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Sample records for chimaeric transposase zinc-finger

  1. Zinc finger recombinases with adaptable DNA sequence specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Proudfoot

    Full Text Available Site-specific recombinases have become essential tools in genetics and molecular biology for the precise excision or integration of DNA sequences. However, their utility is currently limited to circumstances where the sites recognized by the recombinase enzyme have been introduced into the DNA being manipulated, or natural 'pseudosites' are already present. Many new applications would become feasible if recombinase activity could be targeted to chosen sequences in natural genomic DNA. Here we demonstrate efficient site-specific recombination at several sequences taken from a 1.9 kilobasepair locus of biotechnological interest (in the bovine β-casein gene, mediated by zinc finger recombinases (ZFRs, chimaeric enzymes with linked zinc finger (DNA recognition and recombinase (catalytic domains. In the "Z-sites" tested here, 22 bp casein gene sequences are flanked by 9 bp motifs recognized by zinc finger domains. Asymmetric Z-sites were recombined by the concomitant action of two ZFRs with different zinc finger DNA-binding specificities, and could be recombined with a heterologous site in the presence of a third recombinase. Our results show that engineered ZFRs may be designed to promote site-specific recombination at many natural DNA sequences.

  2. Zinc finger proteins in cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Jen, Jayu; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins are the largest transcription factor family in human genome. The diverse combinations and functions of zinc finger motifs make zinc finger proteins versatile in biological processes, including development, differentiation, metabolism and autophagy. Over the last few decades, increasing evidence reveals the potential roles of zinc finger proteins in cancer progression. However, the underlying mechanisms of zinc finger proteins in cancer progression vary in different cancer...

  3. Zinc finger structure-function in Ikaros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marvin; A; Payne

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger motif was used as a vehicle for the initial discovery of Ikaros in the context of T-cell differentiation and has been central to all subsequent analyses of Ikaros function.The Ikaros gene is alternately spliced to produce several isoforms that confer diversity of function and consequently have complicated analysis of the function of Ikaros in vivo.Key features of Ikaros in vivo function are associated with six C2H2 zinc fingers;four of which are alternately incorporated in the production of the various Ikaros isoforms.Although no complete structures are available for the Ikaros protein or any of its family members,considerable evidence has accumulated about the structure of zinc fingers and the role that this structure plays in the functions of the Ikaros family of proteins.This review summarizes the structural aspects of Ikaros zinc fingers,individually,and in tandem to provide a structural context for Ikaros function and to provide a structural basis to inform the design of future experiments with Ikaros and its family members.

  4. Directed evolution of improved zinc finger methyltransferases.

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    Brian Chaikind

    Full Text Available The ability to target DNA methylation toward a single, user-designated CpG site in vivo may have wide applicability for basic biological and biomedical research. A tool for targeting methylation toward single sites could be used to study the effects of individual methylation events on transcription, protein recruitment to DNA, and the dynamics of such epigenetic alterations. Although various tools for directing methylation to promoters exist, none offers the ability to localize methylation solely to a single CpG site. In our ongoing research to create such a tool, we have pursued a strategy employing artificially bifurcated DNA methyltransferases; each methyltransferase fragment is fused to zinc finger proteins with affinity for sequences flanking a targeted CpG site for methylation. We sought to improve the targeting of these enzymes by reducing the methyltransferase activity at non-targeted sites while maintaining high levels of activity at a targeted site. Here we demonstrate an in vitro directed evolution selection strategy to improve methyltransferase specificity and use it to optimize an engineered zinc finger methyltransferase derived from M.SssI. The unusual restriction enzyme McrBC is a key component of this strategy and is used to select against methyltransferases that methylate multiple sites on a plasmid. This strategy allowed us to quickly identify mutants with high levels of methylation at the target site (up to ∼80% and nearly unobservable levels of methylation at a off-target sites (<1%, as assessed in E. coli. We also demonstrate that replacing the zinc finger domains with new zinc fingers redirects the methylation to a new target CpG site flanked by the corresponding zinc finger binding sequences.

  5. Genome Engineering With Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are targetable DNA cleavage reagents that have been adopted as gene-targeting tools. ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are subject to cellular DNA repair processes that lead to both targeted mutagenesis and targeted gene replacement at remarkably high frequencies. This article briefly reviews the history of ZFN development and summarizes applications that have been made to genome editing in many different organisms and situations. Considerable progress has been mad...

  6. Prediction of DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumedha Roy; Shayoni Dutta; Kanika Khanna; Shruti Singla; Durai Sundar

    2012-07-01

    Zinc finger proteins interact via their individual fingers to three base pair subsites on the target DNA. The four key residue positions −1, 2, 3 and 6 on the alpha-helix of the zinc fingers have hydrogen bond interactions with the DNA. Mutating these key residues enables generation of a plethora of combinatorial possibilities that can bind to any DNA stretch of interest. Exploiting the binding specificity and affinity of the interaction between the zinc fingers and the respective DNA can help to generate engineered zinc fingers for therapeutic purposes involving genome targeting. Exploring the structure–function relationships of the existing zinc finger–DNA complexes can aid in predicting the probable zinc fingers that could bind to any target DNA. Computational tools ease the prediction of such engineered zinc fingers by effectively utilizing information from the available experimental data. A study of literature reveals many approaches for predicting DNA-binding specificity in zinc finger proteins. However, an alternative approach that looks into the physico-chemical properties of these complexes would do away with the difficulties of designing unbiased zinc fingers with the desired affinity and specificity. We present a physico-chemical approach that exploits the relative strengths of hydrogen bonding between the target DNA and all combinatorially possible zinc fingers to select the most optimum zinc finger protein candidate.

  7. Speed-stability paradox in DNA-scanning by zinc-finger proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Iwahara, Junji; Levy, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Extensive contact with DNA via multiple zinc fingers allows highly specific DNA-binding of zinc-finger-class transcription factors, but can also slow the target search process. Here we introduce recent insights into how zinc-finger proteins can rapidly scan DNA. Potential application of the new knowledge to the zinc-finger-based technology is also discussed.

  8. Zinc Finger Nuclease-Mediated Gene Targeting in Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc finger nucleases were used to facilitate homology driven repair and site-specific transgene integration in transgenic tobacco cell cultures. A target DNA sequence containing a non-functional, partial 3' PAT gene sequence flanked by zinc finger binding sites was stably integrated into BY2 suspension cultures using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A transgenic event containing a single integrated copy of the target sequence was used for gene targeting through co-transformation with two different Agrobacterium strains containing: i) donor DNA sequences comprising the 5' partial DNA fragment necessary to correct the non-functional PAT gene flanked by sequences homologous to the pre-integrated target DNA and ii) DNA that encoded a zinc finger nuclease that specifically recognized binding sites within the pre-integrated target. Two gene targeting strategies differing with respect to the distance between the zinc finger binding site and the homologous sequences were used. Gene targeting was demonstrated for both strategies as evidenced by the re-constitution of a functional PAT gene and was confirmed via molecular and biochemical analyses. Sequencing of recombined DNA confirmed that PAT gene reconstitution resulted from homology-driven repair at the zinc finger nuclease cleavage site. However, imperfect recombination resulting from non-homologous processes was also observed. (author)

  9. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: A zinc finger transcription factor

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; D'Souza, Ursula M.; Eisch, Amelia J.; Yajima, Shunsuke; Lammers, Claas-Hinrich; Yang, Young; Lee, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Yong-Man; Nestler, Eric J.; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2001-01-01

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in ...

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Plant-specific Zinc Finger-Homeobox and Mini Zinc Finger Gene Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Hu; Claude W.dePamphilis; Hong Ma

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger-homaodomain proteins (ZHD) are present in many plants;however,the evolutionary history of the ZHD gene family remains largely unknown.We show here that ZHD genes are plant-specific,nearly all intronless,and related to MINI ZINC FINGER (MIF) genes that possess only the zinc finger.Phylogenetic analyses of ZHD genes from representative land plants suggest that non-seed plant ZHD genes occupy basal positions and angiosperm homologs form seven distinct clades.Several clades contain genes from two or more major angiosperm groups,including eudicots,monocots,magnoliids,and other basal angiosperms,indicating that several duplications occurred before the diversification of flowering plants.In addition,specific lineages have experienced more recent duplications.Unlike the ZHD genes,&fiFs are found only from seed plants,possibly derived from ZHDs by loss of the homeodomain before the divergence of seed plants.Moreover,the MIF genes have also undergone relatively recent gene duplications.Finally,genome duplication might have contributed substantially to the expansion of family size in angiosperms and caused a high level of functional redundancy/overlap in these genes.

  11. Chemically synthesized zinc finger molecules as nano-addressable probes for double-stranded DNAs

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    Christmann Alexander

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our experiments describe an alternative method of dsDNA recognition using zinc finger (ZF molecules which bind DNA specifically and with high affinity. Our aim was to develop zinc finger probes which are able to bind to dsDNA molecules at predetermined sites. In our basic approach we used pairs of complementary oligonucleotides to form dsDNAs, containing one of the three SP1-transcription factor motifs as a zinc finger recognition site. Two zinc finger probes of the SP1 motif were chemically synthesized and modified with a Dy-633 fluorophore. The SP1 peptides were folded into functional zinc fingers using zinc chloride. The addressable dsDNAs were immobilized on optical fibres, and the kinetics and binding rates of the artificial zinc finger probes were measured by a fluorescence detecting device (photomultiplying tube. The two zinc fingers and their corresponding DNA recognition sites served as specific probes and controls for the matching site and vice versa. Our experiments showed that a variety of dsDNA-binding probes may be created by modification of the amino acid sequence of natural zinc finger proteins. Our findings offer an alternative approach of addressing dsDNA molecules, for example for use in a nanoarray device.

  12. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Cys2/His2 Type Zinc Finger Protein Gene in Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The zinc finger proteins belong to the largest family of transcription factors.But there is little research of Cys2/His2 type zinc finger proteins in cotton,and there is no submission of correlating ESTs

  13. Comparative analysis of zinc finger proteins involved in plant disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Rai, Amit Kumar; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh; Sharma, Tilak R

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to understand the role of zinc finger domains in proteins of resistance (R) genes cloned from different crops. We analyzed protein sequences of seventy R genes of various crops in which twenty six proteins were found to have zinc finger domains along with nucleotide binding sites - leucine rice repeats (NBS-LRR) domains. We identified thirty four zinc finger domains in the R proteins of nine crops and were grouped into 19 types of zinc fingers. The size of individual zinc finger domain within the R genes varied from 11 to 84 amino acids, whereas the size of proteins containing these domains varied from 263 to 1305 amino acids. The biophysical analysis revealed that molecular weight of Pi54 zinc finger was lowest whereas the highest one was found in rice Pib zinc finger named as Transposes Transcription Factor (TTF). The instability (R(2) =0.95) and the aliphatic (R(2) =0.94) indices profile of zinc finger domains follows the polynomial distribution pattern. The pairwise identity analysis showed that the Lin11, Isl-1 & Mec-3 (LIM) zinc finger domain of rice blast resistance protein pi21 have 12.3% similarity with the nuclear transcription factor, X-box binding-like 1 (NFX) type zinc finger domain of Pi54 protein. For the first time, we reported that Pi54 (Pi-k(h)-Tetep), a rice blast resistance (R) protein have a small zinc finger domain of NFX type located on the C-terminal in between NBS and LRR domains of the R-protein. Compositional analysis depicted by the helical wheel diagram revealed the presence of a hydrophobic region within this domain which might help in exposing the LRR region for a possible R-Avr interaction. This domain is unique among all other cloned plant disease resistance genes and might play an important role in broad-spectrum nature of rice blast resistance gene Pi54. PMID:22916136

  14. Rapid Mutation of Endogenous Zebrafish Genes Using Zinc Finger Nucleases Made by Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN)

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Jonathan E.; Reyon, Deepak; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Maeder, Morgan L.; Sander, Jeffry D.; Peterson, Randall Theodore; Joung, Jae Keith

    2009-01-01

    Background: Customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) form the basis of a broadly applicable tool for highly efficient genome modification. ZFNs are artificial restriction endonucleases consisting of a non-specific nuclease domain fused to a zinc finger array which can be engineered to recognize specific DNA sequences of interest. Recent proof-of-principle experiments have shown that targeted knockout mutations can be efficiently generated in endogenous zebrafish genes via non-homologous end-jo...

  15. Metal Coupled Folding of Cys2His2 Zinc-Finger

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wenfei; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Zinc-fingers, which widely exist in eukaryotic cell and play crucial roles in life processes, depend on the binding of zinc ion for their proper folding. To computationally study the zinc coupled folding of the zinc-fingers, charge transfer and metal induced protonation/deprotonation effects have to be considered. Here, by attempting to implicitly account for such effects in classical molecular dynamics and performing intensive simulations with explicit solvent for the peptides with and witho...

  16. Research Progress of PR Domain Zinc Finger Protein 14

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    Yudong HAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available PR domain zinc finger protein 14 (PRDM14 is an important member of the PRDM family, PRDM14 plays a key role in the maintenance of cell integrity and differentiation, growth and apoptosis of the cell. It also plays an critical role in the formation of primordial germ cells, the maintenance of the totipotency of stem cells and the formation of tissues and organs. PRDM14 bears a single PR domain and six tandemly repeated zinc fingers, which is involved in the process of the deacetylation and methylation of the histone, and is involved in the formation of tumor trough the change level of methylation in the promoter region. The abnormal methylation of PRDM14 can change the chromatin structure, DNA conformation and the interaction mode of DNA and protein, it can suppress transcription and expression of the gene, which caused the occurrence, development and metastasis of tumor. The research progress of PRDM14 is reviewed based on the relevant literatures published in China and abroad.

  17. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  18. ZifBASE: a database of zinc finger proteins and associated resources

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    Punetha Ankita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the occurrence of zinc finger protein motifs in genomes is crucial to the developing field of molecular genome engineering. The knowledge of their target DNA-binding sequences is vital to develop chimeric proteins for targeted genome engineering and site-specific gene correction. There is a need to develop a computational resource of zinc finger proteins (ZFP to identify the potential binding sites and its location, which reduce the time of in vivo task, and overcome the difficulties in selecting the specific type of zinc finger protein and the target site in the DNA sequence. Description ZifBASE provides an extensive collection of various natural and engineered ZFP. It uses standard names and a genetic and structural classification scheme to present data retrieved from UniProtKB, GenBank, Protein Data Bank, ModBase, Protein Model Portal and the literature. It also incorporates specialized features of ZFP including finger sequences and positions, number of fingers, physiochemical properties, classes, framework, PubMed citations with links to experimental structures (PDB, if available and modeled structures of natural zinc finger proteins. ZifBASE provides information on zinc finger proteins (both natural and engineered ones, the number of finger units in each of the zinc finger proteins (with multiple fingers, the synergy between the adjacent fingers and their positions. Additionally, it gives the individual finger sequence and their target DNA site to which it binds for better and clear understanding on the interactions of adjacent fingers. The current version of ZifBASE contains 139 entries of which 89 are engineered ZFPs, containing 3-7F totaling to 296 fingers. There are 50 natural zinc finger protein entries ranging from 2-13F, totaling to 307 fingers. It has sequences and structures from literature, Protein Data Bank, ModBase and Protein Model Portal. The interface is cross linked to other public

  19. Zinc-finger antiviral protein inhibits XMRV infection.

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    Xinlu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that specifically inhibits the replication of certain viruses, including Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV, HIV-1, and certain alphaviruses and filoviruses. ZAP binds to specific viral mRNAs and recruits cellular mRNA degradation machinery to degrade the target RNA. The common features of ZAP-responsive RNA sequences remain elusive and thus whether a virus is susceptible to ZAP can only be determined experimentally. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV is a recently identified γ-retrovirus that was originally thought to be involved in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome but recently proved to be a laboratory artefact. Nonetheless, XMRV as a new retrovirus has been extensively studied. Since XMRV and MoMLV share only 67.9% sequence identity in the 3'UTRs, which is the target sequence of ZAP in MoMLV, whether XMRV is susceptible to ZAP remains to be determined. FINDINGS: We constructed an XMRV-luc vector, in which the coding sequences of Gag-Pol and part of Env were replaced with luciferase-coding sequence. Overexpression of ZAP potently inhibited the expression of XMRV-luc in a ZAP expression-level-dependent manner, while downregulation of endogenous ZAP rendered cells more sensitive to infection. Furthermore, ZAP inhibited the spreading of replication-competent XMRV. Consistent with the previously reported mechanisms by which ZAP inhibits viral infection, ZAP significantly inhibited the accumulation of XMRV-luc mRNA in the cytoplasm. The ZAP-responsive element in XMRV mRNA was mapped to the 3'UTR. CONCLUSIONS: ZAP inhibits XMRV replication by preventing the accumulation of viral mRNA in the cytoplasm. Documentation of ZAP inhibiting XMRV helps to broaden the spectrum of ZAP's antiviral activity. Comparison of the target sequences of ZAP in XMRV and MoMLV helps to better understand the features of ZAP-responsive elements.

  20. Conservation, diversification and expansion of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome

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    Böhm Siegfried

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The classical C2H2 zinc finger domain is involved in a wide range of functions and can bind to DNA, RNA and proteins. The comparison of zinc finger proteins in several eukaryotes has shown that there is a lot of lineage specific diversification and expansion. Although the number of characterized plant proteins that carry the classical C2H2 zinc finger motifs is growing, a systematic classification and analysis of a plant genome zinc finger gene set is lacking. Results We found through in silico analysis 176 zinc finger proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana that hence constitute the most abundant family of putative transcriptional regulators in this plant. Only a minority of 33 A. thaliana zinc finger proteins are conserved in other eukaryotes. In contrast, the majority of these proteins (81% are plant specific. They are derived from extensive duplication events and form expanded families. We assigned the proteins to different subgroups and families and focused specifically on the two largest and evolutionarily youngest families (A1 and C1 that are suggested to be primarily involved in transcriptional regulation. The newly defined family A1 (24 members comprises proteins with tandemly arranged zinc finger domains. Family C1 (64 members, earlier described as the EPF-family in Petunia, comprises proteins with one isolated or two to five dispersed fingers and a mostly invariant QALGGH motif in the zinc finger helices. Based on the amino acid pattern in these helices we could describe five different signature sequences prevalent in C1 zinc finger domains. We also found a number of non-finger domains that are conserved in these families. Conclusions Our analysis of the few evolutionarily conserved zinc finger proteins of A. thaliana suggests that most of them could be involved in ancient biological processes like RNA metabolism and chromatin-remodeling. In contrast, the majority of the unique A. thaliana zinc finger proteins are known or

  1. An expanded binding model for Cys2His2 zinc finger protein–DNA interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cys2His2 zinc finger (C2H2-ZF) proteins comprise the largest class of eukaryotic transcription factors. The 'canonical model' for C2H2-ZF protein–DNA interaction consists of only four amino acid–nucleotide contacts per zinc finger domain, and this model has been the basis for several efforts for computationally predicting and experimentally designing protein–DNA interfaces. Here, we perform a systematic analysis of structural and experimental binding data and find that, in addition to the canonical contacts, several other amino acid and base pair combinations frequently play a role in C2H2-ZF protein–DNA binding. We suggest an expansion of the canonical C2H2-ZF model to include one to three additional contacts, and show that computational approaches including these additional contacts improve predictions of DNA targets of zinc finger proteins

  2. Zinc finger as distance determinant in the flexible linker of intron endonuclease I-TevI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Amy B; Stanger, Matt J; Dansereau, John T; Van Roey, Patrick; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene

    2002-06-25

    I-TevI, the phage T4 td intron-encoded endonuclease, recognizes a lengthy DNA target and initiates intron mobility by introducing a double-strand break in the homing site. The enzyme uses both sequence and distance determinants to cleave the DNA 23-25 bp upstream of the intron insertion site. I-TevI consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain separated by a long, flexible linker. The DNA-binding domain consists of three subdomains: a zinc finger, a minor-groove binding alpha-helix, and a helix-turn-helix. In this study, a mutational analysis was undertaken to assess the roles of these subdomains in substrate binding and cleavage. Surprisingly, the zinc finger is not required for DNA binding or catalysis. Rather, the zinc finger is a component of the linker and directs the catalytic domain to cleave the homing site at a fixed distance from the intron insertion site. When the cleavage site (CS) is shifted outside a given range, wild-type I-TevI defaults to the fixed distance, whereas zinc-finger mutants have lost the distance determinant and search out the displaced cleavage sequences. Although counterintuitive, a protein containing a 19-aa deletion of the zinc finger can extend further than can wild-type I-TevI to cleave a distant CS sequence, and a Cys-to-Ala mutant of the ligands for zinc, nominally a longer protein, can retract to cleave at a closer CS sequence. Models are presented for the novel function of the zinc finger, as a molecular constraint, whereby intramolecular protein-protein interactions position the catalytic domain by "catalytic clamp" and/or "linker-organizer" mechanisms. PMID:12077294

  3. Potential application of FoldX force field based protein modeling in zinc finger nucleases design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, ZuYong; Mei, Gui; Zhao, ChunPeng; Chen, YaoSheng

    2011-05-01

    Engineered sequence-specific zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) make the highly efficient modification of eukaryotic genomes possible. However, most current strategies for developing zinc finger nucleases with customized sequence specificities require the construction of numerous tandem arrays of zinc finger proteins (ZFPs), and subsequent largescale in vitro validation of their DNA binding affinities and specificities via bacterial selection. The labor and expertise required in this complex process limits the broad adoption of ZFN technology. An effective computational assisted design strategy will lower the complexity of the production of a pair of functional ZFNs. Here we used the FoldX force field to build 3D models of 420 ZFP-DNA complexes based on zinc finger arrays developed by the Zinc Finger Consortium using OPEN (oligomerized pool engineering). Using nonlinear and linear regression analysis, we found that the calculated protein-DNA binding energy in a modeled ZFP-DNA complex strongly correlates to the failure rate of the zinc finger array to show significant ZFN activity in human cells. In our models, less than 5% of the three-finger arrays with calculated protein-DNA binding energies lower than -13.132 kcal mol(-1) fail to form active ZFNs in human cells. By contrast, for arrays with calculated protein-DNA binding energies higher than -5 kcal mol(-1), as many as 40% lacked ZFN activity in human cells. Therefore, we suggest that the FoldX force field can be useful in reducing the failure rate and increasing efficiency in the design of ZFNs. PMID:21455692

  4. Stress Responsive Zinc-finger Protein Gene of Populus euphratica in Tobacco Enhances Salt Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The Populus euphratica stress responsive zinc-finger protein gene PSTZ, which encodes a protein including typical Cys2/His2 zinc finger structure, was isolated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from P. euphratica.Northern hybridization revealed that its expression was induced under drought and salt stress conditions. To examine its function, cDNA of the PSTZ gene, driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, was cloned into a plant expression vector pBin438 and introduced into tobacco plants. Transgenic tobacco showed an enhanced salt tolerance, suggesting that PSTZ may play a role in plant responsiveness to salt stress.

  5. Metal binding and folding properties of a minimalist Cys2His2 zinc finger peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, S.F.; Kilfoil, V J; Schmidt, M.H.; Amann, B T; Berg, J M

    1992-01-01

    A minimalist Cys2His2 zinc finger peptide, Lys-Tyr-Ala-Cys-Ala-Ala-Cys-Ala-Ala-Ala-Phe-Ala-Ala-Lys-Ala-Ala-Leu-Ala- Ala-His-Ala-Ala-Ala-His-Ala-Lys, has been synthesized. Metal binding studies using Co2+ as a probe indicated that this peptide forms a 1:1 peptide/metal complex with a dissociation constant comparable to that observed for other zinc finger peptides. At high peptide concentrations, a 2:1 peptide/metal complex also forms, with four cysteinates coordinated to Co2+. Additional studi...

  6. Proteomic analysis of MCF-7 cell lines expressing the zinc-finger or the proline-rich domain of retinoblastoma-interacting-zinc-finger protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambery, Angela; Farina, Annarita; Di Maro, Antimo; Rossi, Mariangela; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Malorni, Livia; Cacace, Giuseppina; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Malorni, Antonio; Parente, Augusto

    2006-05-01

    To identify a growth-promoting activity related to retinoblastoma-interacting-zinc-finger (RIZ) protein, differential protein expression of MCF-7 cell lines expressing the zinc-finger or the proline-rich domain of RIZ protein was analyzed by a robust bottom-up mass-spectrometry proteomic approach. Spots corresponding to qualitative and quantitative differences in protein expression have been selected and identified. Some of these proteins have been previously reported as being associated with different types of carcinomas or involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Knowledge of specific differentially expressed proteins by MCF-7-derived cell lines expressing RIZ different domains will provide the basis for identifying a growth-promoting activity related to RIZ gene products. PMID:16674107

  7. Herbivory responsive C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor protein StZFP2 from potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    While C2H2 zinc finger transcription factors are often regulated by abiotic stress, their role during insect infestation has been overlooked. This study demonstrates that the transcripts of the zinc finger transcription factors StZFP1 and StZFP2 are induced in potato (Solanum tuberosum) upon infesta...

  8. C terminal retroviral-type zinc finger domain from the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein is structurally similar to the N-terminal zinc finger domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic and computational methods were employed for the structure determination of an 18-residue peptide with the amino acid sequence of the C-terminal retriviral-type (r.t.) zinc finger domain from the nucleocapsid protein (NCP) of HIV-1 [Zn(HIV1-F2)]. Unlike results obtained for the first retroviral-type zinc finger peptide, Zn (HIV1-F1) broad signals indicative of confomational lability were observed in the 1H NMR spectrum of An(HIV1-F2) at 25 C. The NMR signals narrowed upon cooling to -2 C, enabling complete 1H NMR signal assignment via standard two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods. Distance restraints obtained from qualitative analysis of 2D nuclear Overhauser effect (NOESY) data were sued to generate 30 distance geometry (DG) structures with penalties in the range 0.02-0.03 angstrom 2. All structures were qualitatively consistent with the experimental NOESY spectrum based on comparisons with 2D NOESY back-calculated spectra. These results indicate that the r.t. zinc finger sequences observed in retroviral NCPs, simple plant virus coat proteins, and in a human single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein share a common structural motif

  9. Quantum chemical modelling of reactivity and selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, Igor A.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.; Burt, Stanley K.

    Interactions of 1,2-dithiolane species with zinc-containing sites, which mimic the zinc finger domains of retroviral and the cellular zinc finger proteins, have been investigated by quantum chemistry tools. According to the calculations, the immediate domains of zinc binding sites in the cellular and retroviral zinc fingers interact differently with such agents of the disulphide family. Thus, when approaching the model cellular-type domains, the molecules of 1,2-dithiolanes experience considerable potential barriers along the reaction path. However, these species react practically barrier-less with the model retroviral-type domains at the correlated DFT level. The results of the quantum chemical modelling provide firm support to the selectivity of 1,2-dithiolanes towards retroviral and cellular zinc fingers. This can be of great practical importance for the design of therapeutics that accomplish functional inactivation of the zinc fingers of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) retroviral type nucleocapsid protein NCp7.

  10. DUF581 is plant specific FCS-like zinc finger involved in protein-protein interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jamsheer K

    Full Text Available Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction.

  11. Recruitment of mRNA-destabilizing protein TIS11 to stress granules is mediated by its zinc finger domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIS11, a member of the CCCH zinc finger protein family, was found to be distributed throughout cells with a preferential cytoplasmic localization when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. Upon treatment with heat shock, TIS11 became localized in discrete particles in the cytoplasm of the transfectants. We showed the TIS11-positive particles to be stress granules (SGs), which are known to be formed in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells in response to environmental stresses. By deletion studies using the green fluorescent protein fusion system, we mapped a functional stress granule (SG) localization signal to a region containing two tandem repeats of the zinc finger motif of TIS11. Site-directed mutations of Tyr105/Tyr113, Gly109/Gly 114, and Phe119 in the first zinc finger motif diminished the ability of this TIS11 domain to direct SG localization. Importantly, when the zinc-chelating Cys residues in either the first or second zinc finger were mutated to Ala residues, the recruitment of the TIS11 zinc finger region to SG was significantly inhibited by the mutation and was completely abolished by the mutation in both zinc fingers. These results suggest that recruitment of TIS11 to heat shock-induced SG is governed by the tandem zinc finger domains of this protein

  12. Zinc-finger nickase-mediated insertion of the lysostaphin gene into the beta-casein locus in cloned cows

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Guo, Wenjiang; Chang, Bohao; Liu, Jun; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc-finger nickases (ZFNickases) are a type of programmable nuclease that can be engineered from zinc-finger nucleases to induce site-specific single-strand breaks or nicks in genomic DNA, which result in homology-directed repair. Although zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene disruption has been demonstrated in pigs and cattle, they have not been used to target gene addition into an endogenous gene locus in any large domestic species. Here we show in bovine fetal fibroblasts that targeting ZFN...

  13. Lead neurotoxicity: exploring the potential impact of lead substitution in zinc-finger proteins on mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordemann, Jacqueline Michelle; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2016-06-01

    Childhood lead poisoning is a costly and largely preventable public health problem that lowers IQs, decreases attention spans, and leads to the development of other childhood intellectual disabilities. Furthermore, recent evidence links developmental lead poisoning with the etiology of disorders that appear much later in life, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. Little is known about how lead influences the onset of these disorders. This paper reviews the evidence that lead substitution for zinc in zinc-finger proteins contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. The zinc-finger proteins potentially impacted by lead include DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and Presenilin 1 and 2 (PSEN1/2) in Alzheimer's disease, the dopamine receptor in Parkinson's disease, and the NMDA receptor, zinc-finger protein 804A (ZNF804A), and disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1)-binding zinc-finger (DBZ) in schizophrenia. PMID:26745006

  14. Solution NMR characterization of Sgf73(1-104) indicates that Zn ion is required to stabilize zinc finger motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chaohua [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wu, Minhao [School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Pan; Shi, Chaowei [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zang, Jianye, E-mail: zangjy@ustc.edu.cn [School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-07-02

    Zinc finger motif contains a zinc ion coordinated by several conserved amino acid residues. Yeast Sgf73 protein was identified as a component of SAGA (Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase) multi-subunit complex and Sgf73 protein was known to contain two zinc finger motifs. Sgf73(1-104), containing the first zinc finger motif, was necessary to modulate the deubiquitinase activity of SAGA complex. Here, Sgf73(1-104) was over-expressed using bacterial expression system and purified for solution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) structural studies. Secondary structure and site-specific relaxation analysis of Sgf73(1-104) were achieved after solution NMR backbone assignment. Solution NMR and circular dichroism analysis of Sgf73(1-104) after zinc ion removal using chelation reagent EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid) demonstrated that zinc ion was required to maintain stable conformation of the zinc finger motif.

  15. Design, construction, and analysis of specific zinc finger nucleases for microphthalmia - associate transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the design, construction, and cleavage analysis of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs that could cut the specific sequences within microphthalmia - associate transcription factor (mitfa of zebra fish. The target site and ZFPs were selected and designed with zinc finger tools, while the ZFPs were synthesized using DNAWorks and two-step PCR. The ZFNs were constructed, expressed, purified, and analyzed in vitro. As expected, the designed ZFNs could create a double-stand break (DSB at the target site in vitro. The DNAWorks, two-step PCR, and an optimized process of protein expression were firstly induced in the construction of ZFNs successfully, which was an effective and simplified protocol. These results could be useful for further application of ZFNs - mediated gene targeting.

  16. Can Co(II) or Cd(II) substitute for Zn(II) in zinc fingers?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rabindra Reddy; M Radhika

    2001-02-01

    Zinc finger domains consist of sequences of amino acids containing cysteine and histidine residues tetrahedrally coordinated to a zinc ion. The role of zinc in a DNA binding finger was considered purely structural due to the absence of redox chemistry in zinc. However, whether other metals e.g. Co(II) or Cd(II) can substitute Zn(II) is not settled. For an answer the detailed interaction of Co(II) and Cd(II) with cysteine methylester and histidine methylester has been investigated as a model for the zinc core in zinc fingers. The study was extended to different temperatures to evaluate the thermodynamic parameters associated with these interactions. The results suggest that zinc has a unique role.

  17. Immune-related zinc finger gene ZFAT is an essential transcriptional regulator for hematopoietic differentiation in blood islands

    OpenAIRE

    Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yoko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Doi, Keiko; HIROSE, Yumiko; Koyanagi, Midori; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Kuroki, Masahide; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2010-01-01

    TAL1 plays pivotal roles in vascular and hematopoietic developments through the complex with LMO2 and GATA1. Hemangioblasts, which have a differentiation potential for both endothelial and hematopoietic lineages, arise in the primitive streak and migrate into the yolk sac to form blood islands, where primitive hematopoiesis occurs. ZFAT (a zinc-finger gene in autoimmune thyroid disease susceptibility region / an immune-related transcriptional regulator containing 18 C2H2-type zinc-finger doma...

  18. Metal-dependent folding of a single zinc finger from transcription factor IIIA.

    OpenAIRE

    Frankel, A D; Berg, J M; Pabo, C. O.

    1987-01-01

    A 30-amino acid peptide, which corresponds to the second "zinc finger" domain of transcription factor IIIA, has been synthesized and purified. This peptide folds in the presence of zinc: adding Zn2+ significantly changes the circular dichroism spectrum, and Zn2+ protects the peptide from tryptic digestion. The peptide also binds Co2+, and the absorption spectrum of the Co2+ complex suggests that a tetrahedral binding site is formed by two cysteines and two histidines. Experiments at higher te...

  19. High-frequency genome editing using ssDNA oligonucleotides with zinc-finger nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fuqiang; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Huang, Yuping; Gjoka, Monika; Duda, Katarzyna; Taunton, Jack; Collingwood, Trevor N; Frödin, Morten; Davis, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have enabled highly efficient gene targeting in multiple cell types and organisms. Here we describe methods for using simple ssDNA oligonucleotides in tandem with ZFNs to efficiently produce human cell lines with three distinct genetic outcomes: (i) targeted point mut...... mutation, (ii) targeted genomic deletion of up to 100 kb and (iii) targeted insertion of small genetic elements concomitant with large genomic deletions....

  20. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E.; Taylor, Orley R.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in “nonmodel” insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nucleases th...

  1. Control of a neuronal morphology program by an RNA-binding zinc finger protein, Unkempt

    OpenAIRE

    Murn, Jernej; Zarnack, Kathi; Yang, Yawei J.; Durak, Omer; Murphy, Elisabeth A.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Gonzalez, Dilenny M.; Teplova, Marianna; Curk, Tomaž; Zuber, Johannes; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Ule, Jernej; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Tsai, Li-Huei; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular morphology is an essential determinant of cellular function in all kingdoms of life, yet little is known about how cell shape is controlled. Here we describe a molecular program that controls the early morphology of neurons through a metazoan-specific zinc finger protein, Unkempt. Depletion of Unkempt in mouse embryos disrupts the shape of migrating neurons, while ectopic expression confers neuronal-like morphology to cells of different nonneuronal lineages. We found that Unkempt is ...

  2. Metal Coupled Folding of Cys2His2 Zinc-Finger

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wenfei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Zinc-fingers, which widely exist in eukaryotic cell and play crucial roles in life processes, depend on the binding of zinc ion for their proper folding. To computationally study the zinc coupled folding of the zinc-fingers, charge transfer and metal induced protonation/deprotonation effects have to be considered. Here, by attempting to implicitly account for such effects in classical molecular dynamics and performing intensive simulations with explicit solvent for the peptides with and without zinc binding, we investigate the folding of the Cys2His2 type zinc-finger motif and the coupling between the peptide folding and zinc binding. We find that zinc ion not only stabilizes the native structure, but also participates in the whole folding process. It binds to the peptide at early stage of folding, and directs or modulates the folding and stabilizations of the component beta-hairpin and alpha-helix. Such a crucial role of zinc binding is mediated by the packing of the conserved hydrophobic residues. We also f...

  3. The (unusual) aspartic acid in the metal coordination sphere of the prokaryotic zinc finger domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abrosca, Gianluca; Russo, Luigi; Palmieri, Maddalena; Baglivo, Ilaria; Netti, Fortuna; de Paola, Ivan; Zaccaro, Laura; Farina, Biancamaria; Iacovino, Rosa; Pedone, Paolo Vincenzo; Isernia, Carla; Fattorusso, Roberto; Malgieri, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of choices of protein ligands and coordination geometries leads to diverse Zn(II) binding sites in zinc-proteins, allowing a range of important biological roles. The prokaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger domain (originally found in the Ros protein from Agrobacterium tumefaciens) tetrahedrally coordinates zinc through two cysteine and two histidine residues and it does not adopt a correct fold in the absence of the metal ion. Ros is the first structurally characterized member of a family of bacterial proteins that presents several amino acid changes in the positions occupied in Ros by the zinc coordinating residues. In particular, the second position is very often occupied by an aspartic acid although the coordination of structural zinc by an aspartate in eukaryotic zinc fingers is very unusual. Here, by appropriately mutating the protein Ros, we characterize the aspartate role within the coordination sphere of this family of proteins demonstrating how the presence of this residue only slightly perturbs the functional structure of the prokaryotic zinc finger domain while it greatly influences its thermodynamic properties. PMID:27238756

  4. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1(Mipu1):zinc finger protein 667 - a multifunctional KRAB/C2H2 zinc finger protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1 (Mipu1) is a newly discovered upregulated gene produced in rats during the myocardial ischemic preconditioning process. Mipu1 cDNA contains a 1824-base pair open reading frame and encodes a 608 amino acid protein with an N-terminal Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain and classical zinc finger C2H2 motifs in the C-terminus. Mipu1 protein is located in the cell nucleus. Recent studies found that Mipu1 has a protective effect on the ischemia-reperfusion injury of heart, brain, and other organs. As a nuclear factor, Mipu1 may perform its protective function through directly transcribing and repressing the expression of proapoptotic genes to repress cell apoptosis. In addition, Mipu1 also plays an important role in regulating the gene expression of downstream inflammatory mediators by inhibiting the activation of activator protein-1 and serum response element

  5. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1(Mipu1):zinc finger protein 667 - a multifunctional KRAB/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} zinc finger protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D.; Zhang, C. [Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, Post-doctoral Mobile Stations for Basic Medicine, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China); Fan, W.J. [Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, Post-doctoral Mobile Stations for Basic Medicine, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China); Pan, W.J.; Feng, D.M.; Qu, S.L.; Jiang, Z.S. [Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, Post-doctoral Mobile Stations for Basic Medicine, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China)

    2014-10-31

    Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1 (Mipu1) is a newly discovered upregulated gene produced in rats during the myocardial ischemic preconditioning process. Mipu1 cDNA contains a 1824-base pair open reading frame and encodes a 608 amino acid protein with an N-terminal Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain and classical zinc finger C{sub 2}H{sub 2} motifs in the C-terminus. Mipu1 protein is located in the cell nucleus. Recent studies found that Mipu1 has a protective effect on the ischemia-reperfusion injury of heart, brain, and other organs. As a nuclear factor, Mipu1 may perform its protective function through directly transcribing and repressing the expression of proapoptotic genes to repress cell apoptosis. In addition, Mipu1 also plays an important role in regulating the gene expression of downstream inflammatory mediators by inhibiting the activation of activator protein-1 and serum response element.

  6. Characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms. Association with differentiation of hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and macroglia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Kjaerulff, Karen M; Pedersen, Hans C;

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ (broad complex tramtrack bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger) zinc finger factors are a class of nuclear DNA-binding proteins involved in development, chromatin remodeling, and cancer. However, BTB/POZ domain zinc finger factors linked to development of the mammalian cerebral cortex......, cerebellum, and macroglia have not been described previously. We report here the isolation and characterization of two novel nuclear BTB/POZ domain zinc finger isoforms, designated HOF(L) and HOF(S), that are specifically expressed in early hippocampal neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and gliogenic...

  7. The Electronic Behavior of Zinc-Finger Protein Binding Sites in the Context of the DNA Extended Ladder Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiwa, Nestor; Cordeiro, Claudette; Heermann, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Instead of ATCG letter alignments, typically used in bioinformatics, we propose a new alignment method using the probability distribution function of the bottom of the occupied molecular orbital (BOMO), highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO). We apply the technique to transcription factors with Cys2His2 zinc fingers. These transcription factors search for binding sites, probing for the electronic patterns at the minor and major DNA groves. The eukaryotic Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins bind to DNA ubiquitously at highly conserved domains. They are responsible for gene regulation and the spatial organization of DNA. To study and understand these zinc finger DNA-protein interactions, we use the extended ladder in the DNA model proposed by Zhu, Rasmussen, Balatsky & Bishop (2007) te{Zhu-2007}. Considering one single spinless electron in each nucleotide π-orbital along a double DNA chain (dDNA), we find a typical pattern for the bottom of BOMO, HOMO and LUMO along the binding sites. We specifically looked at two members of zinc finger protein family: specificity protein 1 (SP1) and early grown response 1 transcription factors (EGR1). When the valence band is filled, we find electrons in the purines along the nucleotide sequence, compatible with the electric charges of the binding amino acids in SP1 and EGR1 zinc finger.

  8. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voytas Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s. Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence. Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the

  9. Zinc finger protein TTP interacts with CCL3 mRNA and regulates tissue inflammation*

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Amar, Marcelo J.; Remaley, Alan T.; Kwon, Jaeyul; Blackshear, Perry J.; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hwang, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Zinc finger protein tristetraprolin (TTP) modulates macrophage inflammatory activity by destabilizing cytokine mRNAs. Here, through a screen of TTP-bound mRNAs in activated human macrophages, we have identified CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) mRNA as the most abundantly bound TTP target mRNA and have characterized this interaction via conserved AU-rich elements. Compared to the wild-type cells, TTP−/− macrophages produced higher levels of LPS-induced CCL3. In addition, the plasma level of CCL3 i...

  10. Targeted regulation of imprinted genes by synthetic zinc-finger transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvenot, Y; Ginjala, V; Zhang, L; Liu, P-Q; Oshimura, M; Feinberg, A P; Wolffe, A P; Ohlsson, Rolf; Gregory, P D

    2003-03-01

    Epigenetic control of transcription is essential for mammalian development and its deregulation causes human disease. For example, loss of proper imprinting control at the IGF2-H19 domain is a hallmark of cancer and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, with no targeted therapeutic approaches available. To address this deficiency, we engineered zinc-finger transcription proteins (ZFPs) that specifically activate or repress the IGF2 and H19 genes in a domain-dependent manner. Importantly, we used these ZFPs successfully to reactivate the transcriptionally silent IGF2 and H19 alleles, thus overriding the natural mechanism of imprinting and validating an entirely novel avenue for 'transcription therapy' of human disease. PMID:12621455

  11. Zinc fingers, zinc clusters, and zinc twists in DNA-binding protein domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Vallee, B L; Coleman, J E; Auld, D S

    1991-01-01

    We now recognize three distinct motifs of DNA-binding zinc proteins: (i) zinc fingers, (ii) zinc clusters, and (iii) zinc twists. Until very recently, x-ray crystallographic or NMR three-dimensional structure analyses of DNA-binding zinc proteins have not been available to serve as standards of reference for the zinc binding sites of these families of proteins. Those of the DNA-binding domains of the fungal transcription factor GAL4 and the rat glucocorticoid receptor are the first to have be...

  12. Zinc Finger 280B Regulates sGCα1 and p53 in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Shuai; Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Zhou, Jun; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2013-01-01

    The Zinc Finger (ZNF) 280B protein was identified as an unexpected target of an shRNA designed for sGCα1. Further analysis showed that these two proteins are connected in another way, with 280B up-regulation of sGCα1 expression. Knock-down and over-expression experiments showed that 280B serves pro-growth and pro-survival functions in prostate cancer. Surprisingly however, these pro-cancer functions of 280B are not mediated by sGCα1, which itself has similar functions in prostate cancer, but ...

  13. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, To Uyen [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Vaughan, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.vaughan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient.

  14. Recent developments and clinical studies utilizing engineered zinc finger nuclease technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young-Il; Kim, Hyongbum; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2015-10-01

    Efficient methods for creating targeted genetic modifications have long been sought for the investigation of gene function and the development of therapeutic modalities for various diseases, including genetic disorders. Although such modifications are possible using homologous recombination, the efficiency is extremely low. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are custom-designed artificial nucleases that make double-strand breaks at specific sequences, enabling efficient targeted genetic modifications such as corrections, additions, gene knockouts and structural variations. ZFNs are composed of two domains: (i) a DNA-binding domain comprised of zinc finger modules and (ii) the FokI nuclease domain that cleaves the DNA strand. Over 17 years after ZFNs were initially developed, a number of improvements have been made. Here, we will review the developments and future perspectives of ZFN technology. For example, ZFN activity and specificity have been significantly enhanced by modifying the DNA-binding domain and FokI cleavage domain. Advances in culture methods, such as the application of a cold shock and the use of small molecules that affect ZFN stability, have also increased ZFN activity. Furthermore, ZFN-induced mutant cells can be enriched using episomal surrogate reporters. Additionally, we discuss several ongoing clinical studies that are based on ZFN-mediated genome editing in humans. These breakthroughs have substantially facilitated the use of ZFNs in research, medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26089249

  15. The zinc finger transcription factor 191 is required for early embryonic development and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191/ZNF24) was cloned and characterized as a SCAN family member, which shows 94% identity to its mouse homologue zinc finger protein 191 (Zfp191). ZNF191 can specifically interact with an intronic polymorphic TCAT repeat (HUMTH01) in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene. Allelic variations of HUMTH01 have been stated to have a quantitative silencing effect on TH gene expression and to correlate with quantitative and qualitative changes in the binding by ZNF191. Zfp191 is widely expressed during embryonic development and in multiple tissues and organs in adult. To investigate the functions of Zfp191 in vivo, we have used homologous recombination to generate mice that are deficient in Zfp191. Heterozygous Zfp191 +/- mice are normal and fertile. Homozygous Zfp191 -/- embryos are severely retarded in development and die at approximately 7.5 days post-fertilization. Unexpectedly, in Zfp191 -/- and Zfp191 +/- embryos, TH gene expression is not affected. Blastocyst outgrowth experiments and the RNA interference-mediated knockdown of ZNF191 in cultured cells revealed an essential role for Zfp191 in cell proliferation. In further agreement with this function, no viable Zfp191 -/- cell lines were obtained by derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cells from blastocysts of Zfp191 +/- intercrosses or by forced homogenotization of heterozygous ES cells at high concentrations of G418. These data show that Zfp191 is indispensable for early embryonic development and cell proliferation

  16. Predicting success of oligomerized pool engineering (OPEN for zinc finger target site sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin Mathew J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise and efficient methods for gene targeting are critical for detailed functional analysis of genomes and regulatory networks and for potentially improving the efficacy and safety of gene therapies. Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN is a recently developed method for engineering C2H2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs designed to bind specific DNA sequences with high affinity and specificity in vivo. Because generation of ZFPs using OPEN requires considerable effort, a computational method for identifying the sites in any given gene that are most likely to be successfully targeted by this method is desirable. Results Analysis of the base composition of experimentally validated ZFP target sites identified important constraints on the DNA sequence space that can be effectively targeted using OPEN. Using alternate encodings to represent ZFP target sites, we implemented Naïve Bayes and Support Vector Machine classifiers capable of distinguishing "active" targets, i.e., ZFP binding sites that can be targeted with a high rate of success, from those that are "inactive" or poor targets for ZFPs generated using current OPEN technologies. When evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation on a dataset of 135 experimentally validated ZFP target sites, the best Naïve Bayes classifier, designated ZiFOpT, achieved overall accuracy of 87% and specificity+ of 90%, with an ROC AUC of 0.89. When challenged with a completely independent test set of 140 newly validated ZFP target sites, ZiFOpT performance was comparable in terms of overall accuracy (88% and specificity+ (92%, but with reduced ROC AUC (0.77. Users can rank potentially active ZFP target sites using a confidence score derived from the posterior probability returned by ZiFOpT. Conclusion ZiFOpT, a machine learning classifier trained to identify DNA sequences amenable for targeting by OPEN-generated zinc finger arrays, can guide users to target sites that are most likely to function

  17. Herbivory responsive C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor protein StZFP2 from potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Susan D; Novak, Nicole G; Jones, Richard W; Farrar, Robert R; Blackburn, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    While C2H2 zinc finger transcription factors (TF) are often regulated by abiotic stress, their role during insect infestation has been overlooked. This study demonstrates that the transcripts of the zinc finger transcription factors StZFP1 and StZFP2 are induced in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) upon infestation by either the generalist tobacco hornworm (THW, Manduca sexta L.) or the specialist Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). StZFP1 has been previously characterized as conferring salt tolerance to transgenic tobacco and its transcript is induced by Phytophthora infestans and several abiotic stresses. StZFP2 has not been characterized previously, but contains the hallmarks of a C2H2 zinc finger TF, with two conserved zinc finger domains and DLN motif, which encodes a transcriptional repressor domain. Expression studies demonstrate that StZFP2 transcript is also induced by tobacco hornworm and Colorado potato beetle. These observations expand the role of the C2H2 transcription factor in potato to include the response to chewing insect pests. PMID:24811678

  18. Knockout of Myostatin by Zinc-finger Nuclease in Sheep Fibroblasts and Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Liqin; Wu, Yangsheng; Li, Wenrong; An, Jing; Zhang, Fuchun; Liu, Mingjun

    2016-10-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) can negatively regulate the growth and development of skeletal muscle, and natural mutations can cause "double-muscling" trait in animals. In order to block the inhibiting effect of MSTN on muscle growth, we transferred zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN) which targeted sheep MSTN gene into cultured fibroblasts. Gene targeted colonies were isolated from transfected fibroblasts by serial dilution culture and screened by sequencing. Two colonies were identified with mono-allele mutation and one colony with bi-allelic deletion. Further, we introduced the MSTN-ZFN mRNA into sheep embryos by microinjection. Thirteen of thirty-seven parthenogenetic embryos were targeted by ZFN, with the efficiency of 35%. Our work established the technical foundation for generation of MSTN gene editing sheep by somatic cloning and microinjection ZFN into embryos. PMID:27189642

  19. Control of a neuronal morphology program by an RNA-binding zinc finger protein, Unkempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murn, Jernej; Zarnack, Kathi; Yang, Yawei J; Durak, Omer; Murphy, Elisabeth A; Cheloufi, Sihem; Gonzalez, Dilenny M; Teplova, Marianna; Curk, Tomaž; Zuber, Johannes; Patel, Dinshaw J; Ule, Jernej; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Tsai, Li-Huei; Walsh, Christopher A; Shi, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Cellular morphology is an essential determinant of cellular function in all kingdoms of life, yet little is known about how cell shape is controlled. Here we describe a molecular program that controls the early morphology of neurons through a metazoan-specific zinc finger protein, Unkempt. Depletion of Unkempt in mouse embryos disrupts the shape of migrating neurons, while ectopic expression confers neuronal-like morphology to cells of different nonneuronal lineages. We found that Unkempt is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein and identified its precise binding sites within coding regions of mRNAs linked to protein metabolism and trafficking. RNA binding is required for Unkempt-induced remodeling of cellular shape and is directly coupled to a reduced production of the encoded proteins. These findings link post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression with cellular shape and have general implications for the development and disease of multicellular organisms. PMID:25737280

  20. Characterization of the tandem CWCH2 sequence motif: a hallmark of inter-zinc finger interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aruga Jun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C2H2 zinc finger (ZF domain is widely conserved among eukaryotic proteins. In Zic/Gli/Zap1 C2H2 ZF proteins, the two N-terminal ZFs form a single structural unit by sharing a hydrophobic core. This structural unit defines a new motif comprised of two tryptophan side chains at the center of the hydrophobic core. Because each tryptophan residue is located between the two cysteine residues of the C2H2 motif, we have named this structure the tandem CWCH2 (tCWCH2 motif. Results Here, we characterized 587 tCWCH2-containing genes using data derived from public databases. We categorized genes into 11 classes including Zic/Gli/Glis, Arid2/Rsc9, PacC, Mizf, Aebp2, Zap1/ZafA, Fungl, Zfp106, Twincl, Clr1, and Fungl-4ZF, based on sequence similarity, domain organization, and functional similarities. tCWCH2 motifs are mostly found in organisms belonging to the Opisthokonta (metazoa, fungi, and choanoflagellates and Amoebozoa (amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum. By comparison, the C2H2 ZF motif is distributed widely among the eukaryotes. The structure and organization of the tCWCH2 motif, its phylogenetic distribution, and molecular phylogenetic analysis suggest that prototypical tCWCH2 genes existed in the Opisthokonta ancestor. Within-group or between-group comparisons of the tCWCH2 amino acid sequence identified three additional sequence features (site-specific amino acid frequencies, longer linker sequence between two C2H2 ZFs, and frequent extra-sequences within C2H2 ZF motifs. Conclusion These features suggest that the tCWCH2 motif is a specialized motif involved in inter-zinc finger interactions.

  1. The functional significance of common polymorphisms in zinc finger transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Sarah H; Guan, Anna; Yu, Abigail S; Zhang, Chi; Zykovich, Artem; Korf, Ian; Rannala, Bruce; Segal, David J

    2014-09-01

    Variants that alter the DNA-binding specificity of transcription factors could affect the specificity for and expression of potentially many target genes, as has been observed in several tumor-derived mutations. Here we examined if such trans expression quantitative trait loci (trans-eQTLs) could similarly result from common genetic variants. We chose to focus on the Cys2-His2 class of zinc finger transcription factors because they are the most abundant superfamily of transcription factors in human and have well-characterized DNA binding interactions. We identified 430 SNPs that cause missense substitutions in the DNA-contacting residues. Fewer common missense SNPs were found at DNA-contacting residues compared with non-DNA-contacting residues (P = 0.00006), consistent with possible functional selection against SNPs at DNA-contacting positions. Functional predictions based on zinc finger transcription factor (ZNF) DNA binding preferences also suggested that many common substitutions could potentially alter binding specificity. However, Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium analysis and examination of seven orthologs within the primate lineage failed to find evidence of trans-eQTLs associated with the DNA-contacting positions or evidence of a different selection pressure on a contemporary and evolutionary timescales. The overall conclusion was that common SNPs that alter the DNA-contacting residues of these factors are unlikely to produce strong trans-eQTLs, consistent with the observations by others that trans-eQTLs in humans tend to be few and weak. Some rare SNPs might alter specificity and remained rare due to purifying selection. The study also underscores the need for large-scale eQTLs mapping efforts that might provide experimental evidence for SNPs that alter the choice of transcription factor binding sites. PMID:24970883

  2. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Wataru; Kezuka, Aki; Murakami, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Jinhee; Abe, Koichi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Motoki, Hiroaki; Matsuo, Takafumi; Shimura, Nobuaki [System Instruments Co., Ltd., 776-2 Komiya-cho, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0031 (Japan); Noda, Mamoru; Igimi, Shizunobu [Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Ikebukuro, Kazunori, E-mail: ikebu@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Zif268 fused to luciferase was used for E. coli O157, Salmonella and coliform detection. •Artificial zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was constructed for Norovirus detection. •An analyzer that automatically detects PCR products by zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was developed. •Target pathogens were specifically detected by the automatic analyzer with zinc finger protein fused to luciferase. -- Abstract: An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268–luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF–luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF–luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0 × 10 to 1.0 × 10{sup 6} copies.

  3. Automatic polymerase chain reaction product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger protein fused to luciferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Zif268 fused to luciferase was used for E. coli O157, Salmonella and coliform detection. •Artificial zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was constructed for Norovirus detection. •An analyzer that automatically detects PCR products by zinc finger protein fused to luciferase was developed. •Target pathogens were specifically detected by the automatic analyzer with zinc finger protein fused to luciferase. -- Abstract: An automatic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product detection system for food safety monitoring using zinc finger (ZF) protein fused to luciferase was developed. ZF protein fused to luciferase specifically binds to target double stranded DNA sequence and has luciferase enzymatic activity. Therefore, PCR products that comprise ZF protein recognition sequence can be detected by measuring the luciferase activity of the fusion protein. We previously reported that PCR products from Legionella pneumophila and Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 genomic DNA were detected by Zif268, a natural ZF protein, fused to luciferase. In this study, Zif268–luciferase was applied to detect the presence of Salmonella and coliforms. Moreover, an artificial zinc finger protein (B2) fused to luciferase was constructed for a Norovirus detection system. In the luciferase activity detection assay, several bound/free separation process is required. Therefore, an analyzer that automatically performed the bound/free separation process was developed to detect PCR products using the ZF–luciferase fusion protein. By means of the automatic analyzer with ZF–luciferase fusion protein, target pathogenic genomes were specifically detected in the presence of other pathogenic genomes. Moreover, we succeeded in the detection of 10 copies of E. coli BL21 without extraction of genomic DNA by the automatic analyzer and E. coli was detected with a logarithmic dependency in the range of 1.0 × 10 to 1.0 × 106 copies

  4. Localization and Differential Expression of the Krüppel-Associated Box Zinc Finger Proteins 1 and 54 in Early Mouse Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Maria; Teperek, Marta; Elholm, Grethe;

    2010-01-01

    -fused reporter gene into zygotes demonstrated the intracellular distribution of ZFP1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and ZFP54-GFP colocalized with a DNA marker in the two-cell embryo. The KRAB domain was essential to colocalize with DNA, and deletion of the KRAB domain in ZFP1-GFP and ZFP54-GFP localized...... transcriptional repressors, zinc finger protein (ZFP1) and ZFP54, belonging to the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) zinc finger family, were isolated. ZFP1 and ZFP54 contain an N-terminally located KRAB repressor domain followed by 8 and 12 repeats of Krüppel zinc-finger motifs, respectively. Reverse transcription...

  5. Deducing the Energetic Cost of Protein Folding in Zinc Finger Proteins Using Designed Metallopeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc finger transcription factors represent the largest single class of metalloproteins in the human genome. Binding of Zn(II) to their canonical Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 sites results in metal-induced protein folding events required to achieve their proper structure for biological activity. The thermodynamic contribution of Zn(II) in each of these coordination spheres toward protein folding is poorly understood because of the coupled nature of the metal-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Using an unstructured peptide scaffold, GGG, we have employed fluorimetry, potentiometry, and calorimetry to determine the thermodynamics of Zn(II) binding to the Cys4, Cys3His1, and Cys2His2 ligand sets with minimal interference from protein folding effects. The data show that Zn(II) complexation is entropy driven and modulated by proton release. The formation constants for Zn(II)-GGG with a Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 site are 5.6 x 1016, 1.5 x 1015, or 2.5 x 1013 M-1, respectively. Thus, the Zn(II)-Cys4, Zn(II)-Cys3His1, and Zn(II)-Cys2His2 interactions can provide up to 22.8, 20.7, and 18.3 kcal/mol, respectively, in driving force for protein stabilization, folding, and/or assembly at pH values above the ligand pKa values. While the contributions from the three coordination motifs differ by 4.5 kcal/mol in Zn(II) affinity at pH 9.0, they are equivalent at physiological pH, ?G = -16.8 kcal/mol or a Ka = 2.0 x 1012 M-1. Calorimetric data show that this is due to proton-based enthalpy-entropy compensation between the favorable entropic term from proton release and the unfavorable enthalpic term due to thiol deprotonation. Since protein folding effects have been minimized in the GGG scaffold, these peptides possess nearly the tightest Zn(II) affinities possible for their coordination motifs. The Zn(II) affinities in each coordination motif are compared between the GGG scaffold and natural zinc finger proteins to determine the free energy required to fold the latter

  6. A new family of zinc finger proteins in petunia: structure, DNA sequence recognition, and floral organ-specific expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuji, H; Nakamura, N; Katsumoto, Y

    1994-07-01

    We have previously cloned a gene for a zinc finger protein (EPF1) that is expressed specifically in petals and interacts with the promoter region of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene in petunia. In an attempt to isolate genes encoding additional factors that interact with this promoter, we cloned four novel genes encoding zinc finger proteins (EPF2-5a, EPF2-5b, EPF2-4, and EPF2-7). Sequence analyses revealed that overall similarity between the EPF1 and the EPF2 protein family, except in the zinc finger motifs and the basic amino acid cluster, was very low, suggesting that the two groups belong to different subfamilies. DNA binding specificities of EPF1, EPF2-5, and EPF2-4 were very similar, as expected from the conserved zinc finger motifs. However, EPF2-7 showed no binding to the probes tested in spite of having the conserved motifs. DNA binding studies using a series of spacing mutant probes suggested a binding mechanism in which the EPF proteins recognize spacings in target DNA. RNA gel blot analyses and histochemical analyses with a promoter and beta-glucuronidase fusion revealed that expression of the EPF2-5 gene (EPF2-5) was petal and stamen specific. Expression of the EPF2-7 gene (EPF2-7) was sepal and petal specific and localized in vascular tissues. The preferential expression in two adjacent floral organs raises the possibility that these genes are downstream transcription factors of floral homeotic genes. PMID:8069106

  7. Characterization and chondrocyte differentiation stage-specific expression of KRAB zinc-finger protein gene ZNF470

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a study to identify novel transcriptional regulators of chondrogenesis-related gene expression, we have cloned and characterized cDNA for zinc-finger protein 470 (ZNF470), the human ortholog of which encodes a 717 amino acid residue protein containing 17 Cys2His2 zinc-finger domains, as well as KRAB-A and KRAB-B motifs. The cDNA library used to isolate the initial ZNF470 clone was prepared from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells at an intermediate stage of chondrogenic differentiation. We have determined the intron-exon structure of the human ZNF470 gene, which has been mapped to a zinc-finger cluster in a known imprinted region of human chromosome 19q13.4. ZNF470 is expressed at high levels in human testis and is expressed at low or undetectible levels in other adult tissues. Human ZNF470 expressed in mammalian cells as an EGFP fusion protein localizes predominantly to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. ZNF470, analyzed by quantitative real time PCR, was transiently expressed before the maximal expression of COL2A1 during chondrogenic differentiation in vitro. We have also characterized the bovine ortholog of human ZNF470, which encodes a 508 amino acid residue protein having 10 zinc-finger domains. A bovine ZNF470 cDNA clone was used to examine expression of ZNF470 in bovine articular chondrocytes treated with retinoic acid to stimulate dedifferentiation. Bovine ZNF470 expression was undetectable in freshly isolated bovine articular chondrocytes, but was dramatically upregulated in dedifferentiated retinoic acid-treated chondrocytes. These results, in two model systems, suggest a possible role for ZNF470 in the regulation of chondrogenesis-specific gene expression

  8. Male-specific Fruitless isoforms have different regulatory roles conferred by distinct zinc finger DNA binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Justin E.; Fear, Justin M.; Knott, Simon; Baker, Bruce S.; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Arbeitman, Michelle N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Drosophila melanogaster adult males perform an elaborate courtship ritual to entice females to mate. fruitless (fru), a gene that is one of the key regulators of male courtship behavior, encodes multiple male-specific isoforms (FruM). These isoforms vary in their carboxy-terminal zinc finger domains, which are predicted to facilitate DNA binding. Results By over-expressing individual FruM isoforms in fru-expressing neurons in either males or females and assaying the global transcri...

  9. The transition to endoreduplication in trophoblast giant cells is regulated by the mSNA zinc finger transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, H; Scott, I C; Cross, J C

    1998-07-01

    Terminal cell differentiation is usually associated with cell cycle exit. In some lineages, however, cells undergo continued rounds of DNA synthesis without intervening mitoses (endoreduplication) resulting in polyploid nuclei. This is striking in rodent trophoblast giant cells which contain up to 1000N of DNA. In Drosophila, the Escargot gene has been implicated in regulating the transition from mitotic cell cycles to endocycles during development. We found that a murine homologue, mSna, was expressed in mouse trophoblast and was downregulated during giant cell differentiation. The mSNA zinc finger protein bound to E-box DNA elements and, in transfected C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts, acted as a transcriptional repressor. The maximal repressive effect was dependent on both the zinc finger DNA-binding domain and the N-terminal, seven-amino-acid SNAG domain. Misexpression experiments in Rcho-1 trophoblast cells revealed that mSna regulates the transition from replicating precursor cells to committed giant cells: overexpression blocked, whereas antisense RNA-mediated underexpression promoted trophoblast giant cell differentiation. Overexpression of mSna in precursor cells had no effect on cell cycle kinetics, but did increase cyclin A and B levels, implying actions during G2. These effects were dependent on both the zinc finger and SNAG domains. Together, these data suggest that mSNA has an ESCARGOT-like function to repress the transcription of genes that promote the transition from mitotic to endoreduplicative cell cycles in rodent trophoblast. PMID:9676199

  10. Cloning and characterization of SmZF1, a gene encoding a Schistosoma mansoni zinc finger protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Paulo R Eleutério de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger motifs (Cys2His2 are found in several proteins playing a role in the regulation of transcripton. SmZF1, a Schistosoma mansoni gene encoding a zinc finger protein was initially isolated from an adult worm cDNA library, as a partial cDNA. The full sequence of the gene was obtained by subcloning and sequencing cDNA and genomic fragments. The collated gene sequence is 2181 nt and the complete cDNA sequence is 705 bp containing the full open reading frame of the gene. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of three introns interrupting the coding region. The open reading frame theoretically encodes a protein of 164 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 18,667Da. The predicted protein contains three zinc finger motifs, usually present in transcription regulatory proteins. PCR amplification with specific primers for the gene allowed for the detection of the target in egg, cercariae, schistosomulum and adult worm cDNA libraries indicating the expression of the mRNA in these life cycle stages of S. mansoni. This pattern of expression suggests the gene plays a role in vital functions of different life cycle stages of the parasite. Future research will be directed to elucidate the functional role of SmZF1.

  11. Chalcogen bonding interactions between reducible sulfur and selenium compounds and models of zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Patricia B; Bayse, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Reducible sulfur and selenium (r-S/Se) compounds, defined as sulfur and selenium compounds not in the lowest -2 oxidation state (e.g., -1 to +6), release Zn(2+) from zinc-sulfur proteins such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and metallothionein. A series of density functional theory calculations was performed on donor-acceptor complexes between r-S/Se compounds and models of the Cys2His2, Cys3His and Cys4 ZF sites. These S⋯S/Se chalcogen bonding interactions consist of the donation of electron density from a S lone pair on the ZF model to a S/Se-X antibonding molecular orbital of the r-S/Se compound. The strength of the interaction was shown to be dependent upon the Lewis basicity of the ZF model (Cys4>Cys3His>Cys2His2) and the Lewis acidity of the r-S/Se compound as measured by the energy of the S/Se-X antibonding orbital. Interactions with the softer r-Se compounds were stronger than the r-S compounds, consistent with the greater reactivity of the former with ZF proteins. PMID:26877152

  12. Redox-responsive zinc finger fidelity switch in homing endonuclease and intron promiscuity in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Justin B; Smith, Dorie; Belfort, Marlene

    2011-02-01

    It is well understood how mobile introns home to allelic sites, but how they are stimulated to transpose to ectopic locations on an evolutionary timescale is unclear. Here we show that a group I intron can move to degenerate sites under oxidizing conditions. The phage T4 td intron endonuclease, I-TevI, is responsible for this infidelity. We demonstrate that I-TevI, which promotes mobility and is subject to autorepression and translational control, is also regulated posttranslationally by a redox mechanism. Redox regulation is exercised by a zinc finger (ZF) in a linker that connects the catalytic domain of I-TevI to the DNA binding domain. Four cysteines coordinate Zn(2+) in the ZF, which ensures that I-TevI cleaves its DNA substrate at a fixed distance, 23-25 nucleotides upstream of the intron insertion site. We show that the fidelity of I-TevI cleavage is controlled by redox-responsive Zn(2+) cycling. When the ZF is mutated, or after exposure of the wild-type I-TevI to H(2)O(2), intron homing to degenerate sites is increased, likely because of indiscriminate DNA cleavage. These results suggest a mechanism for rapid intron dispersal, joining recent descriptions of the activation of biomolecular processes by oxidative stress through cysteine chemistry. PMID:21256016

  13. Origin and evolution of new exons in the rodent zinc finger protein 39 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Lixin; ZHENG Hongkun; LI Xin; YANG Shuang; CHEN Hong; WANG Wen

    2005-01-01

    The origin of new structures and functions is an important process in evolution. In the past decades, we have obtained some preliminary knowledge of the origin and evolution of new genes. However, as the basic unit of genes, the origin and evolution of exons remain unclear. Because young exons retain the footprints of origination, they can be good materials for studying origin and evolution of new exons. In this paper, we report two young exons in a zinc finger protein gene of rodents. Since they are unique sequences in mouse and rat genome and no homologous sequences were found in the orthologous genes of human and pig, the young exons might originate after the divergence of primates and rodents through exonization of intronic sequences. Strong positive selection was detected in the new exons between mouse and rat, suggesting that these exons have undergone significant functional divergence after the separation of the two species. On the other hand, population genetics data of mouse demonstrate that the new exons have been subject to functional constraint, indicating an important function of the new exons in mouse. Functional analyses suggest that these new exons encode a nuclear localization signal peptide, which may mediate new ways of nuclear protein transport. To our knowledge, this is the first example of the origin and evolution of young exons.

  14. Mutagenesis of Genes for Starch Debranching Enzyme Isoforms in Pea by Zinc-Finger Endonucleases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch debranching enzymes in plants are divided into two groups based on their ability to hydrolyze different substrates. The first group, pullulanases, hydrolyze α-1,6-glucosidic linkages in substrates such as pullulan, amylopectin and glycogen. The second group of debranching enzymes, isoamylases, hydrolyze glycogen and amylopectin and are not active on pullulan. Three isoforms of isoamylase and a pullulanase have been isolated from a cDNA library of Pisum sativum. These isoamylases have been characterized following their heterologous expression in E. coli. Based on the DNA sequence that encodes these debranching enzymes, a specific mutagenesis targeting these enzymes will be attempted. The technique involves the homologous recombination of DNA mediated by zinc-finger endonucleases. Vectors will be constructed to include a fragment that will modify these genes. Using this technique, it is hoped that null mutants for each enzyme will be created and the exact role of these enzymes for the synthesis and degradation of starch in plants will be elucidated. (author)

  15. Classification of the treble clef zinc finger: noteworthy lessons for structure and function evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Treble clef (TC) zinc fingers constitute a large fold-group of structural zinc-binding protein domains that mediate numerous cellular functions. We have analysed the sequence, structure, and function relationships among all TCs in the Protein Data Bank. This led to the identification of novel TCs, such as lsr2, YggX and TFIIIC τ 60 kDa subunit, and prediction of a nuclease-like function for the DUF1364 family. The structural malleability of TCs is evident from the many examples with variations to the core structural elements of the fold. We observe domains wherein the structural core of the TC fold is circularly permuted, and also some examples where the overall fold resembles both the TC motif and another unrelated fold. All extant TC families do not share a monophyletic origin, as several TC proteins are known to have been present in the last universal common ancestor and the last eukaryotic common ancestor. We identify several TCs where the zinc-chelating site and residues are not merely responsible for structure stabilization but also perform other functions, such as being redox active in C1B domain of protein kinase C, a nucleophilic acceptor in Ada and catalytic in organomercurial lyase, MerB. PMID:27562564

  16. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E; Taylor, Orley R; Wolfe, Scot A; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in "nonmodel" insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nucleases that generate mutations at targeted genomic sequences. We focused our ZFN approach on targeting the type 2 vertebrate-like cryptochrome gene of the monarch (designated cry2), which encodes a putative transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clockwork. Co-injections of mRNAs encoding ZFNs targeting the second exon of monarch cry2 into "one nucleus" stage embryos led to high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining-mediated, mutagenic lesions in the germline (up to 50%). Heritable ZFN-induced lesions in two independent lines produced truncated, nonfunctional CRY2 proteins, resulting in the in vivo disruption of circadian behavior and the molecular clock mechanism. Our work genetically defines CRY2 as an essential transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clock and provides a proof of concept for the use of ZFNs for manipulating genes in the monarch butterfly genome. Importantly, this approach could be used in other lepidopterans and "nonmodel" insects, thus opening new avenues to decipher the molecular underpinnings of a variety of biological processes. PMID:23009861

  17. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  18. An elastic-network based local molecular field analysis of zinc-finger proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2011-01-01

    We study two designed and one natural zinc-finger peptide each with the Cys2His2 (CCHH) type of metal binding motif. In the approach we have developed, we describe the role of the protein and solvent outside the Zn(II)-CCHH metal-residue cluster by a molecular field represented by generalized harmonic restraints. The strength of the field is adjusted to reproduce the binding energy distribution of the metal with the cluster obtained in a reference all-atom simulation with empirical potentials. The quadratic field allows us to investigate analytically the protein restraints on the binding site in terms of its eigenmodes. Examining these eigenmodes suggests, consistent with experimental observations, the importance of the first histidine (H) in the CCHH cluster in metal binding. Further, the eigenvalues corresponding to these modes also indicate that the designed proteins form a tighter complex with the metal. We find that the bulk protein and solvent response tends to destabilize metal-binding, emphasizing tha...

  19. The Drosophila gene escargot encodes a zinc finger motif found in snail-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, M; Noguchi, P D; Sensabaugh, S M; Odenwald, W F; Kassis, J A

    1992-02-01

    Two independent P-element enhancer detection lines were obtained that express lacZ in a pattern of longitudinal stripes early in germband elongation. In this paper, molecular and genetic characterization of a gene located near these transposons is presented. Sequence analysis of a cDNA clone from the region reveals that this gene has a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila snail gene (Boulay et al., 1987). The sequence similarity extends over 400 nucleotides, and includes a region encoding five tandem zinc finger motifs (72% nucleotide identity; 76% amino acid identity). This region is also conserved in the snail homologue from Xenopus laevis (76% nucleotide identity; 83% amino acid identity) (Sargent and Bennett, 1990). We have named the Drosophila snail-related gene escargot (esg), and the region of sequence conservation common to all three genes the 'snailbox'. A number of Drosophila genomic DNA fragments cross-hybridize to a probe from the snailbox region suggesting that snail and escargot are members of a multigene family. The expression pattern of escargot is dynamic and complex. Early in germband elongation, escargot RNA is expressed in a pattern of longitudinal stripes identical to the one observed in the two enhancer detection lines. Later in development, escargot is expressed in cells that will form the larval imaginal tissues, escargot is allelic with l(2)35Ce, an essential gene located near snail in the genome. PMID:1571289

  20. Snail-type zinc finger proteins prevent neurogenesis in Scutoid and transgenic animals of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, N; Matakatsu, H; Taniguchi, M; Hayashi, S

    1999-10-01

    Scutoid is a classical dominant gain-of-function mutation of Drosophila, causing a loss of bristles and roughening of the compound eye. Previous genetic and molecular analyses have shown that Scutoid is associated with a chromosomal transposition resulting in a fusion of no-oceli and snail genes. How this gene fusion event leads to the defects in neurogenesis was not known until now. Here have found that snail is ectopically expressed in the eye-antennal and wing imaginal discs in Scutoid larvae, and that this expression is reduced in Scutoid revertants. We have also shown that the expressivity of Scutoid is enhanced by zeste mutations. snail and escargot encode evolutionarily conserved zinc-finger proteins involved in the development of mesoderm and limbs. Snail and Escargot proteins share a common target DNA sequence with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) type proneural gene products. When expressed in the developing external sense organ precursors of the thorax and the eye, these proteins cause a loss of mechanosensory bristles in the thorax and perturbed the development of the compound eye. Such phenotypes resemble those associated with Scutoid. Furthermore, the effect of ectopic Escargot on bristle development is antagonized by coexpression of the bHLH gene asense. Thus, our results suggest that the Scutoid phenotype is due to an ectopic snail expression under the control of no-oceli enhancer, antagonizing neurogenesis through its inhibitory interaction with bHLH proteins. PMID:10552298

  1. Worniu, a Snail family zinc-finger protein, is required for brain development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Shovon I; Ganguly, Atish; Roote, John; Ip, Y Tony

    2004-10-01

    The Snail family of zinc-finger transcriptional repressors is essential for morphogenetic cell movements, mesoderm formation, and neurogenesis during embryonic development. These proteins also control cell cycle, cell death, and cancer progression. In Drosophila, three members of this protein family, Snail, Escargot, and Worniu, have essential but redundant functions in asymmetric cell division of neuroblasts. In addition, Snail is critical for early mesoderm formation and Escargot is required for maintaining diploidy in wing imaginal disc cells. In this report, we demonstrate that Worniu plays a role in brain development. We show that alleles of the l(2)35Da complementation group are mutants of worniu. The developing larvae of these mutant alleles fail to shorten their brainstems. The brain phenotype, as well as the lethality, of these mutants can be rescued by worniu transgenes. Moreover, RNAi experiments targeting the worniu transcript show the same nonshortening phenotype in larval brains. worniu is expressed in the neuroblasts of brain hemispheres and ventral ganglions. The results suggest that the loss of Worniu function within the neuroblasts ultimately causes the larval brainstem to fail to go through shortening during development. PMID:15366015

  2. The mesoderm determinant snail collaborates with related zinc-finger proteins to control Drosophila neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S I; Hu, X; Roote, J; Ip, Y T

    1999-11-15

    The Snail protein functions as a transcriptional regulator to establish early mesodermal cell fate. Later, in germ band-extended embryos, Snail is also expressed in most neuroblasts. Here we present evidence that this expression of Snail is required for central nervous system (CNS) development. The neural function of snail is masked by two closely linked genes, escargot and worniu. Both Escargot and Worniu contain zinc-finger domains that are highly homologous to that of Snail. Although not affecting expression of early neuroblast markers, the deletion of the region containing all three genes correlates with loss of expression of CNS determinants including fushi tarazu, pdm-2 and even-skipped. Transgenic expression of each of the three Snail family proteins can rescue efficiently the fushi tarazu defects, and partially the pdm-2 and even-skipped CNS patterns. These results demonstrate that the Snail family proteins have essential functions during embryonic CNS development, around the time of ganglion mother cell formation. PMID:10562554

  3. Zinc finger protein 521 overexpression increased transcript levels of Fndc5 in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Motahere-Sadat Hashemi; Abbas Kiani Esfahani; Maryam Peymani; Alireza Shoaraye Nejati; Kamran Ghaedi; Mohammad Hossein Nasr-Esfahani; Hossein Baharvand

    2016-03-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 is highly expressed in brain, neural stem cells and early progenitors of the human hematopoietic cells. Zfp521 triggers the cascade of neurogenesis inmouse embryonic stemcells through inducing expression of the early neuroectodermal genes Sox1, Sox3 and Pax6. Fndc5, a precursor of Irisin has inducing effects on the expression level of brain derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus. Therefore, it is most likely that Fndc5 may play an important role in neural differentiation. To exhibit whether the expression of this protein is under regulation with Zfp521, we overexpressed Zfp521 in a stable transformants of mESCs expressing EGFP under control of Fndc5 promoter. Increased expression of Zfp521 enhanced transcription levels of both EGFP and endogenous Fndc5. This result was confirmed by overexpression the aforementioned vectors in HEK cells and indicated that Zfp521 functions upstream of Fndc5 expression. It is most likely that Zfp521 may act through the binding to its response element on Fndc5 core promoter. Therefore it is concluding that an enhanced expression of Fndc5 in neural progenitor cells is stimulated by Zfp521 overexpression in these cells.

  4. Zinc-finger nuclease mediated disruption of Rag1 in the LEW/Ztm rat

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    Zschemisch Nils-Holger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN represented an innovative method for the genome manipulation in vertebrates. ZFN introduced targeted DNA double strand breaks (DSB and initiated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ after pronuclear or cytoplasmatic microinjection into zygotes. Resulting frame shift mutations led to functional gene ablations in zebra fish, mice, pigs and also in laboratory rats. Therefore, we targeted the rat Rag1 gene essential for the V(DJ recombination within the immunoglobulin production process and for the differentiation of mature B and T lymphocytes to generate an immunodeficient rat model in the LEW/Ztm strain. Results After microinjection of Rag1 specific ZFN mRNAs in 623 zygotes of inbred LEW/Ztm rats 59 offspring were born from which one carried a 4 bp deletion. This frame shift mutation led to a premature stop codon and a subsequently truncated Rag1 protein confirmed by the loss of the full-length protein in Western Blot analysis. Truncation of the Rag1 protein was characterized by the complete depletion of mature B cells. The remaining T cell population contained mature CD4+/CD3+/TCRαβ+ as well as CD8+/CD3+/TCRαβ+ positive lymphocytes accompanied by a compensatory increase of natural killer cells in the peripheral blood. Reduction of T cell development in Rag1 mutant rats was associated with a hypoplastic thymus that lacked follicular structures. Histological evaluation also revealed the near-complete absence of lymphocytes in spleen and lymph nodes in the immunodeficient Rag1 mutant rat. Conclusion The Rag1 mutant rat will serve as an important model for transplantation studies. Furthermore, it may be used as a model for reconstitution experiments related to the immune system, particularly with respect to different populations of human lymphocytes, natural killer cells and autoimmune phenomena.

  5. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

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    Tatiana Flisikowska

    Full Text Available Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+ and IgG(+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  6. Investigating the DNA-binding ability of GATA-1-N-terminal zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 interacts with both DNA and other proteins through its zinc finger domains (ZnFs). While it has been known for me time that the C-terminal ZnF binds DNA at GATA sites, only recently has it been observed that the N-terminal finger (NF) is capable of interacting with GATC sites. Further, a number of naturally occurring mutations in NF (V205M, G208S, R216Q, D218G) that lead to anaemia and thrombocytopenia have been identified. We are interested in characterising the NF-DNA interaction and determining the effects of mutation upon this interaction. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have observed an interaction between recombinant NF and a 16-mer DNA duplex containing a core GATC sequence. This result forms the basis from which residues in NF involved in DNA binding can be identified, and work is being carried out to improve the quality of the NMR data with the aim of determining the solution structure of the NF-DNA complex. The DNA-binding affinity of both wild-type and mutant NFs mentioned above is also being investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry. These data suggest that the strength of the interaction between NF and the 16-mer DNA duplex is in the sub-micromolar range, and comparisons between the DNA-binding affinities of the NF mutants are being made. Together, these studies will help us to understand how GATA-1 acts as a transcriptional regulator and how mutations in NF domain of GATA-1 may lead to blood disorders

  7. ZFN-Site searches genomes for zinc finger nuclease target sites and off-target sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseli Christian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs are man-made restriction enzymes useful for manipulating genomes by cleaving target DNA sequences. ZFNs allow therapeutic gene correction or creation of genetically modified model organisms. ZFN specificity is not absolute; therefore, it is essential to select ZFN target sites without similar genomic off-target sites. It is important to assay for off-target cleavage events at sites similar to the target sequence. Results ZFN-Site is a web interface that searches multiple genomes for ZFN off-target sites. Queries can be based on the target sequence or can be expanded using degenerate specificity to account for known ZFN binding preferences. ZFN off-target sites are outputted with links to genome browsers, facilitating off-target cleavage site screening. We verified ZFN-Site using previously published ZFN half-sites and located their target sites and their previously described off-target sites. While we have tailored this tool to ZFNs, ZFN-Site can also be used to find potential off-target sites for other nucleases, such as TALE nucleases. Conclusions ZFN-Site facilitates genome searches for possible ZFN cleavage sites based on user-defined stringency limits. ZFN-Site is an improvement over other methods because the FetchGWI search engine uses an indexed search of genome sequences for all ZFN target sites and possible off-target sites matching the half-sites and stringency limits. Therefore, ZFN-Site does not miss potential off-target sites.

  8. Zinc finger transcription factors displaced SREBP proteins as the major Sterol regulators during Saccharomycotina evolution.

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    Sarah L Maguire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs, which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1 and C. albicans (Cph2 have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1 and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina.

  9. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masahito [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Umeyama, Kazuhiro [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); International Cluster for Bio-Resource Research, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Matsunari, Hitomi [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Takayanagi, Shuko [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo University, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  10. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. → ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. → Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  11. AAV-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases targeting hepatitis B virus inhibits active replication.

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    Nicholas D Weber

    Full Text Available Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment that targets active and persistent HBV infections remains. As a novel approach to treat HBV, we have targeted the HBV genome for disruption to prevent viral reactivation and replication. We generated 3 zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs that target sequences within the HBV polymerase, core and X genes. Upon the formation of ZFN-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB, imprecise repair by non-homologous end joining leads to mutations that inactivate HBV genes. We delivered HBV-specific ZFNs using self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV vectors and tested their anti-HBV activity in HepAD38 cells. HBV-ZFNs efficiently disrupted HBV target sites by inducing site-specific mutations. Cytotoxicity was seen with one of the ZFNs. scAAV-mediated delivery of a ZFN targeting HBV polymerase resulted in complete inhibition of HBV DNA replication and production of infectious HBV virions in HepAD38 cells. This effect was sustained for at least 2 weeks following only a single treatment. Furthermore, high specificity was observed for all ZFNs, as negligible off-target cleavage was seen via high-throughput sequencing of 7 closely matched potential off-target sites. These results show that HBV-targeted ZFNs can efficiently inhibit active HBV replication and suppress the cellular template for HBV persistence, making them promising candidates for eradication therapy.

  12. AAV-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases targeting hepatitis B virus inhibits active replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Nicholas D; Stone, Daniel; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Schiffer, Joshua T; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment that targets active and persistent HBV infections remains. As a novel approach to treat HBV, we have targeted the HBV genome for disruption to prevent viral reactivation and replication. We generated 3 zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target sequences within the HBV polymerase, core and X genes. Upon the formation of ZFN-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB), imprecise repair by non-homologous end joining leads to mutations that inactivate HBV genes. We delivered HBV-specific ZFNs using self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors and tested their anti-HBV activity in HepAD38 cells. HBV-ZFNs efficiently disrupted HBV target sites by inducing site-specific mutations. Cytotoxicity was seen with one of the ZFNs. scAAV-mediated delivery of a ZFN targeting HBV polymerase resulted in complete inhibition of HBV DNA replication and production of infectious HBV virions in HepAD38 cells. This effect was sustained for at least 2 weeks following only a single treatment. Furthermore, high specificity was observed for all ZFNs, as negligible off-target cleavage was seen via high-throughput sequencing of 7 closely matched potential off-target sites. These results show that HBV-targeted ZFNs can efficiently inhibit active HBV replication and suppress the cellular template for HBV persistence, making them promising candidates for eradication therapy. PMID:24827459

  13. Zebrafish foxP2 zinc finger nuclease mutant has normal axon pathfinding.

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    Lingyan Xing

    Full Text Available foxP2, a forkhead-domain transcription factor, is critical for speech and language development in humans, but its role in the establishment of CNS connectivity is unclear. While in vitro studies have identified axon guidance molecules as targets of foxP2 regulation, and cell culture assays suggest a role for foxP2 in neurite outgrowth, in vivo studies have been lacking regarding a role for foxP2 in axon pathfinding. We used a modified zinc finger nuclease methodology to generate mutations in the zebrafish foxP2 gene. Using PCR-based high resolution melt curve analysis (HRMA of G0 founder animals, we screened and identified three mutants carrying nonsense mutations in the 2(nd coding exon: a 17 base-pair (bp deletion, an 8bp deletion, and a 4bp insertion. Sequence analysis of cDNA confirmed that these were frameshift mutations with predicted early protein truncations. Homozygous mutant fish were viable and fertile, with unchanged body morphology, and no apparent differences in CNS apoptosis, proliferation, or patterning at embryonic stages. There was a reduction in expression of the known foxP2 target gene cntnap2 that was rescued by injection of wild-type foxP2 transcript. When we examined axon pathfinding using a pan-axonal marker or transgenic lines, including a foxP2-neuron-specific enhancer, we did not observe any axon guidance errors. Our findings suggest that foxP2 is not necessary for axon pathfinding during development.

  14. The LSD1-type zinc finger motifs of Pisum sativa LSD1 are a novel nuclear localization signal and interact with importin alpha.

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    Shanping He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic studies of the Arabidopsis mutant lsd1 highlight the important role of LSD1 in the negative regulation of plant programmed cell death (PCD. Arabidopsis thaliana LSD1 (AtLSD1 contains three LSD1-type zinc finger motifs, which are involved in the protein-protein interaction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further understand the function of LSD1, we have analyzed cellular localization and functional localization domains of Pisum sativa LSD1 (PsLSD1, which is a homolog of AtLSD1. Subcellular localization analysis of green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged PsLSD1 indicates that PsLSD1 is localized in the nucleus. Using a series of GFP-tagged PsLSD1 deletion mutants, we found that the three LSD1-type zinc finger motifs of PsLSD1 alone can target GFP to the nucleus, whereas deletion of the three zinc finger motifs or any individual zinc finger motif causes PsLSD1 to lose its nuclear localization, indicating that the three zinc finger motifs are necessary and sufficient for its nuclear localization. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis analysis of GFP-tagged PsLSD1 indicates that tertiary structure and basic amino acids of each zinc finger motif are necessary for PsLSD1 nuclear localization. In addition, yeast two-hybrid, pull-down, and BiFC assays demonstrate that the three zinc finger motifs of PsLSD1 directly bind to importin α in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that the LSD1-type zinc finger motifs of PsLSD1 are a novel nuclear localization signal and directly bind to importin α, and suggest that the nuclear import of LSD1 may rely on the interaction between its zinc finger motifs and importin α. Moreover, the nuclear localization of PsLSD1 suggests that LSD1 may function as a transcription regulator involved in negatively regulating PCD.

  15. Association of erythroid transcription factors: complexes involving the LIM protein RBTN2 and the zinc-finger protein GATA1.

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, H; Grutz, G.; Axelson, H; Forster, A.; Rabbitts, T H

    1995-01-01

    The RBTN2 LIM-domain protein, originally identified as an oncogenic protein in human T-cell leukemia, is essential for erythropoiesis. A possible role for RBTN2 in transcription during erythropoiesis has been investigated. Direct interaction of the RBTN2 protein was observed in vivo and in vitro with the GATA1 or -2 zinc-finger transcription factors, as well as with the basic helix-loop-helix protein TAL1. By using mammalian two-hybrid analysis, complexes involving RBTN2, TAL1, and GATA1, tog...

  16. Evidence that bovine forebrain embryonic zinc finger-like gene influences immune response associated with mastitis resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Mayumi; Fujikawa, Akira; Womack, James E.; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Mastitis, a mammary gland inflammation in response to bacterial infection, is a major problem in the dairy industry. We found that cows susceptible to mastitis have a three-base insertion in a glycine-coding stretch of the gene for forebrain embryonic zinc finger-like (FEZL), a transcription factor with a role in neuronal development. Mastitis induces FEZL expression in mammary glands, and induced FEZL promotes expression of the axon-attracting molecule semaphorin 5A (SEMA5A) through a GCAG s...

  17. The maize INDETERMINATE1 flowering time regulator defines a highly conserved zinc finger protein family in higher plants

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    Colasanti Joseph

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maize INDETERMINATE1 gene, ID1, is a key regulator of the transition to flowering and the founding member of a transcription factor gene family that encodes a protein with a distinct arrangement of zinc finger motifs. The zinc fingers and surrounding sequence make up the signature ID domain (IDD, which appears to be found in all higher plant genomes. The presence of zinc finger domains and previous biochemical studies showing that ID1 binds to DNA suggests that members of this gene family are involved in transcriptional regulation. Results Comparison of IDD genes identified in Arabidopsis and rice genomes, and all IDD genes discovered in maize EST and genomic databases, suggest that ID1 is a unique member of this gene family. High levels of sequence similarity amongst all IDD genes from maize, rice and Arabidopsis suggest that they are derived from a common ancestor. Several unique features of ID1 suggest that it is a divergent member of the maize IDD family. Although no clear ID1 ortholog was identified in the Arabidopsis genome, highly similar genes that encode proteins with identity extending beyond the ID domain were isolated from rice and sorghum. Phylogenetic comparisons show that these putative orthologs, along with maize ID1, form a group separate from other IDD genes. In contrast to ID1 mRNA, which is detected exclusively in immature leaves, several maize IDD genes showed a broad range of expression in various tissues. Further, Western analysis with an antibody that cross-reacts with ID1 protein and potential orthologs from rice and sorghum shows that all three proteins are detected in immature leaves only. Conclusion Comparative genomic analysis shows that the IDD zinc finger family is highly conserved among both monocots and dicots. The leaf-specific ID1 expression pattern distinguishes it from other maize IDD genes examined. A similar leaf-specific localization pattern was observed for the putative ID1 protein

  18. Characterization of the contradictory chromatin signatures at the 3' exons of zinc finger genes.

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    Kimberly R Blahnik

    Full Text Available The H3K9me3 histone modification is often found at promoter regions, where it functions to repress transcription. However, we have previously shown that 3' exons of zinc finger genes (ZNFs are marked by high levels of H3K9me3. We have now further investigated this unusual location for H3K9me3 in ZNF genes. Neither bioinformatic nor experimental approaches support the hypothesis that the 3' exons of ZNFs are promoters. We further characterized the histone modifications at the 3' ZNF exons and found that these regions also contain H3K36me3, a mark of transcriptional elongation. A genome-wide analysis of ChIP-seq data revealed that ZNFs constitute the majority of genes that have high levels of both H3K9me3 and H3K36me3. These results suggested the possibility that the ZNF genes may be imprinted, with one allele transcribed and one allele repressed. To test the hypothesis that the contradictory modifications are due to imprinting, we used a SNP analysis of RNA-seq data to demonstrate that both alleles of certain ZNF genes having H3K9me3 and H3K36me3 are transcribed. We next analyzed isolated ZNF 3' exons using stably integrated episomes. We found that although the H3K36me3 mark was lost when the 3' ZNF exon was removed from its natural genomic location, the isolated ZNF 3' exons retained the H3K9me3 mark. Thus, the H3K9me3 mark at ZNF 3' exons does not impede transcription and it is regulated independently of the H3K36me3 mark. Finally, we demonstrate a strong relationship between the number of tandemly repeated domains in the 3' exons and the H3K9me3 mark. We suggest that the H3K9me3 at ZNF 3' exons may function to protect the genome from inappropriate recombination rather than to regulate transcription.

  19. Identification and characterization of a salt stress-inducible zinc finger protein from Festuca arundinacea

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    Martin Ruth C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased biotic and abiotic plant stresses due to climate change together with an expected global human population of over 9 billion by 2050 intensifies the demand for agricultural production on marginal lands. Soil salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses responsible for reduced crop productivity worldwide and the salinization of arable land has dramatically increased over the last few decades. Consequently, as land becomes less amenable for conventional agriculture, plants grown on marginal soils will be exposed to higher levels of soil salinity. Forage grasses are a critical component of feed used in livestock production worldwide, with many of these same species of grasses being utilized for lawns, erosion prevention, and recreation. Consequently, it is important to develop a better understanding of salt tolerance in forage and related grass species. Findings A gene encoding a ZnF protein was identified during the analysis of a salt-stress suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH expression library from the forage grass species Festuca arundinacea. The expression pattern of FaZnF was compared to that of the well characterized gene for delta 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS, a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis, which was also identified in the salt-stress SSH library. The FaZnF and P5CS genes were both up-regulated in response to salt and drought stresses suggesting a role in dehydration stress. FaZnF was also up-regulated in response to heat and wounding, suggesting that it might have a more general function in multiple abiotic stress responses. Additionally, potential downstream targets of FaZnF (a MAPK [Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase], GST [Glutathione-S-Transferase] and lipoxygenase L2 were found to be up-regulated in calli overexpressing FaZnF when compared to control cell lines. Conclusions This work provides evidence that FaZnF is an AN1/A20 zinc finger protein that is involved in the regulation

  20. BTB-Zinc Finger Oncogenes Are Required for Ras and Notch-Driven Tumorigenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Karen; Turkel, Nezaket; Willoughby, Lee F; Ellul, Jason; Murray, Michael J; Richardson, Helena E; Brumby, Anthony M

    2015-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, pathways that promote the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) can both facilitate metastasis and endow tumor cells with cancer stem cell properties. To gain a greater understanding of how these properties are interlinked in cancers we used Drosophila epithelial tumor models, which are driven by orthologues of human oncogenes (activated alleles of Ras and Notch) in cooperation with the loss of the cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib). Within these tumors, both invasive, mesenchymal-like cell morphology and continual tumor overgrowth, are dependent upon Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity. To identify JNK-dependent changes within the tumors we used a comparative microarray analysis to define a JNK gene signature common to both Ras and Notch-driven tumors. Amongst the JNK-dependent changes was a significant enrichment for BTB-Zinc Finger (ZF) domain genes, including chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (chinmo). chinmo was upregulated by JNK within the tumors, and overexpression of chinmo with either RasV12 or Nintra was sufficient to promote JNK-independent epithelial tumor formation in the eye/antennal disc, and, in cooperation with RasV12, promote tumor formation in the adult midgut epithelium. Chinmo primes cells for oncogene-mediated transformation through blocking differentiation in the eye disc, and promoting an escargot-expressing stem or enteroblast cell state in the adult midgut. BTB-ZF genes are also required for Ras and Notch-driven overgrowth of scrib mutant tissue, since, although loss of chinmo alone did not significantly impede tumor development, when loss of chinmo was combined with loss of a functionally related BTB-ZF gene, abrupt, tumor overgrowth was significantly reduced. abrupt is not a JNK-induced gene, however, Abrupt is present in JNK-positive tumor cells, consistent with a JNK-associated oncogenic role. As some mammalian BTB-ZF proteins are also highly oncogenic, our work suggests that EMT

  1. The SLEEPER genes: a transposase-derived angiosperm-specific gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knip Marijn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DAYSLEEPER encodes a domesticated transposase from the hAT-superfamily, which is essential for development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Little is known about the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in other species, or how and when it was domesticated. We studied the presence of DAYSLEEPER orthologs in plants and propose a model for the domestication of the ancestral DAYSLEEPER gene in angiosperms. Results Using specific BLAST searches in genomic and EST libraries, we found that DAYSLEEPER-like genes (hereafter called SLEEPER genes are unique to angiosperms. Basal angiosperms as well as grasses (Poaceae and dicotyledonous plants possess such putative orthologous genes, but SLEEPER-family genes were not found in gymnosperms, mosses and algae. Most species contain more than one SLEEPER gene. All SLEEPERs contain a C2H2 type BED-zinc finger domain and a hATC dimerization domain. We designated 3 motifs, partly overlapping the BED-zinc finger and dimerization domain, which are hallmark features in the SLEEPER family. Although SLEEPER genes are structurally conserved between species, constructs with SLEEPER genes from grapevine and rice did not complement the daysleeper phenotype in Arabidopsis, when expressed under control of the DAYSLEEPER promoter. However these constructs did cause a dominant phenotype when expressed in Arabidopsis. Rice plant lines with an insertion in the RICESLEEPER1 or 2 locus displayed phenotypic abnormalities, indicating that these genes are functional and important for normal development in rice. We suggest a model in which we hypothesize that an ancestral hAT transposase was retrocopied and stably integrated in the genome during early angiosperm evolution. Evidence is also presented for more recent retroposition events of SLEEPER genes, such as an event in the rice genome, which gave rise to the RICESLEEPER1 and 2 genes. Conclusions We propose the ancestral SLEEPER gene was formed after a process of retro

  2. Expression of a subset of the Arabidopsis Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger protein gene family under water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, H; Araki, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-05-01

    The genes encoding Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger proteins constitute a large family in higher plants. To elucidate the functional roles of these types of protein, four different members of the gene family were cloned from Arabidopsis by PCR-aided methods. One was identical to the already reported gene STZ/ZAT10 and three were as yet unidentified genes, then designated AZF1 (Arabidopsis zinc-finger protein 1), AZF2 and AZF3. The AZF- and STZ-encoded proteins contain two canonical Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger motifs, separated by a long spacer. Three conserved regions, named B-box, L-box, and DNL-box, were also recognized outside the zinc-finger motifs, as in other members of the two-fingered Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger protein family. These four genes were positioned on the same branch of a phylogenetic tree constructed based on the zinc-finger motif sequences, suggesting their structural and functional relationship. RNA blot analysis showed that all four genes were mainly expressed in roots and at different levels in other organs. Expression of the four genes responded to water stress. High-salt treatment resulted in elevated levels of expression of all of these genes. Low-temperature treatment increased the expression levels of AZF1, AZF3, and STZ, but not AZF2. Only AZF2 expression was strongly induced by ABA treatment, where the time course of the induction was similar to that caused by high salinity. In situ localization showed that AZF2 mRNA accumulated in the elongation zone of the roots under the salt-stress condition. These results suggest that AZF1, AZF2, AZF3, and STZ are all involved in the water-stress response in an ABA-dependent or -independent pathway to regulate downstream genes. PMID:10806347

  3. The DnaJ-Like Zinc Finger Domain Protein PSA2 Affects Light Acclimation and Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Wen; Chen, Si-Ming; Wang, Wei-Jie; Huang, Xing-Qi; Zhou, Chang-Fang; Zhuang, Zhong; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids and the assembly of thylakoid membranes are critical for the photoautotrophic growth of plants. Different factors are involved in these two processes. In recent years, members of the DnaJ-like zinc finger domain proteins have been found to take part in the biogenesis and/or the maintenance of plastids. One member of this family of proteins, PSA2, was recently found to localize to the thylakoid lumen and regulate the accumulation of photosystem I. In this study, we report that the silencing of PSA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in variegated leaves and retarded growth. Although both chlorophylls and total carotenoids decreased in the psa2 mutant, violaxanthin, and zeaxanthin accumulated in the mutant seedlings grown under growth condition. Lower levels of non-photochemical quenching and electron transport rate were also found in the psa2 mutant seedlings under growth condition compared with those of the wild-type plants, indicating an impaired capability to acclimate to normal light irradiance when PSA2 was silenced. Moreover, we also observed an abnormal assembly of grana thylakoids and poorly developed stroma thylakoids in psa2 chloroplasts. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PSA2 is a member of the DnaJ-like zinc finger domain protein family that affects light acclimation and chloroplast development. PMID:27047527

  4. Genetic dissection of photoreceptor subtype specification by the Drosophila melanogaster zinc finger proteins elbow and no ocelli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias F Wernet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The elbow/no ocelli (elb/noc complex of Drosophila melanogaster encodes two paralogs of the evolutionarily conserved NET family of zinc finger proteins. These transcriptional repressors share a conserved domain structure, including a single atypical C2H2 zinc finger. In flies, Elb and Noc are important for the development of legs, eyes and tracheae. Vertebrate NET proteins play an important role in the developing nervous system, and mutations in the homolog ZNF703 human promote luminal breast cancer. However, their interaction with transcriptional regulators is incompletely understood. Here we show that loss of both Elb and Noc causes mis-specification of polarization-sensitive photoreceptors in the 'dorsal rim area' (DRA of the fly retina. This phenotype is identical to the loss of the homeodomain transcription factor Homothorax (Hth/dMeis. Development of DRA ommatidia and expression of Hth are induced by the Wingless/Wnt pathway. Our data suggest that Elb/Noc genetically interact with Hth, and we identify two conserved domains crucial for this function. Furthermore, we show that Elb/Noc specifically interact with the transcription factor Orthodenticle (Otd/Otx, a crucial regulator of rhodopsin gene transcription. Interestingly, different Elb/Noc domains are required to antagonize Otd functions in transcriptional activation, versus transcriptional repression. We propose that similar interactions between vertebrate NET proteins and Meis and Otx factors might play a role in development and disease.

  5. Engineering HIV-resistant human CD4+ T cells with CXCR4-specific zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Wilen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5 virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4 in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4 remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals.

  6. Identification of a novel zinc finger protein gene (ZNF298) in the GAP2 of human chromosome 21q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have isolated a novel zinc finger protein gene, designated ZNF298, as a candidate gene for a particular phenotype of Down syndrome or bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) which maps to human chromosome 21q22.3. ZNF298 gene consists of 25 exons spanning approximately 80 kb in a direction from the telomere to centromere. There are four kinds of transcripts that harbor three types of 3' UTR. These four transcripts (ZNF298a, ZNF298b, ZNF298c, and ZNF298d) contain putative open reading frames encoding 1178, 1198, 555, and 515 amino acids, respectively. ZNF298 gene was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues at very low level. The protein motif analysis revealed that ZNF298 proteins contain a SET [Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax] domain, multiple C2H2-type zinc finger (ZnFC2H2) domains, several nuclear localization signals (NLSs), and PEST sequences. Nuclear localization of ZNF298 protein was confirmed by transfection of expression vector of GFP-tagged protein into two human cell lines. Interestingly, this gene crosses over a clone gap (GAP2) remaining in the band 21q22.3. We obtained the DNA fragments corresponding to GAP2 using ZNF298 cDNA sequence as anchor primers for PCR and determined its genomic DNA sequence

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiuhong Yang; Chao Sun; Yuanlei Hun; Zhongping Lin

    2008-03-01

    A RING zinc finger ankyrin protein gene, designated AdZFP1, was isolated from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum Spreng by mRNA differential display and RACE. Its cDNA was 1723 bp and encoded a putative protein of 445 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 47.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.49. A typical C3HC4-type RING finger domain was found at the C-terminal region of the AdZFP1 protein, and several groups of ankyrin repeats were found at the N-terminal region. Alignments of amino acid sequence showed that AdZFP1 was 66% identical to the Arabidopsis thaliana putative RING zinc finger ankyrin protein AAN31869. Transcriptional analysis showed that AdZFP1 was inducible under drought stress in root, stem and leaf of the plant. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the transcript of AdZFP1 was strongly induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and also by salinity, cold and heat to some extent. Overexpression of the AdZFP1 gene in transgenic tobacco enhanced their tolerance to drought stress.

  8. The RNA Binding Zinc Finger Protein Tristetraprolin Regulates AU-Rich mRNAs Involved in Breast Cancer-Related Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Souhibani, Norah; Al-Ahmadi, Wijdan; Hesketh, John E.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Khabar, Khalid S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP or ZFP36) is a tandem CCCH zinc finger RNA binding protein that regulates the stability of certain AU-rich mRNAs. Recent work suggests that TTP is deficient in cancer cells when compared to normal cell types. Here we found that TTP expression was lower in invasive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) compared to normal breast cell lines, MCF12A and MCF-10. TTP targets were probed using a novel approach by expressing the C124R zinc finger TTP mutant that act as dominant negati...

  9. Structural and functional organization of the HF.10 human zinc finger gene (ZNF35) located on chromosome 3p21-p22

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanfrancone, L; Pengue, G; Pandolfi, P P;

    1992-01-01

    We report the structural and functional characterization of the HF.10 zinc finger gene (ZNF35) in normal human cells, as well as a processed pseudogene. The HF.10 gene spans about 13 kb and it is interrupted by three introns. All 11 zinc finger DNA-binding domains are contiguously encoded within...... the last 3' exon. The genomic region surrounding HF.10 exon 1 contains a CpG island and acts as a promoter in vitro. Using transient CAT assay in cotransfection experiments in cultured cells, we have determined that the HF.10 finger protein is a transcriptional transactivator. Restriction enzyme...

  10. Biochemical Characterization of Kat1: a Domesticated hAT-Transposase that Induces DNA Hairpin Formation and MAT-Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Rajaei, Naghmeh; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Hofer, Anders; Åström, Stefan U.

    2016-01-01

    Kluyveromyces lactis hAT-transposase 1 (Kat1) generates hairpin-capped DNA double strand breaks leading to MAT-switching (MATa to MATα). Using purified Kat1, we demonstrate the importance of terminal inverted repeats and subterminal repeats for its endonuclease activity. Kat1 promoted joining of the transposon end into a target DNA molecule in vitro, a biochemical feature that ties Kat1 to transposases. Gas-phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecule analysis revealed that Kat1 can form hexamers when complexed with DNA. Kat1 point mutants were generated in conserved positions to explore structure-function relationships. Mutants of predicted catalytic residues abolished both DNA cleavage and strand-transfer. Interestingly, W576A predicted to be impaired for hairpin formation, was active for DNA cleavage and supported wild type levels of mating-type switching. In contrast, the conserved CXXH motif was critical for hairpin formation because Kat1 C402A/H405A completely blocked hairpinning and switching, but still generated nicks in the DNA. Mutations in the BED zinc-finger domain (C130A/C133A) resulted in an unspecific nuclease activity, presumably due to nonspecific DNA interaction. Kat1 mutants that were defective for cleavage in vitro were also defective for mating-type switching. Collectively, this study reveals Kat1 sharing extensive biochemical similarities with cut and paste transposons despite being domesticated and evolutionary diverged from active transposons. PMID:26902909

  11. The Role of Cdkn1A-Interacting Zinc Finger Protein 1 (CIZ1 in DNA Replication and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cdkn1A-interacting zinc finger protein 1 (CIZ1 was first identified in a yeast-2-hybrid system searching for interacting proteins of CDK2 inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1. Ciz1 also binds to CDK2, cyclin A, cyclin E, CDC6, PCNA, TCF4 and estrogen receptor-α. Recent studies reveal numerous biological functions of CIZ1 in DNA replication, cell proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, splicing variants of CIZ1 mRNA is associated with a variety of cancers and Alzheimer’s disease, and mutations of the CIZ1 gene lead to cervical dystonia. CIZ1 expression is increased in cancers and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we will summarize the biological functions and molecular mechanisms of CIZ1 in these physiological and pathological processes.

  12. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplasttargeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, A.; Jenkins, T.; Nielsen, H.B.; Harris, C.A.; Beale, M.H.; Andersen, M.; Mant, A.; Scheller, H.; Camara, B.; Mattsson, O.; Mundy, J.

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3 pro...... pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates that...

  13. A Role for Widely Interspaced Zinc Finger (WIZ) in Retention of the G9a Methyltransferase on Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jeremy M; Parker, Joel S; Liu, Feng; Rothbart, Scott B; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Strahl, Brian D; Jin, Jian; Davis, Ian J; Mosley, Amber L; Pattenden, Samantha G

    2015-10-23

    G9a and GLP lysine methyltransferases form a heterodimeric complex that is responsible for the majority of histone H3 lysine 9 mono- and di-methylation (H3K9me1/me2). Widely interspaced zinc finger (WIZ) associates with the G9a-GLP protein complex, but its role in mediating lysine methylation is poorly defined. Here, we show that WIZ regulates global H3K9me2 levels by facilitating the interaction of G9a with chromatin. Disrupting the association of G9a-GLP with chromatin by depleting WIZ resulted in altered gene expression and protein-protein interactions that were distinguishable from that of small molecule-based inhibition of G9a/GLP, supporting discrete functions of the G9a-GLP-WIZ chromatin complex in addition to H3K9me2 methylation. PMID:26338712

  14. Sensitive and direct electrochemical detection of double-stranded DNA utilizing alkaline phosphatase-labelled zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Soodong; Ha, Dat Thinh; Yang, Haesik; Kim, Moon-Soo

    2015-06-21

    Direct detection of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) using zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) is of great importance in biomedical applications such as identifying pathogens and circulating DNAs. However, its sensitivity is still not sufficiently high because limited signalling labels can be conjugated or fused. Herein, we report sensitive and direct detection of dsDNA using (i) alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a fast catalytic label conjugated to ZFPs along with (ii) electrochemical measurement of an ALP product (l-ascorbic acid) at the indium-tin oxide electrode with a high signal-to-background ratio. ALP is simply conjugated to a ZFP through lysine residues in a ZFP purification tag, a maltose binding protein (MBP). Sandwich-type electrochemical detection of dsDNA allows a detection limit of ca. 100 fM without using DNA amplification. PMID:25969923

  15. Evolutionary expansion and divergence in a large family of primate-specific zinc finger transcription factor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, A T; Huntley, S; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Baggott, D; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-28

    Although most genes are conserved as one-to-one orthologs in different mammalian orders, certain gene families have evolved to comprise different numbers and types of protein-coding genes through independent series of gene duplications, divergence and gene loss in each evolutionary lineage. One such family encodes KRAB-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes, which are likely to function as transcriptional repressors. One KRAB-ZNF subfamily, the ZNF91 clade, has expanded specifically in primates to comprise more than 110 loci in the human genome, yielding large gene clusters in human chromosomes 19 and 7 and smaller clusters or isolated copies at other chromosomal locations. Although phylogenetic analysis indicates that many of these genes arose before the split between old world monkeys and new world monkeys, the ZNF91 subfamily has continued to expand and diversify throughout the evolution of apes and humans. The paralogous loci are distinguished by sequence divergence within their zinc finger arrays indicating a selection for proteins with different DNA binding specificities. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization data show that some of these ZNF genes can have tissue-specific expression patterns, however many KRAB-ZNFs that are near-ubiquitous could also be playing very specific roles in halting target pathways in all tissues except for a few, where the target is released by the absence of its repressor. The number of variant KRAB-ZNF proteins is increased not only because of the large number of loci, but also because many loci can produce multiple splice variants, which because of the modular structure of these genes may have separate and perhaps even conflicting regulatory roles. The lineage-specific duplication and rapid divergence of this family of transcription factor genes suggests a role in determining species-specific biological differences and the evolution of novel primate traits.

  16. C. elegans PAT-9 is a nuclear zinc finger protein critical for the assembly of muscle attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caenorhabditis elegans sarcomeres have been studied extensively utilizing both forward and reverse genetic techniques to provide insight into muscle development and the mechanisms behind muscle contraction. A previous genetic screen investigating early muscle development produced 13 independent mutant genes exhibiting a Pat (paralyzed and arrested elongation at the two-fold length of embryonic development muscle phenotype. This study reports the identification and characterization of one of those genes, pat-9. Results Positional cloning, reverse genetics, and plasmid rescue experiments were used to identify the predicted C. elegans gene T27B1.2 (recently named ztf-19 as the pat-9 gene. Analysis of pat-9 showed it is expressed early in development and within body wall muscle lineages, consistent with a role in muscle development and producing a Pat phenotype. However, unlike most of the other known Pat gene family members, which encode structural components of muscle attachment sites, PAT-9 is an exclusively nuclear protein. Analysis of the predicted PAT-9 amino acid sequence identified one putative nuclear localization domain and three C2H2 zinc finger domains. Both immunocytochemistry and PAT-9::GFP fusion expression confirm that PAT-9 is primarily a nuclear protein and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments showed that PAT-9 is present on certain gene promoters. Conclusions We have shown that the T27B1.2 gene is pat-9. Considering the Pat-9 mutant phenotype shows severely disrupted muscle attachment sites despite PAT-9 being a nuclear zinc finger protein and not a structural component of muscle attachment sites, we propose that PAT-9 likely functions in the regulation of gene expression for some necessary structural or regulatory component(s of the muscle attachment sites.

  17. Structural and dynamical characterization of the Miz-1 zinc fingers 5-8 by solution-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, David; Bedard, Mikaeel; Bilodeau, Josee; Lavigne, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.lavigne@usherbrooke.ca [Universite de Sherbrooke, Departement de Biochimie, Faculte de Medecine et des Sciences de la Sante, Institut de Pharmacologie de Sherbrooke (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Myc-interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz-1) is a BTB/POZ transcription factor that activates the transcription of cytostatic genes, such as p15{sup INK4B} or p21{sup CIP1}. The C-terminus of Miz-1 contains 13 consensus C{sub 2}H{sub 2} zinc finger domains (ZF). ZFs 1-4 have been shown to interact with SMAD3/4, while the remaining ZFs are expected to bind the promoters of target genes. We have noted unusual features in ZF 5 and the linker between ZFs 5 and 6. Indeed, a glutamate is found instead of the conserved basic residue two positions before the second zinc-coordinating histidine on the ZF 5 helix, and the linker sequence is DTDKE in place of the classical TGEKP sequence. In a canonical {beta}{beta}{alpha} fold, such unusual primary structure elements should cause severe electrostatic repulsions. In this context, we have characterized the structure and the dynamics of a Miz-1 construct comprising ZFs 5-8 (Miz 5-8) by solution-state NMR. Whilst ZFs 5, 7 and 8 were shown to adopt the classical {beta}{beta}{alpha} fold for C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ZFs, the number of long-range NOEs was insufficient to define a classical fold for ZF 6. We show by using {sup 15}N-relaxation dispersion experiments that this lack of NOEs is due to the presence of extensive motions on the {mu}s-ms timescale. Since this negatively charged region would have to be located near the phosphodiester backbone in a DNA complex, we propose that in addition to promoting conformational searches, it could serve as a hinge region to keep ZFs 1-4 away from DNA.

  18. The ancient mammalian KRAB zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 8q24.3 illustrates principles of C2H2 zinc finger evolution associated with unique expression profiles in human tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Expansion of multi-C2H2 domain zinc finger (ZNF) genes, including the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) subfamily, paralleled the evolution of tetrapodes, particularly in mammalian lineages. Advances in their cataloging and characterization suggest that the functions of the KRAB-ZNF gene family contributed to mammalian speciation. Results Here, we characterized the human 8q24.3 ZNF cluster on the genomic, the phylogenetic, the structural and the transcriptome level. Six (ZNF7, ZNF34, ZNF250, ZNF251, ZNF252, ZNF517) of the seven locus members contain exons encoding KRAB domains, one (ZNF16) does not. They form a paralog group in which the encoded KRAB and ZNF protein domains generally share more similarities with each other than with other members of the human ZNF superfamily. The closest relatives with respect to their DNA-binding domain were ZNF7 and ZNF251. The analysis of orthologs in therian mammalian species revealed strong conservation and purifying selection of the KRAB-A and zinc finger domains. These findings underscore structural/functional constraints during evolution. Gene losses in the murine lineage (ZNF16, ZNF34, ZNF252, ZNF517) and potential protein truncations in primates (ZNF252) illustrate ongoing speciation processes. Tissue expression profiling by quantitative real-time PCR showed similar but distinct patterns for all tested ZNF genes with the most prominent expression in fetal brain. Based on accompanying expression signatures in twenty-six other human tissues ZNF34 and ZNF250 revealed the closest expression profiles. Together, the 8q24.3 ZNF genes can be assigned to a cerebellum, a testis or a prostate/thyroid subgroup. These results are consistent with potential functions of the ZNF genes in morphogenesis and differentiation. Promoter regions of the seven 8q24.3 ZNF genes display common characteristics like missing TATA-box, CpG island-association and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) modules. Common TFBS modules partly

  19. The ancient mammalian KRAB zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 8q24.3 illustrates principles of C2H2 zinc finger evolution associated with unique expression profiles in human tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Guohui

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expansion of multi-C2H2 domain zinc finger (ZNF genes, including the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB subfamily, paralleled the evolution of tetrapodes, particularly in mammalian lineages. Advances in their cataloging and characterization suggest that the functions of the KRAB-ZNF gene family contributed to mammalian speciation. Results Here, we characterized the human 8q24.3 ZNF cluster on the genomic, the phylogenetic, the structural and the transcriptome level. Six (ZNF7, ZNF34, ZNF250, ZNF251, ZNF252, ZNF517 of the seven locus members contain exons encoding KRAB domains, one (ZNF16 does not. They form a paralog group in which the encoded KRAB and ZNF protein domains generally share more similarities with each other than with other members of the human ZNF superfamily. The closest relatives with respect to their DNA-binding domain were ZNF7 and ZNF251. The analysis of orthologs in therian mammalian species revealed strong conservation and purifying selection of the KRAB-A and zinc finger domains. These findings underscore structural/functional constraints during evolution. Gene losses in the murine lineage (ZNF16, ZNF34, ZNF252, ZNF517 and potential protein truncations in primates (ZNF252 illustrate ongoing speciation processes. Tissue expression profiling by quantitative real-time PCR showed similar but distinct patterns for all tested ZNF genes with the most prominent expression in fetal brain. Based on accompanying expression signatures in twenty-six other human tissues ZNF34 and ZNF250 revealed the closest expression profiles. Together, the 8q24.3 ZNF genes can be assigned to a cerebellum, a testis or a prostate/thyroid subgroup. These results are consistent with potential functions of the ZNF genes in morphogenesis and differentiation. Promoter regions of the seven 8q24.3 ZNF genes display common characteristics like missing TATA-box, CpG island-association and transcription factor binding site (TFBS modules. Common TFBS

  20. Proviral HIV-genome-wide and pol-gene specific Zinc Finger Nucleases: Usability for targeted HIV gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV, which culminates in the establishment of a latent proviral reservoir, presents formidable challenges for ultimate cure. Building on the hypothesis that ex-vivo or even in-vivo abolition or disruption of HIV-gene/genome-action by target mutagenesis or excision can irreversibly abrogate HIV's innate fitness to replicate and survive, we previously identified the isoschizomeric bacteria restriction enzymes (REases AcsI and ApoI as potent cleavers of the HIV-pol gene (11 and 9 times in HIV-1 and 2, respectively. However, both enzymes, along with others found to cleave across the entire HIV-1 genome, slice (SX at palindromic sequences that are prevalent within the human genome and thereby pose the risk of host genome toxicity. A long-term goal in the field of R-M enzymatic therapeutics has thus been to generate synthetic restriction endonucleases with longer recognition sites limited in specificity to HIV. We aimed (i to assemble and construct zinc finger arrays and nucleases (ZFN with either proviral-HIV-pol gene or proviral-HIV-1 whole-genome specificity respectively, and (ii to advance a model for pre-clinically testing lentiviral vectors (LV that deliver and transduce either ZFN genotype. Methods and Results First, we computationally generated the consensus sequences of (a 114 dsDNA-binding zinc finger (Zif arrays (ZFAs or ZifHIV-pol and (b two zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs which, unlike the AcsI and ApoI homeodomains, possess specificity to >18 base-pair sequences uniquely present within the HIV-pol gene (ZifHIV-polFN. Another 15 ZFNs targeting >18 bp sequences within the complete HIV-1 proviral genome were constructed (ZifHIV-1FN. Second, a model for constructing lentiviral vectors (LVs that deliver and transduce a diploid copy of either ZifHIV-polFN or ZifHIV-1FN chimeric genes (termed LV- 2xZifHIV-polFN and LV- 2xZifHIV-1FN, respectively is proposed. Third, two preclinical models for controlled testing of

  1. Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1: its clinical significance and functional role in human thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yan Zhang,* Gang Liu,* Shihe Wu, Futing Jiang, Jiangping Xie, Yuhong WangDepartment of General Surgery, Navy General Hospital of Chinese PLA, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: Transcription factor zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, as one of the key inducers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, has been reported to be regulated by microRNA-144 and Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3, which both promote thyroid cancer cell invasion. However, the involvement of ZEB1 in thyroid cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and clinical implication of ZEB1 in this disease.Methods: Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the subcellular localization and the expression level of ZEB1 protein in 82 self-pairs of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent noncancerous tissues obtained from patients with thyroid cancer. The roles of ZEB1 in thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion, and proliferation were also detected by transwell and MTT analyses, respectively.Results: Immunohistochemistry showed that ZEB1 was predominantly localized in the nucleus of thyroid cancer cells. Its immunoreactive score in thyroid cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in adjacent noncancerous tissues (P=0.01. In addition, ZEB1 overexpression was significantly associated with the advanced tumor node metastasis staging (P=0.008, the positive lymph node metastasis (P=0.01 and distant metastasis (P=0.02. Furthermore, ZEB1 knockdown by siRNA could efficiently inhibit the migration, invasion, and proliferation abilities of thyroid cancer cells in vitro.Conclusion: These findings indicated that ZEB1 might function as an oncogene, the overexpression of which was associated with the aggressive tumor progression of human thyroid cancer. Interestingly, ZEB1 also could promote thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion, and proliferation, suggesting that

  2. Overexpression of a zinc-finger protein gene from rice confers tolerance to cold, dehydration, and salt stress in transgenic tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Vij, Shubha; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2004-01-01

    Stress perception and signal transduction leading to tolerance involve a complex interplay of different gene products. We describe here the isolation and characterization of an intronless gene (OSISAP1) from rice encoding a zinc-finger protein that is induced after different types of stresses, namely cold, desiccation, salt, submergence, and heavy metals as well as injury. The gene is also induced by stress hormone abscisic acid. Overexpression of the gene in transgenic tobacco conferred tole...

  3. iguana encodes a novel zinc-finger protein with coiled-coil domains essential for Hedgehog signal transduction in the zebrafish embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, Christian; Roy, Sudipto; Lewis, Katharine E.; Schauerte, Heike; Joerg-Rauch, Gerd; Kirn, Annette; Weiler, Christian; Geisler, Robert; Haffter, Pascal; Ingham, Philip W

    2004-01-01

    Signaling by lipid-modified secreted glycoproteins of the Hedgehog family play fundamental roles during pattern formation in animal development and in humans; dysfunction of Hedgehog pathway components is frequently associated with a variety of congenital abnormalities and cancer. Transcriptional regulation of Hedgehog target genes is mediated by members of the Gli zinc-finger transcription factors. The relative nuclear concentrations of Gli activator (Gliact) and repressor (Glirep) forms, to...

  4. Comparative Functional Analysis of Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Zinc Finger-Containing Glycine-Rich RNA-Binding Proteins in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    XU, TAO; Gu, Lili; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Suh, Mi Chung; Kang, Hunseung

    2014-01-01

    Although the functional roles of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (RZs) have been characterized in several plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), the physiological functions of RZs in wheat (Triticum aestivum) remain largely unknown. Here, the functional roles of the three wheat RZ family members, named TaRZ1, TaRZ2, and TaRZ3, were investigated using transgenic Arabidopsis plants under various abiotic stress conditions. Expression of Ta...

  5. Sequences homologous to the human x- and y-borne zinc finger protein genes (ZFX/Y) are autosomal in monotreme mannals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.M.; Frost, C.; Graves, M.J.A. (Latrobe Univ., Bundoora (Australia)); Spencer, J.A. (Beckman Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    The human zinc finger protein genes (ZFX/Y) were identified as a result of a systematic search for the testis-determining factor gene on the human Y chromosome. Although they play no direct role in sex determination, they are of particular interest because they are highly conserved among mammals, birds, and amphibians and because, in eutherian mammals at least, they have active alleles on both the X and the Y chromosomes outside the pseudoautosomal region. We used in situ hybridization to localize the homologues of the zinc finger protein gene to chromosome 1 of the Australian echidna and to an equivalent position on chromosomes 1 and 2 of the playtpus. The localization to platypus chromosome 1 was confirmed by Southern analysis of a Chinese hamster [times] platypus cell hybrid retaining most of platypus chromosome 1. This localization is consistent with the cytological homology of chromosome 1 between the two species. The zinc finger protein gene homologues were localized to regions of platypus chromosomes 1 and 2 that included a number of other genes situated near ZFX on the short arm of the human X chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that many of the genes located on the short arm of the human X were originally autosomal and have been translocated to the X chromosome since the eutherian-metatherian divergence. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Imprinting and evolution of two Kruppel-type zinc-finger genes, ZIM3 and ZNF264, located in the PEG3/USP29 imprinted domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Bergmann, A; Wehri, E; Lu, X; Stubbs, L

    2001-09-01

    We have isolated Kruppel-type (C2H2) zinc-finger genes, ZIM3 (zinc-finger gene 3 from imprinted domain) and ZNF264, located downstream of human and mouse USP29 genes (encoding ubiquitin-specific processing protease 29). In human, both ZIM3 and ZNF264 encode zinc-finger proteins with Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) A and B domains at the amino-terminal regions of the predicted proteins. In contrast, mouse Zim3 and Zfp264 seem to have lost protein-coding capability based on the lack of open reading frames (ORFs) in their cDNA sequences. In particular, the 3' end of the Zim3 transcript overlaps with the coding region of the adjacent gene Usp29 in an antisense orientation, indicating the conversion of mouse Zim3 into an antisense transcript gene for Usp29. The expression patterns of ZIM3 and ZNF264 have been largely conserved between human and mouse, with testis-specific expression of ZIM3 and ubiquitous expression of ZNF264, but high expression levels in adult testes in both species. Our studies also demonstrate that both mouse genes are imprinted with maternal expression of Zim3 in adult testes and paternal expression of Zfp264 in neonatal and adult brain. The reciprocal imprinting of two neighboring mouse genes, Zim3 and Zfp264, is consistent with a pattern observed frequently in other imprinted domains, and suggests that the imprinting of these two genes might be coregulated. PMID:11543637

  7. The PR/SET domain zinc finger protein Prdm4 regulates gene expression in embryonic stem cells but plays a nonessential role in the developing mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A J; Nelson, Andrew C; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Bikoff, Elizabeth K

    2013-10-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal. PMID:23918801

  8. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species. PMID:27203728

  9. Mutagenesis of genes for starch debranching enzyme isoforms in pea by means of zinc-finger endonucleases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch debranching enzymes in plants are divided into two groups based on their ability to hydrolyse different substrates. The first group, pullulanases, hydrolyses α-1,6-glucosidic linkages in substrates such as pullulan, amylopectin and glycogen. The second group of debranching enzymes, isoamylases, hydrolyse glycogen and amylopectin and are not active on pullulan. Three isoforms of isoamylase and a pullulanase have been isolated from cDNA library of Pisum sativum. These isoamylases have been characterised based on the their heterologous expression in E coli. Based on the DNA sequence that encodes these debranching enzyme, a specific mutagenesis targeting at these DNA will be attempted. The method that will be employed are based on the techniques developed by Wright et al. (2005). This technique involves the homologous recombination of DNA that is mediated by zinc-finger endonucleases. Vectors will be constructed to include a fragment that will modify these genes. Microinjection technique will be used to insert these vectors into pollen which then will be fertilized. Using this technique, it is hoped that null mutant for each enzyme will be created and the exact role of these enzymes for the synthesis and degradation of starch in plants will be elucidate. (author)

  10. Generation of PPARγ mono-allelic knockout pigs via zinc-finger nucleases and nuclear transfer cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongshan Yang; Jiangtian Tian; Feng Li; Jifeng Zhang; Lin Chang; Duanqing Pei; Y Eugene Chen; Liangxue Lai; Huaqiang Yang; Wei Li; Bentian Zhao; Zhen Ouyang; Zhaoming Liu; Yu Zhao; Nana Fan; Jun Song

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells has revolutionized the field of mouse genetics and allowed for the analysis of diverse aspects of gene function in vivo.For more than two decades,researchers have been actively searching for ES cells from large animals such as pigs and cattle.Unfortunately,to date,no ES cell lines from large animals have passed the crucial test of germ line contribution.The sole method of gene targeting to date in these species remains somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) combined with DNA homologous recombination (HR).Due to the limited proliferation competency and extremely low frequency of HR in somatic cells (less than 10-6),this process is highly inefficient and only a few successful examples have been achieved,even though enrichment strategies such as positivenegative marker selection,promoter-trap and adenoassociated viral delivery were previously used [1-3].The low efficiency of gene targeting in cultured somatic cells is the main barrier for gene targeting in large animals.Recently,zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has emerged as a powerful tool for genome editing.The success of ZFN technology for gene targeting in fruit flies,zebra fish,rodents as well as human cell lines encouraged us to establish a high-efficiency gene-targeting platform in large animals such as pigs [4-8].

  11. Conversion of Human Fibroblasts to Stably Self-Renewing Neural Stem Cells with a Single Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Shahbazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Direct conversion of somatic cells into neural stem cells (NSCs by defined factors holds great promise for mechanistic studies, drug screening, and potential cell therapies for different neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we report that a single zinc-finger transcription factor, Zfp521, is sufficient for direct conversion of human fibroblasts into long-term self-renewable and multipotent NSCs. In vitro, Zfp521-induced NSCs maintained their characteristics in the absence of exogenous factor expression and exhibited morphological, molecular, developmental, and functional properties that were similar to control NSCs. In addition, the single-seeded induced NSCs were able to form NSC colonies with efficiency comparable with control NSCs and expressed NSC markers. The converted cells were capable of surviving, migrating, and attaining neural phenotypes after transplantation into neonatal mouse and adult rat brains, without forming tumors. Moreover, the Zfp521-induced NSCs predominantly expressed rostral genes. Our results suggest a facilitated approach for establishing human NSCs through Zfp521-driven conversion of fibroblasts.

  12. Alterations in dendrite and spine morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons in DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ Knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Hattori

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dendrite and dendritic spine formation are crucial for proper brain function. DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ was first identified as a Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia1 (DISC1 binding partner. DBZ is highly expressed in the cerebral cortex of developing and adult rodents and is involved in neurite formation, cell positioning, and the development of interneurons and oligodendrocytes. The functional roles of DBZ in postnatal brain remain unknown; thus we investigated cortical pyramidal neuron morphology in DBZ knockout (KO mice. Morphological analyses by Golgi staining alone in DBZ KO mice revealed decreased dendritic arborization, increased spine density. A morphological analysis of the spines revealed markedly increased numbers of thin spines. To investigate whole spine structure in detail, electron tomographic analysis using ultra-high voltage electron microscopy combined with Golgi staining was performed. Tomograms and three-dimensional models of spines revealed that the spines of DBZ KO mice exhibited two types of characteristic morphology, filopodia-like spines and abnormal thin-necked spines having an extremely thin spine neck. Moreover, conventional electron microscopy revealed significantly decreased number of postsynaptic densities (PSDs in spines of DBZ KO mice. In conclusion, DBZ deficiency impairs the morphogenesis of dendrites and spines in cortical pyramidal neurons.

  13. Alterations in dendrite and spine morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons in DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Yoshihisa; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Nishida, Tomoki; Hori, Osamu; Tohyama, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite and dendritic spine formation are crucial for proper brain function. DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) was first identified as a Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia1 (DISC1) binding partner. DBZ is highly expressed in the cerebral cortex of developing and adult rodents and is involved in neurite formation, cell positioning, and the development of interneurons and oligodendrocytes. The functional roles of DBZ in postnatal brain remain unknown; thus we investigated cortical pyramidal neuron morphology in DBZ knockout (KO) mice. Morphological analyses by Golgi staining alone in DBZ KO mice revealed decreased dendritic arborization, increased spine density. A morphological analysis of the spines revealed markedly increased numbers of thin spines. To investigate whole spine structure in detail, electron tomographic analysis using ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) combined with Golgi staining was performed. Tomograms and three-dimensional models of spines revealed that the spines of DBZ KO mice exhibited two types of characteristic morphology, filopodia-like spines and abnormal thin-necked spines having an extremely thin spine neck. Moreover, conventional electron microscopy revealed significantly decreased number of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) in spines of DBZ KO mice. In conclusion, DBZ deficiency impairs the morphogenesis of dendrites and spines in cortical pyramidal neurons. PMID:25983680

  14. Zinc Finger Homeodomain Factor Zfhx3 Is Essential for Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Maintaining Prolactin Signaling Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Ma, Gui; Zhang, Xiaolin; He, Yuan; Li, Mei; Han, Xueying; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Nagy, Tamas; Zhao, Qiang; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-06-10

    The zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3, also named ATBF1 for AT motif binding factor 1) is a transcription factor that suppresses prostatic carcinogenesis and induces neuronal differentiation. It also interacts with estrogen receptor α to inhibit cell proliferation and regulate pubertal mammary gland development in mice. In the present study, we examined whether and how Zfhx3 regulates lactogenic differentiation in mouse mammary glands. At different stages of mammary gland development, Zfhx3 protein was expressed at varying levels, with the highest level at lactation. In the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line, an in vitro model of lactogenesis, knockdown of Zfhx3 attenuated prolactin-induced β-casein expression and morphological changes, indicators of lactogenic differentiation. In mouse mammary tissue, knock-out of Zfhx3 interrupted lactogenesis, resulting in underdeveloped glands with much smaller and fewer alveoli, reduced β-casein expression, accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in luminal cells after parturition, and failure in lactation. Mechanistically, Zfhx3 maintained the expression of Prlr (prolactin receptor) and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity, whereas knockdown and knock-out of Zfhx3 in HC11 cells and mammary tissues, respectively, decreased Prlr expression, Stat5 phosphorylation, and the expression of Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 target genes. These findings indicate that Zfhx3 plays an essential role in proper lactogenic development in mammary glands, at least in part by maintaining Prlr expression and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity. PMID:27129249

  15. scratch, a pan-neural gene encoding a zinc finger protein related to snail, promotes neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, M; Sturtevant, M A; Emery, J; Vaessin, H; Grell, E; Bier, E

    1995-10-01

    The Drosophila scratch (scrt) gene is expressed in most or all neuronal precursor cells and encodes a predicted zinc finger transcription factor closely related to the product of the mesoderm determination gene snail (sna). Adult flies homozygous for scrt null alleles have a reduced number of photoreceptors in the eye, and embryos lacking the function of both scrt and the pan-neural gene deadpan (dpn), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, exhibit a significant loss of neurons. Conversely, ectopic expression of a scrt transgene during embryonic and adult development leads to the production of supernumerary neurons. Consistent with scrt functioning as a transcription factor, various genes are more broadly expressed than normal in scrt null mutants. Reciprocally, these same genes are expressed at reduced levels in response to ectopic scrt expression. We propose that scrt promotes neuronal cell fates by suppressing expression of genes promoting non-neuronal cell fates. We discuss the similarities between the roles of the ancestrally related scrt, sna, and escargot (esc) genes in regulating cell fate choices. PMID:7557390

  16. Identification of a DNA binding protein cooperating with estrogen receptor as RIZ (retinoblastoma interacting zinc finger protein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, N; Abbondanza, C; Nigro, V; Rossi, V; Piluso, G; Belsito, A; Gallo, L; Roscigno, A; Bontempo, P; Puca, A A; Molinari, A M; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A

    1999-11-01

    Double-stranded DNA fragments were selected from a random pool by repeated cycles of estrogen receptor-specific immunoprecipitation in the presence of a nuclear extract and PCR amplification (cyclic amplification and selection of target, CAST, for multiple elements). Fragments were cloned and sequence analysis indicated the 5-nucleotide word TTGGC was the most recurrent sequence unrelated to the known estrogen responsive element. Screening a HeLa cell expression library with a probe designed with multiple repeats of this sequence resulted in the identification of a 1700-aa protein showing a complete homology with the product of the human retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger gene RIZ. In transfection experiments, RIZ protein was able to bestow estrogen inducibility to a promoter containing an incomplete estrogen responsive element and a TTGGC motif. RIZ protein present in MCF-7 cell nuclear extract retarded the TTGGC-containing probe in an EMSA. Estrogen receptor was co-immunoprecipitated from MCF-7 cell extract by antibodies to RIZ protein and vice versa, thus indicating an existing interaction between these two proteins. PMID:10544042

  17. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophiya Karki

    Full Text Available The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  18. The sigma-1 receptor-zinc finger protein 179 pathway protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tzu-Chieh; Lin, Shu-Hui; Lee, Pin-Tse; Yeh, Shiu-Hwa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Chou, Szu-Yi; Su, Tsung-Ping; Hung, Jan-Jong; Chang, Wen-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Chuang, Jian-Ying

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have implicated the pathogenesis of several human diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, hence protecting neurons against ROS is very important. In this study, we focused on sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), a chaperone at endoplasmic reticulum, and investigated its protective functions. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced ROS accumulation model, we verified that apoptosis-signaling pathways were elicited by H2O2 treatment. However, the Sig-1R agonists, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), reduced the activation of apoptotic pathways significantly. By performing protein-protein interaction assays and shRNA knockdown of Sig-1R, we identified the brain Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179) as a downstream target of Sig-1R regulation. The neuroprotective effect of Znf179 overexpression was similar to that of DHEAS treatment, and likely mediated by affecting the levels of antioxidant enzymes. We also quantified the levels of peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the hippocampi of wild-type and Znf179 knockout mice, and found both enzymes to be reduced in the knockout versus the wild-type mice. In summary, these results reveal that Znf179 plays a novel role in neuroprotection, and Sig-1R agonists may be therapeutic candidates to prevent ROS-induced damage in neurodegenerative and neurotraumatic diseases. PMID:26792191

  19. Structural Determinants of Sleeping Beauty Transposase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrusán, György; Yant, Stephen R; Szilágyi, András; Marsh, Joseph A; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Barabás, Orsolya; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Transposases are important tools in genome engineering, and there is considerable interest in engineering more efficient ones. Here, we seek to understand the factors determining their activity using the Sleeping Beauty transposase. Recent work suggests that protein coevolutionary information can be used to classify groups of physically connected, coevolving residues into elements called "sectors", which have proven useful for understanding the folding, allosteric interactions, and enzymatic activity of proteins. Using extensive mutagenesis data, protein modeling and analysis of folding energies, we show that (i) The Sleeping Beauty transposase contains two sectors, which span across conserved domains, and are enriched in DNA-binding residues, indicating that the DNA binding and endonuclease functions of the transposase coevolve; (ii) Sector residues are highly sensitive to mutations, and most mutations of these residues strongly reduce transposition rate; (iii) Mutations with a strong effect on free energy of folding in the DDE domain of the transposase significantly reduce transposition rate. (iv) Mutations that influence DNA and protein-protein interactions generally reduce transposition rate, although most hyperactive mutants are also located on the protein surface, including residues with protein-protein interactions. This suggests that hyperactivity results from the modification of protein interactions, rather than the stabilization of protein fold. PMID:27401040

  20. KRAB-zinc finger proteins and KAP1 can mediate long-range transcriptional repression through heterochromatin spreading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Groner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs are tetrapod-specific transcriptional repressors encoded in the hundreds by the human genome. In order to explore their as yet ill-defined impact on gene expression, we developed an ectopic repressor assay, allowing the study of KRAB-mediated transcriptional regulation at hundreds of different transcriptional units. By targeting a drug-controllable KRAB-containing repressor to gene-trapping lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that KRAB and its corepressor KAP1 can silence promoters located several tens of kilobases (kb away from their DNA binding sites, with an efficiency which is generally higher for promoters located within 15 kb or less. Silenced promoters exhibit a loss of histone H3-acetylation, an increase in H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3, and a drop in RNA Pol II recruitment, consistent with a block of transcriptional initiation following the establishment of silencing marks. Furthermore, we reveal that KRAB-mediated repression is established by the long-range spreading of H3K9me3 and heterochromatin protein 1 beta (HP1beta between the repressor binding site and the promoter. We confirm the biological relevance of this phenomenon by documenting KAP1-dependent transcriptional repression at an endogenous KRAB-ZFP gene cluster, where KAP1 binds to the 3' end of genes and mediates propagation of H3K9me3 and HP1beta towards their 5' end. Together, our data support a model in which KRAB/KAP1 recruitment induces long-range repression through the spread of heterochromatin. This finding not only suggests auto-regulatory mechanisms in the control of KRAB-ZFP gene clusters, but also provides important cues for interpreting future genome-wide DNA binding data of KRAB-ZFPs and KAP1.

  1. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein activates GATA4 transcription and mediates cardiac hypertrophic signaling from angiotensin II receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pressure overload and prolonged angiotensin II (Ang II infusion elicit cardiac hypertrophy in Ang II receptor 1 (AT(1 null mouse, whereas Ang II receptor 2 (AT(2 gene deletion abolishes the hypertrophic response. The roles and signals of the cardiac AT(2 receptor still remain unsettled. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF was shown to bind to the AT(2 receptor and transmit the hypertrophic signal. Using PLZF knockout mice we directed our studies on the function of PLZF concerning the cardiac specific transcription factor GATA4, and GATA4 targets. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLZF knockout and age-matched wild-type (WT mice were treated with Ang II, infused at a rate of 4.2 ng·kg(-1·min(-1 for 3 weeks. Ang II elevated systolic blood pressure to comparable levels in PLZF knockout and WT mice (140 mmHg. WT mice developed prominent cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis after Ang II infusion. In contrast, there was no obvious cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis in PLZF knockout mice. An AT(2 receptor blocker given to Ang II-infused wild type mice prevented hypertrophy, verifying the role of AT(2 receptor for cardiac hypertrophy. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that PLZF bound to the GATA4 gene regulatory region. A Luciferase assay verified that PLZF up-regulated GATA4 gene expression and the absence of PLZF expression in vivo produced a corresponding repression of GATA4 protein. CONCLUSIONS: PLZF is an important AT(2 receptor binding protein in mediating Ang II induced cardiac hypertrophy through an AT(2 receptor-dependent signal pathway. The angiotensin II-AT(2-PLZF-GATA4 signal may further augment Ang II induced pathological effects on cardiomyocytes.

  2. The rice B-box zinc finger gene family: genomic identification, characterization, expression profiling and diurnal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyan Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B-box (BBX -containing proteins are a class of zinc finger proteins that contain one or two B-box domains and play important roles in plant growth and development. The Arabidopsis BBX gene family has recently been re-identified and renamed. However, there has not been a genome-wide survey of the rice BBX (OsBBX gene family until now. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we identified 30 rice BBX genes through a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis. Each gene was assigned a uniform nomenclature. We described the chromosome localizations, gene structures, protein domains, phylogenetic relationship, whole life-cycle expression profile and diurnal expression patterns of the OsBBX family members. Based on the phylogeny and domain constitution, the OsBBX gene family was classified into five subfamilies. The gene duplication analysis revealed that only chromosomal segmental duplication contributed to the expansion of the OsBBX gene family. The expression profile of the OsBBX genes was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays throughout the entire life-cycle of rice cultivar Zhenshan 97 (ZS97. In addition, microarray analysis was performed to obtain the expression patterns of these genes under light/dark conditions and after three phytohormone treatments. This analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the OsBBX genes could be classified into eight groups. Eight genes were regulated under the light/dark treatments, and eleven genes showed differential expression under at least one phytohormone treatment. Moreover, we verified the diurnal expression of the OsBBX genes using the data obtained from the Diurnal Project and qPCR analysis, and the results indicated that many of these genes had a diurnal expression pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of the genome-wide identification and the expression and diurnal analysis of the OsBBX gene family should facilitate additional functional studies of the Os

  3. A C2H2 zinc finger protein FEMU2 is required for fox1 expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Deng

    Full Text Available Chlamydomonas reinhardtii fox1 gene encodes a ferroxidase that is involved in cellular Fe uptake and highly induced during Fe deficient conditions. In an effort to identify fox1 promoter regulatory elements, an insertional library was generated in a transgenic Chlamydomonas strain (2A38 harboring an arylsulfatase (ARS reporter gene driven by the fox1 promoter. Mutants with a defective response to low iron conditions were selected for further study. Among these, a strain containing a disrupted femu2 gene was identified. Activation of the fox1 promoter by the femu2 gene product was confirmed by silencing the femu2 gene using RNA interference. In three femu2 RNAi transgenic lines (IR3, IR6, and IR7, ARS reporter gene activities declined by 84.3%, 86.4%, and 88.8%, respectively under Fe deficient conditions. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis of both the femu2 mutant and the RNAi transgenic lines showed significantly decreased transcript abundance of the endogenous fox1 gene under Fe deficient conditions. Amino acid sequence analysis of the femu2 gene product identified three potential C2H2 zinc finger (ZF motifs and a nuclear localization study suggests that FEMU2 is localized to the nucleus. In addition, a potential FEMU2 binding site ((G/TTTGG(G/T(G/TT was identified using PCR-mediated random binding site selection. Taken together, this evidence suggests that FEMU2 is involved in up-regulation of the fox1 gene in Fe deficient cells.

  4. The role of Zic family zinc finger transcription factors in the proliferation and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Zic transcription factors expressed early retinal progenitor cells. ► Zics sustain proliferation activity of retinal progenitor cells. ► Overexpression of Zic in retinal progenitors perturbed rod differentiation. ► Fate determination to rod photoreceptor was not affected. -- Abstract: Members of the Zic family of zinc finger transcription factors play critical roles in a variety of developmental processes. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found that Zics are strongly expressed in SSEA-1-positive early retinal progenitors in the peripheral region of the mouse retina. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction using mRNA from the retina at various developmental stages showed that Zic1 and Zic2 are expressed in the embryonic retina and then gradually disappear during retinal development. Zic3 is also expressed in the embryonic retina; its expression level slightly decreases but it is expressed until adulthood. We overexpressed Zic1, Zic2, or Zic3 in retinal progenitors at embryonic day 17.5 and cultured the retina as explants for 2 weeks. The number of rod photoreceptors was fewer than in the control, but no other cell types showed significant differences between control and Zic overexpressing cells. The proliferation activity of normal retinal progenitors decreased after 5 days in culture, as observed in normal in vivo developmental processes. However, Zic expressing retinal cells continued to proliferate at days 5 and 7, suggesting that Zics sustain the proliferation activities of retinal progenitor cells. Since the effects of Zic1, 2, and 3 are indistinguishable in terms of differentiation and proliferation of retinal progenitors, the redundant function of Zics in retinal development is suggested.

  5. The role of Zic family zinc finger transcription factors in the proliferation and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watabe, Yui [Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Division of Orthoptics, Teikyo University School of Medical Care and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Baba, Yukihiro [Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Mizota, Atsushi [Department of Ophthalmology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Sumiko, E-mail: sumiko@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zic transcription factors expressed early retinal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zics sustain proliferation activity of retinal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Zic in retinal progenitors perturbed rod differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fate determination to rod photoreceptor was not affected. -- Abstract: Members of the Zic family of zinc finger transcription factors play critical roles in a variety of developmental processes. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found that Zics are strongly expressed in SSEA-1-positive early retinal progenitors in the peripheral region of the mouse retina. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction using mRNA from the retina at various developmental stages showed that Zic1 and Zic2 are expressed in the embryonic retina and then gradually disappear during retinal development. Zic3 is also expressed in the embryonic retina; its expression level slightly decreases but it is expressed until adulthood. We overexpressed Zic1, Zic2, or Zic3 in retinal progenitors at embryonic day 17.5 and cultured the retina as explants for 2 weeks. The number of rod photoreceptors was fewer than in the control, but no other cell types showed significant differences between control and Zic overexpressing cells. The proliferation activity of normal retinal progenitors decreased after 5 days in culture, as observed in normal in vivo developmental processes. However, Zic expressing retinal cells continued to proliferate at days 5 and 7, suggesting that Zics sustain the proliferation activities of retinal progenitor cells. Since the effects of Zic1, 2, and 3 are indistinguishable in terms of differentiation and proliferation of retinal progenitors, the redundant function of Zics in retinal development is suggested.

  6. Canine uterine bacterial infection induces upregulation of proteolysis-related genes and downregulation of homeobox and zinc finger factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnvi Hagman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial infection with the severe complication of sepsis is a frequent and serious condition, being a major cause of death worldwide. To cope with the plethora of occurring bacterial infections there is therefore an urgent need to identify molecular mechanisms operating during the host response, in order both to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention and to identify biomarkers for disease. Here we addressed this issue by studying global gene expression in uteri from female dogs suffering from spontaneously occurring uterine bacterial infection. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis showed that almost 800 genes were significantly (p2-fold in the uteri of diseased animals. Among these were numerous chemokine and cytokine genes, as well as genes associated with inflammatory cell extravasation, anti-bacterial action, the complement system and innate immune responses, as well as proteoglycan-associated genes. There was also a striking representation of genes associated with proteolysis. Robust upregulation of immunoglobulin components and genes involved in antigen presentation was also evident, indicating elaboration of a strong adaptive immune response. The bacterial infection was also associated with a significant downregulation of almost 700 genes, of which various homeobox and zinc finger transcription factors were highly represented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these finding outline the molecular patterns involved in bacterial infection of the uterus. The study identified altered expression of numerous genes not previously implicated in bacterial disease, and several of these may be evaluated for potential as biomarkers of disease or as therapeutic targets. Importantly, since humans and dogs show genetic similarity and develop diseases that share many characteristics, the molecular events identified here are likely to reflect the corresponding situation in humans afflicted by similar disease.

  7. The ZNF75 zinc finger gene subfamily: Isolation and mapping of the four members in humans and great apes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, A.; Strina, D.; Frattini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    We have previously reported the characterization of the human ZNF75 gene located on Xq26, which has only limited homology (less than 65%) to other ZF genes in the databases. Here, we describe three human zinc finger genes with 86 to 95% homology to ZNF75 at the nucleotide level, which represent all the members of the human ZNF75 subfamily. One of these, ZNF75B, is a pseudogene mapped to chromosome 12q13. The other two, ZNF75A and ZNF75C, maintain on ORF in the sequenced region, and at least the latter is expressed in the U937 cell line. They were mapped to chromosomes 16 and 11, respectively. All these genes are conserved in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The ZNF75B homologue is a pseudogene in all three great apes, and in chimpanzee it is located on chromosome 10 (phylogenetic XII), at p13 (corresponding to the human 12q13). The chimpanzee homologue of ZNF75 is also located on the Xq26 chromosome, in the same region, as detected by in situ hybridization. As expected, nucleotide changes were clearly more abundant between human and organutan than between human and chimpanzee or gorilla homologues. Members of the same class were more similar to each other than to the other homologues within the same species. This suggests that the duplication and/or retrotranscription events occurred in a common ancestor long before great ape speciation. This, together with the existance of at least two genes in cows and horses, suggests a relatively high conservation of this gene family. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Role of Bmznf-2, a Bombyx mori CCCH zinc finger gene, in masculinisation and differential splicing of Bmtra-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Gajula; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Mita, Kazuei; Nagaraju, Javaregowda

    2016-08-01

    Deciphering the regulatory factors involved in Bombyx mori sex determination has been a puzzle, challenging researchers for nearly a century now. The pre-mRNA of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx), a master regulator gene of sexual differentiation, is differentially spliced, producing Bmdsxm and Bmdsxf transcripts in males and females respectively. The putative proteins encoded by these differential transcripts orchestrate antagonistic functions, which lead to sexual differentiation. A recent study in B. mori illustrated the role of a W-derived fem piRNA in conferring femaleness. In females, the fem piRNA was shown to suppress the activity of a Z-linked CCCH type zinc finger (znf) gene, Masculiniser (masc), which indirectly promotes the Bmdsxm type of splicing. In this study, we report a novel autosomal (Chr 25) CCCH type znf motif encoding gene Bmznf-2 as one of the potential factors in the Bmdsx sex specific differential splicing, and we also provide insights into its role in the alternative splicing of Bmtra2 by using ovary derived BmN cells. Over-expression of Bmznf-2 induced Bmdsxm type of splicing (masculinisation) with a correspondingly reduced expression of Bmdsxf type isoform in BmN cells. Further, the site-directed mutational studies targeting the tandem CCCH znf motifs revealed their indispensability in the observed phenotype of masculinisation. Additionally, the dual luciferase assays in BmN cells using 5' UTR region of the Bmznf-2 strongly implied the existence of a translational repression over this gene. From these findings, we propose Bmznf-2 to be one of the potential factors of masculinisation similar to Masc. From the growing number of Bmdsx splicing regulators, we assume that the sex determination cascade of B. mori is quite intricate in nature; hence, it has to be further investigated for its comprehensive understanding. PMID:27260399

  9. A nucleolus-predominant piggyBac transposase, NP-mPB, mediates elevated transposition efficiency in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Bon Hong

    Full Text Available PiggyBac is a prevalent transposon system used to deliver transgenes and functionally explore the mammalian untouched genomic territory. The important features of piggyBac transposon are the relatively low insertion site preference and the ability of seamless removal from genome, which allow its potential uses in functional genomics and regenerative medicine. Efforts to increase its transposition efficiency in mammals were made through engineering the corresponding transposase (PBase codon usage to enhance its expression level and through screening for mutant PBase variants with increased enzyme activity. To improve the safety for its potential use in regenerative medicine applications, site-specific transposition was achieved by using engineered zinc finger- and Gal4-fused PBases. An excision-prone PBase variant has also been successfully developed. Here we describe the construction of a nucleolus-predominant PBase, NP-mPB, by adding a nucleolus-predominant (NP signal peptide from HIV-1 TAT protein to a mammalian codon-optimized PBase (mPB. Although there is a predominant fraction of the NP-mPB-tGFP fusion proteins concentrated in the nucleoli, an insertion site preference toward nucleolar organizer regions is not detected. Instead a 3-4 fold increase in piggyBac transposition efficiency is reproducibly observed in mouse and human cells.

  10. Heme regulates the expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of chimaeric genes containing 5'-flanking soybean leghemoglobin sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E O; Marcker, K A; Villadsen, IS

    1986-01-01

    The TM1 yeast mutant was transformed with a 2 micron-derived plasmid (YEp24) which carries a chimaeric gene containing the Escherichia coli chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene fused to the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions of the soybean leghemoglobin (Lb) c3 gene. Expression of the chimaeric...... CAT gene is controlled specifically by heme at a post-transcriptional level, most likely by regulating the efficiencies of translation. Expression of another chimaeric gene consisting of the neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) gene fused to only the 5'-flanking region of the Lbc3 gene is regulated by...

  11. Scientific opinion addressing the safety assessment of plants developed using Zinc Finger Nuclease 3 and other Site-Directed Nucleases with similar function

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO)

    2012-01-01

    The European Commission requested that the EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms deliver a scientific opinion related to risk assessment of plants developed using the zinc finger nuclease 3 technique (ZFN-3) which allows the integration of gene(s) in a predefined insertion site in the genome of the recipient species. Since other nucleases with a similar function to ZFN are considered in this opinion the term site-directed nuclease 3 (SDN-3) is used to describe the technique ra...

  12. ZFP580, a Novel Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor, Is Involved in Cardioprotection of Intermittent High-Altitude Hypoxia against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiang-yan; Yu, Hai-long; Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Tian-hui; Mai, Xia; Liu, Hong-Tao; Xu, Rui-cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background ZFP580 is a novel C2H2 type zinc-finger transcription factor recently identified by our laboratory. We previously showed that ZFP580 may be involved in cell survival and growth. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether ZFP580 is involved in the cardioprotective effects of intermittent high-altitude (IHA) hypoxia against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods and Results After rats were subjected to myocardial ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion, ZFP580 ...

  13. NF-κB activation and zinc finger protein A20 expression in mature dendritic cells derived from liver allografts undergoing acute rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Qing Xu; Wei Wang; Lan Xue; Lv-Nan Yan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of NF-κB activation and zinc finger protein A20 expression in the regulation of maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from liver allografts undergoing acute rejection. METHODS: Sixty donor male SD rats and sixty recipient male LEW rats weighing 220-300 g were randomly divided into whole liver transplantation group and partial liver transplantation group. Allogeneic (SD rat to LEW rat) whole and 50 % partial liver transplantation were performed. DCs from liver grafts 0 hour and 4 days after transplantation were isolated and propagated in the presence of GM-CSF in vitro. Morphological characteristics and phenotypical features of DCs propagated for 10 days were analyzed by electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. NF-κB binding activity, IL-12p70 protein and zinc finger protein A20expression in these DCs were measured by EMSA and Western blotting, respectively. Histological grading of rejection was determined. RESULTS: Allogeneic whole liver grafts showed no signs of rejection on day 4 after the transplantation. In contrast,allogeneic partial liver grafts demonstrated moderate to severe rejection on day 4 after the transplantation. After propagation for 10 days in the presence of GM-CSF in vitro,DCs from allogeneic whole liver grafts exhibited features of immature DC with absence of CD40 surface expression,these DCs were found to exhibit detectable but very low level of NF-κB activity, IL-12 p70 protein and zinc finger protein A20 expression. Whereas, DCs from allogeneic partial liver graft 4 days after transplantation displayed features of mature DC, with high level of CD40 surface expression, and as a consequence, higher expression of IL-12p70 protein, higher activities of NF-κB and higher expression of zinc finger protein A20 compared with those of DCs from whole liver grafts (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that A20expression is up-regulated in response to NF-κB activation in mature DCs derived from

  14. High-efficiency genome editing via 2A-coupled co-expression of fluorescent proteins and zinc finger nucleases or CRISPR/Cas9 nickase pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duda, Katarzyna; Lonowski, Lindsey A; Kofoed-Nielsen, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    Targeted endonucleases including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/Cas9 are increasingly being used for genome editing in higher species. We therefore devised a broadly applicable and versatile method for increasing editing...... were minimal, and when occurring, our data suggest that they may be counteracted by selecting intermediate nuclease levels where off-target mutagenesis is low, but on-target mutagenesis remains relatively high. The method was also applicable to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, including CRISPR/Cas9 mutant...

  15. The LSD1-Type Zinc Finger Motifs of Pisum sativa LSD1 Are a Novel Nuclear Localization Signal and Interact with Importin Alpha

    OpenAIRE

    He, Shanping; Huang, Kuowei; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Xiangchun; Huang, Ping; An, Chengcai

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic studies of the Arabidopsis mutant lsd1 highlight the important role of LSD1 in the negative regulation of plant programmed cell death (PCD). Arabidopsis thaliana LSD1 (AtLSD1) contains three LSD1-type zinc finger motifs, which are involved in the protein–protein interaction. Methodology/Principal Findings To further understand the function of LSD1, we have analyzed cellular localization and functional localization domains of Pisum sativa LSD1 (PsLSD1), which is a homolog of...

  16. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed. PMID:24372523

  17. Chorioallantoic Fusion Defects and Embryonic Lethality Resulting from Disruption of Zfp36L1, a Gene Encoding a CCCH Tandem Zinc Finger Protein of the Tristetraprolin Family

    OpenAIRE

    Stumpo, Deborah J.; Byrd, Noah A.; Phillips, Ruth S.; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Maronpot, Robert R.; Castranio, Trisha; Meyers, Erik N.; Mishina, Yuji; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2004-01-01

    The mouse gene Zfp36L1 encodes zinc finger protein 36-like 1 (Zfp36L1), a member of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of tandem CCCH finger proteins. TTP can bind to AU-rich elements within the 3′-untranslated regions of the mRNAs encoding tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), leading to accelerated mRNA degradation. TTP knockout mice exhibit an inflammatory phenotype that is largely due to increased TNF secretion. Zfp36L1 has activities sim...

  18. Zinc finger proteins and other transcription regulators as response proteins in benzo[a]pyrene exposed cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteomic analysis, which combines two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS), is an important approach to screen proteins responsive to specific stimuli. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a prototype of polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is a potent procarcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. To further probe the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, and to find potential molecular markers involved in cellular responses to B[a]P exposure, we performed proteomic analysis of whole cellular proteins in human amnion epithelial cells after B[a]P-treatment. Image visualization and statistical analysis indicated that more than 40 proteins showed significant changes following B[a]P-treatment (P<0.05). Among them, 20 proteins existed only in the control groups, while six were only present in B[a]P-treated cells. In addition, the expression of 10 proteins increased whereas 11 decreased after B[a]P-treatment. These proteins were subjected to in-gel tryptic digestion followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis. Using peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) to search the nrNCBI database, we identified 22 proteins. Most of these proteins have unknown functions and have not been previously connected to a response to B[a]P exposure. To further annotate the characteristics of these proteins, GOblet analysis was carried out and results indicated that they were involved in multiple biological processes including regulation of transcription, cell proliferation, cell aging and other processes. However, expression changes were noted in a number of transcription regulators, including eight zinc finger proteins as well as SNF2L1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 1), which is closely linked to the chromatin remodeling process. These data may provide new clues to further understand the implication of

  19. ZNF1 Encodes a Putative C2H2 Zinc-Finger Protein Essential for Appressorium Differentiation by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xiaofeng; Que, Yawei; Xu, Lin; Deng, Shuzhen; Peng, Youliang; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wang, Zhengyi

    2016-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae forms specialized infection structures called appressoria which are essential for gaining entry to plant tissue. Here, we report the identification of a novel nonpathogenic T-DNA-tagged mutant XF696 of M. oryzae with a single insertion in the promoter of ZNF1, which encodes a putative transcription factor (TF). Targeted gene deletion mutants of ZNF1 are nonpathogenic and unable to develop appressoria. However, Δznf1 mutants still respond to exogenous cyclic AMP on hydrophilic surfaces and can sense hydrophobic surfaces, initiating the differentiation of germ tubes. Interestingly, Δznf1 mutants also produce significantly more conidia compared with the isogenic wild-type strain. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and green fluorescent protein fusion experiments revealed that expression of ZNF1 was highly induced during germination and appressorium development in M. oryzae and potentially regulated by the Pmk1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. We observed that Δznf1 mutants are affected in mitosis and impaired in mobilization and degradation of lipid droplets and glycogen reserves during appressorium differentiation. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that three of the four C2H2 zinc-finger domains are essential for the function of Znf1. Taken together, we conclude that a C2H2 zinc-finger TF encoded by ZNF1 is essential for appressorium development by the rice blast fungus. PMID:26441322

  20. Hepatitis B virus can be inhibited by DNA methyltransferase 3a via specific zinc-finger-induced methylation of the X promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirong, L; Rui, L; Xiaoli, Y; Qiuyan, H; Bikui, T; Sibo, Z; Naishuo, Z

    2014-02-01

    In this work we explored whether DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) targeted to the HBV X promoter (XP) causes epigenetic suppression of hepatitis B virus (HBV). The C-terminus of Dnmt3a (Dnmt3aC) was fused to a six-zinc-finger peptide specific to XP to form a fused DNA methyltransferase (XPDnmt3aC). The binding and methyl-modifying specificity of XPDnmt3aC were verified with an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and methylation-specific PCR, respectively. XP activity and HBV expression were clearly downregulated in HepG2 cells transfected with plasmid pXPDnmt3aC. The injection of XPDnmt3aC into HBV transgenic (TgHBV) mice also showed significant inhibition, leading to low serum HBV surface protein (HBsAg) levels and a reduced viral load. Thus, XPDnmt3aC specifically silenced HBV via site-selective DNA methylation delivered by zinc-finger peptides. This study establishes the foundation of an epigenetic way of controlling HBV-related diseases. PMID:24794726

  1. Cloning and characterization of a novel human zinc finger gene, hKid3, from a C2H2-ZNF enriched human embryonic cDNA library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the zinc finger genes involved in human embryonic development, we constructed a C2H2-ZNF enriched human embryonic cDNA library, from which a novel human gene named hKid3 was identified. The hKid3 cDNA encodes a 554 amino acid protein with an amino-terminal KRAB domain and 11 carboxyl-terminal C2H2 zinc finger motifs. Northern blot analysis indicates that two hKid3 transcripts of 6 and 8.5 kb express in human fetal brain and kidney. The 6 kb transcript can also be detected in human adult brain, heart, and skeletal muscle while the 8.5 kb transcript appears to be embryo-specific. GFP-fused hKid3 protein is localized to nuclei and the ZF domain is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization. To explore the DNA-binding specificity of hKid3, an oligonucleotide library was selected by GST fusion protein of hKid3 ZF domain, and the consensus core sequence 5'-CCAC-3' was evaluated by competitive electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, The KRAB domain of hKid3 exhibits transcription repressor activity when tested in GAL4 fusion protein assay. These results indicate that hKid3 may function as a transcription repressor with regulated expression pattern during human development of brain and kidney

  2. ZNF198 stabilizes the LSD1-CoREST-HDAC1 complex on chromatin through its MYM-type zinc fingers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian B Gocke

    Full Text Available Histone modifications in chromatin regulate gene expression. A transcriptional co-repressor complex containing LSD1-CoREST-HDAC1 (termed LCH hereafter for simplicity represses transcription by coordinately removing histone modifications associated with transcriptional activation. RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST recruits LCH to the promoters of neuron-specific genes, thereby silencing their transcription in non-neuronal tissues. ZNF198 is a member of a family of MYM-type zinc finger proteins that associate with LCH. Here, we show that ZNF198-like proteins are required for the repression of E-cadherin (a gene known to be repressed by LSD1, but not REST-responsive genes. ZNF198 binds preferentially to the intact LCH ternary complex, but not its individual subunits. ZNF198- and REST-binding to the LCH complex are mutually exclusive. ZNF198 associates with chromatin independently of LCH. Furthermore, modification of HDAC1 by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO in vitro weakens its interaction with CoREST whereas sumoylation of HDAC1 stimulates its binding to ZNF198. Finally, we mapped the LCH- and HDAC1-SUMO-binding domains of ZNF198 to tandem repeats of MYM-type zinc fingers. Therefore, our results suggest that ZNF198, through its multiple protein-protein interaction interfaces, helps to maintain the intact LCH complex on specific, non-REST-responsive promoters and may also prevent SUMO-dependent dissociation of HDAC1.

  3. A Novel Zinc Finger Protein 219-like (ZNF219L) is Involved in the Regulation of Collagen Type 2 Alpha 1a (col2a1a) Gene Expression in Zebrafish Notochord

    OpenAIRE

    Lien, Huang-Wei; Yang, Chung-Hsiang; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Hung, Chin-Chun; Liao, Wei-Hao; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Han, Yu-San; Huang, Chang-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The notochord is required for body plan patterning in vertebrates, and defects in notochord development during embryogenesis can lead to diseases affecting the adult. It is therefore important to elucidate the gene regulatory mechanism underlying notochord formation. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish zinc finger 219-like (ZNF219L) based on mammalian ZNF219, which contains nine C2H2-type zinc finger domains. Through whole-mount in situ hybridization, we found that znf219L mRNA is mainly e...

  4. Clone pAT 133 identifies a gene that encodes another human member of a class of growth factor-induced genes with almost identical zinc-finger domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, H.J.; Skerka, C; Bialonski, A; Zipfel, P F

    1991-01-01

    We report the structure and regulation of a gene represented by clone pAT 133, which is induced upon transition from a resting state (G0) through the early phase of the cell cycle (G1). The pAT 133 gene is immediately induced, with FOS-like kinetics, in human T cells and in fibroblasts. Primary structure analysis showed that the encoded protein contains three tandem zinc-finger sequences of the type Cys2-Xaa12-His2. This zinc-finger region, which is thought to bind DNA in a sequence-specific ...

  5. Structure and expression of major histocompatibility complex-binding protein 2, a 275-kDa zinc finger protein that binds to an enhancer of major histocompatibility complex class I genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, L.J. van 't; Lutz, P.M.; Isselbacher, K.J.; Bernards, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding a transcription factor that binds to the enhancer of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes. MHC-binding protein 2 (MBP-2) is a 275-kDa protein, containing two sets of widely separated zinc fingers and a stretch of highly acidic amino acids, a putative

  6. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C; Khan, Amir R

    2016-06-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2-4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD(+) versus NADP(+), but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia coli enzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP(+) cofactor from the parent E. coli domain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity. PMID:27303899

  7. A Family of Zinc Finger Proteins Is Required forChromosome-specific Pairing and Synapsis during Meiosis in C.elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2006-06-07

    Homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis are prerequisitefor accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis. Here, we show that afamily of four related C2H2 zinc-finger proteins plays a central role inthese events in C. elegans. These proteins are encoded within a tandemgene cluster. In addition to the X-specific HIM-8 protein, threeadditional paralogs collectively mediate the behavior of the fiveautosomes. Each chromosome relies on a specific member of the family topair and synapse with its homolog. These "ZIM" proteins concentrate atspecial regions called meiotic pairing centers on the correspondingchromosomes. These sites are dispersed along the nuclear envelope duringearly meiotic prophase, suggesting a role analogous to thetelomere-mediated meiotic bouquet in other organisms. To gain insightinto the evolution of these components, wecharacterized homologs in C.briggsae and C. remanei, which revealed changes in copy number of thisgene family within the nematode lineage.

  8. Arabidopsis VARIEGATED 3 encodes a chloroplast-targeted, zinc-finger protein required for chloroplast and palisade cell development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Holm, Agnethe; Jenkins, Tom; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Harris, Cassandra A.; Beale, Michael H.; Andersen, Mathias; Mant, Alexandra; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Camara, Bilal; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2004-01-01

    The stable, recessive Arabidopsis variegated 3 (var3) mutant exhibits a variegated phenotype due to somatic areas lacking or containing developmentally retarded chloroplasts and greatly reduced numbers of palisade cells. The VAR3 gene, isolated by transposon tagging, encodes the 85.9 kDa VAR3 pro...... pigment profiles are qualitatively similar in wild type and var3, although var3 accumulates lower levels of chlorophylls and carotenoids. These results indicate that VAR3 is a part of a protein complex required for normal chloroplast and palisade cell development....... protein containing novel repeats and zinc fingers described as protein interaction domains. VAR3 interacts specifically in yeast and in vitro with NCED4, a putative polyene chain or carotenoid dioxygenase, and both VAR3 and NCED4 accumulate in the chloroplast stroma. Metabolic profiling demonstrates that...

  9. Proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of stem cells from apical papilla regulated by Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fang; Gao, Lifen; Lu, Yating; Ma, Hongxin; Wang, Hongxing; Liang, Xiaohong; Wang, Yan; Ma, Chunhong

    2016-01-15

    In the process of tooth root development, stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) can differentiate into odontoblasts and form root dentin, however, molecules regulating SCAPs differentiation have not been elucidated. Zinc fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) is a novel transcriptional inhibitor. It is reported to modulate the development of nerve cells, liver cells, B cells, red blood cells, and so on. However, the role of ZHX2 in tooth root development remains unclear. In this study, we explored the potential role of ZHX2 in the process of SCAPs differentiation. The results showed that overexpression of ZHX2 upregulated the expression of osteo/odontogenic related genes and ALP activity, inhibited the proliferation of SCAPs. Consistently, ZHX2 knockdown reduced SCAPs mineralization and promoted SCAPs proliferation. These results indicated that ZHX2 plays a critical role in the proliferation and osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs. PMID:26679602

  10. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I;

    2000-01-01

    and plasma membrane marker proteins. ZAC membrane association was confirmed in assays by a fusion between ZAC and the green fluorescence protein and prompted an analysis of the in vitro phospholipid-binding ability of ZAC. Phospholipid dot-blot and liposome-binding assays indicated that fusion proteins......Arabidopsis proteins were predicted which share an 80 residue zinc finger domain known from ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating proteins (ARF GAPs). One of these is a 37 kDa protein, designated ZAC, which has a novel domain structure in which the N-terminal ARF GAP domain and a C-terminal C2...... domain are separated by a region without homology to other known proteins. Zac promoter/beta-glucuronidase reporter assays revealed highest expression levels in flowering tissue, rosettes and roots. ZAC protein was immuno-detected mainly in association with membranes and fractionated with Golgi...

  11. The ken and barbie gene encoding a putative transcription factor with a BTB domain and three zinc finger motifs functions in terminalia development of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacsovich, Tamas; Yuge, Kazuya; Awano, Wakae; Asztalos, Zoltan; Kondo, Shunzo; Juni, Naoto; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2003-10-01

    Mutations in the ken and barbie locus are accompanied by the malformation of terminalia in adult Drosophila. Male and female genitalia often remain inside the body, and the same portions of genitalia and analia are missing in a fraction of homozygous flies. Rotated and/or duplicated terminalia are also observed. Terminalia phenotypes are enhanced by mutations in the gap gene tailless, the homeobox gene caudal, and the decapentaplegic gene that encodes a TGFbeta-like morphogen. The ken and barbie gene encodes a protein with three CCHH-type zinc finger motifs that are conserved in several transcription factors such as Krüppel and BCL-6. All defects in ken and barbie mutants are fully rescued by the expression of a wild-type genomic construct, which establishes the causality between phenotypes and the gene. PMID:14518006

  12. Identification of the Zinc Finger Protein ZRANB2 as a Novel Maternal Lipopolysaccharide-binding Protein That Protects Embryos of Zebrafish against Gram-negative Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Du, Xiaoyuan; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-02-19

    Zinc finger ZRANB2 proteins are widespread in animals, but their functions and mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we clearly demonstrate that ZRANB2 is a newly identified LPS-binding protein present abundantly in the eggs/embryos of zebrafish. We also show that recombinant ZRANB2 (rZRANB2) acts as a pattern recognition receptor capable of identifying the bacterial signature molecule LPS as well as binding the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio anguilarum, and Aeromonas hydrophila and functions as an antibacterial effector molecule capable of directly killing the bacteria. Furthermore, we reveal that N-terminal residues 11-37 consisting of the first ZnF_RBZ domain are indispensable for ZRANB2 antimicrobial activity. Importantly, microinjection of rZRANB2 into early embryos significantly enhanced the resistance of the embryos against pathogenic A. hydrophila challenge, and this enhanced bacterial resistance was markedly reduced by co-injection of anti-ZRANB2 antibody. Moreover, precipitation of ZRANB2 in the embryo extracts by preincubation with anti-ZRANB2 antibody caused a marked decrease in the antibacterial activity of the extracts against the bacteria tested. In addition, the N-terminal peptide Z1/37 or Z11/37 with in vitro antibacterial activity also promoted the resistance of embryos against A. hydrophila, but the peptide Z38/198 without in vitro antibacterial activity did not. Collectively, these results indicate that ZRANB2 is a maternal LPS-binding protein that can protect the early embryos of zebrafish against pathogenic attacks, a novel role ever assigned to ZRANB2 proteins. This work also provides new insights into the immunological function of the zinc finger proteins that are widely distributed in various animals. PMID:26740623

  13. Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins in end-stage COPD lungs with and without severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koczulla A-Rembert

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. An important fraction of COPD cases harbor a major genetic determinant, inherited ZZ (Glu342Lys α1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD. A study was undertaken to investigate gene expression patterns in end-stage COPD lungs from patients with and without AATD. Methods Explanted lungs of end-stage ZZ AATD-related (treated and non-treated with AAT augmentation therapy and “normal” MM COPD, and liver biopsies from patients suffering from liver cirrhosis with and without ZZ AATD were used for gene expression analysis by Affymetrix microarrays or RT-PCR. Results A total of 162 genes were found to be differentially expressed (p-value ≤ 0.05 and |FC| ≥ 2 between MM and ZZ COPD patients. Of those, 134 gene sets were up-regulated and 28 were down-regulated in ZZ relative to MM lung tissue. A subgroup of genes, zinc finger protein 165, snail homolog 1 (Drosophila (SNAI1, and Krüppel-like transcription factors (KLFs 4 (gut, 9 and 10, perfectly segregated ZZ and MM COPD patients. The higher expression of KLF 9 and KLF10 has been verified in the replication cohort with AATD-related end-stage lung emphysema and liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, higher expression of KLF9, SNAI1 and DEFA1 was found in ZZ COPD lungs without augmentation therapy relative to MM COPD or ZZ COPD with augmentation therapy. Conclusions These results reveal the involvement of transcriptional regulators of the zinc-finger family in COPD pathogenesis and provide deeper insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms of COPD with and without AATD.

  14. A Comprehensive Catalog of Human KRAB-associated Zinc Finger Genes: Insights into the Evolutionary History of a Large Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D M; Hamilton, A T; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Yang, S; Kim, J; Gordon, L; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-30

    Krueppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotic species. In mammals, most ZNF proteins comprise a single class of transcriptional repressors in which a chromatin interaction domain, called the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB) is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs. KRAB-ZNF loci are specific to tetrapod vertebrates, but have expanded dramatically in numbers through repeated rounds of segmental duplication to create a gene family with hundreds of members in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the human genome for key motifs and used them to construct and manually curate gene models. The resulting KRAB-ZNF gene catalog includes 326 known genes, 243 of which were structurally corrected by manual annotation, and 97 novel KRAB-ZNF genes; this single family therefore comprises 20% of all predicted human transcription factor genes. Many of the genes are alternatively spliced, yielding a total of 743 distinct predicted proteins. Although many human KRAB-ZNF genes are conserved in mammals, at least 136 and potentially more than 200 genes of this type are primate-specific including many recent segmental duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are active in a wide variety of human tissues suggesting roles in many key biological processes, but most member genes remain completely uncharacterized. Because of their sheer numbers, wide-ranging tissue-specific expression patterns, and remarkable evolutionary divergence we predict that KRAB-ZNF transcription factors have played critical roles in crafting many aspects of human biology, including both deeply conserved and primate-specific traits.

  15. Gain, loss and divergence in primate zinc-finger genes: a rich resource for evolution of gene regulatory differences between species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Nowick

    Full Text Available The molecular changes underlying major phenotypic differences between humans and other primates are not well understood, but alterations in gene regulation are likely to play a major role. Here we performed a thorough evolutionary analysis of the largest family of primate transcription factors, the Krüppel-type zinc finger (KZNF gene family. We identified and curated gene and pseudogene models for KZNFs in three primate species, chimpanzee, orangutan and rhesus macaque, to allow for a comparison with the curated set of human KZNFs. We show that the recent evolutionary history of primate KZNFs has been complex, including many lineage-specific duplications and deletions. We found 213 species-specific KZNFs, among them 7 human-specific and 23 chimpanzee-specific genes. Two human-specific genes were validated experimentally. Ten genes have been lost in humans and 13 in chimpanzees, either through deletion or pseudogenization. We also identified 30 KZNF orthologs with human-specific and 42 with chimpanzee-specific sequence changes that are predicted to affect DNA binding properties of the proteins. Eleven of these genes show signatures of accelerated evolution, suggesting positive selection between humans and chimpanzees. During primate evolution the most extensive re-shaping of the KZNF repertoire, including most gene additions, pseudogenizations, and structural changes occurred within the subfamily homininae. Using zinc finger (ZNF binding predictions, we suggest potential impact these changes have had on human gene regulatory networks. The large species differences in this family of TFs stands in stark contrast to the overall high conservation of primate genomes and potentially represents a potent driver of primate evolution.

  16. Mycobacterial and HIV infections up-regulated human zinc finger protein 134, a novel positive regulator of HIV-1 LTR activity and viral propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Benjamin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Concurrent occurrence of HIV and Tuberculosis (TB infections influence the cellular environment of the host for synergistic existence. An elementary approach to understand such coalition at the molecular level is to understand the interactions of the host and the viral factors that subsequently effect viral replication. Long terminal repeats (LTR of HIV genome serve as a template for binding trans-acting viral and cellular factors that regulate its transcriptional activity, thereby, deciding the fate of HIV pathogenesis, making it an ideal system to explore the interplay between HIV and the host. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, using biotinylated full length HIV-1 LTR sequence as bait followed by MALDI analyses, we identified and further characterized human-Zinc-finger-protein-134 (hZNF-134 as a novel positive regulator of HIV-1 that promoted LTR-driven transcription and viral production. Over-expression of hZNF-134 promoted LTR driven luciferase activity and viral transcripts, resulting in increased virus production while siRNA mediated knockdown reduced both the viral transcripts and the viral titers, establishing hZNF-134 as a positive effector of HIV-1. HIV, Mycobacteria and HIV-TB co-infections increased hZNF-134 expressions in PBMCs, the impact being highest by mycobacteria. Corroborating these observations, primary TB patients (n = 22 recorded extraordinarily high transcript levels of hZNF-134 as compared to healthy controls (n = 16. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With these observations, it was concluded that hZNF-134, which promoted HIV-1 LTR activity acted as a positive regulator of HIV propagation in human host. High titers of hZNF-134 transcripts in TB patients suggest that up-regulation of such positive effectors of HIV-1 upon mycobacterial infection can be yet another mechanism by which mycobacteria assists HIV-1 propagation during HIV-TB co-infections. hZNF-134, an uncharacterized host protein, thus

  17. Subtraction by addition: domesticated transposases in programmed DNA elimination

    OpenAIRE

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia must eliminate ∼60,000 short sequences from its genome to generate uninterrupted coding sequences in its somatic macronucleus. In this issue of Genes & Development, Baudry and colleagues (pp. 2478–2483) identify the protein that excises these noncoding sequences: a domesticated piggyBac transposase that has been adapted to remove what are likely the remnants of transposon insertions. This new study reveals how addition of a transposase to small RNA-directed ...

  18. A hyperactive piggyBac transposase for mammalian applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yusa, K; Zhou, L.; Li, M. A.; Bradley, A; Craig, N. L.

    2011-01-01

    DNA transposons have been widely used for transgenesis and insertional mutagenesis in various organisms. Among the transposons active in mammalian cells, the moth-derived transposon piggyBac is most promising with its highly efficient transposition, large cargo capacity, and precise repair of the donor site. Here we report the generation of a hyperactive piggyBac transposase. The active transposition of piggyBac in multiple organisms allowed us to screen a transposase mutant library in yeast ...

  19. Zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 interacts with histones, DNA repair proteins and recruits NuRD complex to regulate gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihui; Lam, Norris; Thiele, Carol J

    2015-09-29

    The zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 has been found to control neural fate-determination in flies, regulate murine and frog cardiac development, control murine retinal cell progenitor expansion and function as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which CASZ1 regulates gene transcription to exert these diverse biological functions has not been described. Here we identify co-factors that are recruited by CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and mass spectrometry assays. We find that CASZ1b binds to the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, histones and DNA repair proteins. Mutagenesis of the CASZ1b protein assay demonstrates that the N-terminus of CASZ1b is required for NuRD binding, and a poly(ADP-ribose) binding motif in the CASZ1b protein is required for histone H3 and DNA repair proteins binding. The N-terminus of CASZ1b fused to an artificial DNA-binding domain (GAL4DBD) causes a significant repression of transcription (5xUAS-luciferase assay), which could be blocked by treatment with an HDAC inhibitor. Realtime PCR results show that the transcriptional activity of CASZ1b mutants that abrogate NuRD or histone H3/DNA binding is significantly decreased. This indicates a model in which CASZ1b binds to chromatin and recruits NuRD complexes to orchestrate epigenetic-mediated transcriptional programs. PMID:26296975

  20. Stamen abscission zone transcriptome profiling reveals new candidates for abscission control: enhanced retention of floral organs in transgenic plants overexpressing Arabidopsis ZINC FINGER PROTEIN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Suqin; Lashbrook, Coralie C

    2008-03-01

    Organ detachment requires cell separation within abscission zones (AZs). Physiological studies have established that ethylene and auxin contribute to cell separation control. Genetic analyses of abscission mutants have defined ethylene-independent detachment regulators. Functional genomic strategies leading to global understandings of abscission have awaited methods for isolating AZ cells of low abundance and very small size. Here, we couple laser capture microdissection of Arabidopsis thaliana stamen AZs and GeneChip profiling to reveal the AZ transcriptome responding to a developmental shedding cue. Analyses focus on 551 AZ genes (AZ(551)) regulated at the highest statistical significance (P Gene Ontology Consortium functional categories for cell wall modifying proteins, extracellular regulators, and nuclear-residing transcription factors. Promoter-beta-glucuronidase expression of one transcription factor candidate, ZINC FINGER PROTEIN2 (AtZFP2), was elevated in stamen, petal, and sepal AZs. Flower parts of transgenic lines overexpressing AtZFP2 exhibited asynchronous and delayed abscission. Abscission defects were accompanied by altered floral morphology limiting pollination and fertility. Hand-pollination restored transgenic fruit development but not the rapid abscission seen in wild-type plants, demonstrating that pollination does not assure normal rates of detachment. In wild-type stamen AZs, AtZFP2 is significantly up-regulated postanthesis. Phenotype data from transgene overexpression studies suggest that AtZFP2 participates in processes that directly or indirectly influence organ shed. PMID:18192438

  1. Highly efficient homology-driven genome editing in human T cells by combining zinc-finger nuclease mRNA and AAV6 donor delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianbin; DeClercq, Joshua J; Hayward, Samuel B; Li, Patrick Wai-Lun; Shivak, David A; Gregory, Philip D; Lee, Gary; Holmes, Michael C

    2016-02-18

    The adoptive transfer of engineered T cells for the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity, and infectious disease is a rapidly growing field that has shown great promise in recent clinical trials. Nuclease-driven genome editing provides a method in which to precisely target genetic changes to further enhance T cell function in vivo. We describe the development of a highly efficient method to genome edit both primary human CD8 and CD4 T cells by homology-directed repair at a pre-defined site of the genome. Two different homology donor templates were evaluated, representing both minor gene editing events (restriction site insertion) to mimic gene correction, or the more significant insertion of a larger gene cassette. By combining zinc finger nuclease mRNA delivery with AAV6 delivery of a homologous donor we could gene correct 41% of CCR5 or 55% of PPP1R12C (AAVS1) alleles in CD8(+) T cells and gene targeting of a GFP transgene cassette in >40% of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells at both the CCR5 and AAVS1 safe harbor locus, potentially providing a robust genome editing tool for T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:26527725

  2. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein Roma/Zfp157 Is a Critical Regulator of Cell-Cycle Progression and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L.F. Ho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of DNA replication and cell division is essential for tissue growth and maintenance of genomic integrity and is particularly important in tissues that undergo continuous regeneration such as mammary glands. We have previously shown that disruption of the KRAB-domain zinc finger protein Roma/Zfp157 results in hyperproliferation of mammary epithelial cells (MECs during pregnancy. Here, we delineate the mechanism by which Roma engenders this phenotype. Ablation of Roma in MECs leads to unscheduled proliferation, replication stress, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs depleted for Roma exhibit downregulation of p21Cip1 and geminin and have accelerated replication fork velocities, which is accompanied by a high rate of mitotic errors and polyploidy. In contrast, overexpression of Roma in MECs halts cell-cycle progression, whereas siRNA-mediated p21Cip1 knockdown ameliorates, in part, this phenotype. Thus, Roma is an essential regulator of the cell cycle and is required to maintain genomic stability.

  3. Sda1, a Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor, is involved in polyol metabolism and fumonisin B1 production in Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Smith, Jonathon; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Bluhm, Burton H; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous ascomycete Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and stalk rot of maize, both of which reduce grain quality and yield. Additionally, F. verticillioides produces the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) during infection of maize kernels, and thus potentially compromises human and animal health. The current knowledge is fragmentary regarding the regulation of FB1 biosynthesis, particularly when considering interplay with environmental factors such as nutrient availability. In this study, SDA1 of F. verticillioides, predicted to encode a Cys-2 His-2 zinc finger transcription factor, was shown to play a key role in catabolizing select carbon sources. Growth of the SDA1 knock-out mutant (Δsda1) was completely inhibited when sorbitol was the sole carbon source and was severely impaired when exclusively provided mannitol or glycerol. Deletion of SDA1 unexpectedly increased FB1 biosynthesis, but reduced arabitol and mannitol biosynthesis, as compared to the wild-type progenitor. Trichoderma reesei ACE1, a regulator of cellulase and xylanase expression, complemented the F. verticillioides Δsda1 mutant, which indicates that Ace1 and Sda1 are functional orthologs. Taken together, the data indicate that Sda1 is a transcriptional regulator of carbon metabolism and toxin production in F. verticillioides. PMID:23844049

  4. Sda1, a Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor, is involved in polyol metabolism and fumonisin B1 production in Fusarium verticillioides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Malapi-Wight

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous ascomycete Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and stalk rot of maize, both of which reduce grain quality and yield. Additionally, F. verticillioides produces the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1 during infection of maize kernels, and thus potentially compromises human and animal health. The current knowledge is fragmentary regarding the regulation of FB1 biosynthesis, particularly when considering interplay with environmental factors such as nutrient availability. In this study, SDA1 of F. verticillioides, predicted to encode a Cys-2 His-2 zinc finger transcription factor, was shown to play a key role in catabolizing select carbon sources. Growth of the SDA1 knock-out mutant (Δsda1 was completely inhibited when sorbitol was the sole carbon source and was severely impaired when exclusively provided mannitol or glycerol. Deletion of SDA1 unexpectedly increased FB1 biosynthesis, but reduced arabitol and mannitol biosynthesis, as compared to the wild-type progenitor. Trichoderma reesei ACE1, a regulator of cellulase and xylanase expression, complemented the F. verticillioides Δsda1 mutant, which indicates that Ace1 and Sda1 are functional orthologs. Taken together, the data indicate that Sda1 is a transcriptional regulator of carbon metabolism and toxin production in F. verticillioides.

  5. Arabidopsis Cys2/His2-type zinc-finger proteins function as transcription repressors under drought, cold, and high-salinity stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hideki; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Sakuma, Yoh; Meshi, Tetsuo; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2004-09-01

    ZPT2-related proteins that have two canonical Cys-2/His-2-type zinc-finger motifs in their molecules are members of a family of plant transcription factors. To characterize the role of this type of protein, we analyzed the function of Arabidopsis L. Heynh. genes encoding four different ZPT2-related proteins (AZF1, AZF2, AZF3, and STZ). Gel-shift analysis showed that the AZFs and STZ bind to A(G/C)T repeats within an EP2 sequence, known as a target sequence of some petunia (Petunia hybrida) ZPT2 proteins. Transient expression analysis using synthetic green fluorescent protein fusion genes indicated that the AZFs and STZ are preferentially localized to the nucleus. These four ZPT2-related proteins were shown to act as transcriptional repressors that down-regulate the transactivation activity of other transcription factors. RNA gel-blot analysis showed that expression of AZF2 and STZ was strongly induced by dehydration, high-salt and cold stresses, and abscisic acid treatment. Histochemical analysis of beta-glucuronidase activities driven by the AZF2 or STZ promoters revealed that both genes are induced in leaves rather than roots of rosette plants by the stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing STZ showed growth retardation and tolerance to drought stress. These results suggest that AZF2 and STZ function as transcriptional repressors to increase stress tolerance following growth retardation. PMID:15333755

  6. Identification of a putative DEAD-box RNA helicase and a zinc-finger protein in Candida albicans by functional complementation of the S. cerevisiae rok1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W I; Lee, W B; Song, K; Kim, J

    2000-03-30

    We identified two novel genes, CHR1 and CSR1, of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, by functional complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rok1 mutation. The Rok1 protein is a member of the DEAD protein family of ATP-dependent RNA helicases. ROK1 is required for cell cycle progression and also for rRNA processing. The CHR1 gene product of 578 amino acids is highly homologous to the Rok1 protein (54% identity) and is considered to be a putative DEAD-box RNA helicase. We predict that the CSR1 gene encodes a 73 kDa protein of 612 amino acids with five zinc-finger motifs at the C-terminal region. CHR1 or CSR1 on a high-copy number plasmid showed a slow-growth phenotype in a condition where the ROK1 expression is turned on from the GAL1 promoter. This result is consistent with the lethality caused by the ROK1 overexpression. We conclude that CHR1 encodes a functional homologue of Rok1 protein and CSR1 is a heterologous suppressor of the rok1 mutation. PMID:10705369

  7. Activation of the ustilagic acid biosynthesis gene cluster in Ustilago maydis by the C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor Rua1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Beate; Liu, Lidan; Schink, Kay Oliver; Bölker, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The phytopathogenic basidiomycetous fungus Ustilago maydis secretes, under conditions of nitrogen starvation, large amounts of the biosurfactant ustilagic acid (UA). This secreted cellobiose glycolipid is toxic for many microorganisms and confers biocontrol activity to U. maydis. Recently, a large gene cluster that is responsible for UA biosynthesis was identified. Here, we show that expression of all cluster genes depends on Rua1, a nuclear protein of the C(2)H(2) zinc finger family, whose gene is located within the gene cluster. While deletion of rua1 results in complete loss of UA production, overexpression of rua1 promotes increased UA synthesis even in the presence of a good nitrogen source. Bioinformatic analysis allowed us to identify a conserved sequence element that is present in the promoters of all structural genes involved in UA biosynthesis. Deletion analysis of several promoters within the cluster revealed that this DNA element serves as an upstream activating sequence (UAS) and mediates Rua1-dependent expression. We used the yeast one-hybrid system to demonstrate specific recognition of this DNA element by Rua1. Introduction of nucleotide exchanges into the consensus sequence interfered with Rua1-dependent activation, suggesting that this sequence element acts as a direct binding site for Rua1. PMID:20173069

  8. Expression Profiling and Functional Implications of a Set of Zinc Finger Proteins, ZNF423, ZNF470, ZNF521, and ZNF780B, in Primary Osteoarthritic Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Mesuraca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular chondrocytes are responsible for the maintenance of healthy articulations; indeed, dysregulation of their functions, including the production of matrix proteins and matrix-remodeling proteases, may result in fraying of the tissue and development of osteoarthritis (OA. To explore transcriptional mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of chondrocyte homeostasis and may be implicated in OA development, we compared the gene expression profile of a set of zinc finger proteins potentially linked to the control of chondrocyte differentiation and/or functions (ZNF423, ZNF470, ZNF521, and ZNF780B in chondrocytes from patients affected by OA and from subjects not affected by OA. This analysis highlighted a significantly lower expression of the transcript encoding ZNF423 in chondrocytes from OA, particularly in elderly patients. Interestingly, this decrease was mirrored by the similarly reduced expression of PPARγ, a known target of ZNF423 with anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective properties. The ZNF521 mRNA instead was abundant in all primary chondrocytes studied; the RNAi-mediated silencing of this gene significantly altered the COL2A/COL1 expression ratio, associated with the maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, in chondrocytes cultivated in alginate beads. These results suggest a role for ZNF423 and ZNF521 in the regulation of chondrocyte homeostasis and warrant further investigations to elucidate their mechanism of action.

  9. A family of snail-related zinc finger proteins regulates two distinct and parallel mechanisms that mediate Drosophila neuroblast asymmetric divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y; Chia, W; Yang, X

    2001-04-01

    Three snail family genes snail, escargot and worniu, encode related zinc finger transcription factors that mediate Drosophila central nervous system (CNS) development. We show that simultaneous removal of all three genes causes defective neuroblast asymmetric divisions; inscuteable transcription/translation is delayed/suppressed in the segmented CNS. Further more, defects in localization of cell fate determinants and orientation of the mitotic spindle in dividing neuroblasts are much stronger than those associated with inscuteable loss of function. In inscuteable neuroblasts, cell fate determinants are mislocalized during prophase and metaphase, yet during anaphase and telophase the great majority of mutant neuroblasts localize these determinants as cortical crescents overlying one of the spindle poles. This phenomenon, known as 'telophase rescue', does not occur in the absence of the snail family genes; moreover, in contrast to inscuteable mutants, mitotic spindle orientation is completely randomized. Our data provide further evidence for the existence of two distinct asymmetry-controlling mechanisms in neuroblasts both of which require snail family gene function: an inscuteable-dependent mechanism that functions throughout mitosis and an inscuteable-independent mechanism that acts during anaphase/telophase. PMID:11285234

  10. Clinical Scale Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Gene Editing of PD-1 in Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Joal D; Lee, Gary; Zheng, Zhili; Mendel, Matthew; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Bharathan, Mini; Black, Mary; Gandhi, Nimisha; Yu, Zhiya; Chandran, Smita; Giedlin, Martin; Ando, Dale; Miller, Jeff; Paschon, David; Guschin, Dmitry; Rebar, Edward J; Reik, Andreas; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is expressed on activated T cells and represents an attractive target for gene-editing of tumor targeted T cells prior to adoptive cell transfer (ACT). We used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) directed against the gene encoding human PD-1 (PDCD-1) to gene-edit melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). We show that our clinical scale TIL production process yielded efficient modification of the PD-1 gene locus, with an average modification frequency of 74.8% (n = 3, range 69.9–84.1%) of the alleles in a bulk TIL population, which resulted in a 76% reduction in PD-1 surface-expression. Forty to 48% of PD-1 gene-edited cells had biallelic PD-1 modification. Importantly, the PD-1 gene-edited TIL product showed improved in vitro effector function and a significantly increased polyfunctional cytokine profile (TNFα, GM-CSF, and IFNγ) compared to unmodified TIL in two of the three donors tested. In addition, all donor cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and expanded approximately 500–2,000-fold in vitro. Thus, further study to determine the efficiency and safety of adoptive cell transfer using PD-1 gene-edited TIL for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is warranted. PMID:25939491

  11. The zinc fingers of the SR-like protein ZRANB2 are single-stranded RNA-binding domains that recognize 5′ splice site-like sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mansfield, Robyn E.; Vaz, Paula M.; McGrath, Aaron P.; Setiyaputra, Surya; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Chen, Eva S.; Morris, Brian J.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.; (Sydney)

    2009-09-02

    The alternative splicing of mRNA is a critical process in higher eukaryotes that generates substantial proteomic diversity. Many of the proteins that are essential to this process contain arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. ZRANB2 is a widely-expressed and highly-conserved RS-domain protein that can regulate alternative splicing but lacks canonical RNA-binding domains. Instead, it contains 2 RanBP2-type zinc finger (ZnF) domains. We demonstrate that these ZnFs recognize ssRNA with high affinity and specificity. Each ZnF binds to a single AGGUAA motif and the 2 domains combine to recognize AGGUAA(N{sub x})AGGUAA double sites, suggesting that ZRANB2 regulates alternative splicing via a direct interaction with pre-mRNA at sites that resemble the consensus 5{prime} splice site. We show using X-ray crystallography that recognition of an AGGUAA motif by a single ZnF is dominated by side-chain hydrogen bonds to the bases and formation of a guanine-tryptophan-guanine 'ladder.' A number of other human proteins that function in RNA processing also contain RanBP2 ZnFs in which the RNA-binding residues of ZRANB2 are conserved. The ZnFs of ZRANB2 therefore define another class of RNA-binding domain, advancing our understanding of RNA recognition and emphasizing the versatility of ZnF domains in molecular recognition.

  12. Clinical Scale Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Gene Editing of PD-1 in Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Joal D; Lee, Gary; Zheng, Zhili; Mendel, Matthew; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Bharathan, Mini; Black, Mary; Gandhi, Nimisha; Yu, Zhiya; Chandran, Smita; Giedlin, Martin; Ando, Dale; Miller, Jeff; Paschon, David; Guschin, Dmitry; Rebar, Edward J; Reik, Andreas; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is expressed on activated T cells and represents an attractive target for gene-editing of tumor targeted T cells prior to adoptive cell transfer (ACT). We used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) directed against the gene encoding human PD-1 (PDCD-1) to gene-edit melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). We show that our clinical scale TIL production process yielded efficient modification of the PD-1 gene locus, with an average modification frequency of 74.8% (n = 3, range 69.9-84.1%) of the alleles in a bulk TIL population, which resulted in a 76% reduction in PD-1 surface-expression. Forty to 48% of PD-1 gene-edited cells had biallelic PD-1 modification. Importantly, the PD-1 gene-edited TIL product showed improved in vitro effector function and a significantly increased polyfunctional cytokine profile (TNFα, GM-CSF, and IFNγ) compared to unmodified TIL in two of the three donors tested. In addition, all donor cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and expanded approximately 500-2,000-fold in vitro. Thus, further study to determine the efficiency and safety of adoptive cell transfer using PD-1 gene-edited TIL for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is warranted. PMID:25939491

  13. Characterization of 47 Cys2 -His2 zinc finger proteins required for the development and pathogenicity of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Huang, Pengyun; Zhang, Lilin; Shi, Yongkai; Sun, Dandan; Yan, Yuxin; Liu, Xiaohong; Dong, Bo; Chen, Guoqing; Snyder, John Hugh; Lin, Fucheng; Lu, Jianping

    2016-08-01

    The Cys2 -His2 (C2H2) zinc finger protein family is the second-largest family of transcription factors (TFs) in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal fungus responsible for the destructive rice blast disease. However, little is known about the roles of most C2H2 TFs in the development and pathogenicity of M. oryzae. The roles of 47 C2H2 genes in development and pathogenicity were investigated by gene deletion in M. oryzae. The TF-dependent genes in mycelia or appressoria were analyzed with RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Forty-four C2H2 genes are involved in growth (20 genes), conidiation (28 genes), appressorium formation (four genes) and pathogenicity (22 genes) in M. oryzae. Of these, MGG_14931, named as VRF1, is required for pathogenicity, specifically controlling appressorium maturation by affecting the expression of genes related to appressorial structure and function, including melanin biosynthesis, chitin catabolism, lipid metabolism, proteolysis, transmembrane transport, and response to oxidative stress; MGG_01776, named as VRF2, is required for plant penetration and invasive growth; conidiation-related gene CON7 is required for conidial differentiation; and MoCREA, encoding a carbon catabolite repression protein, is a novel repressor of lipid catabolism when glucose obtainable in M. oryzae. This study provides many insights into the regulation of growth, asexual development, appressorium formation, and pathogenicity by C2H2 TFs in M. oryzae. PMID:27041000

  14. A Zinc-Finger-Family Transcription Factor, AbVf19, Is Required for the Induction of a Gene Subset Important for Virulence in Alternaria brassicicola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Akhil [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Ohm, Robin A. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Oxiles, Lindsay [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Brooks, Fred [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States); Lawrence, Christopher B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor V. [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Cho, Yangrae [Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States)

    2011-10-26

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen with a broad host range within the family Brassicaceae. It produces secondary metabolites that marginally affect virulence. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CDWE) have been considered important for pathogenesis but none of them individually have been identified as significant virulence factors in A. brassicicola. In this study, knockout mutants of a gene, AbVf19, were created and produced considerably smaller lesions than the wild type on inoculated host plants. The presence of tandem zinc-finger domains in the predicted amino acid sequence and nuclear localization of AbVf19- reporter protein suggested that it was a transcription factor. Gene expression comparisons using RNA-seq identified 74 genes being downregulated in the mutant during a late stage of infection. Among the 74 downregulated genes, 28 were putative CWDE genes. These were hydrolytic enzyme genes that composed a small fraction of genes within each family of cellulases, pectinases, cutinases, and proteinases. The mutants grew slower than the wild type on an axenic medium with pectin as a major carbon source. This study demonstrated the existence and the importance of a transcription factor that regulates a suite of genes that are important for decomposing and utilizing plant material during the late stage of plant infection.

  15. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first structures from the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663) reveal that some members of this family form tightly intertwined dimers consisting of two domains (N-terminal α+β core and C-terminal zinc-finger domains), whereas others contain only the core domain. The presence of the zinc-finger domain suggests that some members of this family may perform functions associated with transcriptional regulation, protein–protein interaction, RNA binding or metal-ion sensing. Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2-DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23-SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63-THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2-DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure

  16. Screening and validation of specific zinc finger nucleases targeted pig CFTR gene%猪CFTR基因特异性锌指核酸酶的筛选与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞; 王令; 林娟; 张存芳; 张智英

    2012-01-01

    【目的】获得靶向猪囊性纤维化跨膜传导调节因子(Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator,CFTR)基因的特异锌指核酸酶(Zinc finger nuclease,ZFN),为建立CFTR基因敲除猪细胞系提供技术支持。【方法】通过开源式(Oligomerized pool engineering,OPEN)方法筛选,首先以已知三锌指蛋白为框架,随机突变单个锌指关键位点氨基酸编码序列,建立人工三锌指蛋白随机库;然后应用细菌双杂交技术,从库中筛选出能够结合CFTR基因靶位点的三锌指蛋白;最后将获得的锌指蛋白与非限制性核酸内切酶FokⅠ组装成特异ZFN,通过酵母验证体系,检测ZFN靶向切割其识别序列的效率。【结果】获得3个人工三锌指蛋白随机库,每个库约含有2×106个单克隆,通过2轮细菌双杂交筛选,分别获得48个针对CFTR基因左右两侧靶位点的三锌指蛋白。ZFN活性验证结果表明,约90%的ZFN能够在酵母细胞内实现靶向切割,获得了高效特异的ZFN。【结论】获得了猪CFTR基因高效特异的ZFN。%【Objective】Specific zinc finger nucleases(ZFN)were screened to target pig cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator(CFTR)gene for the preparation of generating CFTR gene knockout pig cell line.【Method】Upon the oligomerized pool engineering(OPEN)strategy,firstly,three libraries of 3-zinc finger proteins were constructed.The DNA sequences of recognition amino acid residues of a finger motif were randomized by cassette mutagenesis.Secondly,bacterial twohybrid(B2H)system was used to screen for ZFPs from the three zinc finger protein libraries.Finally,selected ZFPs were fused to FokⅠdomain to generate specific ZFN for subsequent validation of ZFN cleavage activity in yeast.【Result】Three artificial randomly libraries of 3-zinc finger proteins were obtained,and each contained about 2×106 colonies.The three zinc finger random libraries were used

  17. Identity of zinc finger nucleases with specificity to herpes simplex virus type II genomic DNA: novel HSV-2 vaccine/therapy precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex type II (HSV-2 is a member of the family herpesviridae. Human infection with this double stranded linear DNA virus causes genital ulcerative disease and existing treatment options only serve to resolve the symptomatology (ulcers associated with active HSV-2 infection but do not eliminate latent virus. As a result, infection with HSV-2 follows a life-long relapsing (active versus latent course. On the basis of a primitive bacterium anti-phage DNA defense, the restriction modification (R-M system, we previously identified the Escherichia coli restriction enzyme (REase EcoRII as a novel peptide to excise or irreversibly disrupt latent HSV-2 DNA from infected cells. However, sequences of the site specificity palindrome of EcoRII 5'-CCWGG-3' (W = A or T are equally present within the human genome and are a potential source of host-genome toxicity. This feature has limited previous HSV-2 EcoRII based therapeutic models to microbicides only, and highlights the need to engineer artificial REases (zinc finger nucleases-ZFNs with specificity to HSV-2 genomic-DNA only. Herein, the therapeutic-potential of zinc finger arrays (ZFAs and ZFNs is identified and modeled, with unique specificity to the HSV-2 genome. Methods and results Using the whole genome of HSV-2 strain HG52 (Dolan A et al.,, and with the ZFN-consortium's CoDA-ZiFiT software pre-set at default, more than 28,000 ZFAs with specificity to HSV-2 DNA were identified. Using computational assembly (through in-silico linkage to the Flavobacterium okeanokoites endonuclease Fok I of the type IIS class, 684 ZFNs with specificity to the HSV-2 genome, were constructed. Graphic-analysis of the HSV-2 genome-cleavage pattern using the afore-identified ZFNs revealed that the highest cleavage-incidence occurred within the 30,950 base-pairs (~between the genomic context coordinates 0.80 and 1.00 at the 3' end of the HSV-2 genome. At approximately 3,095 bp before and after the

  18. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Scherneck

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1 contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Developmental and wound-, cold-, desiccation-, ultraviolet-B-stress-induced modulations in the expression of the petunia zinc finger transcription factor gene ZPT2-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Der Krol AR; van Poecke RM; Vorst; Voogt; van Leeuwen W; Borst-Vrensen; Takatsuji; van Der Plas LH

    1999-12-01

    The ZPT2-2 gene belongs to the EPF gene family in petunia (Petunia hybrida), which encodes proteins with TFIIIA-type zinc-finger DNA-binding motifs. To elucidate a possible function for ZPT2-2, we analyzed its pattern of expression in relation to different developmental and physiological stress signals. The activity of the ZPT2-2 promoter was analyzed using a firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter gene, allowing for continuous measurements of transgene activity in planta. We show that ZPT2-2::LUC is active in all plant tissues, but is strongly modulated in cotyledons upon germination, in leaves in response to desiccation, cold treatment, wounding, or ultraviolet-B light, and in petal tissue in response to pollination of the stigma. Analysis of mRNA levels indicated that the modulations in ZPT2-2::LUC expression reflect modulations in endogenous ZPT2-2 gene expression. The change in ZPT2-2::LUC activity by cold treatment, wounding, desiccation, and ultraviolet-B light suggest that the phytohormones ethylene and jasmonic acid are involved in regulating the expression of ZPT2-2. Although up-regulation of expression of ZPT2-2 can be blocked by inhibitors of ethylene perception, expression in plants is not induced by exogenously applied ethylene. The application of jasmonic acid does result in an up-regulation of gene activity and, thus, ZPT2-2 may play a role in the realization of the jasmonic acid hormonal responses in petunia. PMID:10594102

  20. The brain-specific neural zinc finger transcription factor 2b (NZF-2b/7ZFMyt1 suppresses cocaine self-administration in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Chandrasekar

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-specific neural-zinc-finger transcription factor-2b (NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 is induced in the mesolimbic dopaminergic region after chronic cocaine exposure and lentiviral-mediated expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens results in decreased locomotor activity (Chandrasekar and Dreyer, 2009. In this study the role of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in active cocaine seeking and of its interaction with histone deacetylase on the altered behavior has been observed. Localized expression of NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 in the nucleus accumbens resulted in attenuated cocaine self-administration, whereas silencing this transcription factor with lentiviruses expressing siRNAs increased the animal′s motivation to self-infuse cocaine. Low doses of sodium butyrate, a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylase, were sufficient to reverse the NZF2b/7ZFMyt1-mediated decrease in cocaine self-administration. NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression resulted in strong induction of transcription factors REST1 and NAC1 and of the dopamine D2 receptor, with concomitant inhibition of BDNF and its receptor TrkB. We show that NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 colocalizes with histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2, probably overcoming the suppression of transcriptional activity caused by Lingo1. These findings show that molecular adaptations mediated by NZF2b/7ZFMyt1 expression possibly lead to decreased responsiveness to the reinforcing properties of cocaine and play a prominent role in affecting the behavioral changes induced by the drug.

  1. Scientific opinion addressing the safety assessment of plants developed using Zinc Finger Nuclease 3 and other Site-Directed Nucleases with similar function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The European Commission requested that the EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms deliver a scientific opinion related to risk assessment of plants developed using the zinc finger nuclease 3 technique (ZFN-3 which allows the integration of gene(s in a predefined insertion site in the genome of the recipient species. Since other nucleases with a similar function to ZFN are considered in this opinion the term site-directed nuclease 3 (SDN-3 is used to describe the technique rather than ZFN-3 specifically. The EFSA GMO Panel considers that its guidance documents are applicable for the evaluation of food and feed products derived from plants developed using the SDN-3 technique and for performing an environmental risk assessment. However, on a case-by-case basis lesser amounts of event specific data may be needed for the risk assessment of plants developed using the SDN-3 technique. The EFSA GMO Panel compared the hazards associated with plants produced by the SDN-3 technique with those obtained by conventional plant breeding techniques and by currently used transgenesis. With respect to the genes introduced, the SDN-3 technique does not differ from transgenesis or from the other genetic modification techniques currently used, and can be used to introduce transgenes, intragenes or cisgenes. The main difference between the SDN-3 technique and transgenesis is that the insertion of DNA is targeted to a predefined region of the genome. Therefore, the SDN-3 technique can minimise hazards associated with the disruption of genes and/or regulatory elements in the recipient genome. Whilst the SDN-3 technique can induce off-target changes in the genome of the recipient plant these would be fewer than those occurring with most mutagenesis techniques. Furthermore, where such changes occur they would be of the same types as those produced by conventional breeding techniques.

  2. Down-regulation of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2 releases GLI1 from the nuclear repressor complex to restore its transcriptional activity during mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riku, Miho; Inaguma, Shingo; Ito, Hideaki; Tsunoda, Takumi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kasai, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies, the molecular mechanisms underlying its development and progression are not fully understood. To identify key molecules involved, we screened publicly available microarray datasets for genes differentially expressed between breast cancers and normal mammary glands. We found that three of the genes predicted in this analysis were differentially expressed among human mammary tissues and cell lines. Of these genes, we focused on the role of the zinc-finger homeobox protein TSHZ2, which is down-regulated in breast cancer cells. We found that TSHZ2 is a nuclear protein harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal, and we confirmed its function as a C-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-dependent transcriptional repressor. Through comprehensive screening, we identified TSHZ2-suppressing genes such as AEBP1 and CXCR4, which are conversely up-regulated by GLI1, the downstream transcription factor of Hedgehog signaling. We found that GLI1 forms a ternary complex with CtBP2 in the presence of TSHZ2 and that the transcriptional activity of GLI1 is suppressed by TSHZ2 in a CtBP-dependent manner. Indeed, knockdown of TSHZ2 increases the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 in TSHZ2-expressing immortalized mammary duct epithelium. Concordantly, immunohistochemical staining of mammary glands revealed that normal duct cells expresses GLI1 in the nucleus along with TSHZ2 and CtBP2, whereas invasive ductal carcinoma cells, which does not express TSHZ2, show the increase in the expression of AEBP1 and CXCR4 and in the cytoplasmic localization of GLI1. Thus, we propose that down-regulation of TSHZ2 is crucial for mammary tumorigenesis via the activation of GLI1. PMID:26744317

  3. Cytotoxic Effects during Knock Out of Multiple Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV Sequences in the Pig Genome by Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Semaan

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation has been proposed as a solution to the shortage of suitable human donors for transplantation and pigs are currently favoured as donor animals. However, xenotransplantation may be associated with the transmission of zoonotic microorganisms. Whereas most porcine microorganisms representing a risk for the human recipient may be eliminated by designated pathogen free breeding, multiple copies of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs are integrated in the genome of all pigs and cannot be eliminated this way. PERVs are released as infectious particles and infect human cells. The zinc finger nuclease (ZFN technology allows knocking out specifically cellular genes, however it was not yet used to eliminate multiple integrated proviral sequences with a strong conservation in the target sequence. To reduce the risk of horizontal PERV transmission and to knock out as many as possible proviruses, for the first time the powerful tool of the ZFN technology was used. ZFN were designed to bind specifically to sequences conserved in all known replication-competent proviruses. Expression and transport of the ZFN into the nucleus was shown by Western blot analysis, co-localisation analysis, PLA and FRET. Survival of transfected cells was analysed using fluorescent ZFN and cell counting. After transfection a strong expression of the ZFN proteins and a co-localisation of the expressed ZFN proteins were shown. However, expression of the ZFN was found to be extremely toxic for the transfected cells. The induced cytotoxicity was likely due to the specific cutting of the high copy number of the PERV proviruses, which is also commonly observed when ZFN with low specificity cleave numerous off-target sites in a genome. This is the first attempt to knock out multiple, nearly identical, genes in a cellular genome using ZFN. The attempt failed, and other strategies should be used to prevent PERV transmission.

  4. A unique sequence in the N-terminal regulatory region controls the nuclear localization of KLF8 by cooperating with the C-terminal zinc-fingers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tina S Mehta; Heng Lu; Xianhui Wang; Alison M Urvalek; Kim-Hang H Nguyen; Farah Monzur; Jojo D Hammond; Jameson Q Ma; Jihe Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Kruppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) transcription factor plays a critical role in cell cycle progression, oncogenic trans-formation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition and invasion. However, its nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) has not been identified. KLF8 shares with other KLFs monopartite NLSs (mNLS) and C2H2 zinc fingers (ZFs), both of which have been shown to be the NLSs for some other KLFs. In this report, using PCR-directed mutagenesis and immunofluorescent microscopy, we show that disruption of the mNLSs, deletion of any single ZF, or mutation of the Zn2+-binding or DNA-contacting motifs did not affect the nuclear localization of KLF8. Deletion of>1.5 ZFs from C-terminus, however, caused cytoplasmic accumulation of KLF8. Surprisingly, deletion of amino acid (aa) 151-200 re-gion almost eliminated KLF8 from the nucleus. S165A, K171E or K171R mutation, or treatment with PKC inhibitor led to partial cytoplasmic accumulation. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that KLF8 interacted with importin-β and this interaction required the ZF motif. Deletion of aa 1-150 or 201-261 region alone did not alter the nuclear lo-calization. BrdU incorporation and cyclin D1 promoter luciferase assays showed that the KLF8 mutants defective in nuclear localization could not promote DNA synthesis or cyclin D1 promoter activation as the wild-type KLF8 did. Taken together, these results suggest that KLF8 has two NLSs, one surrounding S165 and K171 and the other being two tandem ZFs, which are critical for the regulation of KLF8 nuclear localization and its cellular functions.

  5. Diversity of Prdm9 zinc finger array in wild mice unravels new facets of the evolutionary turnover of this coding minisatellite.

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    Jérôme Buard

    Full Text Available In humans and mice, meiotic recombination events cluster into narrow hotspots whose genomic positions are defined by the PRDM9 protein via its DNA binding domain constituted of an array of zinc fingers (ZnFs. High polymorphism and rapid divergence of the Prdm9 gene ZnF domain appear to involve positive selection at DNA-recognition amino-acid positions, but the nature of the underlying evolutionary pressures remains a puzzle. Here we explore the variability of the Prdm9 ZnF array in wild mice, and uncovered a high allelic diversity of both ZnF copy number and identity with the caracterization of 113 alleles. We analyze features of the diversity of ZnF identity which is mostly due to non-synonymous changes at codons -1, 3 and 6 of each ZnF, corresponding to amino-acids involved in DNA binding. Using methods adapted to the minisatellite structure of the ZnF array, we infer a phylogenetic tree of these alleles. We find the sister species Mus spicilegus and M. macedonicus as well as the three house mouse (Mus musculus subspecies to be polyphyletic. However some sublineages have expanded independently in Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus, the latter further showing phylogeographic substructure. Compared to random genomic regions and non-coding minisatellites, none of these patterns appears exceptional. In silico prediction of DNA binding sites for each allele, overlap of their alignments to the genome and relative coverage of the different families of interspersed repeated elements suggest a large diversity between PRDM9 variants with a potential for highly divergent distributions of recombination events in the genome with little correlation to evolutionary distance. By compiling PRDM9 ZnF protein sequences in Primates, Muridae and Equids, we find different diversity patterns among the three amino-acids most critical for the DNA-recognition function, suggesting different diversification timescales.

  6. Comparative functional analysis of wheat (Triticum aestivum zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins in response to abiotic stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    Full Text Available Although the functional roles of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (RZs have been characterized in several plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa, the physiological functions of RZs in wheat (Triticum aestivum remain largely unknown. Here, the functional roles of the three wheat RZ family members, named TaRZ1, TaRZ2, and TaRZ3, were investigated using transgenic Arabidopsis plants under various abiotic stress conditions. Expression of TaRZs was markedly regulated by salt, dehydration, or cold stress. The TaRZ1 and TaRZ3 proteins were localized to the nucleus, whereas the TaRZ2 protein was localized to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and cytoplasm. Germination of all three TaRZ-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis seeds was retarded compared with that of wild-type seeds under salt stress conditions, whereas germination of TaRZ2- or TaRZ3-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis seeds was retarded under dehydration stress conditions. Seedling growth of TaRZ1-expressing transgenic plants was severely inhibited under cold or salt stress conditions, and seedling growth of TaRZ2-expressing plants was inhibited under salt stress conditions. By contrast, expression of TaRZ3 did not affect seedling growth of transgenic plants under any of the stress conditions. In addition, expression of TaRZ2 conferred freeze tolerance in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these results suggest that different TaRZ family members play various roles in seed germination, seedling growth, and freeze tolerance in plants under abiotic stress.

  7. Comparative functional analysis of wheat (Triticum aestivum) zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins in response to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Gu, Lili; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Ryeo Jin; Suh, Mi Chung; Kang, Hunseung

    2014-01-01

    Although the functional roles of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (RZs) have been characterized in several plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), the physiological functions of RZs in wheat (Triticum aestivum) remain largely unknown. Here, the functional roles of the three wheat RZ family members, named TaRZ1, TaRZ2, and TaRZ3, were investigated using transgenic Arabidopsis plants under various abiotic stress conditions. Expression of TaRZs was markedly regulated by salt, dehydration, or cold stress. The TaRZ1 and TaRZ3 proteins were localized to the nucleus, whereas the TaRZ2 protein was localized to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and cytoplasm. Germination of all three TaRZ-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis seeds was retarded compared with that of wild-type seeds under salt stress conditions, whereas germination of TaRZ2- or TaRZ3-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis seeds was retarded under dehydration stress conditions. Seedling growth of TaRZ1-expressing transgenic plants was severely inhibited under cold or salt stress conditions, and seedling growth of TaRZ2-expressing plants was inhibited under salt stress conditions. By contrast, expression of TaRZ3 did not affect seedling growth of transgenic plants under any of the stress conditions. In addition, expression of TaRZ2 conferred freeze tolerance in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these results suggest that different TaRZ family members play various roles in seed germination, seedling growth, and freeze tolerance in plants under abiotic stress. PMID:24800811

  8. ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12) Interacts with FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT) Linking Iron Deficiency and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Cham Thi Tuyet; Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen; Stoof, Claudia; Weber, Eva; Mohrbacher, Julia; Fink-Straube, Claudia; Bauer, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Plants grown under iron (Fe)-deficient conditions induce a set of genes that enhance the efficiency of Fe uptake by the roots. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the central regulator of this response is the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR (FIT). FIT activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, which also serve to integrate external signals that stimulate and possibly inhibit Fe uptake. In the search of signaling components regulating FIT function, we identified ZINC FINGER OF ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA12 (ZAT12), an abiotic stress-induced transcription factor. ZAT12 interacted with FIT, dependent on the presence of the ethylene-responsive element-binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression motif. ZAT12 protein was found expressed in the root early differentiation zone, where its abundance was modulated in a root layer-specific manner. In the absence of ZAT12, FIT expression was upregulated, suggesting a negative effect of ZAT12 on Fe uptake. Consistently, zat12 loss-of-function mutants had higher Fe content than the wild type at sufficient Fe. We found that under Fe deficiency, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were enhanced in a FIT-dependent manner. FIT protein, in turn, was stabilized by H2O2 but only in the presence of ZAT12, showing that H2O2 serves as a signal for Fe deficiency responses. We propose that oxidative stress-induced ZAT12 functions as a negative regulator of Fe acquisition. A model where H2O2 mediates the negative regulation of plant responses to prolonged stress might be applicable to a variety of stress conditions. PMID:26556796

  9. Editing of the Luteinizing Hormone Gene to Sterilize Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, Using a Modified Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology with Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhenkui; Li, Yun; Su, Baofeng; Cheng, Qi; Ye, Zhi; Perera, Dayan A; Fobes, Michael; Shang, Mei; Dunham, Rex A

    2016-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the most important freshwater aquaculture species in the USA. Genetically enhanced fish that are sterile could both profit the catfish industry and reduce potential environmental and ecological risks. As the first step to generate sterile channel catfish, three sets of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) plasmids targeting the luteinizing hormone (LH) gene were designed and electroporated into one-cell embryos, different concentrations were introduced, and the Cel-I assay was conducted to detect mutations. Channel catfish carrying the mutated LH gene were sterile, as confirmed by DNA sequencing and mating experiments. The overall mutation rate was 19.7 % for 66 channel catfish, and the best treatment was ZFN set 1 at the concentration 25 μg/ml. To our knowledge, this is the first instance of gene editing of fish via plasmid introduction instead of mRNA microinjection. The introduction of the ZFN plasmids may have reduced mosaicism, as mutated individuals were gene edited in every tissue evaluated. Apparently, the plasmids were eventually degraded without integration, as they were not detectable in mutated individuals using PCR. Carp pituitary extract failed to induce spawning and restoration of fertility, indicating the need for developing other hormone therapies to achieve reversal of sterility upon demand. This is the first sterilization achieved using ZFN technology in an aquaculture species and the first successful gene editing of channel catfish. Our results will help understand the roles of the LH gene, purposeful sterilization of teleost fishes, and is a step towards control of domestic, hybrid, exotic, invasive, and transgenic fishes. PMID:26846523

  10. Genome wide identification of C1-2i zinc finger proteins and their response to abiotic stress in hexaploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Arnaud; Houde, Mario

    2016-04-01

    The C1-2i wheat Q-type C2H2 zinc finger protein (ZFP) transcription factor subclass has been reported to play important roles in plant stress responses. This subclass of ZFPs has not been studied in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) and we aimed to identify all members of this subclass and evaluate their responses to different abiotic stresses causing oxidative stress. Exploiting the recently published wheat draft genome sequence, we identified 53 members (including homoeologs from A, B and D genomes) of the C1-2i wheat Q-type C2H2 ZFPs (TaZFPs) representing 21 genes. Evolution analysis revealed that 9 TaZFPs members are directly inherited from the parents Triticum urartu and Aegilops tauschii, while 15 diverged through neoploidization events. This TaZFP subclass is responsive to the oxidative stress generator H2O2 and to high light, drought stress and flooding. Most TaZFPs are responsive to H2O2 (37/53), high light (44/53), flooding (31/53) or drought (37/53); 32 TaZFPs were up-regulated by at least 3 stresses and 16 were responsive to all stresses tested. A large number of these TaZFPs were physically mapped on different wheat draft genome sequences with known markers useful for QTL mapping. Our results show that the C1-2i subclass of TaZFPs is associated with responses to different abiotic stresses and that most TaZFPs (30/53 or 57 %) are located on group 5 chromosomes known to be involved in environment adaptation. Detailed characterization of these novel wheat TaZFPs and their association to QTL or eQTL may help to design wheat cultivars with improved tolerance to abiotic stress. PMID:26638714

  11. Subtraction by addition: domesticated transposases in programmed DNA elimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia must eliminate ∼60,000 short sequences from its genome to generate uninterrupted coding sequences in its somatic macronucleus. In this issue of Genes & Development, Baudry and colleagues (pp. 2478–2483) identify the protein that excises these noncoding sequences: a domesticated piggyBac transposase that has been adapted to remove what are likely the remnants of transposon insertions. This new study reveals how addition of a transposase to small RNA-directed silencing machinery can guide major genome reorganization. PMID:19884252

  12. Expression, Purification and Characterization of the Zinc Finger Domain of PLZF Protein%重组PLZF蛋白锌指结构域的表达、提纯和活性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟

    2011-01-01

    PLZF is an important transcription repressor. It consists of an N-terminal BTB domain and a C-terminal zinc finger domain. To date, the three dimensional structure of the zinc finger domain is still not clear. Hence, expression and purification studies were performed. To produce the zinc finger domain of PLZF protein, the sequence encoding zinc finger domain fragment with a start codon added to the 5' was inserted into PET-lla expression vector. The expression plasmid was transformed into E. Coli BL21 ( DE3) strain and protein expressionwas induced by IPTG. The recombinant protein was found to be expressed as inclusion bodies. The inclusion body was solubilized using buffers containing SDS detergent and proteins were purified to more than 96 % homogeneity through gel filtration. The purified proteins were denatured and then refolded by reverse dialysis. The refolded proteins were characterized by DNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay ( EMS A) and found to be active. An important foundation has been laid for further three-dimensional structural study on the zinc finger domain of PLZF.%PLZF(promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger protein)是一种重要的转录抑制因子,它由位于N端的BTB结构域和C端的锌指结构域构成.鉴于目前对于锌指结构域的立体结构还不是十分清楚,对其进行了高效表达和提纯.为了表达PLZF蛋白的锌指结构域,在其编码序列的5'端加上起始密码ATG后插入到表达载体PET-11a的多克隆位点.构建好的表达质粒转化到BI21( DE3)大肠杆菌内并用IPTG诱导表达,发现重组蛋白主要以不溶性的包涵体形式在胞内表达.用含有SDS变性剂的缓冲液溶解包涵体后,采用凝胶过滤方法将重组蛋白纯化到纯度达96%以上.对纯化后的蛋白质用反透析的方法进行复性,然后用DNA结合实验进行活性分析,发现复性后的蛋白质具有特异的DNA结合活性,这为进一步研究PLZF蛋白锌指结构域的立体结构打下了重要基础.

  13. A Zinc Finger Transcription Factor, αA-Crystallin Binding Protein 1, Is a Negative Regulator of the Chondrocyte-Specific Enhancer of the α1(II) Collagen Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Nakatani, Fumihiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of the type II collagen gene (Col2a1) is regulated by multiple cis-acting sites. The enhancer element, which is located in the first intron, is necessary for high-level and cartilage-specific expression of Col2a1. A mouse limb bud cDNA expression library was screened by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae one-hybrid screening method to identify protein factors bound to the enhancer. A zinc finger protein, αA-crystallin binding protein 1 (CRYBP1), which had been reported to bind to the ...

  14. Genetic analysis of Kruppel-like zinc finger 11 variants in 5864 Danish individuals: potential effect on insulin resistance and modified signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 binding by promoter variant -1659G>C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Froguel, Philippe; Hamid, Yasmin H;

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: The transcription factor Krüppel-like zinc finger 11 (KLF11) has been suggested to contribute to genetic risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our previous results showed that four KLF11 variants, in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD block including +185 A>G/Gln62Arg and -1659 G>C) were...... study to assess association to T2D and glucose metabolism-related quantitative traits. We studied effects of LD-block variants on KLF11 function and in particular, the effect of -1659G>C on transcriptional regulation of KLF11 using EMSA, chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene reporter assays, and small...

  15. U7 snRNP-specific Lsm11 protein: dual binding contacts with the 100 kDa zinc finger processing factor (ZFP100) and a ZFP100-independent function in histone RNA 3′ end processing

    OpenAIRE

    Azzouz, Teldja N.; Gruber, Andreas; Schümperli, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The 3' cleavage generating non-polyadenylated animal histone mRNAs depends on the base pairing between U7 snRNA and a conserved histone pre-mRNA downstream element. This interaction is enhanced by a 100 kDa zinc finger protein (ZFP100) that forms a bridge between an RNA hairpin element upstream of the processing site and the U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP). The N-terminus of Lsm11, a U7-specific Sm-like protein, was shown to be crucial for histone RNA processing and to bind ZFP100....

  16. Isolation of a Novel Family of C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins Implicated in Transcriptional Repression Mediated by Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor (COUP-TF) Orphan Nuclear Receptors*

    OpenAIRE

    Avram, Dorina; Fields, Andrew; Top, Karen Pretty On; Nevrivy, Daniel J.; Ishmael, Jane E.; Leid, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Two novel and related C2H2 zinc finger proteins that are highly expressed in the brain, CTIP1 and CTIP2 (COUP TF-interacting proteins 1 and 2, respectively), were isolated and shown to interact with all members of the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) subfamily of orphan nuclear receptors. The interaction of CTIP1 with ARP1 was studied in detail, and CTIP1 was found to harbor two independent ARP1 interaction domains, ID1 and ID2, whereas the putative AF-2 of A...

  17. A hyperactive sleeping beauty transposase enhances transgenesis in zebrafish embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lardelli Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposons are useful molecular tools for transgenesis. The 'sleeping beauty' transposon is a synthetic member of the Tc1/mariner transposon family. Davidson et al. (2003 previously described a vector for zebrafish transgenesis consisting of the inverted repeats of 'sleeping beauty' flanking the gene to be transposed. Subsequently, there have been attempts to enhance the transpositional activity of 'sleeping beauty' by increasing the activity of its transposase. Recently, Mates et al. (2009 generated a hyperactive transposase giving a 100-fold increased transposition rate in mouse embryos. Findings The aim of this experiment was to determine whether this novel hyperactive transposase enhances transgenesis in zebrafish embryos. Using our previously characterised mitfa-amyloidβ-GFP transgene, we observed an eight-fold enhancement in transient transgenesis following detection of transgene expression in melanophores by whole mount in-situ hybridisation. However, high rates of defective embryogenesis were also observed. Conclusion The novel hyperactive 'sleeping beauty' transposase enhances the rate of transgenesis in zebrafish embryos.

  18. Extinction, applied after retrieval of auditory fear memory, selectively increases zinc-finger protein 268 and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 expression in prefrontal cortex and lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Vincenzo; Roquet, Rheall F; DeMis, John; Chiamulera, Cristiano; Monfils, Marie-H

    2014-11-01

    Retrieval of consolidated memories induces a labile phase during which memory can be disrupted or updated through a reconsolidation process. A central component of behavioral updating during reconsolidation using a retrieval-extinction manipulation (Ret+Ext) is the synaptic removal of a calcium-permeable-α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (CP-AMPARs) in the lateral amygdala-a metabotropic GluR1 receptor (mGluR1) dependent mechanism. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Ret+Ext on the expression of molecular markers that could play a role in the reconsolidation process. Specifically, we tested the effects of Ret+Ext on the global expression of zinc-finger 268 protein (Zif268), a marker previously found to be implicated in memory reconsolidation, to confirm its occurrence after retrieval (Ret) and Ret+Ext. We also evaluated the global expression of phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6P), here proposed as a marker of the mGluR1-mediated memory process induced by Ret+Ext. The expression of both markers (zif268, rpS6P) was assessed by immunolocalization in prelimbic cortex (PRL), infralimbic cortex (IL), ventral subdivision of the lateral amygdala (LA) and hippocampus CA1 (CA1) in fear-conditioned rats. Our results showed that retrieval and Ret+Ext, but not extinction alone, increased Zif268 expression in prefrontal cortex and lateral amygdala. Ret+Ext, but not retrieval, retrieval followed by context exposure or extinction alone, increased the expression of rpS6P in prefrontal cortex and LA. In summary, (i) Zif268 increased after retrieval confirming that reconsolidation is engaged in our conditions, (ii) Zif268 increased after Ret+Ext confirming that it does not simply reflect an extinction or reconsolidation disruption (Zif268 level of expression should be lower in both cases) and (iii) rpS6P increased after Ret+Ext, but not after extinction, suggesting, as expected, a potential mGluR1 mediated molecular mechanism specific

  19. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  20. C2H2 zinc finger proteins of the SP/KLF, Wilms tumor, EGR, Huckebein, and Klumpfuss families in metazoans and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-11-15

    Specificity proteins (SPs) and Krüppel-Like Factors (KLFs) are C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factors that play essential roles in differentiation, development, proliferation and cell death. SP/KLF proteins, similarly to Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1), Early Growth Response (EGR), Huckebein, and Klumpfuss, prefer to bind GC-rich sequences such as GC-box and CACCC-box (GT-box). We searched various genomes and transcriptomes of metazoans and single-cell holozoans for members of these families. Seven groups of KLFs (KLFA-G) and three groups of SPs (SPA-C) were identified in the three lineages of Bilateria (Deuterostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Lophotrochozoa). The last ancestor of jawed vertebrates was inferred to have at least 18 KLFs (group A: KLF1/2/4/17, group B: KLF3/8/12; group C: KLF5/5l; group D: KLF6/7; group E: KLF9/13/16; group F: KLF10/KLF11; group G: KLF15/15l) and 10 SPs (group A: SP1/2/3/4; group B: SP5/5l; group C: SP6/7/8/9), since they were found in both cartilaginous and boned fishes. Placental mammals have added KLF14 (group E) and KLF18 (group A), and lost KLF5l (KLF5-like) and KLF15l (KLF15-like). Multiple KLF members were found in basal metazoans (Ctenophora, Porifera, Placozoa, and Cnidaria). Ctenophora has the least number of KLFs and no SPs, which could be attributed to its proposed sister group relationship to other metazoans or gene loss. While SP, EGR and Klumpfuss were only detected in metazoans, KLF, WT1, and Huckebein are present in nonmetazoan holozoans. Of the seven metazoan KLF groups, only KLFG, represented by KLF15 in human, was found in nonmetazoans. In addition, two nonmetazoan groups of KLFs are present in Choanoflagellatea and Filasterea. WT1 could be evolutionarily the earliest among these GC/GT-box-binding families due to its sole presence in Ichthyosporea. PMID:26187067

  1. The BTB/POZ zinc finger protein Broad-Z3 promotes dendritic outgrowth during metamorphic remodeling of the peripheral stretch receptor dbd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Janet A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various members of the family of BTB/POZ zinc-finger transcription factors influence patterns of dendritic branching. One such member, Broad, is notable because its BrZ3 isoform is widely expressed in Drosophila in immature neurons around the time of arbor outgrowth. We used the metamorphic remodeling of an identified sensory neuron, the dorsal bipolar dendrite sensory neuron (dbd, to examine the effects of BrZ3 expression on the extent and pattern of dendrite growth during metamorphosis. Results Using live imaging of dbd in Drosophila pupae, we followed its normal development during metamorphosis and the effect of ectopic expression of BrZ3 on this development. After migration of its cell body, dbd extends a growth-cone that grows between two muscle bands followed by branching and turning back on itself to form a compact dendritic bundle. The ectopic expression of the BrZ3 isoform, using the GAL4/UAS system, caused dbd's dendritic tree to transform from its normal, compact, fasciculated form into a comb-like arbor that spread over on the body wall. Time-lapse analysis revealed that the expression of BrZ3 caused the premature extension of the primary dendrite onto immature myoblasts, ectopic growth past the muscle target region, and subsequent elaboration onto the epidermis. To control the timing of expression of BrZ3, we used a temperature-sensitive GAL80 mutant. When BrZ3 expression was delayed until after the extension of the primary dendrite, then a normal arbor was formed. By contrast, when BrZ3 expression was confined to only the early outgrowth phase, then ectopic arbors were subsequently formed and maintained on the epidermis despite the subsequent absence of BrZ3. Conclusions The adult arbor of dbd is a highly branched arbor whose branches self-fasciculate to form a compact dendritic bundle. The ectopic expression of BrZ3 in this cell causes a premature extension of its growth-cone, resulting in dendrites that extend

  2. A hyperactive sleeping beauty transposase enhances transgenesis in zebrafish embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Lardelli Michael; Newman Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Transposons are useful molecular tools for transgenesis. The 'sleeping beauty' transposon is a synthetic member of the Tc1/mariner transposon family. Davidson et al. (2003) previously described a vector for zebrafish transgenesis consisting of the inverted repeats of 'sleeping beauty' flanking the gene to be transposed. Subsequently, there have been attempts to enhance the transpositional activity of 'sleeping beauty' by increasing the activity of its transposase. Recently...

  3. Sleeping Beauty transposase structure allows rational design of hyperactive variants for genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Franka; Wiedemann, Lisa; Zuliani, Cecilia; Querques, Irma; Sebe, Attila; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a prominent Tc1/mariner superfamily DNA transposon that provides a popular genome engineering tool in a broad range of organisms. It is mobilized by a transposase enzyme that catalyses DNA cleavage and integration at short specific sequences at the transposon ends. To facilitate SB's applications, here we determine the crystal structure of the transposase catalytic domain and use it to model the SB transposase/transposon end/target DNA complex. Together with biochemical and cell-based transposition assays, our structure reveals mechanistic insights into SB transposition and rationalizes previous hyperactive transposase mutations. Moreover, our data enables us to design two additional hyperactive transposase variants. Our work provides a useful resource and proof-of-concept for structure-based engineering of tailored SB transposases. PMID:27025571

  4. Sleeping Beauty transposase structure allows rational design of hyperactive variants for genetic engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Franka; Wiedemann, Lisa; Zuliani, Cecilia; Querques, Irma; Sebe, Attila; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is a prominent Tc1/mariner superfamily DNA transposon that provides a popular genome engineering tool in a broad range of organisms. It is mobilized by a transposase enzyme that catalyses DNA cleavage and integration at short specific sequences at the transposon ends. To facilitate SB's applications, here we determine the crystal structure of the transposase catalytic domain and use it to model the SB transposase/transposon end/target DNA complex. Together with biochemical and cell-based transposition assays, our structure reveals mechanistic insights into SB transposition and rationalizes previous hyperactive transposase mutations. Moreover, our data enables us to design two additional hyperactive transposase variants. Our work provides a useful resource and proof-of-concept for structure-based engineering of tailored SB transposases. PMID:27025571

  5. Immune responses of a chimaeric protein vaccine containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens and LTB against experimental M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchioro, Silvana B; Sácristan, Rubén Del Pozo; Michiels, Annelies; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Conceição, Fabricio R; Dellagostin, Odir A; Maes, Dominiek

    2014-08-01

    A recombinant chimaeric protein containing three Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens (C-terminal portion of P97, heat shock protein P42, and NrdF) fused to an adjuvant, the B subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (LTB), was used to immunize pigs against enzootic pneumonia. The systemic and local immune responses, as well as the efficacy of the chimaeric protein in inducing protection against experimental M. hyopneumoniae infection were evaluated. In total, 60 male piglets, purchased from a M. hyopneumoniae-free herd, at 4 weeks of age were randomly allocated to six different experimental groups of 10 animals each: recombinant chimaeric protein by intramuscular (IM) (1) or intranasal (IN) (2) administration, commercial bacterin by IM administration (3), and the adjuvant LTB by IM (4, control group A) or IN (5, control group B) administration. All groups were immunized at 24 and 38 days of age and challenged at 52 days of age. The sixth group that was not challenged was used as the negative control (IN [n=5] or IM [n=5] administration of the LTB adjuvant). Compared with the non-challenged group, administration of the chimaeric protein induced significant (Phyopneumoniae infection in pigs. This lack of effectiveness points towards the need for further studies to improve the efficacy of this subunit-based vaccine approach. PMID:24909331

  6. Clustered organization of Krueppel zinc-finger genes at Xp11. 23, flanking a translocation breakpoint at OATL1: A physical map with locus assignments for ZNF21, ZNF41, ZNF81, and ELK1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, J.C.; Fletcher, C.D.M. (Soft Tissue Tumour Unit, London (United Kingdom)); Grimaldi, G. (International Institute of Genetics and Biophysics, Naples (Italy)); Thiesen, H.J. (Basel Institute for Immunology (Switzerland)); Bech-Hansen, N.T. (Alberta Children' s Hospital, Calgary (Canada)); Coleman, M.P. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    The ZNF21, ZNF41, and ZNF81 genes encode Krueppel-type zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) and have previously been mapped to chromosome Xp. Published data describing the clustering of ZFP genes on human autosomes led to investigation of the organization of ZNF21, ZNF41, and ZNF81 on the X chromosome. Rodent-human hybrid analysis sublocalized all three genes to Xp22.11-p11.23. ZNF21, ZNF41, and ZNF81 were then shown to segregate within a series of YACs (95 to 730 kb) containing known markers at Xp11.23, such that these YACs could be assembled into a contig spanning approximately 1.5 Mb of DNA. Southern analysis of intact YACs and YAC DNAs cut with rare-cutter restriction enzymes enabled establishment of the spatial organization of the ZFP gene cluster, the OATL1 pseudogene, the recurrent t(X;18) chromosome translocation breakpoint in synovial sarcoma, and the previously described cluster of ARAF1, SYN1, TIMP, and PFC genes. The authors have assigned the ETS-related gene ELK1 to a locus tightly linked to the PFC gene; the entire cluster of five genes is contained within a distance of 120 kb. ZNF41 maps to a 440-kb YAC spanning this region, while a more proximal cluster comprising the ZNF21 and ZNF81 gene lies 150 kb distal to the chromosome breakpoint associated with synovial sarcoma. 50 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The C3H-type zinc finger protein GDS1/C3H42 is a nuclear-speckle-localized protein that is essential for normal growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Won; Jeon, Su Jeong; Hwang, Sung Min; Hong, Jong Chan; Bahk, Jeong Dong

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic C3H-type zinc finger proteins (Znfs) comprise a large family of regulatory proteins involved in many aspects of plant stress response, growth and development. However, compared to mammalian, only a few plant Znfs have been functionally characterized. Here, T-DNA inserted gds1 (growth, development and splicing 1) mutant, displayed abnormal growth throughout the lifecycle owing to the reduction of cell size and number. Inverse PCR analysis revealed that the abnormal growth was caused by the disruption of At3g47120, which encodes a C3H42 protein belonging to the C-X7-C-X5-C-X3-H class of the Znf family. GDS1 was ubiquitously transcribed, but shows high levels of expression in young seedling and unexpanded new leaves. In gds1, the transcripts of many growth- and development-related genes were down-regulated, and the auxin response was dramatically reduced. A fluorescence-based assay revealed that the GDS1 protein was localized to the nucleus, prominently in the speckle compartments. Its arginine/serine dipeptide-rich-like (RS-like) domain was essential for nuclear localization. In addition, the SR1, SRm102 and U1-70K components of the U1 spliceosome interacted with GDS1 in the nuclear speckle compartments. Taken together, these suggest that GDS1, a nuclear-speckle-associated Znf, might play a significant role in splicing during plant growth and development. PMID:27457991

  8. Herpes simplex virus induces the marked up-regulation of the zinc finger transcriptional factor INSM1, which modulates the expression and localization of the immediate early protein ICP0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs rapidly shut off macromolecular synthesis in host cells. In contrast, global microarray analyses have shown that HSV infection markedly up-regulates a number of host cell genes that may play important roles in HSV-host cell interactions. To understand the regulatory mechanisms involved, we initiated studies focusing on the zinc finger transcription factor insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1, a host cell protein markedly up-regulated by HSV infection. Results INSM1 gene expression in HSV-1-infected normal human epidermal keratinocytes increased at least 400-fold 9 h after infection; INSM1 promoter activity was also markedly stimulated. Expression and subcellular localization of the immediate early HSV protein ICP0 was affected by INSM1 expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed binding of INSM1 to the ICP0 promoter. Moreover, the role of INSM1 in HSV-1 infection was further clarified by inhibition of HSV-1 replication by INSM1-specific siRNA. Conclusions The results suggest that INSM1 up-regulation plays a positive role in HSV-1 replication, probably by binding to the ICP0 promoter.

  9. Role of the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-type zinc finger domain containing protein 1 (TRAFD1) from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis in immunity against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi, Rie; Galay, Remil Linggatong; Matsuo, Tomohide; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Talactac, Melbourne Rio; Mochizuki, Masami; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tanaka, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    A tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-type zinc finger domain containing protein 1 (TRAFD1) is a negative feedback regulator that controls excessive immune responses in vertebrates. The sequence of tick hemolymph TRAFD1 from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlTRAFD1) was analyzed after identification and cloning from the expressed sequence tag database. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses showed that HlTRAFD1 transcript and protein levels after blood feeding were present in all developmental stages, and the transcript level was consistently high in all organs examined from adult female ticks upon engorgement. Knockdown of HlTRAFD1 gene by RNA interference did not affect blood feeding or oviposition. However, HlTRAFD1 silencing affected the expression of the longicin gene, a defensin-like molecule, but not the lysozyme gene. Moreover, the survival rate of HlTRAFD1-silenced ticks was lower, and the number of E. coli was higher in the hemolymph and plasmatocytes after E. coli injection compared to the control group. These results suggested that HlTRAFD1 strongly affected both the humoral and cellular immunity of ticks. PMID:26283173

  10. Expression of RIZ1 protein (Retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger protein 1) in prostate cancer epithelial cells changes with cancer grade progression and is modulated in vitro by DHT and E2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Valentina; Staibano, Stefania; Abbondanza, Ciro; Pasquali, Daniela; De Rosa, Caterina; Mascolo, Massimo; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Visconti, Daniela; De Bellis, Annamaria; Moncharmont, Bruno; De Rosa, Gaetano; Puca, Giovanni Alfredo; Bellastella, Antonio; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino

    2009-12-01

    The nuclear protein methyl-transferase Retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger protein 1 (RIZ1) is considered to be a downstream effector of estrogen action in target tissues. Silencing of RIZ1 expression is common in many tumors. We analyzed RIZ1 expression in normal and malignant prostate tissue and evaluated whether estradiol (E2) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment modulated RIZ1 in cultured prostate epithelial cells (PEC). Moreover, we studied the possible involvement of RIZ1 in estrogen action on the EPN prostate cell line, constitutively expressing both estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and beta. RIZ1 protein, found in the nucleus of normal PECs by immunohistochemistry, was progressively lost in cancer tissues as the Gleason score increased and was only detected in the cytoplasmic compartment. RIZ1 transcript levels, as assayed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in primary PEC cultures, were significantly reduced in cancer cells (P < 0.05). In EPN DHT treatment significantly increased RIZ1 transcript and protein levels (P < 0.05); E2 induced a reduction of S phase without significant changes of RIZ1 expression. In E2-treated EPN cell extracts RIZ co-immunoprecipitated with ERbeta and ERalpha. Our data demonstrate that RIZ1 is expressed in normal PECs and down-regulated in cancer cells, with a switch of its sub-cellular localization from the nucleus to the cytoplasm upon cancer grade progression. RIZ1 expression levels in the PECs were modulated by DHT or E2 treatment in vitro. Furthermore, the E2 effects on ER-expressing prostate cells involve RIZ1, which confirms a possible role for ER-mediated pathways in a non-classic E(2)-target tissue. PMID:19746436

  11. Transcriptionally regulated and nontoxic delivery of the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Latella, Maria Carmela; Basile, Valentina; Miselli, Francesca; Galla, Melanie; Imbriano, Carol; Recchia, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase and, in particular, its hyperactive variant SB100X raises increasing interest for gene therapy application, including genome modification and, more recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) reprogramming. The documented cytotoxicity of the transposase, when constitutively expressed by an integrating retroviral vector (iRV), has been circumvented by the transient delivery of SB100X using retroviral mRNA transfer. In this study, we developed an alternative, safe, and efficient transposase delivery system based on a tetracycline-ON regulated expression cassette and the rtTA2(S)-M2 transactivator gene transiently delivered by integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs). Compared with iRV-mediated delivery, expression of tetracycline-induced SB100X delivered by an IDLV results in more efficient integration of a GFP transposon and reduced toxicity. Tightly regulated expression and reactivation of the transposase was achieved in HeLa cells as wells as in human primary keratinocytes. Based on these properties, the regulated transposase-IDLV vectors may represent a valuable tool for genetic engineering and therapeutic gene transfer. PMID:27574698

  12. Active Site Sharing and Subterminal Hairpin Recognition in a New Class of DNA Transposases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Donald R.; Guynet, Catherine; Ton-Hoang, Bao; Perez, Zhanita N.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Chandler, Michael; Dyda, Fred (Centre Nat); (NIH)

    2010-07-20

    Many bacteria harbor simple transposable elements termed insertion sequences (IS). In Helicobacter pylori, the chimeric IS605 family elements are particularly interesting due to their proximity to genes encoding gastric epithelial invasion factors. Protein sequences of IS605 transposases do not bear the hallmarks of other well-characterized transposases. We have solved the crystal structure of full-length transposase (TnpA) of a representative member, ISHp608. Structurally, TnpA does not resemble any characterized transposase; rather, it is related to rolling circle replication (RCR) proteins. Consistent with RCR, Mg{sup 2+} and a conserved tyrosine, Tyr127, are essential for DNA nicking and the formation of a covalent intermediate between TnpA and DNA. TnpA is dimeric, contains two shared active sites, and binds two DNA stem loops representing the conserved inverted repeats near each end of ISHp608. The cocrystal structure with stem-loop DNA illustrates how this family of transposases specifically recognizes and pairs ends, necessary steps during transposition.

  13. Protein engineering with PHD zinc fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The plant homeodomain (PHD) is a protein domain of ∼45-100 residues that is characterised by a Cys4-His-Cys3 zinc-binding motif These domains are found widely in nuclear proteins involved in transcription and seem to have an array of functions. In some instances, PHD domains have been shown to be important in mediating protein-protein interactions. Sequence alignments indicate that while the cysteines, histidine and a few other key residues are strictly conserved, the rest of the domain can vary greatly in terms of both amino acid composition and length. Given the diversity of functions they fulfill in nature, we propose to use these PHD domains as prototype protein interaction scaffolds for drug design. We have determined the solution structure of the second PHD domain of Mi2 (Mi2-PHD2) by multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The structure shows that Mi2-PHD2 adopts a globular fold in solution and contains a di-metal-binding structural motif with the two zinc ions ligated in an interleaved manner. While this structure is similar to that of other PHD domains, two flexible loop regions can also be observed. These loops may be suitable target regions for protein engineering studies, where novel binding functions could be introduced. To test the stability of the Mi2-PHD2 fold, we have made a number of mutations and insertions in the two loop regions NMR spectra of these mutants show they adopt native-like conformations. We are currently determining the structures of a selection of these mutants and are using a combination of rational and combinatorial methods to introduce new functions

  14. Mammalian BEX, WEX and GASP genes: Coding and non-coding chimaerism sustained by gene conversion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponting Chris P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of sequence innovations in the genomes of mammals facilitates understanding of human gene function, as well as sheds light on the molecular mechanisms which underlie these changes. Although gene duplication plays a major role in genome evolution, studies regarding concerted evolution events among gene family members have been limited in scope and restricted to protein-coding regions, where high sequence similarity is easily detectable. Results We describe a mammalian-specific expansion of more than 20 rapidly-evolving genes on human chromosome Xq22.1. Many of these are highly divergent in their protein-coding regions yet contain a conserved sequence motif in their 5' UTRs which appears to have been maintained by multiple events of concerted evolution. These events have led to the generation of chimaeric genes, each with a 5' UTR and a protein-coding region that possess independent evolutionary histories. We suggest that concerted evolution has occurred via gene conversion independently in different mammalian lineages, and these events have resulted in elevated G+C levels in the encompassing genomic regions. These concerted evolution events occurred within and between genes from three separate protein families ('brain-expressed X-linked' [BEX], WWbp5-like X-linked [WEX] and G-protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein [GASP], which often are expressed in mammalian brains and associated with receptor mediated signalling and apoptosis. Conclusion Despite high protein-coding divergence among mammalian-specific genes, we identified a DNA motif common to these genes' 5' UTR exons. The motif has undergone concerted evolution events independently of its neighbouring protein-coding regions, leading to formation of evolutionary chimaeric genes. These findings have implications for the identification of non protein-coding regulatory elements and their lineage-specific evolution in mammals.

  15. The Potential of the Combination of CRISPR/Cas9 and Pluripotent Stem Cells to Provide Human Organs from Chimaeric Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanyou Feng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical organ allotransplantation is limited by the availability of deceased human donors. However, the transplantation of human organs produced in other species would provide an unlimited number of organs. The pig has been identified as the most suitable source of organs for humans as organs of any size would be available. Genome editing by RNA-guided endonucleases, also known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9, in combination with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC, may have the potential to enable the creation of human organs from genetically-modified chimaeric pigs. These could potentially provide an unlimited supply of organs that would not be rejected by the recipient’s immune system. However, substantial research is needed to prove that this approach will work. Genetic modification of chimaeric pigs could also provide useful models for developing therapies for various human diseases, especially in relation to drug development.

  16. 锌指蛋白185对胶质瘤细胞增殖影响的研究%The effect of zinc finger protein 185 on the proliferation of human glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆斌; 郑全辉

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨锌指蛋白ZNF185在人脑胶质瘤细胞增殖中的作用。方法标本取自2011年1月—2013年12月于唐山市工人医院就诊,经病理确诊为胶质瘤患者的肿瘤组织,以瘤旁组织作对照。提取不同组织总蛋白, Western-blot检测ZNF185的表达。提取瘤旁组织总RNA,反转录扩增ZNF185编码序列并克隆至pEGFPC2质粒,构建ZNF185表达载体。采用Lipofactamine2000将ZNF185表达载体转染人胶质瘤细胞系SF767,以转染pEGFPC2空载体细胞作为对照。采用流式细胞仪检测细胞周期变化;MTT法检测细胞增殖活性。结果与瘤旁组织相比, ZNF185在人脑胶质瘤组织中表达显著降低(P<0.01);转染ZNF185表达载体的胶质瘤细胞与对照细胞相比ZNF185的表达显著增加(P<0.01);过表达ZNF185导致SF767细胞G0~G1期细胞比例显著增加(P<0.05),而S期细胞比例减少(P<0.05)。同时,过表达ZNF185也导致SF767细胞的增殖速度显著降低(P<0.05)。结论ZNF185在人脑胶质瘤细胞中发挥抑制细胞增殖的作用。%Objective To explore the role of zinc finger protein (ZNF)185 in the proliferation of human glioma cells. Methods Human glioma tissues and tumor adjacent tissues were obtained from glioma patients diagnosed pathologically in Tangshan Gongren Hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. Total protein was extracted from different tissues. The ZNF185 expression was detected by Western-blot assay. Total RNA was extracted from tumor adjacent tissues. ZNF 185 cod⁃ing sequence was obtained by RT-PCR and inserted into pEGFPC2 plasmid to construct the ZNF185 expression vector. Li⁃pofactamine2000 was used to transfect the ZNF185 expression vector to human glioma cell SF767. pEGFPC2 blank vector transfected SF767 cells were used as control. Changes of cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry, and cell proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay. Results The expression of ZNF185 decreased

  17. CD28 co-stimulation via tumour-specific chimaeric receptors induces an incomplete activation response in Epstein–Barr virus-specific effector memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, B; Pscherer, S; Landmeier, S; Niggemeier, V; Juergens, H; Vormoor, J; Rossig, C

    2006-01-01

    Expression of tumour antigen-specific chimaeric receptors in T lymphocytes can redirect their effector functions towards tumour cells. Integration of the signalling domains of the co-stimulatory molecule CD28 into chRec enhances antigen-specific proliferation of polyclonal human T cell populations. While CD28 plays an essential role in the priming of naive CD4+ T cells, its contribution to effector memory T cell responses is controversial. We compared the function of the chRec with and without the CD28 co-stimulatory domain, expressing it in peripheral blood T cells or Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cell lines. The chimaeric T cell receptors contain an extracellular single-chain antibody domain, to give specificity against the tumour ganglioside antigen GD2. The transduced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) maintained their specificity for autologous EBV targets and their capacity to proliferate after stimulation with EBV-infected B cells. Intracellular cytokine staining demonstrated efficient and comparable antigen-specific interferon (IFN)-γ secretion by CTL following engagement of both the native and the chimaeric receptor, independent of chimaeric CD28 signalling. Furthermore, tumour targets were lysed in an antigen-specific manner by both chRec. However, while antigen engagement by CD28ζ chRec efficiently induced expansion of polyclonal peripheral blood lymphocytes in an antigen-dependent manner, CD28 signalling did not induce proliferation of EBV–CTL in response to antigen-expressing tumour cells. Thus, the co-stimulatory requirement for the efficient activation response of antigen-specific memory cells cannot be mimicked simply by combining CD28 and ζ signalling. The full potential of this highly cytolytic T cell population for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer requires further exploration of their co-stimulatory requirements. PMID:16734614

  18. CD28 co-stimulation via tumour-specific chimaeric receptors induces an incomplete activation response in Epstein-Barr virus-specific effector memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altvater, B; Pscherer, S; Landmeier, S; Niggemeier, V; Juergens, H; Vormoor, J; Rossig, C

    2006-06-01

    Expression of tumour antigen-specific chimaeric receptors in T lymphocytes can redirect their effector functions towards tumour cells. Integration of the signalling domains of the co-stimulatory molecule CD28 into chRec enhances antigen-specific proliferation of polyclonal human T cell populations. While CD28 plays an essential role in the priming of naive CD4(+) T cells, its contribution to effector memory T cell responses is controversial. We compared the function of the chRec with and without the CD28 co-stimulatory domain, expressing it in peripheral blood T cells or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cell lines. The chimaeric T cell receptors contain an extracellular single-chain antibody domain, to give specificity against the tumour ganglioside antigen G(D2). The transduced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) maintained their specificity for autologous EBV targets and their capacity to proliferate after stimulation with EBV-infected B cells. Intracellular cytokine staining demonstrated efficient and comparable antigen-specific interferon (IFN)-gamma secretion by CTL following engagement of both the native and the chimaeric receptor, independent of chimaeric CD28 signalling. Furthermore, tumour targets were lysed in an antigen-specific manner by both chRec. However, while antigen engagement by CD28 zeta chRec efficiently induced expansion of polyclonal peripheral blood lymphocytes in an antigen-dependent manner, CD28 signalling did not induce proliferation of EBV-CTL in response to antigen-expressing tumour cells. Thus, the co-stimulatory requirement for the efficient activation response of antigen-specific memory cells cannot be mimicked simply by combining CD28 and zeta signalling. The full potential of this highly cytolytic T cell population for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer requires further exploration of their co-stimulatory requirements. PMID:16734614

  19. Integration profile and safety of an adenovirus hybrid-vector utilizing hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase for somatic integration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, W; Muck-Hausl, M.; Wang, J.; C. Sun; Gebbing, M.; Miskey, C.; Ivics, Z.; Izsvak, Z; Ehrhardt, A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed adenovirus/transposase hybrid-vectors utilizing the previously described hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase HSB5 for somatic integration and we could show stabilized transgene expression in mice and a canine model for hemophilia B. However, the safety profile of these hybrid-vectors with respect to vector dose and genotoxicity remains to be investigated. Herein, we evaluated this hybrid-vector system in C57Bl/6 mice with escalating vector dose settings. We foun...

  20. Integration Profile and Safety of an Adenovirus Hybrid-Vector Utilizing Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase for Somatic Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenli; Muck-Hausl, Martin; Wang, Jichang; Sun, Chuanbo; Gebbing, Maren; Miskey, Csaba; Ivics, Zoltan; Izsvak, Zsuzsanna; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed adenovirus/transposase hybrid-vectors utilizing the previously described hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase HSB5 for somatic integration and we could show stabilized transgene expression in mice and a canine model for hemophilia B. However, the safety profile of these hybrid-vectors with respect to vector dose and genotoxicity remains to be investigated. Herein, we evaluated this hybrid-vector system in C57Bl/6 mice with escalating vector dose settings. We foun...

  1. A Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase Interacts with Heterochromatin and Catalyzes Reproducible DNA Elimination in Tetrahymena

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Vogt; Kazufumi Mochizuki

    2013-01-01

    The somatic genome of the ciliated protist Tetrahymena undergoes DNA elimination of defined sequences called internal eliminated sequences (IESs), which account for ∼30% of the germline genome. During DNA elimination, IES regions are heterochromatinized and assembled into heterochromatin bodies in the developing somatic nucleus. The domesticated piggyBac transposase Tpb2p is essential for the formation of heterochromatin bodies and DNA elimination. In this study, we demonstrate that the activ...

  2. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  3. Microbial co-habitation and lateral gene transfer: what transposases can tell us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Sean D.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-03-01

    Determining the habitat range for various microbes is not a simple, straightforward matter, as habitats interlace, microbes move between habitats, and microbial communities change over time. In this study, we explore an approach using the history of lateral gene transfer recorded in microbial genomes to begin to answer two key questions: where have you been and who have you been with? All currently sequenced microbial genomes were surveyed to identify pairs of taxa that share a transposase that is likely to have been acquired through lateral gene transfer. A microbial interaction network including almost 800 organisms was then derived from these connections. Although the majority of the connections are between closely related organisms with the same or overlapping habitat assignments, numerous examples were found of cross-habitat and cross-phylum connections. We present a large-scale study of the distributions of transposases across phylogeny and habitat, and find a significant correlation between habitat and transposase connections. We observed cases where phylogenetic boundaries are traversed, especially when organisms share habitats; this suggests that the potential exists for genetic material to move laterally between diverse groups via bridging connections. The results presented here also suggest that the complex dynamics of microbial ecology may be traceable in the microbial genomes.

  4. A High-Capacity Adenoviral Hybrid Vector System Utilizing the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase SB100X for Enhanced Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Philip; Zhang, Wenli; Solanki, Manish; Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    For efficient delivery of required genetic elements we utilized high-capacity adenoviral vectors in the past allowing high transgene capacities of up to 36 kb. Previously we explored the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposase (HSB5) for somatic integration from the high-capacity adenoviral vectors genome. To further improve this hybrid vector system we hypothesized that the previously described hyperactive SB transposase SB100X will result in significantly improved efficacies after transduction of target cells. Plasmid based delivery of the SB100X system revealed significantly increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5. After optimizing experimental setups for high-capacity adenoviral vectors-based delivery of the SB100X system we observed up to eightfold and 100-fold increased integration efficiencies compared with the previously published hyperactive SB transposase HSB5 and the inactive transposase mSB, respectively. Furthermore, transposon copy numbers per cell were doubled with SB100X compared with HSB5 when using the identical multiplicity of infection. We believe that this improved hybrid vector system represents a valuable tool for achieving stabilized transgene expression in cycling cells and for treatment of numerous genetic disorders. Especially for in vivo approaches this improved adenoviral hybrid vector system will be advantageous because it may potentially allow reduction of the applied viral dose. PMID:27434682

  5. RNA interference is responsible for reduction of transgene expression after Sleeping Beauty transposase mediated somatic integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Rauschhuber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrating non-viral vectors based on transposable elements are widely used for genetically engineering mammalian cells in functional genomics and therapeutic gene transfer. For the Sleeping Beauty (SB transposase system it was demonstrated that convergent transcription driven by the SB transposase inverted repeats (IRs in eukaryotic cells occurs after somatic integration. This could lead to formation of double-stranded RNAs potentially presenting targets for the RNA interference (RNAi machinery and subsequently resulting into silencing of the transgene. Therefore, we aimed at investigating transgene expression upon transposition under RNA interference knockdown conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To establish RNAi knockdown cell lines we took advantage of the P19 protein, which is derived from the tomato bushy stunt virus. P19 binds and inhibits 21 nucleotides long, small-interfering RNAs and was shown to sufficiently suppress RNAi. We found that transgene expression upon SB mediated transposition was enhanced, resulting into a 3.2-fold increased amount of colony forming units (CFU after transposition. In contrast, if the transgene cassette is insulated from the influence of chromosomal position effects by the chicken-derived cHS4 insulating sequences or when applying the Forg Prince transposon system, that displays only negligible transcriptional activity, similar numbers of CFUs were obtained. CONCLUSION: In summary, we provide evidence for the first time that after somatic integration transposon derived transgene expression is regulated by the endogenous RNAi machinery. In the future this finding will help to further improve the molecular design of the SB transposase vector system.

  6. Full-length dysferlin transfer by the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase restores dysferlin-deficient muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Escobar, H.; Schoewel, V.; Spuler, S.; Marg, A.; Izsvak, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease characterized by muscle weakness and wasting for which there is no treatment. It is caused by mutations in DYSF, a large, multiexonic gene that forms a coding sequence of 6.2 kb. Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is a nonviral gene transfer vector, already used in clinical trials. The hyperactive SB system consists of a transposon DNA sequence and a transposase protein, SB100X, that can integrate DNA over 10 kb into the target geno...

  7. 青花菜C3H型锌指蛋白基因 BoCCCH2的克隆与表达%Cloning and expression of a C3H-type zinc finger protein gene BoCCCH2 from Brassica oleracea var . italica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋明; 刘青娥; 章燕如; 祝琦; 龚秀; 俞可可; 周秀倩

    2016-01-01

    以青花菜为材料,在克隆C3 H型锌指蛋白基因 BoCCC H2的基础上,研究该基因在不同器官及霜霉菌和灰葡萄孢菌侵染叶片中的表达模式。测序结果表明,BoCCC H2没有内含子,编码区全长为1740 bp ,编码579个氨基酸,推导的蛋白质具2个 ANK结构域和2种CCCH 锌指结构,锌指结构的类型分别为C—X8—C—X5—C—X3—H和C—X5—C—X4—C—X3—H 。反转录聚合酶链反应表明:BoCCC H2在根、叶、花茎、嫩角果、花蕾和花中均有表达,其中在根中的表达量最高;经霜霉菌和灰葡萄孢菌侵染后,该基因表达量均有不同程度的增加,其中在霜霉菌侵染下,表达量在24 h后开始增加,72 h时下降,而在灰葡萄孢菌侵染下,6 h时的表达量最大,12 h时开始缓慢下降。聚类结果表明,BoCCCH2与其他十字花科植物的同源序列聚为一类,支持率达100%,而与豆科、大戟科和蔷薇科等植物的序列处于不同分支。对 BoCCC H2基因的克隆和表达分析为该基因功能研究奠定了基础。%Summary Brassicaoleraceavar.italicaisanimportantvegetablecropworldwide,andinChina,TaizhouCity of Zhejiang Province is one of the major broccoli production areas . Downy mildew and grey mold rot are two common fungal diseases caused by Hyaloperonospora parasitica and Botrytis cinerea , respectively . In recent years , broccoli production in Taizhou was frequently affected by these two fungal diseases , resulting in yield and quality loss . Broccoli germplasm resources resistance to disease is scarce; therefore , molecular breeding is regarded as an effective solution to solve the problem . This is critically important to isolate genes associated with disease resistance , which will act as potential target genes for broccoli breeding . Zinc finger proteins are kinds of important transcription factors in eukaryotic organisms , which involve in various biological activities , such as replication , transcription

  8. Alternative interactions between the Tn7 transposase and the Tn7 target DNA binding protein regulate target immunity and transposition

    OpenAIRE

    Skelding, Zachary; Queen-Baker, Jennie; Craig, Nancy L

    2003-01-01

    The Tn7 transposon avoids inserting into a target DNA that contains a pre-existing copy of Tn7. This phenomenon, known as ‘target immunity’, is established when TnsB, a Tn7 transposase subunit, binds to Tn7 sequences in the target DNA and mediates displacement of TnsC, a critical transposase activator, from the DNA. Paradoxically, TnsB–TnsC interactions are also required to promote transposon insertion. We have probed Tn7 target immunity by isolating TnsB mutants that mediate more frequent in...

  9. Chimeric piggyBac transposases for genomic targeting in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jesse B; Urschitz, Johann; Stoytchev, Ilko; Dang, Nong C; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Belcaid, Mahdi; Maragathavally, Kommineni J; Coates, Craig J; Segal, David J; Moisyadi, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Integrating vectors such as viruses and transposons insert transgenes semi-randomly and can potentially disrupt or deregulate genes. For these techniques to be of therapeutic value, a method for controlling the precise location of insertion is required. The piggyBac (PB) transposase is an efficient gene transfer vector active in a variety of cell types and proven to be amenable to modification. Here we present the design and validation of chimeric PB proteins fused to the Gal4 DNA binding domain with the ability to target transgenes to pre-determined sites. Upstream activating sequence (UAS) Gal4 recognition sites harbored on recipient plasmids were preferentially targeted by the chimeric Gal4-PB transposase in human cells. To analyze the ability of these PB fusion proteins to target chromosomal locations, UAS sites were randomly integrated throughout the genome using the Sleeping Beauty transposon. Both N- and C-terminal Gal4-PB fusion proteins but not native PB were capable of targeting transposition nearby these introduced sites. A genome-wide integration analysis revealed the ability of our fusion constructs to bias 24% of integrations near endogenous Gal4 recognition sequences. This work provides a powerful approach to enhance the properties of the PB system for applications such as genetic engineering and gene therapy. PMID:22492708

  10. A systematic identification of Kolobok superfamily transposons in Trichomonas vaginalis and sequence analysis on related transposases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingshu Meng; Kaifu Chen; Lina Ma; Songnian Hu; Jun Yu

    2011-01-01

    Transposons are sequence elements widely distributed among genomes of all three kingdoms of life, providing genomic changes and playing significant roles in genome evolution. Trichomonas vaginalis is an excellent model system for transposon study since its genome ( ~ 160 Mb) has been sequenced and is composed of ~65% transposons and other repetitive elements. In this study, we primarily report the identification of Kolobok-type transposons (termed tvBac) in T. vaginalis and the results of transposase sequence analysis. We categorized 24 novel subfamilies of the Kolobok element, including one autonomous subfamily and 23 non-autonomous subfamilies. We also identified a novel H2CH motif in tvBac transposases based on multiple sequence alignment. In addition, we supposed that tvBac and Mutator transposons may have evolved independently from a common ancestor according to our phylogenetic analysis. Our results provide basic information for the understanding of the function and evolution of tvBac transposons in particular and other related transposon families in general.

  11. Structural basis of hAT transposon end recognition by Hermes, an octameric DNA transposase from Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Alison B; Ewis, Hosam E; Li, Xianghong; Knapp, Joshua A; Laver, Thomas; Doss, Anna-Louise; Tolun, Gökhan; Steven, Alasdair C; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad; Atkinson, Peter W; Craig, Nancy L; Dyda, Fred

    2014-07-17

    Hermes is a member of the hAT transposon superfamily that has active representatives, including McClintock's archetypal Ac mobile genetic element, in many eukaryotic species. The crystal structure of the Hermes transposase-DNA complex reveals that Hermes forms an octameric ring organized as a tetramer of dimers. Although isolated dimers are active in vitro for all the chemical steps of transposition, only octamers are active in vivo. The octamer can provide not only multiple specific DNA-binding domains to recognize repeated subterminal sequences within the transposon ends, which are important for activity, but also multiple nonspecific DNA binding surfaces for target capture. The unusual assembly explains the basis of bipartite DNA recognition at hAT transposon ends, provides a rationale for transposon end asymmetry, and suggests how the avidity provided by multiple sites of interaction could allow a transposase to locate its transposon ends amidst a sea of chromosomal DNA. PMID:25036632

  12. Structural Basis for Transposon End Recognition by Hermes, an Octameric hAT DNA Transposase from Musca domestica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Alison B.; Ewis, Hosam E.; Li, Xianghong; Knapp, Joshua A.; Laver, Thomas; Doss, Anna-Louise; Tolun, Gökhan; Steven, Alasdair C.; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad; Atkinson, Peter W.; Craig, Nancy L.; Dyda, Fred

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hermes is a member of the hAT transposon superfamily which has active representatives, including McClintock's archetypal Ac mobile genetic element, in many eukaryotic species. The crystal structure of the Hermes transposase-DNA complex reveals that Hermes forms an octameric ring organized as a tetramer of dimers. While isolated dimers are active in vitro for all the chemical steps of transposition, only octamers are active in vivo. The octamer can provide not only multiple specific DNA-binding domains to recognize repeated subterminal sequences within the transposon ends, which are important for activity, but also multiple non-specific DNA binding surfaces for target capture. The unusual assembly explains the basis of bipartite DNA recognition at hAT transposon ends, provides a rationale for transposon end asymmetry, and suggests how the avidity provided by multiple sites of interaction could allow a transposase to locate its transposon ends amidst a sea of chromosomal DNA. PMID:25036632

  13. 锌指核酸酶技术制备肌肉生长抑制素基因敲除的五指山小型猪成纤维细胞%Production of myostatin gene knockout Wuzhishan miniature pig fibroblasts with zinc-finger nucleases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹随忠; 岳成鹤; 李西睿; 冯冲; 龙川; 潘登科

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of myostatin (MSTN) gene in pigs may improve porcine lean meat percentage (LMP), and create an animal model for certain human diseases. Using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) technology, MSTN gene was deleted in Wuzhishan miniature pig fibroblasts by transfection of either ZFNs plasmids or ZFNs mRNA in high efficiency. Strikingly, ZFNs encoding mRNA could produce MSTN+/-and MSTN-/- cell colonies with single or double allele deletion by single transfection. Sequencing results demonstrated that 92.18% of the mutations were short fragment deletions or insertions (≤10 bp). Prediction of amino acids sequences indicated that more than half of the mutations cause premature transla-tional-termination codon. MSTN+/+, MSTN+/-, and MSTK-/- cell colonies were used as nuclear donor for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and developmental potential of SCNT embryos were measured by the blastocyst rate. The results revealed no significant difference in development competence among the three kinds of reconstructed embryos (14.29% vs. 19.64% vs. 16.13%), which provides the possibility of making myostatin knock out pigs in the future.%敲除猪肌肉生长抑制素(Myostatin,MSTN)基因可能提高猪瘦肉率,MSTN 基因敲除猪也可作为相关疾病的动物模型.文章利用锌指核酸酶(Zinc-finger nucleases,ZFNs)技术敲除五指山小型猪胎儿成纤维细胞MSTN基因,为制备MSTN 基因敲除猪奠定基础.ZFNs 质粒或编码ZFNs 的mRNA 均能高效敲除MSTN 基因,使用ZFNs mRNA 能直接得到MSTN+/-和MSTN-/-两种基因型的细胞克隆.DNA 序列测定与分析发现,细胞克隆的突变类型多为ZFNs 作用靶位点处不大于10 bp 的碱基插入或缺失(92.18 %); 氨基酸预测发现,突变型MSTN 基因的终止密码子常常提前出现.将MSTN 基因敲除的细胞进行体细胞核移植(Somatic cell nuclear transfer,SCNT)发现,胚胎体外早期发育潜力与野生型无显著差异,表明这些细胞可用于后续MSTN 基因敲除猪的制备.

  14. Conformational Diversity of Single-Stranded DNA from Bacterial Repetitive Extragenic Palindromes: Implications for the DNA Recognition Elements of Transposases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Charnavets, Tatsiana; Nunvář, Jaroslav; Nečasová, Iva; Voelker, J.; Breslauer, K.J.; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 10 (2015), s. 585-596. ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR GAP305/12/1801; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0020 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : bacterial repetitive extragenic palindromes (REP) * circular dichroism spectroscopy * REP associated tyrosine transposases (RAYTs) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.385, year: 2014

  15. Integration profile and safety of an adenovirus hybrid-vector utilizing hyperactive sleeping beauty transposase for somatic integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Zhang

    Full Text Available We recently developed adenovirus/transposase hybrid-vectors utilizing the previously described hyperactive Sleeping Beauty (SB transposase HSB5 for somatic integration and we could show stabilized transgene expression in mice and a canine model for hemophilia B. However, the safety profile of these hybrid-vectors with respect to vector dose and genotoxicity remains to be investigated. Herein, we evaluated this hybrid-vector system in C57Bl/6 mice with escalating vector dose settings. We found that in all mice which received the hyperactive SB transposase, transgene expression levels were stabilized in a dose-dependent manner and that the highest vector dose was accompanied by fatalities in mice. To analyze potential genotoxic side-effects due to somatic integration into host chromosomes, we performed a genome-wide integration site analysis using linker-mediated PCR (LM-PCR and linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR. Analysis of genomic DNA samples obtained from HSB5 treated female and male mice revealed a total of 1327 unique transposition events. Overall the chromosomal distribution pattern was close-to-random and we observed a random integration profile with respect to integration into gene and non-gene areas. Notably, when using the LM-PCR protocol, 27 extra-chromosomal integration events were identified, most likely caused by transposon excision and subsequent transposition into the delivered adenoviral vector genome. In total, this study provides a careful evaluation of the safety profile of adenovirus/Sleeping Beauty transposase hybrid-vectors. The obtained information will be useful when designing future preclinical studies utilizing hybrid-vectors in small and large animal models.

  16. Functional characterization of sugarcane mustang domesticated transposases and comparative diversity in sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kajihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs account for a large portion of plant genomes, particularly in grasses, in which they correspond to 50%-80% of the genomic content. TEs have recently been shown to be a source of new genes and new regulatory networks. The most striking contribution of TEs is referred as “molecular domestication”, by which the element coding sequence loses its movement capacity and acquires cellular function. Recently, domesticated transposases known as mustang and derived from the Mutator element have been described in sugarcane. In order to improve our understanding of the function of these proteins, we identified mustang genes from Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays and performed a phenetic analysis to assess the diversity and evolutionary history of this gene family. This analysis identified orthologous groups and showed that mustang genes are highly conserved in grass genomes. We also explored the transcriptional activity of sugarcane mustang genes in heterologous and homologous systems. These genes were found to be ubiquitously transcribed, with shoot apical meristem having the highest expression levels, and were downregulated by phytohormones. Together, these findings suggest the possible involvement of mustang proteins in the maintenance of hormonal homeostasis.

  17. Full-length Dysferlin Transfer by the Hyperactive Sleeping Beauty Transposase Restores Dysferlin-deficient Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Helena; Schöwel, Verena; Spuler, Simone; Marg, Andreas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease characterized by muscle weakness and wasting for which there is no treatment. It is caused by mutations in DYSF, a large, multiexonic gene that forms a coding sequence of 6.2 kb. Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon is a nonviral gene transfer vector, already used in clinical trials. The hyperactive SB system consists of a transposon DNA sequence and a transposase protein, SB100X, that can integrate DNA over 10 kb into the target genome. We constructed an SB transposon-based vector to deliver full-length human DYSF cDNA into dysferlin-deficient H2K A/J myoblasts. We demonstrate proper dysferlin expression as well as highly efficient engraftment (>1,100 donor-derived fibers) of the engineered myoblasts in the skeletal muscle of dysferlin- and immunodeficient B6.Cg-Dysf(prmd) Prkdc(scid)/J (Scid/BLA/J) mice. Nonviral gene delivery of full-length human dysferlin into muscle cells, along with a successful and efficient transplantation into skeletal muscle are important advances towards successful gene therapy of dysferlin-deficient muscular dystrophy. PMID:26784637

  18. Domain III function of Mu transposase analysed by directed placement of subunits within the transpososome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susana Mariconda; Soon-Young Namgoong; Ki-Hoon Yoon; Hong Jiang; Rasika M Harshey

    2000-12-01

    Assembly of the functional tetrameric form of Mu transposase (MuA protein) at the two att ends of Mu depends on interaction of MuA with multiple att and enhancer sites on supercoiled DNA, and is stimulated by MuB protein. The N-terminal domain I of MuA harbours distinct regions for interaction with the att ends and enhancer; the C-terminal domain III contains separate regions essential for tetramer assembly and interaction with MuB protein (III and III, respectively). Although the central domain II (the ‘DDE’ domain) of MuA harbours the known catalytic DDE residues, a 26 amino acid peptide within III also has a non-specific DNA binding and nuclease activity which has been implicated in catalysis. One model proposes that active sites for Mu transposition are assembled by sharing structural/catalytic residues between domains II and III present on separate MuA monomers within the MuA tetramer. We have used substrates with altered att sites and mixtures of MuA proteins with either wild-type or altered att DNA binding specificities, to create tetrameric arrangements wherein specific MuA subunits are nonfunctional in II, III or III domains. From the ability of these oriented tetramers to carry out DNA cleavage and strand transfer we conclude that domain III or III function is not unique to a specific subunit within the tetramer, indicative of a structural rather than a catalytic function for domain III in Mu transposition.

  19. brlA requires both zinc fingers to induce development.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, T H; Deising, H; Timberlake, W E

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the Aspergillus nidulans brlA gene induces a developmental pathway leading to the production of asexual spores. We have introduced mutations into brlA that are expected to disrupt either or both Cys2-His2 Zn(II) coordination sites postulated to exist in the BrlA polypeptide. The resultant brlA alleles fail to induce either the asexual reproductive pathway or the expression of development-specific genes. These data support the hypothesis that brlA encodes a nucleic acid-binding p...

  20. Transposon Invasion of the Paramecium Germline Genome Countered by a Domesticated PiggyBac Transposase and the NHEJ Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeline Dubois

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequences related to transposons constitute a large fraction of extant genomes, but insertions within coding sequences have generally not been tolerated during evolution. Thanks to their unique nuclear dimorphism and to their original mechanism of programmed DNA elimination from their somatic nucleus (macronucleus, ciliates are emerging model organisms for the study of the impact of transposable elements on genomes. The germline genome of the ciliate Paramecium, located in its micronucleus, contains thousands of short intervening sequences, the IESs, which interrupt 47% of genes. Recent data provided support to the hypothesis that an evolutionary link exists between Paramecium IESs and Tc1/mariner transposons. During development of the macronucleus, IESs are excised precisely thanks to the coordinated action of PiggyMac, a domesticated piggyBac transposase, and of the NHEJ double-strand break repair pathway. A PiggyMac homolog is also required for developmentally programmed DNA elimination in another ciliate, Tetrahymena. Here, we present an overview of the life cycle of these unicellular eukaryotes and of the developmentally programmed genome rearrangements that take place at each sexual cycle. We discuss how ancient domestication of a piggyBac transposase might have allowed Tc1/mariner elements to spread throughout the germline genome of Paramecium, without strong counterselection against insertion within genes.

  1. A Domesticated piggyBac Transposase Plays Key Roles in Heterochromatin Dynamics and DNA Cleavage during Programmed DNA Deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng CY; Vogt A; Mochizuki K.; Yao MC

    2010-01-01

    Transposons comprise large fractions of eukaryotic genomes and provide genetic reservoirs for the evolution of new cellular functions. We identified TPB2, a homolog of the piggyBac transposase gene that is required for programmed DNA deletion in Tetrahymena. TPB2 was expressed exclusively during the time of DNA excision, and its encoded protein Tpb2p was localized in DNA elimination heterochromatin structures. Notably, silencing of TPB2 by RNAi disrupts the final assembly of these heterochrom...

  2. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis induces expression of transposases and cell death of Streptococcus mitis in a biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Pinedo, Ana E; Baker, Vinesha D; Frias-Lopez, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    Oral microbial communities are extremely complex biofilms with high numbers of bacterial species interacting with each other (and the host) to maintain homeostasis of the system. Disturbance in the oral microbiome homeostasis can lead to either caries or periodontitis, two of the most common human diseases. Periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease caused by the coordinated action of a complex microbial community, which results in inflammation of tissues that support the teeth. It is the most common cause of tooth loss among adults in the United States, and recent studies have suggested that it may increase the risk for systemic conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. In a recent series of papers, Hajishengallis and coworkers proposed the idea of the "keystone-pathogen" where low-abundance microbial pathogens (Porphyromonas gingivalis) can orchestrate inflammatory disease by turning a benign microbial community into a dysbiotic one. The exact mechanisms by which these pathogens reorganize the healthy oral microbiome are still unknown. In the present manuscript, we present results demonstrating that P. gingivalis induces S. mitis death and DNA fragmentation in an in vitro biofilm system. Moreover, we report here the induction of expression of multiple transposases in a Streptococcus mitis biofilm when the periodontopathogen P. gingivalis is present. Based on these results, we hypothesize that P. gingivalis induces S. mitis cell death by an unknown mechanism, shaping the oral microbiome to its advantage. PMID:24866802

  3. Tethering of the conserved piggyBac transposase fusion protein CSB-PGBD3 to chromosomal AP-1 proteins regulates expression of nearby genes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas T Gray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein arose more than 43 million years ago when a 2.5-kb piggyBac 3 (PGBD3 transposon inserted into intron 5 of the Cockayne syndrome Group B (CSB gene in the common ancestor of all higher primates. As a result, full-length CSB is now coexpressed with an abundant CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein by alternative splicing of CSB exons 1-5 to the PGBD3 transposase. An internal deletion of the piggyBac transposase ORF also gave rise to 889 dispersed, 140-bp MER85 elements that were mobilized in trans by PGBD3 transposase. The CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein binds MER85s in vitro and induces a strong interferon-like innate antiviral immune response when expressed in CSB-null UVSS1KO cells. To explore the connection between DNA binding and gene expression changes induced by CSB-PGBD3, we investigated the genome-wide DNA binding profile of the fusion protein. CSB-PGBD3 binds to 363 MER85 elements in vivo, but these sites do not correlate with gene expression changes induced by the fusion protein. Instead, CSB-PGBD3 is enriched at AP-1, TEAD1, and CTCF motifs, presumably through protein-protein interactions with the cognate transcription factors; moreover, recruitment of CSB-PGBD3 to AP-1 and TEAD1 motifs correlates with nearby genes regulated by CSB-PGBD3 expression in UVSS1KO cells and downregulated by CSB rescue of mutant CS1AN cells. Consistent with these data, the N-terminal CSB domain of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun and with RNA polymerase II, and a chimeric CSB-LacI construct containing only the N-terminus of CSB upregulates many of the genes induced by CSB-PGBD3. We conclude that the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein substantially reshapes the transcriptome in CS patient CS1AN and that continued expression of the CSB-PGBD3 fusion protein in the absence of functional CSB may affect the clinical presentation of CS patients by directly altering the transcriptional program.

  4. A Broad Range of Dose Optima Achieve High-level, Long-term Gene Expression After Hydrodynamic Delivery of Sleeping Beauty Transposons Using Hyperactive SB100x Transposase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M; Olson, Erik R; Somia, Nikunj V; Russell, Stephen J; McIvor, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been shown to enable long-term gene expression by integrating new sequences into host cell chromosomes. We found that the recently reported SB100x hyperactive transposase conferred a surprisingly high level of long-term expression after hydrodynamic delivery of luciferase-encoding reporter transposons in the mouse. We conducted dose-ranging studies to determine the effect of varying the amount of SB100x transposase-encoding plasmid (pCMV-SB100x) at a set dose of luciferase transposon and of varying the amount of transposon-encoding DNA at a set dose of pCMV-SB100x in hydrodynamically injected mice. Animals were immunosuppressed using cyclophosphamide in order to prevent an antiluciferase immune response. At a set dose of transposon DNA (25 µg), we observed a broad range of pCMV-SB100x doses (0.1-2.5 µg) conferring optimal levels of long-term expression (>10(11) photons/second/cm(2)). At a fixed dose of 0.5 μg of pCMV-SB100x, maximal long-term luciferase expression (>10(10) photons/second/cm(2)) was achieved at a transposon dose of 5-125 μg. We also found that in the linear range of transposon doses (100 ng), co-delivering the CMV-SB100x sequence on the same plasmid was less effective in achieving long-term expression than delivery on separate plasmids. These results show marked flexibility in the doses of SB transposon plus pCMV-SB100x that achieve maximal SB-mediated gene transfer efficiency and long-term gene expression after hydrodynamic DNA delivery to mouse liver. PMID:26784638

  5. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence Jn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAK(S2580F) or ERBB2(H473Y) or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IP(E805G) were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ(+) T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27(-)CD45RA(-)) and less-differentiated (CD27(+)CD45RA(+)) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens. PMID:26945006

  6. Expression and purification of a novel ZNF191 zinc finger protein——ZNF191 protein and its truncated zinc finger region ZNF191 (243—368)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉奇; 余龙; 余文浩; 施少林; 孙炳耘; 吴国俊; 黄仲贤

    1999-01-01

    ZNF191 is a new zine finger gene whieh has a 1107 bp open reading frame (ORF) and eneodes a 368 amino avid protein including a putative DNA-binding domain of four Cys2 His2 zine finger motifs at its C-terminal region. The ZNF191 cDNA is loeated in the chromosome 18q12.1 region where it is known that a variety of hereditary diseases are related to. Probably, this protein has potential function of stimulating the gene franscription. In order to examine the function and structure of ZNF191 protein, the ORF of ZNF191 and its zine finger region ZNF191(243--368) genes were inserted into PTSA-18 expression vector by PCR amplification, then the constructed genes were expressed in the PTSA-18/B121 (DE3) system. The two proteins were purified by DEAE-52, CM-23 and Heparin-Sepharose 4B columns. The pooled proteins showed a single band as assayed by Coomasie Brillian Blue Staining of an SDS/polyacryamide gel.

  7. Roles of the N- and C-terminal domains of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I isoforms in malonyl-CoA sensitivity of the enzymes: insights from expression of chimaeric proteins and mutation of conserved histidine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, S T; Foster, D W; McGarry, J D; Brown, N F

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) plays a major role in the regulation of fatty acid entry into the mitochondrial matrix for beta-oxidation by virtue of its inhibition by malonyl-CoA. Two isoforms of CPT I, the liver type (L) and muscle type (M), have been identified, the latter being 100 times more sensitive to malonyl-CoA and having a much higher Km for the substrate carnitine. Here we have examined the roles of different regions of the CPT I molecules in their response to malonyl-CoA, etomoxir (an irreversible inhibitor) and carnitine. To this end, we analysed the properties of engineered rat CPT I constructs in which (a) the N-terminal domain of L-CPT I was deleted, (b) the N-terminal domains of L- and M-CPT I were switched, or (c) each of three conserved histidine residues located towards the N-terminus in L-CPT I was mutated. Several novel points emerged: (1) whereas the N-terminal domain is critical for a normal malonyl-CoA response, it does not itself account for the widely disparate sensitivities of the liver and muscle enzymes to the inhibitor; (2) His-5 and/or His-140 probably play a direct role in the malonyl-CoA response, but His-133 does not; (3) the truncated, chimaeric and point- mutant variants of the enzyme all bound the covalent, active-site- directed ligand, etomoxir; and (4) only the most radical alteration of L-CPT I, i.e. deletion of the N-terminal 82 residues, affected the response to carnitine. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of CPT I plays an essential, but permissive, role in the inhibition of the enzyme by malonyl-CoA. By contrast, the larger C-terminal region dictates the degree of sensitivity to malonyl-CoA, as well as the response to carnitine; it is also sufficient for etomoxir binding. Additionally, further weight is added to the notion that one or more histidine residues may be involved in the CPT I-malonyl-CoA interaction. PMID:9794789

  8. Highly efficient modification of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene via zinc-finger nucleases in cattle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengli Yu; Junjie Luo; Zhiyuan Song; Fangrong Ding; Yunping Dai; Ning Li

    2011-01-01

    Dear Editor,Gene targeting is in widespread use as a gold standard for determining the function of genes in mice and human embryonic stem cells [1].However,the poor efficiency of this technology has hindered its application to domestic animals,for which embryonic stem cells are not available.Although gene-targeted large domestic animals have been produced successfully by combination of homologous recombination-based targeting strategy and cloning [2-4],the efficiency is very low and,more importantly,the disruption of the targeted gene is usually mono-allelic.It thus takes a long time to obtain a null mutant.

  9. TIF1alpha: a possible link between KRAB zinc finger proteins and nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Douarin, B; You, J; Nielsen, Anders Lade;

    1998-01-01

    Ligand-induced gene activation by nuclear receptors (NRs) is thought to be mediated by transcriptional intermediary factors (TIFs), that interact with their ligand-dependent AF-2 activating domain. Included in the group of the putative AF-2 TIFs identified so far is TIF1alpha, a member of a new...... family of proteins which contains an N-terminal RBCC (RING finger-B boxes-coiled coil) motif and a C-terminal bromodomain preceded by a PHD finger. In addition to these conserved domains present in a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins, TIF1alpha was found to contain several protein......-protein interaction sites. Of these, one specifically interacts with NRs bound to their agonistic ligand and not with NR mutants that are defective in the AF-2 activity. Immediately adjacent to this 'NR box', TIF1alpha contains an interaction site for members of the chromatin organization modifier (chromo) family, HP...

  10. Brittle Cornea Syndrome Associated with a Missense Mutation in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Elisabeth; Knappskog, Per Morten; Midtbø, Marit;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diverse clinical manifestations, identify the causative mutation and explain the association with red hair in a family with brittle cornea syndrome (BCS). Methods: Eight family members in three generations underwent ophthalmic, dental, and general medical examination...... mapping with SNP markers, DNA sequencing, and MC1R genotyping. Results: At 42 and 48 years of age, respectively, both affected individuals were blind due to retinal detachment and secondary glaucoma. They had extremely thin and bulging corneas, velvety skin, chestnut colored hair, scoliosis, reduced BMD......, dental anomalies, hearing loss and minor cardiac defects. The morphologies of the skin biopsies were normal except that in some areas slightly thinner collagen fibrils were seen in one of the affected individuals. Molecular genetic analysis revealed a novel missense mutation of ZNF469, c.10016G>A that...

  11. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezaket Turkel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab. Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems.

  12. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome ...

  13. The retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger protein RIZ is a downstream effector of estrogen action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondanza, C; Medici, N; Nigro, V; Rossi, V; Gallo, L; Piluso, G; Belsito, A; Roscigno, A; Bontempo, P; Puca, A A; Molinari, A M; Moncharmont, B; Puca, G A

    2000-03-28

    Co-immunoprecipitation experiments in cell extract from cultured cells or target tissues indicated that estrogen receptor was complexed with the retinoblastoma binding protein RIZ in a ligand-dependent manner. Mapping of interaction sites indicated that in both proteins the same regions and motifs responsible for the interaction of transcriptional co-activator and nuclear receptors were involved. In cultured cells, estradiol induced a redistribution of RIZ protein within the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. A similar effect was produced in vivo, in prepuberal rat endometrium, by administration of a physiological dose of estradiol. Therefore, RIZ protein could be a specific effector of estrogen action downstream of the hormone-receptor interaction, presumably involved in proliferation control. PMID:10706618

  14. The retinoblastoma-interacting zinc-finger protein RIZ is a downstream effector of estrogen action

    OpenAIRE

    Abbondanza, Ciro; Medici, Nicola; Nigro, Vincenzo; Rossi, Valentina; Gallo, Luigi; Piluso, Giulio; Belsito, Angela; Roscigno, Annarita; Bontempo, Paola; Puca, Annibale A; Molinari, Anna Maria; Moncharmont, Bruno; Puca, Giovanni A.

    2000-01-01

    Co-immunoprecipitation experiments in cell extract from cultured cells or target tissues indicated that estrogen receptor was complexed with the retinoblastoma binding protein RIZ in a ligand-dependent manner. Mapping of interaction sites indicated that in both proteins the same regions and motifs responsible for the interaction of transcriptional co-activator and nuclear receptors were involved. In cultured cells, estradiol induced a redistribution of RIZ protein within the nucleus and in th...

  15. AAV-Mediated Delivery of Zinc Finger Nucleases Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Inhibits Active Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Daniel Stone; Ruth Hall Sedlak; De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S.; Pavitra Roychoudhury; Schiffer, Joshua T.; Martine Aubert; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatme...

  16. Functional promoter variant in zinc finger protein 202 predicts severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Grande, Peer;

    2008-01-01

    involved in vascular maintenance and lipid metabolism. Methods We first determined genotype association for 9 ZNF202 SNPs with severe atherosclerosis ( ankle brachial index >0.7 vs. <= 0.7) in a cross-sectional study of 5,355 individuals from the Danish general population. We then determined genotype...... association with IHD in 10,431 individuals from the Danish general population, the CCHS ( Copenhagen City Heart Study), including 1,511 incident IHD events during 28 years of follow-up. Results were verified in 2 independent case-control studies including, respectively, 942 and 1,549 cases with IHD and 8......,998 controls. Finally, we determined whether g. -660A>G altered transcriptional activity of the ZNF202 promoter in vitro. Results Cross-sectionally, ZNF202 g. -660 GG versus AA homozygosity predicted an odds ratio for severe atherosclerosis of 2.01 ( 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34 to 3.01). Prospectively...

  17. Characterization of a zinc finger DNA-binding protein expressed specifically in Petunia petals and seedlings.

    OpenAIRE

    Takatsuji, H; Mori, M; Benfey, P.N.; L Ren; Chua, N H

    1992-01-01

    In Petunia, the expression of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene (EPSPS) is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Nuclear extracts from Petunia petal contain a factor that interacts with the 5' upstream region of EPSPS. DNase I footprinting experiments revealed four strong binding sites (EP1-EP4) and several weaker sites that appear to bind the same factor. We have isolated a cDNA clone (EPF1) encoding a DNA-binding protein that has similar binding activity to that ...

  18. Expression of Zinc Finger Protein 804A (ZNF804A) in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder with lifetime prevalence between 0.5 and 1%. The disease is characterized by delusions, hallucinations, altered cognition, emotional reactivity and disorganized behavior. Research increasingly suggests that schizophrenia is a subtle disorder of brain...

  19. Characterization and expression of a new class of zinc finger protein that binds to silencer region of ascorbate oxidase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisu, Y; Ono, T; Shimofurutani, N; Suzuki, M; Esaka, M

    1998-10-01

    A unique A/T-rich sequence (5'-AAAAAGTAAAAA-GTAAAAAAGTAAAAAG-3), referred to as the AGTA repeat, is found in the silencer region of the pumpkin ascorbate oxidase gene. A cDNA for protein (AOBP) that binds to the AGTA repeat was isolated from pumpkin by the southwestern method. The AOBP protein has a new class of zinc/DNA-binding domain named Dof/MOA domain that is highly conserved in many plant proteins and is significantly related to those of steroid hormone receptors and GATA1. Gel retardation analysis indicated that AOBP bound to the AGTA repeat through the Dof/MOA domain. Metal chelators, 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA, specifically inhibited the DNA binding of AOBP, indicating that metal coordination plays an important role in DNA binding of AOBP. Thus, the Dof/MOA domain acts as a zinc/DNA-binding domain in AOBP. Gel retardation analysis with mutated oligonucleotides suggested that the Dof/MOA domain recognized the AGTA core sequence. AOBP mRNA was expressed in mature tissues of pumpkin, but was expressed only in small amounts or was not expressed in growing tissues. Furthermore, the expression was auxin-independent. The expression pattern of AOBP and that of ascorbate oxidase did not show a positive correlation. PMID:9871365

  20. Antagonistic control of oxidative stress-induced cell death in Arabidopsis by two related, plant-specific zinc finger proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Epple, Petra; Mack, Amanda A.; Morris, Veronica R. F.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2003-01-01

    The most familiar form of plant programmed cell death is the hypersensitive response (HR) associated with successful plant immune responses. HR is preceded by an oxidative burst and the generation of both reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and NO. The Arabidopsis LSD1 gene encodes a negative regulator of plant programmed cell death that meets several criteria for a regulator of processes relevant to ROI management during pathogen responses. Here we demonstrate that a highly conserved L...

  1. Myeloid Zinc Finger 1 (Mzf1) Differentially Modulates Murine Cardiogenesis by Interacting with an Nkx2.5 Cardiac Enhancer

    OpenAIRE

    Doppler, Stefanie A.; Werner, Astrid; Barz, Melanie; Lahm, Harald; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Dreßen, Martina; Schiemann, Matthias; Voss, Bernhard; Gregoire, Serge; Kuppusamy, Rajarajan; Wu, Sean M.; Lange, Rüdiger; Krane, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Vertebrate heart development is strictly regulated by temporal and spatial expression of growth and transcription factors (TFs). We analyzed nine TFs, selected by in silico analysis of an Nkx2.5 enhancer, for their ability to transactivate the respective enhancer element that drives, specifically, expression of genes in cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Mzf1 showed significant activity in reporter assays and bound directly to the Nkx2.5 cardiac enhancer (Nkx2.5 CE) during murine ES cell differ...

  2. Epigenetic reprogramming of endogenous genes for permanent modulation of gene expression : Targeted interventions by self-engineered zinc finger proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Christian

    2015-01-01

    De epigenetische componenten van een gen, waarvan DNA methylatie en histonmodificaties het belangrijkste zijn, hebben een belangrijke rol bij de regulatie van genexpressie. Deregulatie van de epigenetische informatie kan er toe leiden dat genen afwijkend tot expressie komen, wat vervolgens tot ziekt

  3. ZIP4 Regulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by Activating IL-6/STAT3 Pathway via Zinc Finger Transcription Factor CREB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate a strong correlation of zinc transporter ZIP4 and pancreatic cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have recently found that ZIP4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which ZIP4 regulates pancreatic cancer growth. Experimental Design The expression of cyclin D1, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer xenografts and cells were examined by real time PCR, Bio-Plex cytokine assay, and Western blot, respectively. The activity of CREB is examined by a promoter activity assay. Results Cyclin D1 was significantly increased in the ZIP4 overexpressing MIA PaCa-2 cells (MIA-ZIP4)-injected orthotopic xenografts and was downregulated in the ZIP4 silenced ASPC-1 (ASPC-shZIP4) group. The phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an upstream activator of cyclin D1, was increased in MIA-ZIP4 cells, and decreased in ASPC-shZIP4 cells. IL-6, a known upstream activator for STAT3, was also found to be significantly increased in the MIA-ZIP4 cells and xenografts, and decreased in the ASPC-shZIP4 group. Overexpression of ZIP4 led to a 75% increase of IL-6 promoter activity, and caused increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Conclusions Our study suggest that ZIP4 overexpression causes increased IL-6 transcription via CREB, which in turn activates STAT3, and leads to increased cyclin D1 expression, resulting in increased cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. These results elucidated a novel pathway in ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth, and suggest new therapeutic targets including ZIP4, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:20160059

  4. The Zinc Finger Protein Mig1 Regulates Mitochondrial Function and Azole Drug Susceptibility in the Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Caza, Mélissa; Hu, Guanggan; Price, Michael; Perfect, John R.; Kronstad, James W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. In previous studies, we found that the Hap complex in this pathogen represses genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory functions and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle components under low-iron conditions. The orthologous Hap2/3/4/5 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exerts a regulatory influence on mitochondrial functions, and Hap4 is subject to glucose repression via ...

  5. DNA damage-inducible SUMOylation of HERC2 promotes RNF8 binding via a novel SUMO-binding Zinc finger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Jannie Michaela Rendtlew; Povlsen, Lou Klitgaard; Villumsen, Bine Hare;

    2012-01-01

    Nonproteolytic ubiquitylation of chromatin surrounding deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the RNF8/RNF168/HERC2 ubiquitin ligases facilitates restoration of genome integrity by licensing chromatin to concentrate genome caretaker proteins near the lesions. In parallel, SUMO...

  6. A dual role for zinc fingers in both DNA binding and zinc sensing by the Zap1 transcriptional activator

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Amanda J.; Zhao, Hui; Luo, Huan; Jensen, Laran T.; Srinivasan, Chandra; Evans-Galea, Marguerite; Winge, Dennis R.; Eide, David J.

    2000-01-01

    The Zap1 transcriptional activator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae controls zinc homeostasis. Zap1 induces target gene expression in zinc-limited cells and is repressed by high zinc. One such target gene is ZAP1 itself. In this report, we examine how zinc regulates Zap1 function. First, we show that transcriptional autoregulation of Zap1 is a minor component of zinc responsiveness; most regulation of Zap1 activity occurs post-translationally. Secondly, nuclear localization of Zap1 does not change...

  7. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by α-helical region substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the α-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHDRING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHDRING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHDRING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  8. ZNF282 (Zinc finger protein 282), a novel E2F1 co-activator, promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, So-Young; Ha, Sang Yun; Yu, Eun Ji; Lee, Keun-Woo; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Seok-Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Zincfinger protein 282 (ZNF282) is a newly identified transcription factor and little is known about its expression and function. Originally, ZNF282 is known to bind U5RE (U5 repressive element) of HLTV-1 (human T cell leukemia virus type 1) with a repressive effect. Recently we reported that ZNF282 functions as an estrogen receptor co-activator and plays an essential role in breast tumorigenesis. Although these results suggest the possible role of ZNF282 in cancers, clinical significance and...

  9. The Chimaerical Quest for the Optical Plasmonic Superlens

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, George; Mias, Christos

    2013-01-01

    This commentary aims to expose the fallacy of claiming that a plasmonic silver film superlens is capable to image real subwavelength objects. This lens was proposed by the Berkeley's group who, in their misleading experiment, inappropriately regarded subwavelength apertures as the objects to be imaged whereas the main function of these apertures was to transform free space laser light into an evanescent field necessary for exciting the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon in silver. In additi...

  10. Oxidase-deficient neutrophils from X-linked chronic granulomatous disease iPS cells: functional correction by zinc finger nuclease–mediated safe harbor targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Jizhong; Sweeney, Colin L; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Choi, Uimook; Pan, Jason; WANG, HONGMEI; Dowey, Sarah N.; Cheng, Linzhao; Malech, Harry L.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a patient with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), a defect of neutrophil microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulting from gp91phox deficiency. We demonstrated that mature neutrophils differentiated from X-CGD iPSCs lack ROS production, reproducing the pathognomonic CGD cellular phenotype. Targeted gene transfer into iPSCs, with subsequent selection and full characterization to ensure no off-target c...

  11. Nuclear hormone receptors involved in neoplasia: erb A exhibits a novel DNA sequence specificity determined by amino acids outside of the zinc-finger domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Smit-McBride, Z; Lewis, S; Sharif, M; Privalsky, M L

    1993-01-01

    The erb A oncogene is a dominant negative allele of a thyroid hormone receptor gene and acts in the cancer cell by encoding a transcriptional repressor. We demonstrate here that the DNA sequence recognition properties of the oncogenic form of the erb A protein are significantly altered from those of the normal thyroid hormone receptors and more closely resemble those of the retinoic acid receptors; this alteration appears to play an important role in defining the targets of erb A action in ne...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of mixed ligand complexes of Zn(II) and Co(II) with amino acids: Relevance to zinc binding sites in zinc fingers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rabindra Reddy; M Radhika; P Manjula

    2005-05-01

    Mixed ligand complexes of Zn(II) and Co(II) with cysteine, histidine, cysteinemethylester, and histidinemethylester have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and infrared, 1H NMR, TGA and FAB mass spectra. In these complexes, histidine, and histidinemethylester act as bidentate ligands involving amino and imidazole nitrogens in metal coordination. Similarly, cysteine, and cysteinemethylester also act as bidentate ligands coordinating through thiol sulphur and amino nitrogen. Tetrahedral geometry has been proposed for Zn(II) and Co(II) complexes based on experimental evidence.

  13. The Nuclear Zinc Finger Protein Zfat Maintains FoxO1 Protein Levels in Peripheral T Cells by Regulating the Activities of Autophagy and the Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Shuhei; Iwaihara, Yuri; Tanaka, Yoko; Luo, Hao; Nishi, Kensuke; Doi, Keiko; Koyanagi, Midori; Okamura, Tadashi; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Shirasawa, Senji

    2016-07-15

    Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) is a key molecule for the development and functions of peripheral T cells. However, the precise mechanisms regulating FoxO1 expression in peripheral T cells remain elusive. We previously reported that Zfat(f/f)-CD4Cre mice showed a marked decline in FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, partially through proteasomal degradation. Here we have identified the precise mechanisms, apart from proteasome-mediated degradation, of the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells. First, we confirmed that tamoxifen-inducible deletion of Zfat in Zfat(f/f)-CreERT2 mice coincidently decreases FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells, indicating that Zfat is essential for maintaining FoxO1 levels in these cells. Although the proteasome-specific inhibitors lactacystin and epoxomicin only moderately increase FoxO1 protein levels, the inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine restore the decreased FoxO1 levels in Zfat-deficient T cells to levels comparable with those in control cells. Furthermore, Zfat-deficient T cells show increased numbers of autophagosomes and decreased levels of p62 protein, together indicating that Zfat deficiency promotes lysosomal FoxO1 degradation through autophagy. In addition, Zfat deficiency increases the phosphorylation levels of Thr-308 and Ser-473 of Akt and the relative amounts of cytoplasmic to nuclear FoxO1 protein levels, indicating that Zfat deficiency causes Akt activation, leading to nuclear exclusion of FoxO1. Our findings have demonstrated a novel role of Zfat in maintaining FoxO1 protein levels in peripheral T cells by regulating the activities of autophagy and the Akt signaling pathway. PMID:27226588

  14. Sda1, a Cys2-His2 Zinc Finger Transcription Factor, Is Involved in Polyol Metabolism and Fumonisin B1 Production in Fusarium verticillioides

    OpenAIRE

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Smith, Jonathon; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Burton H. Bluhm; Shim, Won-Bo

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous ascomycete Fusarium verticillioides causes ear rot and stalk rot of maize, both of which reduce grain quality and yield. Additionally, F. verticillioides produces the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) during infection of maize kernels, and thus potentially compromises human and animal health. The current knowledge is fragmentary regarding the regulation of FB1 biosynthesis, particularly when considering interplay with environmental factors such as nutrient availability. In this stud...

  15. The Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 Cysteine-2/Histidine-2 Repressor-Like Transcription Factor Regulates Development and Tolerance to Salinity in Tomato and Arabidopsis(1[W])

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hichri, I.; Muhovski, Y.; Žižková, Eva; Dobrev, Petre; Franco-Zorrilla, J.M.; Solano, R.; Lopez-Vidriero, I.; Motyka, Václav; Lutts, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 4 (2014), s. 1967-1990. ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/11/0774 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : RICE ORYZA-SATIVA * AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED TRANSFORMATION * TARGET-SEQUENCE RECOGNITION Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 6.841, year: 2014

  16. Zinc-finger transcription factors are associated with guanine quadruplex motifs in human, chimpanzee, mouse and rat promoters genome-wide

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, V. K.; Baral, A.; Kumar, P.; D. Saha; Chowdhury, S.

    2011-01-01

    Function of non-B DNA structures are poorly understood though several bioinformatics studies predict role of the G-quadruplex DNA structure in transcription. Earlier, using transcriptome profiling we found evidence of widespread G-quadruplex-mediated gene regulation. Herein, we asked whether potential G-quadruplex (PG4) motifs associate with transcription factors (TF). This was analyzed using 220 position weight matrices [designated as transcription factor binding sites (TFBS)], representing ...

  17. The Coronary Artery Disease-associated Coding Variant in Zinc Finger C3HC-type Containing 1 (ZC3HC1) Affects Cell Cycle Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter D; Kaiser, Michael A; Ghaderi Najafabadi, Maryam; McVey, David G; Beveridge, Allan J; Schofield, Christine L; Samani, Nilesh J; Webb, Tom R

    2016-07-29

    Genome-wide association studies have to date identified multiple coronary artery disease (CAD)-associated loci; however, for most of these loci the mechanism by which they affect CAD risk is unclear. The CAD-associated locus 7q32.2 is unusual in that the lead variant, rs11556924, is not in strong linkage disequilibrium with any other variant and introduces a coding change in ZC3HC1, which encodes NIPA. In this study, we show that rs11556924 polymorphism is associated with lower regulatory phosphorylation of NIPA in the risk variant, resulting in NIPA with higher activity. Using a genome-editing approach we show that this causes an effective decrease in cyclin-B1 stability in the nucleus, thereby slowing its nuclear accumulation. By perturbing the rate of nuclear cyclin-B1 accumulation, rs11556924 alters the regulation of mitotic progression resulting in an extended mitosis. This study shows that the CAD-associated coding polymorphism in ZC3HC1 alters the dynamics of cell-cycle regulation by NIPA. PMID:27226629

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of the AP-2α Promoter by BTEB-1 and AP-2rep, a Novel wt-1/egr-Related Zinc Finger Repressor

    OpenAIRE

    Imhof, Axel; Schuierer, Marion; Werner, Oliver; Moser, Markus; Roth, Christina; Bauer, Reinhard; BUETTNER, REINHARD

    1999-01-01

    AP-2 transcription factors have been suggested to exert key regulatory functions in vertebrate embryonic development, in tumorigenicity of various cancer cell types, and in controlling cell cycle and apoptotic effector genes. In this study, we investigated transcriptional regulation of the AP-2α gene promoter mediated by an autoregulatory element (referred to as A32) with a core consensus AP-2 binding site at position −336 relative to the mRNA initiation site. AP-2 and multiple different nucl...

  19. The Stat6-regulated KRAB domain zinc finger protein Zfp157 regulates the balance of lineages in mammary glands and compensates for loss of Gata-3

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Carrie H.; Khaled, Walid T.; Frend, Hayley; Nichols, Jennifer; Watson, Christine J.

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate specification in mammary stem and progenitor cells is not well understood. In this study by Watson and colleagues, the authors identify a novel transcriptional regulator, Zfp157, as a target of Stat6. The authors demonstrate that Zfp157 regulates mammary progenitor cells by deleting Zfp157 in luminal cells, which resulted in a dramatic shift in the cellular composition of the mammary gland. In addition, the authors found that Gata-3 is not an essential regulator of mammary gland mor...

  20. The Zinc Finger Protein Zfr1p Is Localized Specifically to Conjugation Junction and Required for Sexual Development in Tetrahymena thermophila

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jing; Tian, Huaru; Wang, Wei; Liang, Aihua

    2012-01-01

    Conjugation in Tetrahymena thermophila involves a developmental program consisting of three prezygotic nuclear divisions, pronuclear exchange and fusion, and postzygotic and exconjugant stages. The conjugation junction structure appears during the initiation of conjugation development, and disappears during the exconjugant stage. Many structural and functional proteins are involved in the establishment and maintenance of the junction structure in T. thermophila. In the present study, a zinc f...

  1. A stage-specific open reading frame from three-day old adult worms of Trichinella spiralis encodes zinc-finger motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu X.P.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to isolate genes coding for stage-specific antigens of T. spiralis. Such antigens may then be associated with local and systemic immune responses against adult T. spiralis. Recombinant clones were obtained with an adult stage specific probe from a cDNA library of three-day old adult T. spiralis. Several cDNA clones encoding the same peptide were identified and their stage specificity was confirmed by northern blot analysis. Three independent clones were fully sequenced, and the resulting sequence found to code for a 487 amino acid peptide with a deduced molecular weight of ≈ 55 kDa. Sequence analysis showed that the 55 kDa peptide contained putative DNA binding motifs, suggesting that this protein may be involved in transcriptional regulation during the early development of the parasite.

  2. ZNF198, a zinc finger protein rearranged in myeloproliferative disease, localizes to the PML nuclear bodies and interacts with SUMO-1 and PML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion gene in atypical myeloproliferative disease produces a constitutively active cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, unlike ZNF198 which is normally a nuclear protein. We have now shown that the ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion kinase interacts with the endogenous ZNF198 protein suggesting that the function of ZNF198 may be compromised in cells expressing it. Little is currently known about the endogenous function of ZNF198 and to investigate this further we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis and identified SUMO-1 as a binding partner of ZNF198. These observations were confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation which demonstrated that ZNF198 is covalently modified by SUMO-1. Since many of the SUMO-1-modified proteins are targeted to the PML nuclear bodies we used confocal microscopy to show that SUMO-1, PML and ZNF198 colocalize to punctate structures, shown by immunocytochemistry to be PML bodies. Using co-immunoprecipitation we now show that PML and sumoylated ZNF198 can be found in a protein complex in the cell. Mutation of the SUMO-1 binding site in wild-type ZNF198 resulted in loss of distinct PML bodies, reduced PML levels and a more dispersed nuclear localization of the PML protein. In cells expressing ZNF198/FGFR1, which also lack the SUMO-1 binding site, SUMO-1 is preferentially localized in the cytoplasm, which is associated with loss of distinct PML bodies. Recently, arsenic trioxide (ATO) was proposed as an alternative therapy for APL that was resistant to traditional therapy. Treatment of cells expressing ZNF198/FGFR1 with ATO demonstrated reduced autophosphorylation of the ZNF198/FGFR1 protein and induced apoptosis, which is not seen in cells expressing wild-type ZNF198. Overall our results suggest that the sumoylation of ZNF198 is important for PML body formation and that the abrogation of sumoylation of ZNF198 in ZNF198/FGFR1 expressing cells may be an important mechanism in cellular transformation

  3. DNA methylation patterns in human tissues of uniparental origin using a zinc-Finger gene (ZNF127) from the Angelman/Prader-Willi region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Locker, J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    In order to further our understanding of the epigenetic modification of DNA and its role in imprinting, we examined DNA methylation patterns of human tissues of uniparental origin. We used complete hydatidiform moles (CHM), which are totally androgenetic conceptions, to examine the paternal methylation pattern in the absence of a maternal contribution and we used ovarian teratomas to represent the maternal counterpart. We carried out an analysis of DNA methylation of a gene which has been shown to contain sites which are differentially methylated in a parent-specific fashion. The gene, ZNF127, is located on chromosome 15q11-q13 in the region associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The parent-of-origin DNA methylation has been postulated to reflect the presence of an imprint and recent studies have confirmed that ZNF127 is differentially expressed only from the paternal chromosome. We identified a unique pattern of hyper- and hypomethylated sites in androgenetic conceptions which was nearly identical to the paternal pattern found in sperm. This may represent the paternal germ-line methylation imprint. We also studied partial hydatidiform moles, non-molar triploid conceptions, normal chorionic villi, and somatic tissue. These all demonstrated a modified DNA methylation pattern characteristic of normal chorionic villi with only limited findings of the imprint. Our results suggest that human androgenetic conceptions may provide an excellent model to analyze epigenetic DNA modifications, such as methylation, in imprinted genes. The paternal allele-specific methylation imprint will also be useful clinically to confirm the androgenetic nature of suspected molar conceptions in which parental blood samples may not be available. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Isolation of chimaeric forms of elongation factor EF-Tu by affinity chromatography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šanderová, Hana; Krásný, Libor; Jonák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 770, 1-2 (2002), s. 129-135. ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/98/0863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : elongation factor EF-Tu, chimeric protein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.913, year: 2002

  5. A functional Kv1.2-hERG chimaeric channel expressed in Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Mandeep S.; Cockcroft, Christopher J.; Munsey, Tim; Smith, Kathrine J.; Powell, Andrew J.; Carter, Paul; Wrighton, David C.; Rong, Hong-Lin; Yusaf, Shahnaz P.; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2014-02-01

    Members of the six-transmembrane segment family of ion channels share a common structural design. However, there are sequence differences between the members that confer distinct biophysical properties on individual channels. Currently, we do not have 3D structures for all members of the family to help explain the molecular basis for the differences in their biophysical properties and pharmacology. This is due to low-level expression of many members in native or heterologous systems. One exception is rat Kv1.2 which has been overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and crystallised. Here, we tested chimaeras of rat Kv1.2 with the hERG channel for function in Xenopus oocytes and for overexpression in Pichia. Chimaera containing the S1-S6 transmembrane region of HERG showed functional and pharmacological properties similar to hERG and could be overexpressed and purified from Pichia. Our results demonstrate that rat Kv1.2 could serve as a surrogate to express difficult-to-overexpress members of the six-transmembrane segment channel family.

  6. A functional Kv1.2-hERG chimaeric channel expressed in Pichia pastoris

    OpenAIRE

    Dhillon, MS; Cockcroft, CJ; Munsey, T; Smith, KJ; Powell, AJ; Carter, P; Wrighton, DC; Rong, HL; Yusaf, SP; Sivaprasadarao, A

    2014-01-01

    Members of the six-transmembrane segment family of ion channels share a common structural design. However, there are sequence differences between the members that confer distinct biophysical properties on individual channels. Currently, we do not have 3D structures for all members of the family to help explain the molecular basis for the differences in their biophysical properties and pharmacology. This is due to low-level expression of many members in native or heterologous systems. One exce...

  7. Angiotensinogen gene-inducible enhancer-binding protein 1, a member of a new family of large nuclear proteins that recognize nuclear factor kappa B-binding sites through a zinc finger motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Ron, D; Brasier, A R; Habener, J F

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the rat angiotensinogen gene during the acute-phase response is dependent on a previously characterized acute-phase response element (APRE) that binds at least two types of nuclear proteins: a cytokine-inducible activity indistinguishable from nuclear factor kappa-B (NF kappa B) and a family of C/EBP-like proteins. We screened a rat liver cDNA expression library with a labeled APRE DNA probe and isolated a single clone that encodes a sequence-specific APRE-bindin...

  8. Cadmium down-regulation of kidney Sp1 binding to mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 gene promoters: Possible reaction of cadmium with the zinc finger domain of Sp1

    OpenAIRE

    Kothinti, Rajendra K.; Blodgett, Amy B.; Petering, David H.; Tabatabai, Niloofar M.

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) exposure causes glucosuria (glucose in the urine). Previously, it was shown that Cd exposure of primary cultures of mouse kidney cells (PMKC) decreased mRNA levels of the glucose transporters, SGLT1 and SGLT2 and that Sp1 from Cd-exposed cells displayed reduced binding to the GC boxes of the mouse SGLT1 promoter in vitro. Here, we identified a GC box upstream of mouse SGLT2 gene. ChIP assays on PMKC revealed that exposure to 5 μM Cd abolished Sp1 binding to SGLT1 GC box while it ...

  9. The zinc-finger transcription factor SALL4 is frequently expressed in human cancers: association with clinical outcome in squamous cell carcinoma but not in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Ergin; Tennstedt, Pierre; Högner, Anica; Lebok, Patrick; Sauter, Guido; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Izbicki, Jakob R; Wilczak, Waldemar

    2016-04-01

    SALL4 is a transcription factor originally identified as a homeotic gene essential for organ development. Early studies suggested that SALL4 is a useful marker to identify testicular and ovarian germ cell tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of SALL4 immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on a tissue microarray (TMA) with 3966 samples from 94 different tumor types and on a further TMA with 492 esophagus carcinomas. SALL4 immunostaining was by far most prevalent and most intensive in testicular tumors with a positivity rate of 93.1 % in seminomas, 80 % in mixed germ cell tumors (embryonic carcinomas/yolk sac tumors), and 18.5 % in teratomas, respectively. However, SALL4 expression is not specific to germ cell tumors. We observed SALL4 positivity in non-germ cell tumors as carcinomas of the kidney (28.9 % of chromophobe, 34.4 % of clear cell carcinoma), in intestinal type adenocarcinoma of the stomach (10.9 %), in adenocarcinoma (10.5 %) and squamous cell carcinoma (7.2 %) of the esophagus, and in malignant melanoma (8.1 %) and invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma (20 %). SALL4 expression was not found in lymphomas, in soft tissue tumors or breast tumors. At analysis of esophagus carcinoma TMA, no significant association was seen between SALL4 expression and overall survival in adenocarcinoma. However, SALL4 expression was strongly associated with worse overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma. SALL4 expression can be found at relevant frequencies in various tumors of different primary sites. SALL4 expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus may constitute a sign of dedifferentiation leading to poor patient prognosis. PMID:26818834

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255079374 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available steine-rich protein with zinc finger Micromonas sp. RCC299 MMDARPVNVGLGSAPAQRGVKRQRDWSDKPTPKSGFCEHGRRRSRCKECGGSAICEHGRQRAQCKECG...GSAICEHGRQRSHCKECGGASICEHGRRRSQCKECGGSQICEHGRHRSQCKECGGSQICEHGRRRSVCKECGGSEICEHGRQRAQCKECGGASICEHGRVRSRCKECG...GASVCEHGRQRRYCKECGGASICEHGRQRAQCKQCGGSAICEHGRQRSHCKECGGASVCEHGRRRSQCKECG

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255074333 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available steine-rich protein with zinc finger Micromonas sp. RCC299 MEGSESEEEEKHATKKGVKRKRAPPTKGPCEHGVKYRSNCKVCSACPHGKRRCHCKECG...GASICEHGRIRSTCKECGGATICEHGRRRSQCKECGGSQICEHGRHRPQCKECGGSQICEHGRRRTECKECGGGSICEHDRVRSQCKECGGSQICEHGRQRSKCKECGGSQICEHGRRRTECKECGGGSICEHDRVRSQCKECGGGSICEHDRVRSKCKECRAAKARTG ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255086954 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available steine-rich protein with zinc finger Micromonas sp. RCC299 MPAIWRPNVRIELSDVDVEVKATEEEVTKKGTKRKRAPPTKGPCQHGVKYRSNCKVCSACPHGRQRHRCKECG...GSQICEHGRERSYCKECGGSQICEHGRQRSRCKDCSGASICEHGRQRRYCKECGGSAFCEHGRIRSTCKECGGASICEHGRHRIQCKECGGSQICEHGRRRSQCKECG...GSQICEHGRIRSTCKECGGSQICEHGRHRQYCKECGGSAFCEHGRIRSTCKECDGSQICEHGRIHSLCKECGGSGICEHGRQRNQCKECGGSGICEHGRQRYSCKECGGSGICEHGRRRYRCKECRAAKHI ...

  13. Conformational toggling controls target site choice for the heteromeric transposase element Tn7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiaojuan; Straus, Marco R; Caron, Jeremy J; Wang, Huasheng; Chung, Yu Seon; Guarné, Alba; Peters, Joseph E

    2015-12-15

    The bacterial transposon Tn7 facilitates horizontal transfer by directing transposition into actively replicating DNA with the element-encoded protein TnsE. Structural analysis of the C-terminal domain of wild-type TnsE identified a novel protein fold including a central V-shaped loop that toggles between two distinct conformations. The structure of a robust TnsE gain-of-activity variant has this loop locked in a single conformation, suggesting that conformational flexibility regulates TnsE activity. Structure-based analysis of a series of TnsE mutants relates transposition activity to DNA binding stability. Wild-type TnsE appears to naturally form an unstable complex with a target DNA, whereas mutant combinations required for large changes in transposition frequency and targeting stabilized this interaction. Collectively, our work unveils a unique structural proofreading mechanism where toggling between two conformations regulates target commitment by limiting the stability of target DNA engagement until an appropriate insertion site is identified. PMID:26384427

  14. A genome-wide transcriptional analysis of producer and non-producer NS0 myeloma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Soo Hean Gary; Falciani, Francesco; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2007-06-01

    'Genome-wide' or 'global' gene expression profiling provides a powerful approach to the characterization of a cell's transcriptional state. Such technology has been used in animal cell culture to create genome-wide snapshots of transcriptional activity in response to environmental factors or cellular triggers under bioprocessing conditions. Furthermore, it allows us to have a fundamental understanding of genetic mechanisms involved in recombinant protein production. One such mechanism adversely affecting the growth of recombinant bacteria is the increased metabolic burden resulting from the maintenance of plasmid copy number and heterologous protein expression. There have also been some reports on the effect of metabolic burden in mammalian cell systems. In the present study, we have used a mouse array representing 6400 genes to assess the expression profile of a WT (wild-type) mouse plasmacytoma cell line, NS0 WT, and a GS (glutamine synthetase)-NS0 6A1-100 cell line expressing chimaeric monoclonal antibody. The producer cells did not exhibit a slower growth as the result of any metabolic burden, but showed differences in metabolic activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that the producer cell line was selected for a higher expression of chromosomal genes, genes for zinc-finger proteins as well as cell-cycle-related events. On the other hand, protein synthesis is greater and ribosomal genes were more expressed in the WT cells. A possible shift from expressing antigen presenting proteins to recombinant protein could also be seen. Hence, gene expression profiling suggests that the effect of the metabolic burden in slowing growth can be mostly negated in producer cell lines by careful clonal selection, where stable transfected cells are selected for both high productivity as well as high growth rates. PMID:17223793

  15. Dicty_cDB: SSH167 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available kkkk***FFKMVKRNNNNSINYEINKIIPVQTTKDINSKRE KEIHVQIKKINSN--- ---vthwnqmi*lhhhlnhlilplqhlqakefpnlkqg*qrnqtklfplvllgetenltt tstadtta...liqpmaqiqelaihpvmiplqnqprkevdhlkfnqtvamfveepllhi gekvssmtkmkifailvv*ii*kkekknkfqkikivsti...gnificant alignments: (bits) Value (Q54L80) RecName: Full=GATA zinc finger domain-containing protei... 78 3e...-13 (Q54L83) RecName: Full=GATA zinc finger domain-containing protei... 73 1e-11 ...(Q54US7) RecName: Full=GATA zinc finger domain-containing protei... 70 8e-11 (Q54X31) RecName: Full=Putative GATA zinc finger domai

  16. Experiment list: SRX190239 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available type zinc fingers and is a n important regulator of T-cell development and plays an important...o GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n important regulator of T-cell development and plays an important

  17. Gclust Server: 5714 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TED: similar to zinc finger and BTB domain containing 8 opposite strand ; no annotation 19 1.00e-14 42.86 22...resentative annotation XP_001133395.1 PREDICTED: similar to zinc finger and BTB domain containing 8 opposite

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287447 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287447 J043016O04 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-30 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288349 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288349 J090023P19 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-23 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241364 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241364 J065152E11 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-20 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK104521 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104521 006-303-E08 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 4e-11 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK067216 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067216 J013098P16 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-23 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK103046 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103046 J033117G06 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-24 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK105286 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105286 001-116-E08 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-11 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK069995 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069995 J023037B09 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 6e-20 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK072007 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072007 J013098F24 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 6e-11 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK068989 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068989 J023002F22 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 4e-27 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK072236 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072236 J023003N03 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 4e-20 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK119840 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119840 002-178-C07 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-20 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK067295 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067295 J013106J21 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-29 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK069264 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069264 J023011B03 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-13 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK104353 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104353 001-034-G12 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 4e-18 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK066313 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066313 J013065E23 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-14 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK073653 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073653 J033048F17 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 1e-20 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK066352 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066352 J013063O03 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-14 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK101919 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101919 J033071J10 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 9e-11 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK121806 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121806 J033097L10 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-23 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK072584 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072584 J023132A01 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-12 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK071527 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071527 J023099O15 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-25 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK060894 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060894 001-035-C07 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 4e-11 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK119444 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119444 001-133-C11 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-17 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK072630 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072630 J023130P03 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-11 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK101292 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101292 J033033G18 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 9e-11 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK060188 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060188 001-001-D10 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 5e-27 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK100156 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100156 J023019I03 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 8e-23 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK106099 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106099 001-207-C04 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 4e-18 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK121573 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121573 J033036A12 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 8e-12 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK119393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119393 001-132-D02 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-15 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK064076 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064076 002-100-A06 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduce...d expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 2e-19 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK071686 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071686 J023109M13 (Q9UIJ5) Zinc finger DHHC domain containing protein 2 (Zinc finger protein 372) (Reduced... expression associated with metastasis protein) (Ream) (Reduced expression in cancer protein) (Rec) ZDHC2_HUMAN 3e-22 ...

  11. AcEST: DK954325 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ink to BlastX Result : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id Q6DJQ6 Definition sp|Q6DJQ6|ZIC3_XENTR Zinc finger protein ZIC 3... Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q6DJQ6|ZIC3_...XENTR Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS=Xenopus tropic... 34 0.79 sp|Q62521|ZIC3_MOUSE Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 ...gallus GN=ODZ2 PE=2 SV=1 33 1.3 sp|O60481|ZIC3_HUMAN Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS...=Homo sapiens G... 32 2.3 sp|O57311|ZIC3_XENLA Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS=Xenopus laevis... 32 3.9 sp|Q9R1

  12. AcEST: DK961397 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p_hit_id Q6DJQ6 Definition sp|Q6DJQ6|ZIC3_XENTR Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS=Xenopus tropicalis Align length...cant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q6DJQ6|ZIC3_XENTR Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS=Xenopus tropic... 34 0.50 sp|Q62521|ZIC...3_MOUSE Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS=Mus musculus G... 33 0.85 sp|Q9WT...apiens GN=ODZ2 PE=1 SV=2 33 0.85 sp|Q9DER5|TEN2_CHICK Teneurin-2 OS=Gallus gallus GN=ODZ2 PE=2 SV=1 33 0.85 sp|O60481|ZIC...3_HUMAN Zinc finger protein ZIC 3 OS=Homo sapiens G... 32 1.4 sp|O57311|ZIC3_XENLA Zinc finger protein ZIC

  13. AcEST: BP917110 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in ring-zinc-finger protein (Fragment)... 36 0.82 tr|Q7X7W8|Q7X7W8_PEA Makor...in ring-zinc-finger protein (Makorin R... 36 0.82 tr|Q7X760|Q7X760_PEA Makorin ring-zinc-finger protein (Fragment...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000096_B04. Accession BP917110 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL782Cont...otein... 37 0.025 sp|Q6YYC0|C3H55_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 37 0.032 sp|Q13434|MKRN4_HUMAN Putative makor... tRNA methyltran... 35 0.094 sp|Q657B3|C3H7_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein ... 35 0.094 sp|Q9QXP6|MKRN1_MOUSE Makor

  14. The Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Induces Expression of Transposases and Cell Death of Streptococcus mitis in a Biofilm Model

    OpenAIRE

    Duran-Pinedo, Ana E.; Baker, Vinesha D.; Frias-Lopez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Oral microbial communities are extremely complex biofilms with high numbers of bacterial species interacting with each other (and the host) to maintain homeostasis of the system. Disturbance in the oral microbiome homeostasis can lead to either caries or periodontitis, two of the most common human diseases. Periodontitis is a polymicrobial disease caused by the coordinated action of a complex microbial community, which results in inflammation of tissues that support the teeth. It is the most ...

  15. AcEST: BP914061 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000039_D09 599 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000039_D09. BP914061 CL1730C ... d Q6A085 Definition sp|Q6A085|ZN629_MOUSE Zinc finger p rotein 629 OS=Mus musculus Align length 29 Score ( ... ments: (bits) Value sp|Q6A085|ZN629_MOUSE Zinc finger p rotein 629 OS=Mus musculus GN... 40 0.007 sp|Q3MJ6 ... ing pro... 40 0.012 sp|Q9UEG4|ZN629_HUMAN Zinc finger p rotein 629 OS=Homo sapiens GN... 40 0.012 sp|Q5R4K ... 8|ZN615_PONAB Zinc finger p rotein 615 OS=Pongo abelii GN... 39 0.026 sp|Q8N8J ...

  16. AcEST: BP921243 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000147_D06 610 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000147_D06. BP921243 CL1730C ... d Q6A085 Definition sp|Q6A085|ZN629_MOUSE Zinc finger p rotein 629 OS=Mus musculus Align length 29 Score ( ... ments: (bits) Value sp|Q6A085|ZN629_MOUSE Zinc finger p rotein 629 OS=Mus musculus GN... 40 0.007 sp|O7546 ... 7|Z324A_HUMAN Zinc finger p rotein 324A OS=Homo sapiens G... 40 0.009 sp|Q3MJ6 ... ing pro... 40 0.012 sp|Q9UEG4|ZN629_HUMAN Zinc finger p rotein 629 OS=Homo sapiens GN... 40 0.012 sp|Q5R4K ...

  17. Experiment list: SRX100559 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ortant regulator of T-cell development and plays an important role in endothelial c...o the GATA family of transcription factors. The protein contains two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n imp

  18. Dicty_cDB: VSE650 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chondrial 8.0 %: vacuolar 4.0 %: cytoskeletal 4.0 %: endoplasmic reticulum 4.0 %: vesicles of secret...ck*ink*si*sfi*kkkkk Frame B: ---kqg*qrnqtklfplvllvklkillqpvllipllplilliqpmaqiqelaihpvmipl qnqprkevdhlkfnqtva...) Value (Q54L80) RecName: Full=GATA zinc finger domain-containing protei... 78 1e-13 (Q54L83) RecName: Full=GATA zinc finger domai...n-containing protei... 73 5e-12 (Q54US7) RecName: Full=GATA zinc finger domain-contain...ing protei... 70 3e-11 (Q54X31) RecName: Full=Putative GATA zinc finger domain-contai

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0262 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0262 sp|P15822|ZEP1_HUMAN Zinc finger protein 40 (Human immunodeficiency virus type ... I enhancer-binding protein 1) (HIV -EP1) (Major histocompatibility complex-binding pro ...

  20. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.;

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis...

  1. AcEST: DK954508 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 508 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Cont...ces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q0JP11|C3H3_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta...2TA39|ZMAT5_BOVIN Zinc finger matrin-type protein 5 OS=Bos taurus GN=ZMAT5 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 170 Score...id Q0JP11 Definition sp|Q0JP11|C3H3_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 3 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Align len...80 >sp|Q9UDW3|ZMAT5_HUMAN Zinc finger matrin-type protein 5 OS=Homo sapiens GN=ZMAT5 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 170 Score

  2. AcEST: BP918901 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Definition sp|Q0J952|C3H32_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 32 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Align len...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000118_G10. Accession BP918901 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID - Sequen...K977|C3H19_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 32 2.0 sp|Q4PGU6|SLT11_USTMA Pre-mRNA-splicing factor...tion ring formation regulator ezrA OS=... 33 0.68 sp|Q75K81|C3H36_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta... >sp|Q6Z358|C3H49_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 49 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica GN=Os07g0281000 PE=2 SV=1 Len

  3. AcEST: DK953361 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 361 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Cont... E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q8CHP0|ZC3H3_MOUSE Zinc finger...82 tr|Q247W7|Q247W7_TETTH Zinc finger protein, putative (Fragment) ... 36 0.82 tr...... 33 0.52 sp|Q4VBT5|MKRN1_DANRE Makorin-1 OS=Danio rerio GN=mkrn1 PE=2 SV=1 33 0.68 sp|Q688R3|C3H33_ORYSJ Zinc finger...in-1 OS=Macropus eugenii GN=MKRN1 PE=... 32 1.2 sp|Q5NAV3|C3H5_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta

  4. AcEST: DK950028 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1.2 sp|Q688R3|C3H33_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 33 1.5 sp|Q9TT91|MKRN1_MACEU Makorin-1 OS=Macropus eugen...028 Tissue type prothallia Developmental stage gametophyte Contig ID CL3704Contig1 Sequen...ces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q8CHP0|ZC3H3_MOUSE Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta...ococcus lucimar... 36 1.5 tr|Q247W7|Q247W7_TETTH Zinc finger protein, putative (Fragment) ... 36 ... 32 2.6 sp|Q9UPT8|ZC3H4_HUMAN Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 32 2.6 sp|Q7TP17|U2AF4_RAT Splicing factor

  5. AcEST: DK960037 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 037 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Cont...s: (bits) Value sp|Q84UQ3|C3H56_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 50 9e-06 sp|Q8IN94|OSA_DROME Trithor...9 sp|Q7Q6S8|MED14_ANOGA Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcriptio... 33 1.9 >sp|Q84UQ3|C3H56_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta...ized protein OS=Oryza... 50 1e-04 tr|Q93XK1|Q93XK1_PEA Zinc finger protein (Fragment) OS=Pis...GKECPYGDRC 692 R + C+ F + CPYGD C Sbjct: 167 GRAYKGRHCKKFYTDEGCPYGDAC 190 >tr|Q93XK1|Q93XK1_PEA Zinc finger protein (Fragment

  6. AcEST: DK959241 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ype prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Contig ID - Sequen...ining protein (Fragment... 79 2e-13 tr|B6ADT3|B6ADT3_9CRYT Zinc finger, CCCH type domain-conta...ces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q84UQ3|C3H56_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta... protein, putative OS=Plasmodi... 60 1e-07 tr|Q247W7|Q247W7_TETTH Zinc finger protein, putative (Fragment...G 134 >tr|Q4YW46|Q4YW46_PLABE Zinc finger protein, putative OS=Plasmodium berghei GN=PB000519.02.0 PE=4 SV=1 Length = 646 Score

  7. AcEST: DK963175 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 175 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Cont...p|Q2R4J4|C3H63_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 35 0.39 sp|Q6GLT5|MKRN1_XENLA Makor...in-1 OS=Xenopus laevis GN=mkrn1 PE=2 ... 33 1.1 sp|Q9STM4|ZFNL6_ARATH Putative zinc finger CCCH domain-conta...O48772|ZFN2_ARATH Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein ... 31 4.3 sp|Q8NCQ5|FBX15_HUMAN F-box only protein 15 OS=Homo sapien...1 5.6 sp|Q5JLB5|C3H12_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 31 5.6 sp|Q8K480|MFRP_MOUSE Membrane frizzled-re

  8. AcEST: DK950898 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .053 sp|Q803J8|ZC3HF_DANRE Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 37 0.069 sp|Q9DFG8|MKRN2_DANRE Makorin-2 OS=Danio rer...ER 129 >sp|Q8WU90|ZC3HF_HUMAN Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 15 OS=Homo sapiens GN=ZC3H15 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 426 Score...898 Tissue type prothallia Developmental stage gametophyte Contig ID CL2801Contig1 Sequen...otein... 37 0.090 sp|Q7JWR9|ZC3HF_DROME Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 37 0.090 sp|Q9TT91|MKRN1_MACEU Makor...H7N8|ZC3HF_CHICK Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 36 0.15 sp|Q9ERV1|MKRN2_MOUSE Makor

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04621-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available one SSM371. 50 0.13 1 ( CP000903 ) Bacillus weihenstephanensis KBAB4, complete genome. 34 0.24 2 ( CU633510 ) Pig...Neurospora crassa DNA linkage gro... 34 4.6 AM269977_6( AM269977 |pid:none) Aspergillus niger contig An01c03..., AN1-type d... 79 2e-13 (Q8N6M9) RecName: Full=AN1-type zinc finger protein 2A; 77 5e-13 C...ame: Full=AN1-type zinc finger protein 2A; AltName:... 74 5e-12 (Q0D5B9) RecName: Full=Zinc finger AN1 and C...5_1( AB378635 |pid:none) Lotus japonicus ZF-G96 mRNA for tr... 68 4e-10 (Q8TCF1) RecName: Full=AN1-type zinc finger protei

  10. Protein: FEB6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEB6 Photoresponse regulatory proteins HD1 SE1 Zinc finger protein HD1 Protein CONSTANS-like, Pr ... otein HEADING DATE 1, Protein PHOTOPERIOD SENSITIVITY ... 1 39947 Oryza sativa subsp. japonica 4340746 Q9FDX ...

  11. Experiment list: SRX190183 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GATA family of transcription factors. The protein contains two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n important ...regulator of T-cell development and plays an important role in endothelial cell b... belongs to the GATA family of transcription factors. The protein contains two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n important... regulator of T-cell development and plays an important role in end

  12. Experiment list: SRX190194 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ch belongs to the GATA family of transcription factors. The protein contains two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n important... regulator of T-cell development and plays an important role in e...ortant regulator of T-cell development and plays an important...s a protein which belongs to the GATA family of transcription factors. The protein contains two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n imp

  13. Overexpression of VOZ2 confers biotic stress tolerance but decreases abiotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Sumire; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Sato, Masa H.

    2013-01-01

    VOZ (vascular plant one zinc-finger protein) is a plant specific one-zinc finger type transcriptional activator, which is highly conserved through land plant evolution. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations in VOZ1 and VOZ2 showed increased cold and drought stress tolerances whereas decreased biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic plants overexpressing VOZ2 impairs freezing and drought stress tolerances but increases resistance to a fu...

  14. Condensation by DNA looping facilitates transfer of large DNA molecules into mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Montigny, William J.; Houchens, Christopher R.; Illenye, Sharon; Gilbert, Jonathan; Coonrod, Emily; Chang, Young-Chae; Nicholas H. Heintz

    2001-01-01

    Experimental studies of complete mammalian genes and other genetic domains are impeded by the difficulty of introducing large DNA molecules into cells in culture. Previously we have shown that GST–Z2, a protein that contains three zinc fingers and a proline-rich multimerization domain from the polydactyl zinc finger protein RIP60 fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), mediates DNA binding and looping in vitro. Atomic force microscopy showed that GST–Z2 is able to condense 1...

  15. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK e...

  16. AcEST: BP914643 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000061_C09 434 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000061_C09. BP914643 - Show ... -dehydrogenase 12 OS=Xeno... 29 6.6 sp|Q10938|YWS2_CAE EL Putative zinc finger protein B0310.2 OS=Cae ... 2 ... 7 FWYLGVVAAVWWGLRAAWCLLDGARVWVL 45 >sp|Q10938|YWS2_CAE EL Putative zinc finger protein B0310.2 OS=Cae norha ...

  17. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypo...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102070 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102070 J033082G07 At4g02220.1 zinc finger (MYND type) family protein / programmed cell death ... 2 ... ining protein similar to SP|Q16342 Programmed cell death ... protein 2 (Zinc finger protein Rp-8) {Homo sapiens ... les PF01753: MYND finger, PF04194: Programmed cell death ... protein 2, C-terminal putative domain 1e-129 ...

  19. Distance determination by GIY-YIG intron endonucleases: discrimination between repression and cleavage functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene; Edgell, David R

    2006-01-01

    GIY-YIG homing endonucleases are modular proteins, with conserved N-terminal catalytic domains connected by linkers to C-terminal DNA-binding domains. I-TevI, the T4 phage GIY-YIG intron endonuclease, functions both in promoting td intron homing, and in acting as a transcriptional autorepressor. Repression is achieved by binding to an operator, which is cleaved at 100-fold reduced efficiency relative to the intronless homing site. The linker includes a zinc finger, which functions in distance determination, to constrain the catalytic domain to cleave the homing site at a fixed position. Here we show that I-BmoI, a related GIY-YIG endonuclease lacking a zinc finger, also possesses some cleavage distance discrimination. Furthermore, hybrid endonucleases constructed by swapping the domains of I-BmoI and I-TevI are active, precise and demonstrate that features other than the zinc finger facilitate distance determination. Most importantly, I-TevI zinc finger mutants cleave the operator more efficiently than the homing site, the converse of wild-type protein. These results are consistent with the zinc finger acting as a measuring device, directing efficient cleavage of the homing site to promote intron mobility, while reducing cleavage at the operator to ensure transcriptional autorepression and phage viability. PMID:16582101

  20. AcEST: DK959103 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 103 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Cont...2 OS=Propio... 37 0.10 sp|Q13064|MKRN3_HUMAN Makorin-3 OS=Homo sapiens GN=MKRN3 PE=1 SV=1 37 0.13 sp|Q7XPK1|C3H31_ORYSJ Zinc finger...013 tr|O93432|O93432_DANRE Zinc finger protein (Fragment) OS=Danio r... 43 0.022 tr|B4L3A4|B4L3A4_DROMO GI15...ink to BlastX Result : Swiss-Prot sp_hit_id Q84UQ3 Definition sp|Q84UQ3|C3H56_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta.................................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignment

  1. AcEST: DK947564 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 564 Tissue type young leaves Developmental stage sporophyte Contig ID CL4109Contig1 Sequen... E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q0JP11|C3H3_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta... CCCH domain-containing protein... 37 0.058 sp|Q9H000|MKRN2_HUMAN Makorin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G...gth = 468 Score = 40.0 bits (92), Expect = 0.009 Identities = 20/51 (39%), Positives = 25/51 (49%) Frame = +2 Quer...3|Q1RPY3_CIOIN Zinc finger protein OS=Ciona intestinalis... 74 8e-12 tr|Q207M5|Q207M5_ICTPU Zinc finger matrin type 5 (Fragment

  2. AcEST: BP921484 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tion sp|Q2QTY2|C3H65_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 65 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Align length 27 Score...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000150_E01. Accession BP921484 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID - Sequen...|Q5ZA07|C3H41_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 31 3.3 sp|Q6AUG0|U2AFB_ORYSJ Splicing factor...p|Q5ZDJ6|C3H8_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 8 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica GN=Os01g0616400 PE=2 SV=2 Len...gth = 462 Score = 50.1 bits (118), Expect = 7e-06 Identities = 18/25 (72%), Positives = 20

  3. AcEST: BP914215 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000056_D05. Accession BP914215 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL1787Cont...DJ6 Definition sp|Q5ZDJ6|C3H8_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 8 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Align len...tr|Q9C7B5|Q9C7B5_ARATH Zinc finger protein, putative, 5' partial... 139 1e-31 tr|A9SXY6|A9SXY6_PHYPA Predicted protein (Fragment... alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q5ZDJ6|C3H8_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing prote...YYLKTGQCKFGITCKFHHP-----QP 164 Query: 57 SQTTVAP 37 + TTV P Sbjct: 165 AGTTVPP 171 Score = 91.7 bits (226), Expect = 3e-18 Ident

  4. Methods for Identification and Characterization of Protein Unexpectedly Expressed in Escherichia Coli:A Case Study Involvingβ-Lactamase Observed during the Expression of Zinc Finger 2-8 of NRSF/REST%原核表达过程中非目标蛋白质识别与确认的方法:NRSF/REST蛋白功能结构域ZnF2-8原核表达过程中β-内酰胺酶的确认

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岩; 赵玢; 杨中正; 申杰; 胡伟; 蓝文贤; 吴厚铭; 曹春阳

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is often used to produce recombinant proteins rapidly with high yield. However, the bacteria expresses non-target proteins unexpectedly in many cases, some of which may later be proven useful. Full characterization of these unpredicted proteins are usually expensive and time-consuming. In this study, we used E. coli to express neuron-restrictive silencer factor/RE1-silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST) functional motif ZnF2-8, which is involved in the interaction of NRSF/REST with neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE/RE1) dsDNA or small non-coding dsRNA for neuron gene transcriptional repression or activation. Overexpression of a non-target protein was observed. Two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and other biochemical assays were used in combination to characterize the non-target protein to beb-lactamase.%大肠杆菌常被用来大量快速制备重组蛋白质。但是,在原核表达目标蛋白质时非目标蛋白质经常会意外表达。有时这些非目标蛋白质也非常有使用价值,但是最终确认这些非目标蛋白质的过程昂贵又及其耗时。基于此,该文发展了一个新的基于二维核磁共振波谱技术、X-单晶衍射技术、结合其他生物化学方法,确认在原核表达神经限制性沉默因子 NRSF/REST 蛋白(该蛋白能够特异性识别神经限制性沉默因子 RE1 dsDNA及神经限制性激活因子dsRNA,以调节神经元干细胞的发育)功能结构域ZnF2-8时非目标蛋白b-内酰胺酶(b-lactamase)。

  5. Transformation of Cowpea Vigna unguiculata Cells with an Antibiotic Resistance Gene Using a Ti-Plasmid-Derived Vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, Jacques; Goldbach, Rob

    1986-01-01

    A chimaeric antibiotic resistance gene was transferred to cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a member of the legume family. This transfer was established by inoculating cowpea leaf discs with an Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring a Ti-plasmid-derived vector that contained two copies of a chimaeric

  6. Accelerated evolution of the Prdm9 speciation gene across diverse metazoan taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L Oliver

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The onset of prezygotic and postzygotic barriers to gene flow between populations is a hallmark of speciation. One of the earliest postzygotic isolating barriers to arise between incipient species is the sterility of the heterogametic sex in interspecies' hybrids. Four genes that underlie hybrid sterility have been identified in animals: Odysseus, JYalpha, and Overdrive in Drosophila and Prdm9 (Meisetz in mice. Mouse Prdm9 encodes a protein with a KRAB motif, a histone methyltransferase domain and several zinc fingers. The difference of a single zinc finger distinguishes Prdm9 alleles that cause hybrid sterility from those that do not. We find that concerted evolution and positive selection have rapidly altered the number and sequence of Prdm9 zinc fingers across 13 rodent genomes. The patterns of positive selection in Prdm9 zinc fingers imply that rapid evolution has acted on the interface between the Prdm9 protein and the DNA sequences to which it binds. Similar patterns are apparent for Prdm9 zinc fingers for diverse metazoans, including primates. Indeed, allelic variation at the DNA-binding positions of human PRDM9 zinc fingers show significant association with decreased risk of infertility. Prdm9 thus plays a role in determining male sterility both between species (mouse and within species (human. The recurrent episodes of positive selection acting on Prdm9 suggest that the DNA sequences to which it binds must also be evolving rapidly. Our findings do not identify the nature of the underlying DNA sequences, but argue against the proposed role of Prdm9 as an essential transcription factor in mouse meiosis. We propose a hypothetical model in which incompatibilities between Prdm9-binding specificity and satellite DNAs provide the molecular basis for Prdm9-mediated hybrid sterility. We suggest that Prdm9 should be investigated as a candidate gene in other instances of hybrid sterility in metazoans.

  7. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-04-11

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, which is probably one of the most exciting and yet enigmatic members of the POK/ZBTB family. PMID:23396304

  8. AcEST: BP912056 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YMU001_000012_E08 538 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: YMU001_000012_E08. BP912056 - Show ... g protein IPI3 OS=Candida... 30 5.7 sp|P34611|NCL1_CAE EL B-box type zinc finger protein ncl-1 OS=Cae ... 3 ... ESIGG-MNKIITVDADQNLKETFVAHQQKT 316 >sp|P34611|NCL1_CAE EL B-box type zinc finger protein ncl-1 OS=Cae norha ...

  9. Experiment list: SRX150646 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ich belongs to the GATA family of transcription factors. The protein contains two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n important... regulator of T-cell development and plays an important role in endothelial cell biology. D

  10. Amino acid substitutions of cysteine residues near the amino terminus of Wheat streak mosaic virus HC-Pro abolishes virus transmission by the wheat curl mite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The amino-terminal half of HC-Pro of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is required for semi-persistent transmission by the wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella Keifer). The amino-proximal region of WSMV HC-Pro is cysteine-rich with a zinc finger-like motif. Amino acid substitutions were made in this re...

  11. Sequence Classification: 899074 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|19115116|ref|NP_594204.1| protein of unknown ... function, has a TRIAD composite ... zinc finger domain || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  12. GenBank blastx search result: AK110320 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein p30), a zinc finger protein pseudogene, the 5' end of a variant of the MAGED1 gene for melanoma antigen, family D, 1 and two CpG islands, complete sequence.|PRI PRI 3e-99 +2 ...

  13. GenBank blastx search result: AK063713 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein p30), a zinc finger protein pseudogene, the 5' end of a variant of the MAGED1 gene for melanoma antigen, family D, 1 and two CpG islands, complete sequence.|PRI PRI 1e-122 +2 ...

  14. Monomeric site-specific nucleases for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Wolfs, Jason M; Kolaczyk, Tomasz; Roberts, Alanna K; Hu, Sherry X; Edgell, David R

    2012-05-22

    Targeted manipulation of complex genomes often requires the introduction of a double-strand break at defined locations by site-specific DNA endonucleases. Here, we describe a monomeric nuclease domain derived from GIY-YIG homing endonucleases for genome-editing applications. Fusion of the GIY-YIG nuclease domain to three-member zinc-finger DNA binding domains generated chimeric GIY-zinc finger endonucleases (GIY-ZFEs). Significantly, the I-TevI-derived fusions (Tev-ZFEs) function in vitro as monomers to introduce a double-strand break, and discriminate in vitro and in bacterial and yeast assays against substrates lacking a preferred 5'-CNNNG-3' cleavage motif. The Tev-ZFEs function to induce recombination in a yeast-based assay with activity on par with a homodimeric Zif268 zinc-finger nuclease. We also fused the I-TevI nuclease domain to a catalytically inactive LADGLIDADG homing endonuclease (LHE) scaffold. The monomeric Tev-LHEs are active in vivo and similarly discriminate against substrates lacking the 5'-CNNNG-3' motif. The monomeric Tev-ZFEs and Tev-LHEs are distinct from the FokI-derived zinc-finger nuclease and TAL effector nuclease platforms as the GIY-YIG domain alleviates the requirement to design two nuclease fusions to target a given sequence, highlighting the diversity of nuclease domains with distinctive biochemical properties suitable for genome-editing applications. PMID:22566637

  15. Domain Modeling: NP_064611.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_064611.3 chr4 Structure of the Wilms Tumor Suppressor Protein Zinc Finger Domain... Bound to DNA p2prta_ chr4/NP_064611.3/NP_064611.3_holo_471-589.pdb psi-blast 475G,476G,478T,479G,496E,497R,

  16. Domain Modeling: NP_003411.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_003411.3 chr3 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A DESIGNED ZINC FINGER PROTEIN BOUND TO DNA c1meyf_ chr3/NP_003411.3.../NP_003411.3_holo_219-301.pdb blast 224C,226V,227C,228G,229K,230G,231F,232S,233Q,234S

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302773417 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002970126.1 33090:1320 35493:561 131221:561 3193:561 58023:1315 3242:5003 3243:5003 3244:5003 ... 3245:5003 3246:5003 88036:5003 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302770196 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002968517.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302775504 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002971169.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302820643 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002991988.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:3870 3242:4590 3243:4590 3244:4590 ... 3245:4590 3246:4590 88036:4590 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302807776 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002985582.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:3870 3242:4590 3243:4590 3244:4590 ... 3245:4590 3246:4590 88036:4590 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302805184 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002984343.1 33090:1320 35493:561 131221:561 3193:561 58023:1315 3242:5003 3243:5003 3244:5003 ... 3245:5003 3246:5003 88036:5003 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302820714 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002992023.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302783867 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002973706.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302794632 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002979080.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302799092 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002981305.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:3870 3242:4590 3243:4590 3244:4590 ... 3245:4590 3246:4590 88036:4590 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302781987 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002972767.1 33090:1320 35493:561 131221:561 3193:561 58023:1315 3242:5003 3243:5003 3244:5003 ... 3245:5003 3246:5003 88036:5003 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302806942 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002985202.1 33090:1320 35493:561 131221:561 3193:561 58023:1315 3242:5003 3243:5003 3244:5003 ... 3245:5003 3246:5003 88036:5003 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302787975 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002975757.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302824897 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002994087.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:3870 3242:4590 3243:4590 3244:4590 ... 3245:4590 3246:4590 88036:4590 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302762154 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002964499.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302762166 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002964505.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302809723 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002986554.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor, p ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302820722 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available XP_002992027.1 33090:9716 35493:756 131221:756 3193:756 58023:1565 3242:4591 3243:4591 3244:4591 ... 3245:4591 3246:4591 88036:4591 EPF -type Cis2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor Se ...

  15. Screening of 99 Danish patients with congenital heart disease for GATA4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Litu; Tümer, Zeynep; Jacobsen, Joes Ramsøe;

    2006-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) affects nearly 1% of the population, but only few genes involved in human CHD are presently known. Germ-line mutations in the zinc finger transcription factor GATA4 have been associated with familial cases of atrial and ventricular septal defects and pulmonary...

  16. Main: 1WH5 [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1WH5 シロイヌナズナ Arabidopsis Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Similarity To Unknown Protein N ... 410; Arabidopsis Thaliana Molecule: Zf-Hd Homeobox Family ... Protein; Chain: A; Fragment: Homeobox Domain; Syno ... nym: Zinc Finger Homeobox Family ... Protein; Engineered: Yes Dna Binding Protein D.Kan ...

  17. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0621 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0621 gnl|UG|Mm#S10845368 Mus musculus 12 days embryo embryonic body between diaphragm...o ZINC FINGER PROTEIN 13 (FRAGMENT) [Rattus norvegicus], full insert sequence /cds=p(137,1846) /gb=AK034880 /gi=26330267 /ug=Mm.358911 /len=3228 2e-38 45% ...

  18. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-04-0075 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-04-0075 gnl|UG|Mm#S10845368 Mus musculus 12 days embryo embryonic body between diaphragm...o ZINC FINGER PROTEIN 13 (FRAGMENT) [Rattus norvegicus], full insert sequence /cds=p(137,1846) /gb=AK034880 /gi=26330267 /ug=Mm.358911 /len=3228 5e-43 48% ...

  19. Identification of a major phosphopeptide in human tristetraprolin by phosphopeptide mapping and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) binds and destabilizes some pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs. TTP-deficient mice develop a profound inflammatory syndrome due to excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. TTP expression is induced by various factors including insulin and ex...

  20. Fine mapping of ZNF804A and genome-wide significant evidence for its involvement in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, H.J.; Norton, N.; Dwyer, S.; Moskvina, V.; Nikolov, I.; Carroll, L.; Georgieva, L.; Williams, N.M.; Morris, D.W.; Quinn, E.M.; Giegling, I.; Ikeda, M.; Wood, J.; Lencz, T.; Hultman, C.; Lichtenstein, P.; Thiselton, D.; Maher, B.S.; Malhotra, A.K.; Riley, B.; Kendler, K.S.; Gill, M.; Sullivan, P.; Sklar, P.; Purcell, S.; Nimgaonkar, V.L.; Kirov, G.; Holmans, P.; Corvin, A.; Rujescu, D.; Craddock, N.; Owen, M.J.; O'Donovan, M.C.; GROUP investigators, [No Value

    2011-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) reported evidence for association between rs1344706 within ZNF804A (encoding zinc-finger protein 804A) and schizophrenia (P = 1.61 x 10(-7)), and stronger evidence when the phenotype was broadened to include bipolar disorder (P = 9.96 x 10(-9)). In this

  1. Rice8987Corresponding Table(f_g_primer): g_6772 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g_6772 3UTR_6772 SA1821 AU057822 >CELZC13_1(U67953|pid:g1519680) Caenorhabditis elegans cosmid Z ... 3; contains similarity to C3HC4-class zinc finger (PS :PS 00518). DPlate 080 B09 5' GCA TGT TCC TGT CCT CC ...

  2. Rice8987 g_array: cDNA information: 6772 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g_6772 SA1821 >CELZC13_1(U67953|pid:g1519680) Caenorhabditis elegans cosmid ZC13; contains simil ... arity to C3HC4-class zinc finger (PS :PS 00518). DPlate 080 B09 AU057822 D18 ...

  3. AcEST: DK953266 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CLPP1_PSEAE ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic sub... 32 3.2 sp|P31264|HMPB_D...ROME Homeotic protein proboscipedia OS=Drosophil... 31 4.1 sp|Q9UEG4|ZN629_HUMAN Zinc finger protein 629 OS=

  4. AcEST: DK954929 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available J4|C3H63_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 32 3.0 sp|A1AV60|SECA_RUTMC Protein translocase...7 IASPRWPG 224 >sp|A1AV60|SECA_RUTMC Protein translocase subunit secA OS=Ruthia magnifica subsp. Calyptogena

  5. Venturing into the New Science of Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolarová, Markéta; McGrath, John A; Tolar, Jakub

    2016-04-01

    Gene editing with zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins system, or meganucleases can, in principle, mediate any genome modification. Recent studies have shown that COL7A1 mutations in cells of patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be corrected by homology-directed DNA repair. PMID:27012560

  6. Znf202 Affects High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Promotes Hepatosteatosis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrins, C.L.J.; Out, R.; Santbrink, P. van; Zee, A. van der; Mahmoudi, T.; Groenendijk, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Berkel, T.J.C. van; Dijk, K.W. van; Biessen, E.A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The zinc finger protein Znf202 is a transcriptional suppressor of lipid related genes and has been linked to hypoalphalipoproteinemia. A functional role of Znf202 in lipid metabolism in vivo still remains to be established. Methodology and Principal Findings: We generated mouse Znf202 ex

  7. Znf202 Affects High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Promotes Hepatosteatosis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.J. Vrins (Carlos L.J.); R. Out (Ruud); P. van Santbrink (Peter); A. van der Zee (Anneke); T. Mahmoudi (Tokameh); M. Groenendijk (Martine); L.M. Havekes (Louis); Th.J.C. van Berkel (Theo); J.A.P. Willems van Dijk (Ko); E.A.L. Biessen (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The zinc finger protein Znf202 is a transcriptional suppressor of lipid related genes and has been linked to hypoalphalipoproteinemia. A functional role of Znf202 in lipid metabolism in vivo still remains to be established. Methodology and Principal Findings: We generated mou

  8. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication with artificial transcription factors targeting the highly conserved primer-binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Eberhardy; J. Goncalves; S. Coelho; D.J. Segal; B. Berkhout; C.F. Barbas

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primer-binding site (PBS) is a highly conserved region in the HIV genome and represents an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV therapies. In this study, we designed four artificial zinc finger transcription factors to bind at or adjac

  9. GATA-2 and GATA-3 regulate trophoblast-specific gene expression in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Ma (Grace); M.E. Roth (Matthew); J.C. Groskopf (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J.D. Engel (Douglas); D.I.H. Linzer (Daniel); F.Y. Tsai (Fong-Ying); S.H. Orkin (Stuart)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe previously demonstrated that the zinc finger transcription factors GATA-2 and GATA-3 are expressed in trophoblast giant cells and that they regulate transcription from the mouse placental lactogen I gene promoter in a transfected trophoblast cell line. We present evidence here that bo

  10. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  11. Role of the domains of human gene ZNF569 in MAPK pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Wuzhou; HUANG Xinqiong; ZHU Chuanbing; WANG Yuequn; LI Yongqing; WU Xiushan

    2006-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal pathways are important components in signal transduction connecting cell-surface receptors to critical regulatory targets within cells,mediating multiple intracetlular signal cascades and phosphorylating their target proteins,such as transcriptional factors ELK-l,SRE and AP-1,and finally activating the expression of intracellular functional genes.Zinc finger genes are some of the largest gene families in humans,and Zinc finger proteins play an essential role in altering gene expression by acting as transcription factors.Zinc finger proteins are also involved in multiple cell processes,including proliferation,differentiation and development,by interacting with DNA.Here,we reported the transcriptional activities of the domains of zinc finger gene ZNF569 taking advantage of MAPK pathway.Overexpression of ZNF569 in COS-7 cells dramatically inhibited the transcriptional repressor activities of SRE and AP-1,which was also confirmed by subcellular localization analysis.Report assays indicated that the potent repression domains of ZNF569 were the KRAB and ZNF motifs.The results suggested that ZNF569 protein might act as a transcriptional repressor in MAPK signaling pathway to regulate cellular processes.

  12. The emerging role of krüppel-like factors in endocrine-responsive cancers of female reproductive tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüppel-like factors (KLFs), of which there are currently 17 known protein members, belong to the Specificity-protein (Sp) family of transcription factors and are characterized by the presence of Cys2/His2 zinc-finger motifs in their carboxy-terminal domains that confer preferential binding to GC/GT...

  13. Domain Modeling: NP_066574.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_066574.2 chr2 CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A DESIGNED ZINC FINGER PROTEIN BOUND TO DNA c1meyf_ chr2/NP_066574.2.../NP_066574.2_holo_254-335.pdb blast 255K,259C,261E,262C,263G,264K,265A,266F,267F,268D

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-35-0420 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-35-0420 ref|NP_001001588.1| MYST histone acetyltransferase (monocytic leukemia...) 3 [Danio rerio] gb|AAT11171.1| monocytic leukemia zinc finger protein; MYST3; ZNF220 [Danio rerio] NP_001001588.1 0.23 36% ...

  15. Dicty_cDB: VHE434 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VH (Link to library) VHE434 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16228-1 VHE434P (Link to Original ... gene for SMART/HDAC1 associated repressor protein (SHARP ), the 3' end of the ZNF151 gene for zinc finger pr ...

  16. Experiment list: SRX150655 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available to the cap'n'collar type of basic region leucine zipper factor family (CNC-bZip). The encoded protein conta...ins broad complex, tramtrack, bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger (BTB/POZ) domains, which is atypical of C

  17. AcEST: DK954725 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TST39A01NGRL0021_D08 580 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0021_D08. 5' end seq ... B domain-containing prot... 36 0.12 sp|P34303|YKQ8_CAE EL Putative zinc finger protein C06E1.8 OS=Cae ... 3 ...

  18. Sequence Classification: 889124 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sing of pre-rRNA to mature rRNA; contains a C2/C2 zinc finger motif; srd1 mutation suppresses defects cause...TMB Non-TMH TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|10383786|ref|NP_009944.2| Protein involved in the proces

  19. AcEST: BP915293 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available response protein 1 OS=Bos taur... 30 4.2 sp|Q499R0|ZF518_RAT Zinc finger protein 518 OS=Rattus norvegicus... 30 5.5 sp|Q4K9T4|NUOCD...PVHISERSETRVSRSKANCT----IERNFNKRKTCKNKFAKIKTRI 1258 >sp|Q4K9T4|NUOCD_PSEF5 NADH-q

  20. Experiment list: SRX104409 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available two GATA-type zinc fingers and is a n important regulator of T-cell development and plays an important role in endothelial cell biol...ogy. Defects in this gene are the cause of hypoparathyroidism with sensorineural de

  1. High-frequency, precise modification of the tomato genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermak, T.; Baltes, N.J.; Čegan, Radim; Zhang, Y.; Voytas, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, NOV 6 2015 (2015). ISSN 1465-6906 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH14002 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : ZINC-FINGER NUCLEASES * HOMOLOGOUS RECOMBINATION * ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 10.810, year: 2014

  2. A short Gfi-1B isoform controls erythroid differentiation by recruiting the LSD1-corest complex through the dimethylation of its SNAG domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Laurent (Benoît); V. Randrianarison-Huetz (Voahangy); E. Frisan (Emilie); C. Andrieu-Soler (Charlotte); E. Soler (Eric); M. Fontenay (Michaela); I. Dusanter-Fourt (Isabelle); D. Dumenil (Dominique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractGfi-1B is a transcriptional repressor essential for the regulation of erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Here we identify Gfi-1B p32, a Gfi-1B isoform, as essential for erythroid differentiation. Gfi-1B p32 is generated by alternative splicing and lacks the two first zinc finger domain

  3. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation), UEV [ubiquitin E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme) variant] and NZF (nuclear protein localization gene 4 zinc finger) domain-containing proteins appear to have more specialized functions. Here we discuss functional and structural properties of...

  4. AcEST: BP913337 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000029_B06. Accession BP913337 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL2828Cont..... 34 0.30 sp|Q84ZT0|C3H51_ORYSJ Putative zinc finger CCCH domain-containin... 34 0.30 sp|Q9QXP6|MKRN1_MOUSE Makor...in... 43 7e-04 sp|Q338N2|C3H62_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 38 0.028 sp|Q6FNR8|CWC2_CANGA Pre...-mRNA-splicing factor CWC2 OS=Candida gl... 36 0.080 sp|Q5NAV3|C3H5_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta....23 sp|Q9JJ48|ZC3H8_MOUSE Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 34 0.30 sp|Q6C007|CWC2_YARLI Pre

  5. AcEST: BP920705 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1e-04 sp|Q5ZA07|C3H41_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 46 1e-04 sp|Q9DFG8|MKRN2_DANRE Makorin-2 OS=Danio rer...|Q6ZPZ3|ZC3H4_MOUSE Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein 4 OS=Mus musculus GN=Zc3h4 PE=1 SV=2 Length = 1304 Score...5 2e-12 tr|Q6AYB0|Q6AYB0_RAT Zinc finger CCCH type containing 8 OS=Rattu... 74 4e-12 tr|A9UQJ4|A9UQJ4_MONBE Predicted protein (Frag...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000140_D12. Accession BP920705 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID - Sequen... GN=mkr... 51 4e-06 sp|Q1EHT7|C3H4_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein ... 50 1e-05 sp|Q6GLT5|MKRN1_XENLA Makor

  6. AcEST: DK947950 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10071|GLI3_HUMAN Zinc finger protein GLI3 OS=Homo sapiens GN... 31 4.9 sp|Q8WXX7|AUTS2_HUMAN Autism suscepti...FSPPHPYINPYMDYIRSLHSSPSLSMI 216 >sp|Q8WXX7|AUTS2_HUMAN Autism susceptibility gene 2 protein OS=Homo sapiens

  7. Dysregulation of crypt cell proliferation and lineage determination, and villus cell migration in the small intestines of mice lacking the intestinal smooth muscle-expressed transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9), a zinc-finger transcription factor, is implicated in the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell fate. Mice with targeted inactivation of Klf9 gene exhibit postnatal growth retardation and increased mortality after birth. Using these mice, we have...

  8. Domain Modeling: NP_009062.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_009062.2 chrX CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A DESIGNED ZINC FINGER PROTEIN BOUND TO DNA c1meyf_ chrX/NP_009062....2/NP_009062.2_holo_145-216.pdb psi-blast 146E,150L,151G,152G,153T,154A,155V,156A,159F,

  9. Domain Modeling: NP_001071092.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_001071092.1 chr19 ZINC FINGER-DNA RECOGNITION: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF A ZIF268-DNA COMPLEX AT 2....1 ANGSTROMS c1zaac_ chr19/NP_001071092.1/NP_001071092.1_holo_446-524.pdb blast 450C,452C,455C,

  10. Domain Modeling: NP_005072.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_005072.2 chr2 STRUCTURE OF A CYS2HIS2 ZINC FINGER/TATA BOX COMPLEX (TATAZF;CLONE... #6) c1g2ff_ chr2/NP_005072.2/NP_005072.2_holo_1429-1508.pdb psi-blast 1432C,1435C,1437R,1438A,1439F,1441W,1

  11. Domain Modeling: NP_005332.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_005332.1 chr1 Structure of the Wilms Tumor Suppressor Protein Zinc Finger Domain... Bound to DNA p2prta_ chr1/NP_005332.1/NP_005332.1_holo_463-600.pdb blast 467C,468E,469F,470C,472H,483H,487H

  12. Functional analysis of genes involved in the regulation of development of reproductive organs in rice (Oryza sativa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Quality of the rice grain is determined mainly by starch and protein contents of the endosperm. In this thesis, the analyses of four genes involved in the regulation of development of rice grain and floret are presented. Two CCCH type zinc finger proteins, OsGZF1 and OsGZF2, were identified as novel

  13. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Goossens (Steven); E. Radaelli (Enrico); O. Blanchet (Odile); K. Durinck (Kaat); J. van der Meulen (Joni); S. Peirs (Sofie); T. Taghon (Tom); C.S. Tremblay (Cedric S.); M. Costa (Magdaline); M.F. Ghahremani; J. De Medts (Jelle); S. Bartunkova (Sonia); K. Haigh (Katharina); C. Schwab (Claire); N. Farla (Natalie); T. Pieters (Tim); F. Matthijssens (Filip); N. van Roy (Nadine); J.A. Best (J. Adam); K. Deswarte (Kim); P. Bogaert (Pieter); C. Carmichael (Catherine); A. Rickard (Adam); S. Suryani (Santi); L.S. Bracken (Lauryn S.); R. Alserihi (Raed); K. Canté-Barrett (Kirsten); L. Haenebalcke (Lieven); E. Clappier; P. Rondou (Pieter); K. Slowicka (Karolina); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); A.W. Goldrath (Ananda W.); V. Janzen (Viktor); M.P. McCormack (Matthew P.); R.B. Lock (Richard B.); D.J. Curtis (David J.); C.J. Harrison (Christine); G. Berx (Geert); F. Speleman (Franki); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules); J. Soulier (Jean); P. van Vlierberghe (Pieter); K. Haigh (Katharina)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEarly T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using

  14. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  15. Phylogenetic position of the giant house bat Scotophilus nigrita (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vallo, Peter; Benda, P.; Červený, J.; Koubek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2015), s. 225-231. ISSN 0025-1461 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/09/P624; GA AV ČR IAA6093404 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : cranial morphometrics * cytochrome b * phylogeny * zinc finger protein Y Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.681, year: 2014

  16. AcEST: BP918343 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |Q9NDJ2|DOM_DROME Helicase domino OS=Drosophila melanogaster G... 48 4e-05 sp|O60315|ZEB2_HUMAN Zinc finger ...EF+ N E+ ED+ T+ A+E L Sbjct: 393 PWHPDEDDEEFT-ANEEEAEDEEDTIAAEEQL 423 >sp|Q9NDJ2|DOM_DROME Helicase domino O

  17. The POU proteins Brn-2 and Oct-6 share important functions in Schwann cell development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Jaegle (Martine); M. Ghazvini (Mehrnaz); W.J. Mandemakers (Wim); M. Piirsoo (Marko); S. Driegen (Siska); F. Levavasseur (Francoise); S. Raghoenath; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); D. Meijer (Daniëlle)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic hierarchy that controls myelination of peripheral nerves by Schwann cells includes the POU domain Oct-6/Scip/Tst-1and the zinc-finger Krox-20/Egr2 transcription factors. These pivotal transcription factors act to control the onset of myelination during devel

  18. Functional identification of an Arabidopsis snf4 ortholog by screening for heterologous multicopy suppressors of snf4 deficiency in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinow, T.; Bhalerao, R.; Breuer, F.; Umeda, M.; Salchert, Klaus-Dieter; Koncz, C.

    2000-01-01

    , zinc-finger factors AZF2 and ZAT10, as well as orthologs of hexose/UDP-hexose transporters, calmodulin, SMC1-cohesin and Snf4. Here we describe the characterization of AtSNF4, a functional Arabidopsis Snf4 ortholog, that interacts with yeast Snf1 and specifically binds to the C-terminal regulatory...

  19. Domain Modeling: NP_055653.2 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_055653.2 chr22 Functional and structural basis of nuclear localization signal in ZIC3 zinc fi ... nger domain: a role of conserved tryptophan ... residue in the zinc finger domain p2ej4a_ chr22/NP ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065522 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065522 J013026G17 At5g64830.1 programmed cell death ... 2 C-terminal domain-containing protein low ... similarity to SP|P46718 Programmed cell death ... protein 2 (Zinc finger protein Rp-8) {Mus musculus ... }; contains Pfam profile PF04194: Programmed cell death ... protein 2, C-terminal domain 3e-62 ...

  1. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  2. Insights into Strand Exchange in BTB Domain Dimers from the Crystal Structures of FAZF and Miz1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stogios, Peter J.; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Chen, Lu; Pomroy, Neil C.; Privé, Gilbert G. (Toronto); (OCI)

    2010-09-22

    The BTB domain is a widely distributed protein-protein interaction motif that is often found at the N-terminus of zinc finger transcription factors. Previous crystal structures of BTB domains have revealed tightly interwound homodimers, with the N-terminus from one chain forming a two-stranded anti-parallel {beta}-sheet with a strand from the other chain. We have solved the crystal structures of the BTB domains from Fanconi anemia zinc finger (FAZF) and Miz1 (Myc-interacting zinc finger 1) to resolutions of 2.0 {angstrom} and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. Unlike previous examples of BTB domain structures, the FAZF BTB domain is a nonswapped dimer, with each N-terminal {beta}-strand associated with its own chain. As a result, the dimerization interface in the FAZF BTB domain is about half as large as in the domain-swapped dimers. The Miz1 BTB domain resembles a typical swapped BTB dimer, although it has a shorter N-terminus that is not able to form the interchain sheet. Using cysteine cross-linking, we confirmed that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) BTB dimer is strand exchanged in solution, while the FAZF BTB dimer is not. A phylogenic tree of the BTB fold based on both sequence and structural features shows that the common ancestor of the BTB domain in BTB-ZF (bric a brac, tramtrack, broad-complex zinc finger) proteins was a domain-swapped dimer. The differences in the N-termini seen in the FAZF and Miz1 BTB domains appear to be more recent developments in the structural evolution of the domain.

  3. Caspases in plants: metacaspase gene family in plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, David; Bohn, Bianca; Cabreira, Caroline; Leipelt, Fábio; Dias, Nathalia; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria H; Cagliari, Alexandro

    2015-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an ordered cell suicide that removes unwanted or damaged cells, playing a role in defense to environmental stresses and pathogen invasion. PCD is component of the life cycle of plants, occurring throughout development from embryogenesis to the death. Metacaspases are cysteine proteases present in plants, fungi, and protists. In certain plant-pathogen interactions, the PCD seems to be mediated by metacaspases. We adopted a comparative genomic approach to identify genes coding for the metacaspases in Viridiplantae. We observed that the metacaspase was divided into types I and II, based on their protein structure. The type I has a metacaspase domain at the C-terminus region, presenting or not a zinc finger motif in the N-terminus region and a prodomain rich in proline. Metacaspase type II does not feature the prodomain and the zinc finger, but has a linker between caspase-like catalytic domains of 20 kDa (p20) and 10 kDa (p10). A high conservation was observed in the zinc finger domain (type I proteins) and in p20 and p10 subunits (types I and II proteins). The phylogeny showed that the metacaspases are divided into three principal groups: type I with and without zinc finger domain and type II metacaspases. The algae and moss are presented as outgroup, suggesting that these three classes of metacaspases originated in the early stages of Viridiplantae, being the absence of the zinc finger domain the ancient condition. The study of metacaspase can clarify their assignment and involvement in plant PCD mechanisms. PMID:26277721

  4. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  5. EST Table: CK534064 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ery vector pFA545] gb|ABB59013.1| transposase [Himar1-delivery and mutagenesis vect...or pFNLTP16 H3] gb|ACK37846.1| transposase [Himar1-delivery and mutagenesis vector pHBurk3] gb|ACK37849.1| transposase [Himar1-delive...CK534064 rswgb0_002162.y1 10/09/29 50 %/137 aa gb|AAU04866.1| mariner transposase [Mariner transposase deliv...ry and mutagenesis vector pHBurk5] 10/08/31 38 %/106 aa

  6. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations. PMID:26627003

  7. AcEST: DK957716 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 60 Definition Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0029_B15. 5' end sequence. Accession DK9577...... 35 5.4 tr|A4HIG6|A4HIG6_LEIBR Zinc-finger protein, conserved OS=Leishma... 34 7.0 tr|Q6BJD1|Q6BJD1_DEBHA...ENLPKLD 282 QT P+S K + KE KLD Sbjct: 96 AQTQAKPLSPKMAVTDKPKTLKEVAKKLD 124 >tr|A4HIG6|A4HIG6_LEIBR Zinc-finger protein, conserve...TST39A01NGRL0029_B15 660 Adiantum capillus-veneris mRNA. clone: TST39A01NGRL0029_B1..., and David J. Lipman (1997), Gapped BLAST and PSI-BLAST: a new generation of protein database search programs, Nucleic Acids Res

  8. Suppressor of hairy-wing, modifier of mdg4 and centrosomal protein of 190 gene orthologues of the gypsy insulator complex in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballar-Lejarazú, R; Brennock, P; James, A A

    2016-08-01

    DNA insulators organize independent gene regulatory domains and can regulate interactions amongst promoter and enhancer elements. They have the potential to be important in genome enhancing and editing technologies because they can mitigate chromosomal position effects on transgenes. The orthologous genes of the Anopheles stephensi putative gypsy-like insulator protein complex were identified and expression characteristics studied. These genes encode polypeptides with all the expected protein domains (Cysteine 2 Histidine 2 (C2H2) zinc fingers and/or a bric-a-brac/poxvirus and zinc finger). The mosquito gypsy transcripts are expressed constitutively and are upregulated in ovaries of blood-fed females. We have uncovered significant experimental evidence that the gypsy insulator protein complex is widespread in vector mosquitoes. PMID:27110891

  9. AcEST: BP911995 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000011_G09. Accession BP911995 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL245Cont...: 724 VGKVTNSVWMM 734 >sp|Q7TMA2|ZN503_MOUSE Zinc finger protein 503 OS=Mus musculus GN=Znf503 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 652 Score...SHLAGAAAASASCAHDPAAAA 465 >sp|Q96F45|ZN503_HUMAN Zinc finger protein 503 OS=Homo sapiens GN=ZNF503 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 646 Score...nition tr|Q9F713|Q9F713_CHLTE Orf122 (Fragment) OS=Chlorobium tepidum Align length 121 Score (bit) 138.0 E-value 2.0e-31 Repor.... 49 1e-04 >tr|Q9F713|Q9F713_CHLTE Orf122 (Fragment) OS=Chlorobium tepidum PE=4 SV=1 Length = 121 Score = 13

  10. AcEST: BP919208 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 sp|B0F0H3|MKRN2_XENLA Makorin-2 OS=Xenopus laevis GN=mkrn2 PE=2 ... 37 0.037 sp|Q8N5P1|ZC3H8_HUMAN Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000122_E01. Accession BP919208 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL3327Cont... CCCH domain-containing protein... 38 0.022 sp|Q9TT91|MKRN1_MACEU Makorin-1 OS=Macropus eugen.... 161 2e-38 tr|A7S076|A7S076_NEMVE Predicted protein (Fragment) OS=Nematoste... 161 2e-38 tr|B8JLK7|B8JLK7_DANRE Zinc finger... CCCH domain-containing protein 11 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Align length 123 Score (bi

  11. AcEST: DK950528 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 528 Tissue type prothallia Developmental stage gametophyte Contig ID CL2801Contig1 Sequen..........................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q1EHT7|C3H4_ORYSJ Zinc finger...in, ring finger protein, 1 variant (... 49 3e-04 tr|Q256Y7|Q256Y7_HUMAN Makorin-1 OS=Homo sapien... protein, 2 (Fragment... 48 4e-04 tr|B7Q4B2|B7Q4B2_IXOSC Makorin, putative (Fragment... >tr|Q1RLH2|Q1RLH2_CIOIN Zinc finger protein OS=Ciona intestinalis GN=Ci-ZF(C3H/RING)-1 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 447 Score

  12. AcEST: BP912089 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZA07|C3H41_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 106 7e-23 sp|Q9DFG8|MKRN2_DANRE Makorin-2 OS=Danio rer... R... 63 1e-08 tr|Q76KB3|Q76KB3_PEA Makorin ring-zinc-finger protein (Fragment)... 63 1e-08 tr|B4PIZ4|B4PIZ4...iola... 54 5e-06 tr|Q8UW54|Q8UW54_SERQU Makorin ring finger protein 2 (Fragment...is mRNA. clone: YMU001_000012_H11. Accession BP912089 Tissue type prothallium Developmental stage - Contig ID CL1268Cont...PDGRREEPQRQQVGTSSRN 446 >sp|Q9DD48|MKRN2_SERQU Makorin-2 OS=Seriola quinqueradiata GN=mkrn2 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 423 Score

  13. AcEST: DK950672 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ype prothallia Developmental stage gametophyte Contig ID - Sequence GTCACTTGAGGCC... CCCH domain-containing protein 12 OS=Oryza sativa subsp. japonica Align length 78 Score...05 sp|A3CEM4|C3H64_ORYSJ Putative zinc finger CCCH domain-containin... 41 0.005 sp|P26651|TTP_HUMAN Tristetraproline OS=Homo sapien...... 40 0.015 sp|Q8JFF3|MKRN1_SERQU Makorin-1 OS=Seriola quinqueradiata GN=mkr... 40 0.015 sp|Q6K977|C3H19_ORYSJ Zinc finger...QHFMRTGTCKFGASCKYHHP 123 Score = 30.4 bits (67), Expect = 9.1 Identities = 25/91 (27%), Positives = 42/91 (46%) Frame = +1 Quer

  14. AcEST: DK956571 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ype prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Contig ID - Sequen...GPNCKFDHP 381 >sp|Q9SWF9|ZFNL_PEA Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein ZFN-like OS=Pisum sativum PE=2 SV=1 Length = 417 Score...... 41 0.004 sp|A3CEM4|C3H64_ORYSJ Putative zinc finger CCCH domain-containin... 41 0.004 sp|Q9DD48|MKRN2_SERQU Makorin-2 OS=Ser...GGTCKFNHPQTQSTNLMVS 169 Score = 40.4 bits (93), Expect = 0.007 Identities = 14/28 (50%), Positives = 19/28 (67%) Frame = +2 Quer...AGRVSLNMLGYPLRSNEVDCAYFLRTGHCKFGG 150 Query: 401 ACKFDH 418 CKF+H Sbjct: 151 TCKFNH 156 Score = 75.5 bits (184), Expect = 2e-13 Ident

  15. AcEST: DK954175 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 175 Tissue type prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Cont...5 sp|Q8N5P1|ZC3H8_HUMAN Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 39 0.025 sp|Q6GLT5|MKRN1_XENLA Makorin-1 OS=Xen... CCCH domain-containing protein 15 OS=Danio rerio GN=zc3h15 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 433 Score =...in-3 OS=Homo sapiens GN=MKRN3 PE=1 SV=1 40 0.009 sp|Q8BYK8|ZC3H6_MOUSE Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta... CCCH domain-containing protein 15 OS=Gallus gallus GN=ZC3H15 PE=1 SV=1 Length = 429 Score = 9

  16. AcEST: DK944880 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Tissue type young leaves Developmental stage sporophyte Contig ID CL1Contig2 Sequen.........................done Score E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q9LSL6|DOF57_ARATH Dof zinc finger...al... 30 7.1 >sp|Q9LSL6|DOF57_ARATH Dof zinc finger protein DOF5.7 OS=Arabidopsis thaliana GN=DOF5.7 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 316 Score...TTMDFQLAGLSL 142 >sp|Q3SYW2|CO2_BOVIN Complement C2 OS=Bos taurus GN=C2 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 750 Score..._id Q6R9L5 Definition tr|Q6R9L5|Q6R9L5_MAIZE Putative uncharacterized protein orf121-a-ct OS=Zea mays Align length 49 Score

  17. AcEST: DK958860 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ype prothallia with plantlets Developmental stage gametophytes with sporophytes Contig ID - Sequen...74 sp|Q338N2|C3H62_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-containing protein... 37 0.074 sp|Q6C007|CWC2_YARLI Pre-mRNA-splicing factor... and polyadenylation specificity f... 33 1.1 >sp|Q6ZK57|C3H54_ORYSJ Zinc finger CCCH domain-conta...gth = 677 Score = 140 bits (352), Expect = 8e-33 Identities = 91/224 (40%), Positives = 112/224 (50%) Frame = +1 Quer...-mRNA-splicing factor CWC2 OS=Candida glabrata GN=CWC2 PE=3 SV=1 Length = 306 Score = 42.4 bits (98), Expect = 0.002 Ident

  18. An AAVS1-Targeted Minigene Platform for Correction of iPSCs From All Five Types of Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Merling, Randall K; Sweeney, Colin L; Chu, Jessica; Bodansky, Aaron; Choi, Uimook; Priel, Debra Long; Kuhns, Douglas B; WANG, HONGMEI; Vasilevsky, Sam; De Ravin, Suk See; Winkler, Thomas; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Zou, Jizhong; Zarember, Kol A.; Gallin, John I.

    2014-01-01

    There are five genetic forms of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), resulting from mutations in any of five subunits of phagocyte oxidase, an enzyme complex in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages that produces microbicidal reactive oxygen species. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from peripheral blood CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells of patients with each of five CGD genotypes. We used zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) targeting the AAVS1 safe harbor site together with CGD geno...

  19. Targeted Genome Editing of Sweet Orange Using Cas9/sgRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Hongge Jia; Nian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification, including plant breeding, has been widely used to improve crop yield and quality, as well as to increase disease resistance. Targeted genome engineering is expected to contribute significantly to future varietal improvement, and genome editing technologies using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9/single guide RNA (sgRNA) have already been succes...

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Phosphoproteins in the Rice Nucleus During the Early Stage of Seed Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Yin, Xiaojian; Sakata, Katsumi; Yang, Pingfang; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-07-01

    The early stage of seed germination is the first step in the plant life cycle without visible morphological change. To investigate the mechanism controlling the early stage of rice seed germination, we performed gel-and label-free nuclear phosphoproteomics. A total of 3467 phosphopeptides belonging to 102 nuclear phosphoproteins from rice embryos were identified. Protein-synthesis-related proteins were mainly phosphorylated. During the first 24 h following imbibition, 115 nuclear phosphoproteins were identified, and significant changes in the phosphorylation level over time were observed in 29 phosphoproteins. Cluster analysis indicated that nucleotide-binding proteins and zinc finger CCCH- and BED-type proteins increased in abundance during the first 12 h of imbibition and then decreased. The in silico protein-protein interactions for 29 nuclear phosphoproteins indicated that the Sas10/Utp3 protein, which functions in snoRNA binding and gene silencing, was the center of the phosphoprotein network in nuclei. The germination rate of seeds was significantly slowed with phosphatase inhibitor treatment. The mRNA expression of the zinc finger CCCH-type protein did not change, and the zinc finger BED-type protein was upregulated in rice embryos during the early stage of germination with phosphatase inhibitor treatment. These results suggest that the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of nuclear proteins are involved in rice seed germination. Furthermore, transcription factors such as zinc finger CCCH- and BED-type proteins might play a key role through nuclear phosphoproteins, and Sas10/Utp3 protein might interact with nuclear phosphoproteins in rice embryos to mediate the early stage of seed germination. PMID:26035336

  1. Low concentration of arsenite exacerbates UVR-induced DNA strand breaks by inhibiting PARP-1 activity

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Xu-Jun; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Wenlan; Timmins, Graham S.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated arsenic exposure with many types of human cancers. Arsenic has also been shown to act as a co-carcinogen even at low concentrations. However, the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is unknown. Recent studies indicate that arsenic can interfere with DNA repair processes. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 is a zinc-finger DNA repair protein, which can promptly sense DNA strand breaks and initiate DNA repair pathways. In the present study,...

  2. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells ...

  3. Identification of a Major Phosphopeptide in Human Tristetraprolin by Phosphopeptide Mapping and Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Heping; Deterding, Leesa J.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2014-01-01

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) binds and destabilizes some pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs. TTP-deficient mice develop a profound inflammatory syndrome due to excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. TTP expression is induced by various factors including insulin and extracts from cinnamon and green tea. TTP is highly phosphorylated in vivo and is a substrate for several protein kinases. Multiple phosphorylation sites are identified in human TTP, but it is diffic...

  4. Recruitment of Ikaros to Pericentromeric Heterochromatin Is Regulated by Phosphorylation*

    OpenAIRE

    Gurel, Zafer; Ronni, Tapani; Ho, Sam; Kuchar, Jason; Payne, Kimberly J.; Turk, Christoph W.; Dovat, Sinisa

    2008-01-01

    Ikaros encodes a zinc finger protein that is involved in heritable gene silencing. In hematopoietic cells, Ikaros localizes to pericentromeric heterochromatin (PC-HC) where it recruits its target genes, resulting in their activation or repression via chromatin remodeling. The function of Ikaros is controlled by post-translational modifications. CK2 kinase has been shown to phosphorylate Ikaros at its C terminus, affecting cell cycle progression. Using in vivo labeling ...

  5. EST Table: FY021402 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY021402 rbmov30i12 11/12/09 n.h 11/11/04 35 %/105 aa ref|NP_001039046.1| zinc finger, HIT type ... 3 [Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis] emb|CAJ82353.1| thyroid ... hormone receptor interactor 3 [Xenopus tropicalis] ... gb|AAI21594.1| thyroid ... hormone receptor interactor 3 [Xenopus (Silurana) ... tropicalis] gb|AAI57155.1| thyroid ... hormone receptor interactor 3 [Xenopus (Silurana) ...

  6. EST Table: FY040494 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY040494 rbmte23n08 11/11/04 34 %/212 aa ref|NP_001005425.1| zinc finger protein 663 [Mus muscul ... us] gb|AAH67000.1| Gene model ... 1008, (NCBI) [Mus musculus] emb|CAI51608.1| novel ... H2 type domains [Mus musculus] gb|EDL06459.1| gene model ... 1008, (NCBI) [Mus musculus] 11/11/04 36 %/178 aa F ...

  7. Sequence Classification: 889982 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ily; has similarity to mammalian Tis11 protein, which activates transcription and also has a...TMB Non-TMH TMB TMB Non-TMB Non-TMB >gi|6320355|ref|NP_010435.1| Member of the CCCH zinc finger fam... role in mRNA degradation; may function with Tis11p in iron homeostasis; Cth1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6320355 ...

  8. Interleukin 2 gene transcription is regulated by Ikaros-induced changes in histone acetylation in anergic T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanmay; Duré, Myrianne; Paroder, Monika; Soto-Nieves, Noemí; Puga, Irene; Macián, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    In T cells anergy may be evoked by an unbalanced stimulation of the T-cell receptor in the absence of costimulation. Anergic T cells are unresponsive to new antigen receptor engagement and do not produce interleukin 2. We present evidence that anergizing stimuli induce changes in histone acetylation, which mediates transcriptional repression of interleukin 2 expression. In response to calcium signaling, anergic T cells up-regulate the expression of Ikaros, a zinc finger transcription factor e...

  9. Affinity-based enrichment strategies to assay methyl-CpG binding activity and DNA methylation in early Xenopus embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanović Ozren; Veenstra Gert Jan C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background DNA methylation is a widespread epigenetic modification in vertebrate genomes. Genomic sites of DNA methylation can be bound by methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins (MBDs) and specific zinc finger proteins, which can recruit co-repressor complexes to silence transcription on targeted loci. The binding to methylated DNA may be regulated by post-translational MBD modifications. Findings A methylated DNA affinity precipitation method was implemented to assay binding of proteins...

  10. Induction of Extracellular Matrix-Remodeling Genes by the Senescence-Associated Protein APA-1

    OpenAIRE

    Benanti, Jennifer A.; Williams, Dawnnica K.; Robinson, Kristin L; Ozer, Harvey L.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2002-01-01

    Human fibroblasts undergo cellular senescence after a finite number of divisions, in response to the erosion of telomeres. In addition to being terminally arrested in the cell cycle, senescent fibroblasts express genes that are normally induced upon wounding, including genes that remodel the extracellular matrix. We have identified the novel zinc finger protein APA-1, whose expression increased in senescent human fibroblasts independent of telomere shortening. Extended passage, telomerase-imm...

  11. A novel genetic mechanism regulates dorsolateral hinge-point formation during zebrafish cranial neurulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nyholm, Molly K.; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2009-01-01

    During neurulation, vertebrate embryos form a neural tube (NT), the rudiment of the central nervous system. In mammals and birds, a key step in cranial NT morphogenesis is dorsolateral hinge-point (DLHP) bending, which requires an apical actomyosin network. The mechanism of DLHP formation is poorly understood, although several essential genes have been identified, among them Zic2, which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor. We found that DLHP formation in the zeb...

  12. ZEB1 Expression in Endometrial Biopsy Predicts Lymph Node Metastases in Patient with Endometrial Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Feng; Xiangming Wang; Xiaozhi Cao; Lijuan Shen; Jiansheng Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression of zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) in endometrial biopsy and its correlation with preoperative characteristics, including lymph node metastases in patient with endometrial cancer. Methods. Using quantitative RT-PCR, ZEB1 expressions in endometrial biopsy from 452 patients were measured. The relationship between ZEB1 expression and preoperative characteristics was analyzed. Results. ZEB1 expressions were significantly...

  13. Purification and characterization of transcription factor IIIA from Acanthamoeba castellanii

    OpenAIRE

    Polakowski, Nicholas; Paule, Marvin R.

    2002-01-01

    TFIIIA is required to activate RNA polymerase III transcription from 5S RNA genes. Although all known TFIIIA homologs harbor nine zinc fingers that mediate DNA binding, very limited sequence homology is found among these proteins, which reflects unique properties of some TFIIIA homologs. For example, the Acanthamoeba castellanii homolog directly regulates 5S RNA transcription. We have purified and characterized A.castellanii TFIIIA (AcTFIIIA) as a step toward obtaining a clearer understanding...

  14. Funktionsanalyse ausgewählter DOF-Transkriptionsfaktoren bei der Modellpflanze Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Skirycz, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are global regulators of gene expression playing essential roles in almost all biological processes, and are therefore of great scientific and biotechnological interest. This project focused on functional characterisation of three DNA-binding-with-one-zinc-finger (DOF) TFs from the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, namely OBP1, OBP2 and AtDOF4;2. These genes were selected due to severe growth phenotypes conferred upon their constitutive over-expression. To ...

  15. Domain Modeling: NP_071911.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_071911.3 chr10 QGSR (ZIF268 VARIANT) ZINC FINGER-DNA COMPLEX (GCAC SITE) c1a1ha_ chr10/NP_071911.3.../NP_071911.3_holo_9-104.pdb psi-blast 13K,16Q,19L,20T,21Q,22Q,23T,24H,25H,28M,29I,32S,33V,

  16. Domain Modeling: NP_975011.3 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_975011.3 chr19 Aart, a six finger zinc finger designed to recognize ANN triplets... c2i13b_ chr19/NP_975011.3/NP_975011.3_holo_42-170.pdb psi-blast 49L,51F,52L,54I,56V,57S,58K,60D,62I,65L,66E

  17. CRISPR-Cas: Development and applications for mammalian genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Ran, Fei Ann

    2014-01-01

    The ability to introduce targeted modifications into genomes and engineer model organisms holds enormous promise for biomedical and technological applications, and has driven the development of tools such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). To facilitate genome engineering in mammalian cells, we have engineered the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 programmable nuclease systems from Streptococcus p...

  18. Combined clinical and genetic testing algorithm for cervical cancer diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Liou, Yu-Ligh; Zhang, Tao-Lan; Yan, Tian; Yeh, Ching-Tung; Kang, Ya-Nan; Cao, Lanqin; Wu, Nayiyuan; Chang, Chi-Feng; Wang, Huei-Jen; Yen, Carolyn; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Background Opportunistic screening in hospitals is widely used to effectively reduce the incidence rate of cervical cancer in China and other developing countries. This study aimed to identify clinical risk factor algorithms that combine gynecologic examination and molecular testing (paired box gene 1 (PAX1) or zinc finger protein 582 (ZNF582) methylation or HPV16/18) results to improve diagnostic accuracy. Methods The delta Cp of methylated PAX1 and ZNF582 was obtained via quantitative methy...

  19. Crystal structure of the BTB domain from the LRF/ZBTB7 transcriptional regulator

    OpenAIRE

    Peter J. Stogios; Chen, Lu; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2007-01-01

    BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF) proteins are transcription regulators with roles in development, differentiation, and oncogenesis. In these proteins, the BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a protein–protein interaction motif that contains a dimerization interface, a possible oligomerization surface, and surfaces for interactions with other factors, including nuclear co-repressors and histone deacetylases. The BTB-ZF protein LRF (also known as ZBTB7, FBI-1, OCZF, and Pokemon) is a master re...

  20. MUC1 enhances invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Lopamudra Das; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Subramani, Durai B.; Besmer, Dahlia; Nath, Sritama; Tinder, Teresa L; Bajaj, Ekta; Shanmugam, Kandavel; Lee, Yong Yook; Hwang, Sun IL; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2010-01-01

    Increased motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells are associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snai1 and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that trigger this process by repressing E-cadherin and enhancing vimentin and N-Cadherin protein expression. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in pancreatic tumors remain elusive. MUC1, a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is associated with the most invasive forms of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (P...