney.

  11. Polypeptide synthesis in alphavirus-infected Aedes albopictus cells during the establishment of persistent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M A; Boulton, R W; Raghow, R S; Dalgarno, L

    1980-01-01

    Polypeptide synthesis was examined in mosquito cells during the establishment of a persistent infection with two alphaviruses, Ross River virus (RRV) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and in vertebrate cells cytopathically-infected with the same viruses. In Aedes albopictus cell, RRV reached peak titres at 34--48 hours p.i. At 12 hours 85 per cent of cells assayed as infected by infective centre assay; by 48 hours when persistence was established, virus production was reduced and less than 5 per cent of cells assayed as infected. There was no shut-down of host polypeptide synthesis during infection. Viral polypeptide synthesis was maximal between 10 and 24 hours p.i. The major viral polypeptides labelled were nucleocapsid protein and envelope protein(s). The precursor polypeptide p95 which was prominent in infected BHK cells was not detected in mosquito cells. Similar results were obtained on SFV infection. During the establishment of persistence there was a coordinate decline in the synthesis of RRV polypeptides, reaching undetectable levels by 72 hours p.i. Subculturing persitently-infected cells led to a small increase in viral polypeptide synthesis and virus titre. In contrast, during RRV growth in BHK celos host protein synthesis was severly inhibited and by 9--11 hours p.i. virus-specific polypeptide synthesis represented more than 90 per cent of total protein synthetic activity.

  12. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF A HUMAN-MOUSE CHIMERIC ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BLADDER CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白银; 王琰; 周丽君; 俞莉章

    2001-01-01

    To construct and express a human-mouse chimeric antibody against human bladder cancer. Method: The variable region genes of anti-human bladder cancer monoclonal antibody BDI-1 were cloned by RT-PCR. A human-mouse chimeric antibody expression vector was constructed and transfected into CHO cells. The chimeric antibody against bladder cancer was expressed and characterized. Result: Eukaryotic expression vector of the chimeric antibody against human bladder carcinoma was successfully constructed, and was expressed in eukaryotic cells; the expressed chimeric antibody ch-BDI showed same specificity as its parent McAb against human bladder cancer cells. Conclusion: The constructed chimeric antibody was expressed successfully in eukaryotic cells, and the chimeric antibody had desired affinity against human bladder cancer cells.

  13. A novel system for the launch of alphavirus RNA synthesis reveals a role for the Imd pathway in arthropod antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthi Avadhanula

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are RNA viruses transmitted between vertebrate hosts by arthropod vectors, primarily mosquitoes. How arthropods counteract alphaviruses or viruses per se is not very well understood. Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying innate immunity against bacterial and fungal infections. In this study we report the use of a novel system to analyze replication of Sindbis virus (type species of the alphavirus genus RNA following expression of a Sindbis virus replicon RNA from the fly genome. We demonstrate deficits in the immune deficiency (Imd pathway enhance viral replication while mutations in the Toll pathway fail to affect replication. Similar results were observed with intrathoracic injections of whole virus and confirmed in cultured mosquito cells. These findings show that the Imd pathway mediates an antiviral response to Sindbis virus replication. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an antiviral role for the Imd pathway in insects.

  14. DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  15. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine, without a prior appointment. The vaccine can be reimbursed directly by Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the Medical Service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor. Medical Service

  16. Periodontal vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine is the name applied generally to a substance of the nature of dead or attenuated living infectious material introduced into the body with the object of increasing its power to resist or get rid of a disease. Vaccines are generally prophylactic, i.e. they ameliorate the effects of future infection. One such vaccine considered here is the "Periodontal vaccine". Till date, no preventive modality exists for periodontal disease and treatment rendered is palliative. Thus, availability of periodontal vaccine would not only prevent and modulate periodontal disease, but also enhance the quality of life of people for whom periodontal treatment cannot be easily obtained. The aim of the research should be development of a multispecies vaccine targeting the four prime periodontal pathogens, viz. Porphyromonas gingivalis, T. forsythus, T. denticola and A. comitans. Success is still elusive in case of periodontal vaccine due to the complex etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  17. Advances in human papilloma virus vaccines: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Tomar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and third leading cause of cancer death. Approximately 500,000 women worldwide develop new cases of cervical cancer annually, with 80% of these new cases occurring in developing countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV infection is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer. The currently available HPV vaccines, gardasil and cervarix, can prevent infection by certain HPV types, but not all. At present, research efforts are being devoted to developing broader spectrum preventative vaccines, as well as therapeutic vaccines. To confer additional therapeutic activities, chimeric vaccines have been developed. Multivalent vaccine technologies employ strategies for addressing a broader spectrum of HPV types or for combining HPV with other pathogens. Edible vaccines are also disclosed. For needleless immunization, jet gun, gene gun and microneedles have been developed. Biodegradable and mucoadhesive polymer-based vaccine formulations have been developed to deliver vaccines through the mucosa and enhance immunogenicity. Various viral vectors of recombinant HPV DNA vaccine are disclosed. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 37-43

  18. Virus-Like Particles of Chimeric Recombinant Porcine Circovirus Type 2 as Antigen Vehicle Carrying Foreign Epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs of chimeric porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 were generated by replacing the nuclear localization signal (NLS; at 1–39 aa of PCV2 capsid protein (Cap with classical swine fever virus (CSFV T-cell epitope (1446–1460 aa, CSFV B-cell epitope (693–716 aa and CSFV T-cell epitope conjugated with B-cell epitope. The recombinant proteins were expressed using the baculovirus expression system and detected by immunoblotting and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The abilities to form PCV2 VLPs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Immunogenicities of the three recombinant proteins were evaluated in mice. Our Results indicated that Cap protein NLS deletion or substitution with CSFV epitopes did not affect the VLPs assembly. Three chimeric Cap proteins could form VLPs and induce efficient humoral and cellular immunity against PCV2 and CSFV in mice. Results show that PCV2 VLPs can be used as an efficient antigen carrier for delivery of foreign epitopes, and a potential novel vaccine.

  19. A 6K-deletion variant of salmonid alphavirus is non-viable but can be rescued through RNA recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tz-Chun Guo

    Full Text Available Pancreas disease (PD of Atlantic salmon is an emerging disease caused by Salmonid alphavirus (SAV which mainly affects salmonid aquaculture in Western Europe. Although genome structure of SAV has been characterized and each individual viral protein has been identified, the role of 6K protein in viral replication and infectivity remains undefined. The 6K protein of alphaviruses is a small and hydrophobic protein which is involved in membrane permeabilization, protein processing and virus budding. Because these common features are shared across many viral species, they have been named viroporins. In the present study, we applied reverse genetics to generate SAV3 6K-deleted (Δ6K variant and investigate the role of 6K protein. Our findings show that the 6K-deletion variant of salmonid alphavirus is non-viable. Despite viral proteins of Δ6K variant are detected in the cytoplasm by immunostaining, they are not found on the cell surface. Further, analysis of viral proteins produced in Δ6K cDNA clone transfected cells using radioimmunoprecipitation (RIPA and western blot showed a protein band of larger size than E2 of wild-type SAV3. When Δ6K cDNA was co-transfected with SAV3 helper cDNA encoding the whole structural genes including 6K, the infectivity was rescued. The development of CPE after co-transfection and resolved genome sequence of rescued virus confirmed full-length viral genome being generated through RNA recombination. The discovery of the important role of the 6K protein in virus production provides a new possibility for the development of antiviral intervention which is highly needed to control SAV infection in salmonids.

  20. A 6K-deletion variant of salmonid alphavirus is non-viable but can be rescued through RNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X; Haugland, Øyvind; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) of Atlantic salmon is an emerging disease caused by Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) which mainly affects salmonid aquaculture in Western Europe. Although genome structure of SAV has been characterized and each individual viral protein has been identified, the role of 6K protein in viral replication and infectivity remains undefined. The 6K protein of alphaviruses is a small and hydrophobic protein which is involved in membrane permeabilization, protein processing and virus budding. Because these common features are shared across many viral species, they have been named viroporins. In the present study, we applied reverse genetics to generate SAV3 6K-deleted (Δ6K) variant and investigate the role of 6K protein. Our findings show that the 6K-deletion variant of salmonid alphavirus is non-viable. Despite viral proteins of Δ6K variant are detected in the cytoplasm by immunostaining, they are not found on the cell surface. Further, analysis of viral proteins produced in Δ6K cDNA clone transfected cells using radioimmunoprecipitation (RIPA) and western blot showed a protein band of larger size than E2 of wild-type SAV3. When Δ6K cDNA was co-transfected with SAV3 helper cDNA encoding the whole structural genes including 6K, the infectivity was rescued. The development of CPE after co-transfection and resolved genome sequence of rescued virus confirmed full-length viral genome being generated through RNA recombination. The discovery of the important role of the 6K protein in virus production provides a new possibility for the development of antiviral intervention which is highly needed to control SAV infection in salmonids.

  1. A recombinant DNA vaccine encoding C. andersoni oocyst wall protein induces immunity against experimental C. parvum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Ren, Wenzhi; Pan, Qingshan; Wang, Qiuyue; Elhag, I A Elfaki; Li, Jianhua; Li, Mingying; Gong, Pengtao; Liu, Yingli; Zhang, Xichen

    2011-06-30

    Cryptosporidium andersoni parasited in the abomasum has been demonstrated as a cause of reduction of milk production in dairy cow. In this study, a novel chimeric DNA vaccine pVAX1-AB was constructed and the efficacy against Cryptosporidium parvum was determined. BALB/c mice were divided into 3 groups and immunized with DNA vaccine expressing the oocyst wall protein, AB protein of C. andersoni, the recombinant plasmid containing the AB gene, respectively. After inoculation of 1 × 10(6) oocysts of C. parvum, the humoral and cellular immune responses were detected. Experimental results showed that the recombinant plasmid can induce corresponding specific antibody response, simultaneously influenced cellular immune responses, and provided greater protection rate (48.6%) than the other groups. These results indicated that chimeric DNA vaccine has a potential in Cryptosporidium vaccine development.

  2. Generation and characterization of a recombinant chimeric protein (rCpLi) consisting of B-cell epitopes of a dermonecrotic protein from Loxosceles intermedia spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, T M; Oliveira, D; Figueiredo, L F M; Machado-de-Avila, R A; Duarte, C G; Dias-Lopes, C; Guimarães, G; Felicori, L; Minozzo, J C; Chávez-Olortegui, C

    2013-06-01

    A chimeric protein was constructed expressing three epitopes of LiD1, a dermonecrotic toxin from the venom of Loxosceles intermedia spider. This species is responsible for a large number of accidents involving spiders in Brazil. We demonstrated that the chimeric protein (rCpLi) generated is atoxic and that antibodies previously developed in rabbits against synthetic epitopes reactive with rCpLi in ELISA and immunoblot assays. The antibody response in rabbits against the rCpLi was evaluated by ELISA and we have detected an antibody response in all immunized animals. Overlapping peptides covering the amino acid sequence of the rCpLi were synthesized on a cellulose membrane, and their recognition by rabbit anti-rCpLi serum assessed. Three different antigenic regions were identified. The percentage of inhibition of the dermonecrotic, hemorrhagic and edematogenic activities caused by the recombinant protein LiD1r in naïve rabbits was assessed by pre-incubation with anti-rCpLi antibodies. Anti-rCpLi induced good dermonecrotic and hemorrhagic protection. The levels of protection were similar to the antiboides anti-LiD1r. In summary, we have developed a polyepitope recombinant chimeric protein capable of inducing multiple responses of neutralizing antibodies in a rabbit model. This engineered protein may be a promising candidate for therapeutic serum development or vaccination.

  3. Development of a Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Vaccine Regimen in the Canine Model of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Steven Lawrence; Stone, Brad; Graves, Scott S; Fuller, Deborah H; De Rosa, Stephen C; Spies, Gregory A; Mize, Gregory J; Fuller, James T; Storb, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigen (miHA) vaccines have the potential to augment graft-versus-tumor effects without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We used mixed hematopoietic chimerism in the canine model of major histocompatibility complex-matched allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation as a platform to develop a miHA vaccination regimen. We engineered DNA plasmids and replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 constructs encoding large sections of canine SMCY and the entire canine SRY gene. Priming with replication-deficient human adenovirus type 5 constructs and boosting with ex vivo plasmid-transfected dendritic cells and cutaneous delivery of plasmids with a particle-mediated epidermal delivery device (PMED) in 2 female dogs induced antigen-specific T-cell responses. Similar responses were observed after a prime-boost vaccine regimen in three female hematopoietic cell transplantation donors. Subsequent donor lymphocyte infusion resulted in a significant change of chimerism in 1 of 3 male recipients without any signs of graft-versus-host disease. The change in chimerism in the recipient occurred in association with the development of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to the same peptide pools detected in the donor. These studies describe the first in vivo response to miHA vaccination in a large, outbred animal model without using recipient cells to sensitize the donor. This model provides a platform for ongoing experiments designed to define optimal miHA targets and develop protocols to directly vaccinate the recipient.

  4. The molecular and cellular aspects of arthritis due to alphavirus infections: lesson learned from Ross River virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulli, Nestor E; Melton, Julian; Wilmes, Anja; Ewart, Gary; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2007-04-01

    Alphaviruses such as the Sindbis-group viruses, Scandinavian Ockelbo virus, the African Asian chikungunya virus, the African O'nyong-nyong virus, the South American Mayaro virus, and the Australasian Barmah Forest and Ross River viruses, are commonly associated with outbreaks of acute and persistent arthritis and arthralgia in humans. The mechanisms by which these viruses cause arthritis/arthralgia are poorly understood. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of viral arthritides using our newly developed mouse model of Ross River virus-induced joint and muscle inflammation.

  5. Molecular detection of flaviviruses and alphaviruses in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) from coastal ecosystems in the Colombian Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Suaza-Vasco, Juan; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Uribe, Sandra; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses belonging to the genera Flavivirus and Alphavirus were detected in mosquitoes in a rural area of San Bernardo del Viento (Córdoba, Colombia). A total of 22,180 mosquitoes were collected, sorted into 2,102 pools, and tested by generic/nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, dengue virus, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis virus, yellow fever virus, and Culex flavivirus were detected and identified by sequencing. The detection of arboviral pathogens in this zone represents possible circulation and indicates a human health risk, demonstrating the importance of virological surveillance activities. PMID:27706377

  6. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Maarit Neuvonen; Arunas Kazlauskas; Miika Martikainen; Ari Hinkkanen; Tero Ahola; Kalle Saksela

    2011-01-01

    Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homolo...

  7. High affinity mouse-human chimeric Fab against Hepatitis B surface antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biplab Bose; Navin Khanna; Subrat K Acharya; Subrata Sinha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Passive immunotherapy using antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been advocated in certain cases of Hepatitis B infection. We had earlier reported on the cloning and expression of a high affinity scFv derived from a mouse monoclonal (5S) against HBsAg. However this mouse antibody cannot be used for therapeutic purposes as it may elicit anti-mouse immune responses. Chimerization by replacing mouse constant domains with human ones can reduce the immunogenicity of this antibody.METHODS: We cloned the VH and VL genes of this mouse antibody; and fused them with CH1 domain of human IgG1 and CL domain of human kappa chain respectively. These chimeric genes were cloned into a phagemid vector. After initial screening using the phage display system, the chimeric Fab was expressed in soluble form in E. Coli.RESULTS: The chimeric Fab was purified from the bacterial periplasmic extract. We characterized the chimeric Fab using several in vitro techniques and it was observed that the chimeric molecule retained the high affinity and specificity of the original mouse monoclonal.This chimeric antibody fragment was further expressed in different strains of E> coli to increase the yield.CONCLUSION: We have generated a mouse-human chimeric Fab against HBsAg without any significant loss in binding and epitope specificity. This chimeric Fab fragment can be further modified to generate a fulllength chimeric antibody for therapeutic uses.

  8. Blood Chimerism in Dizygotic Monochorionic Twins During 5 Years Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegiel, M H; Hansen, M H; Haedersdal, S; Barrett, A N; Rieneck, K; Main, K M; Hansen, A T; Clausen, F B

    2017-04-19

    Dizygotic monochorionic twin pregnancies can result in blood chimerism due to in utero twin-to-twin exchange of stem cells. In this case, we examined the proportion of allogeneic red blood cells by flow cytometry and the proportion of allogeneic nucleated cells by digital polymerase chain reaction at 7 months and again at 5 years. We found an increase in the proportion of allogeneic cells from 63% to 89% in one twin, and a similar increase in autologous cells in the other twin from 57% to 84%. A paradigm for stem cell therapy could be modeled on this case: induction of tolerance and chimerism by antenatal transfusion of donor stem cells. The procedure would hold the promise of transplantation and tolerance induction without myeloablative conditioning for inheritable benign hematological diseases such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Birth of two chimeric genes in the Hominidae lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courseaux, A; Nahon, J L

    2001-02-16

    How genes with newly characterized functions originate remains a fundamental question. PMCHL1 and PMCHL2, two chimeric genes derived from the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) gene, offer an opportunity to examine such an issue in the human lineage. Detailed structural, expression, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the PMCHL1 gene was created near 25 million years ago (Ma) by a complex mechanism of exon shuffling through retrotransposition of an antisense MCH messenger RNA coupled to de novo creation of splice sites. PMCHL2 arose 5 to 10 Ma by an event of duplication involving a large chromosomal region encompassing the PMCHL1 locus. The RNA expression patterns of those chimeric genes suggest that they have been submitted to strong regulatory constraints during primate evolution.

  10. Mechanisms of Tolerance Induction by Hematopoietic Chimerism: The Immune Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolcu, Esma S; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2017-03-01

    Hematopoietic chimerism is one of the effective approaches to induce tolerance to donor-derived tissue and organ grafts without administration of life-long immunosuppressive therapy. Although experimental efforts to develop such regimens have been ongoing for decades, substantial cumulative toxicity of combined hematopoietic and tissue transplants precludes wide clinical implementation. Tolerance is an active immunological process that includes both peripheral and central mechanisms of mutual education of coresident donor and host immune systems. The major stages include sequential suppression of early alloreactivity, establishment of hematopoietic chimerism and suppressor cells that sustain the state of tolerance, with significant mechanistic and temporal overlap along the tolerization process. Efforts to devise less toxic transplant strategies by reduction of preparatory conditioning focus on modulation rather than deletion of residual host immunity and early reinstitution of regulatory subsets at the central and peripheral levels. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:700-712.

  11. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  12. Flu vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor.CERN Medical Service

  13. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  14. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  15. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  16. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    minimum of one chimeric transcript containing a coding region breakpoint (range of 1-13). For this class of fusions, translation and proteome alignment...patients and contained a predicted HLA*02:01 restricted epitope. In vitro, we identified T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood that recognizes...low frequency. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Next generation sequencing, T cell immunotherapy, mutations, neoantigens, prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  17. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Neph...

  18. Leptospirosis vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Li; Wang Zhijun; Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the...

  19. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development.

  20. Group size and nest spacing affect Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus infection in nestling house sparrows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A O'Brien

    Full Text Available The transmission of parasites and pathogens among vertebrates often depends on host population size, host species diversity, and the extent of crowding among potential hosts, but little is known about how these variables apply to most vector-borne pathogens such as the arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses. Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae: Alphavirus is an RNA arbovirus transmitted by the swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius to the cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota and the introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus that has recently invaded swallow nesting colonies. The virus has little impact on cliff swallows, but house sparrows are seriously affected by BCRV. For house sparrows occupying swallow nesting colonies in western Nebraska, USA, the prevalence of BCRV in nestling sparrows increased with sparrow colony size at a site but decreased with the number of cliff swallows present. If one nestling in a nest was infected with the virus, there was a greater likelihood that one or more of its nest-mates would also be infected than nestlings chosen at random. The closer a nest was to another nest containing infected nestlings, the greater the likelihood that some of the nestlings in the focal nest would be BCRV-positive. These results illustrate that BCRV represents a cost of coloniality for a vertebrate host (the house sparrow, perhaps the first such demonstration for an arbovirus, and that virus infection is spatially clustered within nests and within colonies. The decreased incidence of BCRV in sparrows as cliff swallows at a site increased reflects the "dilution effect," in which virus transmission is reduced when a vector switches to feeding on a less competent vertebrate host.

  1. Group size and nest spacing affect Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) infection in nestling house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Valerie A; Brown, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    The transmission of parasites and pathogens among vertebrates often depends on host population size, host species diversity, and the extent of crowding among potential hosts, but little is known about how these variables apply to most vector-borne pathogens such as the arboviruses (arthropod-borne viruses). Buggy Creek virus (BCRV; Togaviridae: Alphavirus) is an RNA arbovirus transmitted by the swallow bug (Oeciacus vicarius) to the cliff swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and the introduced house sparrow (Passer domesticus) that has recently invaded swallow nesting colonies. The virus has little impact on cliff swallows, but house sparrows are seriously affected by BCRV. For house sparrows occupying swallow nesting colonies in western Nebraska, USA, the prevalence of BCRV in nestling sparrows increased with sparrow colony size at a site but decreased with the number of cliff swallows present. If one nestling in a nest was infected with the virus, there was a greater likelihood that one or more of its nest-mates would also be infected than nestlings chosen at random. The closer a nest was to another nest containing infected nestlings, the greater the likelihood that some of the nestlings in the focal nest would be BCRV-positive. These results illustrate that BCRV represents a cost of coloniality for a vertebrate host (the house sparrow), perhaps the first such demonstration for an arbovirus, and that virus infection is spatially clustered within nests and within colonies. The decreased incidence of BCRV in sparrows as cliff swallows at a site increased reflects the "dilution effect," in which virus transmission is reduced when a vector switches to feeding on a less competent vertebrate host.

  2. Hunting in the rainforest and mayaro virus infection: An emerging alphavirus in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo O Izurieta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of this report were to document the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and to examine potential risk factors for Mayaro virus infection among the personnel of a military garrison in the Amazonian rainforest. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of the personnel of a garrison located in the Ecuadorian Amazonian rainforest. The cross-sectional study employed interviews and seroepidemiological methods. Humoral immune response to Mayaro virus infection was assessed by evaluating IgM- and IgG-specific antibodies using ELISA. Results: Of 338 subjects studied, 174 were from the Coastal zone of Ecuador, 73 from Andean zone, and 91 were native to the Amazonian rainforest. Seroprevalence of Mayaro virus infection was more than 20 times higher among Amazonian natives (46% than among subjects born in other areas (2%. Conclusions: Age and hunting in the rainforest were significant predictors of Mayaro virus infection overall and among Amazonian natives. The results provide the first demonstration of the potential presence of Mayaro virus infection in Ecuador and a systematic evaluation of risk factors for the transmission of this alphavirus. The large difference in prevalence rates between Amazonian natives and other groups and between older and younger natives suggest that Mayaro virus is endemic and enzootic in the rainforest, with sporadic outbreaks that determine differences in risk between birth cohorts of natives. Deep forest hunting may selectively expose native men, descendants of the Shuar and Huaronai ethnic groups, to the arthropod vectors of Mayaro virus in areas close to primate reservoirs.

  3. Alpha interferon and not gamma interferon inhibits salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Guo, Tz-Chun; Mutoloki, Stephen; Haugland, Øyvind; Marjara, Inderjit S; Evensen, Øystein

    2010-09-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is an emerging virus in salmonid aquaculture, with SAV-3 being the only subtype found in Norway. Until now, there has been little focus on the alpha interferon (IFN-alpha)-induced antiviral responses during virus infection in vivo or in vitro in fish. The possible involvement of IFN-gamma in the response to SAV-3 is also not known. In this study, the two IFNs were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins (recombinant IFN-alpha [rIFN-alpha] and rIFN-gamma) and used for in vitro studies. SAV-3 infection in a permissive salmon cell line (TO cells) results in IFN-alpha and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) mRNA upregulation. Preinfection treatment (4 to 24 h prior to infection) with salmon rIFN-alpha induces an antiviral state that inhibits the replication of SAV-3 and protects the cells against virus-induced cytopathic effects (CPE). The antiviral state coincides with a strong expression of Mx and ISG15 mRNA and Mx protein expression. When rIFN-alpha is administered at the time of infection and up to 24 h postinfection, virus replication is not inhibited, and cells are not protected against virus-induced CPE. By 40 h postinfection, the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) is phosphorylated concomitant with the expression of the E2 protein as assessed by Western blotting. Postinfection treatment with rIFN-alpha results in a moderate reduction in E2 expression levels in accordance with a moderate downregulation of cellular protein synthesis, an approximately 65% reduction by 60 h postinfection. rIFN-gamma has only a minor inhibitory effect on SAV-3 replication in vitro. SAV-3 is sensitive to the preinfection antiviral state induced by rIFN-alpha, while postinfection antiviral responses or postinfection treatment with rIFN-alpha is not able to limit viral replication.

  4. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiss Brian J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus, a protein that inhibits RNAi, to determine the effects of linking arbovirus infection with RNAi inhibition. Results B2 protein expression from SINV (TE/3'2J inhibited the accumulation of non-specific small RNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquito cell culture and virus-specific small RNAs both in infected cell culture and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. More viral genomic and subgenomic RNA accumulated in cells and mosquitoes infected with TE/3'2J virus expressing B2 (TE/3'2J/B2 compared to TE/3'2J and TE/3'2J virus expressing GFP. TE/3'2J/B2 exhibited increased infection rates, dissemination rates, and infectious virus titers in mosquitoes following oral bloodmeal. Following infectious oral bloodmeal, significantly more mosquitoes died when TE/3'2J/B2 was ingested. The virus was 100% lethal following intrathoracic inoculation of multiple mosquito species and lethality was dose-dependent in Ae. aegypti. Conclusion We show that RNAi is active in Ae. aegypti cell culture and that B2 protein inhibits RNAi in mosquito cells when expressed by a recombinant SINV. Also, SINV more efficiently replicates in mosquito cells when RNAi is inhibited. Finally, TE/3'2J/B2 kills mosquitoes in a dose-dependent manner independent of infection route and mosquito species.

  5. Mannose binding lectin is required for alphavirus-induced arthritis/myositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn M Gunn

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne alphaviruses such as chikungunya virus and Ross River virus (RRV are emerging pathogens capable of causing large-scale epidemics of virus-induced arthritis and myositis. The pathology of RRV-induced disease in both humans and mice is associated with induction of the host inflammatory response within the muscle and joints, and prior studies have demonstrated that the host complement system contributes to development of disease. In this study, we have used a mouse model of RRV-induced disease to identify and characterize which complement activation pathways mediate disease progression after infection, and we have identified the mannose binding lectin (MBL pathway, but not the classical or alternative complement activation pathways, as essential for development of RRV-induced disease. MBL deposition was enhanced in RRV infected muscle tissue from wild type mice and RRV infected MBL deficient mice exhibited reduced disease, tissue damage, and complement deposition compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, mice deficient for key components of the classical or alternative complement activation pathways still developed severe RRV-induced disease. Further characterization of MBL deficient mice demonstrated that similar to C3(-/- mice, viral replication and inflammatory cell recruitment were equivalent to wild type animals, suggesting that RRV-mediated induction of complement dependent immune pathology is largely MBL dependent. Consistent with these findings, human patients diagnosed with RRV disease had elevated serum MBL levels compared to healthy controls, and MBL levels in the serum and synovial fluid correlated with severity of disease. These findings demonstrate a role for MBL in promoting RRV-induced disease in both mice and humans and suggest that the MBL pathway of complement activation may be an effective target for therapeutic intervention for humans suffering from RRV-induced arthritis and myositis.

  6. The efficacy of CP7_E2alf: an animal study involving piglets from C–strain vaccinated sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangelova, Desislava Yordanova; Nielsen, Jens; Strandbygaard, Bertel;

    Outbreaks of Classical Swine Fever (CSF) in the European Union have caused enormous economical losses. To facilitate the possibility of free trade with pigs and their products, a chimeric live DIVA vaccine CP7_E2alf was developed. Most likely, passive immunity against CSF virus in populations...

  7. Chimeric Mice with Competent Hematopoietic Immunity Reproduce Key Features of Severe Lassa Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Oestereich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lassa fever (LASF is a highly severe viral syndrome endemic to West African countries. Despite the annual high morbidity and mortality caused by LASF, very little is known about the pathophysiology of the disease. Basic research on LASF has been precluded due to the lack of relevant small animal models that reproduce the human disease. Immunocompetent laboratory mice are resistant to infection with Lassa virus (LASV and, to date, only immunodeficient mice, or mice expressing human HLA, have shown some degree of susceptibility to experimental infection. Here, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into irradiated type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR-/- was used to generate chimeric mice that reproduced important features of severe LASF in humans. This included high lethality, liver damage, vascular leakage and systemic virus dissemination. In addition, this model indicated that T cell-mediated immunopathology was an important component of LASF pathogenesis that was directly correlated with vascular leakage. Our strategy allows easy generation of a suitable small animal model to test new vaccines and antivirals and to dissect the basic components of LASF pathophysiology.

  8. Chimeric Mice with Competent Hematopoietic Immunity Reproduce Key Features of Severe Lassa Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestereich, Lisa; Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Pallasch, Elisa; Kerber, Romy; Rieger, Toni; Wurr, Stephanie; Bockholt, Sabrina; Pérez-Girón, José V; Krasemann, Susanne; Günther, Stephan; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2016-05-01

    Lassa fever (LASF) is a highly severe viral syndrome endemic to West African countries. Despite the annual high morbidity and mortality caused by LASF, very little is known about the pathophysiology of the disease. Basic research on LASF has been precluded due to the lack of relevant small animal models that reproduce the human disease. Immunocompetent laboratory mice are resistant to infection with Lassa virus (LASV) and, to date, only immunodeficient mice, or mice expressing human HLA, have shown some degree of susceptibility to experimental infection. Here, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into irradiated type I interferon receptor knockout mice (IFNAR-/-) was used to generate chimeric mice that reproduced important features of severe LASF in humans. This included high lethality, liver damage, vascular leakage and systemic virus dissemination. In addition, this model indicated that T cell-mediated immunopathology was an important component of LASF pathogenesis that was directly correlated with vascular leakage. Our strategy allows easy generation of a suitable small animal model to test new vaccines and antivirals and to dissect the basic components of LASF pathophysiology.

  9. Redirecting T cells with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Andrea; Magnani, Chiara F; Tettamanti, Sarah; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Biagi, Ettore

    2017-08-23

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Nowadays the survival rate is around 85%. Nevertheless, an urgent clinical need is still represented by primary refractory and relapsed patients who do not significantly benefit from standard approaches, including chemo-radiotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). For this reason, immunotherapy has so far represented a challenging novel treatment opportunity, including, as the most validated therapeutic options, cancer vaccines, donor-lymphocyte infusions and tumor-specific immune effector cells. More recently, unexpected positive clinical results in ALL have been achieved by application of gene-engineered chimeric antigen expressing (CAR) T cells. Several CAR designs across different trials have generated similar response rates, with Complete Response (CR) of 60-90% at 1 month and an Event-Free Survival (EFS) of 70% at 6 months. Relevant challenges anyway remain to be addressed, such as amelioration of technical, cost and feasibility aspects of cell and gene manipulation and the necessity to face the occurrence of relapse mechanisms. This review describes the state of the art of ALL immunotherapies, the novelties in terms of gene manipulation approaches and the problems emerged from early clinical studies. We describe and discuss the process of clinical translation, including the design of a cell manufacturing protocol, vector production and regulatory issues. Multiple antigen targeting and combination of CAR T cells with molecular targeted drugs have also been evaluated as latest strategies to prevail over immune-evasion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 3 - Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, L; Knight-Jones, T J D; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed research knowledge gaps in the field of FMDV (foot-and-mouth disease virus) vaccines. The study took the form of a literature review (2011-15) combined with research updates collected in 2014 from 33 institutes from across the world. Findings were used to identify priority areas for future FMD vaccine research. Vaccines play a vital role in FMD control, used both to limit the spread of the virus during epidemics in FMD-free countries and as the mainstay of disease management in endemic regions, particularly where sanitary controls are difficult to apply. Improvements in the performance or cost-effectiveness of FMD vaccines will allow more widespread and efficient disease control. FMD vaccines have changed little in recent decades, typically produced by inactivation of whole virus, the quantity and stability of the intact viral capsids in the final preparation being key for immunogenicity. However, these are exciting times and several promising novel FMD vaccine candidates have recently been developed. This includes the first FMD vaccine licensed for manufacture and use in the USA; this adenovirus-vectored FMD vaccine causes in vivo expression of viral capsids in vaccinated animals. Another promising vaccine candidate comprises stabilized empty FMDV capsids produced in vitro in a baculovirus expression system. Recombinant technologies are also being developed to improve otherwise conventionally produced inactivated vaccines, for example, by creating a chimeric vaccine virus to increase capsid stability and by inserting sequences into the vaccine virus for desired antigen expression. Other important areas of ongoing research include enhanced adjuvants, vaccine quality control procedures and predicting vaccine protection from immune correlates, thus reducing dependency on animal challenge studies. Globally, the degree of independent vaccine evaluation is highly variable, and this is essential for vaccine quality. Previously neglected, the

  11. Chimeric flagellin expressed by Salmonella typhimurium induces an ESAT-6-specific Th 1-type immune response and CTL effects following intranasal immunization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Liu Liu; Ke Wen; Jinlin Huang; Shizhong Geng; Junsong Shen; Zhiming Pan; Xinan Jiao

    2011-01-01

    The flagellin component FliC of Salmonella typhimurium is capable of activating the innate immune system via specific interactions with TLR5 and can also act as a carrier of foreign antigen to elicit antigen-specific immune responses.Thus,we constructed an attenuated Salmonella strain SL5928(fliC/esat) expressing chimeric flagellin that contained the ESAT-6 antigen coding sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis inserted into the highly variable region of the Salmonella flagellin coding gene fliCi.The chimeric flagellin functioned normally,as demonstrated using a flagella swarming assay and electron microscopy.To analyze the effects of chimeric flagellin,the cell-mediated immune response and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) effects specific for ESAT-6antigen were tested after intranasal immunization of mice with flagellated Salmonella SL5928(fliC/esat).The results showed that SL5928(fliC/esat) intranasal immunization can strongly elicit an ESAT-6-specific T helper (Th) 1-type immune response in mucosal lymphoid tissues,such as nasopharynx-associated lymph nodes,lung and Peyer's patches,and a Th 1/Th2 response was elicited in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes.Furthermore,intranasal immunization of SL5928(fliC/esat) produced efficient CTL effects,as demonstrated using a 5-and 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) assay.Thus,our study revealed that Salmonella flagellin acts as a carrier for foreign antigen and triggers strong Th 1 and CTL responses during intranasal immunization.Chimeric flagellin is potentially an effective strategy for the development of novel vaccines against tuberculosis in humans and animals.

  12. Chimeric virus-like particles containing influenza HA antigen and GPI-CCL28 induce long-lasting mucosal immunity against H3N2 viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Teena; Berman, Zachary; Luo, Yuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Shelly; Compans, Richard W.; Wang, Bao-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Influenza virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, with worldwide seasonal epidemics. The duration and quality of humoral immunity and generation of immunological memory to vaccines is critical for protective immunity. In the current study, we examined the long-lasting protective efficacy of chimeric VLPs (cVLPs) containing influenza HA and GPI-anchored CCL28 as antigen and mucosal adjuvant, respectively, when immunized intranasally in mice. We report that the cVLPs induced significantly higher and sustainable levels of virus-specific antibody responses, especially IgA levels and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers, more than 8-month post-vaccination compared to influenza VLPs without CCL28 or influenza VLPs physically mixed with sCCL28 (soluble) in mice. After challenging the vaccinated animals at month 8 with H3N2 viruses, the cVLP group also demonstrated strong recall responses. On day 4 post-challenge, we measured increased antibody levels, ASCs and HAI titers with reduced viral load and inflammatory responses in the cVLP group. The animals vaccinated with the cVLP showed 20% cross-protection against drifted (Philippines) and 60% protection against homologous (Aichi) H3N2 viruses. Thus, the results suggest that the GPI-anchored CCL28 induces significantly higher mucosal antibody responses, involved in providing long-term cross-protection against H3N2 influenza virus when compared to other vaccination groups. PMID:28067290

  13. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophiya Karki

    Full Text Available The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  14. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Sophiya; Li, Melody M H; Schoggins, John W; Tian, Suyan; Rice, Charles M; MacDonald, Margaret R

    2012-01-01

    The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV), the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  15. Novel inhibitors of neurotropic alphavirus replication that improve host survival in a mouse model of acute viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindac, Janice A; Yestrepsky, Bryan D; Barraza, Scott J; Bolduc, Kyle L; Blakely, Pennelope K; Keep, Richard F; Irani, David N; Miller, David J; Larsen, Scott D

    2012-04-12

    Arboviral encephalitis is a potentially devastating human disease with no approved therapies that target virus replication. We previously discovered a novel class of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole-based inhibitors active against neurotropic alphaviruses such as western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) in cultured cells. In this report, we describe initial development of these novel antiviral compounds, including bioisosteric replacement of the 4H-thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole core with indole to improve metabolic stability and the introduction of chirality to assess target enantioselectivity. Selected modifications enhanced antiviral activity while maintaining low cytotoxicity, increased stability to microsomal metabolism, and also revealed striking enantiospecific activity in cultured cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate improved outcomes (both symptoms and survival) following treatment with indole analogue 9h (CCG-203926) in an in vivo mouse model of alphaviral encephalitis that closely correlate with the enantiospecific in vitro antiviral activity. These results represent a substantial advancement in the early preclinical development of a promising class of novel antiviral drugs against virulent neurotropic alphaviruses.

  16. Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) Compounds Alter New World Alphavirus Capsid Localization and Reduce Viral Replication in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Pinkham, Chelsea; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Shafagati, Nazly; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A; Tamir, Sharon; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-11-01

    The capsid structural protein of the New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), interacts with the host nuclear transport proteins importin α/β1 and CRM1. Novel selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, KPT-185, KPT-335 (verdinexor), and KPT-350, target the host's primary nuclear export protein, CRM1, in a manner similar to the archetypical inhibitor Leptomycin B. One major limitation of Leptomycin B is its irreversible binding to CRM1; which SINE compounds alleviate because they are slowly reversible. Chemically inhibiting CRM1 with these compounds enhanced capsid localization to the nucleus compared to the inactive compound KPT-301, as indicated by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Differences in extracellular versus intracellular viral RNA, as well as decreased capsid in cell free supernatants, indicated the inhibitors affected viral assembly, which led to a decrease in viral titers. The decrease in viral replication was confirmed using a luciferase-tagged virus and through plaque assays. SINE compounds had no effect on VEEV TC83_Cm, which encodes a mutated form of capsid that is unable to enter the nucleus. Serially passaging VEEV in the presence of KPT-185 resulted in mutations within the nuclear localization and nuclear export signals of capsid. Finally, SINE compound treatment also reduced the viral titers of the related eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, suggesting that CRM1 maintains a common interaction with capsid proteins across the New World alphavirus genus.

  17. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  18. Seasonal Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  19. Thionin-D4E1 chimeric protein protects plants against bacterial infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stover, Eddie W; Gupta, Goutam; Hao, Guixia

    2017-08-08

    The generation of a chimeric protein containing a first domain encoding either a pro-thionon or thionin, a second domain encoding D4E1 or pro-D4E1, and a third domain encoding a peptide linker located between the first domain and second domain is described. Either the first domain or the second domain is located at the amino terminal of the chimeric protein and the other domain (second domain or first domain, respectively) is located at the carboxyl terminal. The chimeric protein has antibacterial activity. Genetically altered plants and their progeny expressing a polynucleotide encoding the chimeric protein resist diseases caused by bacteria.

  20. Chimeric RNA Oligonucleotides with Triazole and Phosphate Linkages: Synthesis and RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Tomoko; Kogashi, Kanako; Okada, Koudai; Mattarella, Martin; Suzuki, Takeru; Yasumoto, Kenichi; Sogawa, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Hiroyuki

    2015-12-01

    Chimeric RNA oligonucleotides with an artificial triazole linker were synthesized using solution-phase click chemistry and solid-phase automated synthesis. Scalable synthesis methods for jointing units for the chimeric structure have been developed, and after click-coupling of the jointing units with triazole linkers, a series of chimeric oligonucleotides was prepared by utilizing the well-established phosphoramidite method for the elongation. The series of chimeric 21-mer oligonucleotides that possessed the triazole linker at different strands and positions allowed for a screening study of the RNA interference to clarify the preference of the triazole modifications in small-interfering RNA molecules.

  1. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  2. Tailoring DNA vaccines: designing strategies against HER2 positive cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMarchini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The crucial role of HER2 in epithelial transformation and its selective overexpression on cancer tissues makes it an ideal target for cancer immunotherapies such as passive immunotherapy with Trastuzumab. There are, however, a number of concerns regarding the use of monoclonal antibodies which include resistance, repeated treatments, considerable costs and side effects that make active immunotherapies against HER2 desirable alternative approaches. The efficacy of anti-HER2 DNA vaccination has been widely demonstrated in transgenic cancer-prone mice, which recapitulate several features of human breast cancers. Nonetheless, the rational design of a cancer vaccine able to trigger a long lasting immunity, and thus prevent tumor recurrence in patients, would require the understanding of how tolerance and immunosuppression regulate antitumor immune responses and, at the same time, the identification of the most immunogenic portions of the target protein. We herein retrace the findings that led to our most promising DNA vaccines that, by encoding human/rat chimeric forms of HER2, are able to circumvent peripheral tolerance. Preclinical data obtained with these chimeric DNA vaccines have provided the rationale for their use in an ongoing phase I clinical trial (EudraCT 2011-001104-34.

  3. New World and Old World Alphaviruses Have Evolved to Exploit Different Components of Stress Granules, FXR and G3BP Proteins, for Assembly of Viral Replication Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Reynaud, Josephine M.; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Mobley, James A.; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The positive-strand RNA viruses initiate their amplification in the cell from a single genome delivered by virion. This single RNA molecule needs to become involved in replication process before it is recognized and degraded by cellular machinery. In this study, we show that distantly related New World and Old World alphaviruses have independently evolved to utilize different cellular stress granule-related proteins for assembly of complexes, which recruit viral genomic RNA and facilitate formation of viral replication complexes (vRCs). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) utilizes all members of the Fragile X syndrome (FXR) family, while chikungunya and Sindbis viruses exploit both members of the G3BP family. Despite being in different families, these proteins share common characteristics, which determine their role in alphavirus replication, namely, the abilities for RNA-binding and for self-assembly into large structures. Both FXR and G3BP proteins interact with virus-specific, repeating amino acid sequences located in the C-termini of hypervariable, intrinsically disordered domains (HVDs) of viral nonstructural protein nsP3. We demonstrate that these host factors orchestrate assembly of vRCs and play key roles in RNA and virus replication. Only knockout of all of the homologs results in either pronounced or complete inhibition of replication of different alphaviruses. The use of multiple homologous proteins with redundant functions mediates highly efficient recruitment of viral RNA into the replication process. This independently evolved acquisition of different families of cellular proteins by the disordered protein fragment to support alphavirus replication suggests that other RNA viruses may utilize a similar mechanism of host factor recruitment for vRC assembly. The use of different host factors by alphavirus species may be one of the important determinants of their pathogenesis. PMID:27509095

  4. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk provide control over structural and morphological details because it can be self-assembled through diverse processing methods including film casting and fiber electrospinning. Biosilica nanostructures in diatoms are formed in aqueous ambient conditions at neutral pH and low temperatures. The R5 peptide derived from the silaffin protein of Cylindrotheca fusiformis induces and regulates silica precipitation in the chimeric protein designs under similar ambient conditions. Whereas mineralization reactions performed in the presence of R5 peptide alone form silica particles with a size distribution of 0.5–10 μm in diameter, reactions performed in the presence of the new fusion proteins generate nanocomposite materials containing silica particles with a narrower size distribution of 0.5–2 μm in diameter. Furthermore, we demonstrate that composite morphology and structure could be regulated by controlling processing conditions to produce films and fibers. These results suggest that the chimeric protein provides new options for processing and control over silica particle sizes, important benefits for biomedical and specialty materials, particularly in light of the all aqueous processing and the nanocomposite features of these new materials. PMID:16769898

  5. Characterization of chimeric Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3 toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Shelton, Anthony M; Cheng, Jiaan; Feng, Ming-Guang; Shen, Zhicheng

    2007-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vip) are potential alternatives for B. thuringiensis endotoxins that are currently utilized in commercial transgenic insect-resistant crops. Screening a large number of B. thuringiensis isolates resulted in the cloning of vip3Ac1. Vip3Ac1 showed high insecticidal activity against the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda and the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea but very low activity against the silkworm Bombyx mori. The host specificity of this Vip3 toxin was altered by sequence swapping with a previously identified toxin, Vip3Aa1. While both Vip3Aa1 and Vip3Ac1 showed no detectable toxicity against the European corn borer Ostrinia nubilalis, the chimeric protein Vip3AcAa, consisting of the N-terminal region of Vip3Ac1 and the C-terminal region of Vip3Aa1, became insecticidal to the European corn borer. In addition, the chimeric Vip3AcAa had increased toxicity to the fall armyworm. Furthermore, both Vip3Ac1 and Vip3AcAa are highly insecticidal to a strain of cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) that is highly resistant to the B. thuringiensis endotoxin Cry1Ac, thus experimentally showing for the first time the lack of cross-resistance between B. thuringiensis Cry1A proteins and Vip3A toxins. The results in this study demonstrated that vip3Ac1 and its chimeric vip3 genes can be excellent candidates for engineering a new generation of transgenic plants for insect pest control.

  6. Viral vaccines and their manufacturing cell substrates: New trends and designs in modern vaccinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana F; Soares, Hugo R; Guerreiro, Miguel R; Alves, Paula M; Coroadinha, Ana S

    2015-09-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective interventions in global health. The worldwide vaccination programs significantly reduced the number of deaths caused by infectious agents. A successful example was the eradication of smallpox in 1979 after two centuries of vaccination campaigns. Since the first variolation administrations until today, the knowledge on immunology has increased substantially. This knowledge combined with the introduction of cell culture and DNA recombinant technologies revolutionized vaccine design. This review will focus on vaccines against human viral pathogens, recent developments on vaccine design and cell substrates used for their manufacture. While the production of attenuated and inactivated vaccines requires the use of the respective permissible cell substrates, the production of recombinant antigens, virus-like particles, vectored vaccines and chimeric vaccines requires the use - and often the development - of specific cell lines. Indeed, the development of novel modern viral vaccine designs combined with, the stringent safety requirements for manufacture, and the better understanding on animal cell metabolism and physiology are increasing the awareness on the importance of cell line development and engineering areas. A new era of modern vaccinology is arriving, offering an extensive toolbox to materialize novel and creative ideas in vaccine design and its manufacture. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Plant-made vaccines against West Nile virus are potent, safe, and economically feasible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    The threat of West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics with increasingly severe neuroinvasive infections demands the development and licensing of effective vaccines. To date, vaccine candidates based on inactivated, live-attenuated, or chimeric virus, and viral DNA and WNV protein subunits have been developed. Some have been approved for veterinary use or are under clinical investigation, yet no vaccine has been licensed for human use. Reaching the milestone of a commercialized human vaccine, however, may largely depend on the economics of vaccine production. Analysis suggests that currently only novel low-cost production technologies would allow vaccination to outcompete the cost of surveillance and clinical treatment. Here, we review progress using plants to address the economic challenges of WNV vaccine production. The advantages of plants as hosts for vaccine production in cost, speed and scalability, especially those of viral vector-based transient expression systems, are discussed. The progress in developing WNV subunit vaccines in plants is reviewed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, and immunogenicity in animal models. The development of vaccines based on enveloped and non-enveloped virus-like particles is also discussed. These advancements suggest that plants may provide a production platform that offers potent, safe and affordable human vaccines against WNV.

  8. Chimeric mitochondrial peptides from contiguous regular and swinger RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Seligmann

    2016-01-01

    Previous mass spectrometry analyses described human mitochondrial peptides entirely translated from swinger RNAs, RNAs where polymerization systematically exchanged nucleotides. Exchanges follow one among 23 bijective transformation rules, nine symmetric exchanges (X ↔ Y, e.g. A ↔ C) and fourteen asymmetric exchanges (X → Y → Z → X, e.g. A → C → G → A), multiplying by 24 DNA's protein coding potential. Abrupt switches from regular to swinger polymerization produce chimeric RNAs. Here, human m...

  9. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrit, Jeffrey T; Fast, Patricia E; Gieber, Lisa; Kuipers, Hester; Dean, Hansi J; Koff, Wayne C

    2016-06-03

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of one of the most lethal pandemics in human history, although in recent years access to highly effective anti-retroviral therapy has provided new hope worldwide. Transmission of HIV by sexual contact, childbirth and injection drug use has been reduced, but 2 million are newly infected each year, and much of the transmission is from people who do not know their status. In addition to known methods, a preventive vaccine is needed to end the pandemic. The extraordinary mutability and genetic diversity of HIV is an enormous challenge, but vaccines are being designed for broad coverage. Computer-aided design of mosaic immunogens, incorporating many epitopes from the entire genome or from conserved regions aim to induce CD8+ T cells to kill virus-infected cells or inhibit virus replication, while trimeric envelope proteins or synthetic mimics aim to induce broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies similar to those cloned from some infected patients. Induction of more potent and durable responses may require new adjuvants or replicating chimeric vectors chimeras that bear HIV genes. Passive or genetic delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies may provide broad protection and/or lead to insights for vaccine designers. Proof-of-concept trials in non-human primates and in one human efficacy trial have provided scientific clues for a vaccine that could provide broad and durable protection against HIV. The use of vaccines to destroy HIV reservoirs as part of therapy or cure is now also being explored.

  10. Identifying protective dengue vaccines: guide to mastering an empirical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B

    2013-09-23

    A recent clinical trial of a live-attenuated tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccine afforded no protection against disease caused by dengue 2 (DENV-2). This outcome was unexpected as two or more doses of this vaccine had raised broad neutralizing antibody responses. Data from pre-clinical subhuman primate studies revealed that vaccination with the monotypic DENV-2 component failed to meet established criteria for solid protection to homotypic live virus challenge. Accordingly, it is suggested that preclinical testing adopt more rigorous criteria for protection and that Phase I testing be extended to require evidence of solid monotypic protective immunity for each component of a dengue vaccine by direct challenge with live-attenuated DENV. Because live-attenuated tetravalent DENV vaccines exhibit evidence of immunological interference phenomena, during Phase II, volunteers given mixtures of DENV 1-4 vaccines should be separately challenged with monotypic live-attenuated DENV. Immune responses to live-attenuated challenge viruses and vaccine strains should be studied in an attempt to develop useful in vitro correlates of in vivo protection. Finally, it will be important to learn if DENV non-structural protein 1 (NS1) contributes to pathogenesis of the vascular permeability syndrome in humans. If so, immunity to dengue 1-4 NS1 may be crucial to prevent severe disease.

  11. A comparative study of marine salmonid alphavirus subtypes 1-6 using an experimental cohabitation challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D A; Frost, P; McLaughlin, K; Rowley, H M; Gabestad, I; Gordon, A; McLoughlin, M F

    2011-04-01

    A comparative challenge study of six marine isolates representing subtypes 1-6 of salmonid alphavirus (salmon pancreas disease virus, Genus Alphavirus, Family Togaviridae) was conducted in Atlantic salmon in a fresh water cohabitation trial. Histopathological lesions typical of pancreas disease were observed with all subtypes, and virus was re-isolated from serum of cohabitant fish in each case. Using a virus neutralization (VN) test neutralizing salmonid alphavirus (SAV) subtype 1 strain F93-125, VN antibodies were detected in all challenge groups, consistent with serological cross-reactivity between these subtypes. Using real-time RT-PCR, SAV RNA was detected in heart tissue from 2 to 3 weeks post-challenge (wpc) in all cohabitant groups excluding controls. The results obtained suggested differences in the dynamics of infection between strains of SAV and potentially between subtypes. Results for SAV subtypes 1 and 3 suggested essentially synchronous infection of cohabitant fish. These two study groups also had the highest virus load in heart tissue as measured by quantitative RT-PCR and also had the most extensive histopathological changes. In contrast, results for SAV subtypes 2 and 6 strains were consistent with asynchronous infection in the cohabitant fish and were characterized by slow spread, low virus loads and mild histopathological changes. The SAV subtype 4 and 5 strains occupied an intermediate position in this regard. Despite the use of concentration procedures, it was not possible to detect SAV RNA in water samples from selected study tanks. However, testing of faeces from the SAV subtypes 1, 3 and 6 challenge groups found positive signals in each beginning at 1-3 wpc and remaining detectable for a further 2-3 weeks. Parallel testing of mucus samples found these became positive at 2-3 wpc and remained positive for a further 1-3 weeks. These results demonstrate for the first time that shedding and transmission of virus may occur by both these routes

  12. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  13. Chimeric honeybees (Apis mellifera) produced by transplantation of embryonic cells into pre-gastrula stage embryos and detection of chimerism by use of microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergem, M; Norberg, K; Roseth, A; Meuwissen, T; Lien, S; Aamodt, R H

    2006-04-01

    The production of chimeras, by use of cell transplantation, has proved to be highly valuable in studies of development by providing insights into cell fate, differentiation, and developmental potential. So far, chimeric honeybees have been created by nuclear transfer technologies. We have developed protocols to produce chimeric honeybees by use of cell transplantation. Embryonic cells were transplanted between pre-gastrula stage embryos (32-34 hr after oviposition) and hatched larvae were reared in vitro for 4 days. Chimeric individuals were detected by use of microsatellite analysis and a conservative estimation approach. 4.8% of embryos, posteriorly injected with embryonic cells, developed into chimeric honeybee larvae. By injection of cells pre-stained with fluorescent cell tracer dye, we studied the integration of transplanted cells in the developing embryos. Number of injected cells varied from 0 to 50 and cells remained and multiplied mainly in the area of injection.

  14. High-resolution air quality simulation over Europe with the chemistry transport model CHIMERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Terrenoire

    2015-01-01

    The results suggest that future work should focus on the development of national bottom-up emission inventories including a better account for semi-volatile organic compounds and their conversion to SOA, the improvement of the CHIMERE urban parameterization, the introduction into CHIMERE of the coarse nitrate chemistry and an advanced parameterization accounting for windblown dust emissions.

  15. Using recombinant DNA technology for the development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2012-07-15

    Dramatic increases in dengue (DEN) incidence and disease severity have been reported, in great part due to the geographic expansion of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. One result is the expanded co-circulation of all dengue 1-4 serotype viruses (DENV) in urban areas worldwide, especially in South and South-East Asia, and South America. DEN disease severity ranges from asymptomatic infections to febrile dengue fevers (DF) to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). There is an urgent need for a safe and effective tetravalent DEN vaccine. Several live attenuated, tetravalent DEN vaccine candidates have been generated by recombinant DNA technology; these candidates are capable of providing immunity to all four DENV serotypes. In this paper we review (a) recombinant live-attenuated DEN vaccine candidates in terms of deletion, antigen chimerization, and the introduction of adaptive mutations; (b) strategies for improving tetravalent vaccine attenuation; and (c) live-attenuated DENV vaccine development.

  16. An overview of bioinformatics tools for epitope prediction: implications on vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth E; Nieto-Gomez, Ricardo; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    Exploitation of recombinant DNA and sequencing technologies has led to a new concept in vaccination in which isolated epitopes, capable of stimulating a specific immune response, have been identified and used to achieve advanced vaccine formulations; replacing those constituted by whole pathogen-formulations. In this context, bioinformatics approaches play a critical role on analyzing multiple genomes to select the protective epitopes in silico. It is conceived that cocktails of defined epitopes or chimeric protein arrangements, including the target epitopes, may provide a rationale design capable to elicit convenient humoral or cellular immune responses. This review presents a comprehensive compilation of the most advantageous online immunological software and searchable, in order to facilitate the design and development of vaccines. An outlook on how these tools are supporting vaccine development is presented. HIV and influenza have been taken as examples of promising developments on vaccination against hypervariable viruses. Perspectives in this field are also envisioned.

  17. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  18. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  19. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  20. Vaccinations during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Vaccinations and pregnancy Vaccinations and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... date before you get pregnant. What is a vaccination? A vaccination is a shot that contains a ...

  1. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  2. Antipneumococcal vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP is a gram-positive bacterium with more than 90 known serotypes causing around 11% of all deaths worldwide in children aged 1-59 months. A new era in prevention of SP-related diseases started in at the beginning of 2000s when a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was recommended as the vaccine of choice in pediatric age. PCV7 dramatically reduced invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD among children with indirect effects noted among other age groups as well. However, thanks to a strict surveillance network, an increase in non-vaccine serotypes (NVTs causing IPD was noted worldwide and in late 2000s a new second generation vaccine (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine-PCV13 with an expanded serotype coverage was licensed. Due to the lack of solid effectiveness data, up to know it is difficult to predict how the composition of NVTs will change after the large-scale introduction of PCV13 or whether the characteristics of the serotypes will change. Long-term surveillance of both IPD, pneumonia, acute otitis media and carriage will be crucial to ascertain whether these second generation vaccines are having the desired effect of reducing the incidence of diseases in the long term. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  3. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  4. Chimeric antigen receptor engineered stem cells: a novel HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Anjie; Carrillo, Mayra A; Kitchen, Scott G

    2017-03-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for suppressing HIV and improving patients' quality of life, HIV persists in cART-treated patients and remains an incurable disease. Financial burdens and health consequences of lifelong cART treatment call for novel HIV therapies that result in a permanent cure. Cellular immunity is central in controlling HIV replication. However, HIV adopts numerous strategies to evade immune surveillance. Engineered immunity via genetic manipulation could offer a functional cure by generating cells that have enhanced antiviral activity and are resistant to HIV infection. Recently, encouraging reports from several human clinical trials using an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T-cell therapy for treating B-cell malignancies have provided valuable insights and generated remarkable enthusiasm in engineered T-cell therapy. In this review, we discuss the development of HIV-specific chimeric antigen receptors and the use of stem cell based therapies to generate lifelong anti-HIV immunity.

  5. CHIMERE 2013: a model for regional atmospheric composition modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Menut

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric trace gas and aerosol pollutants have adverse effects on health, environment and climate. In order to quantify and mitigate such effects, a wide range of processes leading to the formation and transport of pollutants must be considered, understood and represented in numerical models. Regional scale pollution episodes result from the combination of several factors: high emissions (from anthropogenic or natural sources, stagnant meteorological conditions, kinetics and efficiency of the chemistry and the deposition. All these processes are highly variable in time and space, and their relative contribution to the pollutants budgets can be quantified with chemistry-transport models. The CHIMERE chemistry-transport model is dedicated to regional atmospheric pollution event studies. Since it has now reached a certain level a maturity, the new stable version, CHIMERE 2013, is described to provide a reference model paper. The successive developments of the model are reviewed on the basis of published investigations that are referenced in order to discuss the scientific choices and to provide an overview of the main results.

  6. Chimeric Antisense Oligonucleotide Conjugated to α-Tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed an efficient system for delivering short interfering RNA (siRNA to the liver by using α-tocopherol conjugation. The α-tocopherol–conjugated siRNA was effective and safe for RNA interference–mediated gene silencing in vivo. In contrast, when the 13-mer LNA (locked nucleic acid-DNA gapmer antisense oligonucleotide (ASO was directly conjugated with α-tocopherol it showed markedly reduced silencing activity in mouse liver. Here, therefore, we tried to extend the 5′-end of the ASO sequence by using 5′-α-tocopherol–conjugated 4- to 7-mers of unlocked nucleic acid (UNA as a “second wing.” Intravenous injection of mice with this α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO achieved more potent silencing than ASO alone in the liver, suggesting increased delivery of the ASO to the liver. Within the cells, the UNA wing was cleaved or degraded and α-tocopherol was released from the 13-mer gapmer ASO, resulting in activation of the gapmer. The α-tocopherol–conjugated chimeric ASO showed high efficacy, with hepatic tropism, and was effective and safe for gene silencing in vivo. We have thus identified a new, effective LNA-DNA gapmer structure in which drug delivery system (DDS molecules are bound to ASO with UNA sequences.

  7. Serotype Chimeric Human Adenoviruses for Cancer GeneTherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akseli Hemminki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy consists of numerous approaches where the common denominator is utilization of vectors for achieving therapeutic effect. A particularly potent embodiment of the approach is virotherapy, in which the replication potential of an oncolytic virus is directed towards tumor cells to cause lysis, while normal cells are spared. Importantly, the therapeutic effect of the initial viral load is amplified through viral replication cycles and production of progeny virions. All cancer gene therapy approaches rely on a sufficient level of delivery of the anticancer agent into target cells. Thus,enhancement of delivery to target cells, and reduction of delivery to non-target cells, in an approach called transductional targeting, is attractive. Both genetic and non-genetic retargeting strategies have been utilized. However, in the context of oncolytic viruses, it is beneficial to have the specific modification included in progeny virions and hence genetic modification may be preferable. Serotype chimerism utilizes serotype specific differences in receptor usage, liver tropism and seroprevalence in order to gain enhanced infection of target tissue. This review will focus on serotype chimeric adenoviruses for cancer gene therapy applications.

  8. Chimeric behavior of excited thioxanthone in protic solvents: II. Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai-Constapel, Vidisha; Villnow, Torben; Ryseck, Gerald; Gilch, Peter; Marian, Christel M

    2014-12-18

    The chimeric behavior of thioxanthone in protic solvents has been investigated employing computational chemistry methods. In particular, methanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol have been chosen in this study. The solvent environment has been modeled using microsolvation in combination with a conductor-like screening model. The vertical excitation spectrum within the same solvent is seen to depend on the number of specific bonds formed between the chromophore and the solvent molecules. Two different models have been discussed in this work, namely, one and two H-bond models. In particular, the formation of the second H-bond causes the energy gap between the πHπL* and nOπL* states to increase further. Excited-state absorption spectra for the photophysically relevant electronic states have been theoretically determined for comparison with the time-resolved spectra recorded experimentally [Villnow, T.; Ryseck, G.; Rai-Constapel, V.; Marian, C. M.; Gilch, P. J. Phys. Chem. A 2014]. The equilibration of the 1(πHπL*) and 3(nOπL*) states holds responsible for the chimeric behavior. This equilibrium sets in with a calculated time constant of 23 ps in methanol and 14 ps in TFE (5 and 10 ps in experiment, respectively). The radiative decay from the optically bright 1(πHπL*) state is computed to occur with a time constant of 25 ns in both solvents (14–25 ns in experiment).

  9. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, George; Shi, Meng; Conteh, Solomon; Richie, Nancy; Banania, Glenna; Geneshan, Harini; Valencia, Anais; Singh, Priti; Aguiar, Joao; Limbach, Keith; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rayner, Jonathan; Smith, Jonathan; Bruder, Joseph T; King, C Richter; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Takeo, Satoru; Endo, Yaeta; Doolan, Denise L; Richie, Thomas L; Weiss, Walter R

    2009-08-10

    Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA), alphavirus replicons (VRP), attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad), or attenuated poxvirus (Pox). These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  10. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jiang

    Full Text Available Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA, alphavirus replicons (VRP, attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad, or attenuated poxvirus (Pox. These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  11. Buggy Creek virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus) upregulates expression of pattern recognition receptors and interferons in House Sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbinder-Orth, Carol A; Barak, Virginia A; Rainwater, Ellecia L; Altrichter, Ashley M

    2014-06-01

    Birds serve as reservoirs for at least 10 arthropod-borne viruses, yet specific immune responses of birds to arboviral infections are relatively unknown. Here, adult House Sparrows were inoculated with an arboviral alphavirus, Buggy Creek virus (BCRV), or saline, and euthanized between 1 and 3 days postinoculation. Virological dynamics and gene expression dynamics were investigated. Birds did not develop viremia postinoculation, but cytopathic virus was found in the skeletal muscle and spleen of birds 1 and 3 days postinoculation (DPI). Viral RNA was detected in the blood of BCRV-infected birds 1 and 2 DPI, in oral swabs 1-3 DPI, and in brain, heart, skeletal muscle, and spleen 1-3 DPI. Multiple genes were significantly upregulated following BCRV infection, including pattern recognition receptors (TLR7, TLR15, RIG-1), type I interferon (IFN-α), and type II interferon (IFN-γ). This is the first study to report avian immunological gene expression profiles following an arboviral infection.

  12. Identification and analysis of pig chimeric mRNAs using RNA sequencing data

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    Ma Lei

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene fusion is ubiquitous over the course of evolution. It is expected to increase the diversity and complexity of transcriptomes and proteomes through chimeric sequence segments or altered regulation. However, chimeric mRNAs in pigs remain unclear. Here we identified some chimeric mRNAs in pigs and analyzed the expression of them across individuals and breeds using RNA-sequencing data. Results The present study identified 669 putative chimeric mRNAs in pigs, of which 251 chimeric candidates were detected in a set of RNA-sequencing data. The 618 candidates had clear trans-splicing sites, 537 of which obeyed the canonical GU-AG splice rule. Only two putative pig chimera variants whose fusion junction was overlapped with that of a known human chimeric mRNA were found. A set of unique chimeric events were considered middle variances in the expression across individuals and breeds, and revealed non-significant variance between sexes. Furthermore, the genomic region of the 5′ partner gene shares a similar DNA sequence with that of the 3′ partner gene for 458 putative chimeric mRNAs. The 81 of those shared DNA sequences significantly matched the known DNA-binding motifs in the JASPAR CORE database. Four DNA motifs shared in parental genomic regions had significant similarity with known human CTCF binding sites. Conclusions The present study provided detailed information on some pig chimeric mRNAs. We proposed a model that trans-acting factors, such as CTCF, induced the spatial organisation of parental genes to the same transcriptional factory so that parental genes were coordinatively transcribed to give birth to chimeric mRNAs.

  13. Donor chimerism early after reduced-intensity conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation predicts relapse and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P

    2014-10-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T cell-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). We evaluated 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid and 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18 to 74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T cell-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched), with a median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6 to 120.7). In multivariable analysis, total donor cell and T cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism D100 total donor cell chimerism or T cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts who may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early restriction of alphavirus replication and dissemination contributes to age-dependent attenuation of systemic hyperinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryman, Kate D; Gardner, Christina L; Meier, Kathryn C; Biron, Christine A; Johnston, Robert E; Klimstra, William B

    2007-02-01

    Severity of alphavirus infection in humans tends to be strongly age-dependent and several studies using laboratory-adapted Sindbis virus (SB) AR339 strains have indicated that SB-induced disease in mice is similarly contingent upon host developmental status. In the current studies, the consensus wild-type SB, TR339, and in vivo imaging technology have been utilized to examine virus replication and disease manifestations in mice infected subcutaneously at 5 days of age (5D) vs 11D. Initial virulence studies with TR339 indicated that this age range is coincident with rapid transition from fatal to non-fatal outcome. Fatal infection of 5D mice is characterized by high-titre serum viraemia, extensive virus replication in skin, fibroblast connective tissue, muscle and brain, and hyperinflammatory cytokine induction. In contrast, 11D-infected mice experience more limited virus replication and tissue damage and develop mild, immune-mediated pathologies including encephalitis. These results further establish the linkage between hyperinflammatory cytokine induction and fatal outcome of infection. In vivo imaging using luciferase-expressing viruses and non-propagative replicons revealed that host development results in a restriction of virus replication within individual infected cells that is manifested as a delay in reduction of virus replication in the younger mice. Thus, an important contributing factor in age-dependent resistance to alphavirus infection is restriction of replication within first infected cells in peripheral tissues, which may augment other developmentally regulated attenuating effects, such as increasing neuronal resistance to virus infection and apoptotic death.

  15. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

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    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  16. A naturally occurring substitution in the E2 protein of Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 changes viral fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Marius; Andersen, Linda; Blindheim, Steffen H; Rimstad, Espen; Nylund, Are

    2015-01-22

    Phylogenetic analyses of the Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV3) epizootic have suggested that a substitution from proline to serine in the receptor binding protein E2 position 206 has occurred after the introduction of virus from a wild reservoir to farmed salmonid fish in Norway. We modelled the 3D structure of P62, the uncleaved E3-E2 precursor, of SAVH20/03 based on its sequence homology to the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and studied in vitro and in vivo effects of the mutation using reverse genetics. E2(206) is located on the surface of the B-domain of E2, which is associated with receptor attachment in alphaviruses. Recombinant virus expressing the E2(206S) codon replicated slower and produced significantly less genomic copies than virus expressing the ancestral E2(206P) codon in vitro in Bluegill Fry (BF2) cells. The E2(206S) mutant was out-competed by the E2(206P) mutant after 5 passages in an in vitro competition assay, confirming that the substitution negatively affects the efficacy of virus multiplication in cell culture. Both mutants were highly infectious to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), produced similar viral RNA loads in gills, heart, kidney and brain, and induced similar histopathologic changes in these organs. The E2(206S) mutant produced a less persistent infection in salmon and was shed more rapidly to water than the E2(206P) mutant. Reduced generation time through more rapid shedding could therefore explain why a serine in this position became dominant in the viral population after SAV3 was introduced to farmed salmon from the wild reservoir.

  17. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Utt, Age; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; Tammela, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2), obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs). The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV), their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate models for anti

  18. Complexity of the Microglial Activation Pathways that Drive Innate Host Responses During Lethal Alphavirus Encephalitis in Mice

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    Nilufer Esen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Microglia express multiple TLRs (Toll-like receptors and provide important host defence against viruses that invade the CNS (central nervous system. Although prior studies show these cells become activated during experimental alphavirus encephalitis in mice to generate cytokines and chemokines that influence virus replication, tissue inflammation and neuronal survival, the specific PRRs (pattern recognition receptors and signalling intermediates controlling microglial activation in this setting remain unknown. To investigate these questions directly in vivo, mice ablated of specific TLR signalling molecules were challenged with NSV (neuroadapted Sindbis virus and CNS viral titres, inflammatory responses and clinical outcomes followed over time. To approach this problem specifically in microglia, the effects of NSV on primary cells derived from the brains of wild-type and mutant animals were characterized in vitro. From the standpoint of the virus, microglial activation required viral uncoating and an intact viral genome; inactivated virus particles did not elicit measurable microglial responses. At the level of the target cell, NSV triggered multiple PRRs in microglia to produce a broad range of inflammatory mediators via non-overlapping signalling pathways. In vivo, disease survival was surprisingly independent of TLR-driven responses, but still required production of type-I IFN (interferon to control CNS virus replication. Interestingly, the ER (endoplasmic reticulum protein UNC93b1 facilitated host survival independent of its known effects on endosomal TLR signalling. Taken together, these data show that alphaviruses activate microglia via multiple PRRs, highlighting the complexity of the signalling networks by which CNS host responses are elicited by these infections.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of the host response to early stage salmonid alphavirus (SAV-1) infection in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Tharangani K; Bron, James E; Thompson, Kim D; Taggart, John B; Adams, Alexandra; Ireland, Jacqueline H; Richards, Randolph H

    2012-05-01

    Salmon pancreas disease, caused by salmonid alphavirus (SAV) of the family Togaviridae, is an economically important disease affecting farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) in Scotland, Norway, and Ireland. The virus causes characteristic lesions in the pancreas, heart, kidney and skeletal muscle of infected fish. The mechanisms responsible for the pathology and the immune responses elicited in infected Atlantic salmon are not fully understood. A microarray-based study was therefore performed to evaluate the host transcriptomic response during the early stages of an experimentally-induced SAV-1 infection. Atlantic salmon parr were injected intra-peritoneally with viral cell culture supernatant or cell culture supernatant without virus. RNA, extracted from head kidney sampled from infected and control fish at 1, 3 and 5 days post-injection (d.p.i.), was interrogated with the 17 k TRAITS/SGP cDNA microarray. The greatest number of significantly differentially expressed genes was recorded at 3 d.p.i., mainly associated with immune and defence mechanisms, including genes involved in interferon I pathways and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I and II responses. Genes associated with apoptosis and cellular stress were also found to be differentially expressed between infected and uninfected individuals, as were genes involved in inhibiting viral attachment and replication. The microarray results were validated by follow-on analysis of eight genes by real-time PCR. The findings of the study reflect mechanisms used by the host to protect itself during the early stages of SAV-1 infection. In particular, there was evidence of rapid induction of interferon-mediated responses similar to those seen during mammalian alphavirus infections, and also early involvement of an adaptive immune response. This study provides essential knowledge to assist in the development of effective control and management strategies for SAV-1 infection.

  20. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

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    Hongtao Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP, which containing glycoprotein (G and matrix protein (M of rabies virus (RABV Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M. The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  1. Peptide-based subunit vaccine against hookworm infection.

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    Mariusz Skwarczynski

    Full Text Available Hookworms infect more people than HIV and malaria combined, predominantly in third world countries. Treatment of infection with chemotherapy can have limited efficacy and re-infections after treatment are common. Heavy infection often leads to debilitating diseases. All these factors suggest an urgent need for development of vaccine. In an attempt to develop a vaccine targeting the major human hookworm, Necator americanus, a B-cell peptide epitope was chosen from the apical enzyme in the hemoglobin digestion cascade, the aspartic protease Na-APR-1. The A(291Y alpha helical epitope is known to induce neutralizing antibodies that inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1, thus reducing the capacity for hookworms to digest hemoglobin and obtain nutrients. A(291Y was engineered such that it was flanked on both termini by a coil-promoting sequence to maintain native conformation, and subsequently incorporated into a Lipid Core Peptide (LCP self-adjuvanting system. While A(291Y alone or the chimeric epitope with or without Freund's adjuvants induced negligible IgG responses, the LCP construct incorporating the chimeric peptide induced a strong IgG response in mice. Antibodies produced were able to bind to and completely inhibit the enzymatic activity of Na-APR-1. The results presented show that the new chimeric LCP construct can induce effective enzyme-neutralising antibodies in mice, without the help of any additional toxic adjuvants. This approach offers promise for the development of vaccines against helminth parasites of humans and their livestock and companion animals.

  2. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J.S.; Nidom, Chairul A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  3. Evasion of the innate immune response: the Old World alphavirus nsP2 protein induces rapid degradation of Rpb1, a catalytic subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhrymuk, Ivan; Kulemzin, Sergey V; Frolova, Elena I

    2012-07-01

    The Old World alphaviruses are emerging human pathogens with an ability to cause widespread epidemics. The latest epidemic of Chikungunya virus, from 2005 to 2007, affected over 40 countries in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The Old World alphaviruses are highly cytopathic and known to evade the cellular antiviral response by inducing global inhibition of transcription in vertebrate cells. This function was shown to be mediated by their nonstructural nsP2 protein; however, the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon has remained unknown. Here, we report that nsP2 proteins of Sindbis, Semliki Forest, and Chikungunya viruses inhibit cellular transcription by inducing rapid degradation of Rpb1, a catalytic subunit of the RNAPII complex. This degradation of Rpb1 is independent of the nsP2-associated protease activity, but, instead, it proceeds through nsP2-mediated Rpb1 ubiquitination. This function of nsP2 depends on the integrity of the helicase and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase-like domains, and point mutations in either of these domains abolish Rpb1 degradation. We go on to show that complete degradation of Rpb1 in alphavirus-infected cells occurs within 6 h postinfection, before other previously described virus-induced changes in cell physiology, such as apoptosis, autophagy, and inhibition of STAT1 phosphorylation, are detected. Since Rpb1 is a subunit that catalyzes the polymerase reaction during RNA transcription, degradation of Rpb1 plays an indispensable role in blocking the activation of cellular genes and downregulating cellular antiviral response. This indicates that the nsP2-induced degradation of Rpb1 is a critical mechanism utilized by the Old World alphaviruses to subvert the cellular antiviral response.

  4. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment......, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human...... cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our...

  5. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed...... using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR...... with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After...

  6. Vaccination priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Robert; Baños, Ana; deBernardis, Chiara

    2003-02-01

    Selection of immunizations should be based on requirements and on risk of infection. According to the International Health Regulations, many countries require yellow fever vaccination and proof thereof as the International Certificate of vaccination. Additionally selected countries require proof of vaccination against cholera and meningococcal disease. A consultation for travel health advice is always an opportunity to ascertain that routine immunizations have been performed. Recommended immunizations often are more important for traveller's health than the required or routine ones. The most frequent vaccine preventable infection in non-immune travellers to developing countries is hepatitis A with an average incidence rate of 0.3% per month; in high risk backpackers or foreign-aid-volunteers this rate is 2.0%. Many immunizations are recommended for special risk groups only: there is a growing tendency in many countries to immunize all young travellers to developing countries against hepatitis B, as it is uncertain who will voluntarily or involuntarily get exposed. The attack rate of influenza in intercontinental travel is estimated to be 1%. Immunity against poliomyelitis remains essential for travel to Africa and parts of Asia. Many of the 0.2-0.4% who experience an animal bite are at risk of rabies. Typhoid fever is diagnosed with an incidence rate of 0.03% per month among travellers to the Indian subcontinent, North and West Africa (except Tunisia), and Peru, elsewhere this rate is 10-fold lower. Meningococcal disease, Japanese encephalitis, cholera and tuberculosis have been reported in travellers, but these infections are rare in this population. Although no travel health vaccine is cost beneficial, most professionals will offer protection against the frequent risks, while most would find it ridiculous to use all available vaccines in every traveller. It is essentially an arbitrary decision made on the risk level one wishes to recommend protection--but the

  7. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  8. Manipulation of neuraminidase packaging signals and hemagglutinin residues improves the growth of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) influenza vaccine virus yield in eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Subrata; Krylov, Petr S; Turner, Jasmine C; Franks, John; Webster, Robert G; Husain, Matloob; Webby, Richard J

    2017-03-07

    In 2013, a novel avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus causing severe lower respiratory tract disease in humans emerged in China, with continued sporadic cases. An effective vaccine is needed for this virus in case it acquires transmissibility among humans; however, PR8-based A/Anhui/1/2013 (Anhui/1, H7N9), a WHO-recommended H7N9 candidate vaccine virus (CVV) for vaccine production, does not replicate well in chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we explored the possibility that PR8's hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) packaging signals mediate improvement of Anhui/1 CVV yield in eggs. We constructed chimeric HA and NA genes having the coding region of Anhui/1 HA and NA flanked by the 5' and 3' packaging signals of PR8's HA and NA, respectively. The growth of CVVs containing the chimeric HA was not affected, but that of those containing the chimeric NA gene grew in embryonated chicken eggs with a more than 2-fold higher titer than that of WT CVV. Upon 6 passages in eggs further yield increase was achieved although this was not associated with any changes in the chimeric NA gene. The HA of the passaged CVV, did, however, exhibit egg-adaptive mutations and one of them (HA-G218E) improved CVV growth in eggs without significantly changing antigenicity. The HA-G218E substitution and a chimeric NA, thus, combine to provide an Anhui/1 CVV with properties more favorable for vaccine manufacture.

  9. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-04-22

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates.

  10. Protective Immunity Induced by a Chimeric Porcine Circovirus in Piglets%嵌合猪圆环病毒对仔猪的免疫保护研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵小雪; 谢俊岭; 高峰; 周双海; 高洁; 王婷; 谭伟

    2012-01-01

    为分析嵌合猪圆环病毒(PCV 1-2)对仔猪的免疫效力,检测了PCV1-2免疫诱导仔猪产生抗猪圆环病毒Ⅱ型(PCV2)感染的保护性免疫.将10头28日龄健康普通仔猪随机平均分成两组,一组肌注免疫106.05 TCID50 PCV 1-2作为免疫组;另一组不予免疫作为对照.到免疫后28天,免疫组仔猪血清中PCV2ORF2蛋白抗体全部转为阳性.在免疫后28天,所有仔猪经口鼻予以106.95 TCID50 PCV2攻击.攻毒后,免疫组仔猪全部保持临床健康,而对照组仔猪全部出现了PCV2疾病的临床症状;免疫组血清和淋巴组织中PCV2 DNA载量均显著(P<0.05)减少;对照组仔猪淋巴组织普遍出现中度到重度的淋巴细胞减少与组织细胞浸润,而免疫组没有.研究数据表明:PCV1-2免疫诱发了仔猪对PCV2感染的保护性免疫,有望成为候选PCV2弱毒疫苗.%To explore the immunity efficacy of a chimeric porcine circovirus (PCV1-2) to piglets, the protective immunity induced by the PCV1-2 against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections in piglets were investigated. A total of 10 healthy conventional piglets were randomly and equally assigned to two groups of 5 piglets each. Piglets in group 1 were vaccinated by intramuscular injection with 106.05 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of the chimeric PCV1-2 live virus. Piglets in group 2 were not vaccinated and served as controls. By 28 days post-vaccination (DPV), all piglets in group 1 had seroconverted to PCV2 ORF2 antibody. At 28 DPV, all piglets were challenged orally and intranasally with 50625 TCID50 wild pathogenic PCV2 viruses. All vaccinated piglets remained clinically healthy after challenge, while unvaccinated animals developed clinical signs relative to PCV2 diseases. The PCV2 DNA loads in sera and lymphoid tissues were significantly (P<0.05) reduced in vaccinated piglets. Moderate to severe lymphoid depletion and histiocytic replacement were detected in most lymphoid tissues of unvaccinated

  11. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Kristian; Uttenthal, Åse; Jones, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucle....... The epitope used occurs in three different virus species-MEV, canine parvovirus, and feline panleukopenia virus-and thus the same vaccine could be used in three economically important viral hosts-mink, dogs, and cats, respectively....

  12. Characterization of hepatitis C virus recombinants with chimeric E1/E2 envelope proteins and identification of single amino acids in the E2 stem region important for entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas H R; Scheel, Troels K H; Ramirez, Santseharay

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play a key role in host cell entry and represent important targets for vaccine and drug development. Here, we characterized HCV recombinants with chimeric E1/E2 complexes in vitro. Using genotype 1a/2a JFH1-based recombinants expressing 1a...... in particle density. In addition, the 1b-E2 exchange led to a decrease in secreted core protein of 25 to 50%, which was further reduced by the E2 stem region mutations. These findings indicated that compensatory mutations permitted robust infectious virus production, without increasing assembly...

  13. Polio Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resources Share Polio Vaccine What is polio?Poliomyelitis (polio, for short) is a serious illness that can cause paralysis (when you can't move your arms and legs) or even death. Polio is caused by a virus. The virus can be spread by drinking water ...

  14. Vexing Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  15. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including a severe allergy to latex. Babies with "severe combined immunodeficiency" (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ... with moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor if ...

  16. Valuing vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  17. Role of TLR3 in the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, S S; Schulz, O; Alexopoulou, L; Leitner, W W; Flavell, R A; Reis e Sousa, C

    2009-03-01

    Replicon plasmids encoding an alphavirus RNA replicase constitute an alternative to conventional DNA plasmids with promise for DNA vaccination in humans. Replicase activity amplifies the levels of transgene mRNA through a copying process involving double-stranded (ds) RNA intermediates, which contribute to vaccine immunogenicity by activating innate antiviral responses. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a dsRNA innate immune receptor expressed by antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we test the hypothesis that TLR3 is necessary for the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based DNA vaccines. We show that mouse CD8 alpha(+) DC phagocytose dying replicon plasmid-transfected cells in vitro and are activated in a TLR3-dependent manner by dsRNA present within those cells. However, we find that cytotoxic T-cell responses to a replicon plasmid intramuscular vaccine are not diminished in the absence of TLR3 in vivo. Our results underscore the potential role of TLR3 in mediating immune activation by dsRNA-bearing replicon plasmid-transfected cells and indicate that other innate sensing pathways can compensate for TLR3 absence in vivo.

  18. Novel chikungunya vaccine candidate with an IRES-based attenuation and host range alteration mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Plante

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that has recently caused devastating urban epidemics of severe and sometimes chronic arthralgia. As with most other mosquito-borne viral diseases, control relies on reducing mosquito populations and their contact with people, which has been ineffective in most locations. Therefore, vaccines remain the best strategy to prevent most vector-borne diseases. Ideally, vaccines for diseases of resource-limited countries should combine low cost and single dose efficacy, yet induce rapid and long-lived immunity with negligible risk of serious adverse reactions. To develop such a vaccine to protect against chikungunya fever, we employed a rational attenuation mechanism that also prevents the infection of mosquito vectors. The internal ribosome entry site (IRES from encephalomyocarditis virus replaced the subgenomic promoter in a cDNA CHIKV clone, thus altering the levels and host-specific mechanism of structural protein gene expression. Testing in both normal outbred and interferon response-defective mice indicated that the new vaccine candidate is highly attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious after a single dose. Furthermore, it is incapable of replicating in mosquito cells or infecting mosquitoes in vivo. This IRES-based attenuation platform technology may be useful for the predictable attenuation of any alphavirus.

  19. Challenge pools of hepatitis C virus genotypes 1-6 prototype strains: replication fitness and pathogenicity in chimpanzees and human liver-chimeric mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens; Meuleman, Philip; Tellier, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees represent the only animal model for studies of the natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV). To generate virus stocks of important HCV variants, we infected chimpanzees with HCV strains of genotypes 1-6 and determined the infectivity titer of acute-phase plasma pools in additional a...... resource for studies of HCV molecular virology and for studies of pathogenesis, protective immunity, and vaccine efficacy in vivo....... animals. The courses of first- and second-passage infections were similar, with early appearance of viremia, HCV RNA titers of >10(4.7) IU/mL, and development of acute hepatitis; the chronicity rate was 56%. The challenge pools had titers of 10(3)-10(5) chimpanzee infectious doses/mL. Human liver......-chimeric mice developed high-titer infections after inoculation with the challenge viruses of genotypes 1-6. Inoculation studies with different doses of the genotype 1b pool suggested that a relatively high virus dose is required to consistently infect chimeric mice. The challenge pools represent a unique...

  20. Alphavirus replicon-based adjuvants enhance the immunogenicity and effectiveness of Fluzone ® in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon R; Barro, Mario; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J; Johnston, Robert E

    2011-01-29

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) without a transgene (null VRP) have been used to adjuvant effective humoral [1], cellular [2], and mucosal [3] immune responses in mice. To assess the adjuvant activity of null VRP in the context of a licensed inactivated influenza virus vaccine, rhesus monkeys were immunized with Fluzone(®) alone or Fluzone(®) mixed with null VRP and then challenged with a human seasonal influenza isolate, A/Memphis/7/2001 (H1N1). Compared to Fluzone(®) alone, Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals had stronger influenza-specific CD4(+) T cell responses (4.4 fold) with significantly higher levels of virus-specific IFN-γ (7.6 fold) and IL-2 (5.3 fold) producing CD4+ T cells. Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals also had significantly higher plasma anti-influenza IgG (pVRP immunization was 1.2 log greater (pVRP immunized monkeys had a significantly lower level of viral replication (pVRP immunized monkeys immediately after challenge. There were significant inverse correlations between influenza RNA levels in tracheal lavages and plasma anti-influenza HI and IgG anti-influenza antibody titers prior to challenge. These results demonstrate that null VRP dramatically improve both the immunogenicity and protection elicited by a licensed inactivated influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. New Viral Vector for Superproduction of Epitopes of Vaccine Proteins in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyulkina, L.G.; Skurat, E.V.; Frolova, O.Yu.; Komarova, T.V.; Karger, E.M.; Atabekov, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    The novel viral vectors PVX-CP AltMV and PVXdt-CP AltMV are superexpressors of the capsid protein (CP). These viral vectors were constructed on the basis of the potato virus X (PVX) genome andAlternantheramosaic virus (AltMV) CP gene. The expression, based on the hybrid viral vectors, is genetically safe, since the systemic transport and formation of infective viral particles are blocked. CP AltMV can self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) in the absence of genomic RNA. The vectors can be used for the presentation of foreign peptides (including epitopes of human pathogens) on the surface of the VLP. The N-terminal extracellular domain (M2e) of the influenza virus A M2 protein and its truncated variant (ΔM2e) were used as model heterologous peptides for the construction of the chimeric CP AltMV. Chimeric CP AltMV retains its ability to self-assemble into VLP. The epitopes of the M2 influenza virus protein were not eliminated during the process of accumulation, polymerization and purification of chimeric VLP AltMV, providing evidence of the stability of chimeric VLP with C-terminal heterologous epitopes. It appears that VLP produced by the vectors PVX-CP AltMV and PVXdt-CP AltMV can be used in the field of biotechnology for the presentation of the epitopes of vaccine proteins on their surfaces. The chimeric VLP AltMV with the presented foreign epitopes can be used as candidate vaccines. PMID:22649706

  2. Regulation of Semliki Forest virus RNA replication: a model for the control of alphavirus pathogenesis in invertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyongmin Hwang; Rümenapf, Tillmann; Strauss, Ellen G; Strauss, James H

    2004-05-20

    Alphavirus nonstructural proteins are translated as a polyprotein that is ultimately cleaved into four mature proteins called nsP1, nsP2, nsP3, and nsP4 from their order in the polyprotein. The role of this nonstructural polyprotein, of cleavage intermediates, and of mature proteins in synthesis of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) RNA has been studied using mutants unable to cleave one or more of the sites in the nonstructural polyprotein or that had the arginine sense codon between nsP3 and nsP4 changed to an opal termination codon. The results were compared with those obtained for Sindbis virus (SINV), which has a naturally occurring opal codon between nsP2 and nsP3. We found that (1) an active nonstructural protease in nsP2 is required for RNA synthesis. This protease is responsible for all three cleavages in the nonstructural polyprotein. (2) Cleavage between nsP3 and nsP4 (the viral RNA polymerase) is required for RNA synthesis by SFV. (3) SFV mutants that are able to produce only polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesize minus-strand RNA early after infection as efficiently as SF wild type but are defective in the synthesis of plus-strand RNA. The presence of sense or opal following nsP3 did not affect this result. At 30 degrees C, they give rise to low yields of virus after a delay, but at 39 degrees C, they are nonviable. (4) SFV mutants that produce nsP1, P23, nsP4, as well as the precursor P123 are viable but produce an order of magnitude less virus than wild type at 30 degrees C and two orders of magnitude less virus at 39 degrees C. The ratio of subgenomic mRNA to genomic RNA is much reduced in these mutants relative to the parental viruses. (5) At 30 degrees C, the variants containing an opal codon grow as well as or slightly better than the corresponding virus with a sense codon. At 39 degrees C, however, the opal variants produce significantly more virus. These results support the conclusion that SFV and SINV, and by extension all alphaviruses, regulate their

  3. B-cell epitope of beta toxin of Clostridium perfringens genetically conjugated to a carrier protein: expression, purification and characterization of the chimeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Bharti; Solanki, Amit Kumar; Kaushik, Himani; Dixit, Aparna; Garg, Lalit C

    2014-10-01

    Beta toxin (btx) is the prime virulence factor for the pathogenesis of Clostridium perfringens type C strain, known to cause necrotic enteritis and enterotoxaemia in mammalian species. The existing vaccines targeting btx are formaldehyde inactivated culture filtrates of Clostridium. These filtrates raise antigenic load in the host leading to nonspecific and poor responses. The present study aimed to overcome these drawbacks and generate a chimeric protein carrying in silico identified B-cell epitope of btx fused with a carrier protein as a vaccine candidate. Using bioinformatic tools, three stretches of amino acids were predicted as putative B-cell epitopes. One of the epitopes spanning 140-156 amino acid residues was genetically conjugated with B-subunit of heat labile enterotoxin (LTB) of Escherichia coli and expressed as a translational fusion in Vibrio cholerae secretory expression system. High level expression of the recombinant fusion protein rLTB-Btx140-156 was obtained and the protein was successfully purified. The recombinant protein retained the native LTB property to pentamerize and bind to GM1 ganglioside receptor of LTB. The antigenicity of both the epitope and the carrier protein was maintained in fusion protein as indicated by immunoblotting against anti-LTB and anti-btx antibody. The rLTB-Btx140-156 fusion protein therefore can be evaluated as a potential vaccine candidate against C. perfringens.

  4. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ProQuad® (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... up to about 1 person in 5) and measles-like rash (about 1 person in 20) than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Moderate Problems:Seizure (jerking or staring) ...

  5. Detection of a common chimeric transcript between human chromosomes 7 and 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wenwen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interchromosomal chimeric RNA molecules are often transcription products from genomic rearrangement in cancerous cells. Here we report the computational detection of an interchromosomal RNA fusion between ZC3HAV1L and CHMP1A from RNA-seq data of normal human mammary epithelial cells, and experimental confirmation of the chimeric transcript in multiple human cells and tissues. Our experimental characterization also detected three variants of the ZC3HAV1L-CHMP1A chimeric RNA, suggesting that these genes are involved in complex splicing. The fusion sequence at the novel exon-exon boundary, and the absence of corresponding DNA rearrangement suggest that this chimeric RNA is likely produced by trans-splicing in human cells. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Rory Johnson (nominated by Fyodor Kondrashov; Gal Avital and Itai Yanai

  6. T cells expressing VHH-directed oligoclonal chimeric HER2 antigen receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamnani, Fatemeh Rahimi; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali;

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) originated from antibodies is a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy. Several unsuccessful trials, however, highlight the need for alternative conventional binding domains and the better combination...

  7. Frequency of chimerism in populations of the kelp Lessonia spicata in central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Chimerism occurs when two genetically distinct conspecific individuals fuse together generating a single entity. Coalescence and chimerism in red seaweeds has been positively related to an increase in body size, and the consequent reduction in susceptibility to mortality factors, thus increasing survival, reproductive potential and tolerance to stress in contrast to genetically homogeneous organisms. In addition, they showed that a particular pattern of post-fusion growth maintains higher genetic diversity and chimerism in the holdfast but homogenous axes. In Chilean kelps (brown seaweeds), intraorganismal genetic heterogeneity (IGH) and holdfast coalescence has been described in previous research, but the extent of chimerism in wild populations and the patterns of distribution of the genetically heterogeneous thallus zone have scarcely been studied. Since kelps are under continuous harvesting, with enormous social, ecological and economic importance, natural chimerism can be considered a priceless in-situ reservoir of natural genetic resources and variability. In this study, we therefore examined the frequency of IGH and chimerism in three harvested populations of Lessonia spicata. We then evaluated whether chimeric wild-type holdfasts show higher genetic diversity than erect axes (stipe and lamina) and explored the impact of this on the traditional estimation of genetic diversity at the population level. We found a high frequency of IGH (60–100%) and chimerism (33.3–86.7%), varying according to the studied population. We evidenced that chimerism occurs mostly in holdfasts, exhibiting heterogeneous tissues, whereas stipes and lamina were more homogeneous, generating a vertical gradient of allele and genotype abundance as well as divergence, constituting the first time “within- plant” genetic patterns have been reported in kelps. This is very different from the chimeric patterns described in land plants and animals. Finally, we evidenced that IGH affected

  8. Frequency of chimerism in populations of the kelp Lessonia spicata in central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alejandra V; Santelices, Bernabé

    2017-01-01

    Chimerism occurs when two genetically distinct conspecific individuals fuse together generating a single entity. Coalescence and chimerism in red seaweeds has been positively related to an increase in body size, and the consequent reduction in susceptibility to mortality factors, thus increasing survival, reproductive potential and tolerance to stress in contrast to genetically homogeneous organisms. In addition, they showed that a particular pattern of post-fusion growth maintains higher genetic diversity and chimerism in the holdfast but homogenous axes. In Chilean kelps (brown seaweeds), intraorganismal genetic heterogeneity (IGH) and holdfast coalescence has been described in previous research, but the extent of chimerism in wild populations and the patterns of distribution of the genetically heterogeneous thallus zone have scarcely been studied. Since kelps are under continuous harvesting, with enormous social, ecological and economic importance, natural chimerism can be considered a priceless in-situ reservoir of natural genetic resources and variability. In this study, we therefore examined the frequency of IGH and chimerism in three harvested populations of Lessonia spicata. We then evaluated whether chimeric wild-type holdfasts show higher genetic diversity than erect axes (stipe and lamina) and explored the impact of this on the traditional estimation of genetic diversity at the population level. We found a high frequency of IGH (60-100%) and chimerism (33.3-86.7%), varying according to the studied population. We evidenced that chimerism occurs mostly in holdfasts, exhibiting heterogeneous tissues, whereas stipes and lamina were more homogeneous, generating a vertical gradient of allele and genotype abundance as well as divergence, constituting the first time "within- plant" genetic patterns have been reported in kelps. This is very different from the chimeric patterns described in land plants and animals. Finally, we evidenced that IGH affected genetic

  9. Quantitative chimerism kinetics in relapsed leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Xiao-ying; WANG Jing-zhi; ZHANG Xiao-hui; LI Jin-lan; LI Ling-di; LIU Kai-yan; HUANG Xiao-jun; LI Guo-xuan; QIN Ya-zhen; WANG Yu; WANG Feng-rong; LIU Dai-hong; XU Lan-ping; CHEN Huan; HAN Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Chimerism analysis is an important tool for the surveillance of post-transplant engraftment.It offers the possibility of identifying impending graft rejection and recurrence of underlying malignant or non-malignant disease.Here we investigated the quantitative chimerism kinetics of 21 relapsed leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).Methods A panel of 29 selected sequence polymorphism (SP) markers was screened by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to obtain the informative marker for every leukemia patient.Quantitative chimerism analysis of bone marrow (BM) samples of 21 relapsed patients and 20 patients in stable remission was performed longitudinally.The chimerisms of BM and peripheral blood (PB) samples of 14 patients at relapse were compared.Results Twenty-one patients experienced leukemia relapse at a median of 135 days (range,30-720 days) after transplantation.High recipient chimerism in BM was found in all patients at relapse,and increased recipient chimerism in BM samples was observed in 90% (19/21) of patients before relapse.With 0.5% recipient DNA as the cut-off,median time between the detection of increased recipient chimerism and relapse was 45 days (range,0-120 days),with 76% of patients showing increased recipient chimerism at least 1 month prior to relapse.Median percentage of recipient DNA in 20 stable remission patients was 0.28%,0.04%,0.05%,0.05%,0.08%,and 0.05% at 1,2,3,6,9,and 12 months,respectively,after transplantation.This was concordant with other specific fusion transcripts and fluorescent in situ hybridization examination.The recipient chimerisms in BM were significantly higher than those in PB at relapse (P=0.001).Conclusions This SP-based RT-PCR essay is a reliable method for chimerism analysis.Chimerism kinetics in BM can be used as a marker of impending leukemia relapse,especially when no other specific marker is available.Based on our findings

  10. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HaiFang Yin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO, further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.

  11. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Haifang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2013-09-24

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e124; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013

  12. Zygotes segregate entire parental genomes in distinct blastomere lineages causing cleavage-stage chimerism and mixoploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Destouni, Aspasia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Catteeuw, Maaike; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Smits, Katrien; Kurg, Ants; Salumets, Andres; Van Soom, Ann; Voet, Thierry; Vermeesch, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic genome dynamics, such as chromosome instability, contribute to the remarkable genomic heterogeneity among the blastomeres comprising a single embryo during human preimplantation development. This heterogeneity, when compatible with life, manifests as constitutional mosaicism, chimerism, and mixoploidy in live-born individuals. Chimerism and mixoploidy are defined by the presence of cell lineages with different parental genomes or different ploidy states in a single individual, respec...

  13. Mosaic origins of a complex chimeric mitochondrial gene in Silene vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Storchova

    Full Text Available Chimeric genes are significant sources of evolutionary innovation that are normally created when portions of two or more protein coding regions fuse to form a new open reading frame. In plant mitochondria astonishingly high numbers of different novel chimeric genes have been reported, where they are generated through processes of rearrangement and recombination. Nonetheless, because most studies do not find or report nucleotide variation within the same chimeric gene, evolution after the origination of these chimeric genes remains unstudied. Here we identify two alleles of a complex chimera in Silene vulgaris that are divergent in nucleotide sequence, genomic position relative to other mitochondrial genes, and expression patterns. Structural patterns suggest a history partially influenced by gene conversion between the chimeric gene and functional copies of subunit 1 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase gene (atp1. We identified small repeat structures within the chimeras that are likely recombination sites allowing generation of the chimera. These results establish the potential for chimeric gene divergence in different plant mitochondrial lineages within the same species. This result contrasts with the absence of diversity within mitochondrial chimeras found in crop species.

  14. Targeting duplex DNA with chimeric α,β-triplex-forming oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolganova, N. A.; Shchyolkina, A. K.; Chudinov, A. V.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Florentiev, V. L.; Timofeev, E. N.

    201