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Sample records for chilean coastal upwelling

  1. VOCALS-CUpEx: the Chilean Upwelling Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreaud, R. D.; Rutllant, J. A.; Muñoz, R. C.; Rahn, D. A.; Ramos, M.; Figueroa, D.

    2011-03-01

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was a major field experiment conducted in spring of 2008 off southern Peru and northern Chile, aimed at better understanding the coupled climate systems of the southeast Pacific. Because of logistical constrains, the coastal area around 30° S was not sampled during VOCALS-REx. This area not only marks the poleward edge of the subtropical stratocumulus cloud regime (thus acting as a source of transient disturbances) but is also one of the most active upwelling centers and source of surface ocean kinetic energy along the Chilean coast. To fill such an observational gap, a small, brief, but highly focused field experiment was conducted in late spring 2009 in the near-shore region around 30° S. The Chilean Upwelling Experiment (CUpEx) was endorsed by VOCALS as a regional component. CUpEx included long-term monitoring, an intensive two-week field campaign and off-shore research flights. Our goal was to obtain an atmospheric/oceanic dataset with enough temporal and spatial coverage to be able to document (a) the mean diurnal cycles of the lower-troposphere and upper-ocean in a region of complex topography and coastline geometry, and (b) the ocean-atmosphere response to the rapid changes in coastal winds from strong, upwelling-favorable equatorward flow (southerly winds) to downwelling-favorable poleward flow (northerly winds). In this paper we describe the measurement platforms and sampling strategy, and provide an observational overview, highlighting some key mean-state and transient features.

  2. How depositional conditions control input, composition, and degradation of organic matter in sediments from the Chilean coastal upwelling region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niggemann, Jutta; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard;

    2007-01-01

    In a comprehensive study, we compared depositional conditions, organic matter (OM) composition, and organic carbon turnover in sediments from two different depositional systems along the Chilean continental margin: at ~23°S off Antofagasta and at ~36°S off Concepción. Both sites lie within...... investigated for excess 210Pb (210Pbxs) activity, total organic and total inorganic carbon concentrations (TOC and TIC, respectively), C/N-ratios, organic carbon isotopic compositions (d13C), chlorin concentrations, Chlorin Indices (CI), and sulfate reduction rates (SRR). Sediment accumulation rates obtained...... from 210Pb-analysis were similar in both regions (0.04‑0.15 cm yr‑1 at 23°S, 0.10‑0.19 cm yr‑1 at 36°S), although total 210Pbxs fluxes indicated that the vertical particle flux was higher at 36°S than at 23°S. We propose that sediment focusing in isolated deposition centers led to high sediment...

  3. Coastal upwelling observed by multi-satellite sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Coastal upwelling phenomenon along the China coast in the Yellow Sea during August 2007 is studied using ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) data, NOAA Advanced AVHRR series Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data,and NASA QuikSCAT Scatterometer ocean surface wind data. A dark pattern in an ASAR image is interpreted as coastal upwelling. This is because the natural biogenic slicks associated with coastal upwelling damp the Bragg waves on the sea surface and thus make the surface smoother. Most of the incoming radar energy is reflected in the forward direction. As a result, the radar backscatter signal is very weak. Analyzing the concurrent AVHRR SST image, we find that the dark pattern in the ASAR image is indeed corresponding to the low SST area. The wind retrieval in the slicks dominant region is biased due to the low Normalised Radar Cross Section (NRCS) associated with the coastal upwelling. We applied a SST correction to the NRCS values to improve the accuracy of wind retrieval from ASAR data.

  4. Coastal upwelling observed by multi-satellite sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiaoMing; LI XiaoFeng; HE MingXia

    2009-01-01

    Coastal upwelling phenomenon along the China coast in the Yellow Sea during August 2007 is studied using ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) data, NOAA Advanced AVHRR series Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data, and NASA QuikSCAT Scatterometer ocean surface wind data. A dark pattern in an ASAR image is interpreted as coastal upwelling. This is because the natural biogenic slicks associated with coastal upwelling damp the Bragg waves on the sea surface and thus make the surface smoother. Most of the incoming radar energy is reflected in the forward direction. As a result, the radar backscatter signal is very weak. Analyzing the concurrent AVHRR SST Image, we find that the dark pattern in the ASAR image is indeed corresponding to the low SST area. The wind retrieval in the slicks dominant region is biased due to the low Normaliced Radar Cross Section (NRCS) associated with the coastal upwelling. We applied a SST correction to the NRCS values to improve the accuracy of wind retrieval from ASAR data.

  5. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, V L.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Adams, Nicolaus G.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Bill, Brian D.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Stehr, Carla M.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Wekell, John C.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Moeller, Peter (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Busman, Mark (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Woodruff, Dana L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  6. Coastal Upwelling and Deep Fog: 50-year Worldwide Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koracin, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    An analysis is presented of the marine fog distribution based upon the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) ship observations taken during 1950-2007. Deep fog occurrence is reported in routine weather reports that are encoded in an ICOADS ship observation. Occurrence is estimated by the number of deep fog observations divided by the total present weather observations in a one-degree area centered on latitude and longitude grid point intersections. The mean fog occurrence for the summer (June-July-August) 1950-2007 was computed for each one degree point for the world. There are five major world locations with coastal SST minimums due to wind driven upwelling. Four of these are during the local summer on the eastern side of a semi-permanent anticyclone on eastern sides of northern and southern mid-latitudes of the Pacifica and the Atlantic. The fifth is during the SW monsoon in the Indian Ocean. For all five of these locations, the deep fog occurrence is at maximum during the upwelling season, with the greatest occurrences concentrated along the coast and isolated over the SST minimum. For the five coastal fog maxima, the greatest and longest duration occurrence along coast occurrence is associated with the coldest sea surface temperature and longest along coast occurrence, which is along N. California- S. Oregon. In contrast, the lowest occurrence of fog and the least along coast occurrence is associated with the warmest sea surface temperatures and least along coast occurrence along the SE Arabian Peninsula. The remaining three zones, Peru-Chile, NW Africa, and SW Africa are between the two extremes in fog occurrence, along coast coverage and sea surface temperature. Peru-Chile is more complex than the others as the Peru upwelling and fog appears the more dominant although ship observations are sparse along Chile.

  7. Coastal upwelling in Southern Coast of Sumbawa Island, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufikurahman, Qamal; Hidayat, Rahmat

    2017-01-01

    Circulation and water mass characteristics in southern coast of Sumbawa Island is strongly influenced by monsoon which change each season. This research aims to (1) identify the Ekman transport and Ekman pumping variations and (2) analyse the SST and chlorophyll-a variability. During Juni-July-August (JJA) season, the highest value of Ekman transport (-0.72 m2 s-1) moves the water mass towards Indian Ocean while Ekman pumping (0.15x10-4 m2 s-1) rises the water mass to the surface (upwelling). Impact of coastal upwelling was identified by cooling SST and high chlorophyll-a. Coolest SST (26.58°C) associated with highest chlorophyll-a (0.6 mg m-3) were found in JJA season. Inter-annual variation of SST and chlorophyll-a concentrations during 2003-2015 is driven by Ekman transport and Ekman pumping. Coolest SST and highest chlorophyll-a were found in JJA season in 2006 with an average value of 25.98°C and 0.78 mg m-3, also in JJA season in 2008 with an average value of 26°C and 0.71 mg m-3. Thus the process of Ekman transport and Ekman pumping has an important role in lifting the cold water high nutriens from the deeper layer to surface. The high concentration of chlorophyll-a in water is the impact of appointment nutrient from the deeper layer by the coastal upwelling.

  8. Coastal upwelling at Cape Frio: Its structure and weakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Cape Frio at the Angola-Namibia border, is the northern-most coastal upwelling cell of the Benguela Current ( 17S, 11E) and is sensitive to climate variability. This study provides new insights using daily high resolution satellite and ocean-atmosphere reanalysis datasets in the period 1985-2015. The annual cycle of SST follows two months behind the net heat balance and wind stress curl, reaching a minimum in July-September. Ranking the daily SST record, two intense multi-day upwelling events stand out. The more recent case of 26-29 August 2005 is studied, given the greater density and sophistication of satellite data. A coastal wind jet >10 m s-1 develops next to Cape Frio, with sharp edges imposed by a thermal inversion and the mountainous cape. The cold plume wind stress curl and downward heat fluxes. Leeward of Cape Frio, a wind shadow and poleward currents contribute to phytoplankton blooms. Daily time series 1985-2015 reveal warming SST +.035C/yr and diminishing winds -0.025 m s-1/yr. The trend toward cyclonic winds over Angola and the northern Benguela Current reflects a poleward and offshore shift of the main axis of southeasterly winds.

  9. Amino acid biogeo- and stereochemistry in coastal Chilean sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Schubert, Carsten J.;

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) and amino acid enantiomers (D- and L-forms) was investigated in sediments underlying two contrasting Chilean upwelling regions,: at ~23°S off Antofagasta and at ~36°S off Concepcion. The contribution of amino acids to total organic...... carbon (%TAAC: 7-14%) and total nitrogen (%TAAN: 23-38%) in surface sediments decreased with increasing water depth (from 126 to 1350 m) indicating that organic matter becomes increasingly decomposed in surface sediments at greater water depth. Changes in the ratio between the protein amino acid...... aspartate and its non-protein degradation product β-alanine confirmed this observation. Furthermore, estimates of THAA mineralization showed that sedimentary amino acid reactivity decreased with both increasing water depth as well as progressive degradation status of the organic matter that was incorporated...

  10. Metagenomes of the picoalga Bathycoccus from the Chile coastal upwelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Vaulot

    Full Text Available Among small photosynthetic eukaryotes that play a key role in oceanic food webs, picoplanktonic Mamiellophyceae such as Bathycoccus, Micromonas, and Ostreococcus are particularly important in coastal regions. By using a combination of cell sorting by flow cytometry, whole genome amplification (WGA, and 454 pyrosequencing, we obtained metagenomic data for two natural picophytoplankton populations from the coastal upwelling waters off central Chile. About 60% of the reads of each sample could be mapped to the genome of Bathycoccus strain from the Mediterranean Sea (RCC1105, representing a total of 9 Mbp (sample T142 and 13 Mbp (sample T149 of non-redundant Bathycoccus genome sequences. WGA did not amplify all regions uniformly, resulting in unequal coverage along a given chromosome and between chromosomes. The identity at the DNA level between the metagenomes and the cultured genome was very high (96.3% identical bases for the three larger chromosomes over a 360 kbp alignment. At least two to three different genotypes seemed to be present in each natural sample based on read mapping to Bathycoccus RCC1105 genome.

  11. Seasonal variability and trends in coastal upwelling across the Northwest African coastline, 1981-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, T. E.; Hanna, E.; Bigg, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of coastal upwelling systems under global warming is of huge biological, climatological and socio-economic importance. It was hypothesized in the early 1990's that upwelling might increase as a result of stronger land-ocean pressure gradients, however published results since then have conflicted as to whether coastal upwelling intensity has increased across the NW African coastline. Here, we present seasonal upwelling estimates for NW Africa (11-35°N) from 1981-2012, focusing mainly on changes during summer (JJA). Seasonal coastal upwelling indices are derived or estimated from several near-surface wind, sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface height (SSH), geometric vertical velocity and near-surface horizontal current datasets. For the wind-stress upwelling indices we use observational data (ICOADS), forecast model data (PFEL) and five atmospheric reanalysis datasets (ERA-Interim, NCEP-DOE II, 20th Century Reanalysis, MERRA and CFSR). For the SST indices we use the HadISST, Reynolds OISST and ICOADS datasets and for SSH we use satellite altimetry data from AVISO. Ocean reanalysis products (ORS4A, SODA 2.1.6 and GODAS) are used for ocean motion data. The numerous indices generally correlate well spatially, all reflecting a similar pattern induced by the trade wind climatology A statistically significant upwelling increase above 21°N is found in several indices, with a corresponding decrease in upwelling intensity below 20°N as well. This supports the upwelling intensification hypothesis as at approximately 20°N the summer trade winds are displaced by onshore monsoonal winds, which favour downwelling. However, these trend directions aren't ubiquitous across all the datasets, with most of the reanalysis wind indices suggesting no significant trend direction and sea-level height from altimetry showing no signs of lowering at coastal gridpoints (which would potentially indicate an upwelling increase). We attempt to validate if upwelling trends are

  12. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, John A; Menge, Bruce A; Lubchenco, Jane; Chan, Francis; Bane, John M; Kirincich, Anthony R; McManus, Margaret A; Nielsen, Karina J; Pierce, Stephen D; Washburn, Libe

    2007-03-06

    Wind-driven coastal ocean upwelling supplies nutrients to the euphotic zone near the coast. Nutrients fuel the growth of phytoplankton, the base of a very productive coastal marine ecosystem [Pauly D, Christensen V (1995) Nature 374:255-257]. Because nutrient supply and phytoplankton biomass in shelf waters are highly sensitive to variation in upwelling-driven circulation, shifts in the timing and strength of upwelling may alter basic nutrient and carbon fluxes through marine food webs. We show how a 1-month delay in the 2005 spring transition to upwelling-favorable wind stress in the northern California Current Large Marine Ecosystem resulted in numerous anomalies: warm water, low nutrient levels, low primary productivity, and an unprecedented low recruitment of rocky intertidal organisms. The delay was associated with 20- to 40-day wind oscillations accompanying a southward shift of the jet stream. Early in the upwelling season (May-July) off Oregon, the cumulative upwelling-favorable wind stress was the lowest in 20 years, nearshore surface waters averaged 2 degrees C warmer than normal, surf-zone chlorophyll-a and nutrients were 50% and 30% less than normal, respectively, and densities of recruits of mussels and barnacles were reduced by 83% and 66%, respectively. Delayed early-season upwelling and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions.

  13. Diatoms Si uptake capacity drives carbon export in coastal upwelling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrantes, F.; Cermeno, P.; Lopes, C.; Romero, O.; Rufino, M.; van Iperen, J.; Matos, L.; Magalhães, V.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal upwelling systems account for approximatelyhalf of global ocean primary production and contributedisproportionately to biologically driven carbon sequestration.Diatoms, silica-precipitating microalgae, constitutethe dominant phytoplankton in these productive regions,and their abundance and a

  14. Variability in upwelling intensity and nutrient regime in the coastal upwelling system offshore Namibia: results from sediment archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeis, Kay-Christian; Struck, Ulrich; Leipe, Thomas; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2009-03-01

    The coastal upwelling system offshore Namibia is ideally suited to address a focal question of the Integrated Marine Biogeochemistry and Ecosystem Research Programme: what are the mechanisms that drive long-term changes in ecosystems? Considerable interannual variability in climatic forcing is indicated by long time series of meteorological and remote sensing observation; these accompany considerable interannual to interdecadal changes in the upwelling intensity over the last 100 years, as well as a centennial trend. On longer time scales, the only archives available are sediment records spanning the late Holocene. To decipher the sediment record, we mapped surface-sediment patterns of proxies for physical (sea surface temperature/SST from alkenone unsaturation indexes) and nutrient (δ15N on bulk sedimentary N) variables. Their present-day surface-sediment patterns outline the coastal upwelling cells and filaments and associated high productivity area. Analysed in an array of dated sediment cores, the spatial patterns of SST suggest long-term (>100 years) variability in the location and intensity of individual upwelling cells. The patterns of δ15N outline an area of intense denitrification near the coast, and advection of water with low-oxygen concentrations in the undercurrent from the North. δ15N exhibits considerable downcore variability, in particular over the last 50 years. The variability appears to be governed by differences in extent of denitrification and thus of the shelf oxygen balance, which appears to have deteriorated in the last 50 years. Together, the data suggest that SST and denitrification conditions have remained in the narrow bounds outlined by today’s patterns in surface sediments, but that spatially small variability in upwelling intensity and make-up of upwelling feed waters induced considerable changes in the lower trophic levels of the coastal upwelling ecosystem over the last 6,000 years. Attempts to correlate proxy records from

  15. Influence of ENSO-Related Wind Stress Variability on the Coastal Upwelling off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaringa, E. E.; Campos, E. J.; Lentini, C. A.

    2005-05-01

    The Eastern Tropical and Subtropical Pacific, particularly the coastal region off the western South America, is negatively affected by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. The rise of coastal sea temperatures due to the weakening of coastal upwelling causes the reduction of important fish stocks and other coastal resources of economical significance, especially the sardine and anchovy populations. Here, variability in the intensity of upwelling along the Peruvian coast is studied using monthly means of the ERS-1 and ERS-2 scatterometer wind stress. In the study area, the Trade Winds blow predominantly parallel to the coast, making the upwelling system highly sensitive to variability in the intensity of the wind stress. On its turn, the wind stress intensity is expected to suffer strong variation during ENSO periods. In our ongoing work we try to understand the relationship between coastal upwelling and different ENSO events in the 1991-2000 decade. In this period, two warm events where observed, the relatively weaker 1991-1994 and the stronger 97-98 El Niños. In both cases we found that in the region from 12°S to 3°S, the intensity of alongshore wind stress is reduced considerably, with the coastal upwelled waters being replaced by warmer waters. On the other hand, in the region between 12°S and 19°S the coastal upwelling maintains its intensity because only the cross-shore component of the wind stress was reduced. With respect to the two cold events, the 1996-1997 and the 1998-2000 La Niñas, the intensity of the alongshore windstress was higher than the climatological values. This resulted in more intense upwelling in the entire region.

  16. Trends in coastal upwelling intensity during the late 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Narayan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents linear trends of coastal upwelling intensity in the later part of the 20th century (1960–2001 employing various indices of upwelling, derived from meridional wind stress and sea surface temperature. The analysis was conducted in the four major coastal upwelling regions in the world, which are off North-West Africa, Lüderitz, California and Peru. The trends in meridional wind stress showed a steady increase of intensity from 1960–2001, which was also reflected in the SST index calculated for the same time period. The steady cooling observed in the instrumental records of SST off California substantiated this observation further. It was also noted that the trends in meridional wind stress obtained from different datasets differ substantially from each other. Correlation analysis showed that basin-scale oscillations like the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO could not be directly linked to the observed increase of upwelling intensity off NW Africa and California respectively. The relationship of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO with coastal upwelling off NW Africa turned out to be ambiguous due to a negative correlation between the NAO index and the meridional wind stress and a lack of correlation with the SST index. Our results give additional support to the hypothesis that the coastal upwelling intensity increases globally because of raising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and an associated increase of the land-sea pressure gradient and meridional wind stress.

  17. Imprint of external climate forcing on coastal upwelling in past and future climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems are the major coastal upwelling regions. The trade winds are driving these upwelling regimes located in the subtropics at the eastern boundary of the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. Here we analyse the impact of the external climate forcing, e.g. the greenhouse gas concentration, solar activity and volcano eruptions, on these upwelling systems in simulations of ensembles of two Earth System Models. The ensembles contain three simulations for each time period which cover the past millennium (900–1850, the 20th century (1850–2005 and the near future (2006–2100. Using a set of simulations, differing only in their initial conditions, enables us to detect whether the variability is driven internally or externally. Our analysis shows that the variability of the simulated upwelling is to the most driven internally and that there are no significant trends except for the scenario with the most dramatic increase of greenhouse gas concentrations.

  18. Combined impact of ocean acidification and corrosive waters in a river-influenced coastal upwelling area off Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, C.; De La Hoz, M.; San Martin, V.; Contreras, P.; Navarro, J. M.; Lagos, N. A.; Lardies, M.; Manríquez, P. H.; Torres, R.

    2012-12-01

    organic matter due to natural or anthropogenically stimulated respiration processes within river basin may impact the coastal ocean. Furthermore, the upwelling of corrosive subsurface waters might also undersaturate coastal waters with respect to aragonite. In addition, by using a mesocosm system to simulate different pH and CO2 levels we have evaluate under controlled conditions the effect of ocean acidification on the larval stage of an economically-important gastropod species (Concholepas concholepas). In this presentation, we show some preliminary results using multi-source data from different research projects dealing with the carbon cycle and OA processes along Chilean coast. Funded by Project RIVOM (Fondecyt 1095069), Project TOA-SPACE (Fondecyt 1090624), and Project Anillo ACT132 (CONICYT).

  19. Winter conditioning of the Cascadian margin upwelling system: Remote forcing and coastal river influences (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, B. R.; Goni, M. A.; Evans, W.; Harris, K. E.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Skyllingstad, E. D.; Wall, C.; Wetz, M.; White, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Cascadian margin stretches along the North American Pacific coast from Cape Mendocino to Vancouver Island, and across the land-ocean margin from the crest of the coastal mountains to the California Current. Carbonate system chemistry in these coastal waters is among the most dynamic in the world, with high net community productivity driving the system to a regionally important CO2 sink, while upwelled, respiration-influenced waters carry such elevated CO2 that they are often corrosive to biogenic carbonates. Most of the focus on this ecosystem has been on the influence of the seasonal upwelling and interaction with the upper thermocline of the ocean interior; recently, however, the downwelling-season has been recognized as critical in shaping the carbon cycling of the ecosystem. We present a combination of in-water survey and mooring data from river, estuary, and shelf waters; remote-sensing of coastal surface waters and watershed precipitation; and modeling results describing the physics of coastal circulation and storm-event precipitation and river discharge that shows how the winter conditions control carbon cycling. Coastally-trapped internal waves propagating northward from remote upwelling regions to the south lead to shoaling of the pycnocline such that upwelled source waters are present far inshore of the shelfbreak months before the onset of upwelling favorable winds. The close proximity of upwelled source waters to inner shelf upwelling locations leads to rapid transition in response to late winter and early spring upwelling favorable wind events. Winter storms and closely coupled flooding events deliver regionally significant amounts of nutrient-rich, low-CO2 fresh waters to the coastal ocean during downwelling conditions that retain these inputs on the shelf, and this fuels phytoplankton blooms that are a significant contribution to the annual net community production. These blooms and river influences maintain low coastal surface water pCO2 during

  20. Intraseasonal coastal upwelling signal along the southern coast of Java observed using Indonesian tidal station data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Takanori; Ueki, Iwao; Syamsudin, Fadli; Sofian, Ibnu; Ando, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    Sea level variations along the coasts of Sumatra and Java were investigated to determine the coastal upwelling signal that is linked to local sea surface temperature (SST) variability. We used Indonesian tidal station data together with satellite SST data and atmospheric reanalysis data. The sea level variations along the southern coast of Java have a significant coherence with remote wind, local wind, and local SST variations, with an intraseasonal time scale of 20-50 days. Assuming that a coastal upwelling signal would appear as a sea level drop (SLD), we focused on intraseasonal-scale SLD events in the data. Significant upwelling signals are frequently observed during both the boreal summer and winter. To evaluate the impact of the coastal upwelling on local SST, we examined statistical relationships between sea level and SST variations. The results demonstrated that events that occurred during April-August were associated with local SST cooling. The horizontal distribution of the SST cooling was analogous with annual mean SST, suggesting the importance of intraseasonal-scale coastal upwelling in forming the climatic conditions of the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean.

  1. Influence of upwelling on distribution of chaetognath (zooplankton) in the oxygen deficient zone of the eastern Arabian Sea.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kusum, K.K.; Vineetha, G.; Raveendran, T.V.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Biju, A.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    in the coastal upwelling and coastal transition zones off central-southern Chile (35-40°S). Prog. Oceanogr. 92-95C, 1-7. Escribano, R., Hidalgo, P., Fuentes, M., Donoso, K., 2012. Zooplankton time series in the coastal zone of Chile: Variation in upwelling...., 2010. Patterns of copepod diversity in the Chilean coastal upwelling system. Deep-Sea Res. II 57, 2089-2097. Hidalgo, P., Escribano, R., Fuentes, M., Jorquera, E., Vergara, O., 2012. How coastal upwelling influences spatial patterns of size...

  2. Winter coastal upwelling off northwest Borneo in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yunwei; LING Zheng; CHEN Changlin

    2015-01-01

    Winter coastal upwelling off northwest Borneo in the South China Sea (SCS) is investigated by using satellite data, climatological temperature and salinity fields and reanalysis data. The upwelling forms in Decem-ber, matures in January, starts to decay in February and almost disappears in March. Both Ekman trans-port induced by the alongshore winter monsoon and Ekman pumping due to orographic wind stress curl are favorable for the upwelling. Transport estimates demonstrate that the month-to-month variability of Ekman transport and Ekman pumping are both consistent with that of winter coastal upwelling, but Ek-man transport is two times larger than Ekman pumping in January and February. Under the influence of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the upwelling shows remarkable interannual variability: during winter of El Niño (La Niña) years, an anticyclonic (a cyclonic) wind anomaly is established in the SCS, which behaves a northeasterly (southwesterly) anomaly and a positive (negative) wind stress curl anomaly off the north-west Borneo coast, enhancing (reducing) the upwelling and causing anomalous surface cooling (warming) and higher (lower) chlorophyll concentration. The sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) associated with ENSO off the northwest Borneo coast has an opposite phase to that off southeast Vietnam, resulting in a SSTA seesaw pattern in the southern SCS in winter.

  3. Spatio-temporal trends in coastal upwelling across NW Africa, 1981-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, Thomas; Hanna, Edward; Bigg, Grant

    2013-04-01

    In the early 1990's it was hypothesized that coastal upwelling across the eastern boundary currents may increase as a result of global warming. Since then, numerous studies have sought to elucidate the spatial and temporal trends in coastal upwelling intensity. Across the Canary Current (10-36°N), a conflicting signal (i.e. a positive/negative/no trend) in published results has emerged. We surmise this to be the consequence of (1) minor methodological differences, (2) differences in the temporal periods considered (intra- and inter-annual) and (3) the use of different data sets/sources. Here, we present seasonal upwelling estimates across the most recent 30-year climatic 'normal' period (1981-2010) based on the more commonly used wind stress and sea-surface temperature (SST) methodologies, and reinforce this analysis with traditionally 'lesser-used' sources (including sea-surface height, horizontal current velocity and vertical water column motion). For the wind-stress upwelling index we use six data sources (ERA-Interim, NCEP/NCAR, 20CR, PFEL, ICOADS and MERRA) and for the SST index we use three (HadISST, Reynolds OISST and ICOADS). We also utilize the sparse coastal meteorological and tide-gauge stations scattered across the NW African coastline. Additionally, we examine sea-surface height data from four sources (AVISO, GODAS, SODA and GRACE), horizontal current velocity from two sources (GODAS, SODA) and vertical water column motion from the GODAS dataset as further proxies for upwelling estimation. Generally, across summer, the numerous indices correlate reasonably well and display consistent spatial patterns and the same year-to-year oscillations, although the trend directions across the entire period sometimes diverge. Nevertheless, we conclude there is enough corroborating evidence to suggest there is a positive (negative) tendency in upwelling poleward (equatorward) of 20°N, but are cautious that these trends aren't ubiquitously significant. We suggest

  4. Laboratory Modelling of the Dynamics of Coastal Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-28

    such regions. standing features. as described above. should be absent. instead a uniform upwelled front and associated traveling frontal-eddies...Argote. E.M.L., Amador. B.A. and Barton. E.D.. 1978. Mediciones de vientos. corrientes e hidrografia frente a Punto Colonet. B.C. En Junio 1976. CICESE...the distance of the downstream standing waves bre from the cape were considerably smaller. by As in our previous experiment, travelling baroclinic waves

  5. Aragonite saturation state dynamics in a coastal upwelling zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Katherine E.; Degrandpre, Michael D.; Hales, Burke

    2013-06-01

    upwelling zones may be at enhanced risk from ocean acidification as upwelling brings low aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) waters to the surface that are further suppressed by anthropogenic CO2. ΩAr was calculated with pH, pCO2, and salinity-derived alkalinity time series data from autonomous pH and pCO2 instruments moored on the Oregon shelf and shelf break during different seasons from 2007 to 2011. Surface ΩAr values ranged between 0.66 ± 0.04 and 3.9 ± 0.04 compared to an estimated pre-industrial range of 1.0 ± 0.1 to 4.7 ± 0.1. Upwelling of high-CO2 water and subsequent removal of CO2 by phytoplankton imparts a dynamic range to ΩAr from ~1.0 to ~4.0 between spring and autumn. Freshwater input also suppresses saturation states during the spring. Winter ΩAr is less variable than during other seasons and is controlled primarily by mixing of the water column.

  6. Net primary productivity, upwelling and coastal currents in the Gulf of Ulloa, Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Rodríguez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Gulf of Ulloa, a highly productive area off the western coast of Baja California Peninsula, is examined for five successive years (2003–2007 by using satellite data and seasonal net primary productivity estimates obtained by a vertical generalized production model. The results clearly identify a seasonal signal of coastal upwelling in productivity estimates. Highest values occur from May to June and sometimes July. We also find influence of an equatorward coastal current able of transporting water from neighboring north upwelling areas to the Gulf of Ulloa in winter–spring. This flow contributes to increase the seasonal net primary productivity. The opposite occurs in summer, when a warm poleward current of tropical characteristics arrives to the region. Our findings reveal that such warm coastal current suppressed the productivity in the whole.

  7. Diatoms Si uptake capacity drives carbon export in coastal upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Fatima; Cermeno, Pedro; Lopes, Cristina; Romero, Oscar; Matos, Lélia; Van Iperen, Jolanda; Rufino, Marta; Magalhães, Vitor

    2016-07-01

    Coastal upwelling systems account for approximately half of global ocean primary production and contribute disproportionately to biologically driven carbon sequestration. Diatoms, silica-precipitating microalgae, constitute the dominant phytoplankton in these productive regions, and their abundance and assemblage composition in the sedimentary record is considered one of the best proxies for primary production. The study of the sedimentary diatom abundance (SDA) and total organic carbon content (TOC) in the five most important coastal upwelling systems of the modern ocean (Iberia-Canary, Benguela, Peru-Humboldt, California, and Somalia-Oman) reveals a global-scale positive relationship between diatom production and organic carbon burial. The analysis of SDA in conjunction with environmental variables of coastal upwelling systems such as upwelling strength, satellite-derived net primary production, and surface water nutrient concentrations shows different relations between SDA and primary production on the regional scale. On the global scale, SDA appears modulated by the capacity of diatoms to take up silicic acid, which ultimately sets an upper limit to global export production in these ocean regions.

  8. Models of oxic respiration, denitrification and sulfate reduction in zones of coastal upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, D. E.

    2006-12-01

    Coastal upwelling zones support some of the highest rates of primary production in the oceans. The settling and subsequent decomposition of this organic matter promotes oxygen depletion. In the Eastern tropical North and South Pacific and the Arabian Sea, large tracts of anoxic water develop, where intensive N 2 production through denitrification and anammox accounts for about 1/3 of the total loss of fixed nitrogen in the marine realm. It is curious that despite extensive denitrification in these waters, complete nitrate removal and the onset of sulfate reduction is extremely rare. A simple box model is constructed here to reproduce the dynamics of carbon, oxygen and nutrient cycling in coastal upwelling zones. The model is constructed with five boxes, where water is exchanged between the boxes by vertical and horizontal mixing and advection. These primary physical drivers control the dynamics of the system. The model demonstrates that in the absence of nitrogen fixation, the anoxic waters in a coastal upwelling system will not become nitrate free. This is because nitrate is the limiting nutrient controlling primary production, and if nitrate concentration becomes too low, primary production rate drops and this reduces rates of nitrate removal through N 2 production. With nitrogen fixation, however, complete nitrate depletion can occur and sulfate reduction will ensue. This situation is extremely rare in coastal upwelling zones, probably because nitrogen-fixing bacteria do not prosper in the high nutrient, turbid waters as typically in these areas. Finally, it is predicted here that the chemistry of the upwelling system will develop in a similar matter regardless whether N 2 production is dominated by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or canonical heterotrophic denitrification.

  9. Tomographic mapping of a coastal upwelling and the associated diurnal internal tides in Hiroshima Bay, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzheng; Kaneko, Arata; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Gohda, Noriaki

    2015-06-01

    Temperature variations caused by a typhoon were measured in the northern part of Hiroshima Bay by four coastal acoustic tomography (CAT) systems. The horizontal distributions of depth-averaged temperature from 0 to 8 m were mapped at 10 min intervals between the 11 and 25 September 2013. The horizontal distributions of a coastal upwelling and the associated diurnal internal tides were reconstructed well by regularized inversion based on the grid segmented method, using one-way travel time data along five successful sound transmission lines. Station-to-station ranges were corrected in such a way that sound speed (determined from one-way travel time data) was equal to sound speed calculated from a couple of CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) data sets on each transmission line. In addition, all station positions were adjusted to make focal points at the geographical positions of the transducers. The corrections increased the accuracy of temperature measurements to make temperature errors as small as 0.073-0.079°C. The high accuracy made it possible to map the temperature structure with a variation range of less than 0.5°C. An upwelling grew from 16 to 17 September, due to a typhoon-derived northerly wind. The diurnal internal tide resonated with the semidiurnal external tide, which was pronounced after the upwelling decayed (18 September), around the time the spring tide occurred. The upwelling and mixing fractions were formulated. These fractions increased continuously as the upwelling grew. Complete mixing was observed during the upwelling's mature phase.

  10. Coastal upwelling fluxes of O2, N2O, and CO2 assessed from continuous atmospheric observations at Trinidad, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Lueker

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous atmospheric records of O2/N2, CO2 and N2O obtained at Trinidad, California document the effects of air-sea exchange during coastal upwelling and plankton bloom events. The atmospheric records provide continuous observations of air-sea fluxes related to synoptic scale upwelling events over several upwelling seasons. Combined with satellite, buoy and local meteorology data, calculated anomalies in O2/N2 and N2O were utilized in a simple atmospheric transport model to compute air-sea fluxes during coastal upwelling. CO2 fluxes were linked to the oceanic component of the O2 fluxes through local hydrographic data and estimated as a function of upwelling intensity (surface ocean temperature and wind speed. Regional air-sea fluxes of O2/N2, N2O, and CO2 during coastal upwelling were estimated with the aid of satellite wind and SST data. Upwelling CO2 fluxes were found to represent ~10% of export production along the northwest coast of North America. Synoptic scale upwelling events impact the net exchange of atmospheric CO2 along the coastal margin, and will vary in response to the frequency and duration of alongshore winds that are subject to climate change.

  11. Fish larvae retention linked to abrupt bathymetry at Mejillones Bay (northern Chile during coastal upwelling events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M Rojas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of oceanic circulation and bathymetry on the fish larvae retention inside Mejillones Bay, northern Chile, was examined. Fish larvae were collected during two coastal upwelling events in November 1999 and January 2000. An elevated fish larvae accumulation was found near an oceanic front and a zone of low-speed currents. Three groups of fish larvae were identified: the coastal species (Engraulis ringens and Sardinops sagax, associated with high chlorophyll-a levels; larvae from the families Phosichthyidae (Vinciguerria lucetia and Myctophidae (Diogenichthys laternatus and Triphoturus oculeus, associated with the thermocline (12°C, and finally, larvae of the families Myctophidae (Diogenichthys atlanticus and Bathylagidae (Bathylagus nigrigenys, associated with high values of temperature and salinity. The presence of a seamount and submarine canyon inside Mejillones Bay appears to play an important role in the circulation during seasonal upwelling events. We propose a conceptual model of circulation and particles retention into Mejillones Bay. The assumption is that during strong upwelling conditions the flows that move along the canyon emerge in the centre of Mejillones Bay, producing a fish larvae retention zone. Understanding the biophysical interactions responsible to trap and/or concentrate particles is essential to protect these fragile upwelling ecosystems.

  12. Jet stream intraseasonal oscillations drive dominant ecosystem variations in Oregon's summertime coastal upwelling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, John M; Spitz, Yvette H; Letelier, Ricardo M; Peterson, William T

    2007-08-14

    Summertime wind stress along the coast of the northwestern United States typically exhibits intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) with periods from approximately 15 to 40 days, as well as fluctuations on the 2- to 6-day "weather-band" and 1-day diurnal time scales. Coastal upwelling of cool, nutrient-rich water is driven by extended periods of equatorward alongshore winds, and we show that the approximately 20-day ISOs in alongshore wind stress dominated the upwelling process during summer 2001 off Oregon. These wind stress ISOs resulted from north-south positional ISOs of the atmospheric jet stream (JS). Upper-ocean temperature, phytoplankton, and zooplankton varied principally on the approximately 20-day time scale as well, and these correlated with the ISOs in alongshore wind stress and JS position, even though there also were weather-band stress fluctuations of comparable magnitude. Such wind stress ISOs are typical along Oregon in the summer upwelling season, occurring in 10 of 12 years examined, including 2001. We present a previously unreported direct connection from the atmospheric JS to oceanic primary and secondary production on the intraseasonal time scale and show the leading importance of ISOs in driving this coastal upwelling ecosystem during a typical summer.

  13. Numerical modeling experiments of coastal upwelling at the field of Arctic fjords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosecki, Szymon; Dzierzbicka-Głowacka, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Coastal upwelling is a well described, known phenomenon in theory. Nowadays there is more and more both environmental and modeling studies about it. Upwelling especially in the Arctic fjords is a process that strongly affects hydrodynamics and even more ecosystems. It is so important, that it brings detailed question about effects and needed wind driven forcing parameters. My modeling experiment studies were strongly different than the studies that are typically carried out using numerical models. Instead of searching for this phenomenon in modeled analysis or environmental data, I did several case scenarios simulations. For those I used statistically selected wind data measured in-stiu. The hi-resolution coastal mapping, the flexible mesh discretization method and the sigma-layered three dimensional model MIKE 3 by DHI allowed me to explore this phenomenon with very good accuracy. This studies have been done in Institute of Oceanology PAS in Sopot, as a part of Centre for Polar Studies.

  14. Shifts between gelatinous and crustacean plankton in a coastal upwelling region

    OpenAIRE

    Bode, A.; Álvarez-Ossorio-Costa, M.T. (María Teresa); Miranda, A; Ruiz-villarreal, M

    2013-01-01

    proyectos RADIALES (IEO) y EURO-BASIN (Ref. 264933, 7FP) Variability in the dominance of copepods vs. gelatinous plankton was analysed using monthly time-series covering the last 55 years and related to changes in climatic, oceanographic, and fishery conditions in the upwelling region of Galicia (NW Spain). Seasonality was generally the main component of variability in all groups, both along the coast and in the nearby ocean, but no common long-term trend was found. Coastal copepo...

  15. Coastal upwelling and downwelling forcing of circulation in a semi-enclosed bay: Ria de Vigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, E. D.; Largier, J. L.; Torres, R.; Sheridan, M.; Trasviña, A.; Souza, A.; Pazos, Y.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2015-05-01

    Semi-enclosed bays in upwelling regions are exposed to forcing related to winds, currents and buoyancy over the shelf. The influence of this external forcing is moderated by factors such as connectivity to the open ocean, shelter by surrounding topography, dimensions of the bay, and freshwater outflows. Such bays, preferred locations for ports, mariculture, marine industry, recreational activities and coastal settlement, present a range of characteristics, understanding of which is necessary to their rational management. Observations in such a semi-enclosed bay, the Ria de Vigo in Spain, are used to characterize the influence of upwelling and downwelling pulses on its circulation. In this location, near the northern limit of the Iberian upwelling system, upwelling events dominate during a short summer season and downwelling events the rest of the year. The ria response to the external forcing is central to nutrient supply and resultant plankton productivity that supports its high level of cultured mussel production. Intensive field studies in September 2006 and June 2007 captured a downwelling event and an upwelling event, respectively. Data from eight current profiler moorings and boat-based MiniBat/ADCP surveys provided an unprecedented quasi-synoptic view of the distribution of water masses and circulation patterns in any ria. In the outer ria, circulation was dominated by the introduction of wind-driven alongshore flow from the external continental shelf through the ria entrances and its interaction with the topography. In the middle ria, circulation was primarily related to the upwelling/downwelling cycle, with a cool, salty and dense lower layer penetrating to the inner ria during upwelling over the shelf. A warmer, lower salinity and less dense surface layer of coastal waters flowed inward during downwelling. Without external forcing, the inner ria responded primarily to tides and buoyancy changes related to land runoff. Under both upwelling and downwelling

  16. Coastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007

    KAUST Repository

    Schnetzer, Astrid

    2013-06-10

    Harmful algal blooms dominated by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have become a perennial but variable event within surface waters near the greater Los Angeles area. Toxic blooms during spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 varied strongly in their overall toxicity and duration. Differences in bloom dynamics were linked to differences in storm-induced river discharge following episodic rain events and coastal upwelling, both major coastal processes that led to the injection of nutrients into coastal surface waters. Heavy river runoff during early 2005, a record-rainfall year, favored a phytoplankton community mainly comprised of algal taxa other than Pseudo-nitzschia. The spring bloom during 2005 was associated with low domoic acid surface concentrations and minor contributions of (mainly) P. delicatissima to the diatom assemblage. In contrast, highly toxic P. australis-dominated blooms during spring seasons of 2006 and 2007 were linked to strong upwelling events. River discharge quotas in 2006 and 2007, in contrast to 2005, fell well below annual averages for the region. Surface toxin levels were linked to colder, more saline (i.e. upwelled) water over the 3-year study, but no such consistent relationship between domoic acid levels and other physiochemical parameters, such as macronutrient concentrations or nutrient ratios, was observed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  17. Biogenic halocarbons from coastal oceanic upwelling regions as tropospheric halogen source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Kirstin; Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Hepach, Helmke; Fiehn, Alina; Atlas, Elliot; Quack, Birgit

    2016-04-01

    Halogenated very short lived substances (VSLS) are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. Recently, oceanic upwelling regions in the tropical East Atlantic were identified as strong sources of brominated halocarbons to the troposphere. During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) were investigated above the Peruvian Upwelling for the first time. This study presents novel observations of the three VSLS bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide together with high resolution meteorological measurements and Lagrangian transport modelling. Although relatively low oceanic emissions were observed, except for methyl iodide, surface atmospheric abundances were elevated. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting both as strong barriers for convection and trace gas transport in this region. Significant correlations between observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height were found. We used a simple source-loss estimate to identify the contribution of oceanic emissions to observed atmospheric concentrations which revealed that the observed marine VSLS abundances were dominated by horizontal advection below the trade inversion. The observed VSLS variations can be explained by the low emissions and their accumulation under different MABL and trade inversion conditions. Finally, observations from a second Peruvian Upwelling cruise with R/V SONNE during El Nino in October 2015 will be compared to highlight the role of different El Nino Southern Oscillation conditions. This study confirms the importance of coastal oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on creating effective transport barriers in the lowermost atmosphere controlling the distribution of VSLS abundances above coastal ocean upwelling

  18. Phytoplankton community and environmental correlates in a coastal upwelling zone along western Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Jian-hua; Ye, You-yin; Lin, Geng-ming; Yang, Qing-liang; Lin, Mao

    2016-02-01

    Upwelling system in western Taiwan Strait is important for facilitating the fishery production. This study investigated hydro-chemical properties, phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton species composition, three-dimensional (horizontal, vertical and transect) distribution of phytoplankton abundance, as well as phytoplankton annual variation and the correlation of phytoplankton community with the upwelling of underlying current and nutrients according to samples of Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling zone in western Taiwan Strait from August 27 to September 8, 2009. The results manifest that the nutrient-rich cold and high salinity current on the continental shelf of South China Sea upwells to the Fujian-Guangdong coastal waters through Taiwan Bank and the surging strength to surface is weak while strong at 30-m layer. The thermohaline center of coastal upwelling shifts to the east of Dongshan Island and expanded to offshore waters in comparison with previous records. A total of 137 phytoplankton species belonging to 59 genera in 4 phyla are identified excluding the unidentified species. Diatom is the first major group and followed by dinoflagellate. Cyanobacteria mainly composed by three Trichodesmium species account for a certain proportions, while Chrysophyta are only found in offshore waters. The dominant species include Thalassionema nitzschioides, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Thalassionema frauenfeldii, Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima, Rhizosolenia styliformis, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Diplopsalis lenticula and Trichodesmium thiebautii. Phytoplankton community mainly consists of eurythermal and eurytopic species, followed by warm-water species, tropic high-salinity species and oceanic eurythermic species in order. Phytoplankton abundance ranges from 1.00 × 102 ind./L ~ 437.22 × 102 ind./L with an average of 47.36 × 102 ind./L. For vertical distribution, maximum abundance is found at 30 m-depth and the surface comes second. Besides, the abundance below 30 m

  19. Influence of external climate forcing on coastal upwelling systems analysed in ensemble of past millennium climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim, Nele; Zorita, Eduardo; Hünicke, Birgit; Yi, Xin; Emeis, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems are highly productive coastal ocean areas where nutrient rich, cold water upwells by the action of favorable winds. Observations over the 20th century and ocean sediment records, which may be indicative of upwelling, display an intensification due to stronger external climate forcing, such as increasing greenhouse gas concentrations or changes in solar irradiance. This intensification is compatible with the hypothesis put forward by Bakun (1990) that a stronger external radiative forcing should lead to a more intense coastal upwelling. Here, we analyze ensemble of simulations covering the past millennium with the aim of identifying and quantifying the role of external climate forcing on upwelling in the major Eastern Boundary Upwelling System. We analyse the decadal variability and centennial trends of upwelling in ensemble of simulations with the global climate model MPI-ESM covering the past millennium, the last 150 years and the next 100 years. The future simulations were driven by three IPCC scenarios of concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, RCP2.5, RCP4.5 and RCP 8.5. For the past millennium and the last 150 years, coastal upwelling does not show any imprint of external forcing. This result indicates that chaotic internal variability has dominated upwelling intensity in major upwelling regions over the last thousand years and even since industrialisation up to present. For the 21st century, all ensemble members show a consistent and significant intensification of upwelling in the strongest scenario RCP8.5 for the Benguela upwelling region, consistent and significant weakening for Morocco and California, and no significant change for the Peruvian upwelling. Weaker scenarios do not produce consistent long-term trends that are replicated in all ensemble members. The results are confirmed by analysing another ensemble of past millennium simulations with the model CESM-CAM5 (Community Earth System Model

  20. Wind-driven coastal upwelling and westward circulation in the Yucatan shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castillo, Eugenio; Gomez-Valdes, Jose; Sheinbaum, Julio; Rioja-Nieto, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    The wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in a large shelf sea with a zonally oriented coast are examined. The Yucatan shelf is located to the north of the Yucatan peninsula in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. This area is a tropical shallow body of water with a smooth sloping bottom and is one of the largest shelves in the world. This study describes the wind-driven circulation and wind-induced coastal upwelling in the Yucatan shelf, which is forced by easterly winds throughout the year. Data obtained from hydrographic surveys, acoustic current profilers and environmental satellites are used in the analysis. Hydrographic data was analyzed and geostrophic currents were calculated in each survey. In addition an analytical model was applied to reproduce the currents. The results of a general circulation model were used with an empirical orthogonal function analysis to study the variability of the currents. The study area is divided in two regions: from the 40 m to the 200 m isobaths (outer shelf) and from the coast to the 40 m isobath (inner shelf). At the outer shelf, observations revealed upwelling events throughout the year, and a westward current with velocities of approximately 0.2 m s-1 was calculated from the numerical model output and hydrographic data. In addition, the theory developed by Pedlosky (2007) for a stratified fluid along a sloping bottom adequately explains the current's primary characteristics. The momentum of the current comes from the wind, and the stratification is an important factor in its dynamics. At the inner shelf, observations and numerical model output show a wind-driven westward current with maximum velocities of 0.20 m s-1. The momentum balance in this region is between local acceleration and friction. A cold-water band is developed during the period of maximum upwelling.

  1. Particle fluxes in the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system: Hydrodynamical and biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, D.; Villacieros-Robineau, N.; Salgueiro, E.; Alonso-Pérez, F.; Rosón, G.; Abrantes, F.; Castro, C. G.

    2016-07-01

    To better understand sources and transport of particulate material in the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system, a mooring line dotted with an automated PPS 4/3 sediment trap was deployed off Cape Silleiro at the base of the photic zone. The samples were collected from November 2008 through June 2012 over sampling periods of 4-12 days. Our study represents the first automated sediment trap database for the NW Iberian margin. The magnitude and composition of the settling material showed strong seasonal variability with the highest fluxes during the poleward and winter mixing periods (averages of 12.9±9.6 g m-2 d-1 and 5.6±5.6 g m-2 d-1 respectively), and comparatively lower fluxes (3.6±4.1 g m-2 d-1) for the upwelling season. Intensive deposition events registered during poleward and winter mixing periods were dominated by the lithogenic fraction (80±3%). They were associated to high energy wave-driven resuspension processes, due to the occurrence of south-westerly storms, and intense riverine inputs of terrestrial material from Minho and Douro rivers. On the other hand, during the spring - summer upwelling season, the share of biogenic compounds (organic matter, calcium carbonate (CaCO3), biogenic silica (bSiO2)) to downward fluxes was higher, reflecting an increase in pelagic sedimentation due to the seasonal intensification of primary production and negligible river inputs and wave-driven resuspended material. Otherwise, the large variations of biogenic settling particles were mainly modulated by upwelling intensity, which by means of upwelling filaments ultimately controlled the offshore transport of the organic carbon fixed by primary producers towards the adjacent ocean. Based on the average downward flux of organic carbon (212 mg C m-2 d-1) and considering an average primary production of 1013 mg C m-2 d-1 from literature, we estimated that about 21% of the fixed carbon is vertically exported during the upwelling season.

  2. Coastal upwelling supplies oxygen-depleted water to the Columbia River estuary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Curtis Roegner

    Full Text Available Low dissolved oxygen (DO is a common feature of many estuarine and shallow-water environments, and is often attributed to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment from terrestrial-fluvial pathways. However, recent events in the U.S. Pacific Northwest have highlighted that wind-forced upwelling can cause naturally occurring low DO water to move onto the continental shelf, leading to mortalities of benthic fish and invertebrates. Coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest are strongly linked to ocean forcings, and here we report observations on the spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentration in the Columbia River estuary. Hydrographic measurements were made from transect (spatial survey or anchor station (temporal survey deployments over a variety of wind stresses and tidal states during the upwelling seasons of 2006 through 2008. During this period, biologically stressful levels of dissolved oxygen were observed to enter the Columbia River estuary from oceanic sources, with minimum values close to the hypoxic threshold of 2.0 mg L(-1. Riverine water was consistently normoxic. Upwelling wind stress controlled the timing and magnitude of low DO events, while tidal-modulated estuarine circulation patterns influenced the spatial extent and duration of exposure to low DO water. Strong upwelling during neap tides produced the largest impact on the estuary. The observed oxygen concentrations likely had deleterious behavioral and physiological consequences for migrating juvenile salmon and benthic crabs. Based on a wind-forced supply mechanism, low DO events are probably common to the Columbia River and other regional estuaries and if conditions on the shelf deteriorate further, as observations and models predict, Pacific Northwest estuarine habitats could experience a decrease in environmental quality.

  3. Joint effect of freshwater plume and coastal upwelling on phytoplankton growth off the Changjiang River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-F. Tseng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Changjiang River discharges vast amount of unbalanced nutrients (dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P with N / P > 80 in general into the East China Sea during summertime. To explore nutrient dynamics and P stress potential for phytoplankton, a cruise was conducted in the Changjiang plume during summer 2011. With 3-D observations of nutrients, chlorophyll a (Chl a, and bulk alkaline phosphatase activity (APA, we concluded that the Changjiang Diluted Water (CDW and coastal upwelling significantly influenced the horizontal and vertical heterogeneities of phytoplankton P-deficiency in the plume. Allochthonous APA was detected at nutrient-enriched freshwater end. Excessive N (~10 to 112 µM was obserevd throughout the entire plume surface. In the plume fringe where featured by stratification and excess N, diapycnal phosphate supply was blocked to stimulate APA for phytoplankton growth. We observed upwelling outcrops just attaching the turbidity front at seaward side, where Chl a peaked yet much less APA was detected. An external phosphate supply from subsurface, which stimulated phytoplankton growth but inhibited APA, was suggested and the supply was likely sourced from the Nearshore Kuroshio Branch Current. In such hydrographically complicated Changjiang plume, phosphate supply instead of its concentration was more important determining the expression of APA. Meanwhile, allochthounous APA may also alter the usefulness of APA as a P-stress indicator.

  4. Microzooplankton feeding impact in a coastal upwelling system on the NW Iberian margin: The Ría de Vigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Isabel G.; Figueiras, Francisco G.; Crespo, Bibiana G.; Piedracoba, Sílvia

    2011-01-01

    The dilution technique, combined with identification and enumeration of pico-, nano- and micro-plankton by microscopy, was used to estimate microzooplankton impact on the microbial community in surface waters of a coastal embayment on the NW Iberian upwelling system. Microzooplankton were important consumers of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton in this system, feeding up to 93% of standing stock and more than 100% of production of several groups. Heterotrophic bacteria and heterotrophic picoflagellates experienced the highest and constant impact, with 75-84% of their standing stocks and 85-102% of their production being channelled through the microbial food web. Pico- and nano-phytoplankton were also consumed, although maximum grazing occurred on diatoms during upwelling events, coinciding with highest primary production. Predation on pico-nano-heterotrophs was especially relevant under downwelling conditions, when consumption of total carbon and particularly autotrophic carbon was considerably lower than during upwelling. The results suggest that the existence of a multivorous food web, extending from the microbial loop to the herbivorous food web, could be a major feature in this coastal upwelling system. The microbial loop, which occurs as a permanent background in the system, would contribute to sustain the microbial food web during downwelling, whereas the herbivorous food web could coexist with a microbial food web based on large diatoms during upwelling. The multivorous food web would partially divert diatoms from sinking and hence favour the retention of organic matter in the water column. This could enhance the energy transfer to higher pelagic trophic levels in coastal upwelling systems.

  5. Arabian Sea upwelling - A comparison between coastal and open ocean regions

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    Flux Studies (JGOFS) programme. Analysis of wind measurements indicated active upwelling along the southwest coast of India, which gradually propagates towards north. While the dominant long-shore component of the wind induces upwelling in the south...

  6. Net primary productivity, upwelling and coastal currents in the Gulf of Ulloa, Baja California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Gulf of Ulloa, a highly productive area off the western coast of the Baja California Peninsula, is examined for five successive years (2003–2007 by using satellite data and seasonal net primary productivity (NPP estimates obtained from a vertical generalised production model. The results identify that northwestern winds blow parallel to the coast throughout the year. However, highest NPP occurs from March to June. During this period, an equatorward coastal current transports water from neighbouring upwelling areas to the northern Gulf of Ulloa and in combination with local upwelling, which injects nutrients into the euphotic zone, produce the observed increase in NPP. The opposite situation occurs in late summer when a warm poleward current of tropical characteristics arrives and inhibits the productivity in the whole region and generates the yearly lowest NPP levels. Our findings reveal the importance of lateral advection in the modulation of the primary productivity in this subtropical upwelling region.

  7. Habitat characteristics influence macrofaunal communities in coralline turf more than mesoscale coastal upwelling on the coast of Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelaher, Brendan P.; Carlos Castilla, Juan

    2005-04-01

    Rocky shore communities are often influenced by near-shore coastal upwelling. For macrofauna in algal turf, these effects may be caused directly by well-studied bottom-up mechanisms or indirectly via changes in habitat structure provided by algal turf associated high nutrient loads. Here, we investigated possible interactions between upwelling and habitat structure by sampling diverse faunal assemblages in coralline algal turf on seven rocky intertidal shores in northern Chile, ranging from El Cobre [23°17'1″S, 70°31'40″W] to La Lobería [23°03'40″S, 70°33'14″W]. Some of these shores were located adjacent to strong upwelling centers, while others were in areas rarely affected. On each shore, we sampled four (2 × 2 m) sites separated by 15-50 m. In each site, we collected three replicate cores (80 mm in diameter) from which we measured macrofauna greater than 850 μm, biomass of sediment and epiphytes, frond density and average frond length. We used mean water temperature and its variation at 1-1.5 m water depth (below Extreme Low Water Spring, ELWS) to represent local upwelling intensity because long-term data have shown that these variables make excellent indicators for this region. In total, we found 94 macrofaunal taxa in coralline turf, which is almost three times higher than has previously been reported in Chile. Although macrofaunal assemblages varied significantly among shores, there were no patterns to suggest mesoscale variation in upwelling intensity affected either faunal assemblages or local habitat characteristics. In contrast, multivariate and univariate correlations highlighted sediment and frond density as strong determinants of community structure. We therefore conclude that traditionally studied habitat characteristics, such as structural complexity and habitat heterogeneity, have greater influence on faunal assemblages in mat-like habitats on rocky shores than environmental variables associated with mesoscale coastal upwelling.

  8. Coastal upwelling fluxes of O2, N2O, and CO2 assessed from continuous atmospheric observations at Trinidad,California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Lueker

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous atmospheric records of O2/N2, CO2 and N2O obtained at Trinidad, California document the effects of air-sea exchange during coastal upwelling and plankton bloom events. The atmospheric records provide continuous observations of air-sea fluxes related to synoptic scale upwelling events over several upwelling seasons. Combined with satellite, buoy and local meteorology data, calculated anomalies in O2/N2 and N2O were utilized in a simple atmospheric transport model to compute air-sea fluxes during coastal upwelling. CO2 fluxes were linked to the oceanic component of the O2 fluxes through local hydrographic data and estimated as a function of upwelling intensity (surface ocean temperature and wind speed. Regional air-sea fluxes of O2/N2O, and CO2 during coastal upwelling were estimated with the aid of satellite wind and SST data. Upwelling CO2 fluxes were found to represent ~10% of export production along the northwest coast of North America. Synoptic scale upwelling events impact the net exchange of atmospheric CO2 along the coastal margin, and will vary in response to the frequency and duration of alongshore winds that are subject to climate change.

  9. Effects of upwelling, tides and biological processes on the inorganic carbon system of a coastal lagoon in Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Ribas, M.; Hernández-Ayón, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V. F.; Cabello-Pasini, A.; Mejia-Trejo, A.; Durazo, R.; Galindo-Bect, S.; Souza, A. J.; Forja, J. M.; Siqueiros-Valencia, A.

    2011-12-01

    The role of coastal lagoons and estuaries as sources or sinks of inorganic carbon in upwelling areas has not been fully understood. During the months of May-July, 2005, we studied the dissolved inorganic carbon system in a coastal lagoon of northwestern Mexico during the strongest period of upwelling events. Along the bay, different scenarios were observed for the distributions of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) as a result of different combinations of upwelling intensity and tidal amplitude. DIC concentrations in the outer part of the bay were controlled by mixing processes. At the inner part of the bay DIC was as low as 1800 μmol kg -1, most likely due to high water residence times and seagrass CO 2 uptake. It is estimated that 85% of San Quintín Bay, at the oceanic end, acted as a source of CO 2 to the atmosphere due to the inflow of CO 2-rich upwelled waters from the neighboring ocean with high positive fluxes higher than 30 mmol C m -2 d -1. In contrast, there was a net uptake of CO 2 and HCO 3- by the seagrass bed Zostera marina in the inner part of the bay, so the pCO 2 in this zone was below the equilibrium value and slightly negative CO 2 fluxes of -6 mmol C m -2 d -1. Our positive NEP and ΔDIC values indicate that Bahía San Quintín was a net autotrophic system during the upwelling season during 2005.

  10. Modelling of upwelling in the coastal area of Cabo Frio (Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Carbonel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1 1/2 reduced-gravity model is proposed to study the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic features of the coastal upwelling area of Cabo Frio (Rio de Janeiro-Brazil. The vertical structure of the model is described by an active layer overlaying a deep inert layer where the pressure gradient is set to zero. For the upper layer, the model includes the turbulent version of the momentum. continuity and heat equations. The conservation of heat is represented by a transport equation to describe the thermodynamic changes of the sea surface temperature (SST. The solution domain includes open boundaries in which weakly-retlective conditions are prescribed. Solutions are found numerically on a uniform grid and the fundamental equations are approximated by the finite difference method. Numerical experiments are performed to evaluate the dynamic response of the coastal area of Cabo Frio forced by uniform and non-uniform wind fields. The solutions differ considerably depending on the orientation of the winds. East and northeast winds correlate with colder waters in the zonal coastline of this area and the presence of tlows toward Cabo Frio correlates with north wind components. The proposed model is validated with the numerical simulation of an observed event of upwelling, where a time­-dependent and non-uniform wind ficld develops a SST pattern similar as the observations, particularly the extension of the cool water plume in south-west direction and the rapid time variation of the SST.Um modelo de gravidade reduzida de 1 1/2 camada é proposto para estudar as características hidrodinmicas e termodinmicas da área costeira de Cabo Frio (Rio de Janeiro ­Brasil. A estrutura vertical do modelo é descrita por uma camada ativa sobre uma camada profunda sem movimento onde o gradicnte de pressão é zero. Para a camada superior. o modelo incluí a versão turbulenta das equações de momentum, continuidade e calor. A conservação do calor é representada por uma

  11. Chilean coastal orographic precipitation experiment: A tale of two rain regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, Adam K.

    The Chilean Coastal Orographic Precipitation Experiment Pilot Project (CCOPE-2015) was an exploratory field campaign to better understand the mechanisms of orographic precipitation enhancement in the Nahuelbuta Mountains of Southern Chile (38 deg. S.). Observations collected include: (1) surface rainfall from a network of 10 data logging rain gauges, (2) vertical precipitation profiles from a pair of K-band Micro Rain Radars, (3) rain drop size distributions from an optical disdrometer, (4) upstream wind and thermodynamic profiles from radiosonde launches, and (5) aerosol number concentration and size distribution measurements from a condensation particle counter and an ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer. An overview of observations collected during CCOPE-2015 is presented. The character of precipitation over the Nahuelbuta is contrasted between periods of ice-initiated and warm rain. Thirty-four percent of rainfall fell during warm rain periods, while fifty-two percent of rainfall fell during ice-initiated periods. Warm rain drop size distributions are characterized by many more and relatively smaller drops than ice-initiated drop size distributions. Both the portion and properties of ice-initiated and warm rainfall compare favorably with observations of coastal mountain rainfall at a similar latitude in California. Observations suggest that enhancement is stronger during warm rain periods, but uncertainty precludes declarations of significance. Additionally, the skill of satellite-based quantitative precipitation estimation is assessed for each rain regime. A cutting-edge NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission algorithm severely underestimates orographic enhancement of precipitation in the Nahuelbuta mountains, but performs better in the lee and upwind of the mountains. Much of the error in estimating orographic rain is during warm rain periods, while performance is much improved during ice-initiated rain periods.

  12. What controls biological productivity in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachkar, Z.; Gruber, N.

    2011-06-01

    The magnitude of the biological productivity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of productivity to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003). Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS) and Canary Current System (Canary CS), we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of biological productivity to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the California CS and Canary CS using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), coupled to a nitrogen based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) ecosystem model. We find the nutrient content of the euphotic zone to be 20 % smaller in the Canary CS relative to the California CS. Yet, the biological productivity is 50 % smaller in the latter. This is due to: (1) a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS, related to a more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2) the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS which lead to larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing the productivity. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be associated with the wider continental shelves and the lower eddy activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and enhancing the coupling between new and export production in the Northwest African system. Our results suggest that climate change induced perturbations such as upwelling favorable wind intensification might lead to contrasting biological responses in the California CS and the Canary CS, with major implications for the biogeochemical cycles and fisheries

  13. What controls biological productivity in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the biological productivity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of productivity to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003. Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS and Canary Current System (Canary CS, we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of biological productivity to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the California CS and Canary CS using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS, coupled to a nitrogen based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD ecosystem model. We find the nutrient content of the euphotic zone to be 20 % smaller in the Canary CS relative to the California CS. Yet, the biological productivity is 50 % smaller in the latter. This is due to: (1 a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS, related to a more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2 the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS which lead to larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing the productivity. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be associated with the wider continental shelves and the lower eddy activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and enhancing the coupling between new and export production in the Northwest African system. Our results suggest that climate change induced perturbations such as upwelling favorable wind intensification might lead to contrasting biological responses in the California CS and the Canary CS, with major implications for the biogeochemical cycles

  14. Influences of riverine and upwelling waters on the coastal carbonate system off Central Chile and their ocean acidification implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Cristian A.; Contreras, Paulina Y.; Pérez, Claudia A.; Sobarzo, Marcus; Saldías, Gonzalo S.; Salisbury, Joe

    2016-06-01

    A combined data set, combining data from field campaigns and oceanographic cruises, was used to ascertain the influence of both river discharges and upwelling processes, covering spatial and temporal variation in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and aragonite saturation state. This work was conducted in one of the most productive river-influenced upwelling areas in the South Pacific coasts (36°S). Additionally, further work was also conducted to ascertain the contribution of different DIC sources, influencing the dynamics of DIC along the land-ocean range. Six sampling campaigns were conducted across seven stations at the Biobío River basin, covering approximately 200 km. Three research cruises were undertaken simultaneously, covering the adjacent continental shelf, including 12 sampling stations for hydrographic measurements. Additionally, six stations were also sampled for chemical analyses, covering summer, winter, and spring conditions over 2010 and 2011. Our results evidenced that seaward extent of the river plume was more evident during the winter field campaign, when highest riverine DIC fluxes were observed. The carbonate system along the river-ocean continuum was very heterogeneous varying over spatial and temporal scales. High DIC and pCO2 were observed in river areas with larger anthropogenic effects. CO2 supersaturation at the river plume was observed during all campaigns due to the influence of low pH river waters in winter/spring and high-pCO2 upwelling waters in summer. δ13CDIC evidenced that main DIC sources along the river and river plume corresponded to the respiration of terrestrial organic matter. We have linked this natural process to the carbonate saturation on the adjacent river-influenced coastal area, suggesting that Ωaragonite undersaturation in surface/subsurface waters is largely modulated by the influence of both river discharge and coastal upwelling events in this productive coastal area. Conditions of low Ωaragonite might impact

  15. What controls biological production in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of net primary production (NPP in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the wind-driven upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of NPP to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003. Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS and Canary Current System (Canary CS, we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of NPP to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the two upwelling systems using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS, coupled to a nitrogen-based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD ecosystem model. Using identical ecological/biogeochemical parameters, our coupled model simulates a level of NPP in the California CS that is 50 % smaller than that in the Canary CS, in agreement with observationally based estimates. We find this much lower NPP in the California CS despite phytoplankton in this system having nearly 20 % higher nutrient concentrations available to fuel their growth. This conundrum can be explained by: (1 phytoplankton having a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS; a consequence of more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2 the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS, which permit a larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing NPP. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be a result of the wider continental shelves and the lower mesoscale activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and reducing the spatial decoupling between new and export production in the Canary CS. Our results suggest that climate change

  16. Impacts of coastal upwelling off east Vietnam on the regional winds system: An air-sea-land interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Zheng, Quanan; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Lee, Chia-Ying; Ho, Chung-Ru; Kuo, Nan-Jung; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we analyze the influence of coastal upwelling off southeast Vietnam (CUEV) on local wind field using numerical simulations based on atmospheric model of Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF). Several scenarios are simulated by forcing identical model configurations with different SST fields. Based on simulation results, the relationship between CUEV and reduction of wind forcing is numerically evidenced. With the influence of a typical cold patch with a temperature drop of 3-5 °C, the local wind speeds can drop to less than 70% of original level. We find that the mechanism of response of the wind reduction to CUEV is enhancement of sea-breeze induced wind modulation. Onshore sea-breeze will enhance, while the contrast between land and sea is even more striking due to the contribution of a distinct coastal upwelling. This implies that air-sea-land interaction dominates the process of local wind system modulation in response to transient CUEV. This result sheds a new light on the air-sea interaction process within the SCS basin.

  17. Air-sea exchange of CO2 at a Northern California coastal site along the California Current upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Oechel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncertainty in the air-sea CO2 exchange (CO2 flux in coastal upwelling zones is attributed to high temporal variability, which is caused by changes in ocean currents. Upwelling transports heterotrophic, CO2 enriched water to the surface and releases CO2 to the atmosphere, whereas the presence of nutrient-rich water at the surface supports high primary production and atmospheric CO2 uptake. To quantify the effects of upwelling on CO2 fluxes, we measured CO2 flux at a coastal upwelling site off of Bodega Bay, California, during the summer of 2007 and the fall of 2008 using the eddy covariance technique and the bulk method with pCO2 measurements from November 2010 to July 2011. Variations in sea surface temperatures (SST and alongshore wind speeds suggest that the measurement period in 2007 coincided with a typical early-summer upwelling period and the measurement period in 2008 was during a typical fall relaxation period. A strong source of CO2 (~1.5 ± 7 SD (standard deviation g C m−2 day−1 from the ocean to the atmosphere during the upwelling period was concurrent with high salinity, low SST, and low chlorophyll density. In contrast, a weak source of CO2 flux (~0.2 ± 3 SD g C m−2 day−1 was observed with low salinity, high SST and high chlorophyll density during the relaxation period. Similarly, the sink and source balance of CO2flux was highly related to salinity and SST during the pCO2 measurement periods; high salinity and low SST corresponded to high pCO2, and vice versa. We estimated that the coastal area off Bodega Bay was likely a source of CO2 to the atmosphere based on the following conclusions: (1 the overall CO2 flux estimated from both eddy covariance and pCO2 measurements showed a source of CO2; (2 although the relaxation period during the 2008 measurements were favorable to CO2 uptake, CO2 flux during this period was still a slight source, (3 salinity and SST were found to be good predictors of the CO2 flux for both eddy

  18. Microbial diversity of a Brazilian coastal region influenced by an upwelling system and anthropogenic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano C Cury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upwelling systems are characterised by an intense primary biomass production in the surface (warmest water after the outcrop of the bottom (coldest water, which is rich in nutrients. Although it is known that the microbial assemblage plays an important role in the food chain of marine systems and that the upwelling systems that occur in southwest Brazil drive the complex dynamics of the food chain, little is known about the microbial composition present in this region. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a molecular survey based on SSU rRNA gene from the three domains of the phylogenetic tree of life present in a tropical upwelling region (Arraial do Cabo, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The aim was to analyse the horizontal and vertical variations of the microbial composition in two geographically close areas influenced by anthropogenic activity (sewage disposal/port activity and upwelling phenomena, respectively. A lower estimated diversity of microorganisms of the three domains of the phylogenetic tree of life was found in the water of the area influenced by anthropogenic activity compared to the area influenced by upwelling phenomena. We observed a heterogenic distribution of the relative abundance of taxonomic groups, especially in the Archaea and Eukarya domains. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla, whereas the microeukaryotic community was dominated by Metazoa, Fungi, Alveolata and Stramenopile. The estimated archaeal diversity was the lowest of the three domains and was dominated by uncharacterised marine Crenarchaeota that were most closely related to Marine Group I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The variety of conditions and the presence of different microbial assemblages indicated that the area of Arraial do Cabo can be used as a model for detailed studies that contemplate the correlation between pollution-indicating parameters and the depletion of microbial

  19. Salares versus coastal ecotypes of quinoa: Salinity responses in Chilean landraces from contrasting habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Karina B; Aloisi, Iris; Del Duca, Stefano; Canelo, Valentina; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Silva, Herman; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a highly salt-tolerant species subdivided into five ecotypes and exhibiting broad intra-specific differences in tolerance levels. In a greenhouse study, Chilean landraces belonging either to the salares (R49) or coastal lowlands (VI-1, Villarrica) ecotype with contrasting agro-ecological origins were investigated for their responses to high salinity. The effects of two levels of salinity, 100 (T1) and 300 (T2) mM NaCl, on plant growth and on some physiological parameters were measured. Leaf and root Na(+) accumulation differed among landraces. T2 reduced growth and seed yield in all landraces with maximum inhibition relative to controls in R49. Salinity negatively affected chlorophyll and total polyphenol content (TPC) in VI-1 and Villarrica but not R49. Germination on saline or control media of seeds harvested from plants treated or not with NaCl was sometimes different; the best performing landrace was R49 insofar as 45-65% of seeds germinated on 500 mM NaCl-containing medium. In all landraces, average seedling root length declined strongly with increasing NaCl concentration, but roots of R49 were significantly longer than those of VI-1 and Villarrica up to 300 mM NaCl. Salt caused increases in seed TPC relative to controls, but radical scavenging capacity was higher only in seeds from T2 plants of R49. Total SDS-extractable seed proteins were resolved into distinct bands (10-70 kDa) with some evident differences between landraces. Salt-induced changes in protein patterns were landrace-specific. The responses to salinity of the salares landrace are discussed in relation to its better adaptation to an extreme environment.

  20. Slip Distribution and Seismic Moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean Earthquakes Inferred from Tsunami Waveforms and Coastal Geodetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yushiro; Satake, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The slip distribution and seismic moment of the 2010 and 1960 Chilean earthquakes were estimated from tsunami and coastal geodetic data. These two earthquakes generated transoceanic tsunamis, and the waveforms were recorded around the Pacific Ocean. In addition, coseismic coastal uplift and subsidence were measured around the source areas. For the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake, inversion of the tsunami waveforms recorded at nearby coastal tide gauge and Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) stations combined with coastal geodetic data suggest two asperities: a northern one beneath the coast of Constitucion and a southern one around the Arauco Peninsula. The total fault length is approximately 400 km with seismic moment of 1.7 × 1022 Nm (Mw 8.8). The offshore DART tsunami waveforms require fault slips beneath the coasts, but the exact locations are better estimated by coastal geodetic data. The 22 May 1960 earthquake produced very large, ~30 m, slip off Valdivia. Joint inversion of tsunami waveforms, at tide gauge stations in South America, with coastal geodetic and leveling data shows total fault length of ~800 km and seismic moment of 7.2 × 1022 Nm (Mw 9.2). The seismic moment estimated from tsunami or joint inversion is similar to previous estimates from geodetic data, but much smaller than the results from seismic data analysis.

  1. Modelling shelf-ocean exchange and its biogeochemical consequences in coastal upwelling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar

    slope and deeper depths. The coupled model may potentially serve as a robust tool in investigation of the dynamics of oceanic biogeochemical cycle throughout Earth history as well as a practical method to quantified storage of carbon flux into the ocean across the continental margins under present day...... in eastern boundary upwelling systems is an example of the most productive ocean waters over continental margins where intense supply of nutrients occur from deeper ocean waters. Interesting questions arise related to the biogeochemical cycles in such upwelling systems; such as 1) how the recently observed...... active but cryptic sulfur cycle possibly is coupled to the nitrogen cycle in an oxygen-minimum-zone (OMZ), 2) what is the relation between the shelf–ocean exchange, continental shelf width and development of the observed bottom water anoxia/euxinia associated with different configurations of continental...

  2. First year of of an ocean-atmosphere mooring in the Senegalese coastal upwelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alban; Dausse, Denis; del Rey, Marta Martin; Diakhaté, Moussa; Machu, Éric; Faye, Saliou; Dagorne, Dominique; Gaye, Amadou

    2016-04-01

    The Joint International Laboratory ECLAIRS set up an oceanographic and meteorological buoy, dedicated to monitoring and analysis of the short and long-term changes in climate, atmosphere and marine environment within the Senegal upwelling. The buoy "MELAX" was deployed early 2015 in the heart of the Senegalese upwelling by 30m-depth at (14°20'N, 17°14'W). Data collected are, for the atmosphere, surface wind, solar radiation, humidity and rain, and for the ocean, temperatures, salinity, and currents (from the surface to the bottom) and oxygen. We present the first year of observations, in particular the relationship between wind, sea surface temperatures, hydrology and current, but also briochemistry. Satellite and model data are used to provide a larger-scale context to the punctual observations.

  3. Analysis of Tsunamigenic Coastal Rock Slope Failures Triggered by the 2007 Earthquake in the Chilean Fjordland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, S. A.; Serey, A.; Hermanns, R. L.; Redfield, T. F.; Oppikofer, T.; Duhart, P.

    2011-12-01

    mechanics of brittle faults and jointing related to the LOFZ. The basal failure plane closely followed an older (epidote chlorite facies) thrust fault. Later fracture patterns suggest the thrust relaxed under gravitational stress following rock column uplift. Failure probably utilized a combination of these structures. Digital geomorphic models allowed establishing a sequence of events during failure which together make up the complex rock avalanche deposit. The volume of each individual slide could be more accurately determined. These and ongoing studies will allow a unique characterization of earthquake-induced slope failures in fjord coastal environments, providing new tools for landslide, seismic and tsunami hazard assessment in Patagonia and similar geomorphological settings around the world. This work was funded by Fondecyt project 11070107, the International Center for Geohazards, the Millenium Nucleus 'International Earthquake Research Center Montessus de Ballore', FNDR-Project 'Geological-Mining Environmental Research in Aysen' of the Chilean Government and the Andean Geothermal Center of Excellence.

  4. The MORENA Project: Shelf-ocean exchanges and transport processes along the continental margin in the European coastal upwelling region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiuza, A.F.G. [Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal). Inst. de Oceanografia; Perez, F. [Inst. Investigaciones Marinas, Vigo (Spain); Johnson, J. [Univ. East Anglia (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The MORENA Project (Multidisciplinary Oceanographic Research in the Eastern Boundary of the North Atlantic) is sponsored by the CEC MAST-2 Programme and has as general objective to measure, understand and model shelf-ocean exchange in a typical coastal upwelling region of the eastern boundary layer of the subtropical ocean. This is being attained through a multidisciplinary approach aimed at the quantitative understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transfer of matter (including salt, particulates, nutrients, organic compounds, biomass), momentum and energy across and along the shelf, the shelf break and the slope, in the Iberian region of the European Atlantic. MORENA has the following components: Observations, Modelling and Combined Analysis.

  5. Dynamics of phytoplankton distribution and photosynthetic capacity in a western Norwegian fjord during coastal upwelling: Effects on optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erga, Svein Rune; Ssebiyonga, Nicolausi; Frette, Øyvind; Hamre, Børge; Aure, Jan; Strand, Øivind; Strohmeier, Tore

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the coupling between optical properties and the dynamics of phytoplankton distribution and photosynthetic capacity in the Lysefjord during an exceptional coastal upwelling. At the mouth of the fjord, transparent Coastal water was "piled up" against the sill, while more turbid Fjord water from the outer fjord system was flowing over the sill, creating the intermediate layer which extended further into the fjord. This was reflected by high spectral attenuation coefficients in the upper 10 m of the fjord. Outside the sill, clear water with low spectral attenuation coefficients were found below sill depth down to at least 30 m, while the attenuation coefficients inside the sill were significantly higher between 10 and 20 m. About 4-7 km outwards from the head of the fjord clearer deep basin water was entering the upper layer due to the upwelling which could be traced up to 7 m, bounded by the 7.5 °C and the 31 salinity isolines. In the outer part of the fjord waters with a high chl a content and photosynthetic capacity were observed below the outflowing surface layer containing "old water" from the inner part of the fjord, which was characterized by low nutrient and chl a concentrations. Maximum quantum efficiencies (0.5) were encountered within this subsurface layer. Quantum efficiencies exceeded 0.3 when nitrate and silicate concentrations increased above 2 mmol m -3. About 50% of the PAR light attenuation (0-30 m) was caused by chl a, and the 1% light depth varied between 27 and 35 m along the transect. Due to the influence of freshwater outlets, non-pigmented particles were more abundant in the inner part of the fjord than in the outer part. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) contributed strongly to absorption within the upper 10 m at wavelengths below 470 nm while scattering was the major attenuation contributor for wavelengths above 600 nm. With respect to possible climate change effects on the growth of phytoplankton in

  6. Micro-phytoplankton community structure in the coastal upwelling zone off Concepción (central Chile): Annual and inter-annual fluctuations in a highly dynamic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabalón, V.; Morales, C. E.; González, H. E.; Menschel, E.; Schneider, W.; Hormazabal, S.; Valencia, L.; Escribano, R.

    2016-12-01

    An intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in recent decades has been detected in some of the main eastern boundary current systems, especially at higher latitudes, but the response of coastal phytoplankton communities in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) remains unknown. At higher latitudes in the HCS (35-40°S), strong seasonality in wind-driven upwelling during spring-summer coincides with an annual increase in coastal chlorophyll-a and primary production, and a dominance of micro-phytoplankton. In order to understand the effects of potential upwelling intensification on the micro-phytoplankton community in this region, annual and inter-annual variability in its structure (total and taxa-specific abundance and biomass) and its association with oceanographic fluctuations were analyzed using in situ time series data (2002-2009) from a shelf station off Concepcion (36.5°S). At the annual scale, total mean abundance and biomass, attributed to a few dominant diatom taxa, were at least one order of magnitude greater during spring-summer than autumn-winter, in association with changes in upwelling and surface salinity and temperature, whereas macro-nutrient concentrations remained relatively high all the year. At the inter-annual scale, total abundance and biomass decreased during the upwelling season of the 2006-2009 period compared with the 2002-2006 period, notably due to lower abundances of Skeletonema and Leptocylindrus, but the relative dominance of a few taxa was maintained. The 2006-2009 period was characterized by higher upwelling intensity, colder and higher salinity waters, and changes in nutrient concentrations and ratios compared with the first period. The inter-annual changes in the micro-phytoplankton community were mostly associated with changes in surface salinity and temperature (changes in upwelling intensity) but also with changes in Si/N and N/P, which relate to other land-derived processes.

  7. Dynamics of the carbonate system in a large continental shelf system under the influence of both a river plume and coastal upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhimian; Dai, Minhan; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Deli; Li, Qian; Zhai, Weidong; Meng, Feifei; Gan, Jianping

    2011-06-01

    We examined the dynamics of the carbonate system in a complex mixing scheme with enhanced biological consumption modulated by both a river plume and summer coastal upwelling in a large shelf system, the northern South China Sea (NSCS) shelf. The plume waters originated from a large flooding upstream the Pearl River, and extended from the mouth of the Pearl River estuary to the middle shelf and were characterized by low dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TAlk), and a high aragonite saturation state (Ωarag). In contrast, the upwelled water occupying the nearshore area was distinguished by high DIC and TAlk and a low Ωarag. While the dynamics of the carbonate system were largely shaped by physical mixing through plume and upwelling processes between the plume water, the offshore subsurface water and the offshore surface water, biological consumption of DIC was observable in both the river plume and the coastal upwelling areas and contributed to the elevated Ωarag during their pathway. Correlations between salinity normalized TAlk and DIC indicated that organic carbon production rather than biocalcification exclusively induced the DIC removal. By using a three end-member mixing model, we estimated the net community productivity in the plume water and the upwelled water to be 36 ± 19 mmol C m-2 d-1 and 23 ± 26 mmol C m-2 d-1, respectively. With the combination of stoichiometric relationship analysis of the carbonate system and applying the three end-member mixing model, we successfully differentiated semiquantitatively the biologically mediated DIC variations from its overall mixing control. We also attempted to link this natural process to the carbonate saturation on the NSCS shelf, contending that at present natural factors associated with the river plume and the coastal upwelling largely modulate the dynamics of the carbonate system on the NSCS shelf, whereas anthropogenic stressors such as ocean acidification currently play a relatively

  8. Phytoplankton and nutrient distributions in a front-eddy area adjacent to the coastal upwelling zone off Concepcion (Chile): implications for ecosystem productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Carmen; Anabalón, Valeria; Hormazábal, Samuel; Cornejo, Marcela; Bento, Joaquim; Silva, Nelson

    2016-04-01

    The impact that sub-mesoscale (1-10 km) to mesocale (50-100 km) oceanographic variability has on plankton and nutrient distributions (horizontal and vertical) in the coastal upwelling and transition zones off Concepcion was the focus of this study. Satellite time-series data (wind, sea-surface temperature (SST), and altimetry) were used to understand the dynamic context of in situ data derived from a short-term front survey (3 d) during the upwelling period (3-6 February, 2014). The survey included two transects perpendicular to the coast, covering the shelf and shelf-break areas just north of Punta Lavapie, a main upwelling center (˜37° S). Wind and SST time-series data indicated that the survey was undertaken just after a moderate upwelling event (end of January) which lead to a relaxation phase during early February. A submesoscale thermal front was detected previous to and during the survey and results from an eddy tracking algorithm based on altimetry data indicated that this front (F1) was flanked on its oceanic side by an anticyclonic, mesoscale eddy (M1), which was ˜25 d old at the sampling time. M1 strengthened the thermal gradient of F1 by bringing warmer oceanic water nearer to the colder coastal upwelling zone. The distributions of hydrographic variables and nutrients in the water column (interaction creates a complex field of submesoscale processes in the top layer, including vertical nutrient injections and lateral stirring, which contributes to the exportation of coastal communities to the open ocean in this region. We discuss how this interaction might affect ecosystem productivity in the coastal band.

  9. Late Eocene diatomite from the Peruvian coastal desert, coastal upwelling in the eastern Pacific, and Pacific circulation before the terminal Eocene event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, R.; Dunbar, R.; Martin, J.B.; Baker, P.

    1988-09-01

    Previously undocumented late Eocene diatomaceous sediments are present near Fundo Desbarrancado (FD) in southern Peru. These sediments are similar to Miocene diatomite from the same area but, unlike the Miocene diatomite, the FD sediments contain cherty layers, are enriched in CaCO/sub 3/, have a diverse and abundant radiolarian fauna, and possess varved-massive and millimeter- and meter-scale biogenic-terrigenous alternations. The FD sediments are part of an Eocene sequence that includes the clastic sediments of the Paracas Formation, and they are correlative to the Chira Formation of northern Peru. The Paleogene biogenic sediments of western South America show that coastal upwelling developed in the eastern Pacific before the latest Eocene, argue for the existence of a proto-Humboldt current at this time, and suggest that the terminal Eocene event was the culmination of gradual changes and not a catastrophic event at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary.

  10. Deep ocean mass fluxes in the coastal upwelling off Mauritania from 1988 to 2012: variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gerhard; Romero, Oscar; Merkel, Ute; Donner, Barbara; Iversen, Morten; Nowald, Nico; Ratmeyer, Volker; Ruhland, Götz; Klann, Marco; Wefer, Gerold

    2016-05-01

    A more than two-decadal sediment trap record from the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystem (EBUE) off Cape Blanc, Mauritania, is analysed with respect to deep ocean mass fluxes, flux components and their variability on seasonal to decadal timescales. The total mass flux revealed interannual fluctuations which were superimposed by fluctuations on decadal timescales. High winter fluxes of biogenic silica (BSi), used as a measure of marine production (mostly by diatoms) largely correspond to a positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index (December-March). However, this relationship is weak. The highest positive BSi anomaly was in winter 2004-2005 when the NAO was in a neutral state. More episodic BSi sedimentation events occurred in several summer seasons between 2001 and 2005, when the previous winter NAO was neutral or even negative. We suggest that distinct dust outbreaks and deposition in the surface ocean in winter and occasionally in summer/autumn enhanced particle sedimentation and carbon export on short timescales via the ballasting effect. Episodic perturbations of the marine carbon cycle by dust outbreaks (e.g. in 2005) might have weakened the relationships between fluxes and large-scale climatic oscillations. As phytoplankton biomass is high throughout the year, any dry (in winter) or wet (in summer) deposition of fine-grained dust particles is assumed to enhance the efficiency of the biological pump by incorporating dust into dense and fast settling organic-rich aggregates. A good correspondence between BSi and dust fluxes was observed for the dusty year 2005, following a period of rather dry conditions in the Sahara/Sahel region. Large changes of all bulk fluxes occurred during the strongest El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in 1997-1999 where low fluxes were obtained for almost 1 year during the warm El Niño and high fluxes in the following cold La Niña phase. For decadal timescales, Bakun (1990) suggested an intensification of coastal upwelling

  11. Impact of sea-level change on the paleo Primary Productivity record in the NW African coastal upwelling area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, X.; Paul, A.

    2009-04-01

    A sea level decrease of 120 m at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) drastically modifies the shelf morphology of the North West African coastal upwelling area. Using a regional coupled circulation-ecosystem model subject to a set of boundary conditions that reflect Present Day (PD) and LGM conditions, we aim to quantify how changes in shelf morphology, as well as changes in sub-surface nutrient concentrations or local climatic conditions, influence the biological productivity and its record in the sediments. The oceanic circulation is simulated by the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS), taking advantage of the AGRIF (Adaptive Grid Refinement in Fortran) technique to set-up an embedded grid structure. A high-resolution grid (1/10°) is centred on our study area, and is nested in a larger, coarser grid (1/2°) over the Atlantic domain. Boundary and initial conditions for PD and LGM are provided by global simulations performed with the University of Victoria Earth System-Climate Model (UVic ESCM). We used NPZD (Nutrient, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton and Detritus) biogeochemical models. We have identified the following issues in interpreting a sedimentary record at a fixed core location as an indicator of the total upwelling productivity: - Changes in the shelf morphology due to sea-level change appeared to have an impact on the productivity of the upwelling itself, but also to displace the high-productivity zone. - Comparing the Primary Production (PP) between PD and LGM at a given geographical location, or comparing the zonal mean of the PP, can show opposite results. The comparison at geographical locations assumes a direct connection between the production in the surface ocean and the underlying sediments. The comparison of the zonal mean of PP or sediment flux assumes that lateral advection of particulates and sediment transport are significant processes in producing the sedimentary signal at a given location. We illustrate the various situations, with or without

  12. The Role of Shelf Break Upwelling Along the East Coast of the US in the Coastal Carbon Cycle: A Model's Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, S. A.; Mahadevan, A.; Archer, D.

    2008-12-01

    The coastal ocean is highly productive because it has several sources of nutrients: rivers, sediments and the open ocean. Although the East Coast of the United States is not an upwelling regime, its continental shelf is supplied by nutrients from the open ocean. Instead of traditional upwelling, a persistent front at the continental shelf break regulates the source of nutrients by interactions with the bottom boundary layer and the winds via a mechanism referred to as "shelf break upwelling." Shelf break upwelling also leads to ventilation of carbon dioxide and methane from coastal waters. A three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, 2km resolution model with idealized bathymetry is used to simulate the shelf and shelf-break front circulations of an archetypical passive margin off the eastern coast of the United States. The model is adapted for the coastal setting from a model developed for open ocean fronts after Mahadevan et al, (1996a) and Mahadevan et al, (1996b) and is ground-truthed using data from the Mid- Atlantic Bight. We diagnose the pathways for nutrient supply and ventilation using a series of idealized tracers including nutrient, gas and bottom boundary layer tracers We find that the location of the foot of the front determines the source waters for the shelf break upwelling. In response to Southerly winds, the foot of the front moves onshore. Conversely, the foot moves offshore in response to Northerly winds. Targeted tracer results indicate that the source waters for upwelling depend on the direction of the wind: Southerly winds bring slope bottom water to the shelf, while Northerly winds bring up shelf bottom boundary layer water. The upwelling flux is sensitive to the duration as well as the magnitude of wind events. The physics and geochemistry of the bottom boundary layer and the shelf break front are not resolved in global-scale carbon cycle models, yet they appear to play a strong role in the coastal carbon cycle. Mahadevan, A., J. Oliger, and R

  13. Offshore influence of coastal upwelling off Mauritania, NW Africa, as recorded by diatoms in sediment traps at 2195 m water depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Carina B.; Romero, Oscar E.; Wefer, Gerold; Gabric, Albert J.

    1998-06-01

    Downward flux and taxonomic composition of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages were determined from sediment trap samples off Cap Blanc (CB1, NW Africa) over a 1-year period (March 1988-March 1989) and compared to the assemblages in the underlying surface sedi ment. Trap content was composed of biogenic and lithogenic material. The dominant constituents of the biogenic fraction were calcium carbonate, biogenic opal, and organic matter. Coccolithophorids, planktonic foraminifera and pteropods contributed to the CaCO 3 flux; opal derived mainly from diatoms. During the sampling year prominent total flux maxima occurred in spring and summer. Highest diatom flux values were reached in March-April (20.1×10 5 valves m -2 d -1) and July-August (22.9×10 5 valves m -2 d -1) in coincidence with the total flux pattern. Radiolaria showed three distinct peaks: in autumn (16×10 4 shells m -2 d -1), spring (˜11×10 4 shells m -2 d -1) and summer (10×10 4 shells m -2 d -1). The flux pattern of silicoflagellates differed greatly from those of the other groups and from the total particle flux, with highest values between October 1988 and March 1989. For all microorganisms surveyed, September was the month of lowest production. We identified a total of 166 diatom taxa and 3 silicoflagellate species. Off Cap Blanc, upwelling occurs year-round, and "giant filaments" of relatively high pigment concentration develop and persist throughout the year with substantial seasonal and interannual variations. We show that the shifts in siliceous phytoplankton do reflect both the seaward displacement of the coastal upwelling center and the periods of relaxation when oligotrophic waters prevail. Accumulation rates in the surface sediment were calculated to be 1.36×10 8 valves m -2 yr -1 for diatoms and 1.05×10 6 skeletons m -2 yr -1 for silicoflagellates. Most of the diatoms found in the water column at 2195 m also occurred in the sediment surface, with a slight enrichement of robust

  14. Twelve years of change in coastal upwelling along the central-northern coast of Chile: spatially heterogeneous responses to climatic variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Aravena

    Full Text Available We use time-series analyses to characterize the effects of recent climate variability upon the local physical conditions at 11 study sites along the northern-central coast of Chile (29-34°S. Environmental indices show that the 1° Bakun upwelling index in this coastal region has fluctuated in time, starting from a stable period around the 1980's, peaking during the mid 90s, decreasing during the next ten years and increasing at a steep rate since 2010. Upwelling intensity decreased with increasing latitude, showing also a negative correlation with climate patterns (El Niño3 sea surface temperature-SST anomalies and the Multivariate El Niño Index. We hypothesize that the impacts of climate variability on upwelling events seem to be spatially heterogeneous along the region. Non-sheltered locations and, particularly, sites on prominent headlands show an immediate (lag = 0 and negative correlation between local SST, upwelling events and wind stress. We suggest that near-shore thermal conditions are closely coupled to large-scale forcing of upwelling variability and that this influence is modulated through local topographic factors.

  15. Twelve years of change in coastal upwelling along the central-northern coast of Chile: spatially heterogeneous responses to climatic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Guillermo; Broitman, Bernardo; Stenseth, Nils Christian

    2014-01-01

    We use time-series analyses to characterize the effects of recent climate variability upon the local physical conditions at 11 study sites along the northern-central coast of Chile (29-34°S). Environmental indices show that the 1° Bakun upwelling index in this coastal region has fluctuated in time, starting from a stable period around the 1980's, peaking during the mid 90s, decreasing during the next ten years and increasing at a steep rate since 2010. Upwelling intensity decreased with increasing latitude, showing also a negative correlation with climate patterns (El Niño3 sea surface temperature-SST anomalies and the Multivariate El Niño Index). We hypothesize that the impacts of climate variability on upwelling events seem to be spatially heterogeneous along the region. Non-sheltered locations and, particularly, sites on prominent headlands show an immediate (lag = 0) and negative correlation between local SST, upwelling events and wind stress. We suggest that near-shore thermal conditions are closely coupled to large-scale forcing of upwelling variability and that this influence is modulated through local topographic factors.

  16. Environmental proteomics of microbial plankton in a highly productive coastal upwelling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowell, Sarah [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Smith, Daniel [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Barofsky, Douglas [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Giovannoni, Stephen [Oregon State University, Corvallis

    2011-01-01

    Metaproteomics is one of a suite of new approaches providing insights into the activities of microorganisms in natural environments. Proteins, the final products of gene expression, indicate cellular priorities, taking into account both transcriptional and posttranscriptional control mechanisms that control adaptive responses. Here, we report the proteomic composition of the o 1.2 lm fraction of a microbial community from Oregon coast summer surface waters, detected with two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Spectra corresponding to proteins involved in protein folding and biosynthesis, transport, and viral capsid structure were the most frequently detected. A total of 36% of all the detected proteins were best matches to the SAR11 clade, and other abundant coastal microbial clades were also well represented, including the Roseobacter clade (17%), oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria group (6%), OM43 clade (1%). Viral origins were attributed to 2.5% of proteins. In contrast to oligotrophic waters, phosphate transporters were not highly detected in this nutrient-rich system. However, transporters for amino acids, taurine, polyamines and glutamine synthetase were among the most highly detected proteins, supporting predictions that carbon and nitrogen are more limiting than phosphate in this environment. Intriguingly, one of the highly detected proteins was methanol dehydrogenase originating from the OM43 clade, providing further support for recent reports that the metabolism of one-carbon compounds by these streamlined methylotrophs might be an important feature of coastal ocean biogeochemistry.

  17. A numerical investigation of the atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast over the coastal upwelling region of Cabo Frio, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, M. [Departamento de Meteorologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcelo_dourado@ufpel.edu.br; Pereira de Oliveira, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    An one-dimensional atmospheric second order closure model, coupled to an oceanic mixed layer model, is used to investigate the short term variation of the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers in the coastal upwelling area of Cabo Frio, Brazil (23 degrees Celsius S, 42 degrees Celsius 08' W). The numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the impact caused by the thermal contrast between atmosphere and ocean on the vertical extent and other properties of both atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. The numerical simulations were designed taking as reference the observations carried out during the passage of a cold front that disrupted the upwelling regime in Cabo Frio in July of 1992. The simulations indicated that in 10 hours the mechanical mixing, sustained by a constant background flow of 10 m s-1, increases the atmospheric boundary layer in 214 m when the atmosphere is initially 2 K warmer than the ocean (positive thermal contrast observed during upwelling regime). For an atmosphere initially -2 K colder than the ocean (negative thermal contrast observed during passage of the cold front), the incipient thermal convection intensifies the mechanical mixing increasing the vertical extent of the atmospheric boundary layer in 360 m. The vertical evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is consistent with the observations carried out in Cabo Frio during upwelling condition. When the upwelling is disrupted, the discrepancy between the simulated and observed atmospheric boundary layer heights in Cabo Frio during July of 1992 increases considerably. During the period of 10 hours, the simulated oceanic mixed layer deepens 2 m and 5.4 m for positive and negative thermal contrasts of 2 K and -2 K, respectively. In the latter case, the larger vertical extent of the oceanic mixed layer is due to the presence of thermal convection in the atmospheric boundary layer, which in turn is associated to the absence of upwelling caused by the passage of cold fronts

  18. Export of pre-aged, labile DOM from a central California coastal upwelling system: Insights from D/L amino acids and Δ14C signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, B. D.; Shen, Y.; Benner, R. H.; Druffel, E. R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal upwelling zones are among the most productive regions in the world and play a major role in global carbon and nitrogen cycles. Recent research suggests that a substantial fraction of newly fixed organic matter is exported offshore in the form of dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, to date only a few studies have examined DOM composition in the context of production and export from upwelling systems. The ultimate fate and geochemical impact of coastal DOM exported to offshore and mesopelagic ecosystems also remains largely unknown. Between 2007-2009 we conducted a high-resolution biogeochemical time series at the Granite Canyon Marine Pollution Studies Lab in part to evaluate the seasonal production and export of DOM from the Central CA coast. Our previous work demonstrated substantial, albeit disparate, seasonal production of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC, DON) - with high DON (and low C:N ratios) produced during upwelling and high DOC produced during summer/fall water column stratification (Walker and McCarthy, 2012). Here we present new total dissolved D/L amino acid (TDAA) and UV-oxidizable DOC radiocarbon (Δ14C) data with the goal of determining the relative sources (heterotrophic vs. autotrophic), bioavailability, microbial processing and 14C-ages of C-rich vs. N-rich DOM exported from this upwelling system. Our results suggest that C-rich DOM produced during water column stratification carries a large microbial signature (i.e. high D/L AA ratios and non-protein AA abundance), whereas N-rich DOM produced during upwelling appears to be fresh, autotrophic DOM (i.e. lowest D/L AA ratios and highest TDAA abundance). DOM Δ14C signatures also did not approximate in situ dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and instead were far more negative and highly correlated to water mass density. Together our results indicate a previously unrecognized source of highly labile yet pre-aged DOM potentially impacting offshore and mesopelagic ecosystems.

  19. Contribution of changes in opal productivity and nutrient distribution in the coastal upwelling systems to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene climate cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Etourneau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The global late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling (~3.0–2.0 million years ago, Ma concurred with extremely high diatom and biogenic opal production in most of the major coastal upwelling regions. This phenomenon was particularly pronounced in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS, off Namibia, where it is known as the Matuyama Diatom Maximum (MDM. Our study focuses on a new diatom silicon isotope (δ30Si record covering the MDM in the BUS. Unexpectedly, the variations in δ30Si signal follow biogenic opal content, whereby the highest δ30Si values correspond to the highest biogenic opal content. We interpret the higher δ30Si values during the MDM as a result of a stronger degree of silicate utilization in the surface waters caused by high productivity of mat-forming diatom species. This was most likely promoted by weak upwelling intensity dominating the BUS during the Plio/Pleistocene cooling combined with a large silicate supply derived from a strong Southern Ocean nutrient leakage responding to the expansion of Antarctic ice cover and the resulting stratification of the polar ocean 3.0–2.7 Ma ago. A similar scenario is hypothesized for other major coastal upwelling systems (e.g. off California during this time interval, suggesting that the efficiency of the biological carbon pump was probably sufficiently enhanced in these regions during the MDM to have significantly increased the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the deep ocean. In addition, the coeval extension of the area of surface water stratification in both the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific, which decreased CO2 release to the atmosphere, led to further enhanced atmospheric CO2 drawn-down and thus contributed significantly to late Pliocene/early Pleistocene cooling.

  20. A model-based insight into the coupling of nitrogen and sulfur cycles in a coastal upwelling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar; Canfield, Donald Eugene; Fennel, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    detritus, to quantify the nitrogen and sulfur cycles in the Chilean OMZ. A new biogeochemical submodule was developed and coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). The model results generally agree with the observed distribution of reactive species and the measured process rates. Modeled...

  1. Late Cenozoic Deformation of the Coastal Cordillera, Northern Chilean Forearc, 18- 25°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, R. W.; González, G.; Loveless, J. P.; Carrizo, D.

    2007-12-01

    Overlying the only part of the South American continental crust that is in direct contact with the subducting Nazca Plate, the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile and southern Peru should provide the most complete geological record of the coupling between the two plates. This record of coupling is exquisitely preserved in the hyperarid Atacama Desert. This preservation is both one of the major advantages and major challenges of working in this region: On the positive side, exposure of geomorphic surfaces is complete and unencumbered by erosion or vegetation, and brittle saline soils preserve subtle deformation features that would quickly be obliterated in more humid environments. On the negative side, ancient geomorphic features are just as fresh as Recent one and the lack of organic material precludes radiocarbon dating, a traditional tool of paleoseismology. During the last several years, we have concentrated on documenting three fundamental characteristics of late Cenozoic forearc deformation: (1) NS shortening on reverse faults striking at a high angle to, and dextral-reverse faults striking oblique to, the continental margin; (2) N-striking normal faults of the forearc and their reactivation, locally, as reverse faults; and (3) extensive suites of tension cracks. Reverse faults striking at a high angle to the margin are present between 19 and 21.5°S, straddling the topographic symmetry plane that marks the axis of the Bolivian orocline. Limited dating of tuffs and surfaces shows that these structures have been active for at least the last 6 Ma. At least 5 of these structures -- Atajaña, Pisagua, Iquique north and south, and Barranco Alto -- cut the Pleistocene marine terraces of the coastal platform, producing 20 to 50 m of vertical offset. A forearc crustal earthquake just south of Pisagua in March 2007 demonstrates that margin parallel shortening continues to the present and that permanent deformation occurs during the interseismic part of the plate

  2. Short-term dynamics of nutrients influenced by upwelling in a small oligotrophic coastal ecosystem,Gan Bay,in the northwest Philippines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping Xu; Minhan Dai; Weidong Zhai; Dongxing Yuan; Jinwen Liu; Zhenyu Sun; Hua Lin; Jingyu Wi

    2009-01-01

    We present a time-series analysis of nutrient and pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) levels in an oligotrophic coastal ecosystem (Gan Bay),which was likely to be influenced by upwelled subsurface water.Gan Bay is off Currimao Harbor,in the northwest Philippines and is located at the boundary of the South China Sea (SCS).This 42-h time-series observation was conducted in December 2006.In addition to continuous observations of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pCO2,discrete samples were collected at a depth of 5 m every 3 h for measurements of nutrients,including soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and inorganic nitrogen (NO3- + NO2-) in order to examine their dynamics and possible physical and biological controls.We observed remarkably large short-term variations in the surface water,spanning a 10-fold change for SRP (32-330 nM) and from <0.3 μM to 4.3 μM for NO3- + NO2-.DO also varied substantially from a lower end of 171 to 205 μM O2.Surface water pCO2 changed from an equilibrium stage with the atmosphere (~386 μatm) to a stage where it was a significant source for the atmospheric CO2 (seawater pCO2~469 μatm).We found that the variation of nutrients was driven neither by tidal mixing nor by biological activities,as was suggested by the variations in the total bacterial abundance and chlorophyll a.Instead,our inverse T-S relationship suggested a two end-member mixing process during the observation period.The N:P ratio throughout the observation period was ~13.2,which is characteristic of SCS subsurface and deep waters.Moreover,pCO2 was correlated inversely with the sea surface temperature.It is likely,therefore,that an upwelled subsurface cold water with high nutrients,low-temperature and high-pCO2 existed.It should be noted that this upwelled cold water did not appear to impact the entire observation period (approximately 35 h of 42 h),which might suggest an extremely dynamic nature for this upwelled cold water mass.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of

  3. Wind-driven coastal upwelling along the western boundary of the Bay of Bengal during the southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Gouveia, A.D.; Michael, G.S.; Sundar, D.; Nampoothiri, G.

    , the longshore component of the wind stress was 0.45 dyne cm -2, which corresponds to an Ekman transport of 120 m 3 s -1 per 100 m of the coast. The winds were most favourable to upwelling when leg E of the track (Fig. 1) was covered. Here the Ekman transport... 88 90E -IO N Fig. 2. Winds measured on board the vessel every 3 h during the cruise (some of the wind vectors are not shown, to avoid confusion). Wind stress (F) was calculated using the bulk aerodynamic formula -Fffi CDp\\[~IV, where CD was taken...

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Coastal and Open-Ocean Records of the Great Chilean Tsunamis of 2010, 2014 and 2015 off the Coast of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Oleg; Rabinovich, Alexander B.; Thomson, Richard E.

    2016-12-01

    The three great earthquakes off the coast of Chile on 27 February 2010 (Maule, M w 8.8), 1 April 2014 (Iquique, M w 8.2) and 16 September 2015 (Illapel, M w 8.3) generated major transoceanic tsunamis that spread throughout the Pacific Ocean and were measured by numerous coastal tide gauges and open-ocean DART stations. Statistical and spectral analyses of the tsunami waves from the events recorded on the Pacific coast of Mexico enabled us to estimate parameters of the waves along the coast and to compare statistical features of the events. We also identified three coastal "hot spots" (sites having maximum tsunami risk): Puerto Angel, Puerto Madero and Manzanillo. Based on the joint spectral analyses of the tsunamis and background noise, we have developed a method for using coastal observations to determine the underlying spectrum of tsunami waves in the deep ocean. The "reconstructed" open-ocean tsunami spectra are in close agreement with the actual tsunami spectra evaluated from direct analysis of the DART records offshore of Mexico. We have further used the spectral estimates to parameterize the energy of the three Chilean tsunamis based on the total open-ocean tsunami energy and frequency content of the individual events.

  5. Emergy analysis of coastal systems influenced by upwelling in northern Chile: Estimation of ecological-economic sustainability at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous studies carried out in a variety of environments have suggested that coastal marine systems generate a variety of goods and services for humanity. However, in recent decades there has been a marked degradation of these ecosystems, as well as over-exploitation of natural ...

  6. Linking the Modern and Recent Record of Cabo Frio Upwelling with Local Climate and Biogeochemical Processes in Hypersaline Coastal Lagoons, Região dos Lagos, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Nascimento, G. S.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Belem, A. L.; Carreira, R.; Eglinton, T. I.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    A unique marine and lagoonal system along the coast east of Rio de Janeiro is being investigated to understand the impact of climatic variability on the South Atlantic carbon cycle and biomineralisation processes involved in carbonate precipitation in the hypersaline coastal lagoons. The region is dominated by a semi-arid microclimate attributed to the local coastal upwelling phenomenon near Cabo Frio. The intensity of the upwelling affects the hydrology of the annual water and biogeochemical cycles in the lagoons, as well as biogeochemical signals of environmental change recorded in both onshore and offshore sediments. Preliminary results of δ18O and δD values of water samples collected monthly in Lagoa Vermelha and Brejo do Espinho from 2011 to 2014 show lower values for waters corresponding to the wet season, reflecting increased input of meteoric water. The higher values for waters collected during the dry season reflect the greater amount of evaporation with increased seasonal aridity. Radiocarbon dating of Holocene marine and lagoonal cores indicates that Mg-carbonate precipitation in the lagoons is associated with high evaporation. Modern field observations for the last 3 years suggest that the amount of carbonate precipitation is correlated with evaporitic conditions associated with the upwelling phenomenon. A calibration study of hydrogen isotopic fractionation in the modern lagoons is underway to define a relationship between δDlipid of suspended particles and δDwater of associated water. This isotopic relationship will be applied to material obtained in cores from the lagoons. Offshore cores will be studied using well-tested paleotemperature proxies to evaluate the intensity of the upwelling during the Holocene. In summary, linking the coastal upwelling with the lagoonal hydrology has the potential to furnish important insights about the relationship between the local climate and paleoceanographic circulation associated with the regional carbon cycle.

  7. Upwelling and anthropogenic forcing on phytoplankton productivity and community structure changes in the Zhejiang coastal area over the last 100 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanshan; XING Lei; ZHANG Hailong; FENG Xuwen; YANG Haili; ZHAO Meixun

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton productivity and community structure in marginal seas have been altered significantly dur-ing the past three decades, but it is still a challenge to distinguish the forcing mechanisms between climate change and anthropogenic activities. High time-resolution biomarker records of two 210Pb-dated sediment cores (#34:28.5°N, 122.272°E;CJ12-1269:28.861 9°N, 122.515 3°E) from the Min-Zhe coastal mud area were compared to reveal changes of phytoplankton productivity and community structure over the past 100 years. Phytoplankton productivity started to increase gradually from the 1970s and increased rapidly after the late 1990s at Site #34;and it started to increase gradually from the middle 1960s and increased rapidly after the late 1980s at Site CJ12-1269. Productivity of Core CJ12-1269 was higher than that of Core #34. Phy-toplankton community structure variations displayed opposite patterns in the two cores. The decreasing D/B (dinosterol/brassicasterol) ratio of Core #34 since the 1960s revealed increased diatom contribution to total productivity. In contrast, the increasing D/B ratio of Core CJ12-1269 since the 1950s indicated in-creased dinoflagellate contribution to total productivity. Both the productivity increase and the increased dinoflagellate contribution in Core CJ12-1269 since the 1950-1960s were mainly caused by anthropogenic activities, as the location was closer to the Changjiang River Estuary with higher nutrient concentration and decreasing Si/N ratios. However, increased diatom contribution in Core #34 is proposed to be caused by increased coastal upwelling, with higher nutrient concentration and higher Si/N ratios.

  8. Alkenone-based temperature patterns along the eastern South Pacific Coastal Ocean: the effect of upwelling and advection on the sedimentary alkenone unsaturation-index (U37K'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Garcés-Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the sedimentary record of alkenone unsaturation-index (U37K' in the eastern South Pacific displays a wide range of temperatures, in response to sea surface temperature (SST, as well as nutrient concentrations. The U37K' inshore-offshore trend shows low-correlation with SSTs at many transitional sites (50–200 km offshore, and in one oligotrophic coastal site (~20° S. In contrast, in open-ocean sites SSTs play the expected dominant role. The latitudinal trend shows that nitrate, phosphate and/or temperature affect distinctively the U37K', suggesting progressive high-impacts in areas with permanent nutrient-stress conditions (~20° S, which is consistent with previous experiments. In contrast, this impact is slightly and not observable in transitional and open-ocean areas, respectively, where the coupling between offshore propagation of mesoscale eddies and upwelling filaments supply additional chlorophyll/nutrient. This study is a first field approximation to the impacts of thermal/non-thermal factors over the unsaturation-index in eastern Boundary Current systems, which would help in future temperature reconstructions.

  9. Population parameters and the relationships between environmental factors and abundance of the Acetes americanus shrimp (Dendrobranchiata: Sergestidae near a coastal upwelling region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Freitas dos Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe population dynamics of Acetes americanus was investigated, focusing on the sex ratio, individual growth, longevity, recruitment and relationship between abundance and environmental factors in the region of Macaé, strongly influenced by coastal upwelling. Otter trawl net samplings were performed from July 2010 to June 2011 at two points (5 m and 15 m. Nearly 19,500 specimens, predominantly females (77.15%, were captured. Their sizes, larger than that of males, indicated sexual dimorphism. Shrimps at lower latitudes present larger sizes and longer longevity than those from higher latitudes. This difference is probably due to low temperatures and high primary productivity. Though no statistical correlation was found between abundance and environmental factors, the species was more abundant in temperatures closer to 20.0º C and in months with high chlorophyll-a levels. Due to the peculiar characteristics of this region, A. americanusshowed greater differences in size and longevity than individuals sampled in other studies undertaken in the continental shelf of Southeast Brazil.

  10. Potential contribution of planktonic components to ammonium cycling in the coastal area off central-southern Chile during non-upwelling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Veronica; Morales, Carmen E.; Farías, Laura; Cornejo, Marcela; Graco, Michelle; Eissler, Yoanna; Cuevas, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The potential contributions of different microbial components (consumption and production, and carbon assimilation associated with photolithotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic (nitrification) metabolisms in the water column were performed. Despite low water column concentrations of ammonium in wintertime, intense ammonium transformations were registered. Prokaryotes (or bacterioplankton) contributed most to ammonium generation rates over the entire water column; these rates increased with depth (0.4-3.1 μM d -1). In surface waters (10 m depth), aerobic ammonium oxidation (potentially by Bacteria and Archaea) was the dominant consumption process (average 0.7 μM d -1) whereas in the subsurface layer (20 and 50 m depth), unexpectedly, eukaryotes accounted for most of its consumption (average 2.1 μM d -1). Nitrification oxidized an important proportion of the ammonium in both layers (from 25% to 100%) and provided regenerated nitrate. The integrated water column rates of chemosynthesis (0.005 g C m -2 d -1) represented a large proportion (51%) of the total dark carbon fixation during the non-upwelling season when integrated rates of photosynthesis are relatively low (0.42 g C m -2 d -1) and microbial food webs dominate the transfer of carbon within this coastal system.

  11. A statistical approach to coastal upwelling in the Baltic Sea based on the analysis of satellite data for 1990-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lehmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of Baltic Sea upwelling has been carried out to cover, for the first time, the entire sea area for the period 1990-2009. Weekly composite SST maps based on NOAA/AVHRR satellite data were used to evaluate the location and frequency of upwelling. The results obtained were analysed and compared with earlier studies with excellent agreement. Our study enables the most intense upwelling areas in the entire Baltic Sea to be evaluated. According to the analysis of 443 SST maps, the most common upwelling regions are found off the Swedish south and east coasts (frequency 10-25%, the Swedish coast of the Bothnian Bay (16%, the southern tip of Gotland (up to 15%, and the Finnish coast of the Gulf of Finland (up to 15%. Pronounced upwelling also occurs off the Estonian coast and the Baltic east coast (up to 15%, the Polish coast and the west coast of Rügen (10-15%; otherwise the upwelling frequency was between 5 and 10%. Additionally, simulated SST distributions derived from a Baltic Sea numerical model were analysed for the same period. Furthermore, at specific positions close to the coastline, surface winds based on the SMHI meteorological data base were analysed for the same 20-year period. Wind components parallel to the coast were discriminated into favourable and unfavourable winds forcing upwelling. The obtained frequencies of upwelling-favourable winds fit very well the observed upwelling frequencies derived from satellite SST maps. A positive trend of upwelling frequencies along the Swedish east coast and the Finnish coast of the Gulf of Finland was calculated for the period 1990-2009.

  12. Development of coastal upwelling edge detection algorithms associated with harmful algal blooms off the Washington coast using sea surface temperature imagery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Nathan R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Trainer, Vera L.

    2005-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing imagery is being used to identify and characterize upwelling conditions on the coast of Washington State, with an emphasis on detecting ocean features associated with harmful algal bloom events. Blooms of phytoplankton, including the domoic acid-producing diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, appear to be associated with a semi-permanent eddy bordering Washington and British Columbia that is observed in satellite imagery during extended upwelling events. Strong upwelling conditions may act as a barrier to movement of these blooms onshore. Using NOAA AVHRR temperature imagery, edge detection algorithms are being developed to define the strength, location and extent of the surface temperature expression of upwelling along the coast of Washington. The edge detection technique uses a simple kernel-based gradient method that compares temperatures of pixels at a user-specified distance. This allows identification of larger features with subtle edges. The resulting maximum-gradient map is then converted to a binary format with a user-specified temperature threshold. Skeletonization and edge-linking algorithms are then employed to develop final map products. The upwelling edge detection maps are being examined in relation to harmful algal bloom events that have occurred along the coast.

  13. Development of coastal upwelling edge detection algorithms associated with harmful algal blooms off the Washington coast using sea surface temperature imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nathan R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Trainer, Vera L.

    2005-08-01

    Satellite remote sensing imagery is being used to identify and characterize upwelling conditions on the coast of Washington State, with an emphasis on detecting ocean features associated with harmful algal bloom events. Blooms of phytoplankton, including the domoic acid-producing diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, appear to be associated with a semi-permanent eddy bordering Washington and British Columbia that is observed in satellite imagery during extended upwelling events. Strong upwelling conditions may act as a barrier to movement of these blooms onshore. Using NOAA AVHRR temperature imagery, edge detection algorithms are being developed to define the strength, location and extent of the surface temperature expression of upwelling along the coast of Washington. The edge detection technique uses a simple kernel-based gradient method that compares temperatures of pixels at a user-specified distance. This allows identification of larger features with subtle edges. The resulting maximum-gradient map is then converted to a binary format with a user-specified temperature threshold. Skeletonization and edge-linking algorithms are then employed to develop final map products. The upwelling edge detection maps are being examined in relation to harmful algal bloom events that have occurred along the coast.

  14. Role of nutrient recycling in upwelling ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T E

    1979-01-01

    The regeneration of nitrogen is an important process that increases the efficiency of the upwelling ecosystem by enlarging their spatial scales. Ammonium regeneration was considered to contribute 42 to 72 percent of phytoplankton nitrogen requirements in the northwest Africa, Peru, and Baja California upwelling systems. Zooplankton are responsible for the largest portion of regenerated nitrogen; however, fish and benthic sediments may be nearly as large. Comparisons of the importance of ammonium regeneration in upwelling areas with coastal and open ocean regions indicate that the percentage contributions are similar. Future nutrient regeneration studies are needed to assess the recycling of benthic sediments, microzooplankton, gelatinous zooplankton, demersal fish, bacterioplankton, and mollusks.

  15. Dehumidification of Iberia by enhanced summer upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P. M.; Costa, V.; Nogueira, M.; Semedo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dehumidification of Iberia by enhanced summer upwelling Miranda PMA, Costa V, Semedo AIDL, Faculdade de Ciências, University of LisbonA 24-year simulation of the recent Iberian climate, using the WRF model at 9km resolution forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis (1989-2012), is analysed for the decadal evolution of the upwelling forcing coastal wind and for column integrated Precipitable water vapour (PWV). Results indicate that, unlike what was found by Bakun et al. (2009) for the Peruvian region, a statistically significant trend in the upwelling favourable (northerly) wind has been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in PWV, not only inland but also over the coastal waters. Such increase is consistent with a reinforced northerly coastal jet in the maritime boundary layer contributing to atmospheric Ekman pumping of dry continental air into the coastal region. Diagnostics of the prevalence of the Iberian thermal low following Hoinka and Castro (2003) also show a positive trend in its frequency during an extended summer period (April to September). These results are consistent with recent studies indicating an upward trend in the frequency of upwelling in SW Iberia (Alves and Miranda 2013), and may be relevant for climate change applications as an increase in coastal upwelling (Miranda et al 2013) may lead to substantial regional impacts in the subtropics. Aknowledgements: Study supported by FCT Grant RECI/GEO-MET/0380/2012Alves JMR, Miranda PMA (2013) Variability of Iberian upwelling implied by ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalyses, Tellus A 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/tellusa.v65i0.19245.Bakun et al (2010) Greenhouse gas, upwelling-favorable winds, and the future of coastal ocean upwelling ecosystems, Global Change Biology, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2009.02094.xHoinka KP, Castro M (2003) The Iberian Peninsula thermal low. QJRMS, 129, 1491- 1511, doi: 10.1256/qj.01.189.Miranda et al (2013) Climate change and upwelling: response of Iberian upwelling to atmospheric

  16. Compound-specific δ15N amino acid measurements in littoral mussels in the California upwelling ecosystem: a new approach to generating baseline δ15N Isoscapes for coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokhshoori, Natasha L; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    We explored δ(15)N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA) in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus) as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ(15)N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE), determining bulk δ(15)N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ(15)N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼ 7‰ to ∼ 12‰, R(2) = 0.759). In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ(15)N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ(15)N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ(15)N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC), with (15)N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ(15)N values of phenylalanine (δ(15)NPhe), the best AA proxy for baseline δ(15)N values. We hypothesize δ(15)N(Phe) values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ(15)N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ(15)N(Phe) values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ(15)N values. We propose that δ(15)N(Phe) isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ(15)N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives.

  17. Compound-specific δ15N amino acid measurements in littoral mussels in the California upwelling ecosystem: a new approach to generating baseline δ15N Isoscapes for coastal ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L Vokhshoori

    Full Text Available We explored δ(15N compound-specific amino acid isotope data (CSI-AA in filter-feeding intertidal mussels (Mytilus californianus as a new approach to construct integrated isoscapes of coastal primary production. We examined spatial δ(15N gradients in the California Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE, determining bulk δ(15N values of mussel tissue from 28 sites between Port Orford, Oregon and La Jolla, California, and applying CSI-AA at selected sites to decouple trophic effects from isotopic values at the base of the food web. Bulk δ(15N values showed a strong linear trend with latitude, increasing from North to South (from ∼ 7‰ to ∼ 12‰, R(2 = 0.759. In contrast, CSI-AA trophic position estimates showed no correlation with latitude. The δ(15N trend is therefore most consistent with a baseline δ(15N gradient, likely due to the mixing of two source waters: low δ(15N nitrate from the southward flowing surface California Current, and the northward transport of the California Undercurrent (CUC, with (15N-enriched nitrate. This interpretation is strongly supported by a similar linear gradient in δ(15N values of phenylalanine (δ(15NPhe, the best AA proxy for baseline δ(15N values. We hypothesize δ(15N(Phe values in intertidal mussels can approximate annual integrated δ(15N values of coastal phytoplankton primary production. We therefore used δ(15N(Phe values to generate the first compound-specific nitrogen isoscape for the coastal Northeast Pacific, which indicates a remarkably linear gradient in coastal primary production δ(15N values. We propose that δ(15N(Phe isoscapes derived from filter feeders can directly characterize baseline δ(15N values across major biochemical provinces, with potential applications for understanding migratory and feeding patterns of top predators, monitoring effects of climate change, and study of paleo- archives.

  18. The upwelling record in the sediments of the westen continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; PrakashBabu, C.; Rao, Ch.M.

    , International Indian Ocean Expedition, Oceanographic Monographs, 2,173 pp. DIESTER-HAASS L. (1976) Quaternary accumulation rates of biogenous and terrigenous components on the East Atlantic continental slope off NW Africa. Marine Geology, 21, 1-24. Dm.... THIEDE (1983) Coastal upwelling its sediment record. Plenum Press, New York, 604 pp. THIEDE J. (1983) Skeletal plankton and nekton in upwelling water masses off north western south America and northwest Africa. In: Coastal upwelling: its sediment record...

  19. Characterization of upwelling phenomenon along the Italian coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasi, Arianna; Morucci, Sara; Rinaldi, Eleonora; Bignami, Francesco; Inghilesi, Roberto; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2013-04-01

    In order to investigate wind-driven upwelling along the Italian coasts, preliminary wind data provided by the ISPRA Italian Tide Gauge Measurement Network (RMN) have been analyzed. In a further step, MyOcean Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data have been analyzed in order to define an SST index for wind-driven coastal upwelling assessment. At first, hourly wind data for the period 2009 - 2011 have been used in order to provide the statistical distribution and the wind rose plots at each RMN station. In particular, wind direction and speed have been selected in order to find upwelling-favorable areas and periods of time. E.g. wind directions in the sector between North and West in the Tyrrhenian Sea and between South and East in the Adriatic Sea have been defined as upwelling favorable, the wind sector being defined as the ± 30° arc around the direction parallel to the coast. Moreover only wind speeds greater than 3.0 m/s have been considered as significant for upwelling. For each location, the number of selected data has been divided by the total number of recorded wind data, thus obtaining a sort of upwelling frequency, which allows to define areas mostly exposed to upwelling. Once these areas were defined, satellite SST data have been used as a proxy to study the changes in upwelling intensity, since upwelling waters are colder than surrounding waters. So, in a given satellite SST image the upwelling event is identifiable through SST minima along the coasts. Finally, the SST upwelling index has been defined; also, this index has been "weighted" with wind intensity and direction indicating upwelling conditions obtained from the RMN wind dataset, to better distinguish between upwelling-favorable and downwelling-favorable conditions at each RMN site.

  20. The relationship between Arabian Sea upwelling and Indian monsoon revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies based on upwelling indices (sediment records, sea-surface temperature and wind suggest that upwelling along the western coast of Arabian Sea is strongly affected by the Indian summer monsoon (ISM. In order to examine this relationship directly, we employ the vertical water mass transport produced by the eddy-resolving global ocean simulation STORM driven by meteorological reanalysis over the last 61 years. With its very high spatial resolution (10 km, STORM allows us to identify characteristics of the upwelling system. We analyze the co-variability between upwelling and meteorological and oceanic variables from 1950 to 2010. The analyses reveal high interannual correlations between coastal upwelling and along-shore wind-stress (r=0.73 as well as with sea-surface temperature (r0.83. However, the correlation between the upwelling and the ISM is small and other factors might contribute to the upwelling variability. In addition, no long-term trend is detected in our modeled upwelling time series.

  1. The Effects of Changing Climatological Variables on Upwelling along the Southern California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmick, C.; Kudela, R. M.; Bausell, J.

    2015-12-01

    A large part of the high productivity of CA current ecosystems can be attributed to Ekman upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water, driven by north winds running parallel to shore. As meteorological (e.g. wind direction and velocity, atmospheric pressure fields, etc.) and oceanographic (e.g. sea surface temperature) parameters change in the context of climate change, it is unclear how ecosystems and the coastal upwelling on which they depend, will be impacted. To better understand the effects of meteorological and oceanographic forcing on coastal upwelling, eleven years (2005-2015) of data were taken from satellites, weather stations and data-collecting buoys located in and around the Santa Barbara Channel as part of the NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP). These data were then analyzed using regression and time-series cross-correlation statistics in order to identify trends in meteorological and oceanographic cycles, their relationship to localized upwelling (e.g. upwelling indices), and how climate change may impact upwelling. Results indicate that as temperature has increased over the last four years (as a result of the 'warm blob'), upwelling has decreased. They also indicate differences in the annual cycles of cross-shore pressure gradients during years of poor versus years when upwelling conditions are favorable. This documented dependence of the coastal wind on sea surface temperature could have important implications as our oceans change; elevated sea surface temperatures, such as those associated with the 'warm blob', may result in less coastal upwelling and lower ecosystem productivity.

  2. Zonation of bacterioplankton communities along aging upwelled water in the northern Benguela upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eBergen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upwelling areas are shaped by enhanced primary production in surface waters, accompanied by a well-investigated planktonic succession. Although bacteria play an important role in biogeochemical cycles of upwelling systems, little is known about bacterial community composition and its development during upwelling events. The aim of this study was to investigate the succession of bacterial assemblages in aging upwelled water of the Benguela upwelling from coastal to offshore sites. Water from the upper mixed layer at 12 stations was sampled along two transects from the origin of the upwelling to a distance of 220 km. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was then used in a bacterial diversity analysis and major bacterial taxa were quantified by catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH. Additionally, bacterial cell numbers and bacterial production were assessed . Community statistical analysis revealed a reproducible zonation along the two transects, with four clusters of significantly different microbial assemblages. Clustering was mainly driven by phytoplankton composition and abundance. Similar to the temporal succession that occurs during phytoplankton blooms in temperate coastal waters, operational taxonomic units (OTUs affiliated with Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant during algal blooming whereas Pelagibacterales were highly abundant in regions with low algal abundance. The most dominant heterotrophic OTU (9% of all reads was affiliated with Pelagibacterales and showed a strong negative correlation with phytoplankton. By contrast, the second most abundant heterotrophic OTU (6% of all reads was affiliated with the phylum Verrucomicrobia and correlated positively with phytoplankton. Together with the close relation of bacterial production and phytoplankton abundance, our results showed that bacterial community dynamics is strongly driven by the development and composition of the phytoplankton

  3. [Chilean nuclear policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla, E

    1996-06-01

    This official document is statement of the President of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Dr. Eduardo Bobadilla, about the nuclear policy of the Chilean State, Thanks to the international policy adopted by presidents Aylwin (1990-1994) and his successor Frei Ruiz Tagle (1994-), a nuclear development plan, protected by the Chilean entrance to the nuclear weapons non proliferation treaty and Tlatelolco Denuclearization treaty, has started. Chile will be able to develop without interference, an autonomous nuclear electrical system and other pacific uses of nuclear energy. Chile also supports a new international treaty to ban nuclear weapon tests.

  4. Intensification of upwelling along Oman coast in a warming scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, V.; Ajayamohan, R. S.; Valsala, V.; Sandeep, S.

    2016-07-01

    The oceanic impact of poleward shift in monsoon low-level jet (MLLJ) is examined using a Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Two sets of downscaling experiments were conducted using ROMS with boundary and initial conditions from six CMIP5 models. While outputs from the historical run (1981-2000) acts as forcing for the first, the second uses RCP8.5 (2080-2099). By comparing the outputs, it is found that Oman coast will experience an increase in upwelling in tune with MLLJ shift. Consistent with the changes in upwelling and zonal Ekman transport, temperature, salinity, and productivity show significant changes near the Oman coast. The changes in MLLJ causes the coastal wind to angle against the Oman coast in such a fashion that the net upwelling increases in the next century and so does the marine productivity. This study contrasts the general view of weakening of upwelling along the Arabian coasts due to the weakening of monsoon winds.

  5. Interactions between trophic levels in upwelling and non-upwelling regions during summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, A.; Fernandes, C. E. G.; Gonsalves, M.-J. B. D.; Subina, N. S.; Mamatha, S. S.; Krishna, K.; Varik, S.; Kumari, R.; Gauns, M.; Cejoice, R. P.; Pandey, S. S.; Jineesh, V. K.; Kamaleson, A. S.; Vijayan, V.; Mukherjee, I.; Subramanyan, S.; Nair, S.; Ingole, B.; LokaBharathi, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is a regular phenomenon occurring along the southwest coast of India during summer monsoon (May-September). We hypothesize that there could be a shift in environmental parameters along with changes in the network of interactions between bacteria, phytoplankton, and zooplankton in upwelling and non-upwelling regions. During cruise # 267 on FORV Sagar Sampada, water samples were analysed for environmental and biological parameters from two transects, one upwelling region off Trivandrum (TVM) (8°26‧N, 76°20‧E-8°30‧N, 76°50‧E), and the other non-upwelling region off Calicut (CLT) (11°11‧N, 75°30‧E-11°14‧N,74°54‧E), about 230 nmi to the north. Meteorological, hydrological, and nutrient profiles confirmed upwelling off TVM. Bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton significantly responded. Primary and bacterial productivity enhanced together with increase in the percentage of viable bacteria (TVC). Pearson's correlation analysis pointed out the differences in bacterial interactions with other trophic levels at both transects. TVC played a prominent role in trophic interactions off TVM by depending on phytoplankton for substrate (r = 0.754). This contrasted with CLT where total counts (TC) played an important role. However, most interrelationships were less pronounced. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed the correlation analysis and further showed that the factor loadings of the biotic and abiotic parameters differed in strength and direction in the two regions. More importantly, the processes of mineralization by bacteria and uptake by phytoplankton are obviously more coupled off TVM as evidenced by the clustering of the related parameters in the PCA biplot. Canonical correspondence analysis also complements these findings and demonstrated that the abiotic factors influenced phytoplankton and bacteria similarly at TVM but differently at CLT. The impact on the trophic interrelationships is evident by the close association

  6. Observational evidence of upwelling off the southwest coast of India during June-July 2006

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lekshmi, S.; Smitha, B.R.; Revichandran, C.

    Considerable latitudinal variability exists in the forcing mechanisms and intensity of coastal upwelling along the southwest coast of India. Present work is based on the insitu observations conducted onboard FORV Sagar Sampada for 12 days along two...

  7. On an upwelling front along the west coast of India during later part of southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Antony, M.K.

    A coastal front, associated with upwelling, is identified from the observed thermal field along the west coast of India during September, 1987. The front, which is seen very clearly upto a depth of about 75 m, has a horizontal gradient...

  8. Thermal indices of upwelling effects on inner-shelf habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Fabián J.; Navarrete, Sergio A.; Castillo, Manuel; Menge, Bruce A.; Castilla, Juan C.; Largier, John; Wieters, Evie A.; Broitman, Bernardo L.; Barth, John A.

    2009-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in regimes of coastal upwelling may have profound effects on the distribution and local dynamics of coastal marine populations and entire communities. Currently available mesoscale indices for upwelling intensity lack the resolution needed to characterize and compare inner-shelf upwelling regimes at small spatial scales (1-10’s km), which is often required to test relevant hypotheses in ecology, conservation, and management. We present local, quantitative indices of thermal variability, whose pattern across sites is largely driven by variation in coastal upwelling intensity at scales of few kilometers. Index calculations were based on daily records of insitu Sea Surface Temperature [SST], gathered at 30 sites along the Oregon-California coast, and at 25 sites along the coast of northern and central Chile. Several univariate metrics were calculated using daily series of temperature anomalies, and combined to produce a multivariate ordination of sites (Multivariate Upwelling Zone Index of Cooling, MUZIC) that allowed us to compare sites across regions. Multivariate indices calculated for 13 central Chile sites explained 52% and 50% of the among-site variance in corticated algal biomass and growth rate, respectively. Upwelling-induced variability at the scales documented here can have significant consequences on the ecology of coastal ecosystems. The basic data requirements (i.e. SST time series) and the simplicity of calculation make these indices a useful tool to apply at a large number of sites around the world, and to examine the generality of community- and population-level responses to physical forcing.

  9. On an upwelling front, propagation of upwelling and vertical velocity in the eastern Arabian sea during monsoon, 1987

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, M.K.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    A coastal upwelling front parallel to the coast and identifiable upto a depth of 75 m was observed between 12.5 and 16 degrees N along the eastern Arabian Sea in September, 1987 from closely spaced digital BT data. With a north-south slope...

  10. Modelling the CO2 atmosphere-ocean flux in the upwelling zones using radiative transfer tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapivin, Vladimir F.; Varotsos, Costas A.

    2016-12-01

    An advanced mathematical model of the radiation forcing on the ocean surface is proposed for the assessment of the CO2 fluxes between atmosphere and ocean boundary in the upwelling zones. Two types of the upwelling are considered: coastal and local in the open ocean that are closely associated with changes in solar irradiance. The proposed model takes into account the maximal number of the carbon fluxes in the upwelling ecosystem considering that in the latter the only original source of energy and matter for all forms of life is the energy of the solar radiation. The vertical structure of the upwelling zone is represented by four levels: the upper mixed layer above the thermocline, the intermediate photic layer below the thermocline, the deep ocean and the near-bottom layer. Peruvian upwelling and typical local upwelling of tropical pelagic region are considered as examples for the model calculations.

  11. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  12. Variability of Iberian upwelling implied by ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. R. Alves

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Regional Ocean Modeling System ocean model is used to simulate the decadal evolution of the regional waters in offshore Iberia in response to atmospheric fields given by ECMWF ERA-40 (1961–2001 and ERA-Interim (1989–2008 reanalyses. The simulated sea surface temperature (SST fields are verified against satellite AVHRR SST, and they are analysed to characterise the variability and trends of coastal upwelling in the region. Opposing trends in upwelling frequency are found at the northern limit, where upwelling has been decreasing in recent decades, and at its southern edge, where there is some evidence of increased upwelling. These results confirm previous observational studies and, more importantly, indicate that observed SST trends are not only due to changes in radiative or atmospheric heat fluxes alone but also due to changes in upwelling dynamics, suggesting that such a process may be relevant in climate change scenarios.

  13. Upwelling Dynamics off Monterey Bay: Heat Flux and Temperature Variability, and their Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Jamieson and the other donors to the Paul E. Gray Endowed Fund for UROP. 5 Table of contents Acknowledgements...viscous stress. In the surface Ekman layer, as the result of these stresses, the net transport is 90 degrees to the right of the wind in the northern...upward fluid motions). Upwelling can also occur in non-coastal areas. Equatorial upwelling occurs due to the opposite directions of Ekman drift

  14. Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, Ryan R; Checkley, David M

    2008-02-12

    Upwelling of nutrient-rich, subsurface water sustains high productivity in the ocean's eastern boundary currents. These ecosystems support a rate of fish harvest nearly 100 times the global mean and account for >20% of the world's marine fish catch. Environmental variability is thought to be the major cause of the decadal-scale biomass fluctuations characteristic of fish populations in these regions, but the mechanisms relating atmospheric physics to fish production remain unexplained. Two atmospheric conditions induce different types of upwelling in these ecosystems: coastal, alongshore wind stress, resulting in rapid upwelling (with high vertical velocity, w); and wind-stress curl, resulting in slower upwelling (low w). We show that the level of wind-stress curl has increased and that production of Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) varies with wind-stress curl over the past six decades. The extent of isopycnal shoaling, nutricline depth, and chlorophyll concentration in the upper ocean also correlate positively with wind-stress curl. The size structure of plankton assemblages is related to the rate of wind-forced upwelling, and sardine feed efficiently on small plankters generated by slow upwelling. Upwelling rate is a fundamental determinant of the biological structure and production in coastal pelagic ecosystems, and future changes in the magnitude and spatial gradient of wind stress may have important and differing effects on these ecosystems. Understanding of the biological mechanisms relating fisheries production to environmental variability is essential for wise management of marine resources under a changing climate.

  15. Potential new production in two upwelling regions of the western Arabian Sea: Estimation and comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaomei; Zhan, Haigang; Du, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Using satellite-derived and in situ data, the wind-driven potential new production (nitrate supply) for the 300 km wide coastal band in two upwelling regions of the western Arabian Sea (AS) during the southwest monsoon is estimated. The upward nitrate flux to the euphotic zone is generally based on the physical processes of coastal transport (Ekman transport and geostrophic transport) and offshore Ekman pumping. The coastal geostrophic current in the western AS influences the upwelling intensity and latitudinal distributions of nitrate supply. The Oman and Somalia upwelling regions have similar level of potential new production (nitrate supply) during the summer monsoon, while the satellite estimates of primary production off Oman are 2 times greater than those off Somalia. The much higher potential f-ratio in the Somalia upwelling region indicates that the primary production could be limited by availability of other macronutrients (e.g., silicate). The correlation analysis of the primary production and the aerosol optical thickness shows that the Oman upwelling region displays a stronger coupling between the atmospheric deposition and the phytoplankton abundance. The high summertime dust levels in the atmosphere are suggested to contribute to the high primary production in the Oman upwelling region.

  16. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  17. Partial decoupling of primary productivity from upwelling in the California Current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Lionel; Deutsch, Curtis; McWilliams, James C.; Frenzel, Hartmut; Liang, Jun-Hong; Colas, François

    2016-07-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep nutrient-rich water along subtropical eastern boundaries yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems. Simple indices of coastal wind strength have been extensively used to estimate the timing and magnitude of biological productivity on seasonal and interannual timescales and underlie the prediction that anthropogenic climate warming will increase the productivity by making coastal winds stronger. The effect of wind patterns on regional net primary productivity is not captured by such indices and is poorly understood. Here we present evidence, using a realistic model of the California Current system and satellite measurements, that the observed slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On the regional scale the wind drop-off leads to substantially higher production even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of productivity from upwelling results from the impact of wind patterns on alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. Our results imply that productivity in eastern boundary upwelling systems will be better predicted from indices of the coastal wind that account for its offshore structure.

  18. Peru-Chile upwelling dynamics under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerder, Véra; Colas, Francois; Echevin, Vincent; Codron, Francis; Tam, Jorge; Belmadani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The consequences of global warming on the Peru-Chile Current System (PCCS) ocean circulation are examined with a high-resolution, eddy-resolving regional oceanic model. We performed a dynamical downscaling of climate scenarios from the IPSL-CM4 Coupled General Circulation Model (CGCM), corresponding to various levels of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. High-resolution atmospheric forcing for the regional ocean model are obtained from the IPSL atmospheric model run on a stretched grid with increased horizontal resolution in the PCCS region. When comparing future scenarios to preindustrial (PI) conditions, the circulation along the Peru and Chile coasts is strongly modified by changes in surface winds and increased stratification caused by the regional warming. While the coastal poleward undercurrent is intensified, the surface equatorial coastal jet shoals and the nearshore mesoscale activity are reinforced. Reduction in alongshore wind stress and nearshore wind stress curl drive a year-round reduction in upwelling intensity off Peru. Modifications in geostrophic circulation mitigate this upwelling decrease in late austral summer. The depth of the upwelling source waters becomes shallower in warmer conditions, which may have a major impact on the system's biological productivity.

  19. Biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. Part 1: Introduction to the effects of upwelling along the west coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is examined as it relates to the cycling of chemical species in coastal waters along the west coast of North America. The temporal and spatial features of upwelling phenomena in the Eastern boundary regions of the North Pacific Ocean are presented and discussed in terms of upwelling episodes. Climate conditions affecting upwelling include: thermal effects, wind-induced shear stress which moves surface layers, and the curl of the wind stress vector which is thought to affect the extent and nature of upwelling and the formation of offshore convergent downwelling fronts. These effects and the interaction of sunlight and upwelled nutrients which result in a biological bloom in surface waters is modeled analytically. The roles of biological and chemical species, including the effects of predation, are discussed in that context, and relevant remote sensing and in situ observations are presented. Climatological, oceanographic, biological, physical, chemical events, and processes that pertain to biogeochemical cycling are presented and described by a set of partial differential equations. Simple preliminary results are obtained and are compared with data. Thus a fairly general framework has been laid where the many facets of biogeochemical cycling in coastal upwelled waters can be examined in their relationship to one another, and to the whole, to whatever level of detail or approximation is warranted or desired.

  20. Identification of upwelling areas in the Oman Sea Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Masoud

    2016-07-01

    Satellite-derived sea-surface temperature, TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) sea-level anomalies (SLAs), modeled wind data, and hydrodynamic data from World Ocean Database were used to characterize the upwelling along the Oman Sea coasts during 2002 - 2012. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the satellite-derived sea-surface temperature (SST) shows the first mode affected by upwelling processes, which represents a biannual variability. In addition, the SST shows the upwelling front moving offshore with the development of Southwest (SW) Monsoon in early June. SST shows the persistence of cold upwelling waters for nearly a month after the end of the SW Monsoon within the bays along the Oman coast. TOPEX/POSEIDON SLAs indicate that with the onset of the SW Monsoon, a 30-cm drop in height is observed along the Oman coast associated the presence of the cool upwelled waters. This drop in height sets up a horizontal pressure gradient and results in a compensating along-shore, northeastward flowing, geostrophic current (East Arabian Current) during the SW Monsoon. Similarly, the altimeter data slow an offshore decrease in height during the Northeast (NE) Monsoon, indicating a seasonal reversal in direction of the East Oman Currents with flow to the southwest. The following upwelling characteristics are identified for the Oman upwelling zone: 1- Upwelling zones have seen along Oman and Pakistan coasts and in the western coasts, like Iran, persistent upwelling zones are not available. 2- Upwelling zones along Oman coasts are more persistent and developed than in Pakistan coastal area. 3- Upwelling in the Oman and East Pakistan coasts starts with SW-Monsoon and will developed in the mid-August, adjusted with summer cooling. 4- Along Oman Sea, upwelling zones were developed between Rasal-Haddad and the southern bay. Mean SST during SW-Monsoon is about 22 °C. 5-Waters with temperature about 23°C were upwelled from depth 50-75 m along Oman coasts, and about 50 m along Pakistan coasts. 6

  1. On the upwelling off the Southern Tip and along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Smitha, B.R.; Sanjeevan, V.N.; VimalKumar, K.G.; Revichandran, C.

    ; the latter is forced by the longshore wind stress. Moderate to relatively intense upwelling occurs along the Kollam to Mangalore coast (9 degrees N to 13 degrees N) due to the combined action of the longshore wind stress, the coastally trapped Kelvin waves...

  2. Intense submesoscale upwelling in anticyclonic eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannigan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations from around the global ocean show that enhanced biological activity can be found in anticyclonic eddies. This may mean that upwelling of nutrient-rich water occurs within the eddy, but such upwelling is not captured by models that resolve mesoscale processes. High-resolution simulations presented here show intense submesoscale upwelling from the thermocline to the mixed layer in anticyclonic eddies. The properties of the upwelling are consistent with a process known as symmetric instability. A simple limiting nutrient experiment shows that this upwelling can drive much higher biological activity in anticyclonic eddies when there is a high nutrient concentration in the thermocline. An estimate for the magnitude of upwelling associated with symmetric instability in anticyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea shows that it may be of comparable magnitude to other processes, though further work is required to understand the full implications for basin-scale nutrient budgets.

  3. 闽粤近岸夏季上升流区浮游植物群落组成及其影响因素%Community composition of phytoplankton in Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling region in summer and related affecting factors.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雨; 林茂; 林更铭; 项鹏

    2011-01-01

    基于2009年6月11-16日闽粤近岸(21.6°-24.3°N,115.7°-118.7° E)30个站位133个样品的调查资料,对闽粤近岸上升流区浮游植物群落的物种组成、丰度变化进行了三维结构(水平、垂直、断面)研究,并探讨其与下层水涌升、营养盐补充的关系.共记录浮游植物4门85属159种,以及未定种9种.其中,硅藻为优势类群,甲藻次之,以束毛藻为主要组分的固氮蓝藻也占有较大比例,而金藻仅在近岸10 m上层检出.细长翼根管藻、菱形海线藻、尖刺伪菱形藻、中肋骨条藻、佛氏海线藻、具槽帕拉藻、斯氏几内亚藻、铁氏束毛藻、纺锤角藻和旋沟藻为群落的优势种.调查区内浮游植物以广温种为主,其次是暖水种,而热带高盐和外海广温种较少.浮游植物细胞丰度平均为每升67.59 x 102个.浮游植物垂直分布的总体特点是丰度在表层最大,随着水深增加逐渐减小.浮游植物细胞丰度的平面和断面分布不均匀,密集区出现在南澳岛邻近海域,与上升流中心重合.上升流强度较弱或在涌升早期阶段,浮游植物细胞丰度增长不明显,密集区位于或邻近上升流中心.南澳岛至漳浦一线海域的4条断面(B,C、D、E)浮游植物细胞丰度值较高,存在经由台湾浅滩的陆架海流向近岸的上涌现象.10 m上层浮游植物细胞丰度与磷酸盐(PO(-3)4)呈显著正相关,幂函数拟合最佳,与无机氮盐(DIN)没有显著的相关关系.对浮游植物营养盐胁迫的生理生态学研究有助于理解上升流区浮游植物的细胞丰度变化和水华的形成.%Based on the investigation data of 133 samples from 30 grid stations in the Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling region (21.6°-24. 3°N,115. 7°-118.7° E) in 11-16 June 2009 , this paper studied the phytoplankton species composition and cell abundance in the region in three dimensions ( vertical. horizontal. and sectional) , and approached their relations with major

  4. Meteorological constraints on oceanic halocarbons above the Peruvian upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Quack, Birgit; Atlas, Elliot; Fiehn, Alina; Hepach, Helmke; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-09-01

    During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) were investigated above the Peruvian upwelling. This study presents novel observations of the three very short lived substances (VSLSs) - bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide - together with high-resolution meteorological measurements, Lagrangian transport and source-loss calculations. Oceanic emissions of bromoform and dibromomethane were relatively low compared to other upwelling regions, while those for methyl iodide were very high. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting as strong barriers for convection and vertical transport of trace gases in this region. Observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height correlated well during the cruise. We used a simple source-loss estimate to quantify the contribution of oceanic emissions along the cruise track to the observed atmospheric concentrations. This analysis showed that averaged, instantaneous emissions could not support the observed atmospheric mixing ratios of VSLSs and that the marine background abundances below the trade inversion were significantly influenced by advection of regional sources. Adding to this background, the observed maximum emissions of halocarbons in the coastal upwelling could explain the high atmospheric VSLS concentrations in combination with their accumulation under the distinct MABL and trade inversions. Stronger emissions along the nearshore coastline likely added to the elevated abundances under the steady atmospheric conditions. This study underscores the importance of oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on the atmospheric distribution of marine VSLS emissions.

  5. 南海西北部陆架区沿岸流和上升流对中华哲水蚤分布的影响%Effects of coastal current and upwelling on the distributions of Calanus sinicus on the northwest continental shelf of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹健强; 黄良民; 李开枝; 练树民; 李超伦; 张建林

    2013-01-01

    Calanus sinicus is a planktonic copepod with wide geographical distribution on the continental shelf of the northwest Pacific It plays an important role in marine system. Four cruises were conducted from July 2006 to October 2007 in order to understand the seasonal and horizontal variations with the influences of monsoon, ocean cur-rent and temperature on its distributions on the northwest continental shelf of the South China Sea. The diel vertical migration (DVM) of C. sinicus was studied at one station located in the southeast of Hainan Island during summer. The results showed that the distribution of C. sinicus abundance varied seasonally and regionally. The mean of C. sinicus abundance was high with 23. 30±77. 78 ind. /m3 in spring, and decreased to 13. 74 + 45.10 ind. /m3 in summer. It disappeared in autumn and did not enter into the study area during the investigated period in winter. The surveyed area was divided into three sub-regions in order to further analyze the regional difference, including the east inshore waters of Leizhou Peninsula, the east inshore waters of Hainan Island and and the offshore waters from Leizhou Peninsula to Hainan Island. The average abundance of C. sinicus within the inshore waters of Leizhou Peninsula was reached to be 115. 63 (±145. 93) and 68. 12 (±84. 00) ind/m3 in spring and summer, respectively, which was higher than those of the inshore Hainan Island and the offshore from Leizhou Peninsula to Hainan Island. The behavior of C. sinicus DVM was not found in the upwelling area in summer. C. sinicus seemed to be mostly habited in the bottom layer in order to avoid the damage of high temperature in the surface layer. The study area is the seasonal distribution zone of C. sinicus. Our findings suggested that C. sinicus was transported from the East China Sea to the northwest continental shelf of South China Sea by the Guangdong Coastal Current, which was driven by the northeast monsoon in winter and spring. The presence of a

  6. Stratigraphic modeling of organic matter distribution and preservation in deep marine environment. Case of a margin with pelagic sedimentation: the coastal upwelling system of Benguela (Namibia, Western South Africa); Modelisation stratigraphique de la distribution et de la preservation de la matiere organique en milieu marin profond. Cas d'une marge a sedimentation pelagique: systeme d'upwelling cotier du Benguela (Namibie, Afrique du Sud Ouest)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranier, J.

    2006-06-15

    In order to develop stratigraphic modelling of organic matter distribution and preservation in marine environment, the methodology established, uses three modelling softwares. We make use of a 3D stratigraphic model, DIONISOS, which allows to build margin thanks to sediment input and transport and thanks to basin deformation. Biogenic sediments are introduced in DIONISOS after their production modelling by two coupled models, ROMS and NPZD. ROMS is a physical model which allows to simulate upwelling dynamics thanks to wind strength exerted on ocean surface and to margin morphology. NPZD models relationships (photosynthesis, grazing, excretion, mortality, re-mineralization, etc.) between four boxes: nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. Nutrients availability (model inputs) and flux intensity between boxes are controlled by upwelling dynamics, i-e ROMS. Thanks to these three softwares, organic matter can be modelled from its production to its fossilization considering the influence of various factors as upwelling intensity, nutrients availability, chemical compounds of water mass and oxygenation of water column, species competition (diatoms and coccolithophoridae), margin morphology and eustatism. After testing sensibility of the various parameters of the three models, we study their capacity for reproduce biogenic sedimentation and simulate climatic cycle effect on organic matter distribution on a passive continental margin: the Namibian margin (Southwest Africa). They are validated comparing results with core data from this margin. (author)

  7. Current, CTD, and other data from the YAQUINA and other platforms from the coastal waters of Washington/Oregon as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 28 January 1975 to 01 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7800403)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current, CTD, and other data were collected from the YAQUINA and other platforms from the coastal waters of Washington/Oregon from 28 January 1975 to 01 September...

  8. Physical, chemical, and other data from bottle casts from the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 11 July 1973 to 21 July 1973 (NODC Accession 7601145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 11 July 1973 to 21...

  9. Surface circulation and upwelling patterns around Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de Vos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sri Lanka occupies a unique location within the equatorial belt in the northern Indian Ocean with the Arabian Sea on its western side and the Bay of Bengal on its eastern side. The region is characterised by bi-annually reversing monsoon winds resulting from seasonal differential heating and cooling of the continental land mass and the ocean. This study explored elements of the dynamics of the surface circulation and coastal upwelling in the waters around Sri Lanka using satellite imagery and the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS configured to the study region and forced with ECMWF interim data. The model was run for 2 yr to examine the seasonal and shorter term (∼10 days variability. The results confirmed the presence of the reversing current system in response to the changing wind field: the eastward flowing Southwest Monsoon Current (SMC during the Southwest (SW monsoon transporting 11.5 Sv and the westward flowing Northeast Monsoon Current (NMC transporting 9.5 Sv during the Northeast (NE monsoon, respectively. A recirculation feature located to the east of Sri Lanka during the SW monsoon, the Sri Lanka Dome, is shown to result from the interaction between the SMC and the Island of Sri Lanka. Along the eastern and western coasts, during both monsoon periods, flow is southward converging along the south coast. During the SW monsoon the Island deflects the eastward flowing SMC southward whilst along the east coast the southward flow results from the Sri Lanka Dome recirculation. The major upwelling region, during both monsoon periods, is located along the south coast and is shown to be due to flow convergence and divergence associated with offshore transport of water. Higher surface chlorophyll concentrations were observed during the SW monsoon. The location of the flow convergence and hence the upwelling centre was dependent on the relative strengths of wind driven flow along the east and west coasts: during the SW (NE monsoon the flow

  10. Diel variation in the vertical distribution of fish larvae forced by upwelling filaments off Punta Angamos (northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M Rojas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of daily vertical migration (DVM of ichthyoplanktonic associations off Punta Angamos, in northern Chile, was examined. In September 1998 and January 1999, two oceanographic surveys were conducted during coastal upwelling events. Fish larvae were collected during the day/night in three depth strata (0-20, 20-80 and 80-200 m and inside/outside of upwelling filaments. The study area was dominated by a southward flow along 200 m depth; meanwhile, the Ekman layer did not exceed 20 m depth. The greatest accumulation of larvae was found in the middle layer (20-80 m, where the current velocity was low and did not interact with the circulation associated with upwelling the filament formation. Most fish larvae were found in non-upwelling waters in the middle stratum. Independent of the origin of water (upwelling/non-upwelling, larvae of Dioge-nichthys laternatus (Myctophidae, Engraulis ringens (Engraulidae and Bathylagus nigrigenys (Bathylagidae showed a deeper vertical distribution during the day, suggesting a daily vertical migration. This behavior can potentially increase retention of larvae near the coast in productive areas through vertical evasion of the Ekman layer during upwelling events.

  11. Late Quaternary upper-water column structure in upwelling areas of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a quantitative analysis of planktonic foraminifera in two gravity cores (17928 and 17954), the history of the upper-water structure of the eastern and western slopes of the South China Sea (SCS) over the last 220 Ka was reconstructed using the transfer function technique. Our results show that lower sea surface temperature (SST) and shallower depth of thermocline (DOT) exist at Core 17928, off Luzon, in the glacial periods; on the contrary, the same situation turned up in the interglacial at Core 17954, off Vietnam. These changes of the upper-water column structure in the two areas are induced by coastal upwelling, which in turn is driven by monsoons, namely, winter monsoon leads to upwelling at the eastern slope, and summer monsoon gives birth to upwelling on the western slope. Moreover, the intensity of upwellings is also closely related to the evolution of the East Asian monsoon. Therefore, we assume that the changes of the upwelling in the two sites indicate strengthenning of winter and su mmer monsoon during the glacial and interglacial periods, respectively.

  12. Microbial and biogeochemical responses to projected future nitrate enrichment in the California upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal California is a dynamic upwelling region where nitrogen (N and iron (Fe can both limit productivity and influence biogeochemistry over different spatial and temporal scales. With global change, the flux of nitrate from upwelling is expected to increase over the next century, potentially driving additional oceanic regions toward Fe limitation. In this study we explored the effect of changes in Fe/N ratio on native phytoplankton from five currently Fe-replete sites near the major California upwelling centers at Bodega Bay and Monterey Bay using nutrient addition incubation experiments. Despite the high nitrate levels (13-30 M in the upwelled water, phytoplankton at three of the five sites showed increased growth when 10 M nitrate was added. None of the sites showed enhanced growth following addition of 10 nM Fe. Nitrate additions favored slow sinking single-celled diatoms over faster sinking chain-forming diatoms, suggesting that future increases in nitrate flux could affect carbon and silicate export and alter grazer populations. In particular, solitary cells of Cylindrotheca were more abundant than the toxin-producing genus Pseudonitzschia following nitrate addition. These responses suggest the biogeochemistry of coastal California could change in response to future increases in nitrate, and multiple stressors like ocean acidification and hypoxia may further result in ecosystem shifts.

  13. Iron Meteorites and Upwelling in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, B. S.; Behr, E.; Mardon, A.; Behr, E.

    2016-09-01

    In Antarctica, a meteorite stranding zone, stone meteorites are more common than iron. Dr. Evatt's team suggests that the heat conductivity of iron may be opposing the upwelling effects so iron meteorites sink under the ice unlike the stone ones.

  14. Nutrients, oxygen and biogeochemical processes in the Humboldt upwelling current system off Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I. Graco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The upwelling system of the Humboldt Current, is considered among the most productive systems in the world, extending along the eastern South Pacific off Chile and Peru. In particular the coastal waters off Peru attracted considerable interest for being among the most fertile and productive the world, highlighting fisheries, such as anchovy, which represent one of the pillars of the economy of Peru.

  15. Modelling an alkenone-like proxy record in the NW African upwelling

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A regional biogeochemical model is applied to the NW African coastal upwelling between 19° N and 27° N to investigate how a water temperature proxy is produced at the sea surface and recorded in the slope sediments. The biological model has two phytoplankton groups, to distinguish an alkenone producer group (considered as coccolithophores) from other phytoplankton. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) is used to simulate the ocean circulation, and takes advantage of the ...

  16. Ecology of planktonic cephalopod paralarvae in coastal upwelling systems

    OpenAIRE

    Roura, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    [spa] Esta tesis es el fruto de tres años de muestreo nocturno de zooplancton en la Ría de Vigo (2008-2010) y dos campañas oceanográficas realizadas sobre la plataforma y el talud continental del noroeste de la Península Ibérica (CAIBEX-I) y del noroeste de África (CAIBEX-III). El objetivo principal de este trabajo era comprender aspectos fundamentales de la ecología de las paralarvas planctónicas del pulpo común, Octopus vulgaris, tales como su dieta en la naturaleza, su distribución en las ...

  17. Benthic primary production in an upwelling-influenced coral reef, Colombian Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Hauffe, Torsten; Pizarro, Valeria; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombian Caribbean), abiotic factors such as light intensity, water temperature, and nutrient availability are subjected to high temporal variability due to seasonal coastal upwelling. These factors are the major drivers controlling coral reef primary production as one of the key ecosystem services. This offers the opportunity to assess the effects of abiotic factors on reef productivity. We therefore quantified primary net (Pn) and gross production (Pg) of the dominant local primary producers (scleractinian corals, macroalgae, algal turfs, crustose coralline algae, and microphytobenthos) at a water current/wave-exposed and-sheltered site in an exemplary bay of Tayrona National Natural Park. A series of short-term incubations was conducted to quantify O2 fluxes of the different primary producers during non-upwelling and the upwelling event 2011/2012, and generalized linear models were used to analyze group-specific O2 production, their contribution to benthic O2 fluxes, and total daily benthic O2 production. At the organism level, scleractinian corals showed highest Pn and Pg rates during non-upwelling (16 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1), and corals and algal turfs dominated the primary production during upwelling (12 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1, respectively). At the ecosystem level, corals contributed most to total Pn and Pg during non-upwelling, while during upwelling, corals contributed most to Pn and Pg only at the exposed site and macroalgae at the sheltered site, respectively. Despite the significant spatial and temporal differences in individual productivity of the investigated groups and their different contribution to reef productivity, differences for daily ecosystem productivity were only present for Pg at exposed with higher O2 fluxes during non-upwelling compared to upwelling. Our findings therefore indicate that total benthic primary productivity of local autotrophic reef communities is

  18. Benthic primary production in an upwelling-influenced coral reef, Colombian Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvin Eidens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombian Caribbean, abiotic factors such as light intensity, water temperature, and nutrient availability are subjected to high temporal variability due to seasonal coastal upwelling. These factors are the major drivers controlling coral reef primary production as one of the key ecosystem services. This offers the opportunity to assess the effects of abiotic factors on reef productivity. We therefore quantified primary net (Pn and gross production (Pg of the dominant local primary producers (scleractinian corals, macroalgae, algal turfs, crustose coralline algae, and microphytobenthos at a water current/wave-exposed and-sheltered site in an exemplary bay of Tayrona National Natural Park. A series of short-term incubations was conducted to quantify O2 fluxes of the different primary producers during non-upwelling and the upwelling event 2011/2012, and generalized linear models were used to analyze group-specific O2 production, their contribution to benthic O2 fluxes, and total daily benthic O2 production. At the organism level, scleractinian corals showed highest Pn and Pg rates during non-upwelling (16 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1, and corals and algal turfs dominated the primary production during upwelling (12 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1, respectively. At the ecosystem level, corals contributed most to total Pn and Pg during non-upwelling, while during upwelling, corals contributed most to Pn and Pg only at the exposed site and macroalgae at the sheltered site, respectively. Despite the significant spatial and temporal differences in individual productivity of the investigated groups and their different contribution to reef productivity, differences for daily ecosystem productivity were only present for Pg at exposed with higher O2 fluxes during non-upwelling compared to upwelling. Our findings therefore indicate that total benthic primary productivity of local autotrophic reef

  19. Distribution of 226Ra Radionuclide in Upwelling Event Off Ulsan, Gampo and Pohang, Korea

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    Muslim

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Upwelling is an important event in the sea for it makes the area to become more productive. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of radium-226 as radiotoxic in the upwelling area in the summer season. Measurements of the horizontal and vertical activities of 226Ra in the Ulsan, Gampo and Pohang waters were conducted in June, August 1999 and June 2000 when the upwelling event was expected to occur. Water temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO were also measured concurrently. The thermocline layer or the layer where the temperature decreased drastically occurred at a depth between 30 m to 100 m for samples dated June 1999 and 30 m to more than 100 m for samples dated August 1999 and June 2000. The salinity decreased with depth but the DO concentration increased in this layer. The condition affected the vertical distribution of 226Ra in the study area, where the 226Ra activities showed to be relatively homogeneous vertically in each station. This indicates that the upwelling which occurred in the study area was capable to distribute the 226Ra activities from the bottom to the surface. Thus, the 226Ra distribution at that time did not increase with depth, opposite to what usually occurs in the ocean at normal condition. The 226Ra activities also did not decrease after elapsed time of one year, in fact, it increased. However, horizontally the 226Ra activities decreased with increasing distance from the coastal zone. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the upwelling event in the Ulsan, Gampo and Pohang was effective for increasing the 226Ra activities and was capable to create homogeneous 226Ra activities from the bottom to the surface in the water column, and the source of 226Ra was likely to originate from outside area (i.e. coastal zone and bottom area.

  20. The use of circulation weather types to predict upwelling activity along the Western Iberian Peninsula coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre M.; Cordeiro Pires, Ana; Sousa, Pedro M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2013-04-01

    Coastal upwelling is a phenomenon that occurs in most western oceanic coasts due to the presence of mid-latitude high-pressure systems that generate equatorward winds along the coast and consequent offshore displacement of surface waters that in turn cause deeper, colder, nutrient-rich waters to arise. In western Iberian Peninsula (IP) the high-pressure system associated to northerly winds occurs mainly during spring and summer. Upwelling systems are economically relevant, being the most productive regions of the world ocean and crucial for fisheries. In this work, we evaluate the intra- and inter-annual variability of the Upwelling Index (UI) off the western coast of the IP considering four locations at various latitudes: Rias Baixas, Aveiro, Figueira da Foz and Cabo da Roca. In addition, the relationship between the variability of the occurrence of several circulation weather types (Ramos et al., 2011) and the UI variability along this coast was assessed in detail, allowing to discriminate which types are frequently associated with strong and weak upwelling activity. It is shown that upwelling activity is mostly driven by wind flow from the northern quadrant, for which the obtained correlation coefficients (for the N and NE types) are higher than 0.5 for the four considered test locations. Taking into account these significant relationships, we then developed statistical multi-linear regression models to hindcast upwelling series (April to September) at the four referred locations, using monthly frequencies of circulation weather types as predictors. Modelled monthly series reproduce quite accurately observational data, with correlation coefficients above 0.7 for all locations, and relatively small absolute errors. Ramos AM, Ramos R, Sousa P, Trigo RM, Janeira M, Prior V (2011) Cloud to ground lightning activity over Portugal and its association with Circulation Weather Types. Atmospheric Research 101:84-101. doi: 10.1016/j.atmosres.2011.01

  1. Role of Ekman Transport Versus Ekman Pumping in Driving Summer Upwelling in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dakui; WANG Hui; LI Ming; LIU Guimei; WU Xiangyu

    2013-01-01

    Relative roles of Ekman transport and Ekman pumping in driving summer upwelling in the South China Sea (SCS) are examined using QuikSCAT scatterometer wind data.The major upwelling regions in the SCS are the coastal regions east and southeast of Vietnam (UESEV),east and southeast of Hainan Island (UESEH),and southeast of Guangdong province (USEG).It is shown that the Ekman transport due to alongshore winds and Ekman pumping due to offshore wind stress curl play different roles in the three upwelling systems.In UESEV,Ekman pumping and Ekman transport are equally important in generating upwelling.The Ekman transport increases linearly from 0.49 Sv in May to 1.23 Sv in August,while the Ekman pumping increases from 0.36 to 1.22 Sv during the same period.In UESEH,the mean estimates of Ekman transport and Ekman pumping are 0.14 and 0.07 Sv,respectively,indicating that 33% of the total wind-driven upwelling is due to Ekman pumping.In USEG,the mean Ekman transport is 0.041 Sv with the peak occurring in July,while Ekman pumping is much smaller (0.003 on average),indicating that the upwelling in this area is primarily driven by Ekman transport.In the summers of 2003 and 2007 following E1 Ni(n)o-Southem Oscillation (ENSO) events,both Ekman transport and Ekman pumping decrease in UESEV due to the abnormally weak southwest monsoon.During the same events,however,Ekman transport is slightly enhanced and Ekman pumping is weakened in UESEH and USEG.

  2. Variabilidad estacional de cadmio en un sistema de surgencia costera del norte de Chile (Bahía Mejillones del Sur, 23° S Seasonal variability of cadmium in a coastal upwelling system off northern Chile (Mejillones bay, 23° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE VALDÉS

    2006-12-01

    observada en esta razón pueden ser explicados ya sea por una mayor eficiencia en la remoción de PO4 que de Cadmio en las aguas superficiales o una mayor remineralización de cadmio en las aguas subsuperficialesTotal and dissolved cadmium were measured from surface to 100 m water depth, between June 2002 and April 2003, in Mejillones bay. Total and dissolved cadmium range concentration was 0.41-10.7 and 0.08-1.61 nM, respectively. Cadmium profiles and water structure were used to study seasonal variability patterns of this metal in this upwelling system. Oceanographic conditions during this period correspond to a normal (non-El Niño year. Water masses present in this bay correspond to subantartic superficial water, subtropical superficial water and Equatorial subsuperficial water with different degree of mixture and stratification during sampling period. Cadmium profiles showed a classic nutrient-type distribution. Whereas some differences in this profiles could be attributed to a water masses mixing condition into the bay. Multivariate analysis indicates that temporal cadmium variations were associated with chlorophyll-a concentration and temperature fluctuation, indicating that, at this temporal resolution, phytoplanktonic biomass production is the principal factor controlling cadmium concentration in surface waters of Mejillones bay. By other hand, in spite of cadmium being a redox-sensitive metal, any significant influence of dissolved oxygen on this metal were founded, thus microxic condition of bottom water of Mejillones bay is not the principal factor that promotes cadmium flux to the sediments. Cd/PO4 ratio is in agreement with normal values reported for the Chilean coast, and its low values, compared with the northeast Pacific coast, can be explained either by the fact that PO4 is more efficiently removed than cadmium from the surface layer, or that cadmium remineralization is occurring much faster than in the case of PO4

  3. Comparative study of potential transfer of natural and anthropogenic cadmium to plankton communities in the North-West African upwelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, P.A., E-mail: pierreamael.auger@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Océans (LPO), UMR-CNRS 6523/IFREMER/IRD/UBO, BP70, 29280 Plouzané (France); Machu, E.; Gorgues, T.; Grima, N. [Laboratoire de Physique des Océans (LPO), UMR-CNRS 6523/IFREMER/IRD/UBO, BP70, 29280 Plouzané (France); Waeles, M. [Université de Bretagne Occidentale (UBO), Laboratoire de l' Environnement Marin (LEMAR), UMR-CNRS 6539/IRD/UBO, place N. Copernic, 29280 Plouzané (France)

    2015-02-01

    A Lagrangian approach based on a physical–biogeochemical modeling was used to compare the potential transfer of cadmium (Cd) from natural and anthropogenic sources to plankton communities (Cd-uptake) in the North-West African upwelling. In this region, coastal upwelling was estimated to be the main natural source of Cd while the most significant anthropogenic source for marine ecosystem is provided by phosphate industry. In our model experiment, Cd-uptake (natural or anthropogenic) in the North-West African upwelling is the result of an interplay between the Cd dispersion (by advection processes) and the simulated biological productivity. In the Moroccan waters, advection processes limit the residence time of water masses resulting in a low natural Cd-uptake by plankton communities while anthropogenic Cd-uptake is high. As expected, the situation is reversed in the Senegalo-Mauritanian upwelling where natural Cd-uptake is higher than anthropogenic Cd-uptake. Based upon an estimate of Cd sources, our modeling study shows, unexpectedly, that the anthropogenic signal of potential Cd-bioaccumulation in the Moroccan upwelling is of the same order of magnitude as the natural signal mainly present in the Senegalo-Mauritanian upwelling region. A comparison with observed Cd levels in mollusk and fishes, which shows overall agreement with our simulations, is confirming our estimates. - Highlights: • We model the physical–biogeochemical dynamics in the North-West African upwelling. • We model the transport of cadmium from natural and anthropogenic sources. • We derive proxies of potential cadmium absorption and bioaccumulation in the plankton food chain. • The anthropogenic signal off Morocco at least equals the natural upwelling signal off Mauritania. • We compare our results with observed cadmium levels in mollusks and fishes.

  4. Reflections on the Chilean Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia SANTOS PÉREZ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chile has historically excelled in Latin America for its political stability and its institutional strength, which did not prevent it from living under an authoritarian regime (1973-1988. The political transition was a consequence of a fast political pact between the military and a strong political class that led to a limited democracy because of the origin and content of the Constitution, partially overcome by the constitutional reform of 2005. However, the slow development of the Chilean democratic process is due to both the institutional framework and the behavior of the political actors who have favored political stability based on consensus before the plurality of competition and the political debate for the sake of democratic quality.

  5. West Florida shelf upwelling: Origins and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Liu, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    Often described as oligotrophic, the west Florida continental shelf supports abundant fisheries, experiences blooms of the harmful alga, Karenia brevis, and exhibits subsurface chlorophyll maxima evident in shipboard and glider surveys. Renewal of inorganic nutrients by the upwelling of deeper ocean water onto the shelf may account for this, but what are the origins and pathways by which such new water may broach the shelf break and advance toward the shoreline? We address these questions via numerical model simulations of pseudo-Lagrangian, isopycnic water parcel trajectories. Focus is on 2010, when the west Florida shelf was subjected to an anomalously protracted period of upwelling caused by Gulf of Mexico Loop Current interactions with the shelf slope. Origins and pathways are determined by integrating trajectories over successive 45 day intervals, beginning from different locations along the shelf break and at various locations and depths along the shelf slope. Waters upwelling across the shelf break are found to originate from relatively shallow depths along the shelf slope. Even for the anomalous 2010 year, much of this upwelling occurs from about 150 m and above, although waters may broach the shelf break from 300 m depth, particularly in the Florida Panhandle. Such interannual renewal of west Florida shelf waters appears to have profound effects on west Florida shelf ecology.

  6. Impact of climate change on surface wind regime over the Peru-Chile upwelling region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubanova, K.; Echevin, V.; Dewitte, B.; Garreaud, R.; Terray, P.; Vrac, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ocean region off the Chile-Peru coast is characterized by upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich waters, which drives an exceptionally high biological productivity. This upwelling is induced by the persistent southerly winds along the coast that exhibit a coastal jet structure at intraseasonal scales. Recent climate change studies based on the coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCM) show a strengthening of the large-scale southerlies along the subtropical coast that could lead to an increase in coastal upwelling. However the coastal jet events which represent a considerable source of the synoptic variability of the alongshore winds are characterized by horizontal scale comparable to a AOGCM grid cell size, and cannot be therefore explicitly resolved by the AOGCMs. In order to provide a regional estimate of the winds as predicted by the coarse-resolution AOGCMs, a statistical downscaling method based on multiple linear regression is proposed. Large-scale wind at 10 m and sea level pressure are chosen as the predictor variables for regional 10 m wind. The validation is performed in two steps. First, QuikSCAT and ERS satellite products and NCEP reanalysis for the period 1992-2006 are used to build and validate the statistical model for the present climate. Second, the model is validated under a warmer climate: it is applied to large-scale predictors extracted from HadCM3 AOGCM simulations for the A2 and B2 SRES scenarios (2071-2100); the downscaled wind is then compared with outputs of the PRECIS regional climate model, forced at its boundaries by the same HadCM3 scenarios. To assess climate change impact on the along-shore wind, the statistical downscaling is applied to two contrasted SRES scenarios, namely the so-called preindustrial and CO2 quadrupling. The outputs of the IPSL-CM4 AOGCM are used as predictors. Evolution of the along-shore wind regime with a focus on the change of the coastal jet characteristics is discussed. For this particular

  7. Low-frequency variations in primary production in the Oman upwelling zone associated with monsoon winds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Xiaomei; ZHAN Haigang; WEI Xing

    2012-01-01

    Thirteen-year satellite-derived data are used to investigate the temporal variability of net primaryproduction (NPP) in the Oman upwelling zone and its potential forcing mechanisms.The NPP in the Oman upwelling zone is characterized by an abnormal decrease during El Ni(n)o events.Such an NPP decrease may be related to El Ni(n)o-driven anomalous summertime weak wind.During the summer following El Ni(n)o,the anomalous northeasterly wind forced by southwest Indian Ocean warming weakens the southwest monsoon and warms the Arabian Sea.The abnormal wind weakens the coastal Ekman transport,offshore Ekman pumping and horizontal advection,resulting in reduced upward nutrient supply to the euphotic zone.A slightly declining trend in NPP after 2000 associated with a gradual decrease in surface monsoon winds is discussed.

  8. Phosphorus cycling in the red tide incubator region of Monterey Bay in response to upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the cycling of phosphorus (P in the euphotic zone following upwelling in northeastern Monterey Bay (the Red Tide Incubator region of coastal California, with particular emphasis on how phytoplankton and bacteria mediate and respond to changes in P availability. In situ measurements of nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton community composition, and cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (determined via enzyme labeled fluorescence assay were measured during 3 cruises. Upwelling led to a 10-fold increase in dissolved inorganic (DIP in surface waters, reaching ~0.5 mol L-1. This DIP was drawn down rapidly as upwelling relaxed over a period of 1 week. Relatively low ratios of nitrate to DIP uptake (~5:1 suggest that luxury P uptake was occurring as phytoplankton bloomed. Dissolved organic (DOP remained relatively constant (~0.3mol L-1 before and immediately following upwelling, but doubled as upwelling relaxed, likely due to phytoplankton excretion and release during grazing. This transition from a relatively high DIP:DOP ratio to lower DIP:DOP ratio was accompanied by a decline in the abundance of diatoms, which had low AP activity, toward localized, spatially-heterogeneous blooms of dinoflagellates in the genera Prorocentrum, Ceratium, Dinophysis, Alexandrium, and Scrippsiella that showed high AP activity regardless of ambient DIP levels. A nutrient addition incubation experiment showed that phytoplankton growth was primarily limited by nitrate, followed by DIP and then DOP, suggesting that P is a regulating, rather than limiting, nutrient in this region. AP activity was observed in bacteria associated with lysed cell debris and aggregates of particulate organic material, where it may serve to facilitate P regeneration, as well as affixed to the surfaces of intact phytoplankton cells, possibly indicative of close, beneficial phytoplankton-bacteria interactions.

  9. Initial observation of upwelling along east coast of Peninsular Malaysia musica-gratis.softonic.it/ >musica gratis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhir, M.; Tanggang, F.

    2013-12-01

    There is no published evidence of upwelling in coastal area along the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. However numbers of recent cruise data collected during the southwest monsoon found features of thermocline lifting and isolated cooler temperature water along the coast, These sign was observed along the 104°E from numbers of parallel transects. To confirm the presence of upwelling, satellite remote sensing data was used, and numerical model experiments were conducted. Cooler sea-surface temperature along the coast was observed from both in-situ and satellite data, while upward movement in the vertical profiles agreed with the location of upwelling from both in-situ and satellite data. Moreover, these data also show that the upwelled water band along the 104°E longitude stretch approximately 650 km long. Initially, southwesterly wind during this season is believed to be the important mechanism that contributed to this wind-induced Ekman upwelling. musica-gratis.softonic.it/ >musica gratis

  10. A physical view of La Guajira Upwelling System, Colombian Basin, Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, G.; Beier, E.; Barton, E. D.; Ruiz-Ochoa, M.; Correa, J. G.

    2013-05-01

    La Guajira Peninsula lies within a large upwelling system along the South Caribbean Coast, created by the NE trade winds. In this location, sea surface temperature (SST) exhibits the lowest mean value and the highest variability in the whole Colombian Basin. The seasonal variation of SST explains up to 75 % of the total variability. La Guajira coastal zone also experiences the highest values of wind stress and wind stress curl, with the greatest annual and semiannual variability in the Colombian Basin. It has been shown that wind stress curl enhances the upwelling over the region. Near 90% of the variability of SST in La Guajira can be explained by the seasonality plus the first three EOFs interannual modes: the first, synchronous throughout the Basin, is dominant, and consists of a uniform interannual variation in phase with the North Tropical Atlantic Index; the second co-varies strongly with the second mode of wind stress curl; and the third reflects the role of the vertical atmospheric circulation cell associated with the Caribbean Low Level Jet off Central America. The inclusion of wind stress curl with its maximum offshore of La Guajira explains in part the extension of cool coastal water into the Colombian Basin, with advection in filaments, eddies and meanders. In order to complement the physical knowledge of La Guajira upwelling system, an analysis of water masses, sea surface height, Ekman suction, Ekman transport and coastal upwelling index (CUI) was performed. Hydrographic data was obtained from gridded climatologies from the National Oceanographic Data Center (WOD01); sea surface height anomalies from the Archiving, Validation, and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanography (AVISO) data; and wind data from the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform Ocean Surface Wind Velocity Product for Meteorological and Oceanographic Applications (CCMP). The upwelling forms a local water mass, La Guajira surface water (LGSW), with the mixing of subtropical underwater and

  11. Paleomagnetism of Permian and Triassic rock, central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Randall D.; Kent, Dennis V.; Mpodozis, Constantino; Davidson, John

    The first paleomagnetic data from Permian and Triassic formations west of the Andean divide are presented. Four formations of Permian or Triassic age in the central Chilean Andes have been investigated: two are located in the coastal ranges, and two are in the main cordillera. Of the formations in the main cordillera (Pastos Blancos and Matahuaico formations), only the Pastos Blancos Formation has yielded characteristic directions. While a fold test is absent, magnetizations are most likely secondary and yield pre-tilt corrected concordant inclinations, but yield declinations discordant 30° clockwise in comparison to the South American apparent polar wander path. Both formations from the coastal ranges (Cifuncho and Pichidangui formations) yielded stable directions. Postfolding magnetizations in the Cifuncho Formation also show declinations discordant 30° clockwise and concordant inclinations. The Pichidangui Formation has two stable components: one of postfolding age is concordant to apparent polar wander path data, and one of probable prefolding (Late Triassic) age is concordant in declination, but discordant in inclination. Further work is needed to better define the prefolding magnetizations in the Pichidangui Formation, but at present these preliminary results are the first paleomagnetic signs of displaced terranes along the Pacific margin of Chile. If correct, the results suggest that the Pichidangui Formation was some 15° of latitude farther south during the Late Triassic and had likely moved northward to its present latitudinal position with respect to cratonic South America by Middle to Late Jurassic.

  12. Biophysical interactions in the Cabo Frio upwelling system, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Augusto Coelho-Souza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The rising of cold water from deeper levels characterizes coastal upwelling systems. This flow makes nutrients available in the euphotic layer, which enhances phytoplankton production and growth. On the Brazilian coast, upwelling is most intense in the Cabo Frio region (RJ. The basic knowledge of this system was reviewed in accordance with concepts of biophysical interactions. The high frequency and amplitude of the prevailing winds are the main factor promoting the rise of South Atlantic Central Water, but meanders and eddies in the Brazil Current as well as local topography and coast line are also important. Upwelling events are common during spring/summer seasons. Primary biomass is exported by virtue of the water circulation and is also controlled by rapid zooplankton predation. Small pelagic fish regulate plankton growth and in their turn are preyed on by predatory fish. Sardine furnishes an important regional fish stock. Shoreline irregularities define the embayment formation of the Marine Extractive Reserve of Arraial do Cabo making it an area with evident different intensities of upwelled water that harbors high species diversity. Consequently, on a small spatial scale there are environments with tropical and subtropical features, a point to be explored as a particularity of this ecosystem.Os sistemas costeiros de ressurgência são caracterizados pela ascensão de águas frias que tornam os nutrientes disponíveis na camada eufótica para o crescimento e aumento da produção fitoplanctônica. No Brasil, a região do Cabo Frio (RJ é o principal sistema de ressurgência costeira. O objetivo desse artigo foi revisar o atual conhecimento desse sistema através dos conceitos sobre interações biofísicas. A ascensão da Água Central do Atlântico Sul ocorre devido à alta frequência e amplitude dos ventos, à presença de meandros e vórtices na Corrente do Brasil, além da topografia local e da linha de costa. Os eventos de ressurg

  13. Comment on "current separation and upwelling over the southeast shelf of Vietnam in the South China Sea" by Chen et al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippner, Joachim W.; Bombar, Deniz; Loick-Wilde, Natalie;

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Chen et al. (2012) showed that the offshore current in front of the Vietnamese upwelling area in the South China Sea (SCS) is caused by an encounter of southward buoyancy-driven coastal current and tidal rectified currents from the southwest. These findings seem not in agreemen...

  14. ICT & Learning in Chilean Schools: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jaime; Salinas, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    By the early nineties a Chilean network on computers and education for public schools had emerged. There were both high expectancies that technology could revolutionize education as well as divergent voices that doubted the real impact of technology on learning. This paper presents an evaluation of the Enlaces network, a national Information and…

  15. Fostering Teaching Quality in Chilean Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman Cruzat, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explain the strategies that have been carried out by three Chilean universities in order to advance the quality of their teaching. The studied institutions are the Universidad de los Andes, the Universidad de Talca and the Universidad Catolica de Chile. In each of these three cases the analysis included, both the policies…

  16. Surface Waters of the NW Iberian Margin: Upwelling on the Shelf versus Outwelling of Upwelled Waters from the Rı´as Baixas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Gago, J.; Míguez, B. M.; Gilcoto, M.; Pérez, F. F.

    2000-12-01

    A set of hydrographic surveys were carried out in the Rı´a of Vigo (NW Spain) at 2-4 d intervals during four 2-3 week periods in 1997, covering contrasting seasons. Residual exchange fluxes with the adjacent shelf were estimated with a 2-D, non-steady-state, salinity-temperature weighted box model. Exchange fluxes consist of a steady-state term (dependent on the variability of continental runoff) and a non-steady-state term (dependent on the time changes of density gradients in the embayment). More than 95% of the short-time-scale variability of the exchange fluxes in the middle and outer rı´a can be explained by the non-steady-state term that, in turns, is correlated (R 2>75%) with the offshore Ekman transport. Conversely, 96% of the variability of exchange fluxes in the inner rı´a rely on the steady-state term. The outer and middle rı´a are under the direct influence of coastal upwelling, which enhances the positive residual circulation pattern by an order of magnitude: from 10 2to 10 3 m 3s -1. On the contrary, downwelling provokes a reversal of the circulation in the outer rı´a. The position of the downwelling front along the embayment depends on the relative importance of Ekman transport ( Qx, m 3s -1km -1) and continental runoff ( R, m 3s -1). When Qx/ R>7±2 the reversal of the circulation affects the middle rı´a. Our results are representative for the 'Rı´as Baixas', four large coastal indentations in NW Spain. During the upwelling season (spring and summer), 60% of shelf surface waters off the 'Rı´as Baixas' consist of fresh Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) upwelled in situ. The remaining 40% consists of upwelled ENACW that previously enters the rı´as and it is subsequently outwelled after thermohaline modification. During the downwelling season (autumn and winter), 40% of the warm and salty oceanic subtropic surface water, which piled on the shelf by the predominant southerly winds, enters the rı´as.

  17. [The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H

    2001-01-01

    On September 29th, 2000, The Chilean Association of Biomedical Journal Editors was founded, sponsored by the "Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (CONICYT)" (the Governmental Agency promoting and funding scientific research and technological development in Chile) and the "Sociedad Médica de Santiago" (Chilean Society of Internal Medicine). The Association adopted the goals of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME) and therefore it will foster "cooperation and communication among Editors of Chilean biomedical journals; to improve editorial standards, to promote professionalism in medical editing through education, self-criticism and self-regulation; and to encourage research on the principles and practice of medical editing". Twenty nine journals covering a closely similar number of different biomedical sciences, medical specialties, veterinary, dentistry and nursing, became Founding Members of the Association. A Governing Board was elected: President: Humberto Reyes, M.D. (Editor, Revista Médica de Chile); Vice-President: Mariano del Sol, M.D. (Editor, Revista Chilena de Anatomía); Secretary: Anna María Prat (CONICYT); Councilors: Manuel Krauskopff, Ph.D. (Editor, Biological Research) and Maritza Rahal, M.D. (Editor, Revista de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello). The Association will organize a Symposium on Biomedical Journal Editing and will spread information stimulating Chilean biomedical journals to become indexed in international databases and in SciELO-Chile, the main Chilean scientific website (www.scielo.cl).

  18. Observations of Gulf Stream-induced and wind-driven upwelling in the Georgia Bight using ocean color and infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Pietrafesa, L. J.; Yoder, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Ocean color and infrared imagery from U2 aircraft and satellite sensors are used to study upwelling interaction between Gulf Stream and continental shelf waters in the Georgia Bight. The photographic data are combined with in situ measurements of currents, chlorophyll, temperature, salinity, coastal winds, and sea-level in observations of five different upwelling events including a near-short wind-driven upwelling caused by topographic effects, three filament-induced upwellings in the Gulf Stream, and a possible meander-induced upwelling event in the Gulf Stream. Chlorophyll distributions are used to trace the circulation and propagation of filaments along the advective routes by which the water moves offshore. Photographic and mooring array measurements of temperature time series are found to provide nearly identical results for the phase speeds of each event. Field measurements of surface pigments, and Nimbus/7 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates are found to agree well over the range of concentrations 0.1 to 0.7 mg/m to the third. Examples of U2/Ocean Color Scanner and Nimbus 7 CZCS photographs are provided.

  19. Oxygen cycling in the northern Benguela Upwelling System: Modelling oxygen sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin; Eggert, Anja

    2016-12-01

    This paper elucidates the oxygen dynamics in the northern Benguela Upwelling System by means of process oriented, numerical modelling. Owing to the complex physical-biological interaction in this system, a coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model is required to grasp the various aspects of the oxygen dynamics. We used high-resolution atmospheric fields derived from observations to force our model, available since 1999. The model results represent a 15 years, consistent data set of realistic hydrographic and ecosystem variables, including oxygen distribution patterns. After a concise description of the main aspects of the model, we use the model data to analyse the components contributing to the oxygen dynamics, namely, the ocean circulation, the exchange between ocean and atmosphere as well as the local biogeochemical oxygen cycling in the system. We thoroughly validate the model with available field observations and remote sensing data. The strengths of coastal upwelling, which controls the nutrient supply to the euphotic zone, as well as the poleward undercurrent that carries oxygen and nutrients to the shelf in the northern Benguela Upwelling System are well reproduced in the model. Among the biological oxygen sinks, mineralisation in the sediment, respiration of zooplankton and nitrification in the water column are important. We also found that vertical migration of zooplankton in response to the oxygen conditions provides a regulating feedback, which may prevent a complete deoxygenation of suboxic waters. As long as oxygen or nitrate are available in the bottom waters, the activities of chemolithoautotrophic sulphur bacteria on the sediment surface keep the redoxcline within the sediment and prevent the release of hydrogen sulphide into the water column. By horizontal integration of the simulated ocean-atmosphere oxygen flux, it can be shown that the Kunene upwelling cell between 16 ° S and 18 ° S is a boundary between the equatorial ocean, characterise by

  20. Spatio-temporal variation of microphytoplankton in the upwelling system of the south-eastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon of 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lathika Cicily Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The phytoplankton standing crop was assessed in detail along the South Eastern Arabian Sea (SEAS during the different phases of coastal upwelling in 2009. During phase 1 intense upwelling was observed along the southern transects(8°N and 8.5°N. The maximum chlorophyll a concentration (22.7 mg m-3 was observedin the coastal waters off Thiruvananthapuram (8.5°N. Further north there was no signature of upwelling, with extensive Trichodesmium erythraeum blooms. Diatoms dominated in these upwelling regions with thecentric diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus being the dominant species along the 8°N transect. Along the 8.5°N transect pennate diatoms like Nitzschia seriata and Pseudo-nitzschia sp. dominated. Duringphase 2, upwelling of varying intensity was observed throughout the study area with maximum chlorophyll a concentrations along the 9°N transect (25 mg m-3 with Chaetoceros curvisetus as the dominantphytoplankton. Along the 8.5°N transect pennate diatoms during phase 1 were replaced by centric diatoms like Chaetoceros sp. The presence of solitary pennate diatoms Amphora sp. and Navicula sp.were significant in the waters off Kochi. Upwelling was waning during phase 3 and was confined to the coastal waters of the southern transects with the highest chlorophyll a concentration of 11.2 mg m-3. Along withdiatoms, dinoflagellate cell densities increased in phases 2 and 3. In the northern transects (9°N and 10°N the proportion of dinoflagellates was comparatively higher and was represented mainly by Protoperidinium spp.

  1. Currents and upwelling along the Latium coasts in the Central Tyrrhenian Sea (western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rossi

    Full Text Available In this study, springtime coastal currents along the Latium coast and their relation to external forcings, mainly wind stress curl and atmospheric pressure, are analysed. As a main result, we find that hydrographical measurements reveal currents parallel to the bottom isobaths, but with isopycnal sloping upwards towards the coast, suggesting the importance of upwellings in determining the coastal currents. This is confirmed by thermal satellite data showing the presence of a ~10-km-wide patch of cold water east of Mount Argentario, i.e. a cyclonic vortex. The current meter data give rather small values of the time-averaged alongshore velocities (~2 cm s–1 for most current meters and ~3 cm s–1 for the current meter placed immediately off the Argentario and also smaller values for the offshore velocities. The correlation between these two types of currents is rather poor; this is also due to the variability characteristic of a wind-induced upwelling. Finally, we obtain a value of 0.74 for the correlation between the alongshore current (first mode of Empirical Orthogonal Functions decomposition and the wind stress if a 23-h time lag is assumed.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Effects of Upwelling on the Fatty Acid Composition of Benthic Filter Feeders in the Southern Benguela Ecosystem: Not All Upwelling Is Equal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Christopher David; Noyon, Margaux

    2016-01-01

    Variability in mesoscale nearshore oceanographic conditions plays an important role in the distribution of primary production and food availability for intertidal consumers. Advection of nutrient rich waters by upwelling usually allows the proliferation of diatoms, later replaced by dinoflagellates. We examined upwelling effects on the fatty acid (FA) signature of a benthic intertidal filter feeder to identify its response to pulsed variability in food availability. The study took place in two contrasting seasons and at two upwelling and two non-upwelling sites interspersed within the southern Benguela upwelling system of South Africa. We investigated the FA composition of the adductor muscles and gonads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis to assess how FA are apportioned to the different tissues and whether this changes between upwelling and non-upwelling conditions. In situ temperature loggers used to identify upwelling conditions at the four sites indicated that such events occurred only at the upwelling centres and only in summer. Tissues differed strongly, with gonads presenting a higher proportion of essential FAs. This could reflect the faster turnover rate of gonad tissue or preferential retention of specific FA for reproductive purposes. FA composition did not vary as a direct function of upwelling, but there were strong dissimilarities among sites. Upwelling influenced mussel diets at one upwelling site while at the other, the expected signature of upwelling was displaced downstream of the core of upwelling. Condition Index (CI) and Gonad Index (GI) differed among sites and were not influenced by upwelling, with GI being comparable among sites. In addition, FA proportions were consistent among sites, indicating similar food quality and quantity over time and under upwelling and non-upwelling conditions. This suggests that the influence of upwelling on the west coast of South Africa is pervasive and diffuse, rather than discrete; while nearshore

  3. Changes in optical characteristics of surface microlayers hint to photochemically and microbially mediated DOM turnover in the upwelling region off the coast of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Galgani, Luisa; Engel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The coastal upwelling system off the coast of Peru is characterized by high biological activity and a pronounced subsurface oxygen minimum zone, as well as associated emissions of atmospheric trace gases such as N2O, CH4 and CO2. From 3 to 23 December 2012, R/V Meteor (M91) cruise took place in the Peruvian upwelling system between 4.59 and 15.4° S, and 82.0 to 77.5° W. During M91 we investigated the composition of the sea-surface microlayer (SML), the oceanic uppermos...

  4. Monsoonal variability in abiotic parameters in coastal waters off Trivandrum evokes press and pulse response in biotic variables

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subina, N.S.; Bhosle, S.; Nair, S.; Lokabharathi, P.A.

    Trivandrum Coast experiences coastal upwelling during south west monsoon, which is accompanied by abiotic changes in physio-chemical parameters. The resultant biotic responses could range from an instantaneous pulse to a sustained press reaction...

  5. Upwelling features near Sri Lanka in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    ShreeRam, P.; Rao, L.V.G.

    , the southwest monsoon in summer and the northeast monsoon in winter. The wind stress associated with these winds cause mass drift of oceanic waters leading to upwelling and downwelling. The upwelling features in the Bay of Bengal with a special mention about...

  6. Evidence of Upwelling along Peninsular Malaysia during Southwest Monsoon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daryabor, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Upwelling off the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia (PM) was detected from recent cruise data collected during the southwest monsoon. Thermocline lifting was observed at 104˚E from a number of parallel transects. To confirm the presence of upwelling, satellite remote sensing data were used...

  7. Salinity inversions in the thermocline under upwelling favorable winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Basdurak, N. Berkay; Gräwe, Ulf; Knoll, Michaela; Mohrholz, Volker; Müller, Selina

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses and explains the phenomenon of salinity inversions in the thermocline offshore from an upwelling region during upwelling favorable winds. Using the nontidal central Baltic Sea as an easily accessible natural laboratory, high-resolution transect and station observations in the upper layers are analyzed. The data show local salinity minima in the strongly stratified seasonal thermocline during summer conditions under the influence of upwelling favorable wind. A simple analytical box model using parameters (including variation by means of a Monte Carlo method) estimated from a hindcast model for the Baltic Sea is constructed to explain the observations. As a result, upwelled water with high salinity and low temperature is warmed up due to downward surface heat fluxes while it is transported offshore by the Ekman transport. The warming of upwelled surface water allows maintenance of stable stratification despite the destabilizing salinity stratification, such that local salinity minima in the thermocline can be generated. Inspection of published observations from the Benguela, Peruvian, and eastern tropical North Atlantic upwelling systems shows that also there salinity inversions occur in the thermocline, but in these cases thermocline salinity shows local maxima, since upwelled water has a lower salinity than the surface water. It is hypothesized that thermocline salinity inversions should generally occur offshore from upwelling regions whenever winds are steady enough and surface warming is sufficiently strong.

  8. [Chilean's nursing knowledge organization and their tendencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Sara Mendoza; Klijin, Tatiana Paravic

    2004-01-01

    A Quantitative, descriptive and retrospective research that explored the Chilean Nursing knowledge organization an their tendencies. The universe was composed by scientists reports published in the Chilean nursing journals between 1965 and 2003 (N=214). Data were collected by an instrument based on the CIPE's and Nogueira's classification and cienciometría indications. Statistics measures of central tendency analysis was managed with SPSS. Some of the results obtained were: the more frequent study subject's was the professional nursing and the tendency is to be focused at the mature people's health necessities and their risk of being ill. It was found: little theoretical nursing sustenance at the reports. The "Ciencia y Enfermería" is the journal that exhibits the best scientific quality of alls.

  9. Constructing Realities: Bullying Usages in Chilean Discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bassaletti-Contreras

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The article reports an exploratory research on the uses given in Chile to the Anglicism bullying. In order to do so, its evolution is reviewed from the early studies in the Nordic countries, to the treatment of the topic in the Chilean context. The focus of this work is based on socioconstructionism and in turn promotes the consideration of the characteristics of the socio-cultural and historical context of knowledge production with a postcolonial intention. To review the constructions on the subject, we selected Chilean videos at the YouTube virtual platform, using as methodology discourse analysis and dense description. In results can be observed two meanings of bullying: (i to refer to any kind of aggression and (ii as a homologous of abuse among schoolchildren. In response, it is realized the discrepancy with the proposed definitions from general academia and those used in the local environment in investigations, interventions, public policy and mass media in Chile.

  10. An overview of Chilean Marine Sciences Journals

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The work provides a global vision of Chilean marine sciences journals, besides the problems that have existed in relation to their edition and publication. In spite of being serious publications with rich scientific content related to the study area, mainly along the coast of the eastern South Pacific, these journals have not reached the expected levels to be considered within the ISI system journals. With the purpose of obtaining an objective appreciation in regard to the presentation format...

  11. Uniparental ancestry markers in Chilean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Dutra Vieira-Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans has led to the development of a multi-ethnic, admixed population in Chile. This study aimed to contribute to the characterization of the uniparental genetic structure of three Chilean regions. Newborns from seven hospitals in Independencia, Providencia, Santiago, Curicó, Cauquenes, Valdívia, and Puerto Montt communes, belonging to the Chilean regions of Santiago, Maule, and Los Lagos, were studied. The presence of Native American mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups and two markers present in the non-recombinant region of the Y chromosome, DYS199 and DYS287, indicative of Native American and African ancestry, respectively, was determined. A high Native American matrilineal contribution and a low Native American and African patrilineal contributions were found in all three studied regions. As previously found in Chilean admixed populations, the Native American matrilineal contribution was lower in Santiago than in the other studied regions. However, there was an unexpectedly higher contribution of Native American ancestry in one of the studied communes in Santiago, probably due to the high rate of immigration from other regions of the country. The population genetic sub-structure we detected in Santiago using few uniparental markers requires further confirmation, owing to possible stratification for autosomal and X-chromosome markers.

  12. Isotopic and enzymatic analyses of planktonic nitrogen utilisation in the vicinity of Cape Sines (Portugal) during weak upwelling activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawyk, Gerd; Coste, Bernard; Collos, Yves; Rodier, Martine

    1997-01-01

    Using measurements of 15N uptake and activities of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase, the utilization of nitrogenous nutrients by microplankton in the Portuguese upwelling area was investigated. During this cruise the euphotic zone of coastal waters was in most cases bisected by a nitracline forming two layers. Total inorganic nitrogen uptake rates (NH 4+ + NO 3-) in the upper mixed and nitrate-impoverished layer ranged from 0.1 to 0.8 nM h -1 and were primarily supported by regenerated (ammonium) nitrogen (62-97%), whereas they varied between 0.9 and 10.4 nM h -1 in the deep nitrate-rich layer and were mainly driven by new (nitrate) nitrogen (52-82%). Depth profiles of Chl a-specific uptake rates for ammonium and nitrate paralleled those of absolute uptake rates, i.e. values of VNH 4+Chl were highest (up to 16.1 nmol μg -1 h -1) in nitrate-poor surface waters while values of VNO 3-Chl were maximum (up to 8.4 nmol μg -1 h -1)within the nitracline. This latter vertical ordering of planktonic nitrogen nutrition was consistent with an aged upwelling situation. However, applying several indices of cell metabolism and nutritional status, such as 15N uptake/enzyme activity, surge uptake internally controlled uptake, and V maxChl/K t ratios, we were able to demonstrate that the phytoplankton assemblages inhabiting the nutrient-impoverished upper layer still bore the signature of physically mediated nitrogen (nitrate) supply generated by active upwelling that had occurred during the week before our visit to the area. This signature was the most evident in samples from the station furthest inshore and faded with distance from shore as a result of the deepening of the nitrate isopleths (weakening of upwelling activity), which showed the same offshore trend. The appearance of nitrate-rich waters at the surface, after a strong pulse of upwelling favourable winds just before the end of the cruise, led to a five-fold increase in average (over the euphotic zone

  13. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    (Hernandez-Leon et al., 2008) could also be a key factor contributing to NH4+ generation off Trivandrum. Despite such observations, DNC values suggest that upwelling is still in the initial stages. In an upwelling area, NW of Spain, Varela et al. (2003...., 2008. Variability in biological responses influenced by upwelling events in the Eastern Arabian Sea. J. Mar. Sys. 74(1-2), 545–560. Hernandez-Leon, S., Fraga, C., Ikeda, T., 2008. A global estimation of mesozooplankton ammonium excretion in the open...

  14. The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamuy, M.; Pignata, G.; Maza, J.

    2012-01-01

    The CHilean Automatic Supernova sEarch (CHASE) project began in 2007 with the goal to discover young, nearby southern supernovae in order to (1) better understand the physics of exploding stars and their progenitors, and (2) refine the methods to derive extragalactic distances. During the first...... four years of operation, CHASE has produced more than 130 supernovae, being the most successful project of its type in the southern hemisphere. Here we describe the project and present illustrative examples of CHASE discoveries of particular relevance....

  15. [Ethics code of the Chilean Biological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Etica, C; Valenzuela, C; Cruz-Coke, R; Ureta, T; Bull, R

    1997-01-01

    The Chilean Biological Society has approved an ethics code for researchers, elaborated by its Ethic Committee. The text, with 16 articles, undertakes the main ethical problems that researchers must solve, such as institutional, professional or societal ethics, scientific fraud, breaches in collaborative work, relationships between researchers, participation in juries and committees, ethical breaches in scientific publications, scientific responsibility and punishments. This code declares its respect and valorization of all life forms and adheres to international biomedical ethical codes. It declares that all knowledge, created or obtained by researchers is mankind's heritage.

  16. Coastal Morphology and Coastal Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Graaff, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lecture notes ct5309. Tides, currents and water; coastal problems; sediment transport processes; coastal transport modes; longshore transport; cross-shore transport; fundamentals of mud; channels and trenches; coastal protection; application of structures; application of nourishments.

  17. Living benthic foraminiferal species as indicators of cold-warm water masses interaction and upwelling areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Patrícia P. B.; Pimenta, Felipe M.; Eichler, Beatriz B.; Vital, Helenice

    2016-03-01

    The western South Atlantic continental margin, between 27° and 37°S, is dominated by four main water masses: cold-fresh Subantarctic Shelf Water (SASW), warm-salty Subtropical Shelf Water (STSW), cold upwelled South Atlantic Central Water (SACW), and fresh Plata Plume Water (PPW). Despite the large seasonal variability of PPW extension along the shelf, an intense and relatively stable temperature-salinity gradient separates the SASW and the STSW forming the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF) around 32°S. The two dominant shelf water masses (SASW and STSW) arise from the process of mixing of oceanic waters. The SASW originates from the dilution of Subantarctic Water due to excess precipitation and continental runoff, and the STSW consists of modified warm tropical waters and South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) diluted below PPW. A previous article demonstrates distribution of Bulimina marginata, a shelf environment and deep-sea species of benthic foraminifera, is influenced by the front location and it can be used as a proxy of the STSF in sediment core analysis. Here we show three other infaunal living species inhabiting at the Continental margin: Buccella peruviana, Globocassidulina subglobosa and Uvigerina peregrina and their distribution limits show the interaction of Subantartic Shelf Water, Subtropical Shelf Water, and upwelling of SACW, in the bottom sediment of coastal studied areas.

  18. Mercury content in Chilean fish and estimated intake levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Sandra; Fortt, Antonia

    2007-09-01

    The intake of fish products is a major public health concern due to possible methyl mercury exposure, which is especially toxic to the human nervous system. This pilot study (n = 46) was designed to determine mercury concentrations in fish products for national consumption (Chilean jack mackerel, hake, Chilean mussel, tuna) and for export (salmon, Patagonian toothfish, swordfish, southern hake), and to estimate the exposure of the general population. The fish products were collected from markets in Talcahuano, Puerto Montt and Santiago. Samples were analyzed at the National Environmental Center by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mercury levels in swordfish and one canned tuna sample exceeded levels prescribed by national and international standards. The remaining two export products (Patagonian toothfish, also known as Chilean sea bass, and salmon) complied with international limits, which are more demanding than Chilean regulations. Theoretical estimates of mercury intake varied from 0.08 to 3.8 microg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for high fish consumers, exceeding the provisional tolerable intake for tuna, Chilean seabass, Chilean jack mackerel and swordfish. This group appears to be at the greatest risk from mercury contamination among the Chilean population.

  19. The combined effect of transient wind-driven upwelling and eddies on vertical nutrient fluxes and phytoplankton dynamics along Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenlin; Lowe, Ryan; Ivey, Greg; Xu, Jiangtao; Falter, James

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influence of wind stresses, stratification, and coastal mesoscale eddies on upwelling intensity, vertical nutrient fluxes, and phytoplankton biomass on the continental shelf off Ningaloo Reef in northwestern Australia during an austral spring-summer period. A three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic model, ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System), was coupled with a four-component nitrogen-based biogeochemical NPZD model (Nitrogen Phytoplankton Zooplankton Detritus) to resolve the shelf circulation as well as the coupled nutrient and phytoplankton dynamics within a broad shelf region surrounding Ningaloo Reef. The simulated currents, temperatures, and chlorophyll a concentrations generally agreed well with both the remotely sensed satellite images and observational data collected during a field experiment from September to November 2010. Scenario tests for an individual wind-driven upwelling event under a variety of hypothetical physical forcing conditions showed that shelf currents and biogeochemical variables were largely a function of wind stress and stratification. However, the functional relationships derived from this single wind event could not be extrapolated to other periods of the upwelling season, due to the additional influence of 3-D mesoscale processes on the shelf. The presence, intensification, and propagation of a coastal anticyclonic eddy during the study period strongly influenced the spatial and temporal variations in nutrient profiles, which in turn caused fluctuations in vertical nutrient fluxes that were largely independent of wind stress. These results emphasize that it is necessary to fully capture the 3-D details of the mesoscale and submesoscale coastal dynamics to properly predict upwelling-induced coastal phytoplankton dynamics in eddy-intensive shelf regions such as Ningaloo Reef.

  20. Patch scales in coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, Bernardo R.

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal scales over which ecological processes are coupled to environmental variability is a major challenge for ecologists. Here, I assimilate patterns of oceanographic variability with ecological field studies in an attempt to quantify spatial and temporal scales of coupling. Using coastal time series of chlorophyll-a concentration from remote sensing, the first chapter examines the alongshore extent of coastal regions subject to similar temporal patterns of oceanographic variability in Western North America (WNA) and North-Central Chile (Chile). I found striking interhemispherical differences in the length of coastal sections under similar oceanographic regimes, with the Chile region showing longshore coherency over much smaller spatial scales (˜60 km) than on the coast of WNA (˜140 km). Through a spatial analysis of coastal orientation I suggest that the characteristic length scales may be traced to the geomorphologic character of the ocean margins. The second chapter examines spatial patterns of primary production through long-term means of coastal chlorophyll-a concentration and kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) cover and explores their relationship with coastal geomorphology and sea surface temperature (SST). Spatial analyses showed a striking match in length scales around 180--250 km. Strong anticorrelations at small spatial lags and positive correlations at longer distances suggest little overlap between patches of kelp and coastal chlorophyll-a. In agreement with findings from the previous chapter, I found that coastal patches could be traced back to spatial patterns of coastal geomorphology. Through SST time series and long-term datasets of larval recruitment in Santa Cruz Island, California, the third chapter examines temporal patterns of oceanographic variability as determinants of ecological patterns. SST time series from sites experiencing low larval recruitment rates were dominated by strong temporal variability. These sites

  1. Growth variability and stable isotope composition of two larval carangid fishes in the East Australian Current: The role of upwelling in the separation zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syahailatua, Augy; Taylor, Matthew D.; Suthers, Iain M.

    2011-03-01

    The larvae of two carangid fishes, silver trevally ( Pseudocaranx dentex) and yellowtail scad ( Trachurus novaezelandiae), were compared among coastal water masses and the East Australian Current (EAC). Samples followed a north to south gradient including a southern region of upwelling, generated as the EAC separated from the coast. Mean larval carangid densities were greater in the mixed layer (10-30 m) than the surface, but there was no difference between inshore and offshore stations or along latitudinal gradients. Overall, P. dentex recent larval growth over two days pre-capture was faster than T. novaezelandiae, and faster at inshore, coastal stations than in the EAC. Integrated larval growth rate (mm d -1) was usually faster at inshore stations for both species. T. novaezelandiae were enriched in both nitrogen (δ 15N) and carbon (δ 13C) stable isotopes relative to P. dentex. Larvae of both species captured within the upwelling region were enriched in δ 15N and depleted in δ 13C relative to other sites. Recent larval growth had a significant positive relationship with fluorescence (as a proxy of chlorophyll a biomass), and integrated larval growth rate had a significant positive relationship with fluorescence and larval isotope (δ 15N) composition. Recent and integrated growth of larval T. novaezelandiae and P. dentex was enhanced by EAC separation and upwelling, and also in coastal water; stimulated by food availability, and potentially through exploitation of a different trophic niche.

  2. Regenerated primary production dominates in a periodically upwelling shelf ecosystem, northeast New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, S. J.; Zeldis, J. R.; Nodder, S. D.; Gall, M.

    2012-01-01

    issues of using chl-a data in this region for modelling primary production. Caveats and problems associated with using the new production paradigm, f ratios and e ratios to calculate carbon export from highly dynamic coastal systems are discussed. Contrary to our hypothesis of NO3--fuelled production in this upwelling system through the spring-to-summer transition, we found relatively high primary production levels were supported by regenerated nutrients most likely derived from the breakdown of NO3- sourced in the nitracline. The resulting pattern of persistent low nutrient uptake f ratios (f<0.3), punctuated only by a brief episode of new production in early spring (f=0.53, outer shelf), resulted in new production accounting for 10-20% of total inorganic nitrogen production, producing low organic material export. In situ oxidation was the primary fate of carbon on the northeast New Zealand continental shelf, where 80-90% of the carbon fixed by phytoplankton was remineralised in the euphotic zone.

  3. Association between eating behavior scores and obesity in Chilean children

    OpenAIRE

    Amador Paola; Obregón Ana M; Cataldo Rodrigo; Domínguez-Vásquez Patricia; Smalley Susan V; González Andrea; Ho-Urriola Judith A; Santos José L; Weisstaub Gerardo; Hodgson M Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Inadequate eating behavior and physical inactivity contribute to the current epidemic of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the association between eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chilean children. Design and methods We recruited 126 obese, 44 overweight and 124 normal-weight Chilean children (6-12 years-old; both genders) according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) criteria. Eating behavior scores were calculated using the ...

  4. Wine tourism : a review of the Chilean case

    OpenAIRE

    Kunc, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Wine tourism has become a thriving niche in global tourism industry with successful cases like Napa Valley in the USA with 19 million visitors per year. However, there are important disparities among wine regions. The paper analyses the case of the Chilean wine tourism, which is one of the regions with less wine tourists although it is very important in global wine industry, and its reasons for its low level of development. Chilean wine industry has been developing its infrastructure in wine ...

  5. Nutrition education in Chilean primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Sonia; Zacarías, Isabel; Andrade, Margarita; Kain, Juliana; Lera, Lydia; Vio, Fernando; Morón, Cecilio

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to incorporate nutrition education in Chilean primary schools. The baseline information included nutritional status, food consumption and physical activity of 1701 children from 3rd to 7th grade in ten urban and rural schools. Main results showed a high prevalence of obesity (15.4%) and overweight (19.6%), low consumption of vegetables, fruits, and dairy products, high intake of snacks and a low level of physical activity, especially in girls. Because the Ministry of Education does not allow the incorporation of new programs into the curriculum, the educational strategy was based on the development of a text book, a teacher's guide, five practical guides for students from third to eighth grade and a CD-Rom. These materials were validated by 36 teachers in six schools through an educational intervention. Teachers and students considered the educational materials useful, motivational and easy to understand. This program is being implemented in 57 schools.

  6. Late Quaternary Planktic Foraminifer Fauna andMonsoon Upwelling Records from the Western South China Sea, Near the Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Sen Yu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine sediment core MD012394 from the Vietnam coastal upwelling area in the western South China Sea was investigated in order to reconstruct the last Quaternary monsoon upwelling based on planktic foraminifer fauna assemblages and fauna-based sea surface temperature (SST estimates. The age model of core MD012394 was constructed using oxygen isotope stratigraphy of the planktic foraminifer G. sacculifer, with 10 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS 14C dating of planktic foraminifers from the sediment samples. Our studies on the relative and absolute abundances of planktic foraminifer assemblages reveal eight dominant species in core MD012394: N. dutertrei + N. pachyderma (right coiling, G. ruber, G. glutinata, G. sacculifer, P. obliquiloculata, G. menardii + G. tumida, G. calida, and G. inflata. In a Q-mode factor analysis of the fauna abundance data, the fauna factors show variations that do not parallel the glacial/interglacial changes throughout the last 135 kyr. The relative abundance patterns of G. inflata and N. dutertrei (including N. pachyderma-R are interpreted as hydrographic proxies for East Asian summer and winter monsoon, respectively, in the current study. We calculated the fluctuations in the SST using the Revised Analog Method (RAM in MD012394 and found that the abundance changes of the summer monsoon upwelling indicator G. inflata were similar and nearly synchronous. This suggests that the summer monsoon-driven upwelling signal was strong near the local summer insolation maximum, which induced low SSTs, particular around ~11, 33, 59, and 83 kya. Our studies support the view that the strengths of both summer insolation and the East Asian summer monsoon have determined the relative abundance of planktic foraminifers and the SSTs in the western SCS during the last 135 kyr.

  7. Impact of river discharge, upwelling and vertical mixing on the nutrient loading and productivity of the Canadian Beaufort Shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-É. Tremblay

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations and elemental stoichiometry of particulate and dissolved pools of carbon (C, nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P and silicon (Si in the southeast Beaufort Sea during summer 2009 were assessed and compared with those of surface waters provided by the Mackenzie river as well as by winter mixing and upwelling of upper halocline waters at the shelf break. Neritic surface waters showed a clear enrichment in dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC, respectively, nitrate, total particulate nitrogen (TPN and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON originating from the river. Silicate as well as bulk DON and DOC declined in a conservative manner away from the delta's outlet, whereas nitrate dropped non-conservatively to very low background concentrations inside the brackish zone. By contrast, the excess of soluble reactive P (SRP present in oceanic waters declined in a non-conservative manner toward the river outlet, where concentrations were very low and consistent with P shortage in the Mackenzie River. These opposite gradients imply that the admixture of Pacific-derived, SRP-rich water is necessary to allow phytoplankton to use river-derived nitrate and to a lesser extent DON. A coarse budget based on concurrent estimates of primary production shows that river N deliveries support a small fraction of primary production when considering the entire shelf, due to the ability of phytoplankton to thrive in the subsurface chlorophyll maximum beneath the thin, nitrate-depleted river plume. Away from shallow coastal bays, local elevations in the concentration of primary production and dissolved organic constituents were consistent with upwelling at the shelf break. By contrast with shallow winter mixing, nutrient deliveries by North American rivers and upwelling relax surface communities from N limitation and permit a more extant utilization of the excess SRP entering through Bering Strait. In this context, increased nitrogen supply by rivers

  8. Zooplankton diel vertical migration and influence of upwelling on the biomass in the Chukchi Sea during summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huiwu; CHEN Hongxia; XUE Liang; LIU Na; LIU Yanliang

    2015-01-01

    The diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton and the influence of upwelling on zooplankton biomass were examined using water column data of current velocity and mean volume backscattering strength (MVBS) collected by moored acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) deployed in the southeastern Chukchi Sea during the 5th Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) in summer 2012, combined with the satellite observational data such as sea surface temperature (SST), wind, and chlorophylla (Chla). Hourly acoustic data were continuously collected for 49-d in the mooring site. Spectral analysis indicated that there were different migrating patterns of zooplankton, even though precisely classifying the zooplankton taxa was not available. The prevailing 24-h cycle corresponded to the normal DVM with zooplankton swimming upwards at sunrise and returning to deep waters at sunset. There was a clear DVM in the upper 17 m of the water column during the period with distinct day-night cycles, and no active DVM throughout the water column when the sun above the horizon (polar day), suggesting that light intensity was the trigger for DVM. Also there was a second migrating pattern with 12-h cycle. The upwelling event occurring in the northwest of Alaskan coastal area had important influence on zooplankton biomass at the mooring site. During the upwelling, the SST close to the mooring site dropped significantly from maximal 6.35℃ to minimal 1.31℃ within five days. Simultaneously, there was a rapid increase in the MVBS and Chla level, suggesting the aggregation of zooplankton related to upwelling.

  9. Non-limiting food conditions for growth and production of the copepod community in a highly productive upwelling zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Rubén; Bustos-Ríos, Evelyn; Hidalgo, Pamela; Morales, Carmen E.

    2016-09-01

    Zooplankton production is critical for understanding marine ecosystem dynamics. This work estimates copepod growth and production in the coastal upwelling and coastal transition zones off central-southern Chile (~35 to 37°S) during a 3-year time series (2004, 2005, and 2006) at a fixed shelf station, and from spring-summer spatial surveys during the same period. To estimate copepod production (CP), we used species-biomasses and associated C-specific growth rates from temperature dependent equations (food-saturated) for the dominant species, which we assumed were maximal growth rates (gmax). Using chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for food conditions, we determined a size-dependent half-saturation constant with the Michaelis-Menten equation to derive growth rates (g) under the effect of food limitation. These food-dependent C-specific growth rates were much lower (absence of bottom-up control, allowing copepods to grow without limitation due to food resources.

  10. Modelling Upwelling Irradiance using Secchi disk depth in lake ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ROSSI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple model for upwelling irradiance has been developed. The model represents the relationship between Photosynthetically Active Radiation diffuse attenuation coefficients and Secchi disk depth described with a physical-mathematical expression. This physical mathematical expression allows the evaluation of the sub surface upwelling irradiance that was generated by the interaction between downwelling irradiance and the water column. The validation of the relation was performed using experimental data collected from five different aquatic ecosystems at different latitudes, solar elevations and irradiance levels. We found a good linear, positive correlation between the theoretical and measured upwelling irradiance (R2 = 0.96. The residues were well distributed, around the null value, according a Gaussian curve (R2 = 0.92. The results confirm the importance and the versatility of the Secchi disk measurements for aquatic optics.

  11. Dynamics of transient upwelling across the tropical tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randel, W. J.; Abalos, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical upwelling is a fundamental component of the stratospheric Brewer Dobson circulation (BDC), influencing temperatures, water vapor and chemical constituents throughout the global stratosphere. There is a substantial component of sub-seasonal variability in upwelling, with strong effects on temperatures and tracers in the tropical lower stratosphere. Upwelling diagnosed using momentum balance calculations from ERAinterim data demonstrate that transience is linked to the effects of extratropical wave forcing, with centers of action in the high latitude winter stratosphere and in the subtropical upper troposphere of both hemispheres. Zonal mean wind tendencies are an important part of communicating the remote wave forcing to the deep tropics. Dynamical patterns reflect clear differences in forcing the shallow vs. deep branches of the BDC; the shallow branch is most correlated with wave forcing in the subtropical upper troposphere, while the deep branch is mainly influenced by high latitude planetary waves.

  12. Why productive upwelling areas are often sources rather than sinks of CO2? – a comparative study on eddy upwellings in the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jiao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine upwelling regions are known to be productive in carbon fixation and thus thought to be sinks of CO2, whereas many upwelling areas in the ocean are actually sources rather than sinks of CO2. To address this paradox, multiple biogeochemical parameters were investigated at two cyclonic-eddy-induced upwelling sites CE1 and CE2 in the western South China Sea. The results showed that upwelling can exert significant influences on biological activities in the euphotic zone and can either increase or decrease particulate organic carbon (POC export flux depending on upwelling conditions such as the magnitude, timing, and duration of nutrient input and consequent microbial activities. At CE2 the increase of phytoplankton biomass caused by the upwelled nutrients resulted in increase of POC export flux compared to non-eddy reference sites, while at CE1 the microbial respiration of organic carbon stimulated by the upwelled nutrients significantly contributed to the attenuation of POC export flux, aggravating outgassing of CO2. These results suggest that on top of upwelled dissolved inorganic carbon release, microbial activities stimulated by upwelled nutrients and phytoplankton labile organic carbon can play a critical role for a marine upwelling area to be a source rather than a sink of CO2. Meanwhile, we point out that even though an upwelling region is outgassing, carbon sequestration still takes place through the POC-based biological pump as well as the refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC-based microbial carbon pump.

  13. Wind-driven upwelling effects on cephalopod paralarvae: Octopus vulgaris and Loliginidae off the Galician coast (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Jaime; Álvarez-Salgado, X. Antón; González, Ángel F.; Souto, Carlos; Gilcoto, Miguel; Guerra, Ángel

    2016-02-01

    Circulation patterns of coastal upwelling areas may have central consequences for the abundance and cross-shelf transport of the larval stages of many species. Previous studies have provided evidences that larvae distribution results from a combination of subtidal circulation, species-specific behaviour and larval sources. However, most of these works were conducted on organisms characterised by small-sized and abundant early life phases. Here, we studied the influence of the hydrography and circulation of the Ría de Vigo and adjacent shelf (NW Iberian upwelling system) on the paralarval abundance of two contrasting cephalopods, the benthic common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) and the pelagic squids (Loliginidae). We sampled repeatedly a cross-shore transect during the years 2003-2005 and used zero inflated models to accommodate the scarcity and patchy distribution of cephalopod paralarvae. The probability of catching early stages of both cephalopods was higher at night. Octopus paralarvae were more abundant in the surface layer at night whereas loliginids preferred the bottom layer regardless of the sampling time. Abundance of both cephalopods increased when shelf currents flowed polewards, water temperature was high and water column stability was low. The probability of observing an excess of zero catches decreased during the year for octopus and at high current speed for loliginids. In addition, the circulation pattern conditioned the body size distribution of both paralarvae; while the average size of the captured octopuses increased (decreased) with poleward currents at daylight (nighttime), squids were smaller with poleward currents regardless of the sampling time. These results contribute to the understanding of the effects that the hydrography and subtidal circulation of a coastal upwelling have on the fate of cephalopod early life stages.

  14. Offshore forcing on the "pressure point" of the West Florida Shelf: Anomalous upwelling and its influence on harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonggang; Weisberg, Robert H.; Lenes, Jason M.; Zheng, Lianyuan; Hubbard, Katherine; Walsh, John J.

    2016-08-01

    Gulf of Mexico Loop Current (LC) interactions with the West Florida Shelf (WFS) slope play an important role in shelf ecology through the upwelling of new inorganic nutrients across the shelf break. This is particularly the case when the LC impinges upon the shelf slope in the southwest portion of the WFS near the Dry Tortugas. By contacting shallow water isobaths at this "pressure point" the LC forcing sets the entire shelf into motion. Characteristic patterns of LC interactions with the WFS and their occurrences are identified using unsupervised neural network, self-organizing map, from 23 years (1993-2015) of altimetry data. The duration of the occurrences of such LC patterns is used as an indicator of offshore forcing of anomalous upwelling. Consistency is found between the altimetry-derived offshore forcing and the occurrence and severity of WFS coastal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis: years without major blooms tend to have prolonged LC contact at the "pressure point," whereas years with major blooms tend not to have prolonged offshore forcing. Resetting the nutrient state of the shelf by the coastal ocean circulation in response to deep-ocean forcing demonstrates the importance of physical oceanography in shelf ecology. A satellite altimetry-derived seasonal predictor for major K. brevis blooms is also proposed.

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru22 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-25 to 2014-09-23 (NCEI Accession 0138015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project is a comprehensive observational and analytical program to examine the dynamics and source waters of the relaxation flows in a coastal upwelling system...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru22 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-04 to 2014-08-22 (NCEI Accession 0138014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project is a comprehensive observational and analytical program to examine the dynamics and source waters of the relaxation flows in a coastal upwelling system...

  17. Coastal Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction, waves, sediment transport, littoral transport, lonshore sediment transport, onshore-offshore sediment transport, coastal changes, dune erosion and storm surges, sedimentation in channels and trenches, coastal engineering in practice.

  18. The impact of Chilean migration on employment in Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariola Sanz, L

    1989-06-01

    This paper discusses the employment situation of Chilean migrant workers, their impact on labor markets in Patagonia, Argentina, and the government's past and projected responses to this phenomenon. In 1980, Chilean inhabitants of patagonia comprised 11% of the area's population. Chilean migration to patagonia was closely linked to economic activities that began to flourish in the 20th century, such as livestock raising, fruit and vegetable cultivation, and mining for coal and petroleum. No Chilean migrants work in a wide range of sectors. In Patagonia's southern provinces availability and ability to withstand rigorous climate conditions are the main factors which account for the prevalence of Chilean manpower. Chilean migrants do not in general displace local manpower. Legislation and the permeability of the border ensure that most workers enter the country as tourists. Clandestine migration is not an issue. Illegal migrants have provoked negative reactions for several reasons: 1) they comprise a marginal population without formal citizenship; 2) being employed as clandestine workers, they pay no social security, nor do their employers; 3) being illegal, they are obliged to accept lower wages and inferior working conditions which creates unfair competition within labor markets; and 4) as a result of these conditions, xenophobic and endophobic attitudes in relations with Argentine nationalists are reinforced. The government has attempted to solve these problems through various measures. Beginning in 1934, most foreigners entered Argentina with a tourist visa, becoming illegal when they stayed beyond authorized limits. Several measures over the years provided amnesty to illegal migrants. Currently, the law promotes immigration, monitors the admission of foreigners to the country and stipulates their rights and obligations. The law lists 115 articles on immigration promotion and on regulation of the movements of foreigners. Because of the present economic crisis in

  19. Upwelling Index, 42N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  20. Upwelling Index, 48N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  1. Upwelling Index, 24N 113W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  2. Nutrients, Recycling, and Biological Populations in Upwelling Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Nutrient recycling has been studied in the upwelling areas of Baja California, Northwest Africa, and Peru. Regeneration by biological populations in these areas contributes significant quantities of recycled nitrogen which is utilized in productivity processes. Each area has a different combination of organisms which leads to differences in the relative contributions of zooplankton, nekton, or benthos to the nutrient cycles. Comparisons of ammonium regeneration rates of zooplankton and nekton-micronekton populations in the three upwelling areas show that zooplankton recycle relatively less nitrogen in the Baja California and Peru systems than nekton. In the Northwest Africa upwelling region, however, zooplankton, fish, and benthic inputs are all substantial. In recent years the Peruvian upwelling system has been altered with the decline of the anchoveta population and an increase in the importance of zooplankton in nutrient recycling. The distribution of recycled nitrogen (ammonium and urea) in transects across the shelf at 10°S and 15°S indicates that regeneration is relatively more important at 10°S in the region of the wide shelf. In both areas the distribution of ammonium and urea are not entirely coincident thereby indicating differences in their production and/or utilization.

  3. Upwelling Index, 21N 107W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  4. Upwelling Index, 60N 149W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  5. Upwelling Index, 60N 146W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  6. Upwelling Index, 45N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  7. Propagating buoyant mantle upwelling on the Reykjanes Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Fernando; Hey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge have been attributed to mantle plume flow radiating outward from the Iceland hotspot. This model requires very rapid mantle upwelling and a "rheological boundary" at the solidus to deflect plume material laterally and prevent extreme melting above the plume stem. Here we propose an alternative explanation in which shallow buoyant mantle upwelling instabilities propagate along axis to form the crustal features of the ridge and flanks. As only the locus of buoyant upwelling propagates this mechanism removes the need for rapid mantle plume flow. Based on new geophysical mapping we show that a persistent sub-axial low viscosity channel supporting buoyant mantle upwelling can explain the current oblique geometry of the ridge as a reestablishment of its original configuration following an abrupt change in opening direction. This mechanism further explains the replacement of ridge-orthogonal crustal segmentation with V-shaped crustal ridges and troughs. Our findings indicate that crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge and flanks are formed by shallow buoyant mantle instabilities, fundamentally like at other slow spreading ridges, and need not reflect deep mantle plume flow.

  8. Upwelling Index, 33N 119W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  9. Upwelling Index, 27N 116W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  10. Upwelling Index, 57N 137W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  11. Upwelling Index, 30N 119W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  12. Upwelling Index, 54N 134W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  13. Upwelling Index, 51N 131W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  14. Upwelling Index, 39N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  15. Upwelling Index, 36N 122W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N. The...

  16. Minimun Pension Insurance in the Chilean Pension System Minimun Pension Insurance in the Chilean Pension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Zurita

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the "social" features of the Chilean individual capitalization pension system is the minimum pension scheme. which guarantees its members a minimum pension irrespective of the funds they accumulate, with the only requirement of twenty years of social security tax payments. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the implicit fiscal subsidy, using an option-based approach. We capture the risk associated to the returns on the pension fund account of a worker by modeling its value as a diffusion process and show the correspondence between the minimum pension insurance and a financial put option. Our results are the present value of the minimum pension benefit, equivalent to 3 percent of Chilean GDP for current active and non-active affiliated workers. These estimates are notoriously higher than previous results based on deterministic models, and strongly suggest the importance of explicitly considering the risk associated to pension assets when estimating the cost to the government of the insurance implied by the minimum pension benefit. One of the "social" features of the Chilean individual capitalization pension system is the minimum pension scheme. which guarantees its members a minimum pension irrespective of the funds they accumulate, with the only requirement of twenty years of social security tax payments. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the implicit fiscal subsidy, using an option-based approach. We capture the risk associated to the returns on the pension fund account of a worker by modeling its value as a diffusion process and show the correspondence between the minimum pension insurance and a financial put option. Our results are the present value of the minimum pension benefit, equivalent to 3 percent of Chilean GDP for current active and non-active affiliated workers. These estimates are notoriously higher than previous results based on deterministic models, and strongly suggest the importance of explicitly considering

  17. Results of Chilean water markets: Empirical research since 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Carl J.

    2004-09-01

    Chile's free-market Water Code turned 20 years old in October 2001. This anniversary was an important milestone for both Chilean and international debates about water policy because Chile has become the world's leading example of the free-market approach to water law and water resources management, the textbook case of treating water rights not merely as private property but also as a fully marketable commodity. The predominant view outside of Chile is that Chilean water markets and the Chilean model of water management have been a success, and this perception has encouraged other countries to follow Chile's lead in water law reform. Much of the debate about Chilean water markets, however, has been based more on theoretical or political beliefs than on empirical study. This paper reverses that emphasis by reviewing the evolution of empirical research about these markets since 1990, when Chile returned to democratic government after 16 years of military rule. During the period since 1990, understanding of how Chilean water markets have worked in practice has gradually improved. There have been two major trends in this research: first, a gradual shift from exaggerated claims of the markets' success toward more balanced assessments of mixed results and, second, a heavy emphasis on the economics of water rights trading with very little attention given to the Water Code's impacts on social equity, river basin management, environmental protection, or resolution of water conflicts. The analysis in this study is qualitative and interdisciplinary, combining law, economics, and institutions.

  18. Surface mixing and biological activity in the four Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rossi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS are characterized by a high productivity of plankton associated with large commercial fisheries, thus playing key biological and socio-economical roles. Since they are populated by several physical oceanic structures such as filaments and eddies, which interact with the biological processes, it is a major challenge to study this sub- and mesoscale activity in connection with the chlorophyll distribution. The aim of this work is to make a comparative study of these four upwelling systems focussing on their surface stirring, using the Finite Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLEs, and their biological activity, based on satellite data. First, the spatial distribution of horizontal mixing is analysed from time averages and from probability density functions of FSLEs, which allow us to divide each areas in two different subsystems. Then we studied the temporal variability of surface stirring focussing on the annual and seasonal cycle. We also proposed a ranking of the four EBUS based on the averaged mixing intensity. When investigating the links with chlorophyll concentration, the previous subsystems reveal distinct biological signatures. There is a global negative correlation between surface horizontal mixing and chlorophyll standing stocks over the four areas. To try to better understand this inverse relationship, we consider the vertical dimension by looking at the Ekman-transport and vertical velocities. We suggest the possibility of a changing response of the phytoplankton to sub/mesoscale turbulence, from a negative effect in the very productive coastal areas to a positive one in the open ocean. This study provides new insights for the understanding of the variable biological productivity in the ocean, which results from both dynamics of the marine ecosystem and of the 3-D turbulent medium.

  19. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  20. Anthropometric profile of elite Chilean Paralympic athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Durán-Agüero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sport is one of the most popular social events worldwide. It becomes interesting to characterize its practitioners, even more in some poorly studied groups such as Paralympic athletes. The main objective of this study is to determine the anthropometric profile of Chilean Elite Paralympic Athletes (CEPA through body composition and somatotype. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 41 subjects (93% of the classified to the Para-Panamerican Games Toronto 2015, who practiced table tennis (n=6, football 5 (n=11, swimming (n=8, rugby (n=7, powerlifting (n=6 and wheelchair tennis (n=3. The body composition and somatotype were assessed through the protocol described by the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK. Results: The CEPA reach an average for that classifies somatotype mostly as meso-endomorphic (5.3 - 7.8 - 0.5, a BMI of 27.4 kg/m2, and body composition for fat mass reaches 29.8% in women and 25.7% in men, while muscle mass gain 42.6% (women and 44.5% (men. Conclusions: The CEPA have a somatotype profile that classifies mostly as meso-endomorphic, body composition has a predominance muscle mass and high fat mass, although is similar to other Paralympics athletes.

  1. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIANELLI, ROSINA; FERRER, LILIAN; MCELMURRY, BEVERLY J.

    2008-01-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV. PMID:18432428

  2. First host plant records for Iridopsis hausmanni Vargas (Lepidoptera, Geometridae in the coastal valleys of northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available First host plant records for Iridopsis hausmanni Vargas (Lepidoptera, Geometridae in the coastal valleys of northern Chile. The trees Haplorhus peruviana Engl. and Schinus molle L. (Anacardiaceae are mentioned as the first host plant records for the little known native moth Iridopsis hausmanni Vargas, 2007 (Lepidoptera, Geometridae, Ennominae in the coastal valleys of the northern Chilean Atacama Desert. This is also the first record of Anacardiaceae as host plant for a Neotropical species of Iridopsis Warren, 1894.

  3. Can upwelling signals be detected in intertidal fishes of different trophic levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulgar, J; Poblete, E; Alvarez, M; Morales, J P; Aranda, B; Aldana, M; Pulgar, V M

    2013-11-01

    For intertidal fishes belonging to three species, the herbivore Scartichthys viridis (Blenniidae), the omnivore Girella laevifrons (Kyphosidae) and the carnivore Graus nigra (Kyphosidae), mass and body size relationships were higher in individuals from an upwelling zone compared with those from a non-upwelling zone. RNA:DNA were higher in the herbivores and omnivores from the upwelling zone. Higher biomass and RNA:DNA in the upwelling intertidal fishes may be a consequence of an increased exposure to higher nutrient availability, suggesting that increased physiological conditioning in vertebrates from upwelling areas can be detected and measured using intertidal fishes of different trophic levels.

  4. Lagrangian flow measurements and observations of the 2015 Chilean tsunami in Ventura, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalligeris, Nikos; Skanavis, Vassilios; Tavakkol, Sasan; Ayca, Aykut; Safty, Hoda El; Lynett, Patrick; Synolakis, Costas

    2016-05-01

    Tsunami-induced coastal currents are spectacular examples of nonlinear and chaotic phenomena. Due to their long periods, tsunamis transport substantial energy into coastal waters, and as this energy interacts with the ubiquitous irregularity of bathymetry, shear and turbulent features appear. The oscillatory character of a tsunami wave train leads to flow reversals, which in principle can spawn persistent turbulent coherent structures (e.g., large vortices or "whirlpools") that can dominate damage and transport potential. However, no quantitative measurements exist to provide physical insight into this kind of turbulent variability, and no motion recordings are available to help elucidate how these vortical structures evolve and terminate. We report our measurements of currents in Ventura Harbor, California, generated by the 2015 Chilean M8.3 earthquake. We measured surface velocities using GPS drifters and image sequences of surface tracers deployed at a channel bifurcation, as the event unfolded. From the maps of the flow field, we find that a tsunami with a near-shore amplitude of 30 cm at 6 m depth produced unexpectedly large currents up to 1.5 m/s, which is a fourfold increase over what simple linear scaling would suggest. Coherent turbulent structures appear throughout the event, across a wide range of scales, often generating the greatest local currents.

  5. The role of Equatorial Undercurrent in sustaining the Eastern Indian Ocean upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengxin; Han, Weiqing; Shu, Yeqiang; Li, Yuanlong; Wang, Dongxiao; Xie, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    By combining volume transport and salinity analysis from 1958 to 2014, this paper investigates how the transient Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) sustains the summer-fall equatorial eastern Indian Ocean (EIO) upwelling. On seasonal time scales, the EIO upwelling is mainly supplied by the salty water from the western basin through a buffering process: The winter-spring EUC carries the salty water from the western basin eastward, induces downwelling in the EIO, and pushes portion of the salty water below the central thermocline, which subsequently upwells to the central thermocline during summer-fall and sustains the EIO upwelling. On interannual time scales, enhanced upwelling occurs during positive Indian Ocean Dipole (+IOD) years. The strong summer-fall EUC associated with the +IOD supplies water for the intensified upwelling. This research provides new knowledge for basin-scale mass and property exchanges associated with the EIO upwelling, contributing to our understanding of three-dimensional ocean circulation and climate variability.

  6. Locking, mass flux and topographic response at convergent plate boundaries - the Chilean case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin. Towards the short end of the time scale, deformation appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. This has fundamental implications for spatial and temporal distribution of seismic hazard. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for the forearc response.

  7. Meteorological constraints on oceanic halocarbons above the Peruvian Upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fuhlbrügge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Halogenated very short lived substances (VSLS are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. Recently, oceanic upwelling regions in the tropical East Atlantic were identified as strong sources of brominated halocarbons to the atmosphere. During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL were investigated above the Peruvian Upwelling for the first time. This study presents novel observations of the three VSLS bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide together with high resolution meteorological measurements and Lagrangian transport modelling. Although relatively low oceanic emissions were observed, except for methyl iodide, surface atmospheric abundances were elevated. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting both as strong barriers for convection and trace gas transport in this region. Significant correlations between observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height were found. We used a simple source-loss estimate to identify the contribution of oceanic emissions to observed atmospheric concentrations which revealed that the observed marine VSLS abundances were dominated by horizontal advection below the trade inversion. The observed VSLS variations can be explained by the low emissions and their accumulation under different MABL and trade inversion conditions. This study confirms the importance of oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on creating effective transport barriers in the lower atmosphere controlling the distribution of VSLS abundances above ocean upwelling regions.

  8. Matanchen complex: new radiocarbon dates on early coastal adaptation in west Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, J B; Taylor, R E; Feldman, L H

    1972-03-17

    Samples of marine shell from archeological context on the coast of Nayarit, Mexico, have given radiocarbon determinations of 1810 +/- 80 B.C., 2000 +/- 100 B.C., and 2100 +/- 100 B.C. Even with maximum correction for upwelling these are the earliest dates for coastal occupation in West Mexico north of Acapulco, Guerrero. Analysis of the midden contents has provided new insights regarding early coastal adaptation.

  9. Supply Management Analysis of the Chilean Navy Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    1. Generic supply chain diagram (from Sanders, 2012) ......................................11 Figure 2. Chilean Navy Logistics Organization...Sanders, 2012). Supply chain management involves the following activities (Monczka et al., 2009, pp. 17–19). • Purchasing or procurement • Inbound ...it will be measured, and how the data obtained will be used (Monczka et al., 2009). Some examples of indicators used inside the military logistics

  10. The 2011 Chilean Student Movement against Neoliberal Educational Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellei, Cristián; Cabalin, Cristian; Orellana, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the 2011 Chilean student movement, the most relevant social mobilisation in Chile since the restoration of democracy in 1990. Based on available material and secondary sources, it describes the main features of this student movement, analyses the key components of the students' discourse and its relationship with the Chilean…

  11. Association between eating behavior scores and obesity in Chilean children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amador Paola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate eating behavior and physical inactivity contribute to the current epidemic of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to assess the association between eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chilean children. Design and methods We recruited 126 obese, 44 overweight and 124 normal-weight Chilean children (6-12 years-old; both genders according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF criteria. Eating behavior scores were calculated using the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CEBQ. Factorial analysis in the culturally-adapted questionnaire for Chilean population was used to confirm the original eight-factor structure of CEBQ. The Cronbach's alpha statistic (>0.7 in most subscales was used to assess internal consistency. Non-parametric methods were used to assess case-control associations. Results Eating behavior scores were strongly associated with childhood obesity in Chilean children. Childhood obesity was directly associated with high scores in the subscales "enjoyment of food" (P Conclusion Our study shows a strong and graded association between specific eating behavior scores and childhood obesity in Chile.

  12. Quality of Chilean Early Childhood Education from an International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Malva; Suzuki, Emy; Herrera, Maria Olivia; Mathiesen, Maria Elena

    2002-01-01

    Assessed the quality of different types of early childhood care and education programs in Chile according to international standards. Recorded structural and process characteristics observed in the classrooms. Found that Chilean preschool programs showed a minimum level of quality, with a high proportion of centers in the inadequate range.…

  13. Prevalence and risk factors for bruises in Chilean bovine carcasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strappini, A.C.; Frankena, K.; Metz, J.H.M.; Kemp, B.

    2010-01-01

    Records of cattle slaughtered at two Chilean slaughterhouses (SLH1 and SLH2) were used to determine prevalence and risk factors for carcasses with bruises. Bruise prevalence amounted to 12.3% but differed between slaughterhouses (20.8% for SLH1 and 8.6% for SLH2 respectively). Bruise severity grade

  14. Chilean Adolescents' and Parents' Views on Autonomy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M. Loreto; Pérez, J. Carola; Cumsille, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand Chilean parents' and adolescents' conceptions of autonomy and whether they hold different expectations for autonomous behaviors by generation and socioeconomic level. A qualitative approach to data collection was used through separate focus groups of parents and adolescents from different socioeconomic condition.…

  15. Modelling an alkenone-like proxy record in the NW African upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Giraud

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional biogeochemical model is applied to the NW African coastal upwelling between 19° N and 27° N to investigate how a water temperature proxy, alkenones, are produced at the sea surface and recorded in the slope sediments. The biogeochemical model has two phytoplankton groups: an alkenone producer group, considered to be coccolithophores, and a group comprising other phytoplankton. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS is used to simulate the ocean circulation and takes advantage of the Adaptive Grid Refinement in Fortran (AGRIF package to set up an embedded griding system. In the simulations the alkenone temperature records in the sediments are between 1.1 and 2.3°C colder than the annual mean SSTs. Despite the seasonality of the coccolithophore production, this temperature difference is not mainly due to a seasonal bias, nor to the lateral advection of phytoplankton and phytodetritus seaward from the cold near-shore waters, but to the production depth of the coccolithophores. If coretop alkenone temperatures are effectively recording the annual mean SSTs, the amount of alkenone produced must vary among the coccolithophores in the water column and depend on physiological factors (e.g. growth rate, nutrient stress.

  16. Modelling an alkenone-like proxy record in the NW African upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Giraud

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional biogeochemical model is applied to the NW African coastal upwelling between 19° N and 27° N to investigate how a water temperature proxy is produced at the sea surface and recorded in the slope sediments. The biological model has two phytoplankton groups, to distinguish an alkenone producer group (considered as coccolithophores from other phytoplankton. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS is used to simulate the ocean circulation, and takes advantage of the Adaptive Grid Refinement in Fortran (AGRIF package to set up an embedded griding system. The results show that the alkenone-like temperature records in the sediments are between 1.1 and 2.1°C colder compared to the annual mean SSTs. Despite the seasonality of the coccolithophorid production, this temperature difference is not mainly due to a seasonal bias, nor to the lateral advection of phytoplankton and phytodetritus from the cold water domain to most offshore locations, but to the production depth of the coccolithophores. If core-top sediment alkenone-derived temperatures are effectively recording the annual mean SSTs, the quantitative alkenone production in the water column must be inhomogeneous among the coccolithophore population and depend on physiological factors (growth rate, nutrient stress.

  17. Modelling an alkenone-like proxy record in the NW African upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, X.

    2006-06-01

    A regional biogeochemical model is applied to the NW African coastal upwelling between 19° N and 27° N to investigate how a water temperature proxy, alkenones, are produced at the sea surface and recorded in the slope sediments. The biogeochemical model has two phytoplankton groups: an alkenone producer group, considered to be coccolithophores, and a group comprising other phytoplankton. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) is used to simulate the ocean circulation and takes advantage of the Adaptive Grid Refinement in Fortran (AGRIF) package to set up an embedded griding system. In the simulations the alkenone temperature records in the sediments are between 1.1 and 2.3°C colder than the annual mean SSTs. Despite the seasonality of the coccolithophore production, this temperature difference is not mainly due to a seasonal bias, nor to the lateral advection of phytoplankton and phytodetritus seaward from the cold near-shore waters, but to the production depth of the coccolithophores. If coretop alkenone temperatures are effectively recording the annual mean SSTs, the amount of alkenone produced must vary among the coccolithophores in the water column and depend on physiological factors (e.g. growth rate, nutrient stress).

  18. February 27, 2010 Chilean Tsunami in Pacific and its Arrival to North East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, Andrey; Pelinovsky, EfiM.; Yalciner, Ahmet C.; Ozer, Ceren; Chernov, Anton; Kostenko, Irina; Shevchenko, Georgy

    2010-05-01

    The outskirts of the fault plane broken by the strong earthquake on February 27, 2010 in Chili with a magnitude 8.8 at the 35km depth of 35.909°S, 72.733°W coordinates generated a moderate size tsunami. The initial amplitude of the tsunami source is not so high because of the major area of the plane was at land. The tsunami waves propagated far distances in South and North directions to East Asia and Wet America coasts. The waves are also recorded by several gauges in Pacific during its propagation and arrival to coastal areas. The recorded and observed amplitudes of tsunami waves are important for the potential effects with the threatening amplitudes. The event also showed that a moderate size tsunami can be effective even if it propagates far distances in any ocean or a marginal sea. The far east coasts of Russia at North East Asia (Sakhalin, Kuriles, Kamchatka) are one of the important source (i.e. November 15, 2006, Kuril Island Tsunami) and target (i.e. February, 27, 2010 Chilean tsunami) areas of the Pacific tsunamis. Many efforts have been spent for establishment of the monitoring system and assessment of tsunamis and development of the mitigation strategies against tsunamis and other hazards in the region. Development of the computer technologies provided the advances in data collection, transfer, and processing. Furthermore it also contributed new developments in computational tools and made the computer modeling to be an efficient tool in tsunami warning systems. In this study the tsunami numerical model NAMI DANCE Nested version is used. NAMI-DANCE solves Nonlinear form of Long Wave (Shallow water) equations (with or without dispersion) using finite difference model in nested grid domains from the source to target areas in multiprocessor hardware environment. It is applied to 2010 Chilean tsunami and its propagation and coastal behavior at far distances near Sakhalin, Kuril and Kamchatka coasts. The main tide gauge records used in this study are from

  19. Coastal circulation and upwelling index along the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Rao, D.P.

    500 db surface as a reference level. The dynamic topography charts show strong southwesterly flow with a large cyclonic cell during NE monsoon whereas during SW monsoon show a complicated pattern with cyclonic and anti-cyclonic cells along the coast...

  20. The Upper Mixed Layer during Coastal Upwelling Events on the Northern Portugal Shelf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Juncheng; SHENG Hong; Alvaro Peliz; Santos A. Miguel

    2003-01-01

    The upper mixed layer (UML) depth obtained from temperature is very close to that from density:thc maximum is about 15 m. This indicates that temperature is a good indicator of mixed layer during measurements. When the surface heat flux is balanced by a cross-shore heat flux, the surface mixed layer depth obtained from the WM model (Weatherly and Martin, 1978), hpRT, is roughly the same as observed. The mixed layer depth calculated from the PWP model (Price, Wellcr and Pinkel, 1986) is close to the depth obtained from thermistor chain temperature data. The results show that both thc WM model and PWP model can provide a good estimate of stratification in the study area during the cruise. The value of log (h/u3)is about 9.5 in the study area, which shows that the study area is strongly stratified in summer. Observations on the northern Portugal shelf reveal high variability in stability, giving rise to semi-diurnal, semi-monthly and diurnal oscillations, and long term variations. The fortnightly oscillations are highlighted by post-springs and post-neaps. The stirring of spring tide is reinforced by strong wind mixing which brings about complete vertical homogeneity everywhere. The semi-diurnal periodic stratification is very pronounced because the major axis of the tidal ellipse is orientated acrossshorc, even though thc tidal current is weak in this area, the maximum stratification is observed around the middle of ebb, and, the water at this time is much warmer. The diurnal oscillation results from the upper ocean response to heating and wind mixing when solar heating warms and stabilizes the upper ocean. There is a clear relationship between upper mixed layer depth and wind-stress magnitude at subtidal frequencies. Stronger winds result in a dccper surface mixed layer. Typically, the surface mixed layer depth lags the wind stress by 6-12h.

  1. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate...... to the sediment-water interface and reduce the hydrogen sulfide flux to the water column. Modeling of pore water sulfide concentration profiles indicates that sulfide produced by bacterial sulfate reduction in the uppermost 16 cm of sediment is sufficient to account for the total flux of hydrogen sulfide...... to the water column. However, the total pool of hydrogen sulfide in the water column is too large to be explained by steady state diffusion across the sediment-water interface. Episodic advection of hydrogen sulfide, possibly triggered by methane eruptions, may contribute to hydrogen sulfide in the water...

  2. Synergistic effects of hypoxia and increasing CO2 on benthic invertebrates of the central Chilean coast

    KAUST Repository

    Steckbauer, Alexandra

    2015-07-10

    Ocean acidification (OA) and hypoxic events are an increasing worldwide problem, but the synergetic effects of these factors are seldom explored. However, this synergetic occurrence of stressors is prevalent. The coastline of Chile not only suffers from coastal hypoxia but the cold, oxygen-poor waters in upwelling events are also supersaturated in CO2, a study site to explore the combined effect of OA and hypoxia. We experimentally evaluated the metabolic response of different invertebrate species (2 anthozoans, 9 molluscs, 4 crustaceans, 2 echinoderms) of the coastline of central Chile (33°30′S, 71°37′W) to hypoxia and OA within predicted levels and in a full factorial design. Organisms were exposed to 4 different treatments (ambient, low oxygen, high CO2, and the combination of low oxygen and high CO2) and metabolism was measured after 3 and 6 days. We show that the combination of hypoxia and increased pCO2 reduces the respiration significantly, compared to a single stressor. The evaluation of synergistic pressures, a more realistic scenario than single stressors, is crucial to evaluate the effect of future changes for coastal species and our results provide the first insight on what might happen in the next 100 years.

  3. Variabilidad mensual de la velocidad de surgencia y clorofila a en la región del Panama Bight (Monthly rate variation upwelling and chlorophyll a in the region of Panama Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Villegas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Las zonas de surgencia y la presencia de clorofila a en la región del Panamá Bight (golfo de Panamá fueron comparadas en una escala mensual. Las variables utilizadas fueron la velocidad vertical de surgencia estimada mediante el software EVA. V.2.0 y la concentración de clorofila a obtenida de imágenes satelitales SeaWifs. El estudio fue realizado para el área costera entre 6° 30’ y 2° N y en los tres principales focos de ascenso de agua, el primero ubicado entre 83-84° W y 1° 30’-2° 30’ N, el segundo entre 81-82° W y 1° 30’-2° 30’ N, y el tercero entre 82-83° W y 2° 30’-3° 30’ N. Los resultados muestran la asociación directa entre la concentración de clorofila a y la surgencia durante todo el año. El estudio también resalta que el desplazamiento de la zona de convergencia intertropical ZCIT determina la variabilidad estacional del proceso de ascenso, atenuándolo cuando pasa sobre el área de estudio y reforzándolo mientras se aleja. El análisis de correlación entre las variables bajo estudio dio como resultado coeficientes estadísticamente significativos entre 0.5 y 0.9 en los tres focos principales y valores no significativos en la zona costera. (Abstract. The influence of the migration of the ITCZ on the climatic variability of the upwelling vertical velocity (Vz and the spatial-temporal behavior of upwelling spots over the CPO was determined. This influence was corroborated by the presence of chlorophyll a in the upwelling zones. Vz values were calculated with EVA . V.2.0 software. The chlorophyll a content was extracted from satellite images for 1997-2000. A comparison between the upwelling zones distribution, the migration of ITCZ and chlorophyll a was made. This comparison was based on the correlation between variables of three upwelling focuses and a coastal upwelling. The first focus was located between 83-84° W and 1° 30’-2° 30’ N, the second one between 81-82° W and 1° 30’- 2° 30

  4. Bacterial and Archaeal Communities Variability Associated with Upwelling and Anthropogenic Pressures in the Protection Area of Arraial do Cabo (Cabo Frio region - RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO A. COELHO-SOUZA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTUpwelling systems contain a high diversity of pelagic microorganisms and their composition and activity are defined by factors like temperature and nutrient concentration. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE technique was used to verify the spatial and temporal genetic variability of Bacteria and Archaea in two stations of the Arraial do Cabo coastal region, one under upwelling pressure and another under anthropogenic pressure. In addition, biotic and abiotic variables were measured in surface and deep waters from three other stations between these stations. Six samplings were done during a year and adequately represented the degrees of upwelling and anthropogenic pressures to the system. Principal Component Analysis (PCA showed negative correlations between the concentrations of ammonia and phosphorous with prokaryotic secondary production and the total heterotrophic bacteria. PCA also showed negative correlation between temperature and the abundance of prokaryotic cells. Bacterial and archaeal compositions were changeable as were the oceanographic conditions, and upwelling had a regional pressure while anthropogenic pressure was punctual. We suggest that the measurement of prokaryotic secondary production was associated with both Bacteria and Archaea activities, and that substrate availability and temperature determine nutrients cycling.

  5. Isotopic evidences of past upwelling intensity in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P

    covering a time span of 520 ka. In these studies, the Dd 18 O and Dd 13 C data P.D. Naidu / Global and Planetary Change 40 (2004) 285–293286 Greater than 70% of the annual particle flux in the upwelling areas of Arabian Sea occurs during the SW monsoon...C where DBD is the bulk density of the sediment (in grams per cubic centimeter), LSR is the linear sedi- P.D. Naidu / Global and Planetary Change 40 (2004) 285–293 287 Fig. 1. Physiography and bathymetry of the western Arabian Sea along with location...

  6. Stable nitrogen isotopes in coastal macroalgae: Geographic and anthropogenic variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Inés G., E-mail: ines.gonzalez@co.ieo.es; Bode, Antonio

    2013-01-15

    Growing human population adds to the natural nitrogen loads to coastal waters. Both anthropogenic and natural nitrogen is readily incorporated in new biomass, and these different nitrogen sources may be traced by the measurement of the ratio of stable nitrogen isotopes (δ{sup 15}N). In this study δ{sup 15}N was determined in two species of macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum and Fucus vesiculosus), and in nitrate and ammonium to determine the relative importance of anthropogenic versus natural sources of nitrogen along the coast of NW Spain. Both algal species and nitrogen sources showed similar isotopic enrichment for a given site, but algal δ{sup 15}N was not related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or δ{sup 15}N in the water samples. The latter suggests that inorganic nitrogen inputs are variable and do not always leave an isotopic trace in macroalgae. However, a significant linear decrease in macroalgal δ{sup 15}N along the coast is consistent with the differential effect of upwelling. Besides this geographic variability, the influence of anthropogenic nitrogen sources is evidenced by higher δ{sup 15}N in macroalgae from rias and estuaries compared to those from open coastal areas and in areas with more than 15 × 10{sup 3} inhabitants in the watershed. These results indicate that, in contrast with other studies, macroalgal δ{sup 15}N is not simply related to either inorganic nitrogen concentrations or human population size but depends on other factors as the upwelling or the efficiency of local waste treatment systems. - Highlights: ► Anthropogenic versus upwelling nitrogen effect on macroalgal δ{sup 15}N was studied. ► The influence of populations and upwelling has not been made before on macroalgal δ{sup 15}N. ► Natural variability has not been taken into account in most biomonitoring studies. ► Upwelling explains most of the variability in δ{sup 15}N in macroalgae.

  7. Southern Ocean warming delayed by circumpolar upwelling and equatorward transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kyle C.; Marshall, John; Scott, Jeffery R.; Donohoe, Aaron; Newsom, Emily R.

    2016-07-01

    The Southern Ocean has shown little warming over recent decades, in stark contrast to the rapid warming observed in the Arctic. Along the northern flank of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, however, the upper ocean has warmed substantially. Here we present analyses of oceanographic observations and general circulation model simulations showing that these patterns--of delayed warming south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and enhanced warming to the north--are fundamentally shaped by the Southern Ocean's meridional overturning circulation: wind-driven upwelling of unmodified water from depth damps warming around Antarctica; greenhouse gas-induced surface heat uptake is largely balanced by anomalous northward heat transport associated with the equatorward flow of surface waters; and heat is preferentially stored where surface waters are subducted to the north. Further, these processes are primarily due to passive advection of the anomalous warming signal by climatological ocean currents; changes in ocean circulation are secondary. These findings suggest the Southern Ocean responds to greenhouse gas forcing on the centennial, or longer, timescale over which the deep ocean waters that are upwelled to the surface are warmed themselves. It is against this background of gradual warming that multidecadal Southern Ocean temperature trends must be understood.

  8. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  9. Oceanic contributions from tropical upwelling systems to atmospheric halogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziska, Franziska; Hepach, Helmke; Stemmler, Irene; Quack, Birgit; Atlas, Elliot; Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Bracher, Astrid; Tegtmeier, Susann; Krüger, Kirstin

    2014-05-01

    Short lived halogenated substances (halocarbons) from the oceans contribute to atmospheric halogens, where they are involved in ozone depletion and aerosol formation. Oceanic regions that are characterized by high biological activity are often associated with increased halocarbon abundance of e.g. bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), representing the main contributors to atmospheric organic bromine. Apart from biological production, photochemical pathways play an important role in the formation of methyl iodide (CH3I), the most abundant organoiodine in the marine atmosphere. Recently, the contribution of biogenic diiodomethane (CH2I2) and chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI) to atmospheric organic iodine has been estimated to be similarly significant as CH3I. In the tropics, rapid uplift of surface air can transport these short-lived compounds into the upper troposphere and into the stratosphere. Oceanic upwelling systems off Mauritania, Peru and in the equatorial Atlantic might therefore potentially contribute large amounts of halocarbons to the stratosphere. Concentrations and emissions of iodo- and bromocarbons from several SOPRAN campaigns in different tropical upwelling systems, the Mauritanian and the equatorial upwelling in the Atlantic, as well as the Peruvian upwelling in the Pacific, will be presented. Processes contributing to halocarbon occurrence in the water column, as well as biological and physical factors influencing their emission into the atmosphere are investigated (Fuhlbrügge, et al. 2013; Hepach et al., 2013). We will present the relative contribution of the upwelling systems to global air-sea fluxes from different modelling studies. The data based bottom-up emissions from Ziska et al. (2013) will be compared to model simulated halocarbons. The model is a global three-dimensional ocean general circulation model with an ecosystem model and halocarbon module embedded (MPIOM/HAMOCC). It resolves CH3I and CHBr3 production, degradation, and

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for bruises in Chilean bovine carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strappini, A C; Frankena, K; Metz, J H M; Gallo, B; Kemp, B

    2010-11-01

    Records of cattle slaughtered at two Chilean slaughterhouses (SLH1 and SLH2) were used to determine prevalence and risk factors for carcasses with bruises. Bruise prevalence amounted to 12.3% but differed between slaughterhouses (20.8% for SLH1 and 8.6% for SLH2 respectively). Bruise severity grade 1 (mild) was most frequently recorded. The type of the animal, source of animal, the level of fat cover and lairage time were associated with the presence of bruises. Older categories of animals and animals that pass through a market before being moved to the slaughterhouse are more prone to show bruises. The results also indicate that under the reported Chilean circumstances animals that have longer lairage times (over 12 h) have a significantly reduced risk for bruises, except for oxen. Presence of bruises is also significantly associated with increased carcass pH values.

  11. The Chilean Health System: 20 Years of Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Annick

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean health care system has been intensively reformed in the past 20 years. Reforms under the Pinochet government (1973-1990 aimed mainly at the decentralization of the system and the development of a private sector. Decentralization involved both a deconcentration process and the devolution of primary health care to municipalities. The democratic governments after 1990 chose to preserve the core organization but introduced reforms intended to correct the system's failures and to increase both efficiency and equity. The present article briefly explains the current organization of the Chilean health care system. It also reviews the different reforms introduced in the past 20 years, from the Pinochet regime to the democratic governments. Finally, a brief discussion describes the strengths and weaknesses of the system, as well as the challenges it currently faces.

  12. Genetic structure characterization of Chileans reflects historical immigration patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyheramendy, Susana; Martinez, Felipe I; Manevy, Federico; Vial, Cecilia; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2015-03-17

    Identifying the ancestral components of genomes of admixed individuals helps uncovering the genetic basis of diseases and understanding the demographic history of populations. We estimate local ancestry on 313 Chileans and assess the contribution from three continental populations. The distribution of ancestry block-length suggests an average admixing time around 10 generations ago. Sex-chromosome analyses confirm imbalanced contribution of European men and Native-American women. Previously known genes under selection contain SNPs showing large difference in allele frequencies. Furthermore, we show that assessing ancestry is harder at SNPs with higher recombination rates and easier at SNPs with large difference in allele frequencies at the ancestral populations. Two observations, that African ancestry proportions systematically decrease from North to South, and that European ancestry proportions are highest in central regions, show that the genetic structure of Chileans is under the influence of a diffusion process leading to an ancestry gradient related to geography.

  13. The role of nutrients in regulation and promotion of harmful algal blooms in upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudela, R. M.; Seeyave, S.; Cochlan, W. P.

    2010-04-01

    The Core Research Project on HABs in upwelling systems, as a component project of the international scientific programme on the Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (GEOHAB), promotes a comparative approach within and across systems to understand and predict the ecology, frequency and occurrence of HABs in eastern boundary current upwelling systems. Unlike other systems, upwelling circulation tends to override nutrient limitation caused by stratification, but is less affected by anthropogenic impacts due to the magnitude of the upwelling nutrient signal. At the same time, upwelling systems are unique in that they undergo seasonal succession as well as short-term spatial and temporal oscillations driven by the time-scale of upwelling wind events. An understanding of nutrient dynamics in upwelling systems is thus critical to any attempt to understand or predict HAB events in these environments. We review the state of knowledge regarding nutrient ecophysiology of a subset of HAB organisms identified in upwelling systems. The upwelling HABs exhibit a number of adaptations previously identified in HAB organisms, such as mixotrophy, osmotrophy and vertical migration. We suggest that, unlike most other HABs, these organisms do not necessarily follow a low nutrient-affinity strategy, and do not fit well with classic allometric scaling relationships. Despite these anomalies, progress has been made in predicting HAB events in upwelling systems, by linking HAB events to the unique environmental conditions associated with these systems. We conclude that this subset of HAB organisms is still poorly described in terms of nutrient ecophysiology, and will benefit from a comparative approach across systems, particularly because the subset of upwelling HABs does not necessarily fit the generic patterns identified for HABs generally.

  14. Women and changes in the Chilean economy: some questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiaroski, M S

    1996-10-01

    The author argues that a new development model that encourages greater participation of women in the work force in domestic piecework, temporary work, and subcontracting may further lead to the exploitation of women in Chile. The importance of women in economic development in Chile should be based on building skills, providing support child care services, reorienting women's education, and tax incentives. Chile over the past decade has achieved relatively stable economic growth and increased employment of women. During 1990-93 the growth of women in the work force increased at a rate of 16.8%, while men's presence increased by only 9.8%. The Chilean economy is based on a sophisticated modern sector and a labor-intensive informal sector. The Chilean model of development relies on cheap, flexible labor and a government approval of this model. Increased participation of women in the labor force is usually perceived as increased economic empowerment. A 1994 Oxfam study found that women were being forced into the labor market due to declines in family income and low wages. 46% of men and women received wages that did not cover basic necessities. The Chilean labor market is gender-stratified. Men are paid better than women for the same work. Men are in more permanent positions. Labor laws are either inadequate or violated, particularly for hours of work and overtime pay and conditions of employment and benefits. Traditional female jobs are those that rely on women's natural attributes. These unskilled attributes are rewarded with low wages. Little opportunity is provided for upgrading skills or acquiring new skills. Some women turn down advancement because of a lack of role models. Women have little opportunity to develop their self-image as workers. Poor self-images affect women's work attitudes and motivation. Some firms use competition between women to boost production. Chilean women remain in subordinate roles.

  15. Educational Opportunity and Contentious Politics: The 2011 Chilean Student Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Salinas, Daniel; Fraser, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Chilean student movement was one of the most massive and original processes of social mobilization in Latin America in the last decade. Led by university students, the movement challenged the longstanding free-market orientation of educational policies in Chile, demanding a more active role for the State in the regulation and supply of education. In this article, we study the main educational and social factors that explain the emergence of the movement. We draw upon social movement ...

  16. A New Liquidity Risk Measure for the Chilean Banking Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastián Becerra; Gregory Claeys; Juan Francisco Martínez

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to construct an appropriate measure of liquidity risk for Chilean banks. There are already several measures of liquidity risk in the literature. Most of these metrics are based on specific assumptions and expert opinion. In order to overcome the potential problems associated with discretionary assumptions, and to exploit the information available, similar to the work of Drehman and Nikolaou (2012), we propose a metric based on the behavior of banks in the procure...

  17. Phylogeography in Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns, 1848) along Two Biogeographical Provinces in the Chilean Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Wevar, Claudio A.; Salinas, Pilar; Hüne, Mathias; Segovia, Nicolás I.; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Astorga, Marcela; Cañete, Juan I.; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Major geologic and climatic changes during the Quaternary exerted a major role in shaping past and contemporary distribution of genetic diversity and structure of aquatic organisms in southern South America. In fact, the northern glacial limit along the Pacific coast, an area of major environmental changes in terms of topography, currents, and water salinity, represents a major biogeographic transition for marine and freshwater species. We used mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop) to investigate the consequences of Quaternary glacial cycles over the pattern of genetic diversity and structure of G. maculatus (Pisces: Galaxiidae) along two biogeographical provinces in the Chilean coast. Extreme levels of genetic diversity and strong phylogeographic structure characterize the species suggesting a low amount of influence of the last glacial cycle over its demography. However, we recognized contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure between main biogeographical areas here analyzed. Along the Intermediate Area (38°–41° S) each estuarine population constitutes a different unit. In contrast, Magellanic populations (43°–53° S) exhibited low levels of genetic differentiation. Contrasting patterns of genetic diversity and structure recorded in the species between the analyzed biogeographic areas are consistent with the marked differences in abiotic factors (i.e., different coastal configurations, Quaternary glacial histories, and oceanographic regimes) and to inherent characteristics of the species (i.e., salt-tolerance, physiology, and reproductive behavior). PMID:26161896

  18. [ANTHROPOMETRIC CHILEAN TABLE TENNIS PLAYERS OF COMPETITIVE FEATURES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez Sepúlveda, Rodrigo; Barraza, Fernando; Rosales Soto, Giovanni; Báez, Eduardo; Tuesta, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the anthropometric profile and somatotype of a sample of 50 players table tennis competitive with an average age 21.6 (± 3.1) years belonging to the Chilean team and institutions of higher education in the region of Valparaiso. The evaluation was conducted under the protocol marking the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK) for the measurement procedure 25 restricted profile variables described by Drinkwater, Norton and Olds. Order to determine the body composition, fat, muscle, bone, skin and tissue residual was considered, using the equations proposed by Kerr. The body shape is characterized through somatotype method proposed by Carter. The sample was divided into 4 groups; Chilean Selection, Traditional Private Universities, State Universities and Private Universities Traditional Nontraditional. Regarding body composition; the Chilean team has the highest values of muscle tissue (45.6 ± 1.7%) and the lowest values of adipose tissue (25.2 ± 1.8%), also presenting lesser value in the Σ 6 skinfolds (mm) . The results showed no significant differences between groups in the aforementioned variables. In general somatotype compared by analyzing SANOVA no significant differences between groups (p = 0.409) was observed. The results show a biotype with such a characterization of endo-mesomorph with average values (4,1-4,9-1,8). This study provides updated data biotypological reference for this sport that can be used for decision-making.

  19. Streamflow responses to Chilean Megathrust earthquakes during the 20th and 21st centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, C.; Manga, M.; Wang, C. Y.; Korup, O.

    2015-12-01

    Coseismic static stress and dynamic stresses generated by propagating seismic waves cause responses in hydrological systems. Such responses include changes in the water level, hydrochemistry and streamflow discharge. Earthquake effects on hydrological systems provide a means to study the interaction between stress changes and regional hydrology, which is otherwise rarely possible. Chile is a country of frequent and large earthquakes and thus provides abundant opportunities to study such interactions and processes. Here we present streamflow responses to several Chilean Megathrust earthquakes, including the 1943 Mw 8.1 Coquimbo, 1950 Mw 8.2 Antofagasta, 1960 Mw 9.5 Valdivia, 1985 Mw 8.0 Valparaiso, 1995 Mw 8.0 Antofagasta, 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, and the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique earthquakes. The stream gauges (n=716) are scattered across Chile, from the Altiplano in the North to Tierra del Fuego in the South. The network thus covers the Andes mountain ranges, the central valley, the Coastal Mountain ranges and (mainly in the more southern parts) the Coastal flats. We combine empirical magnitude-distance relationships, tree-based machine learning tools, and process-based modeling to characterize responses. We first assess the streamflow anomalies and relate these to environmental factors including geology, topography, altitude, soil and vegetation. We then apply 1D-groundwater flow modeling to selected catchments in order to test competing hypotheses for the origin of streamflow changes. We show that the responses of streamflow were heterogeneous, both in sign (decreases and increases in discharge) and in magnitude.

  20. Characterisation of coastal counter-currents on the inner shelf of the Gulf of Cadiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, E.; Laiz, I.; Drago, T.; Relvas, P.

    2016-03-01

    At the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC), poleward currents leaning along the coast alternate with coastal upwelling jets of opposite direction. Here the patterns of these coastal countercurrents (CCCs) are derived from ADCP data collected during 7 deployments at a single location on the inner shelf. The multiyear (2008-2014) time-series, constituting ~ 18 months of hourly records, are further analysed together with wind data from several sources representing local and basin-scale conditions. During one deployment, temperature sensors were also installed near the mooring site to examine the vertical thermal stratification associated with periods of poleward flow. These observations indicate that the coastal circulation is mainly alongshore and barotropic. However, a baroclinic flow is often observed shortly at the time of flow inversion to poleward. CCCs develop all year-round and exclusively control the occurrence of warm coastal water during the upwelling season. On average, one poleward flow lasting 3 days was observed every week, corresponding to CCCs during ~ 40% of the time without seasonal variability. Thus, the studied region is distinct from typical upwelling systems where equatorward coastal upwelling jets largely predominate. CCCs often start to develop near the bed and are frequently associated with 2-layer cross-shore flows characteristic of downwelling conditions (offshore near the bed). In general, the action of alongshore wind stress alone does not justify the development of CCCs. The coastal circulation is best correlated and shows the highest coherence with south-eastward wind in the basin that proceeds from the rotation of southward wind at the West coast of Portugal, hence suggesting a dominant control of large-scale wind conditions. In agreement, wavelet analyses indicate that CCCs are best correlated with alongshore wind occurring in a band period characteristic of the upwelling system (8-32 days). Furthermore, in the absence of wind coastal currents tend

  1. How marine upwelling influences the distribution of Artemesia longinaris (Decapoda: Penaeoidea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Sancinetti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Upwelling events can occur in most of the oceans altering the water physical, chemical and sediment conditions and consequently the species communities dwelling the areas. For better understanding the behavior of populations inhabiting upwelling regions, the spatial and temporal distribution of a Penaeoidea shrimp was studied correlating it with the abiotic factors that vary during upwelling and non-upwelling periods in an area under influence of Cabo Frio upwelling. Bottom salinity and temperature, organic matter and sediment type from each station were sampled from March 2008 to February 2010, in six stations located between 5 and 45 m depth. The lowest temperatures were recorded during spring and summer for both years with temperature values lower than 19ºC. A total of 26,466 Artemesia longinaris shrimps were captured mainly in 10-35 m depth. Upwelling periods showed significant differences in abundance in relation to non-upwelling periods. The spatial distribution among stations varied according to the temperature with higher abundance in stations with values between 19 and 21ºC. The highest abundance of A. longinaris was recorded in spring and summer when intrusions of the cold waters of South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW were frequent. Thus, the effect of cold water of SACW boosted by the upwelling was a determinant factor in the spatial and temporal distribution of A. longinaris in the studied region.

  2. Evolution to decay of upwelling and associated biogeochemistry over the southeastern Arabian sea shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, G.V.M.; Sudheesh, V.; Sudharma, K.V.; Saravanane, N.; Dhanya, V.; Dhanya, K.R.; Lakshmi, G.; Sudhakar, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    (SM). By changing an oligotrophic to a nutrient-replete condition, the upwelling is the major process that regulates the biogeochemistry of this shelf. Its onset is perceptible at 100m depth between January and March. The upwelling reaches the surface...

  3. Measures of Cost Economies in Chilean Banking: 1984-1991 Measures of Cost Economies in Chilean Banking: 1984-1991

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B. Nauriyal

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents measures of cost economies in Chilean banking following the many regulatory and structural changes implemented by Chilean authorities in the aftermath of the 1981-83 financial system crisis. Utilizing panel, and annual cross section monthly data on 37 individual banking institutions in operation over 1984-91, a translogarithmic cost specification is adopted to estimate economies of scale and scope. My findings suggest the presence of persistent and significant economies of scale. Weaker evidence on the presence of economies of scope is also detected. These findings are of additional importance as the estimation methodology adopted overcomes an inherent flaw in most other similar studies that lump together different sizes of financial institutions for a cross sectional analysis over a one or two year period. This paper presents measures of cost economies in Chilean banking following the many regulatory and structural changes implemented by Chilean authorities in the aftermath of the 1981-83 financial system crisis. Utilizing panel, and annual cross section monthly data on 37 individual banking institutions in operation over 1984-91, a translogarithmic cost specification is adopted to estimate economies of scale and scope. My findings suggest the presence of persistent and significant economies of scale. Weaker evidence on the presence of economies of scope is also detected. These findings are of additional importance as the estimation methodology adopted overcomes an inherent flaw in most other similar studies that lump together different sizes of financial institutions for a cross sectional analysis over a one or two year period.

  4. Trophic interactions in northern Chile upwelling ecosystem, year 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica E Barros

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A food web model is constructed to describe predator-prey interactions, community structure and trophic flows in northern Chile upwelling ecosystem (18°20'S, 24°S, for the year 1997. The model is built using the Ecopath with Ecosim software version 6.4, and encompasses 21 functional groups, ranging from primary producers (phytoplankton to top predators (birds and marine mammals, the principal fishing resources and the fishery. Input parameters required to build the model were gathered from specialized literature, grey literature and our own estimates. The results indicated that the total biomass (B T was estimated at 624.7 ton km-2. The combined biomass of small pelagic fish represented 26% of B T, while the combined biomass of demersal fish represented only 0.1% of B T. These results highlight the importance of pelagic fish in this system. Predation mortality resulted to be the main source of mortality. Nevertheless, fishing mortality was important in anchovy, mackerel, common dolphinfish and jack mackerel. The mean trophic level of the fishery was estimated as 3.7, with landings sustained mainly by anchovy. Primary production required to sustain the landings (PPR was estimated at 7.5% of calculated total net primary production, which is lower than PPR estimates in other upwelling ecosystems. The average trophic transfer efficiency was 18%, which is in the range (10-20% informed for marine ecosystems. Results indicate that in 1997 the northern Chile marine ecosystem was characterized for being a system far from maturity, dominated in terms of biomass and flows by the pelagic realm.

  5. Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oumeraci, H.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rouck, J. De;

    1995-01-01

    The paper attempts to present an overview of five research projects supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate General XII, under the MAST 2- Programme (Marine Sciences and Technology), with the overall objective of contributing to the development of improved rational me...... methods for the design of coastal structures....

  6. The Ghost in the Shell : Local and Remote Forcing of a Coastal Bivalve Inhabiting the Humboldt Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The external skeleton of mollusc bivalves, the shell, can furnish a recording of the environmental changes to which the organisms and population are exposed during their lives. The bivalve's growth is subjected to the thermocline variability; which itself is affected by environmental and climatic events. A highly variable environment such as the Humboldt current system (HCS) requires tools capable of recording its variations over a wide range of periodicities. Upwelling, Coastal trapped waves (CTWs), El Niño Southern Oscillation, and Pacific decadal oscillation events contribute to this environmental and climatic variability. The thermocline depth is modified by these different events at their own time-scales (respectively, daily to weekly, intraseasonally, interseasonally to interannually, and on a decadal scale). The thermocline variation translates into changes in Sea surface temperature (SST) and in the qualitative and quantitative productivity of phytoplankton. These two environmental factors are critical to bivalve growth.The sclerochronological (increment width) and sclerochemical (δ18O and δ13C) study consisted on the analysis of the Chilean bivalve Eurhomalea rufa, collected in 2005, as a recorder of the environmental HCS variability. The calibration step identified daily, monthly, and annual marks in the growth patterns of E. rufa. The results confirmed that the thermocline variability mainly drives the bivalve's activity and led to the establishment of a paleotemperature equation. Moreover, periodogram and wavelet analyses exposed the respective impacts of each environmental event from daily to interannual periodicities. In particular, the growth pattern of E. rufa follows SST variability at an intraseasonal periodicity (~ 60 days) which is remotely induced by CTWs. CTWs are generated by Kelvin oceanic waves, which are formed primarily by eastward equatorial Pacific winds (e.g. Shaffer et al. 1997; Montecino and Lange 2009).Sclerochronological studies

  7. Seismic Moment and Slip Distribution of the 1960 and 2010 Chilean Earthquakes as Inferred from Tsunami Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, K.; Fujii, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The 27 February 2010 Chilean earthquake generated tsunami and caused significant damage on the Chilean coast. The tsunami was recorded at many tide gauge stations around the Pacific Ocean, as well as bottom ocean bottom pressure gauges of DART system. We inverted tsunami waveform data, recorded at 11 tide gauges in Chile and Peru and 4 nearby DART stations, to estimate the slip distribution on the fault. When we assume 36 subfaults (12 along strike by 3 downdip, size of each subfault is 50 km × 50 km), very large slip is located at the most downdip subfaults beneath coast and land. Tsunami waveforms recorded other DART stations also require such deep slips. However, other geodetic and seismic data do not show such deep slips, and tsunami data have limited resolution for such a deep onshore slip. We therefore used coastal uplift and subsidence data at 36 locations reported by Farias et al. (2010). The joint inversion indicates two asperities, one to the north around Constitucion and the other to the south around Arauco peninsula. While the largest slip is still located beneath the coast, the offshore slips generally become larger than the tsunami inversion. The total seismic moment is about 1.8 × 1022 Nm (Mw 8.8), similar to the value estimated from tsunami waveforms only, and the fault length is 450 km. For the 22 May 1960 Chilean earthquake, we first made an inversion of tsunami data, recorded at 12 tide gauge stations mostly in South America. When we assume 27 subfaults (9 along strike by 3 downdip, size of each subfault is 100 km × 50 km), the total seismic moment is 4.6 × 1022 Nm (Mw 9.0). Again, the largest slip is estimated at the deepest subfault beneath land near the epicenter, which would produce large coastal uplift where the coastal subsidence was reported by Plafker and Savage (1970). Poor station coverage of tide gauges may limit the resolution of slip distribution particularly at the southern part of the source area. We therefore made a joint

  8. Recruitment of coastal fishes and oceanographic variability in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. R.; Broitman, B. R.; Caselle, J. E.; Wendt, D. E.

    2008-09-01

    Recruitment of pelagic larval fishes to the nearshore environment is dependent on a suite of biological and physical processes operating at many spatial and temporal scales. Nearshore circulation processes associated with coastal upwelling are widely upheld as major determinants of year class strength for many rockfishes ( Sebastes spp.), but the mechanism by which these processes drive recruitment is largely unknown. We used Standard Monitoring Units for the Recruitment of Fishes (SMURFs) to monitor recruitment of two rockfish complexes ( Sebastes spp.) and cabezon ( Scorpaenichthys marmoratus) from March to September of 2004 and 2005 at 3 sites along the central California coast. We examined the relationship between recruitment of these fishes and measurements of oceanographic variability associated with upwelling dynamics, including in situ water temperature, AVHRR sea surface temperature, the Bakun upwelling index, and an index of alongshore surface water transport. We found that rockfish comprising the KCGB complex ( Sebastes atrovirens, Sebastes caurinus, Sebastes carnatus, Sebastes chrysomelas) recruit during early summer, while fishes of the BYO complex ( Sebastes melanops, Sebastes flavidus, Sebastes serranoides), as well as cabezon recruit during late summer. Our results provide limited support for an association between the arrival of juvenile pelagic rockfish and cabezon to the nearshore environment and physical processes related to upwelling and relaxation. Beyond the limitations of our bimonthly sampling scheme, the lack of a clear pattern may be related to the near absence of upwelling-relaxation cycles along this stretch of coast during these two study periods. Moreover, the settlement and recruitment of nearshore fishes may be closely tied to processes occurring earlier in the larval stage.

  9. Long-term trends of upwelling and impacts on primary productivity in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Robert S.; Schulze, Lena M.; Moore, G. W. K.; Charette, Matthew A.; Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert; Danielson, Seth L.

    2013-09-01

    Using a previously established wind proxy for upwelling along the North Slope of Alaska, we examine the interannual to decadal variability in upwelling as well as the climatological monthly trends. The ability of the upwelling to trigger phytoplankton blooms via upward nitrate flux from the halocline is then investigated using data from a moored array together with the proxy. The 70-year record of wind speed from the Barrow, Alaska meteorological station (1941-2010) reveals that strong upwelling events - lasting at least 4 days and exceeding 10 m/s during the storm - occur throughout the year. On average there are 9-10 upwelling events per year, and the number and strength of events has increased over the last 25 years. The low-frequency variability in the upwelling co-varies with previously documented Arctic climate trends, but there is no significant correlation with various high latitude atmospheric indices. There are two seasonal peaks in the occurrence of upwelling, in May and November. The role of the Beaufort High and Aleutian Low in driving the upwelling is investigated using NCEP reanalysis fields. Fluctuations in both of these centers of action contribute to the enhanced winds, and the location of the Aleutian Low storm track plays a key role in the seasonal variability of the upwelling. The upward nitrate flux due to storms in the open water period can account for new primary production that is on par with carbon fixed during the summer growing season in the absence of storms. Evidence from satellite ocean color data of such wind-induced phytoplankton blooms is presented.

  10. Biological and oceanographic upwelling indicators at Cabo Frio (RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleyci A. O. Moser

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton biomass, chemical parameters and hydrology were studied in a transect 101.6 km long off Cabo Frio (RJ, Southeast Brazil, during summer (December 29 to 31, 1991 and winter (June 27 to 30, 1992. Wind induced upwelling events are frequently observed in the area during summer, becoming rare during winter. By the summer cruise a bloom of phytoplankton was observed in surface, close to the coast, with chlorophyll concentrations reaching 25.55 mg Chl-a m-3, uncoupled from the cold, nutrient rich waters of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW, found below 40 m depth. During the winter cruise, the SACW raised at the surface waters in front of Cabo Frio depicting an upwelling event. However, in spite of high surface nitrate concentrations (up to 7.7 f.1M chlorophyll-a were lower than 2 mg Chl-a m-3. The phytoplankton biomass, meteorological and hydrological data suggest a probable upwelling event immediately before the summer cruise, and an ongoing one during winter time. Cluster analyses and principal component analyses (PCA were applied to summer and winter data, pointing out multidimensional fronts in the area during both seasons.A biomassa fitoplanctônica, parâmetros químicos e hidrologia foram estudadas em um transecto de 101,6 Km ao largo de Cabo Frio, (RJ Brasil, durante o verão (Dezembro 29 a 31, 1991 e inverno (Junho 27 a 30, 1992. Nesta área, eventos de ressurgência induzidos pelo vento são comuns durante o verão, tornando-se mais raros durante o inverno. Durante o período de verão uma floração de fitoplâncton foi observada na superfície próximo ao continente, apresentando um máximo de clorofila-a igual a 25,55 mg Cl-a m'3 desacoplado das águas frias e ricas em nutrientes da Água Central do Atlântico Sul (ACAS, presente abaixo de 40 m. Durante o inverno, a ACAS alcançou a superflcie em frente a Cabo Frio, caracterizando um evento de ressurgência. Entretanto, apesar das altas concentrações de nitrato na superf

  11. Preliminary measurements of gamma radiation in Chilean Antarctic Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuardo B, E. (Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago. Dept. de Aplicaciones Nucleares)

    1983-11-01

    Natural and artificial gamma radiation, 1 m above the soil, is being investigated in 4 Chilean Antartic Stations. The measurements are performed with different types of TLD detectors. Preliminary results in the Tte. Marsh Station are reported and discussed. An average exposition of 3,5 ..mu..R/h was found during a 108 days period. This exposition corresponds to an annual dose of about 40 mrad, 8% of the annual dose limit for individual of the public. The presence of low energy artificial radioisotopes was not found.

  12. Chilean Euphorbiaceae species as sources of fuels and raw chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnecco, S.; Bartulin, J.; Marticorena, C.; Ramirez, A.

    1988-01-01

    The potential of some species of Chilean Euphorbiaceae as sources of hydrocarbon-like materials was evaluated. Samples of plants excluding roots, were analyzed for CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ extractives, resins and hydrocarbons. The presence of waxes and natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) was confirmed using spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. C/H values for representative fractions were calculated and extracted samples from selected species analyzed for apparent protein contents. Results suggested that at least two species, Euphorbia lactiflua and Euphorbia copiapina might have an industrial potential.

  13. Misconception p value among Chilean and Italian academic psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Badenes-Ribera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The p value misconceptions are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals’ decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italians, 30 Chileans, questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with original research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed.

  14. Demographic and labor market in the Chilean countryside Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos René Rodríguez Garcés

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the information provided by the National Socioeconomic Survey of 1990 and 2013, the Chilean countryside reconfigurations are analyzed in terms of their demographic trends and labor market restructuring. A continuous process of depopulation and aging of the rural population is demographically notes. The agricultural activities of the rural labor market charge less important in terms of jobs and income, showing a strong process and favoring deagrarianisation positioning services area. Finally, a growing number of households that hold informal consensual unions and a greater presence of single-parent households, mainly consisting of female-headed households is observed.

  15. Corona Formation and Heat Loss on Venus by Coupled Upwelling and Delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    1997-01-01

    Coronae are volcanotectonic features that are unique to Venus and are interpreted to be small-scale upwellings. A model in which upwelling causes delamination at the edge of the plume head, along with deformation of a pre-existing depleted mantel Layer, can produce the full range of topographic forms of coronae. If half of the coronae are active, delamination of the lower lithosphere could account for about 10% of venus's heat loss, with another 15% due to upwelling. Delamination may occur in other geologic enviroment and could help account for 'Venus' heat loss 'deficit'.

  16. Pervasive cracking of the northern Chilean Coastal Cordillera: New evidence for forearc extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, John P.; Hoke, Gregory D.; Allmendinger, Richard W.; González, Gabriel; Isacks, Bryan L.; Carrizo, Daniel A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite convergence across the strongly coupled seismogenic interface between the South American and Nazca plates, the dominant neotectonic signature in the forearc of northern Chile is arc-normal extension. We have used 1 m resolution IKONOS satellite imagery to map nearly 37,000 cracks over an area of 500 km2 near the Salar Grande (21°S). These features, which are best preserved in a ubiquitous gypcrete surface layer, have both nontectonic and tectonic origins. However, their strong preferred orientation perpendicular to the plate convergence vector suggests that the majority owe their formation to approximate east-west extension associated with plate boundary processes such as interseismic loading, coseismic and postseismic strain, and long-term instability resulting from subduction erosion. Similar structures were formed during or shortly after the 1995 Mw = 8.0 earthquake near the city of Antofagasta, south of Salar Grande, and in conjunction with the 2001 Mw = 8.2 8.4 Arequipa, Peru, event. Cracks such as these may form in other forearcs but remain largely unexposed because of vegetative cover or marked fluvial erosion—factors that are absent in northern Chile as a result of its hyperarid climate.

  17. Seasonal variability of the Ekman transport and pumping in the upwelling system off central-northern Chile (˜ 30° S) based on a high-resolution atmospheric regional model (WRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Luis; Ramos, Marcel; Astudillo, Orlando; Dewitte, Boris; Goubanova, Katerina

    2016-09-01

    Two physical mechanisms can contribute to coastal upwelling in eastern boundary current systems: offshore Ekman transport due to the predominant alongshore wind stress and Ekman pumping due to the cyclonic wind stress curl, mainly caused by the abrupt decrease in wind stress (drop-off) in a cross-shore band of 100 km. This wind drop-off is thought to be an ubiquitous feature in coastal upwelling systems and to regulate the relative contribution of both mechanisms. It has been poorly studied along the central-northern Chile region because of the lack in wind measurements along the shoreline and of the relatively low resolution of the available atmospheric reanalysis. Here, the seasonal variability in Ekman transport, Ekman pumping and their relative contribution to total upwelling along the central-northern Chile region (˜ 30° S) is evaluated from a high-resolution atmospheric model simulation. As a first step, the simulation is validated from satellite observations, which indicates a realistic representation of the spatial and temporal variability of the wind along the coast by the model. The model outputs are then used to document the fine-scale structures in the wind stress and wind curl in relation to the topographic features along the coast (headlands and embayments). Both wind stress and wind curl had a clear seasonal variability with annual and semiannual components. Alongshore wind stress maximum peak occurred in spring, second increase was in fall and minimum in winter. When a threshold of -3 × 10-5 s-1 for the across-shore gradient of alongshore wind was considered to define the region from which the winds decrease toward the coast, the wind drop-off length scale varied between 8 and 45 km. The relative contribution of the coastal divergence and Ekman pumping to the vertical transport along the coast, considering the estimated wind drop-off length, indicated meridional alternation between both mechanisms, modulated by orography and the intricate

  18. Zooplankton associated with the oxygen minimum zone system in the northern upwelling region of Chile during March 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, Ruben; Hidalgo, Pamela; Krautz, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    Zooplankton in the coastal upwelling region off northern Chile may play a significant biogeochemical role by promoting carbon flux into the subsurface OMZ (oxygen minimum zone). This work identifies the dominant zooplankton species inhabiting the area influenced by the OMZ in March 2000 off Iquique (20°S, northern Chile). Abundance and vertical distribution studies revealed 17 copepod and 9 euphausiid species distributed between the surface and 600 m at four stations sampled both by day and by night. Some abundant species remained in the well-oxygenated upper layer (30 m), with no evidence of diel vertical migration, apparently restricted by a shallow (40-60 m) oxycline. Other species, however, were found closely associated with the OMZ. The large-sized copepod Eucalanus inermis was found below the oxycline and performed diel vertical migrations into the OMZ, whereas the very abundant Euphausia mucronata performed extensive diel vertical migrations between the surface waters and the core of the OMZ (200 m), even crossing it. A complete assessment of copepods and euphausiids revealed that the whole sampled water column (0-600 m) is occupied by distinct species having well-defined habitats, some of them within the OMZ. Ontogenetic migrations were evident in Eucalanidae and E. mucronata. Estimates of species biomass showed a substantial (>75% of total zooplankton biomass) daily exchange of C between the photic layer and the OMZ. Both E. inermis and E. mucronata can actively exchange about 37.8 g C m -2 d -1 between the upper well-oxygenated (0-60 m) layer and the deeper (60-600 m) OMZ layer. This migrant biomass may contribute about 7.2 g C m -2 d -1 to the OMZ system through respiration, mortality, and production of fecal pellets within the OMZ. This movement of zooplankton in and out of the OMZ, mainly as a result of the migratory behavior of E. mucronata, suggests a very efficient mechanism for introducing large amounts of freshly produced carbon into the OMZ

  19. Controlled artificial upwelling in a fjord to combat toxic algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimans, T. A.; Hansen, A. H.; Fredheim, A.; Lien, E.; Reitan, K. I.

    2003-04-01

    During the summer, primary production in the surface layers of some fjords depletes the nutrients to the degree that some arts of toxic algae dominate the flora. We describe an experiment employing a bubble curtain to lift significant amounts of nutrient-rich seawater to the light zone and provide an environment in which useful algae can survive. The motivation for the experiment is to provide a local region in which mussels can be cleansed from the effects of toxic algae. Three 100-m long, perforated pipes were suspended at 40 m depth in the Arnafjord, a side arm of the Sognefjord. Large amounts of compressed air were supplied during a period of three weeks. The deeper water mixed with the surface water and flowed from the mixing region at 5 to 15 m depth. Within a few days, the mixture of nutrient-rich water covered most of the inner portion of Arnafjord. Within 10 days, the plankton samples showed that the artificial upwelling produced the desired type of algae and excluded the toxic blooms that were occurring outside the manipulated fjord arm. The project (DETOX) is supported by the Norwegian ministries of Fisheries, Agriculture and Public Administration.

  20. Geographical classification of Chilean wines by an electronic nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás H Beltrán

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicolás H Beltrán, Manuel A Duarte-Mermoud, Ricardo E MuñozDepartment of Electrical Engineering, University of Chile, Santiago, ChileAbstract: This paper discusses the classification of Chilean wines by geographical origin based only on aroma information. The varieties of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Carménère analyzed here are produced in four different valleys in the central part of Chile (Colchagua, Maipo, Maule, and Rapel. Aroma information was obtained with a zNoseTM (fast gas chromatograph and the data was analyzed by applying wavelet transform for feature extraction followed by an analysis with support vector machines for classification. Two evaluations of the classification technique were performed; the average percentage of correct classification performed on the validation set was obtained by means of cross-validation against the percentage of correct classification obtained on the test set. This developed technique obtained results on classification rates over 94% in both cases. The geographical origin of a Chilean wine can be resolved rapidly with fast gas chromatography and data processing.Keywords: geographical origin, origin denomination, wine classification, pattern recognition, support vector machines, wavelet analysis, feature extraction

  1. Antimicrobial activity of submerged cultures of Chilean basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueveque, Pedro; Anke, Timm; Saéz, Katia; Silva, Mario; Becerra, José

    2010-10-01

    This study is part of a screening program aimed at searching for bioactive metabolites from Chilean basidiomycetes. Submerged cultivation of fungal mycelia in liquid media was evaluated for antimicrobial activity. A total of 148 strains were obtained in vitro. The extracts produced from submerged cultures were evaluated against bacteria and fungi. In the primary antimicrobial assay, approximately 60% of the extracts presented positive biological activity. The highest frequencies of active strains were from the orders Agaricales (31.0%), Polyporales (20.6%), Sterales (18.3%), Boletales (11.4%), and Cortinariales (9.1%). Antifungal activity was more pronounced than antibacterial activity. Twelve extracts that exhibited strong antimicrobial activity showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 50 µL/mL against Bacillus brevis and 25∼50 µL/mL against Penicillium notatum and Paecilomyces variotii. The biological activity of some strains did not vary considerably, regardless of the substrate or collection site whereas, for others, it showed marked variations. Differences in antimicrobial activities observed in the different fungal genera suggested that the ability to produce bioactive compounds is not homogenously distributed among basidiomycetes. The information obtained from this study reveals that Chilean basidiomycetes are able to generate small and/or large variations in the normal pathway of compounds production. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate this biological and chemical wealth, which could be an unsuspected reservoir of new and potentially useful molecules.

  2. Chilean management education: rhetoric of pragmatism, consumerism, individualism and elitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Mandiola Cotroneo

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand the character and the role of higher education in business in relation to the wider institutional and structural contexts within which they function. Being loyal to that widespread background, business schools in Chile have become efficient providers of appropriate goods and services for their respective clients and consumers, behaving more like corporations and businesses rather than educational institutions. From this perspective, business education's alignment with the wider political and socio-economic shifts associated with the developments of market economies and economic globalization is a necessary reflection. In this paper we will provide an account of our problematization of management education practices in Chile. This practice was pictured as one of the main characters at the forefront of the Chilean neo-liberal revolution during the final years of the last century. In particular, we will unravel more closely the chain of signifiers articulating the meaning of Chilean higher business education. This articulation is recuperated mainly around how those involved in the management education practice talk about (ourthemselves. As well as specialised press writings, some academic accounts and fragments from our own 'ethnographic' involvement are used for this purpose. Particular attention is paid to the social, political and fantasmatic logics (GLYNOS; HOWARTH, 2007 as key elements of our own explanation of this practice, which in turn informs our critical standpoint.

  3. Observed anomalous upwelling in the Lakshadweep Sea during the summer monsoon season of 2005

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, R.R.; Nisha, K.; GirishKumar, M.S.; Pankajakshan, T.; Ravichandran, M.; Johnson, Z.; Girish, K.; Aneeshkumar, N.; Srinath, M.; Rajesh, S.; Rajan, C.K.

    of local and remote forcings are examined to explain the observed anomalous upwelling during SMS of 2005. The equatorward alongshore wind stress (WS) along the KK XBT transect persisted in a transient manner beyond September only during SMS of 2005...

  4. Upwelling variability along the southern coast of Bali and in Nusa Tenggara waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih, Nining Sari; Rakhmaputeri, Noviani; Harto, Agung B.

    2013-03-01

    Spatial and temporal variation of upwelling along the southern coast of Bali and in the Nusa Tenggara waters — Indonesia was studied by using satellite image data of sea surface temperatures and chlorophyll-a from September 1997 to December 2008. This study clearly reveals annual upwelling in the regions from June to October, associated with the southeast monsoon cycle, with the sea surface temperature (chlorophyll-a concentration) being colder (higher) than that during the northwest monsoon. In addition, this study also shows that the upwelling strength is controlled remotely by ENSO and IOD climate phenomena. During El Niño/positive IOD (La Niña/negative IOD) periods, the Bali — Nusa Tenggara upwelling strength increases (decreases).

  5. Ekman Upwelling, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time Ekman current (in zonal, meridional, and modulus sets) and Ekman upwelling data. This data begins with wind velocity...

  6. Upwelling and associated hydrography along the west coast of india during southwest monsoon, 1999

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maheswaran, P.A.; Rajesh, G.; Revichandran, C.; Nair, K.K.C.

    ) and 1.2 degrees C (off Mangalore) from the farthest stations, indicating the presence of upwelled water near the coast. Well defined thermal, saline and density fronts were visible. Relatively high offshore transport was observed off Kanyakumari...

  7. Ekman Upwelling, QuikSCAT SeaWinds, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes science quality Ekman current (in zonal, meridional, and modulus sets) and Ekman upwelling data. This data begins with wind velocity...

  8. Report on the 2010 Chilean earthquake and tsunami response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    In July 2010, in an effort to reduce future catastrophic natural disaster losses for California, the American Red Cross coordinated and sent a delegation of 20 multidisciplinary experts on earthquake response and recovery to Chile. The primary goal was to understand how the Chilean society and relevant organizations responded to the magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake that struck the region on February 27, 2010, as well as how an application of these lessons could better prepare California communities, response partners and state emergency partners for a comparable situation. Similarities in building codes, socioeconomic conditions, and broad extent of the strong shaking make the Chilean earthquake a very close analog to the impact of future great earthquakes on California. To withstand and recover from natural and human-caused disasters, it is essential for citizens and communities to work together to anticipate threats, limit effects, and rapidly restore functionality after a crisis. The delegation was hosted by the Chilean Red Cross and received extensive briefings from both national and local Red Cross officials. During nine days in Chile, the delegation also met with officials at the national, regional, and local government levels. Technical briefings were received from the President’s Emergency Committee, emergency managers from ONEMI (comparable to FEMA), structural engineers, a seismologist, hospital administrators, firefighters, and the United Nations team in Chile. Cities visited include Santiago, Talca, Constitución, Concepción, Talcahuano, Tumbes, and Cauquenes. The American Red Cross Multidisciplinary Team consisted of subject matter experts, who carried out special investigations in five Teams on the (1) science and engineering findings, (2) medical services, (3) emergency services, (4) volunteer management, and (5) executive and management issues (see appendix A for a full list of participants and their titles and teams). While developing this

  9. Practical limitations on the use of diurnal temperature signals to quantify groundwater upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Lautz, Laura K.; Buckley, Sean F.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater upwelling to streams creates unique habitat by influencing stream water quality and temperature; upwelling zones also serve as vectors for contamination when groundwater is degraded. Temperature time series data acquired along vertical profiles in the streambed have been applied to simple analytical models to determine rates of vertical fluid flux. These models are based on the downward propagation characteristics (amplitude attenuation and phase-lag) of the surface diurnal signal. Despite the popularity of these models, there are few published characterizations of moderate-to-strong upwelling. We attribute this limitation to the thermodynamics of upwelling, under which the downward conductive signal transport from the streambed interface occurs opposite the upward advective fluid flux. Governing equations describing the advection–diffusion of heat within the streambed predict that under upwelling conditions, signal amplitude attenuation will increase, but, counterintuitively, phase-lag will decrease. Therefore the extinction (measurable) depth of the diurnal signal is very shallow, but phase lag is also short, yielding low signal to noise ratio and poor model sensitivity. Conversely, amplitude attenuation over similar sensor spacing is strong, yielding greater potential model sensitivity. Here we present streambed thermal time series over a range of moderate to strong upwelling sites in the Quashnet River, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The predicted inverse relationship between phase-lag and rate of upwelling was observed in the field data over a range of conditions, but the observed phase-lags were consistently shorter than predicted. Analytical solutions for fluid flux based on signal amplitude attenuation return results consistent with numerical models and physical seepage meters, but the phase-lag analytical model results are generally unreasonable. Through numerical modeling we explore reasons why phase-lag may have been over-predicted by the

  10. Coastal Analysis, Northampton, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  11. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  12. COASTAL, Pacific, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a coastal study.

  13. The biology and ecology of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas (Cephalopoda in Chilean waters: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Ibáñez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas is the most abundant cephalopod species in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, which supports the biggest cephalopod fishery in the world. Due to its growing economic importance, the population growth and distributional expansion of this squid is being increasingly studied. Nevertheless, some basic features of the biology of D. gigas are still unknown or have been poorly investigated. In this review we summarize the known information regarding the biology and ecology of this species in the southeastern Pacific Ocean; we focus on the Chilean region in order to propose hypotheses and research lines for a better understanding the life history of this organism. Available data on the size structure, reproduction and genetics of D. gigas allows us to propose hypotheses related to the squid's life history traits. Based on the current literature and publications of colleagues, we propose two hypotheses regarding the effect of spatial variation on the life history of D. gigas. Hypothesis 1: Squids mature at large sizes and spawn in oceanic waters with warm temperatures where paralarvae and juveniles develop. Immature squids migrate near shore to feed, grow and mature, and then return to the offshore sites to spawn. Hypothesis 2: Alternatively, juvenile D. gigas in the oceanic zone do not migrate to coastal waters and mature at small sizes compared to individuals living near the coast that mature at larger size and migrate to oceanic waters to spawn. We provide background information about the feeding behavior and parasitism of this species, suggesting that D. gigas is an important trophic link in the southeastern Pacific marine ecosystem. However, more studies on the feeding habits, reproduction and parasite load are needed not only to test hypotheses proposed in this study, but also to advance the overall knowledge of this species.

  14. Linking the kinematics of the interplate and the offshore morphology along the Chilean subduction margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Isabel; Moreno, Marcos; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Morphological features at subduction zones are undoubtedly influenced by the complex interplay between the subducting slab and the overriding plate. Several studies suggest that the subduction dynamics is strongly dependent on the geometry and rheology of the margin (including gravity/density anomalies, viscous mantle flow and roughness of the slab, among others). However, it is not clear how the geomorphological variation of the forearc along strike can be used as a proxy for better understanding the mechanics on the interface and seismotectonic segmentation. Here we investigate the links between the kinematics of the plate interface and the morphology of the overriding plate along the Chilean margin by combining morphometrical and statistical analysis. We constructed swath profiles subtracting the averaged topography and performed gradient analysis to characterize variations of morphological features, and we compared these results with the locking degree distribution derived from the inversion of GPS data. On the coastal area the bathymetry and topography analysis shows a planar feature, gently dipping ocean-wards and backed by a cliff, which exhibits spatial variations in its width, height and extension along-strike. This morphology suggests a quiescence process or a "stable tectonic condition", at least since the late Quaternary (over multiple seismic cycles). The results indicate that this planar feature spatially correlates with the rupture size of recent great earthquakes and locking degree areas, suggesting that earthquake cycle deformation has an imprint on the offshore morphology, which can be used to study the transfer of stresses among adjacent seismotectonic segments and the periodicity and location of large earthquakes. In addition, the longevity of this correlation between topography, earthquake rupture and geodetic locking that likely integrates over a time window of several 103 to several 105 years indicates that the instrumentally inferred locking

  15. Coastal Navigation Portfolio Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-19

    the entire navigation portfolio of projects , both inland and coastal. The Coastal Structures Management , Analysis, and Ranking Tool (CSMART) is a...FEB 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coastal Navigatoin Portfolio Management 5a. CONTRACT...CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program Coastal Navigation Portfolio Management The Coastal Navigatoin Portfolio Management work unit

  16. Dynamics of wind-driven upwelling off the northeastern coast of Hainan Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peigen; Cheng, Peng; Gan, Jianping; Hu, Jianyu

    2016-02-01

    Both observational and reanalysis sea surface temperature data reveal that upwelling occurs frequently off the northeastern coast of Hainan Island (downstream of the change in topography off Tongluo Cape), which cannot be attributed to the along-shelf wind alone. To identify dynamics of the upwelling, we conduct a numerical experiment using an idealized topography that is simplified from the actual topography off the eastern and northeastern coasts of Hainan Island. The result indicates that the upwelling downstream of the change in topography is associated with onshore cross-isobath transport. Analysis of the vertically integrated momentum balance shows that the upwelling-linked onshore transport is primarily intensified by the along-isobath barotropic pressure gradient force (PGT), but is weakened by the along-isobath baroclinic pressure gradient force (PGC). The along-isobath PGT is linked to the advection of relative vorticity, the bottom stress curl and the gradient of momentum flux in vorticity equation. On the other hand, the PGC-related process is diagnosed by potential vorticity (PV) balance. Similar to the negative PV term from wind stress, the negative PV terms of the joint effect of baroclinicity and relief and the baroclinic bottom pressure torque weaken the upwelling-linked onshore transport downstream of the change in topography. The onshore transport is enhanced by the positive PV from bottom stress. In addition, the cross-isobath forces play an important role in upwelling intensification in the shallow nearshore region.

  17. Growth of the Humboldt Current krill in the upwelling zone off central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme-Bugueño, Ramiro; Silva-Aburto, Jocelyn; Escribano, Rubén; Peterson, William T.; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Temporal variability in the daily growth rate (DGR) of the Humboldt Current krill, Euphausia mucronata, was studied in eighteen incubation experiments off the coast of Dichato, central Chile (36.5°S), carried out in 2011-2014. Intermolt period (IMP) was derived from the molting rate method in order to estimate the DGRs. Mean IMP was 9.2 ± 4.8 days (range: 2.9-18.7 d). Overall mean DGR was 0.03 ± 0.13 mm d- 1. DGR showed a dome-shaped pattern, with a higher mean DGR when upwelling was moderate (0.06 ± 0.04 mm d- 1) than intense (0.01 ± 0.00 mm d- 1) or weak (0.01 ± - 0.01 mm d- 1). This dome-shaped trend was observed in chlorophyll-a concentrations (Chla) at similar upwelling regimens. E. mucronata DGR variability was best explained by a generalized linear model which included the contribution of the Equatorial Subsurface Water, temperature, dissolved oxygen and Chla as predictor variables. Results suggest that E. mucronata is better adapted to grow under upwelling conditions when it can take advantage of high biological productivity, although the species growth is not limited when weak upwelling or even downwelling occurs. Analysis of the duration of the upwelling events suggest that E. mucronata growth is limited (shrinking) when upwellings last > 10 days.

  18. Properties of Red Sea coastal currents

    KAUST Repository

    Churchill, J.H.

    2014-02-14

    Properties of coastal flows of the central Red Sea are examined using 2 years of velocity data acquired off the coast of Saudi Arabia near 22 °N. The tidal flow is found to be very weak. The strongest tidal constituent, the M2 tide, has a magnitude of order 4 cm s−1. Energetic near-inertial and diurnal period motions are observed. These are surface-intensified currents, reaching magnitudes of >10 cm s−1. Although the diurnal currents appear to be principally wind-driven, their relationship with the surface wind stress record is complex. Less than 50% of the diurnal current variance is related to the diurnal wind stress through linear correlation. Correlation analysis reveals a classical upwelling/downwelling response to the alongshore wind stress. However, less than 30% of the overall sub-inertial variance can be accounted for by this response. The action of basin-scale eddies, impinging on the coastal zone, is implicated as a primary mechanism for driving coastal flows.

  19. Introduction to coastal engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D' Angremond, K.; Pluim-van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Lecture notes on genesis of the coastline, climatology, oceanography, coastal morphology, coastal formations, coastalzonde management, tidal inlets and estuaries, pollution and density problems, practical problems and common solutions.

  20. Implications of Upwells as Hydrodynamic Jets in a Pulse Jet Mixed System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, Leonard F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bamberger, Judith A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Minette, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report evaluates the physics of the upwell flow in pulse jet mixed systems in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Although the initial downward flow and radial flow from pulse jet mixers (PJMs) has been analyzed in some detail, the upwells have received considerably less attention despite having significant implications for vessel mixing. Do the upwells behave like jets? How do the upwells scale? When will the central upwell breakthrough? What proportion of the vessel is blended by the upwells themselves? Indeed, how the physics of the central upwell is affected by multiple PJMs (e.g., six in the proposed mixing vessels), non-Newtonian rheology, and significant multicomponent solids loadings remain unexplored. The central upwell must satisfy several criteria to be considered a free jet. First, it must travel for several diameters in a nearly constant direction. Second, its velocity must decay with the inverse of elevation. Third, it should have an approximately Gaussian profile. Fourth, the influence of surface or body forces must be negligible. A combination of historical data in a 12.75 ft test vessel, newly analyzed data from the 8 ft test vessel, and conservation of momentum arguments derived specifically for PJM operating conditions demonstrate that the central upwell satisfies these criteria where vigorous breakthrough is achieved. An essential feature of scaling from one vessel to the next is the requirement that the underlying physics does not change adversely. One may have confidence in scaling if (1) correlations and formulas capture the relevant physics; (2) the underlying physics does not change from the conditions under which it was developed to the conditions of interest; (3) all factors relevant to scaling have been incorporated, including flow, material, and geometric considerations; and (4) the uncertainty in the relationships is sufficiently narrow to meet required specifications. Although the central upwell

  1. Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sergio A; Yáñez-Navea, Katherine; Muñoz, Mauricio

    2014-06-15

    The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an "Urbanization Index" based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.

  2. The seasonal upwellings in the Gulf of Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Jean-Marc

    Observational as well as numerical experiments show that Ekman divergence neither at the equator nor at the coast can explain a significant part of the annual upwelling in the Gulf of Guinea. The remote forcing theory is tested by analyzing both historical data and the FOCAL hydrographic stations (1982-1984). The meteorological data base is analysed as well. Analyses of the thermostad show that waters with the same characteristics as those of the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) are carried by the equatorial under current (EUC) and the South Equatorial Undercurrent (SEUC) from the western-central equatorial Atlantic at 35° - 29°W towards the thermostad regions in the Gulf of Guinea. The thermostad water is then carried back westward in the two geostrophic compensation flows flanking the EUC at 2° - 3°N and 2° - 3°S. The cooling of the subthermoclinal waters off Abidjan (5°N) and Pointe-Noire (5°S) is related to the advection and vertical spreading of SACW between 500m and 50m in May-June-July. An exceptional warm event occurred in early 1984 in the Gulf of Guinea. The winds collapsed nearly completely all along the equator in January-April 1984. The onset of the African monsoon was late (in July-August 1984), then the monsoon was weaker than climatology in August-October 1984. The equatorial thermocline was observed 50m deeper than climatology in February 1984, then near the surface in July 1984. Sea levels rose over the equatorial Atlantic, the surge reaching about 13cm at 6°E in February 1984, when the western-central equatorial Atlantic was nearly flat. Minimum sea levels occurred in June-July 1984 at 6°E, before the African monsoon. During this event, the maximum speed in the shallow core of the equatorial undercurrent at 4°W and 6°E was nearly insensitive to large changes in the thermal structure (downwelling or upwelling situations). In February-May 1984, we have observed distinct increasing eastward flows at the equator below 250m and minimum

  3. Predicting Upwelling Radiance on the West Florida Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    conditions on the WFS are as complicated as any coastal region, yielding situations where the chlorophyll a biomass may range from 0.01 to >20 μg...Carder, K.L., Walsh, J.J. and Dieterle, D.A., 1999. Carbon cycling in the upper waters of the Sargasso Sea: II. Numerical simulation of apparent...and inherent optical properties. Deep-Sea Research I, 46(2): 271-317. Bissett, W.P., Walsh, J.J., Dieterle, D.A. and Carder, K.L., 1999. Carbon

  4. A model study of the tropical Atlantic variability, with a focus on upwelling events along the African coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, G.; Pierini, S.

    2009-04-01

    A process-oriented model study of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is presented. It is based on a hierarchy of reduced-gravity primitive equation layer models, including one, two or three active layers; the domain of integration spans the latitudes from 35°S to 35°N and the wind forcing is provided by the ECMWF Re-Analysis data, which are decomposed in EOF. The full oceanic response is first compared with that obtained with a limited number of EOF in order to identify the main patterns of the wind-driven circulation. Particular attention is devoted to the analysis of beta-refracted baroclinic Rossby waves, that shape the oceanic variability in the eastern tropical region. The wind forcing is then confined to zonal bands with different meridional widths centered at the equator, so that the thermocline variability along the African coasts outside such bands is merely due to coastal Kelvin waves originating from eastward-traveling equatorial Kelvin waves through a well known teleconnection mechanism. Comparison of the obtained results with the full oceanic response allows us to distinguish between remotely-forced and locally forced upwelling events. A preliminary validation with altimeter data is finally presented.

  5. Level of evidence and geographic origin of articles published in Chilean dental journals.

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Moraga

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the geographic origin and level of evidence (LE) of articles published in Chilean dental journals during 2012. The target population for the bibliometric study was articles published in exclusively-scientific Chilean dental journals. These variables were analyzed: journal, area, language, country, region, design, scenario, and LE. A total of 120 articles were published in four journals: International Journal of Odontostomatology (IJOS=59), Revista Clínic...

  6. Justified Ilegality?: Controlled clientelism by the Chilean administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moriconi Bezerra

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean civil service is considered one of the most efficient in Latin America. However, different studies describe the informal institutions that operate between the Legislative Power and the bureaucracy to fill positions in the public administration. Although some of these clientelistic practices are against the law, they have been accepted and defended in both the political and scientific spheres. Legality is not considered an important value if certain indexes have a positive development. In this context, it is important to study how corruption and clientelism have been ignored, or hidden, through political discourses and technical reports about the situation of bureaucracy. All of this allows a better understanding of why after 20 years of administrative reforms there are damaging practices which negatively affect democracy that have not been eradicated.

  7. Simple Tool to Evaluate Airtightness in Chilean Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex González Cáceres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the high impact that air leaks have on buildings’ energy expenses, most developed countries have set out norms which regulate their presence in homes. Chile will soon begin this process; however, the airtightness revision strategy in envelopes has not been resolved as of yet. This article presents a tool to Assess Airtightness in Design, EHeD. The software will allow predicting the performance of homes under the regulations which will be set out, aiding designers, builders or owners to make decisions when making changes to improve airtightness. EHeD has been validated through pressurization tests in diverse homes across the country, with results that are in line with expectations, thus validating its calculation model. The methodology considers three stages: determining the main factors that have an impact on the airtightness in Chilean homes, preparing an airtightness database for each component (wall, windows and doors and preparing a calculation model that is integrated in an IT interface.

  8. Chilean prosopis mesocarp flour: phenolic profiling and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Quispe, Cristina; Soriano, Maria Del Pilar C; Theoduloz, Cristina; Jiménez-Aspée, Felipe; Pérez, Maria Jorgelina; Cuello, Ana Soledad; Isla, Maria Inés

    2015-04-17

    In South America, the mesocarp flour of Prosopis species plays a prominent role as a food resource in arid areas. The aim of this work was the characterization of the phenolic antioxidants occurring in the pod mesocarp flour of Chilean Prosopis. Samples were collected in the Copiapo, Huasco and Elqui valleys from the north of Chile. The samples of P. chilensis flour exhibited a total phenolic content ranging between 0.82-2.57 g gallic acid equivalents/100 g fresh flour weight. The highest antioxidant activity, measured by the DPPH assay, was observed for samples from the Huasco valley. HPLC-MS/MS analysis allowed the tentative identification of eight anthocyanins and 13 phenolic compounds including flavonol glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and ellagic acid derivatives. The antioxidant activity and the phenolic composition in the flour suggest that this ancient South American resource may have potential as a functional food.

  9. Chilean Prosopis Mesocarp Flour: Phenolic Profiling and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Schmeda-Hirschmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In South America, the mesocarp flour of Prosopis species plays a prominent role as a food resource in arid areas. The aim of this work was the characterization of the phenolic antioxidants occurring in the pod mesocarp flour of Chilean Prosopis. Samples were collected in the Copiapo, Huasco and Elqui valleys from the north of Chile. The samples of P. chilensis flour exhibited a total phenolic content ranging between 0.82–2.57 g gallic acid equivalents/100 g fresh flour weight. The highest antioxidant activity, measured by the DPPH assay, was observed for samples from the Huasco valley. HPLC-MS/MS analysis allowed the tentative identification of eight anthocyanins and 13 phenolic compounds including flavonol glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and ellagic acid derivatives. The antioxidant activity and the phenolic composition in the flour suggest that this ancient South American resource may have potential as a functional food.

  10. Seasonal variation of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea: Impact of sea ice cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Lena M.; Pickart, Robert S.

    2012-06-01

    Data from a mooring array deployed from August 2002 to September 2004 are used to characterize differences in upwelling near the shelf break in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea due to varying sea ice conditions. The record is divided into three ice seasons: open water, partial ice, and full ice. The basic response is the same in each of the seasons. Roughly 8 h after the onset of easterly winds the shelf break jet reverses, followed approximately 10 h later by upwelling of saltier water which is cold near the shelf break (Pacific Winter Water) and warm at depth (Atlantic Water). The secondary circulation at the outer shelf is, to first order, consistent with a two-dimensional Ekman balance of offshore flow in the upper layer and onshore flow at depth. There are, however, important seasonal differences in the upwelling. Overall the response is strongest in the partial ice season and weakest in the full ice season. It is believed that these differences are dictated by the degree to which wind stress is transmitted through the pack-ice, as the strength of the wind-forcing was comparable over the three seasons. An EOF-based upwelling index is constructed using information about the primary flow, secondary flow, and hydrography. The ability to predict upwelling using the wind record alone is explored, which demonstrates that 90% of easterly wind events exceeding 9.5 m s-1 drive significant upwelling. During certain periods the ice cover on the shelf became landfast, which altered the upwelling and circulation patterns near the shelf break.

  11. Steps in the intensification of Benguela upwelling over the Walvis Ridge during Miocene and Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzel, Sebastian; Dupont, Lydie M.; Marret, Fabienne; Jung, Gerlinde; Wefer, Gerold

    2017-01-01

    Upwelling is a significant part of the ocean circulation controlling largely the transport of nutrient-rich cold waters to the surface and therefore influencing ocean productivity and global climate. The Benguela upwelling system (BUS) is one of the major upwelling areas in the world. Previous reconstructions of the BUS mainly focused on the onset and intensification in southern and central parts, but changes of the northern part have been rarely investigated in detail. Using the Late Miocene to Pliocene organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst record of ODP Site 1081, we reconstruct and discuss the early upwelling history over the Walvis Ridge with a special focus on the movement of the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). We suggest that during the Late Miocene the Angola Current flowed southwards over the Walvis Ridge more frequently than today because the ABF was probably located further south as a result of a weaker meridional temperature gradient. A possible strengthening of the meridional gradient during the latest Miocene to early Pliocene in combination with uplift of south-western Africa intensified the upwelling along the coast and increased the upwelling's filaments over the Walvis Ridge. An intermediate period from 6.2 to 5.5 Ma is shown by the dominance of Habibacysta tectata, cysts of a cool-tolerant dinoflagellate known from the northern Atlantic, indicating changing oceanic conditions contemporaneous with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. From 4.3 Ma on, the upwelling signal got stronger again and waters were well-mixed and nutrient-rich. Our results indicate a northward migration of the ABF as early as 7 Ma and the initial stepwise intensification of the BUS.

  12. Steps in the intensification of Benguela upwelling over the Walvis Ridge during Miocene and Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzel, Sebastian; Dupont, Lydie M.; Marret, Fabienne; Jung, Gerlinde; Wefer, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    Upwelling is a significant part of the ocean circulation controlling largely the transport of nutrient-rich cold waters to the surface and therefore influencing ocean productivity and global climate. The Benguela upwelling system (BUS) is one of the major upwelling areas in the world. Previous reconstructions of the BUS mainly focused on the onset and intensification in southern and central parts, but changes of the northern part have been rarely investigated in detail. Using the Late Miocene to Pliocene organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst record of ODP Site 1081, we reconstruct and discuss the early upwelling history over the Walvis Ridge with a special focus on the movement of the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). We suggest that during the Late Miocene the Angola Current flowed southwards over the Walvis Ridge more frequently than today because the ABF was probably located further south as a result of a weaker meridional temperature gradient. A possible strengthening of the meridional gradient during the latest Miocene to early Pliocene in combination with uplift of south-western Africa intensified the upwelling along the coast and increased the upwelling's filaments over the Walvis Ridge. An intermediate period from 6.2 to 5.5 Ma is shown by the dominance of Habibacysta tectata, cysts of a cool-tolerant dinoflagellate known from the northern Atlantic, indicating changing oceanic conditions contemporaneous with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. From 4.3 Ma on, the upwelling signal got stronger again and waters were well-mixed and nutrient-rich. Our results indicate a northward migration of the ABF as early as 7 Ma and the initial stepwise intensification of the BUS.

  13. Thermohaline processes in a tropical coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Cecilia; Mariño-Tapia, Ismael; Jeronimo, Gilberto; Capurro-Filograsso, Luis

    2013-10-01

    The detailed thermohaline structure of the northern Yucatan coastal zone was obtained for the first time in order to gain an insight into the interactions between various processes in this complex tropical environment of extreme evaporation and high precipitation rates. From the continent, it has water exchange with numerous coastal lagoons (ranging from brackish to hypersaline) and receives intense submarine groundwater discharges (SGD). In the summer of 2006 a high-resolution (500 m cross-shore and 5 km along-shore) oceanographic campaign was performed starting at Holbox Island down to the mouth of Celestun Lagoon. CTD profiles were measured at 1020 stations along 69 coastal cross-shore transects. Additionally, CTD data from 2 wider surveys, covering the continental shelf (Campeche Bank) and the southern Gulf of Mexico respectively were used to complement the results. From the thermohaline properties, two main water masses were identified: (a) the Caribbean Subtropical Underwater (CSUW), upwelled from the Caribbean, which was observed at the bottom very close to the coast in more than 260 km (from the upwelling region near Cape Catoche to approximately 89.5 W during the summer of 2006) and (b) the second dominant group was a mass of warm hypersaline water which originates in Yucatan due to the high temperature and evaporation rates. We call this water mass the Yucatan Sea Water (YSW) after finding evidence of its presence in various field campaigns both in the Yucatan Sea and further to the west in the southern Gulf of Mexico. All the water masses present in the Yucatan coastal zone showed pronounced variations with important dilution and salinisation effects. The permeable karstic geology of the region prevents the continental water from discharging into the ocean through surface rivers and instead the rainfall permeates directly to the aquifer and travels through caves and fractures towards the sea. Three main regions showed evidence of continental discharges

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastrointestinal symptoms on Chilean pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ferrer Poveda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of this research was to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection on Chilean pregnant women and its relationship with the appearance and severity of hyperemesis and dyspepsia. Methods: quantitative study of prevalence in a transversal cut with variable analysis. The sample was taken from 274 Chilean pregnant women from the Bío Bío province through vein puncture between June and December, 2005. Pregnant women were informed of this study, interviewed and signed an informed consent. The samples were processed using ImmunoComb II Helicobacter pylori IgG kit. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Program. Results: out of the total number of pregnant women, 68.6% showed infection by Helicobacter pylori. 79.6% of the total sample had symptoms of dyspepsia, and 72.5% of this group presented Helicobacter pylori infection. 12.4% showed pregnancy hyperemesis; among them, 79.4% were infected with Helicobacter pylori. 73.4% of the pregnant women that showed gastric discomfort during the first three months had Helicobacter pylori infection. 53.7% of them continued with gastric discomfort after the first three months; of those, 95.8% were infected. Helicobacter pylori infection was present only in 1.5% of pregnant women without gastric discomfort. Conclusion: both, gastric discomfort of pregnant women and the continuity of severe symptoms of dyspepsia and hyperemesis after the first three months of gestation are significantly correlated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

  15. Bayesian spatiotemporal interpolation of rainfall in the Central Chilean Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa-Moreno, Juan; Keir, Greg; McIntyre, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in the populous and economically significant Central Chilean region is governed by complex interactions between precipitation, temperature, snow and glacier melt, and streamflow. Streamflow prediction at daily time scales depends strongly on accurate estimations of precipitation in this predominantly dry region, particularly during the winter period. This can be difficult as gauged rainfall records are scarce, especially in the higher elevation regions of the Chilean Andes, and topographic influences on rainfall are not well understood. Remotely sensed precipitation and topographic products can be used to construct spatiotemporal multivariate regression models to estimate rainfall at ungauged locations. However, classical estimation methods such as kriging cannot easily accommodate the complicated statistical features of the data, including many 'no rainfall' observations, as well as non-normality, non-stationarity, and temporal autocorrelation. We use a separable space-time model to predict rainfall using the R-INLA package for computationally efficient Bayesian inference, using the gridded CHIRPS satellite-based rainfall dataset and digital elevation models as covariates. We jointly model both the probability of rainfall occurrence on a given day (using a binomial likelihood) as well as amount (using a gamma likelihood or similar). Correlation in space and time is modelled using a Gaussian Markov Random Field (GMRF) with a Matérn spatial covariance function which can evolve over time according to an autoregressive model if desired. It is possible to evaluate the GMRF at relatively coarse temporal resolution to speed up computations, but still produce daily rainfall predictions. We describe the process of model selection and inference using an information criterion approach, which we use to objectively select from competing models with various combinations of temporal smoothing, likelihoods, and autoregressive model orders.

  16. Allochthonous subsidies of organic matter across a lake-river-fjord landscape in the Chilean Patagonia: Implications for marine zooplankton in inner fjord areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Cristian A.; Martinez, Rodrigo A.; San Martin, Valeska; Aguayo, Mauricio; Silva, Nelson; Torres, Rodrigo

    2011-03-01

    Ecosystems can act as both sources and sinks of allochthonous nutrients and organic matter. In this sense, fjord ecosystems are a typical interface and buffer zone between freshwater systems, glaciated continents, and the coastal ocean. In order to evaluate the potential sources and composition of organic matter across fjord ecosystems, we characterized particulate organic matter along a lake-river-fjord corridor in the Chilean Patagonia using stable isotope (δ 13C) and lipid (fatty acid composition) biomarker analyses. Furthermore, estimates of zooplankton carbon ingestion rates and measurements of δ 13C and δ 15N in zooplankton (copepods) were used to evaluate the implications of allochthonous subsidies for copepods inhabiting inner fjord areas. Our results showed that riverine freshwater flows contributed an important amount of dissolved silicon but, scarce nitrate and phosphate to the brackish surface layer of the fjord ecosystem. Isotopic signatures of particulate organic matter from lakes and rivers were distinct from their counterparts in oceanic influenced stations. Terrestrial allochthonous sources could support around 68-86% of the particulate organic carbon in the river plume and glacier melting areas, whereas fatty acid concentrations were maximal in the surface waters of the Pascua and Baker river plumes. Estimates of carbon ingestion rates and δ 13C in copepods from the river plume areas indicated that terrestrial carbon could account for a significant percentage of the copepod body carbon (20-50%) during periods of food limitation. Particulate organic matter from the Pascua River showed a greater allochthonous contribution of terrigenous/vascular plant sources. Rivers may provide fjord ecosystems with allochthonous contributions from different sources because of the distinct vegetation coverage and land use along each river's watershed. These observations have significant implications for the management of local riverine areas in the context of

  17. Indo-European and Asian origins for Chilean and Pacific chickens revealed by mtDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Jaime; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Mobegi, Victor A; Jianlin, Han; Alcalde, Jose A; Matus, Jose T; Hanotte, Olivier; Moran, Chris; Austin, Jeremy J; Ulm, Sean; Anderson, Atholl J; Larson, Greger; Cooper, Alan

    2008-07-29

    European chickens were introduced into the American continents by the Spanish after their arrival in the 15th century. However, there is ongoing debate as to the presence of pre-Columbian chickens among Amerindians in South America, particularly in relation to Chilean breeds such as the Araucana and Passion Fowl. To understand the origin of these populations, we have generated partial mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 41 native Chilean specimens and compared them with a previously generated database of approximately 1,000 domestic chicken sequences from across the world as well as published Chilean and Polynesian ancient DNA sequences. The modern Chilean sequences cluster closely with haplotypes predominantly distributed among European, Indian subcontinental, and Southeast Asian chickens, consistent with a European genetic origin. A published, apparently pre-Columbian, Chilean specimen and six pre-European Polynesian specimens also cluster with the same European/Indian subcontinental/Southeast Asian sequences, providing no support for a Polynesian introduction of chickens to South America. In contrast, sequences from two archaeological sites on Easter Island group with an uncommon haplogroup from Indonesia, Japan, and the Philippines [corrected] and may represent a genetic signature of an early Polynesian dispersal. Modeling of the potential marine carbon contribution to the Chilean archaeological specimen casts further doubt on claims for pre-Columbian chickens, and definitive proof will require further analyses of ancient DNA sequences and radiocarbon and stable isotope data from archaeological excavations within both Chile and Polynesia.

  18. An annually-resolved palaeoenvironmental archive for the Eastern Boundary North Atlantic upwelling system: Sclerochronology of Glycymeris glycymeris (Bivalvia) shells from the Iberian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Pedro; Monteiro, Carlos; Butler, Paul; Reynolds, David; Richardson, Christopher; Gaspar, Miguel; Scourse, James

    2015-04-01

    The seasonally variable western Iberia upwelling system, albeit placed at a crucial climatic boundary position to record high frequency climate events, lacks well-dated high-resolution records of environmental variability. Bivalve shells provide robust high-resolution archives of oceanographic and climatic variability on timescales of decades to millennia. In particular, the North Atlantic Ocean region has recently seen several noteworthy sclerochronological and geochemical reconstructions based on bivalve shells (mainly Arctica islandica) of high frequency oceanographic and climatic conditions during the last millennium. However, due to the absence of Arctica islandica and similarly long-lived bivalves, sclerochronological palaeoenvironmental studies of southern European coastal shelf seas are scarce. In particular, none of these studies focus on reconstructing the variability of an eastern boundary upwelling system. The relatively long-lived bivalve (>100 years) Glycymeris glycymeris occurs in European and North West African coastal shelf seas and provides a valid annually resolved archive of environmental conditions during growth. Annual growth increment width series from living G. glycymeris shells, collected in 2014 on the western Iberian continental shelf (ca. 35 m water depth), were used to construct a statistically robust, ca. 70-year long absolutely-dated chronology. Sub-annually resolved (11 to 22 samples per year) oxygen stable isotope (δ18Oshell) data covering three years of shell growth, together with the direct evaluation of the time of growth mark deposition in shells collected during the autumn and winter months, were used to constrain the season of growth and to evaluate the seasonal bias of the sea-surface temperature signal preserved in the δ18Oshelldata. The growth increment width and δ18Oshell series, once robustly calibrated against modelled and instrumental oceanographic and climatic series, potentially provide novel insights into the

  19. Octopus vulgaris paralarvae vertical distribution in a fluctuating upwelling-downwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Olmos Pérez

    2014-06-01

    - Upwelling situation: superficial waters (0-20m enter through the northern mouth of the Ría and are washed through the southern mouth. This water movement promotes the entrance of cold, bottom upwelled water through the southern mouth of the Ría. Under this scenario, Octopus paralarvae are concentrated at the surface (10-0m, thus leaving the Ría. This difference is bigger after strong upwelling during the previous days. Abundances inside the Ría are the highest, maybe because it acts as a temporal retention area, or because cold upwelled waters might stimulate hatching inside the Ría. Day/night changes under strong upwelling conditions: paralarvae abundance in both mouths was quite similar, except that during the day they were in sub-surficial waters (10-5 m, while at night paralarvae were mainly found close to the surface (0-5 m. This vertical distribution during the day is remarkable because paralarvae may select offward surface waters.

  20. Synchronisation of the equatorial QBO by the annual cycle in tropical upwelling in a warming climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Kylash; Moroz, Irene; Read, Peter; Osprey, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The response of the period of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) to increases in tropical upwelling is considered using a one-dimensional model. We find that the imposition of the annual cycle in tropical upwelling creates substantial variability in the period of the QBO. The annual cycle creates synchronisation regions in the wave forcing space, within which the QBO period locks onto an integer multiple of the annual forcing period. Outside of these regions, the QBO period undergoes discrete jumps as it attempts to find a stable relationship with the oscillator forcing. The resulting set of QBO periods can be either discrete or broad-banded, depending on the intrinsic period of the QBO. We use the same model to study the evolution of the QBO period as the strength of tropical upwelling increases as would be expected in a warmer climate. The QBO period lengthens and migrates closer towards 36 and 48 month locking regions as upwelling increases. The QBO period does not vary continuously with increased upwelling, however, but instead transitions through a series of 2- and 3-cycles before becoming locked to the annual cycle. Some evidence for the cyclical behaviour of the QBO periods in the real atmosphere is presented.

  1. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  2. Trace metal variability in coastal waters of San Jorge Bay, Antofagasta, Chile: An environmental evaluation and statistical approach to propose local background levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, J; Román, D; Guiñez, M; Rivera, L; Ávila, J; Cortés, P; Castillo, A

    2015-11-15

    Between 2008 and 2011, twelve metals from 384 coastal waters samples from San Jorge Bay (Antofagasta, northern Chile) were collected and analyzed. The goal was to evaluate the quality of the bay's water bodies according to the current Chilean Quality Guideline and to establish background levels for these metals. The result suggests that the coastal waters of San Jorge Bay are of very good quality suitable for recreational activities involving human body contact. The natural background thresholds established for this bay were significantly lower than primary and secondary water quality guidelines. The distribution of Cu, Zn and Pb, along the bay's coastline provides evidence of the effects of industrial activity. Both situations suggest that the threshold indicated in the environmental guidelines of the Chilean legislation may be overestimated and do not represent pollution-free environments.

  3. Report on the 2010 Chilean earthquake and tsunami response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    In July 2010, in an effort to reduce future catastrophic natural disaster losses for California, the American Red Cross coordinated and sent a delegation of 20 multidisciplinary experts on earthquake response and recovery to Chile. The primary goal was to understand how the Chilean society and relevant organizations responded to the magnitude 8.8 Maule earthquake that struck the region on February 27, 2010, as well as how an application of these lessons could better prepare California communities, response partners and state emergency partners for a comparable situation. Similarities in building codes, socioeconomic conditions, and broad extent of the strong shaking make the Chilean earthquake a very close analog to the impact of future great earthquakes on California. To withstand and recover from natural and human-caused disasters, it is essential for citizens and communities to work together to anticipate threats, limit effects, and rapidly restore functionality after a crisis. The delegation was hosted by the Chilean Red Cross and received extensive briefings from both national and local Red Cross officials. During nine days in Chile, the delegation also met with officials at the national, regional, and local government levels. Technical briefings were received from the President’s Emergency Committee, emergency managers from ONEMI (comparable to FEMA), structural engineers, a seismologist, hospital administrators, firefighters, and the United Nations team in Chile. Cities visited include Santiago, Talca, Constitución, Concepción, Talcahuano, Tumbes, and Cauquenes. The American Red Cross Multidisciplinary Team consisted of subject matter experts, who carried out special investigations in five Teams on the (1) science and engineering findings, (2) medical services, (3) emergency services, (4) volunteer management, and (5) executive and management issues (see appendix A for a full list of participants and their titles and teams). While developing this

  4. Subduction processes off chile (SPOC) - results from The amphibious wide-angle seismic experiment across The chilean subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueth, S.; Spoc Resaerch Group

    2003-04-01

    One component of the onshore-offshore, active-passive seismic experiment SPOC (Krawczyk et al., Stiller et al., this vol.) was a 2-D wide-angle seismic experiment covering the Chilean subduction zone from the Nazca Plate to the Magmatic Arc in the main cordillera. Three W-E-profiles of 52 stations each and up to 240 km long were deployed between 36° and 39° S. These profiles recorded chemical shots at their ends and, in order to extend the onshore profiles, the airgun pulses from RV SONNE cruising simultaneously on offshore profiles. On the southernmost of the three profiles OBHs/OBSs were deployed offshore, thus providing continuous wide-angle seismic data from the Nazca Plate to the South-American continent. Data examples, correlations, and velocity models along the three transects will be presented. The Moho of the subducted oceanic crust can be constrained by PmP-reflections down to 45 km depth under the coastal cordillera. The P-wave velocity field of the crust of the upper plate is characterized by gradually increasing P-wave velocities from East to West. Low seismic velocities (Vp ~6.5 km/s below 10 km depth) are observed at the eastern margin of the investigated area.

  5. Linking mantle upwelling with the lithosphere descent [corrected] and the Japan Sea evolution: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Honda, Satoru; Tsepelev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Recent seismic tomography studies image a low velocity zone (interpreted as a high temperature anomaly) in the mantle beneath the subducting Pacific plate near the Japanese islands at the depth of about 400 km. This thermal feature is rather peculiar in terms of the conventional view of mantle convection and subduction zones. Here we present a dynamic restoration of the thermal state of the mantle beneath this region assimilating geophysical, geodetic, and geological data up to 40 million years. We hypothesise that the hot mantle upwelling beneath the Pacific plate partly penetrated through the subducting plate into the mantle wedge and generated two smaller hot upwellings, which contributed to the rapid subsidence in the basins of the Japan Sea and to back-arc spreading. Another part of the hot mantle migrated upward beneath the Pacific lithosphere, and the presently observed hot anomaly is a remnant part of this mantle upwelling.

  6. Analysis of potability conditions of upwelling water in Ubá, MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Rodrigues de Souza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the interference of anthropic activities on the potability of groundwater in the urban area of the city of Ubá, MG. To accomplish this, the physical characteristics (temperature, turbidity and color, chemical (pH, conductivity, chloride, nitrate and hardness and microbiological (total and thermotolerant coliforms of ten upwelling waters were monitored throughout one year. The temperature, pH, color, chloride and hardness of all upwelling waters were considered normal compared to standards of potable water. However, the analyses of turbidity, electrical conductivity, nitrate and total and thermotolerant coliforms indicate contamination by human activities. Overall, the results indicated the occurrence of high environmental degradation, where only 30% of monitored upwelling waters were in accordance with the quality standard, indicating the need for intervention to ensure water quality.

  7. Mantle Plume Upwelling Rates: Evidence from U-Series in Young Ocean Island Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, B.; Turner, S. P.; Stracke, A.; Saal, A. E.

    2004-12-01

    U-series disequilibria measured in recent lavas at intraplate volcanoes provide a powerful probe to examine the validity of the plume model. U-Th and U-Pa fractionation produced during melting is a function of the melting rate. In turn, this parameter should scale with mantle upwelling velocities. Simply stated, a larger melting rate (larger mantle upwelling velocity) yields smaller Th and Pa excess relative to their parent nuclides. A number of observations supports this approach: (1) there is a negative correlation between 230Th excess and buoyancy fluxes (2) based on new measurements of 231Pa in the Azores, Iceland and the Galapagos and literature data, we show here that there is also a well defined correlation between 231Pa excess and buoyancy flux (3) For Hawaii, Iceland and the Azores, 230Th excess (or 231Pa excess) increases as a function of the distance from the centre of the `hotspot'. These observations suggests that `hotspot' buoyancy fluxes are associated with a greater melt production per unit of time and that the centre of `hotspot' corresponds to a faster mantle upwelling velocity than its periphery. This is therefore in strong support of a model where ocean islands are associated with faster upwelling at depth. However, there is in fact not a simple relationship between melt productivity and upwelling velocities. Notably, the presence of volatiles, of mafic lithologies or of variably enriched peridotitic source could all affect melting rate and hence U-Th-Pa fractionation. We have considered these issues in great detail using a large data base for the Azores islands. While there are clear variations in mantle source composition, they cannot explain the observations of increasing 231Pa/235U ratio with distance from the centre of the Azores hotspot . If we take into account the effect of water in the source of the Azores, it clearly affects the scaling between U-series fractionation and upwelling velocity but not the overall conclusions.

  8. The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking is ex-amined by using a mixed-mode model. The results show that the positive feedback process of the ef-fects of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean on the Kelvin wave is the mechanism of the locking of the event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The memory of the Rossby waves for the sign-shifting of the sea surface temperature anomaly from positive to negative 6 months before the cold peak time is the other mechanism of the locking of the La Nia event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The results here are different from previous ones which suggest that the balance between cold and warm trends of sea surface temperature anomaly is the mechanism involved. The cold trend is caused by the upwelling Kelvin wave from upwelling Rossby wave reflected at the western boundary, excited by the westerly anomaly stress over the central Pacific and amplified by the seasonal variation of the coupled strength in its way propagating westward. The warm trend is caused by the Kelvin wave forced by the western wind stress over the middle and eastern equatorial Pacific. The cause of the differences is due to the opposite phase of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean to that in the observation and an improper parameterization scheme for the effects of the seasonal varia-tion of the upwelling mean on the ENSO cycle in previous studies.

  9. The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN BangLiang

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking is examined by using a mixed-mode model. The results show that the positive feedback process of the effects of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean on the Kelvin wave is the mechanism of the locking of the event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The memory of the Rossby waves for the sign-shifting of the sea surface temperature anomaly from positive to negative 6 months before the cold peak time is the other mechanism of the locking of the La Ni(n)a event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The results here are different from previous ones which suggest that the balance between cold and warm trends of sea surface temperature anomaly is the mechanism involved. The cold trend is caused by the upwelling Kelvin wave from upwelling Rossby wave reflected at the western boundary, excited by the westerly anomaly stress over the central Pacific and amplified by the seasonal variation of the coupled strength in its way propagating westward. The warm trend is caused by the Kelvin wave forced by the western wind stress over the middle and eastern equatorial Pacific. The cause of the differences is due to the opposite phase of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean to that in the observation and an improper parameterization scheme for the effects of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean on the ENSO cycle in previous studies.

  10. Chilean Teachers Begin Exchange Program Visit in Magdalena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    . Kelly. The Chilean teachers are visiting Magdalena while they are on their Southern Hemisphere summer vacation, and Magdalena's schools are in session. Two Magdalena teachers, Joleen Welborn and Sandra Montoya, will visit San Pedro in June, while they are on summer vacation and the Chilean schools will be in session. Dr. Eduardo Hardy, the AUI/NRAO representative in Chile, will accompany the Chilean teachers on their visit, which has been coordinated by Harrison. "ALMA is a groundbreaking example of the type of international cooperation that marks the future of astronomy. We are especially pleased to sponsor a program that brings together two communities that both enjoy proximity to world-class astronomical research facilities," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. "While separated by many miles, San Pedro de Atacama and Magdalena have much in common. Both are small communities in high desert environments, and both are next to telescopes where the world's astronomers will be making many exciting discoveries in the coming decades. Bringing these two communities together will advance education and international understanding," Harrison said. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  11. Laboratory Experiments Concerning Upwellings From the Slab-Graveyard: Implications For Geochemical and Seismic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. C.; Kincaid, C.; Hall, P.

    2005-12-01

    The ongoing plume debate appears to focus on upwellings characterized by large heads and smaller tails, that form from a deep or basal thermal boundary layer (BTBL), which are driven by temperature excesses in the range of 200° C. We use 3-D laboratory experiments to explore how upwellings might differ from this common plume description when BTBLs are influenced by subducted plates. An important aspect of the models is the representation of ridge chemical differentiation processes resulting in slabs with two distinct layers; a lighter, depleted upper mantle component (Harzburgite:H) and a heavier, iron-rich crustal component (Basalt/Eclogite:B/E). Laboratory experiments utilize a working fluid of glucose syrup with temperature dependent density and viscosity. Compositionally distinct mantle reservoirs are represented through isothermal density/viscosity contrasts controlled by water content. The ambient fluid (AF) is contained within a rectangular tank that is heated from below and cooled from above to produce background convection with a Rayleigh number of 10-5-10-6. Highly viscous, tabular slabs are produced by pouring compositionally distinct syrup from two slab reservoirs (B/E and H) into a mold which is chilled to -5° C. The viscous layered slab is emplaced at the fluid surface and subsequently sinks through, stalls and spreads within a BTBL roughly twice the slab thickness (1 cm). Results show that a wide variety in upwelling morphologies form when layered slabs reside within the BTBL and that plume heads/tails are largely dissimilar to those of the standard plume model. The manner in which the slab laminae vs. AF in the BTBL combine (or segregate) within upwellings depends on viscosity/density contrasts, how slabs collapse in the BTBL, and time. End-member regimes include: experiments dominated by a very light H-slab component with early, cold H-plumes and late, hot B/E-AF plumes and experiments where density differences between H, B/E and AF are small and

  12. Evaluation of ERTS data for certain oceanographic uses. [upwelling, water circulation, and pollution in Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Upwelling along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan was occurring during the 3 and 21 August 1973 visits by ERTS-1. The NOAA-2 VHRR thermal-IR data are being digitized for comparison. Early indications are that these upwellings induced a calcium carbonate precipitate to form in the surface waters. It is most pronounced in the MSS-4 channel. On the lake bottom this jell-like sediment is known as marl and adds to the eutrophication of the lake. This phenomenon may help to explain the varve-like nature of bottom cores that have been observed in the Great Lakes.

  13. The potential role of mass balance models for the management of upwelling ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarre, Astrid

    1998-01-01

    Upwelling ecosystems are productive fishing grounds, contributing >30% to the world's catch of marine fish. A set of seven trophic mass balance models of productive subsystems of the four largest upwelling areas is used to demonstrate key features of the modeling process and the analysis...... set of species interactions, and its impact can thus be readily compared to that of other piscivores in the ecosystem. This approach consequently allows us to assess the ecological sustainability of a fishery. It therefore addresses the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries recently published...

  14. Distribution of upwelling index planktonic foraminifera in the sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    has been found by Diester-Haass (1976) in the region of Cape Barbas, Northwestern Africa, where upwelling occurs through out tlie year. The correlation coefficient values for planktonic foram inifera with radiolarians shows a positive correlation: r.... Diester-Haass and J. S. Killingle)' (Inn Upwelling 01T North-West Africa: the Holocene decrease as seen in carhon , isotopes and sedimentological indicators. ()('('£//1ologim Actll. l. 1. 3- 17. I ·Colborn J. G. (1975). The thermal structure of the Indian...

  15. The distribution and impacts of harmful algal bloom species in eastern boundary upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, V. L.; Pitcher, G. C.; Reguera, B.; Smayda, T. J.

    2010-04-01

    Comparison of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species in eastern boundary upwelling systems, specifically species composition, bloom densities, toxin concentrations and impacts are likely to contribute to understanding these phenomena. We identify and describe HABs in the California, Canary, Benguela and Humboldt Current systems, including those that can cause the poisoning syndromes in humans called paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP), and amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), as well as yessotoxins, ichthyotoxins, and high-biomass blooms resulting in hypoxia and anoxia. Such comparisons will allow identification of parameters, some unique to upwelling systems and others not, that contribute to the development of these harmful blooms.

  16. Larval fish assemblages across an upwelling front: Indication for active and passive retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, Maik; Brehmer, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    In upwelling areas, enrichment, concentration and retention are physical processes that have major consequences for larval fish survival. While these processes generally increase larval survival, strong upwelling can also increase mortality due to an offshore transport of larvae towards unfavorable habitats. In 2013 a survey was conducted along the Senegalese coast to investigate the upwelling effect with regard to larval fish assemblages and possible larval fish retention. According to water column characteristics two distinct habitats during an upwelling event were discriminated, i.e. the inshore upwelled water and the transition area over the deepest part of the Senegalese shelf. Along the two areas 42,162 fish larvae were collected representing 133 species within 40 families. Highest larval fish abundances were observed in the inshore area and decreasing abundances towards the transition, indicating that certain fish species make use of the retentive function of the inner shelf area as spawning grounds. Two larval fish assemblages overlap both habitats, which are sharply delimited by a strong upwelling front. One assemblage inhabited the inshore/upwelling area characterized by majorly neritic and pelagic species (Sparidae spp., Sardinella aurita), that seem to take the advantage of a passive retention on the shelf. The second assemblage consisted of a mix of pelagic and mesopelagic species (Engraulis encrasicolus, Carangidae spp. and Myctophidae spp.). Some species of the second assemblage, e.g. horse mackerels (Trachurus trachurus and Trachurus trecae), large finned-lantern fish (Hygophum macrochir) and foureyed sole (Microchirus ocellatus), revealed larval peak occurrences at intermediate and deep water layers, where the near-ground upwelling layer is able to transport larvae back to the shelf. This indicates active larval retention for species that are dominant in the transition area. Diel vertical migration patterns of S. aurita, E. encrasicolus and M

  17. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Campos, Rossana; Lee Andruske, Cinthya; Hespanhol, Jefferson; Sulla Torres, Jose; Arruda, Miguel; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Cossio-Bolaños, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of waist circumference (WC) is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a) compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b) propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old) were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders. PMID:26184250

  18. Waist Circumferences of Chilean Students: Comparison of the CDC-2012 Standard and Proposed Percentile Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Gómez-Campos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of waist circumference (WC is considered to be an important means to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. The objectives of the study were to (a compare the WC measurements of Chilean students with the international CDC-2012 standard and other international standards, and (b propose a specific measurement value for the WC of Chilean students based on age and sex. A total of 3892 students (6 to 18 years old were assessed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI, and WC were measured. WC was compared with the CDC-2012 international standard. Percentiles were constructed based on the LMS method. Chilean males had a greater WC during infancy. Subsequently, in late adolescence, males showed values lower than those of the international standards. Chilean females demonstrated values similar to the standards until the age of 12. Subsequently, females showed lower values. The 85th and 95th percentiles were adopted as cutoff points for evaluating overweight and obesity based on age and sex. The WC of Chilean students differs from the CDC-2012 curves. The regional norms proposed are a means to identify children and adolescents with a high risk of suffering from overweight and obesity disorders.

  19. In situ measurements and model estimates of NO3 and NH4 uptake by different phytoplankton size fractions in the southern Benguela upwelling system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Ffion Atkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bulk measurements can be made of phytoplankton standing stocks on a quasi-synoptic scale but it is more difficult to measure rates of production and nutrient uptake. We present a method to estimate nitrogen uptake rates in productive coastal environments. We use observed phytoplankton cell size distributions and ambient nitrogen concentrations to calculate uptake rates of nitrate, ammonium and total nitrogen by different size fractions of diverse phytoplankton communities in a coastal upwelling system. The data are disaggregated into size categories, uptake rates are calculated and these uptake rates are reaggregated to obtain bulk estimates. The calculations are applied to 72 natural assemblages for which nitrogen uptake rates and particle size distributions were measured textit in situ . The calculated values of total N uptake integrated across all size classes are similar to those of textit in situ bulk measurements (N slope=0.90, (NH _ 4 slope=0.96 indicating dependence of NH _ 4 and total N uptake on ambient N concentrations and cell size distributions of the phytoplankton assemblages. NO _ 3 uptake was less well explained by cell size and ambient concentrations, but regressions between measured and estimated rates were still significant. The results suggest that net nitrogen dynamics can be quantified at an assemblage scale using size dependencies of Michaelis-Menten uptake parameters. These methods can be applied to particle size distributions that have been routinely measured in eutrophic systems to estimate and subsequently analyse variability in nitrogen uptake.

  20. Water-column cooling and sea surface salinity increase in the upwelling region off central-south Chile driven by a poleward displacement of the South Pacific High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Wolfgang; Donoso, David; Garcés-Vargas, José; Escribano, Rubén

    2017-02-01

    Here we present results of direct observations of seawater temperature and salinity over the continental shelf off central-south Chile that shows an unprecedented cooling of the entire water column and an increase in upper layer salinity during 2002 to 2013. We provide evidence that this phenomenon is related to the intensification but mostly to a recent southward displacement of the South Pacific High over the same period, from 2007 on. This in turn has accelerated alongshore, equatorward, subtropical coastal upwelling favorable winds, particularly during winter, injecting colder water from below into the upper water column. Consequently, the environmental conditions on the shelf off central-south Chile shifted from a warmer (fresher) to a cooler (saltier) phase; water column temperature dropped from 11.7 °C (2003-2006) to 11.3 °C (2007-2012) and upper layer salinity rose by 0.25; water column stratification gradually decreased. The biological impacts of such abrupt cooling are apparently already happening in this coastal ecosystem, as recent evidence shows substantial changes in the plankton community and negative trends in zooplankton biomass over the same period.

  1. Coastal Erosion Armoring 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Coastal armoring along the coast of California, created to provide a database of all existing coastal armoring based on data available at the time of creation....

  2. Peer victimization: Intimidation and victmization in Chilean students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study about peer intimidation and victimization with 1167 school students from 6th, 7th, and 8th grade from the Valparaiso Region of Valparaíso, Chile. The instrument used was the Insebull Battery (Avilés & Elices, 2007. Results show that approximately 9% of students have been victim of peer victimization many times or almost every day during the school year. Psychological victimization was more frequent thanphysical aggression, particularly through virtual communication such as cell-phone messages and e-mails. Participants tend to be groups of male students. Although male students participate more in physical aggression, they also receive more physical and psychological aggression. The most frequent places were inside the classroom and the school yard, when the teacher is not present. Most students inform not knowing, or vaguely knowing, thereasons underlying these aggressions, and do not do anything to deal with them. These results coincide with international studies and allow a better understanding of the characteristics of peer victimization in specific educational contexts within the Chilean school system.

  3. Upwelling intensity modulates N2O concentrations over the western Indian shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudheesh, V.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Sudharma, K.V.; Naik, H.; Shenoy, D.M.; Sudhakar, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    by the natural origin of intense upwelling at Mangalore relative to Kochi wherein suboxic to anoxic oxygen minimum zone waters spread from offshore to the shelf of Mangalore, over which the runoff and terrestrial nutrients supply acts in unison. Following new...

  4. The significance of nitrogen regeneration for new production within a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darren R.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2016-05-01

    The Lagrangian progression of a biological community was followed in a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system, north-west Africa, during offshore advection. The inert dual tracers sulfur hexafluoride and helium-3 labelled a freshly upwelled patch of water that was mapped for 8 days. Changes in biological, physical, and chemical characteristics were measured, including phytoplankton productivity, nitrogen assimilation, and regeneration. Freshly upwelled water contained high nutrient concentrations but was depleted in N compared to Redfield stoichiometry. The highest rate of primary productivity was measured on the continental shelf, associated with high rates of nitrogen assimilation and a phytoplankton community dominated by diatoms and flagellates. Indicators of phytoplankton abundance and activity decreased as the labelled water mass transited the continental shelf slope into deeper water, possibly linked to the mixed layer depth exceeding the light penetration depth. By the end of the study, the primary productivity rate decreased and was associated with lower rates of nitrogen assimilation and lower nutrient concentrations. Nitrogen regeneration and assimilation took place simultaneously. Results highlighted the importance of regenerated NH4+ in sustaining phytoplankton productivity and indicate that the upwelled NO3- pool contained an increasing fraction of regenerated NO3- as it advected offshore. By calculating this fraction and incorporating it into an f ratio formulation, we estimated that of the 12.38 Tg C of annual regional production, 4.73 Tg C was exportable.

  5. Phytoplankton succession in an isolated upwelled Benguela water body in relation to different initial nutrient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Nausch, Günther; Hansen, Anja

    2014-11-01

    Freshly upwelled water is poor in phytoplankton biomass but rich in nutrients. With its ageing, phytoplankton biomass increases whereas the nutrients are consumed. The overall aim of our investigation was to check the succession in the phytoplankton composition as a consequence of changing nutrient conditions. The experiments were carried out in mesocosms filled with surface water in the northern Benguela region and installed on board of R/V "Maria S. Merian". In the freshly upwelled water, phytoplankton took up nitrogen at a higher rate than phosphorus if compared with the Redfield ratio. Therefore, nitrogen was exhausted already by day 6. Nitrogen limitation after day 6 was indicated by decreasing chlorophyll a (chla) concentrations, primary production rates and productivity indices and increasing C/N ratios in particulate matter. Despite nitrogen limitation, phosphorus addition stimulated further growth, mainly of diatoms, pointing to luxury uptake. Cyanobacteria did not develop and nitrogen fixation was zero even with phosphorus and iron addition. Diatoms stay the most important group in the freshly upwelled water, but autotrophic and heterotrophic dinoflagellates increase strongly in the matured upwelled water. Mesocosms excluded disturbances by advective water transports, which influence the study of succssions under field conditions.

  6. Time and space variations of monsoonal upwelling along the west and east coasts of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; RameshKumar, M.R.; RameshBabu, V.

    (1979) reveals that both LTA and Ekman transport (M sub(E)) are found to be high during the summer monsoon. The LTAs are caused by different oceanographic processes; of the southwest coast of India, the positive LTAs are due to upwelling that is driven...

  7. SST patterns and dynamics of the southern Senegal-Gambia upwelling center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoye, S.; Capet, X.; Estrade, P.; Sow, B.; Dagorne, D.; Lazar, A.; Gaye, A.; Brehmer, P.

    2014-12-01

    The southern end of the Canary current system comprises of an original upwelling center that has so far received little attention, the Southern Senegal-Gambia Upwelling Center (SSUC). We investigate its dynamical functioning by taking advantage of favorable conditions in terms of limited cloud coverage. Analyses and careful examinations of over 1500 satellite images of sea surface temperature scenes contextualized with respect to wind conditions confirm the regularity and stability of the SSUC dynamical functioning (as manifested by the recurrence and persistence of particular SST patterns). The analyses also reveal subtle aspects of its upwelling structure: shelf break cooling of surface waters consistent with internal tide breaking/mixing; complex interplay between local upwelling and the Mauritanian current off the Cape Verde headland; complexity of the inner-shelf/mid shelf frontal transition. The amplitude of the diurnal cycle suggests that large uncertainties exist in the SSUC heat budget. The studies limitations underscore the need for continuous in situ measurement in the SSUC, particularly of winds.

  8. Diagnosing CO2 fluxes in the upwelling system off the Oregon coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Cao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that the interplay between the carbon and nutrients supplied from subsurface waters via biological metabolism would determine the CO2 fluxes in upwelling systems. However, quantificational assessment of such interplay is difficult because of the dynamic nature of both upwelling circulation and the associated biogeochemistry. In this study, the diagnosis approach based upon the carbon/nutrient mass balance in the Ocean-dominated Margin (OceMar framework was applied to resolve the CO2 fluxes in the well-known upwelling system in the US west coast off Oregon, using the data collected along two cross-shelf transects from the inner shelf to the open basin in spring/early summer 2007. Through examining the biological consumption on top of the water mass mixing built upon the total alkalinity–salinity relationship, we successfully predicted and semi-analytically resolved the CO2 fluxes showing strong uptakes from the atmosphere beyond the nearshore regions, primarily resulting from the higher utilization of nutrients relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC based on their concurrent inputs from the depth. On the other hand, we showed significant CO2 outgassing in the nearshore regions associated with intensified upwelling and minor biological consumption, where CO2 fluxes could be simplified without considering DIC/nutrient consumption. We reasoned that our approach in conceptualizing OceMar would be in a steady state with balanced DIC and nutrients via both physical transport and biological alterations in comparable timescales.

  9. Climate change in the Iberian Upwelling System: a numerical study using GCM downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pires, Ana; Nolasco, Rita; Rocha, Alfredo; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Dubert, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    The present work aims at evaluating the impacts of a climate change scenario on the hydrography and dynamics of the Iberian Upwelling System. Using regional ocean model configurations, the study domain is forced with three different sets of surface fields: a climatological dataset to provide the control run; a dataset obtained from averaging several global climate models (GCM) that integrate the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) models used in climate scenarios, for the same period as the climatological dataset; and this same dataset but for a future period, retrieved from the IPCC A2 climate scenario. After ascertaining that the ocean run forced with the GCM dataset for the present compared reasonably well with the climatologically forced run, the results for the future run (relative to the respective present run) show a general temperature increase (from +0.5 to +3 °C) and salinity decrease (from -0.1 to -0.3), particularly in the upper 100-200 m, although these differences depend strongly on season and distance to the coast. There is also strengthening of the SST cross-shore gradient associated to upwelling, which causes narrowing and shallowing of the upwelling jet. This effect is contrary to the meridional wind stress intensification that is also observed, which would tend to strengthen the upwelling jet.

  10. A new species of Eccopsis Zeller (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae from the coastal valleys of northern Chile, with the first continental record of E. galapagana Razowski & Landry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Eccopsis Zeller (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae from the coastal valleys of northern Chile, with the first continental record of E. galapagana Razowski & Landry. Eccopsis Zeller, 1852 is reported for the first time from Chile. Eccopsis razowskii Vargas, n. sp. is described and illustrated based on specimens reared from larvae collected on native Acacia macracantha Willd. (Fabaceae in the coastal valleys of the northern Chilean desert. Eccopsis galapagana Razowski & Landry, 2008, previously known only from the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, is recorded for the first time from continental South America. Larvae of the latter were collected in northern Chile feeding on Prosopis alba Griseb (Fabaceae.

  11. TRADE POLICY AND MAJOR TRENDS IN CHILEAN EXPORTS UNDER DEMOCRACY, 1990-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Llorca-Jaña

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with trade policy and the principal trends in Chilean exports after the return to democracy in 1990. During this period, both exports and imports expanded significantly in Chile. As far as exports are concerned, this boom is mainly due to an effective trade policy of additive regionalism, booming copper prices, export diversification and the economic dynamism of China, the principal beneficiary of Chilean exports. On the negative side, the country is still too dependant on copper and a few other primary products. In addition, nowadays, in relative terms Chile is exporting more copper minerals and less refined copper than it used to do in the 1990s, while Chilean exports remained highly concentrated in a few companies only, many of which belong to foreign nationals.

  12. Reporting quality of papers published in Chilean dental journals. Evaluation period: 2002-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio E Uribe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the reporting quality of papers published between 2002-2012 in Chilean dental journals. Methods: Bibliometric analysis of research papers published in indexed Chilean dental journals between 2002-2012. Three calibrated examinators (interoperator- Kappa=.83 assessed 205 papers: 150 case-reports, 37 observational studies and 18 clinical trials. Reporting quality was evaluated using CARE for case reports, STROBE for observational studies and CONSORT for clinical trials. Descriptive statistics were conducted. Results: Case-reports reported 35% of the required methodological items; epidemiological research reported 16% of required items for Materials and Methods and 10% for Results. Clinical research reported 29% of required Materials and Methods items and 20% of Results items. Conclusion: Case-report, epidemiological and clinician research papers in Chilean dental journals published during the 2002-2012 period are lacking explicit key methodological items, preventing a proper research replication or clinical application of the results.

  13. HIV prevention and low-income Chilean women: machismo, marianismo and HIV misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; McElmurry, Beverly J

    2008-04-01

    Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. As part of a mixed-methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in prevention, in-depth interviews. Results show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to prevention programme development. Future HIV prevention should stress partner communication, empowerment and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV.

  14. Privatizing Water in the Chilean Andes: The Case of Las Vegas de Chiu-Chiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Prieto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean water model has been described as a textbook example of a free-market water system. This article contributes to the critiques of this model by showing the effect of its implementation in the Atacameño community of Chiu-Chiu, located in the Atacama Desert in the south-central Andes. In this community, the privatization of water rights ignored local water management practices that had produced a high-altitude wetland (known as a vega. This led to the inhabitants’ dispossession of crucial water rights and to wetland degradation. This process belies statements that the Chilean model relies on an unregulated market and instead highlights the state’s role in marginalizing local irrigation practices by reducing the water consumption of the indigenous population while keeping the copper mining industry (the main source of Chilean income and related growing urban populations supplied with water.

  15. Potential heterogeneity in crustacean zooplankton assemblages in southern chilean saline lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P De los Rios-Escalante

    Full Text Available The Chilean saline lakes are distributed mainly in the Atacama desert in northern Chile and the southern Patagonian plains. The scarce studies are restricted mainly to northern Chilean saline lakes, and these revealed that the main component in these ecosystems are the halophylic copepod Boeckella poopoensis Marsh 1906, or the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana (Kellog, 1906, and both species do not coexist. The present study consisted of field observations in zooplankton assemblages in southern Chilean saline lakes (51-53 ºS. These first observations revealed three different patterns, one saline lake only with A. persimilis (Piccinelli and Prosdocimi, 1968, a second lake only with B. poopensis, and a third lake with A. persimilis, B. poopoensis and unidentified harpacticoid copepod. These results are different in comparison with the observations in the literature that described the non-coexistence between B. poopoensis with brine shrimps. Ecological and biogeographical topics were discussed.

  16. La familia Hemiaulaceae (Bacillariophyceae de las aguas marinas chilenas The family Hemiaulaceae (Bacillariophyceae from marine Chilean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIO RIVERA

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available La familia Hemiaulaceae comprende cuatro géneros, señalados previamente para las aguas chilenas con las siguientes especies: Cerataulina pelagica (Cleve Hendey, Hemiaulus sinensis Greville, H. membranaceus Cleve, Climacodium biconcavum Cleve, Eucampia antarctica (Castracane Mangin, E. cornuta (Cleve Grunow y E. zodiacus Ehrenberg. Sin embargo, el análisis con microscopía fotónica y electrónica de muestras recolectadas en aguas marinas chilenas que contenían representantes de esta familia (incluyendo la mayoría de aquellas estudiadas anteriormente por otros investigadores nacionales reveló que (1 el género Cerataulina está representado por C. pelagica, distribuida a lo largo de la costa chilena entre Arica por el norte y el Estrecho de Magallanes por el sur, (2 el género Eucampia está representado por cuatro taxa: E. zodiacus f. cylindrocornis Syvertsen (señalada en trabajos anteriores como E. zodiacus f. zodiacus, E. zodiacus f. recta Rivera. Avaria & Cruces f. nov. (descrita aquí, E. cornuta y E. antarctica. Los primeros tres taxa se distribuyen en la zona central y norte de Chile, mientras que E. antarctica es propia de las aguas antárticas desde el Estrecho de Magallanes al sur, (3 las citas anteriores de Hemiaulus sinensis, H. membranaceus y Climacodium biconcavum para las aguas chilenas corresponden a determinaciones erróneas de Eucampia zodiacus f. recta, f. nov. Se entregan descripciones de los taxa encontrados y fotografías obtenidas con los microscopios fotónico y electrónicos que ilustran sus principales características morfológicasThe Family Hemiaulaceae comprises four genera, all of which have been previously reported for coastal waters off Chile, and represented by the following taxa: Cerataulina pelagica (Cleve Hendey, Hemiaulus sinensis Greville, H. membranaceus Cleve, Climacodium biconcavum Cleve, Eucampia antarctica (Castracane Mangin, E. cornuta (Cleve Grunow and E. zodiacus Ehrenberg. However, examination

  17. Response of zooplankton to physical changes in the environment: coastal upwelling along central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Nair, S.R.S.; Haridas, P.; Padmavati, G.

    ), distribution of oxygen (B) contin uous line represents integrated values for upper 5 m and bro ken line values at 15 m depth) and chlorophyll a (C) continu ous line represents integrated values for upper 5 m and broken line values at 15 m depth) at station...

  18. The response of microzooplankton (20-200 mu m) to coastal upwelling and summer stratification in the southeastern

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Devi, C.R.A.; Madhu, N.V.; Sabu, P.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Jacob, J.; Habeebrehman, H.; Prabhakaran, M.P.; Balasubramanian, T.; Nair, K.K.C.

    is an important consumer of phytoplankton (Burkill et al 1993a; Burkill et al., 1993b; Verity et al., 1993; and Miller, 1993), heterotrophic flagellates and bacteria (Azam et al., 1983). Earlier literature indicates that MZP is ecologically significant...-sized cells (Rassoulzadegan et al., 1988; Sherr and Sherr, 1988), they are not able to meet their entire food requirements based on bacteria; hence, they are not considered to be the major bacterivores in oceanic waters (Pierce and Turner, 1992). Therefore...

  19. Application of Coastal Remote Sensing to Rhincodon Typus Habitat Monitoring Northeast of the Yucatán Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leben, R. R.; Shannon, M. R.

    2013-05-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon Typus, congregate annually in the coastal waters northeast of the Yucatán Peninsula from May through mid-September, with peak abundance in occurring between late July and the middle of August. This coincides with seasonal upwelling along the northern Yucatán coast and the eastern margin of the Yucatán shelf. Remote sensing data, including ocean color, sea surface temperature, ocean vector winds, and satellite altimetry, are used to characterize the physical environment supporting this unique coastal ecology, which also has important economic ramifications for the region because of increasing ecotourism activities focused on whale shark aggregations.

  20. Changes in optical characteristics of surface microlayers hint to photochemically and microbially-mediated DOM turnover in the upwelling region off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, L.; Engel, A.

    2015-12-01

    The coastal upwelling system off Peru is characterized by high biological activity and a pronounced subsurface oxygen minimum zone, as well as associated emissions of atmospheric trace gases such as N2O, CH4 and CO2. During the Meteor (M91) cruise to the Peruvian upwelling system in 2012, we investigated the composition of the sea-surface microlayer (SML), the oceanic uppermost boundary directly subject to high solar radiation, often enriched in specific organic compounds of biological origin like Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and marine gels. In the SML, the continuous photochemical and microbial recycling of organic matter may strongly influence gas exchange between marine systems and the atmosphere. In order to understand organic matter cycling in surface films, we analyzed SML and underlying water samples at 38 stations determining DOC concentration, amino acid composition, marine gels, CDOM and bacterial and phytoplankton abundance as indicators of photochemical and microbial alteration processes. CDOM composition was characterized by spectral slope (S) values and Excitation-Emission Matrix fluorescence (EEMs), which allow to track changes in molecular weight (MW) of DOM, and to determine potential DOM sources and sinks. We identified five fluorescent components of the CDOM pool, of which two had excitation/emission characteristics of protein-like fluorophores and were highly enriched in the SML. CDOM composition and changes in spectral slope properties suggested a local microbial release of HMW DOM directly in the SML as a response to light exposure in this extreme environment. Our results suggest that microbial and photochemical processes play an important role for the production, alteration and loss of optically active substances in the SML.

  1. Nutrient regime and upwelling in the northern Benguela since the middle Holocene in a global context – a multi-proxy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Meisel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The last 5500 years of climate change and environmental response in the northern Benguela Coastal Upwelling are reconstructed by means of three sediment cores from the inner shelf off central Namibia. The study is based on nutrient (δ15N, δ13C and productivity proxies (accumulation rates of total organic carbon; ARTOC. Reconstructed sea surface temperatures (alkenone-derived SST and temperatures at subsurface depths (Tδ18O; based on tests of planktonic foraminifers reflect the physical boundary conditions. The selection of proxy indicators proved a valuable basis for robust palaeo-climatic reconstructions, with the resolution ranging from multi-decadal (NAM1 over centennial (core 178 to millennial scale (core 226620. The northern Benguela experienced pronounced and rapid perturbation during the middle and late Holocene, and apparently, not all are purely local in character. In fact, numerous correlations with records from the adjacent South African subcontinent and the northern hemisphere testify to global climatic teleconnections. The Holocene Hypsithermal, for instance, is just as evident as the Little Ice Age (LIA and the Roman Warm Period. The marked SST-rise associated with the latter is substantiated by other marine and terrestrial data from the South African realm. The LIA (at least its early stages manifests itself in intensified winds and upwelling, which accords with increased rainfall receipts above the continental interior. It appears that climate signals are transferred both via the atmosphere and ocean. The combined analysis of SST and Tδ18O proved a useful tool in order to differentiate between both pathways. SSTs are primarily controlled by the intensity of atmospheric circulation features, reflecting changes of upwelling-favourable winds. Tδ18O records the temperature of the source water and often correlates with global ocean conveyor speed due to varying inputs of warm Agulhas Water. It seems as though conveyor slowdown or

  2. Organic carbon in glacial fjords of Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Silvio; Gutiérrez, Marcelo; Tapia, Fabián; Abarzúa, Leslie; Daneri, Giovanni; Reid, Brian; Díez, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The Southern Ice Field in Chilean Patagonia is the largest (13,000 km2) temperate ice mass in the Southern hemisphere, yearly transporting ca. 40 km3 of freshwater to fjords. This volume of fresh and cold water likely affects adjacent marine ecosystems by changing circulation, productivity, food web dynamics, and the abundance and distribution of planktonic and benthic organisms. We hypothesize that freshwater-driven availability of inorganic nutrient and transport of organic and inorganic suspended matter, as well as microbes, become a controlling factor for productivity in the fjord associated with the Baker river and Jorge Montt glacier. Both appear to be sources of silicic acid, but not of nitrate and particulate organic carbon, especially during summer, when surface PAR and glacier thawing are maximal. In contrast to Baker River, the Jorge Montt glacier is also a source of dissolved organic carbon towards a proglacial fjord and the Baker Channel, indicating that a thorough chemical description of sources (tidewater glacier and glacial river) is needed. Nitrate in fiord waters reaches ca. 15 μM at 25 m depth with no evidence of mixing up during summer. Stable isotope composition of particulate organic nitrogen reaches values as low as 3 per mil in low-salinity waters near both glacier and river. Nitrogen fixation could be depleting δ15N in organic matter, as suggested by the detection at surface waters of nif H genes belonging to diazotrophs near the Montt glacier. As diazotrophs have also been detected in other cold marine waters (e.g. Baltic Sea, Arctic Ocean) as well as glaciers and polar terrestrial waters, there is certainly a potential for both marine and freshwater microbes to contribute and have a significant impact on the Patagonian N and C budgets. Assessing the impact of freshwater on C and N fluxes and the microbial community structure in Patagonian waters will allow understanding future scenarios of rapid glacier melting. This research was funded

  3. Mismatch between classroom furniture and anthropometric measures in Chilean schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Viviani, C A

    2010-07-01

    Children spend about five hours per day sitting down while doing their school work. Considering this as well as the potential inadequate use of school furniture, it is likely that some anatomical-functional changes and problems in the learning process may occur. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes within three different schools with the anthropometric characteristics of Chilean students in the Valparaíso region, in order to evaluate the potential mismatch between them. The sample consisted of 195 volunteer students (94 male, 101 female) of the 8th grade, ranging from 12.5 to 14.5 years of age from 3 different schools. Regarding the methodology, 6 anthropometric measures (Stature, Popliteal height, Buttock-popliteal length, Elbow height while sitting, Hip width, Thigh thickness and Subscapular height) were gathered, as well as 8 dimensions from the school furniture. For the evaluation of classroom furniture a match criterion equation was defined. After considering the existing classroom furniture dimensions in each match criterion equation, the anthropometric characteristics of the considered population were compared in order to determine the mismatch between them. Results indicated that seat height, which should be considered as the starting point for the design of classroom furniture, was appropriate for students' popliteal height in only 14% of the 2 out of the 3 schools, and 28% in the third. Seat to desk height was too high and mismatched 99% of the students in one school and 100% in the others. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the classroom's furniture was inadequate in almost all the analyzed cases and subjects. It is possible that the high mismatch percentage found between furniture and students' anthropometry can be associated to the fact that the acquisition and selection of the furniture was made without any ergonomic concern or criteria.

  4. You will never again be a Chilean like the others : From diaspora to diasporic practices among Chilean refugees returning from exile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurid Aga Askeland

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus on repatriation of refugees who came to Norway after the coup d'état in Chile in 1973. The Chilean refugees formed part of a diaspora during exile. The authors’ concern is the returnees' relationship with the diaspora upon return. The purpose of the article is to discuss whether the notion of diaspora may contribute to an understanding of the situation of the returnees. Diaspora is widely used in migration studies, although the concept is not particularly related to studies on refugees and their return. The article is based on interviews with Chilean returnees from Norwegian exile. The authors argue that their situation may be best understood as one of continued diasporic identity and diasporic consciousness.

  5. Coastal Economic Trends for Coastal Geographies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These market data provide a comprehensive set of measures of changes in economic activity throughout the coastal regions of the United States. In regard to the...

  6. External Technical Support for School Improvement: Critical Issues from the Chilean Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osses, Alejandra; Bellei, Cristián; Valenzuela, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    To what extent school improvement processes can be initiated and sustained from the outside has been a relevant question for policy-makers seeking to increase quality in education. Since 2008, the Chilean Government is strongly promoting the use of external technical support (ETS) services to support school improvement processes, as part of the…

  7. Chilean Adolescents' and Parents' Views on Autonomy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M. Loreto; Pérez, J. Carola; Cumsille, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand Chilean parents' and adolescents' conceptions of autonomy and whether they hold different expectations for autonomous behaviors by generation and socioeconomic level. A qualitative approach to data collection was used through separate focus groups of parents and adolescents from different socioeconomic…

  8. HLA-B*5701 frequency in Chilean HIV-infected patients and in general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Poggi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that HLA-B*5701 screening reduces the risk for hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir in HIV-infected patients. Since B*5701 prevalence varies among different populations, it is important to determine the carrier frequency prior to its use for the screening of HIV-infected patients.The aim of this study was to determine HLA-B*5701 carrier frequency in Chilean general population and HIV-infected patients referred for B*5701 typing. For that purpose 300 blood bank donors and 492 abacavir-naïve HIV-infected patients from Chile were screened for B*5701 by a sequence specific primer PCR.We detected 14/300 (4.7% B*57-positive individuals in the Chilean general population, 11 (3.7% were B*5701 positive, and 3 (1% had another subtype.All were heterozygous,thus a B*5701 allele frequency of 2% was determined.Eleven of 492 (2.2 % HIV-patients carried a B*5701 allele. The difference between these frequencies is probably due to slow progression of HIV infection in HLA-B*5701 carriers, thus less patients would require antiretroviral therapy and B*5701 typing. Considering the usefulness of B*5701 screening, its prevalence in the Chilean general population,and the availability of a validated method,we conclude that HLA-B*5701 typing in Chilean HIV-infected patients about to initiate abacavir treatment is strongly recommended

  9. Bruises in Chilean cattle: their characterization, occurrence and relation with pre-slaughter conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strappini, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Bruises on cattle carcass affect the quality of the meat and are indicators of poor welfare conditions. According to the literature the occurrence of bruises is related to pre- slaughter conditions, however their contribution is not clear for Chilean cattle. The aim of this thesis was to provide a b

  10. The Class and Culture-Based Exclusion of the Chilean Neoliberal Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, Eduardo A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I analyze the class- and cultural-based exclusion produced by the Chilean neoliberal educational reform, carried out during the period from 1990 to 2010. This educational reform follows the same neoliberal model applied to the economy of the country. Although some indicators improved in relation to coverage and public spending in…

  11. The Long Journey: Perspectives on the Coordination of Chilean Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, José M.; Leihy, Peodair S.

    2017-01-01

    It is fairly established that Chilean higher education presents a high level of Habermasian "privatism," as long labeled by José Joaquin Brunner, being among the world's most privatized systems in terms of who pays, who is held to benefit directly from its action and who controls it. Less clear, however, is the contribution of public…

  12. Level of evidence and geographic origin of articles published in Chilean dental journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Moraga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the geographic origin and level of evidence (LE of articles published in Chilean dental journals during 2012. The target population for the bibliometric study was articles published in exclusively-scientific Chilean dental journals. These variables were analyzed: journal, area, language, country, region, design, scenario, and LE. A total of 120 articles were published in four journals: International Journal of Odontostomatology (IJOS=59, Revista Clínica de Periodoncia, Implantología y Rehabilitación Oral (PIRO=28, Journal of Oral Research (JOR=18, and Revista Dental de Chile (RDC=15. From the total, 80.83% were published in Spanish and 70% had a Chilean affiliation. Most publications corresponded to areas of pathology (21 others (20 and prosthodontics (20. None of the articles was Level 1 Evidence, 6.49% was 2b, 14.29% was 2c, 63.64% was 4, and 15.58% was 5. Chilean dental journals mainly publish articles of domestic origin and low LE.

  13. Morphology, anatomy and histology of Doto uva Marcus, 1955 (Opisthobranchia: Nudibranchia) from the Chilean coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, M.A.; Velde, van der G.; Roubos, E.W.

    2006-01-01

    Doto uva Marcus, 1955 is a nudibranch species recorded from the Brazilian and Chilean coast. In spite of its wide distribution, D. uva has been described only superficially, mainly as to the pattern of its coloration, external morphology, radular teeth and reproductive system. Here we substantially

  14. Remaking Education from Below: The Chilean Student Movement as Public Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jo

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the Chilean student movement and its ten-year struggle for public education as an example of public pedagogy. Secondary and university students, along with the parents, teachers, workers and community members who have supported them, have engaged in the most sustained political activism seen in Chile since the democratic…

  15. The Impact of Powerful Oral Language Lab on Chilean EFL Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hsuying Chiou; Andruske, Cynthia Lee

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative case study reports the impact of using a public-speaking structure (Powerful Oral Language Lab [POLL]) in teaching preservice Chilean English pedagogy students. It describes how this task-based method of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher training is related to language strategic competence. Twenty students…

  16. Educational Effectiveness in Chilean Secondary Education: Comparing Different "Value Added" Approaches to Evaluate Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Chereau, B.; Thomas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports an original investigation into school performance measures and the multilevel nature of pupil achievement data in the Chilean school system using a sample of 177,461 students, nested within 7146 classrooms, 2283 secondary schools and 313 municipalities. The data-set comprised Year 10 students' 2006 SIMCE test's results in two…

  17. Eating Disorders among a Community-Based Sample of Chilean Female Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granillo, M. Teresa; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Delva, Jorge; Castillo, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and correlates of eating disorders among a community-based sample of female Chilean adolescents. Data were collected through structured interviews with 420 female adolescents residing in Santiago, Chile. Approximately 4% of the sample reported ever being diagnosed with an eating disorder.…

  18. [Recommendations for Chilean travelers to the FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Cecilia; Weitzel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    This article provides a checklist of precautions and vaccines for Chilean travelers attending the FIFA World Cup 2014 in Brazil. It aims to help physicians to prepare visitors of this mass gathering and summarizes useful hints to avoid infectious diseases considering the circumstances and availabilities in Chile.

  19. The Chilean miracle : patrimonialism in a modern free-market democracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelenbos, L.P.C.

    2005-01-01

    International policy institutions claim that Chile's remarkable economic performance testifies to the merits of a neo-liberal development model. This book argues, however, that 'the Chilean miracle' did not result from the adoption ofneoliberalismitself, but from the persis

  20. The Dad in the Che Guevara T-Shirt: Narratives of Chilean English Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard-Warwick, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Building on previous critical research regarding student resistance to English Language Teaching (ELT), this paper illustrates Chilean high-school English teachers' use of narrative to make sense of ideological challenges from students. While the government of Chile is promoting English in connection with the nation's export-oriented economic…

  1. Bringing the Schools Back in: The Stratification of Educational Achievement in the Chilean Voucher System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizala, Alejandra; Torche, Florencia

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the socioeconomic stratification of achievement in the Chilean voucher system using a census of 4th and 8th graders, a multilevel methodology, and accounting for unobserved selectivity into school sector. Findings indicate that the association between the school's aggregate family socioeconomic status (SES) and test scores is…

  2. Draft Genome of Chilean Honeybee (Apis mellifera) Gut Strain Lactobacillus kunkeei MP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Alejandro; Henríquez-Piskulich, Patricia; Sanchez, Carolina; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Moreno-Pino, Mario; Gómez, Marcela; Rodríguez Da Silva, Rafael; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Aldea, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus kunkeei strain MP2, isolated from a Chilean honeybee gut. The sequenced genome has a total size of 1.58 Mb distributed into 44 contigs and 1,356 protein-coding sequences. PMID:25301653

  3. Record of massive upwellings from the Pacific large low shear velocity province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Flores, Kennet E.; Bizimis, Michael; Jicha, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Large igneous provinces, as the surface expression of deep mantle processes, play a key role in the evolution of the planet. Here we analyse the geochemical record and timing of the Pacific Ocean Large Igneous Provinces and preserved accreted terranes to reconstruct the history of pulses of mantle plume upwellings and their relation with a deep-rooted source like the Pacific large low-shear velocity Province during the Mid-Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous. Petrological modelling and geochemical data suggest the need of interaction between these deep-rooted upwellings and mid-ocean ridges in pulses separated by ~10-20 Ma, to generate the massive volumes of melt preserved today as oceanic plateaus. These pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption.

  4. Record of massive upwellings from the Pacific large low shear velocity province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Flores, Kennet E.; Bizimis, Michael; Jicha, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Large igneous provinces, as the surface expression of deep mantle processes, play a key role in the evolution of the planet. Here we analyse the geochemical record and timing of the Pacific Ocean Large Igneous Provinces and preserved accreted terranes to reconstruct the history of pulses of mantle plume upwellings and their relation with a deep-rooted source like the Pacific large low-shear velocity Province during the Mid-Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous. Petrological modelling and geochemical data suggest the need of interaction between these deep-rooted upwellings and mid-ocean ridges in pulses separated by ∼10–20 Ma, to generate the massive volumes of melt preserved today as oceanic plateaus. These pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption. PMID:27824054

  5. Modelling the upwelling offthe east Hainan Island coast in summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Peng; Gu, Yanzhen; Li, Peiliang; Wu, Kejian

    2016-11-01

    A synoptic-scale upwelling event that developed offthe east coast of the Hainan Island (EHIU) in the summer of 2010 is defined well via processing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sea surface temperature (SST) data. The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with high spatial resolution has been used to investigate this upwelling event. By comparing the ROMS results against tide station data, Argo float profiles and MODIS SST, it is confirmed that the ROMS reproduces the EHIU well. The cooler-water core (CWC) distinguished by waters wind stress curl that dominated the east Qiongzhou Strait mouth area suppressed the intensity of the CWC by 0.2-0.4°C. Further, nonlinear interaction between tidal currents and wind stress enhanced vertical mixing greatly, which would benefit the development of the CWC.

  6. Biogenic halocarbons from the Peruvian upwelling region as tropospheric halogen source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepach, Helmke; Quack, Birgit; Tegtmeier, Susann; Engel, Anja; Bracher, Astrid; Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Galgani, Luisa; Atlas, Elliot L.; Lampel, Johannes; Frieß, Udo; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-09-01

    Halocarbons are produced naturally in the oceans by biological and chemical processes. They are emitted from surface seawater into the atmosphere, where they take part in numerous chemical processes such as ozone destruction and the oxidation of mercury and dimethyl sulfide. Here we present oceanic and atmospheric halocarbon data for the Peruvian upwelling zone obtained during the M91 cruise onboard the research vessel METEOR in December 2012. Surface waters during the cruise were characterized by moderate concentrations of bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2) correlating with diatom biomass derived from marker pigment concentrations, which suggests this phytoplankton group is a likely source. Concentrations measured for the iodinated compounds methyl iodide (CH3I) of up to 35.4 pmol L-1, chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI) of up to 58.1 pmol L-1 and diiodomethane (CH2I2) of up to 32.4 pmol L-1 in water samples were much higher than previously reported for the tropical Atlantic upwelling systems. Iodocarbons also correlated with the diatom biomass and even more significantly with dissolved organic matter (DOM) components measured in the surface water. Our results suggest a biological source of these compounds as a significant driving factor for the observed large iodocarbon concentrations. Elevated atmospheric mixing ratios of CH3I (up to 3.2 ppt), CH2ClI (up to 2.5 ppt) and CH2I2 (3.3 ppt) above the upwelling were correlated with seawater concentrations and high sea-to-air fluxes. During the first part of the cruise, the enhanced iodocarbon production in the Peruvian upwelling contributed significantly to tropospheric iodine levels, while this contribution was considerably smaller during the second part.

  7. Last millenium environmental changes in Lake Bertrand sediments, Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacré, V.; Fagel, N.; Schmidt, S.; Alvarez, D.; Araneda, A.; Urrutia, R.

    2012-04-01

    'W). The identification of the diatom assemblages and its temporal variability in both lake sediments will help to identify the origin of those silica-rich layers. In addition, further sedimentological analyses are in progress to better characterize the sediment deposition models. This research was funded by Chilean Fondecyt project number 1070508 and Belgian projects (FNRS proposal 1360 2007-2010, ULg CFRA 1060 2009-2010).

  8. Population genetics of the Chilean frog Batrachyla Leptopus (Leptodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Formas

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic variation of proteins encoded by 14 loci was analyzed in eight (five continental and three insular populations of the Chilean leptodactylid frog Batrachyla leptopus. The overall proportion of polymorphic loci was estimated to be 18.7% and the average number of alleles per locus, 1.2, while observed and expected heterozygosities were 1.7 and 5.1%, respectively. The estimated coefficient of genetic identity was 0.940; the corresponding figure for genetic distance was 0.063. F-statistics analysis showed a total inbreeding coefficient (Fit of 0.855 and high levels of genetic subdivision (Fst = 0.596 as well as of inbreeding within populations (Fis = 0.640. However, there was only a moderate level of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.181 between the insular group of populations and the continental group.A variação eletroforética de proteínas codificadas por 14 loci foi analisada em oito populações (5 continentais e 3 insulares da rã leptodactilídea chilena Batrachyla leptopus. A proporção geral de loci polimórficos foi estimada como sendo de 18,7% e o número médio de alelos por loco, 1,2, enquanto que as heterozigosidades observada e esperada foram 1,7 e 5,1%, respectivamente. O coeficiente esperado de identidade genética foi 0,940; o número correspondente para a distância genética foi 0,063. A análise estatística F mostrou um coeficiente de endogamia total (Fit de 0,855 e altos níveis de subdivisão genética (Fst = 0,596, assim como de endogamia dentro das populações (Fis = 0,640. Contudo, houve apenas um nível moderado de diferenciação genética (Fst = 0,181 entre o grupo insular de populações e o grupo continental.

  9. Prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P Mundt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: High rates of mental disorders have been reported for prison populations worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. The present study aimed to establish prevalence rates of mental disorders in Chilean prisoners. METHOD: A nationwide random sample of 1008 prisoners was assessed in 7 penal institutions throughout Chile. Twelve-month prevalence rates were established using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI and compared to the prevalence rates previously published for the general population. RESULTS: Prevalence rates were 12.2% (95% CI, 10.2-14.1 for any substance use disorder, 8.3% (6.6-10.0 for anxiety disorders, 8.1% (6.5-9.8 for affective disorders, 5.7% (4.4-7.1 for intermittent explosive disorders, 2.2% (1.4-3.2 for ADHD of the adult, and 0.8% (0.3-1.3 for non-affective psychoses. Significantly higher prevalence rates among prisoners as compared to the general population in Chile were seen for major depression (6.1% vs. 3.7% males, Z=2.58, p<0.05 and illicit drug use (3.3% vs. 0.6% males with drug abuse, Z=2.04, p<0.05; 2.6% vs. 0.1% females with drug abuse, Z=5.36, p<0.001; 3.4% vs. 1.1% males with drug dependence, Z=3.70; p<0.001. Dysthymia (6.5% vs. 15.6%, Z=-2.39, p<0.05, simple (3.3% vs. 11.5%, Z=-3.13, p<0.001 and social phobias (3.9% vs. 9.7%, Z=2.38, p<0.05 were significantly less frequent in the female prison population than in the general population. One-year prevalence rates of alcohol abuse (2.3% vs. 3.9%; Z=-2.04; p<0.05 and dependence (2.7% vs. 8.2%; Z=-5.24; p<0.001 were less prevalent in the male prison population than in the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Service provision for prison populations in Chile should acknowledge high rates of depression and illicit drug use. Overall prevalence rates are lower than reported in other LMICs. Previous research in prison populations in LMICs might have overestimated prevalence rates of mental disorders.

  10. Coastal Conditions 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Dataset developed by California Coastal Commission's Melanie Coyne by attaching names to a dynamically segmented coastline using the Department of Navigation and...

  11. Coastal Innovation Imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce C. Glavovic

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the second of two articles that explores the coastal innovation paradox and imperative. Paradoxically, innovation is necessary to escape the vulnerability trap created by past innovations that have degraded coastal ecosystems and imperil coastal livelihoods. The innovation imperative is to reframe and underpin business and technology with coherent governance innovations that lead to social transformation for coastal sustainability. How might coastal management help to facilitate this transition? It is argued that coastal management needs to be reconceptualised as a transformative practice of deliberative coastal governance. A foundation comprising four deliberative or process outcomes is posited. The point of departure is to build human and social capital through issue learning and improved democratic attitudes and skills. Attention then shifts to facilitating community-oriented action and improving institutional capacity and decision-making. Together, these endeavours enable improved community problem-solving. The ultimate process goal is to build more collaborative communities. Instituting transformative deliberative coastal governance will help to stimulate innovations that chart new sustainability pathways and help to resolve the coastal problems. This framework could be adapted and applied in other geographical settings.

  12. The Correlation of Upwelling Phenomena and Ocean Sunfish Occurrences in Nusa Penida, Bali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tito, C. K.; Susilo, E.

    2017-02-01

    Sea surface Temperature (SST) is an important oceanographic variable that can figure the upwelling phenomena. This study aims to determine the variability of SST in relation to upwelling phenomena in the Indian Ocean Southern of Bali Island and the Ocean Sunfish occurrences in the southern of Nusa Penida. Data loggers and remote sensing approach that record temperature was used. An Onset HOBO U20 Water Level Logger U20-001-02 was deployed in Crystal Bay (08°42‧S and 115°27‧E) at 8 meters depth. The daily field SST data were available from June 2011 to December 2014 with 30 minutes time interval. The monthly satellite images obtained from MODIS on board the Aqua satellite. While the ocean sunfish occurrences were based on rate of encounter (ROE) of previous works by Putra (2015) on July to October 2014. It was found that field data and MODIS have a high correlation (r=0.89) with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE=1.64°C). The upwelling phenomena characterized by the evidence of the colder water mass (SST phenomena coincidence with the high occurrences of Ocean Sunfish in Crystal Bay on August to October.

  13. Influence of upwelling saline groundwater on iron and manganese cycling in the Rio Grande floodplain aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Matthew F. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: matthew.f.kirk@gmail.com; Crossey, Laura J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Newell, Dennis L. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bowman, Robert S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Salinity contributions from upwelling groundwater significantly degrade water quality in the Rio Grande, a major source of water for the southwestern USA. This study considers the influence of this upwelling water on the geochemistry and microbiology of the Rio Grande floodplain alluvial aquifer. The composition of surface water, groundwater, and floodplain sediment samples collected from three transects in the Socorro Basin was examined. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was also used to examine microbial biomass samples. The distribution of salinity in the floodplain groundwater largely reflects the configuration of local groundwater flow and mixing of two major water sources, deeply-sourced saline groundwater and river water. Microbial populations in the shallow aquifer consume O{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} and serve to redistribute metal oxides from the saturated zone to locations of groundwater discharge at the surface and possibly near the water table. The upwelling saline groundwater affects floodplain microbial processes by transporting reduced metals and organic electron donors to the alluvial aquifer system. This enhances metal reduction in the saturated zone and ultimately metal oxidation at or near the surface. Geochemical modeling suggests that mixing of the saline groundwater with more dilute water in the floodplain creates conditions more favorable for metal oxidation to occur and thereby influences the distribution of metal oxides.

  14. Macro-Scale Patterns in Upwelling/Downwelling Activity at North American West Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldívar-Lucio, Romeo; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Nakamura, Miguel; Villalobos, Héctor; Lluch-Cota, Daniel; Del Monte-Luna, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of vertical transport (upwelling/downwelling) has been relatively well studied, mainly for the California Current System, including low-frequency changes and latitudinal heterogeneity. The aim of this work was to identify potentially predictable patterns in upwelling/downwelling activity along the North American west coast and discuss their plausible mechanisms. To this purpose we applied the min/max Autocorrelation Factor technique and time series analysis. We found that spatial co-variation of seawater vertical movements present three dominant low-frequency signals in the range of 33, 19 and 11 years, resembling periodicities of: atmospheric circulation, nodal moon tides and solar activity. Those periodicities might be related to the variability of vertical transport through their influence on dominant wind patterns, the position/intensity of pressure centers and the strength of atmospheric circulation cells (wind stress). The low-frequency signals identified in upwelling/downwelling are coherent with temporal patterns previously reported at the study region: sea surface temperature along the Pacific coast of North America, catch fluctuations of anchovy Engraulis mordax and sardine Sardinops sagax, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, changes in abundance and distribution of salmon populations, and variations in the position and intensity of the Aleutian low. Since the vertical transport is an oceanographic process with strong biological relevance, the recognition of their spatio-temporal patterns might allow for some reasonable forecasting capacity, potentially useful for marine resources management of the region. PMID:27893826

  15. Linking predators to seasonality of upwelling: Using food web indicators and path analysis to infer trophic connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah Ann; Sydeman, William J.; Santora, Jarrod A.; Black, Bryan A.; Suryan, Robert M.; Calambokidis, John; Peterson, William T.; Bograd, Steven J.

    2012-08-01

    Upwelling in eastern boundary current systems is a primary driver of ecosystem productivity. Typically, peak upwelling occurs during spring and summer, but winter upwelling may also be important to ecosystem functions. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that winter and spring/summer upwelling, operating through indirect trophic interactions, are important to a suite of top predators in the California Current. To test this hypothesis, we collated information on upwelling, chlorophyll-a concentrations, zooplankton and forage fish, and related these to predator responses including rockfish growth, salmon abundance, seabird productivity and phenology (timing of egg-laying), and whale abundance. Seabird diets served in part as food web indicators. We modeled pathways of response using path analysis and tested for significance of the dominant paths with multiple regression. We found support for the hypothesis that relationships between upwelling and top predator variables were mediated primarily by intermediate trophic levels. Both winter and summer upwelling were important in path models, as were intermediate lower and mid trophic level functional groups represented by chlorophyll-a, zooplankton, and forage fish. Significant pathways of response explained from 50% to 80% of the variation of seabird (Cassin's auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) and common murre (Uria aalge)), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) dependent variables, whereas splitnose rockfish (Sebastes diploproa) showed no significant response pathways. Upwelling and trophic responses for salmon were established for both the year of ocean entry and the year of return, with zooplankton important in the year of ocean entry and forage fish important in the year of return. This study provides one of the first comparative investigations between upwelling and predators, from fish to marine mammals and birds within a geographically restricted area

  16. Coastal Analysis, Charles County, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  17. Coastal Analysis, Dorchester County, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  18. Coastal Analysis, Virginia Beach, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  19. Coastal Analysis, Mathews County, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  20. Coastal Analysis, Nassau,NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  1. Influence of upwelling and tropical environments on the breeding development of the intertidal barnacle Tetraclita stalactifera (Lamarck, 1818

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Skinner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cabo Frio, with its unique oceanographic conditions, is an important biogeographical transitional region between tropical and sub-tropical waters. This is due to the presence of upwelling from the Central Water of the South Atlantic (CWSA, and the presence of tropical waters from the Brazilian Current (BC and Coastal Water (CW. The intertidal barnacle, Tetraclita stalactifera, and its brooding stages were analyzed to correlate environmental conditions with reproductive development. Two thermal contrasting sites were chosen: Ponta da Cabeça (PC, which is under the influence of seasonal upwelling, and Ponta da Fortaleza (PF which experiences tropical influences. At each site, T. stalactifera specimens were collected monthly and their egg lamellae conditions classified into stages from 0 (empty to IV (ready to release. Our results show a seasonal effect on brooding at the PC site and a continuous development at the PF site. Nauplii larval availability also followed this trend. Differences between the sites could be due to ecological differences related to water temperature and the ecological-physiological response of the barnacles to these differences.Cabo Frio, devido suas características oceanográficas, causado pela é uma importante região biogeográfica transicional entre águas tropicais e sub-tropicais. Isto é ressurgência da Água Central do Atlântico Sul (ACAS e a presença de águas tropicais da Corrente do Brasil (CB e de Água Costeira (AC. A craca do mediolitoral Tetraclita stalactifera e seus estágios de maturação larval foram analisados a fim de serem correlacionados às condições ambientais. Dois locais com características termais contrastantes foram escolhidos: a Ponta da Cabeça (PC, que está sobre influência sazonal da ressurgência e a Ponta da Fortaleza (PF, sob influência da água tropical. Em cada local, indivíduos de T. stalactifera foram coletados mensalmente e a condição de suas lamellas ovígeras aferida

  2. Confidence in Coastal Forecasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, F.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis answers the question "How can we show and improve our confidence in coastal forecasts?", by providing four examples of common coastal forecasts. The first example shows how to improve the estimate of the one in ten thousand year storm-surge level. The three dimensional reconstruction,

  3. Characteristics of the Norwegian Coastal Current during Years with High Recruitment of Norwegian Spring Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øystein Skagseth

    Full Text Available Norwegian Spring Spawning herring (NSSH Clupea harengus L. spawn on coastal banks along the west coast of Norway. The larvae are generally transported northward in the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC with many individuals utilizing nursery grounds in the Barents Sea. The recruitment to this stock is highly variable with a few years having exceptionally good recruitment. The principal causes of recruitment variability of this herring population have been elusive. Here we undertake an event analysis using data between 1948 and 2010 to gain insight into the physical conditions in the NCC that coincide with years of high recruitment. In contrast to a typical year when northerly upwelling winds are prominent during spring, the years with high recruitment coincide with predominantly southwesterly winds and weak upwelling in spring and summer, which lead to an enhanced northward coastal current during the larval drift period. Also in most peak recruitment years, low-salinity anomalies are observed to propagate northward during the spring and summer. It is suggested that consistent southwesterly (downwelling winds and propagating low-salinity anomalies, both leading to an enhanced northward transport of larvae, are important factors for elevated recruitment. At the same time, these conditions stabilize the coastal waters, possibly leading to enhanced production and improved feeding potential along the drift route to Barents Sea. Further studies on the drivers of early life history mortality can now be undertaken with a better understanding of the physical conditions that prevail during years when elevated recruitment occurs in this herring stock.

  4. Application of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean to Phytoplankton Ecology Studies in Monterey Bay, CA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a demonstrator for technologies for the next generation of ocean color sensors, the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO provides enhanced spatial and spectral resolution that is required to understand optically complex aquatic environments. In this study we apply HICO, along with satellite remote sensing and in situ observations, to studies of phytoplankton ecology in a dynamic coastal upwelling environment—Monterey Bay, CA, USA. From a spring 2011 study, we examine HICO-detected spatial patterns in phytoplankton optical properties along an environmental gradient defined by upwelling flow patterns and along a temporal gradient of upwelling intensification. From a fall 2011 study, we use HICO’s enhanced spatial and spectral resolution to distinguish a small-scale “red tide” bloom, and we examine bloom expansion and its supporting processes using other remote sensing and in situ data. From a spectacular HICO image of the Monterey Bay region acquired during fall of 2012, we present a suite of algorithm results for characterization of phytoplankton, and we examine the strengths, limitations, and distinctions of each algorithm in the context of the enhanced spatial and spectral resolution.

  5. Global Climatology of the Coastal Low-Level Wind Jets using different Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Daniela C. A.; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Semedo, Alvaro; Cardoso, Rita M.

    2016-04-01

    Coastal Low-Level Jets (henceforth referred to as "coastal jets" or simply as CLLJ) are low-tropospheric mesoscale wind features, with wind speed maxima confined to the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), typically bellow 1km. Coastal jets occur in the eastern flank of the semi-permanent subtropical mid-latitude high pressure systems, along equatorward eastern boundary currents, due to a large-scale synoptic forcing. The large-scale synoptic forcing behind CLLJ occurrences is a high pressure system over the ocean and a thermal low inland. This results in coastal parallel winds that are the consequence of the geostrophic adjustment. CLLJ are found along the California (California-Oregon) and the Canary (Iberia and Northeastern Africa) currents in the Northern Hemisphere, and along the Peru-Humboldt (Peru-Chile), Benguela (Namibia) and Western Australia (West Australia) currents in the Southern Hemisphere. In the Arabian Sea (Oman CLLJ), the interaction between the high pressure over the Indian Ocean in summer (Summer Indian Monsoon) and the Somali (also known as Findlater) Jet forces a coastal jet wind feature off the southeast coast of Oman. Coastal jets play an important role in the regional climates of the mid-latitude western continental regions. The decrease of the sea surface temperatures (SST) along the coast due to upwelling lowers the evaporation over the ocean and the coast parallel winds prevents the advection of marine air inshore. The feedback processes between the CLLJ and upwelling play a crucial role in the regional climate, namely, promoting aridity since the parallel flow prevents the intrusion of moisture inland, and increasing fish stocks through the transport of rich nutrient cold water from the bottom. In this study, the global coastal low-level wind jets are identified and characterized using an ensemble of three reanalysis, the ECMWF Interim Reanalysis (ERA-Interim), the Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) and the NCEP Climate Forecast

  6. ADCP application for long-term monitoring of coastal water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOSHIOKA Hiroshi; TAKAYAMA Tomotsuka; SERIZAWA Shigeatsu

    2005-01-01

    Three kind of application of ADCP is reported for long-term monitoring in coastal sea.(1)The rourine monitoring of water qualities.The water quality and ADCP echo data (600 kHz) observed in the long-term are analgzed at MT (Marine Tower) Station of Kansai International Airport in the Osaka Bay, Japan. The correlation between the turbidity and echo intensity in the surface layer is not good because air bubbles generated by breaking wave are not detected by the turbidity meter, but detected well by ADCP. When estimating the turbidity consists of plankton population from echo intensity, the effect ofbubbles have to be eliminated. (2) Monitoring stirring up of bottom sediment. The special observation was carded out by using following two ADCP in the Osaka Bay, One ADCP was installed upward on the sea. The other ADCP was hanged downward at the gate type stand about 3 m above from the bottom. At the spring tide, high echo intensities indicating the stirring up of bottom sediment were observed. (3) The monitoring for the boundary condition of water mixing at an estuary. In summer season, the ADCP was set at the mouth of Tanabe Bay in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.During the observation, water temperature near the bottom showed remarkable falls with interval of about 5~7 d. When the bottom temperature fell, the inflow current with low echo intensity water appears at the bottom layer in the ADCP record. It is concluded that when occasional weak northeast wind makes weak coastal upwelling at the mouth of the bay, the combination of upwelling with internal tidal flow causes remarkable water exchange and dispels the red tide.

  7. "One of the Most Uniform Races of the Entire World": Creole Eugenics and the Myth of Chilean Racial Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    This article illuminates why Nicolás Palacios's 1904 monograph, Raza chilena: Libro escrito por un Chileno i para los Chilenos [Chilean Race: A Book Written by a Chilean for Chileans], is central to the creation of a myth of Chilean racial homogeneity at the turn of the twentieth century. Placing Palacios in the context of Latin American eugenic discourse, it demonstrates how he selected a specific racial origin story in order to accommodate his belief in racial hierarchy while also depicting race mixing in a positive light. Specifically, the article highlights how the myth of Chilean racial homogeneity elided the difference between the term "mestizo," which was applied to people of mixed racial heritage, and "white." I contend that Palacios sought to differentiate Chileans from other Latin Americans by emphasizing their racial distinctiveness. The article therefore highlights that Latin American eugenics was concerned with the creation of national narratives that historicized particular racial mixtures in order to reify and affirm national differences. As such, it connects to literature regarding the history of eugenics, race, nation, and the creation of whiteness.

  8. Data mining for environmental analysis and diagnostic: a case study of upwelling ecosystem of Arraial do Cabo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Carvalho Pereira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian coastal zone presents a large extension and a variety of environments. Nevertheless, little is known about biological diversity and ecosystem dynamics. Environmental changes always occur; however, it is important to distinguish natural from anthropic variability. Under these scenarios, the aim of this work is to present a Data Mining methodology able to access the quality and health levels of the environmental conditions through the biological integrity concept. A ten-year time series of physical, chemical and biological parameters from an influenced upwelling area of Arraial do Cabo-RJ were used to generate a classification model based on association rules. The model recognizes seven different classes of water based on biological diversity and a new trophic index (PLIX. Artificial neural networks were evolved and optimized by genetic algorithms to forecast these indices, enabling environmental diagnostic to be made taking into account control mechanisms of topology, stability and complex behavioral properties of food web.A zona costeira brasileira apresenta grande extensão e variedade de ambientes. Contudo, pouco se sabe sobre sua diversidade biológica e o funcionamento dos ecossistemas. Como mudanças ambientais são constantes, é muito importante distinguir entre variabilidade natural e antrópica. Nesse cenário, o objetivo deste trabalho é apresentar a metodologia para o desenvolvimento de um Sistema Inteligente de Gerenciamento Integrado do Ecossistema Costeiro (SIGIEC capaz de acessar o nível de qualidade e saúde ambiental através do conceito de Integridade Biológica. Foram usadas séries temporais de dez anos de parâmetros físicos, químicos e biológicos para extrair conhecimento e gerar modelos de regras de associação para classificar sete diferentes tipos de condições ambientais, analisadas através da diversidade biológica e um novo índice trófico (PLIX. Redes neurais artificiais foram otimizadas por

  9. Modern sedimentation in the Cabo Frio upwelling system, Southeastern Brazilian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel M. de Mahiques

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The analyses of Uk'37 paleotemperatures and sedimentological parameters in box cores from the Cabo Frio upwelling zone, southeastern Brazil, were used to understand the modern sedimentation as well as to evaluate the role played by the upwelling process in the sedimentary patterns. Three box-cores located closer to the upwelling area show a general trend of cooling waters taking place in the last 700 years. Since the present upwelling is dependent on local and remote wind regime, a phase of dominating NE winds favors a more effective upward transport of the cold thermocline level South Atlantic CentralWater towards the coast. The intensification in the upwelling regime for the last ca. 700 years can be associated with the strengthening of the NE winds off the area and a possible increase of the Brazil Current mesoscale activity. Nevertheless, the lack of significant correlation of the paleotemperatures and most of sedimentological parameters indicate that upwelling is not the only sedimentation mechanism in the area. Also, the comparison of sedimentological parameters reveals that eventual temporal changes are superimposed by the geographical variability. Sedimentation rates vary from 0.26 mm.yr-1 to 0.66 mm.yr-1.As análises de Uk'37 paleotemperaturas e de parâmetros sedimentológicos em amostras de box-core da zona de ressurgência de Cabo Frio, sudeste do Brasil, foram usadas para compreender os processos de sedimentação moderna na área, bem como avaliar o papel desempenhado pela ressurgência no estabelecimento dos padrões sedimentológicos principais. Como observado em três box-cores localizados nas proximidades da área de ressurgência, é possível verificar uma tendência geral de resfriamento das águas nos últimos 700 anos (idade calibrada. Uma vez que o processo de ressurgência é dependente do regime de ventos local e remoto, uma fase de ventos predominantes de NE favorece um deslocamento mais efetivo das águas frias da

  10. Seasonal variability of phytoplankton fluorescence in relation to the Straits of Messina (Sicily) tidal upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaro, F.; Decembrini, F.; Raffa, F.; Crisafi, E.

    2007-10-01

    In the Straits of Messina, large gradients of tidal displacements, as well as the topographic constrictions, determine the upwelling of deeper waters in the surface layer. This work describes the seasonal variability in the surface distribution of phytoplankton biomass depending on the upwelling phenomena. Temperature, salinity, nitrates and phytoplankton fluorescence were measured in 1994 and 1995 by continuous underway surface real-time measurements onboard dedicated research boats. Each survey was performed following the dynamic phases of flooding and ebbing tides. Tidal currents are essentially southward during high tide and northward during low tide. During the low water slack tide, large spatial gradients of physical-chemical and biological parameters were found, while at the high water slack tide, a diffused phytoplankton fluorescence was observed only in autumn due to a seasonal thermocline. Salinity, nitrate and chlorophyll-a fluorescence data revealed a significant positive intercorrelation, whereas they were inversely correlated with temperature. Generally, the upwelling distribution was limited to narrow zones during winter, while in summer it was found in the middle of the Straits and in the southern zones. During spring in the southern zone of the Straits, the maximum chlorophyll-a fluorescence was detected (May 1995, 0.32 μg-Chla l-1); in summer, when back and forth tidal movements between the Tyrrhenian and the Ionian seas intensify, decreased values were observed throughout the study area. The data set obtained through continuous and repeatable samplings has allowed the study of different time-space scales in the Straits of Messina, a very strong and dynamic environment. The Straits system could be compared to an "intermittent pump" which, during the different seasons, initially enriches itself and subsequently provides nutrients to the surrounding basins.

  11. Seasonal variability of phytoplankton fluorescence in relation to the Straits of Messina (Sicily tidal upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Azzaro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Straits of Messina the large gradients of tidal displacements as well as the topographic constrictions determine the upwelling of deeper waters in the surface layer. This work describes the seasonal variability of surface distribution of phytoplankton biomass depending on upwelling phenomena. Temperature, salinity, nitrates and phytoplankton fluorescence were measured in 1994 and 1995 by continuous underway surface real-time measurements on board dedicated research boats. Each survey was performed following the dynamic phases of flooding and ebbing tides. Tidal currents are essentially southward during the high tide and northward during the low tide.

    During the low water slack, large spatial gradients of physical-chemical and biological parameters were mainly found, while in the high water slack a diffused phytoplankton fluorescence was observed only in autumn, in coincidence of a seasonal thermocline. Salinity, nitrate and chlorophyll-a fluorescence data revealed a significant positive intercorrelation, whereas they are inversely correlated with temperature. Generally, during winter, the upwelling distribution was limited to narrow zones, while in summer it involved the middle of the Straits and southern zones. During spring in the southern zone of the Straits, maximum of chlorophyll-a fluorescence was detected (May 1995, 0.32 µg-Chla l-1; in summer, when back and forth tidal movements become intense between the Tyrrhenian and the Ionian seas, values was everywhere lower.

    The data set from continuous and repeatable acquisition has allowed the study of different time-space scales in the Straits of Messina, a very strong dynamic environment.

    The Straits system can be compared to an "intermittent pump" which, during the different seasons, before enriched itself and then it provides nutrients to the surrounding basins.

  12. Psychometric properties of the "Spanish Burnout Inventory" in Chilean professionals working to physical disabled people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Monte, Pedro R; Olivares Faúndez, Víctor E

    2011-05-01

    While the most commonly employed burnout measure has been the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), researchers have been troubled by some of the psychometric limitations of this instrument. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the "Spanish Burnout Inventory" (SBI). The psychometric properties were analysed with data from a sample of 277 Chilean professionals working to physical disabled people. The psychometric properties of the SBI were examined through the following analyses: confirmatory factor analysis, reliability Cronbach's alpha, and concurrent validity with the MBI. The hypothesized four factor model obtained an adequate data fit for the sample (chi2(164) = 285.32, p burnout in the Chilean cultural context.

  13. Socioeconomic Status and Internalizing Symptoms in Chilean Children: Does Reserve Capacity Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Suzanna M; Castillo, Marcela; Lozoff, Betsy; Gahagan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Informed by the reserve capacity model, we examined pathways between socioeconomic status (SES) and internalizing symptoms (IS) in 1119 Chilean 10-year-olds. Mediators included parental disciplinary style and reserve capacity resources (RCR), namely home environment, parent-child engagement, and self-esteem, and conduct problems. Using structural equation modeling, the model was stratified by gender. For boys, the SES-IS relationship was mediated by the home environment and parental disciplinary style. For girls, the SES-IS relationship was mediated by the home environment, parent-child engagement, self-esteem, and conduct problems. Findings suggest different RCR may protect against IS in a sample of Chilean children. PMID:27123471

  14. Responses to electricity liberalization: the regional strategy of a Chilean generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sol, P. del [Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Dpto. Ingenieria Industrial y de Sistemas

    2002-04-01

    Chilean reformers joined the new trend toward liberalization of the electricity markets around 1980, 12 years before any other Latin American country. This paper summarizes the main characteristics of the electricity reforms in Chile and other Latin American countries. It then analyzes the strategic response by the electricity generating company Endesa de Chile to these reforms. Endesa completely reformulated its competitive strategy. Its most significant commitments were its investments across Latin America in privatized power plants in Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Brazil. Endesa based its internationalization on its Chilean experience in transferring an inefficient state-owned firm and operating it in the new electrical regulatory framework favorable to market competition. The company's competitive advantage originated to a great extent in that Chile was the first country in Latin America to reform its electrical sector. (author)

  15. Beliefs about children's adjustment in same-sex families: Spanish and Chilean university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Monterde-i-Bort, Hector; Barrientos-Delgado, Jaime; Badenes-Ribera, Laura; Cardenas-Castro, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of our study is to compare the beliefs of Spanish and Chilean university students about the effects that same-sex parents might have on their children. A total of 491 participants completed the study (208 Spaniards and 283 Chileans). The results indicate a kind of modern and subtle rejection based on hetero-normativity. Furthermore, the results indicated the effects of sex (men have a greater degree of rejection), traditional and sexist opinions linked to a greater rejection of same-sex parents, and the contact variable which inversely correlates with this rejection. The results show that the etiology of homosexual orientation also correlates with rejection of same-sex parents when it is believed that homosexuality is learned or can be changed.

  16. Spanish and Chilean Standardizations of the Personality Assessment Inventory: the Influence of Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Tallo, Margarita; Cardenal, Violeta; Ferragut, Marta; Santamaría, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the adaptation of psychological questionnaires in different countries, due to the need for cross-cultural research using the same tests adapted to diverse populations. This paper presents the standardization of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI; Morey, 1991, 2007) in Spain and Chile (both Spanish-speaking countries). The Spanish sample was made up of 940 people (461 men and 479 women), and the Chilean sample of 569 people (231 men and 338 women). Results revealed that the Chilean means were higher than those of the Spanish sample at confidence level 99.9%, although the associated effect sizes were generally small to moderate (partial eta-square between 0.008 and 0.187). Sex differences in the variables evaluated were commented on, and the importance of cross-cultural research and the influence of sex on personality and psychopathology variables were discussed.

  17. Bowhead whale body condition and links to summer sea ice and upwelling in the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, John C.; Druckenmiller, Matthew L.; Laidre, Kristin L.; Suydam, Robert; Person, Brian

    2015-08-01

    We examined the response of bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) body condition to summer sea ice conditions and upwelling-favorable winds. We used a long-term dataset collected from whales of the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas (BCB) stock to estimate various body condition indices (BCI's) for individual whales that were harvested by Alaskan Eskimos. A series of offshore regions frequented by bowhead whales in summer were delineated and used to quantify interannual summertime environmental conditions including: (a) mean open water fraction, (b) duration of melt season, (c) date of continuous freeze-up, and (d) mean upwelling-favorable wind stress. Body condition was analyzed relative to these metrics for both the preceding summer feeding season and the previous three seasons combined. Our analysis indicates a significant increase in the long-term trend in an axillary girth-based body condition index (BCIG) over the study period (1989-2011). The increase in BCIG is likely associated with the trend in overall reduction of sea ice, including increased duration of open water, changes in upwelling potential (wind stress), and possibly higher primary production in the Pacific Arctic marine ecosystem favoring water-column invertebrates. We found strong significant positive correlations between BCIG and late summer open water fraction in the Beaufort Sea and smaller nearshore areas off the Mackenzie Delta and west of Banks Island. Additionally, BCIG was positively and significantly correlated with duration of melt season, later date of freeze-up in the Beaufort Sea, and upwelling-favorable winds on the Mackenzie shelf and west of Banks Island. A strong seasonal difference in BCI's was noted for subadult bowheads, presumably associated with summer feeding; however, yearlings were found to drop in BCI over at least the first summer after weaning. Our results indicate an overall increase in bowhead whale body condition and a positive correlation with summer sea ice loss over the

  18. Melt-peridotite reactions in upwelling EM1-type eclogite bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina; Holm, Paul Martin

    2013-01-01

    the Payenia volcanic province (34–38 °S) in Argentina, for which Sr, Nd and double-spike Pb isotope ratios are presented, and from other north Patagonian volcanic fields may provide details of the eclogite melt–peridotite reactions taking place in the melting column of an upwelling OIB-type mantle....... The isotopic composition of the uncontaminated lavas is highly restricted but the Payenia basalts fall in two distinct trace element groups termed the high and low Nb/U groups, which both have EM1-type trace element patterns but with subtle differences that cannot be explained by contamination, fractionation...

  19. Intercultural journalism: Peruvian and Bolivian representation in the Chilean daily press news

    OpenAIRE

    Browne-Sartori, Rodrigo-Francisco; Baessolo-Stiven, Ricardo-Alberto; Silva-Echeto, Víctor-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the processes through which the massive press generates and represents the cultural discourses of two of the most polemic migrant groups coexisting nowadays in Chile: Peruvians and Bolivians. The representation that the communication media carries out regarding the studied cultures strongly influences the imaginaries of the Chilean audiences. That calls for special concern so as to propose the necessary spaces for intercultural exchange as much in the media as in the soc...

  20. U.S. and Chilean College Students' Reading Practices: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Suhua; Orellana, Pelusa; Capps, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences between the amounts of time that U.S. and Chilean students spend on conventional academic reading, extracurricular reading, and Facebook and also to report the types of materials they prefer to read. The study surveyed students in the United States (n = 1,265) and Chile (n = 2,076)…

  1. Democracy and Student Discontent: Chilean Student Protest in the Post-Pinochet Era

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M. M. Cummings

    2015-01-01

    "Objective indicators suggest that economic and political conditions improved in Chile between the country's democratization in 1990 and 2011. Average incomes increased, poverty rates decreased, and the number of positive reviews of Chilean democratic institutions rose. Despite this progress, massive student-led protest waves in 2006 and 2011 demonstrated high levels of subjective discontent in Chile. This paper proposes a three-part explanation for the paradoxical emergence and escalation of...

  2. Democracy and Student Discontent: Chilean Student Protest in the Post-Pinochet Era

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M. M. Cummings; University of Notre Dame, Indiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective indicators suggest that economic and political conditions improved in Chile between the country’s democratization in 1990 and 2011. Average incomes increased, poverty rates decreased, and the number of positive reviews of Chilean democratic institutions rose. Despite this progress, massive student-led protest waves in 2006 and 2011 demonstrated high levels of subjective discontent in Chile. This paper proposes a three-part explanation for the paradoxical emergence and escalation of ...

  3. Poetic of memory at Chilean theather: Scenic practice from 1973 to 1990

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Álvarez, Javiera

    2013-01-01

    The present article tries to point out the search and creation of Memory Theater in Chile through a scenic journey between 1973 and 1990. The reading of such a process is assumed in the light of theatrical discourse of resistance, the political and poetic conception of memory as praxis historicity of the present. key to puttings in scene the construction of contemporary Chilean theater in the context of the Pinochet regime.

  4. Original footage of the Chilean miners with manganism published in Neurology in 1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marcelo; Bustamante, M Leonor; Mena, Francisco; Lees, Andrew

    2015-12-15

    Manganism has captured the imagination of neurologists for more than a century because of its similarities to Parkinson disease and its indirect but seminal role in the "l-dopa miracle." We present unpublished footage of the original case series reported in Neurology® in 1967 by Mena and Cotzias depicting the typical neurologic signs of manganism in 4 Chilean miners and their response to high doses of l-dopa.

  5. Michelle Bachelet’s Government: The Paradoxes of a Chilean President

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the contradictions in Michelle Bachelet’s presidency by focusing on the paradoxical nature of presidential power, the limits on the executive in the Chilean constitution, and how those limits affected President Bachelet’s government. At the outset of her presidency, she faced the problem of wanting to promote inclusive policies while simultaneously experiencing political pressure to maintain elite consensus...

  6. Uncommon social trajectories: Chilean low-income adolescents with reading skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Ortiz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that students from low-income families are less successful at school, as indicated by theories of social reproduction. This article focuses on Chilean students that, in spite of their social background, have performed well in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA 2009. Using logistic regression analysis we identify factors associated with academic achievement in reading. Results show that student variables have a greater explanatory value than family and school variables.

  7. The dance of those left behind. Chilean high school students and the possibility of disagreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Depetris Chauvin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the high school students’ protest against the neoliberal conception of education during the first period of President Michelle Bachelet government. Specifically, I analyze how the new generation of young Chileans critically uses and produces pop culture — photoblogs, posters, and stencils — in order to express disagreement with the mercantilist approach to education and the very concept of neoliberal freedom and equality.

  8. Emerging commons within artisanal fisheries. The Chilean territorial use rights in fisheries (TURFs within a broader coastal landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria L. Gallardo Fernández

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Territorial User Rights in Fisheries (TURFs have spread in Chile, since the late 1990s, in the form of commons institutions. TURFs are presented by some scholars as a social-ecological success; by others as showing economic and compliance problems. Studies looking at the material conditions in which fishers produce and reproduce their livelihoods, and in which TURFs emerge, are scarcer. Ostrom’s theory on the commons claims that certain collective action conditions have to be met to become thriving commons institutions. Our hypothesis is that while institutions are moulded by local material conditions, such as geographical location and social embeddedness, these impose challenges and constraints upon fishers influencing TURFs’ long-term viability. How are collective action conditions influenced when the new TURFs commons do not emerge in tabula rasa contexts but in occupied spaces? Do material conditions influence TURFs’ sustainability? This paper set out to explore these conditions. Huentelauquén’s and Guayacán’s TURFs (central-northern Chile were chosen, as they represent two extremes (rural-urban; on private property-on State/municipal property; mainly diver – mainly fisher contexts in which TURFs have emerged. We mainly used Participatory Rural Approach (PRA tools triangulated with other qualitative methods. This study shows that both social embeddedness (private/State lands, and geographical location (rural/urban matter, resulting in different access to the coast for different TURFs, thus determining some important differences between our cases in at least three relevant areas: entrance, social relations between the fishers’ organization (entitled the TURFs and the landowner (private or municipal/State and the existence or absence of fishing and general infrastructure. Competition for space among key actors seems to affect the process of acquiring a TURF as well as the conditions conductive to collective action. TURFs’ assessments should therefore consider both, the local particularities of specific fishing communities and the larger structural context in which they emerge, that if not paid attention to, can weakens TURFs’ viability for sustainable fisheries.

  9. Electrical properties of the mantle upwelling zone beneath a mid-ocean ridge: An application of vertical gradient sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegen, Marion Dorothea

    On mid-ocean ridges, as adjacent plates move apart, the mantle material rises to fill the void created. During its ascent the solidus of the material is crossed and melting occurs. The melt itself is eventually emplaced at the ridge axis producing new oceanic crust. The understanding of the flow of the solid and molten material is hampered by the lack of knowledge of vital model parameters such as the connectivity of the partial melt. Connectivity is related to the permeability in the upwelling region. It therefore controls the migration pattern of the buoyant melt, the flow of the solid phase material, and the mantle upwelling mechanism. Changes in the geometry of the distribution of melt in the solid material have a large impact on the electrical conductivity. I have measured the conductivity of the upwelling region to constrain possible partial melt geometries. I present results of vertical gradient sounding (VGS) experiments on the Endeavour and Explorer ridge, which are part of the Juan de Fuca and its northern extension, the Explorer ridge, respectively. The VGS method is a natural source EM method based entirely on measurements of the magnetic fields. Electrical responses of the 1D layered normal seafloor combined with a 2D region representing the mantle upwelling zone and proposed upwelling mechanisms are derived. A comparison of the synthetic response of a range of models with data measured on the Endeavour segment shows that the conductivity in the upwelling region is very high (in the order of 1 to 5 ohm m depending on the shape of the upwelling region). The results of this experiment suggest that the pore space containing the conductive melt is well connected. The melt must be able to move freely through the upwelling region. The experiments support so called melt migration models. The data measured on the Explorer segment yielded a different conductivity model. The data do not require the presence of a pronounced 2D conductivity anomaly at depth and

  10. Chilean model for long-term follow-up of phenylketonuria (PKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Cornejo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chilean newborn screening program began in 1984 through of a covenant between the National Ministry of Health and the Chilean University through its Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA with the aim of implementing a pilot study for neonatal detection of phenylketonuria (PKU in Santiago’s central area. In 1989 a program for neonatal diagnosis of PKU and congenital hypothyroidism (HC was initiated by INTA along with Santiago´s occidental health ministry rural area, which covered 20% of newborn population. PKU and HC had an incidence of 1:14,640 and 1:2000 living newborns respectively. These findings allowed the establishment of a favorable cost/benefit ratio which validated the implementation of a program with National character. In 1992 the Chilean Ministry of Health ruled the initiation of PKU and HC newborn screening program and by 1998 the coverage across the country was achieved. INTA is the National Reference Center for confirmation and long term treatment for PKU and HC patients. A follow-up program consists of medical, nutritional, neurological and psychological outcome evaluations as well as periodic biochemical testing in order to guarantee normal patient growth and development. To date 184 children have been diagnosed with classic or moderate PKU, all of them follow a strict monitoring program.

  11. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla A. Bascuñán

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA, which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA, with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA.

  12. Democracy and Student Discontent: Chilean Student Protest in the Post-Pinochet Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. M. Cummings

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective indicators suggest that economic and political conditions improved in Chile between the country’s democratization in 1990 and 2011. Average incomes increased, poverty rates decreased, and the number of positive reviews of Chilean democratic institutions rose. Despite this progress, massive student-led protest waves in 2006 and 2011 demonstrated high levels of subjective discontent in Chile. This paper proposes a three-part explanation for the paradoxical emergence and escalation of the post-Pinochet-era Chilean student protests, and, in so doing, contributes to the broader understanding of social movements and political action. The first two parts of the argument relate to generational change. Firstly, a gap between expectations and capabilities provoked discontent amongst a new generation of Chilean students. Secondly, the new generation’s collective identity as “la generación sin miedo” (the fearless generation motivated the students to turn discontent into political action. Thirdly, government and student actor agency influenced the variance in protest strength between 2005 and 2011.

  13. Rhizobacterial Community Structures Associated with Native Plants Grown in Chilean Extreme Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Milko A; Maruyama, Fumito; Ogram, Andrew V; Navarrete, Oscar U; Lagos, Lorena M; Inostroza, Nitza G; Acuña, Jacquelinne J; Rilling, Joaquín I; de La Luz Mora, María

    2016-10-01

    Chile is topographically and climatically diverse, with a wide array of diverse undisturbed ecosystems that include native plants that are highly adapted to local conditions. However, our understanding of the diversity, activity, and role of rhizobacteria associated with natural vegetation in undisturbed Chilean extreme ecosystems is very poor. In the present study, the combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing approaches was used to describe the rhizobacterial community structures of native plants grown in three representative Chilean extreme environments: Atacama Desert (ATA), Andes Mountains (AND), and Antarctic (ANT). Both molecular approaches revealed the presence of Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria as the dominant phyla in the rhizospheres of native plants. Lower numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed in rhizosphere soils from ATA compared with AND and ANT. Both approaches also showed differences in rhizobacterial community structures between extreme environments and between plant species. The differences among plant species grown in the same environment were attributed to the higher relative abundance of classes Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. However, further studies are needed to determine which environmental factors regulate the structures of rhizobacterial communities, and how (or if) specific bacterial groups may contribute to the growth and survival of native plants in each Chilean extreme environments.

  14. Use of Electronic Versus Print Textbooks by Chilean Dental Students: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Pedro Christian; Schulz, Karen; Parra, Annemarie; Perez-Rojas, Francisco; Rosas, Cristian; Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    Electronic textbooks have become available in recent decades as replacements or alternatives for print versions. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to evaluate the use of electronic versus print textbooks by Chilean dental students. The target population was students from 14 Chilean dental schools. The questionnaire was adapted and translated to Spanish from a previous survey used in a similar study. It consisted of the following variables: preferred type, type used, frequency of use, source, electronic devices used to read, and disposal after use. The use of textbooks was analyzed and compared by gender and course (p≤0.05). The final sample consisted of 3,256 students (21.38±2.5 years of age, 50.8% women). Most of the participants reported using both types of texts, with most (63.9%) preferring print over electronic texts, including significantly more women (pelectronic books on a daily basis (47.3%) or at least twice a week (30.7%). The main source of electronic textbooks was the Internet (43.8%). A personal computer was the most widely used device for reading electronic texts (95.0%), followed by a cell phone (46.4%) and a tablet (24.5%). Overall, these Chilean dental students preferred print over electronic textbooks, despite having available electronic devices.

  15. Content validity and reliability of test of gross motor development in Chilean children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cano-Cappellacci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To validate a Spanish version of the Test of Gross Motor Development (TGMD-2 for the Chilean population. METHODS Descriptive, transversal, non-experimental validity and reliability study. Four translators, three experts and 92 Chilean children, from five to 10 years, students from a primary school in Santiago, Chile, have participated. The Committee of Experts has carried out translation, back-translation and revision processes to determine the translinguistic equivalence and content validity of the test, using the content validity index in 2013. In addition, a pilot implementation was achieved to determine test reliability in Spanish, by using the intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman method. We evaluated whether the results presented significant differences by replacing the bat with a racket, using T-test. RESULTS We obtained a content validity index higher than 0.80 for language clarity and relevance of the TGMD-2 for children. There were significant differences in the object control subtest when comparing the results with bat and racket. The intraclass correlation coefficient for reliability inter-rater, intra-rater and test-retest reliability was greater than 0.80 in all cases. CONCLUSIONS The TGMD-2 has appropriate content validity to be applied in the Chilean population. The reliability of this test is within the appropriate parameters and its use could be recommended in this population after the establishment of normative data, setting a further precedent for the validation in other Latin American countries.

  16. ICT in Chilean Schools: Students' and Teachers' Access and Use of ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Enrique Hinostroza

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the analysis of the data from a national survey of the Chilean educational ICT infrastructure and its use in schools implemented by the Centre for Technology and Education of the Chilean Ministry of Education in 2004. Results show that the context of ICT use in Chilean schools can be characterized as relatively good, insofar as there are no first-order barriers for implementing ICT pedagogy. In this context, students’ ICT use can be categorized based on four factors: communication, productivity, recreation, and communication with teachers. On the other hand, teachers’ ICT use can be categorized using three factors: communication, teaching, and technical. Based on these factors and considering the availability and use of ICT in schools, the question remains how to make this time most effective for improving students’ learning. Additionally, results show that students, on their own, spend a considerable amount of time developing activities described as communication. The question that arises from this finding is how to take advantage of these activities in order to meet teaching and learning aims. Regarding teachers, results open possibilities for redesigning professional development courses by taking advantage of what they already do with ICT.

  17. The management of care: a social and legal function of chilean nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ceballos-Vásquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this article is to reflect on the implication of the concept of management of nursing, making Latin-American countries that have incorporated the management of care aware of its norms and the chilean experience and the legal aspects that regulate the management of care are specifically presented.Development: To achieve this objective, a bibliographic revision of diverse mainstream magazines, texts and laws related to administration and Management of Care was carried out.Initially, the concept of management is analyzed with the purpose of comprehending why the nursing integrate it in its field of performance. To visualize later how some of the countries of Latin-America have incorporated it in their legal frameworks of management of Care care of nursing, and subsequently the experience of the Chilean chilean nursing with regard to the Management management of Care care is analyzed extensively.Conclusions: As final considerations it is indicated that the Management management of Care care is part of the social function of the nurses, for the daily work they are to perform incorporating the management, it would provide managing competencies and would permit the autonomous caretaking to these professionals. 

  18. [Position paper from the Department of Ethics of the Chilean College of Physicians about conscientious objection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Sofía P; Besio, Mauricio; Bórquez Estefó, Gladys; Salinas, Rodrigo A; Valenzuela, Carlos Y; Micolich, Constanza; Novoa Sotta, Fernando; Bernier Villarroel, Lioniel; Montt M, Julio; Misseroni Raddatz, Adelio

    2016-03-01

    The Chilean bill that regulates abortion for three cases (Bulletin Nº 9895-11) includes the possibility that health professionals may manifest their conscientious objection (CO) to perform this procedure. Due to the broad impact that the issue of C O had, the Ethics Department of the Chilean College of Physicians considered important to review this concept and its ethical and legal basis, especially in the field of sexual and reproductive health. In the present document, we define the practical limit s of CO, both for the proper fulfillment of the medical profession obligations, and for the due respect and non-discrimination that the professional objector deserves. We analyze the denial of some health institutions to perform abortions if it is legalize d, and we end with recommendations adjusted to the Chilean reality. Specifically, we recognize the right to conscientious objection that all physicians who directly participate in a professional act have. But we a lso recognize that physicians have ineludib le obligations towards their patients, including the obligation to inform about the existence of this service, how to access to it and -as set out in our code of ethics- to ensure that another colleague will continue attending the patient.

  19. Evaluation of quality of life in Chilean patients with orthognathic surgery. A cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Cea-Herrera

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To compare the presurgical and immediate postsurgical quality of life in Chilean patients with orthognathic surgery. Material and Methods: Cohort study. The study included 30 patients (mean age 20.73, 53.33% male who underwent orthognathic surgery primarily for severe skeletal abnormalities, (17 surgeries, 56.7% and moderate skeletal abnormalities (12 surgeries, 40%, from three Chilean hospitals between February and June 2016. Patients were asked to answer the World Health Organization quality of life Bref version questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF validated in Spanish to measure quality of life (QoL two weeks before and three months after the surgery. Scores for general QoL and for every domain of QoL were described. Variations in the scores of general QoL were analyzed according to sex and severity of orofacial malformation (mild, moderate or severe (t-test p<0.05; STATA 10.0. Results: The average score for QoL according to the WHOQOL-BREF scale was 76.43±13.83 before surgery and 90.5±7.18 three months after surgery (p<0.001. Statistically significant differences according to sex and type of orofacial malformation were found (p<0.01. An increase in the score in all the domains of the WHOQOOL-BREF scale was observed. Conclusion: Orthognathic surgery significantly improved QoL scores in Chilean patients according to the WHOQOL-BREF scale.

  20. Numerical simulation of the structure and variation of upwelling off the east coast of Hainan Island using QuikSCAT winds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yineng; PENG Shiqiu; YANG Wei; WANG Dongxiao

    2012-01-01

    The spatial structure and variation of the upwelling in the waters east and northeast of Hainan Island,China during 2000-2007 were investigated using a nested high-resolution Princeton Ocean Model (POM) forced by QuikSCAT winds.The model produced good simulations of the summer upwelling and the seasonal and annual variability.Strong upwelling occurs from mid-July to mid-August with a peak east of Hainan Island associated with the southwesterly monsoon in the South China Sea.Sensitivity experiments indicated that when the local wind stress controls the variability of the upwelling,the large-scale circulation significantly enhances the upwelling northeast of Hainan Island by inducing a local upwelling and transporting cold water northeast-ward along the island's east coast.The joint effects of the local wind stress and large-scale circulation result in stronger upwelling northeast of Hainan Island.This implies that the annual variation of the upwelling northeast of Hainan Island is controlled not only by the local alongshore wind stress but also by the large-scale circulation.This result will help us investigate the decadal variation of the upwelling in this region in the future.

  1. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility is used to aid in the planning of harbor development and in the design and layout of breakwaters, absorbers, etc.. The goal is...

  2. Pollution of coastal seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Pollution of various environments is a consequence of population growth and industrialisation. Coastal seas form part of marine environment and are very rich in minerals, crude oil fishes etc. They are also being used for disposal of wastes from...

  3. Coastal California Digital Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital ortho-imagery dataset is a survey of coastal California. The project area consists of approximately 3774 square miles. The project design of the digital...

  4. Topics in coastal engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, E.W.

    1972-01-01

    Harbors, development of longshore current formulas, radiation stress, determination of currents along a coast, longshore sand transportation, local coastal accretion, beaches with groins, wave forces on piles, offshore constructions, offshore moorings, submarine pipelines.

  5. National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) is designed to provide high-resolution elevation and imagery data along U.S....

  6. Coastal Temperate Rainforest Symposium

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The North Pacific LCC is helping sponsor the April 2012 science symposium - Coastal Temperate Rainforests: Integrating Communities, Climate Science, and Resource...

  7. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Frouin, R.; Cassanet, G.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. HCMM data analysis shows some mesoscale features which were previously expected to occur: summer coastal upwellings in the Gulf of Lions, tidal fronts bordering the English Channel, and cooler surface waters at the continental shelf break. The analysis of the spectral variance density spectra show that the interpretation of the data usually is limited by the HCMM radiometric performance (noise levels) at wavenumbers below 5 km in the oceanic areas; from this analysis it may also be concluded that a decrease of the radiometric noise level down to 0.1 k against an increase of the ground resolution up to 2 km would give a better optimum of the radiometric performances in the oceanic areas. HCMM data appear to be useful for analysis of the sea surface temperature field, particularly in the very coastal area by profiting from the ground resolution of 500 m.

  8. The impact of Southern Ocean residual upwelling on atmospheric CO2 on centennial and millennial timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Williams, Richard G.; Munday, David R.; Marshall, David P.

    2017-03-01

    The Southern Ocean plays a pivotal role in climate change by exchanging heat and carbon, and provides the primary window for the global deep ocean to communicate with the atmosphere. There has been a widespread focus on explaining atmospheric CO2 changes in terms of changes in wind forcing in the Southern Ocean. Here, we develop a dynamically-motivated metric, the residual upwelling, that measures the primary effect of Southern Ocean dynamics on atmospheric CO2 on centennial to millennial timescales by determining the communication with the deep ocean. The metric encapsulates the combined, net effect of winds and air-sea buoyancy forcing on both the upper and lower overturning cells, which have been invoked as explaining atmospheric CO2 changes for the present day and glacial-interglacial changes. The skill of the metric is assessed by employing suites of idealized ocean model experiments, including parameterized and explicitly simulated eddies, with online biogeochemistry and integrated for 10,000 years to equilibrium. Increased residual upwelling drives elevated atmospheric CO2 at a rate of typically 1-1.5 parts per million/106 m3 s-1 by enhancing the communication between the atmosphere and deep ocean. This metric can be used to interpret the long-term effect of Southern Ocean dynamics on the natural carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2, alongside other metrics, such as involving the proportion of preformed nutrients and the extent of sea ice cover.

  9. Stability of active mantle upwelling revealed by net characteristics of plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Clinton P; Steinberger, Bernhard; Torsvik, Trond H

    2013-06-27

    Viscous convection within the mantle is linked to tectonic plate motions and deforms Earth's surface across wide areas. Such close links between surface geology and deep mantle dynamics presumably operated throughout Earth's history, but are difficult to investigate for past times because the history of mantle flow is poorly known. Here we show that the time dependence of global-scale mantle flow can be deduced from the net behaviour of surface plate motions. In particular, we tracked the geographic locations of net convergence and divergence for harmonic degrees 1 and 2 by computing the dipole and quadrupole moments of plate motions from tectonic reconstructions extended back to the early Mesozoic era. For present-day plate motions, we find dipole convergence in eastern Asia and quadrupole divergence in both central Africa and the central Pacific. These orientations are nearly identical to the dipole and quadrupole orientations of underlying mantle flow, which indicates that these 'net characteristics' of plate motions reveal deeper flow patterns. The positions of quadrupole divergence have not moved significantly during the past 250 million years, which suggests long-term stability of mantle upwelling beneath Africa and the Pacific Ocean. These upwelling locations are positioned above two compositionally and seismologically distinct regions of the lowermost mantle, which may organize global mantle flow as they remain stationary over geologic time.

  10. A comparison of Globigerinoides ruber calcification between upwelling and nonupwelling regions in the Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushant S Naik; Shital P Godad; P Divakar Naidu; V Ramaswamy

    2013-08-01

    Shell weights of planktonic foraminifera species Globigerinoides ruber in the size range of 300–355 μm were measured from sediment traps in the western and eastern Arabian Sea which represent upwelling and non-upwelling conditions respectively. In the Western Arabian Sea Trap (WAST), G. ruber flux ranged from 33.3 to 437.3#/m2/day and shell weights ranged from 6.7 to 14.2 g. Whereas, in the Eastern Arabian Sea Trap (EAST), flux ranged from 0.7 to 164.6#/m2/day and shell weights ranged from 10.4 to 14.8 g. Shell weights of G. ruber versus flux showed significant correlation at both the sites which reveals that shell calcification mainly depends on optimal growth conditions. Though the WAST and EAST location have distinct difference in pCO2 and sea surface temperature (SST), the shell weights of G. ruber are similar in these two regions which suggest that surface water pCO2 and SST do not show dominant influence on shell calcification on a seasonal timescale.

  11. Time series analysis of data for sea surface temperature and upwelling components from the southwest coast of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Priscila Costa; Cordeiro, Clara; Danchenko, Sergei; Icely, John; Cristina, Sónia; Newton, Alice

    2016-11-01

    This study relates sea surface temperature (SST) to the upwelling conditions off the southwest coast of Portugal using statistical analyses of publically available data. Optimum Interpolation (OI) of daily SST data were extracted from the United States (US) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and data for wind speed and direction were from the US National Climatic Data Center. Time series were extracted at a daily frequency for a time horizon of 26 years. Upwelling indices were estimated using westerly (Qx) and southerly (Qy) Ekman transport components. In the first part of the study, time series were inspected for trend and seasonality over the whole period. The seasonally adjusted time series revealed an increasing slope for SST (0.15 °C per decade) and decreasing slopes for Qx (- 84.01 m3 s- 1 km- 1 per decade) and Qy (- 25.20 m3 s- 1 km- 1 per decade), over the time horizon. Structural breaks analysis applied to the time series showed that a statistically significant incremental increase in SST was more pronounced during the last decade. Cross-correlation between upwelling indices and SST revealed a time delay of 5 and 2 days between Qx and SST, and between Qy and SST, respectively. A spectral analysis combined with the previous analysis enabled the identification of four oceanographic seasons. Those seasons were later recognised over a restricted time period of 4 years, between 2008 and 2012, when there was an extensive sampling programme for the validation of ocean colour remote sensing imagery. The seasons were defined as: summer, with intense and regular events of upwelling; autumn, indicating relaxation of upwelling conditions; and spring and winter, showing high interannual variability in terms of number and intensity of upwelling events.

  12. El Niño and similar perturbation effects on the benthos of the Humboldt, California, and Benguela Current upwelling ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Arntz

    2006-01-01

    zones, bringing a variety of (subtropical immigrants. The autochthonous benthic fauna emigrates to deeper water or poleward, or suffers mortality. However, some local macrofaunal species experience important population proliferations, presumably due to improved oxygenation (in the southern hemisphere, higher temperature tolerance, reduced competition or the capability to use different food. Both these negative and positive effects of El Niño influence local artisanal fisheries and the livelihood of coastal populations. In the Humboldt Current system the hypoxic seafloor at outer shelf depths receives important flushing from the equatorial zone, causing havoc on the sulphur bacteria mats and immediate recolonisation of the sediments by mega- and macrofauna. Conversely, off California, the intruding equatorial water masses appear to have lower oxygen than ambient waters, and may cause oxygen deficiency at upper slope depths. Effects of this change have not been studied in detail, although shrimp and other taxa appear to alter their distribution on the continental margin. Other properties and reactions of the two Pacific EBC benthic ecosystems to El Niño seem to differ, too, as does the overall impact of major episodes (e.g., 1982/1983(1984 vs. 1997/1998. The relation of the "Benguela Niño" to ENSO seems unclear although many Pacific-Atlantic ocean and atmosphere teleconnections have been described. Warm, low-oxygen equatorial water seems to be transported into the upwelling area by similar mechanisms as in the Pacific, but most major impacts on the eukaryotic biota obviously come from other, independent perturbations such as an extreme eutrophication of the sediments ensuing in sulphidic eruptions and toxic algal blooms. Similarities and differences of the Humboldt and California Current benthic ecosystems are discussed with particular reference to ENSO impacts since 1972/73. Where there are data available, the authors include the Benguela Current ecosystem as another

  13. Changes in optical characteristics of surface microlayers hint to photochemically and microbially mediated DOM turnover in the upwelling region off the coast of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Luisa; Engel, Anja

    2016-04-01

    The coastal upwelling system off the coast of Peru is characterized by high biological activity and a pronounced subsurface oxygen minimum zone, as well as associated emissions of atmospheric trace gases such as N2O, CH4 and CO2. From 3 to 23 December 2012, R/V Meteor (M91) cruise took place in the Peruvian upwelling system between 4.59 and 15.4° S, and 82.0 to 77.5° W. During M91 we investigated the composition of the sea-surface microlayer (SML), the oceanic uppermost boundary directly subject to high solar radiation, often enriched in specific organic compounds of biological origin like chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and marine gels. In the SML, the continuous photochemical and microbial recycling of organic matter may strongly influence gas exchange between marine systems and the atmosphere. We analyzed SML and underlying water (ULW) samples at 38 stations focusing on CDOM spectral characteristics as indicator of photochemical and microbial alteration processes. CDOM composition was characterized by spectral slope (S) values and excitation-emission matrix fluorescence (EEMs), which allow us to track changes in molecular weight (MW) of DOM, and to determine potential DOM sources and sinks. Spectral slope S varied between 0.012 to 0.043 nm-1 and was quite similar between SML and ULW, with no significant differences between the two compartments. Higher S values were observed in the ULW of the southern stations below 15° S. By EEMs, we identified five fluorescent components (F1-5) of the CDOM pool, of which two had excitation/emission characteristics of amino-acid-like fluorophores (F1, F4) and were highly enriched in the SML, with a median ratio SML : ULW of 1.5 for both fluorophores. In the study region, values for CDOM absorption ranged from 0.07 to 1.47 m-1. CDOM was generally highly concentrated in the SML, with a median enrichment with respect to the ULW of 1.2. CDOM composition and changes in spectral slope properties suggested a local

  14. The Image of E-Learning: Perceptions about a Chilean University and the E-Learning System in the Context of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcas, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the image of a Chilean university, as perceived by those inside and outside of the institution, in contrast with the general image of the e-learning system in Chile. The internal perceptions are those of current students and graduates of this Chilean university, while the external perceptions are those…

  15. Mercury speciation in fish of the Cabo Frio upwelling region, SE-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto da Silva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mercury distribution in the oceans is controlled by complex biogeochemical cycles, resulting in retention of trace amounts of this metal in marine biota. The impact of upwelling processes in this metal behavior has been overlooked. Data from literature are insufficient to evaluate the risks associated with the presence of mercury in the fish collected in upwelling areas and its consumers. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to perform a study of mercury speciation in four fish species belonging to different trophic levels from Cabo Frio-Brazil upwelling region. The total mercury content vary of 53 ng g-1 (Sardinella brasiliensis -sardine to 1215 ng g-1 (Cynoscion striatus -striped weakfish and, with exception of the planktivorous fish, methylmercury levels reaches circa 90% of total mercury concentration.A distribuição de Mercúrio nos oceanos é controlada por um complexo ciclo biogeoquímico, resultando na retenção de pequenas quantidades na biota marinha. O impacto dos processos de ressurgência costeira no comportamento desse metal tem sido negligenciado. Dados da literatura são insuficientes para elucidar o risco associado com a presença de mercúrio em peixes capturados em áreas de ressurgência e seus consumidores. Portanto o objetivo do presente trabalho foi realizar um estudo de especiação de mercúrio em quatro espécies de peixes pertencentes a diferentes níveis tróficos da região de ressurgência de Cabo Frio-Brasil. O conteúdo total de mercúrio variou de 53 ng g-1 (Sardinella brasiliensis -sardinha to 1215 ng g-1 (Cynoscion striatus -pescada e, com exceção da espécie planctivora, os níveis de metilmercúrio atingem cerca de 90% da concentração total de mercúrio.

  16. Natural and human-induced hypoxia and consequences for coastal areas: synthesis and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Gilbert, D.; Gooday, A. J.; Levin, L.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Middelburg, J. J.; Scranton, M.; Ekau, W.; Peña, A.; Dewitte, B.; Oguz, T.; Monteiro, P. M. S.; Urban, E.; Rabalais, N. N.; Ittekkot, V.; Kemp, W. M.; Ulloa, O.; Elmgren, R.; Escobar-Briones, E.; van der Plas, A. K.

    2010-05-01

    Hypoxia has become a world-wide phenomenon in the global coastal ocean and causes a deterioration of the structure and function of ecosystems. Based on the collective contributions of members of SCOR Working Group #128, the present study provides an overview of the major aspects of coastal hypoxia in different biogeochemical provinces, including estuaries, coastal waters, upwelling areas, fjords and semi-enclosed basins, with various external forcings, ecosystem responses, feedbacks and potential impact on the sustainability of the fishery and economics. The obvious external forcings include freshwater runoff and other factors contributing to stratification, organic matter and nutrient loadings, as well as exchange between coastal and open ocean water masses. Their different interactions set up mechanisms that drive the system towards hypoxia. Coastal systems also vary in their relative susceptibility to hypoxia depending on their physical and geographic settings. It is understood that coastal hypoxia has a profound impact on the sustainability of ecosystems, which can be seen, for example, by the change in the food-web structure and system function; other influences include compression and loss of habitat, as well as changes in organism life cycles and reproduction. In most cases, the ecosystem responds to the low dissolved oxygen in non-linear ways with pronounced feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth System, including those that affect human society. Our knowledge and previous experiences illustrate that there is a need to develop new observational tools and models to support integrated research of biogeochemical dynamics and ecosystem behavior that will improve confidence in remediation management strategies for coastal hypoxia.

  17. Natural and human-induced hypoxia and consequences for coastal areas: synthesis and future development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia has become a world-wide phenomenon in the global coastal ocean and causes a deterioration of the structure and function of ecosystems. Based on the collective contributions of members of SCOR Working Group #128, the present study provides an overview of the major aspects of coastal hypoxia in different biogeochemical provinces, including estuaries, coastal waters, upwelling areas, fjords and semi-enclosed basins, with various external forcings, ecosystem responses, feedbacks and potential impact on the sustainability of the fishery and economics. The obvious external forcings include freshwater runoff and other factors contributing to stratification, organic matter and nutrient loadings, as well as exchange between coastal and open ocean water masses. Their different interactions set up mechanisms that drive the system towards hypoxia. Coastal systems also vary in their relative susceptibility to hypoxia depending on their physical and geographic settings. It is understood that coastal hypoxia has a profound impact on the sustainability of ecosystems, which can be seen, for example, by the change in the food-web structure and system function; other influences include compression and loss of habitat, as well as changes in organism life cycles and reproduction. In most cases, the ecosystem responds to the low dissolved oxygen in non-linear ways with pronounced feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth System, including those that affect human society. Our knowledge and previous experiences illustrate that there is a need to develop new observational tools and models to support integrated research of biogeochemical dynamics and ecosystem behavior that will improve confidence in remediation management strategies for coastal hypoxia.

  18. Multiscale upwelling forcing cycles and biological response off north-central Chile Ciclos multiescala en el forzamiento de la surgencia y respuesta biológica en el centro-norte de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ RUTLLANT

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The physical forcing of the upwelling along the subtropical west coasts of the continents encompasses a broad range of time scales which shape both phytoplankton biomass (Chl-a and primary productivity (carbon fixation changes over any given time interval. The narrow continental shelf and the steep alongshore orography off north-central Chile provide for a unique combination of year-round, upwelling-favorable winds with quasi-weekly upwelling pulses associated with atmospheric coastal-trapped disturbances (coastal lows. This variability is modulated by intraseasonal oscillations in the depth of the thermo/nutricline, produced by coastal-trapped waves in the ocean, upon which annual (seasons and interannual (ENSO cycles are superimposed. During coastal field experiments off Cruz Grande bay (29º S, carried on in November 1987 and 1988 (opposite extremes of the ENSO cycle, mean changes of the phytoplankton-integrated Chl-a (B and carbon fixation rate (PP from the active to the relaxed phases of the local upwelling forcing cycle (phyto-pattern were characterized. Those data were contrasted against similar ones reported off Punta Lengua de Vaca (Coquimbo, 30º S and off Mejillones peninsula (Antofagasta, 23º S, encompassing different seasons and phases of intraseasonal and interannual (ENSO cycles from 1992 to 1997. A "warm" phyto-pattern was schematically characterized by a significant increase in B and a quasi-steady evolution of PP from the active to the relaxed phases of one complete upwelling event. Conversely, relative small changes in B and a significant increase in PP characterized a "cold" phyto-pattern. It is proposed here that the ENSO "cold/warm" signal may be offset by more than one opposite "thermal" condition (seasonal and/or intraseasonal in defining a "warm" or "cold" phyto-pattern associated with a particular cycle of the local upwelling forcingEl forzamiento físico de la surgencia a lo largo de las costas occidentales de los

  19. Nitrogen transfers and air-sea N2O fluxes in the upwelling off Namibia within the oxygen minimum zone: a 3-D model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulmier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As regions of high primary production and being often associated to Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Indeed, by exporting the Organic Matter (OM and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. Losses of fixed inorganic N, through denitrification and anammox processes and through nitrous oxide (N2O emissions to the atmosphere, take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and alleviate the role of these regions as a source of N. In the present study, we developed a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical (ROMS/BioBUS model for investigating the full N budget in the Namibian sub-system of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS. The different state variables of a climatological experiment have been compared to different data sets (satellite and in situ observations and show that the model is able to represent this biogeochemical oceanic region. The N transfer is investigated in the Namibian upwelling system using this coupled model, especially in the Walvis Bay area between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed (O2 2 l−1. The upwelling process advects 24.2 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of nitrate enriched waters over the first 100 m over the slope and over the continental shelf. The meridional advection by the alongshore Benguela current brings also nutrient-rich waters with 21.1 × 1010 mol N yr−1. 10.5 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of OM are exported outside of the continental shelf (between 0 and 100-m depth. 32.4% and 18.1% of this OM are exported by advection in the form of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matters (DOM and POM, respectively, however vertical sinking of POM represents the main contributor (49.5% to OM export outside of the first 100-m depth of the water column on the continental shelf. The continental slope also represents a net N

  20. Southern Alaska Coastal Relief Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building coastal-relief models (CRM) for select U.S. coastal regions. Bathymetric, topographic, and shoreline data...

  1. COASTAL STUDY, LINCOLN COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  2. Coastal Processes with Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Robert G.; Dalrymple, Robert A.

    2004-03-01

    The world's coastlines, dividing land from sea, are geological environments that are unique in their composition and the physical processes affecting them. At the dynamically active intersection of land and the oceans, humans have been building structures throughout history. Initially used for naval and commercial purposes, more recently recreation and tourism have increased activity in the coastal zone dramatically. Shoreline development is now causing a significant conflict with natural coastal processes. This text on coastal engineering will help the reader understand these coastal processes and develop strategies to cope effectively with shoreline erosion. The book is organized in four parts: (1) an overview of coastal engineering, using case studies to illustrate problems; (2) hydrodynamics of the coastal zone, reviewing storm surges, water waves, and low frequency motions within the nearshore and surf zone; (3) coastal responses including equilibrium beach profiles and sediment transport; (4) applications such as erosion mitigation, beach nourishment, coastal armoring, tidal inlets, and shoreline management.

  3. COASTAL STUDY, SOLANO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  4. The reduction of biological production induced by mesoscale mixing: a modelling study in the Benguela upwelling

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Hernández-García, Emilio; Garçon, Veronique; López, Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies, both based on remote sensed data and coupled models, showed a reduction of biological productivity due to vigorous horizontal mixing in upwelling systems. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we have considered a system of oceanic flow in the Benguela area coupled with a simple biogeochemical model of Nutrient-Phyto-Zooplankton (NPZ) type. For the flow three different surface velocity fields are considered: one derived from satellite altimetry data, and the other two from a regional numerical model at two different spatial resolutions. We computed horizontal particle dispersion in terms of Lyapunov Exponents, and analyzed their correlations with phytoplankton concentrations. Our modelling approach confirms that in the south Benguela, there is a reduction of biological activity when stirring is increased. Two-dimensional offshore advection seems to be the dominant process involved. In the northern area, other factors not taken into account in our simulation are influencing the ecosyst...

  5. Lead in the western South China Sea: Evidence of atmospheric deposition and upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengli; Goodkin, Nathalie F.; Boyle, Edward A.; Switzer, Adam D.; Bolton, Annette

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, rapid industrial developments have increased lead (Pb) inputs to the South China Sea. To quantify the increasing variability, we investigated 170 years of skeletal Pb and Pb isotopes from an offshore, central Vietnamese coral. The Pb/Ca in the coral was 10-16 nmol/mol before the mid-1950s and increased to more than 30 nmol/mol by 2000. While the regional phaseout of leaded petrol commenced in 2000, coral Pb/Ca continued increasing until 2004, possibly due to regional upwelling and the transport of previously emitted Pb from tropical Pacific waters. The 206Pb/207Pb ratio in the coral was 1.191-1.195 before mid-1950s, suggesting natural sources. Since then, the ratio decreased, reaching ~1.165 in 2004. Lead isotopes show high linearity between natural and Chinese emitted Pb, with the latter contributing ~40%~60% of the skeletal Pb after 2000.

  6. Oceanic three-dimensional Lagrangian Coherent Structures: A study in the Benguela upwelling region

    CERN Document Server

    Bettencourt, João H; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    We study three dimensional oceanic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the Benguela region, as obtained from an output from the ROMS model. To this end we first compute Finite-Size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) fields in the region volume, characterizing mesoscale stirring and mixing there. Average FSLE values show a general decreasing trend with depth, but there is a local maximum at about 100m depth. LCSs are extracted as ridges of the calculated FSLE fields. They present a "curtain-like" geometry in which the strongest attracting and repelling structures appear as quasivertical surfaces. LCSs around a particular cyclonic eddy, pinched off from the upwelling front are also calculated. The LCSs are confirmed to provide pathways and barriers to transport in and out of the eddy.

  7. Quantifying cross-shelf and vertical nutrient flux in the Coastal Gulf of Alaska with a spatially nested, coupled biophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Albert J.; Hinckley, Sarah; Dobbins, Elizabeth L.; Haidvogel, Dale B.; Bond, Nicholas A.; Mordy, Calvin; Kachel, Nancy; Stabeno, Phyllis J.

    2009-12-01

    The Coastal Gulf of Alaska (CGOA) is productive, with large populations of fish, seabirds, and marine mammals; yet it is subject to downwelling-favorable coastal winds. Downwelling regions in other parts of the world are typically much less productive than their upwelling counterparts. Alternate sources of nutrients to feed primary production in the topographically complex CGOA are poorly known and difficult to quantify. Here we diagnose the output from a spatially nested, coupled hydrodynamic and lower trophic level model of the CGOA, to quantify both horizontal and vertical nutrient fluxes into the euphotic zone. Our nested model includes both nitrogen and iron limitation of phytoplankton production, and is driven by a fine-scale atmospheric model that resolves the effects of local orography on the coastal winds. Results indicate significant "rivers" of cross-shelf nitrogen flux due to horizontal advection, as well as "fountains" of vertical transport over shallow banks due to tidal mixing. Using these results, we constructed a provisional budget of nutrient transport among subregions of the CGOA. Contrary to expectations, this budget reveals substantial upwelling of nutrients over major portions of the shelf, driven by local wind-stress curl. These effects are large enough to overwhelm the smaller downwelling flux at the coast throughout the growing season. Vertical mixing by winds and tides, and horizontal flux from the deep basin, are other substantial contributors to nutrients above the 15-m horizon. These findings help to explain the productivity of this coastal ecosystem.

  8. Scour around coastal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Whiteouse, J. S.; Tørum, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the European Union Marine Science and Technology (EU MAST) III project "Scour Around Coastal Structures" (SCARCOST). The summary is presented under three headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Flow and scour processes with the subheadings: flow and scour processes...... pressures and effective stresses around a bottom seated cylinder; non-linear soil modelling with respect to wave-induced pore pressures and gradients; wave-induced pressures on the bottom for non-linear coastal waves, including also wave kinematics; development of a numerical model (linear soil modelling...

  9. Short-term changes in the northwest African Upwelling System induced by Saharan dust deposition events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A G; Coca, J; Redondo, A [SeaSnet Canarias. Dpto. de Biologia (University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria), Canary Islands (Spain); Cuevas, E; Alonso-Perez, S; Bustos, J J [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Agencia Estatal de Meteorologia, Tenerife (Spain); Perez, C; Baldasano, J M [Earth Sciences Department. Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Nickovic, S [Atmospheric Research and Environment Branch, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: aramos@pesca.gi.ulpgc.es

    2009-03-01

    During the last 7-year period (2000-2006) atmosphere circulation changes show strong influences on the dust storm deposition dynamics and, as a result, on the primary production dynamics of the northwest African Upwelling System. From 2000 to 2006, the annual mean sea level pressure became higher ranging from 1014 to 1015 mb. Mean annual zonal wind intensity became higher (from 1.1 to 1.8 m s{sup -1}), while the mean annual meridional was reduced from 6.2 to 5.3 m s{sup -1} at the north of the Canary Islands. Mean annual satellite-derived AVHRR/NOAA SST recorded in the northwest African Upwelling became warmer in both locations, from 18.3 deg. C to 18.8 deg. C in Cape Ghir and from 19.5 deg. C to 20.3 deg. C north Canary Islands waters. CHL records from the SeaWiFS/OV-2 showed a different pattern trend. Mean annual CHL levels increased at Cape Ghir from 0.65 mg m-3 to 0.9 mg m-3 and significantly reduced from 0.59 mg m{sup -3} to 0.31 mg m{sup -3} at the north of the Canary Islands. Changes observed in the role of CHL during the last 7-years period could be associated to intensive dust deposition and exceptional weather warming observed in this area since 2000. However, this study focused on a 7-year period and conclusions on possible links between dust deposition and marine biochemistry activity cannot be generalized.

  10. Evaluation and application of the ROMS 1-way embedding procedure to the central california upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penven, Pierrick; Debreu, Laurent; Marchesiello, Patrick; McWilliams, James C.

    What most clearly distinguishes near-shore and off-shore currents is their dominant spatial scale, O (1-30) km near-shore and O (30-1000) km off-shore. In practice, these phenomena are usually both measured and modeled with separate methods. In particular, it is infeasible for any regular computational grid to be large enough to simultaneously resolve well both types of currents. In order to obtain local solutions at high resolution while preserving the regional-scale circulation at an affordable computational cost, a 1-way grid embedding capability has been integrated into the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS). It takes advantage of the AGRIF (Adaptive Grid Refinement in Fortran) Fortran 90 package based on the use of pointers. After a first evaluation in a baroclinic vortex test case, the embedding procedure has been applied to a domain that covers the central upwelling region off California, around Monterey Bay, embedded in a domain that spans the continental U.S. Pacific Coast. Long-term simulations (10 years) have been conducted to obtain mean-seasonal statistical equilibria. The final solution shows few discontinuities at the parent-child domain boundary and a valid representation of the local upwelling structure, at a CPU cost only slightly greater than for the inner region alone. The solution is assessed by comparison with solutions for the whole US Pacific Coast at both low and high resolutions and to solutions for only the inner region at high resolution with mean-seasonal boundary conditions.

  11. Bacterial community characterization and biogeochemistry of sediments from a tropical upwelling system (Cabo Frio, Southeastern Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Branco, R.; Barreiro, A.; Silva, F. S.; Carvalhal-Gomes, S. B. V.; Fontana, L. F.; Mendonça-Filho, J. G.; Vasconcelos, V.

    2016-11-01

    The Cabo Frio Upwelling System is one of the largest and most productive areas in southeastern Brazil. Although it is well-known that bacterial communities play a crucial role in the biogeochemical cycles and food chain of marine ecosystems, little is known regarding the microbial communities in the sediments of this upwelling region. In this research, we address the effect of different hydrological conditions on the biogeochemistry of sediments and the diversity of bacterial communities. Biogeochemistry profiles of sediments from four sampling stations along an inner-outer transect on the continental shelf were evaluated and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments was used to study the bacterial community composition in these sediments. Our sequencing analysis of excised bands identified Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes phyla as the phylogenetic groups, indicating the existence of great diversity in these marine sediments. In this multidisciplinary study, the use of multivariate analysis was crucial for understanding how biogeochemical profiles influence bacterial community distribution. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated that the biogeochemical variables exhibited a clear spatial pattern that is mainly related to hydrological conditions. A Correspondence Analysis (CA) revealed an important association between certain taxonomic groups and specific sampling locations. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) demonstrated that the biogeochemistry influences the structure of the bacterial community in sediments. Among the bacterial groups identified, the most taxonomically diverse classes (Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria) were found to be distributed regardless of any studied biogeochemical variables influences, whereas other groups responded to biogeochemical conditions which, in turn, were influenced by hydrological conditions. This finding

  12. Two Years of Plankton Tows in a Seasonal Upwelling Region: Foraminiferal Abundances and Implications for the Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. V.; Hill, T. M.; Jahncke, J.

    2014-12-01

    Planktic foraminifera have a long history of use as paleoceaographic proxies due to their environmental sensitivity, cosmopolitan distribution and extensive fossil record. The seasonal, spatial and water mass affinities of foraminifera species have implications for the interpretation of fossil assemblages and the interpretation of shell geochemistry. Two years (2012-2014) of shallow (dynamics of planktic foraminifera in an upwelling regime. Tows along with intensive hydrologic monitoring by CTD casts and discrete bottle sampling (temperature, salinity, oxygen, thermocline depth, carbonate saturation state) have spanned two complete seasonal upwelling-relaxation cycles. We present the results from these tows as well as preliminary models linking environmental drivers and foraminifera assemblages in this highly dynamic environment. Species abundances appear to be highly seasonal, in keeping with water column structure, with a seasonal upwelling to relaxation trade off between the non-spinose foraminifers Neogloboquadrina pachyderma and Neogloboquadrina incompta. We focus on the implications of species seasonality and hydrologic affinities to the interpretation of the fossil record in upwelling regions.

  13. Carbon and oxygen isotope time series records of planktonic and benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea: Implications on upwelling processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Niitsuma, N.

    hydrographic changes associated with summer monsoon upwelling process at the Oman Margin over the last 19 kyr. G. bulloides, P. obliquiloculata and U. excellens show sharp depleted delta super(18)O excursions around 9 ka, ascribed to the distribution of melt...

  14. SPOC Experiment: First Results From Seismological Studies Along the Central Chilean Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierer, P. O.; Tilmann, F.; Flueh, E. R.; Kopp, H.; Gossler, J.

    2002-12-01

    The investigations of the RV SONNE cruise SO161 during the SPOC experiment (Subduction Processes Off Chile) concentrated on the area of the central Chilean margin west off Valparaiso. The main goal of this experiment is to investigate the effects of subducting oceanic seafloor relief on the seismicity of this domain. A marine array of 23 ocean bottom hydrophones and seismometers (OBH/S) was deployed for a period of ten weeks to monitor local earthquakes from this part of the Chilean margin where volcanic structures like the aseismic Juan Fernandez Ridge enter the trench. A strong decrease in dip angle of the subducting plate (flat slab) is observed here, resulting in a segmentation of the margin. The flat slab segment correlates with the absence of Quaternary volcanism and a central valley on the South American plate. It is assumed that a connection between the buoyancy of thickened oceanic crust and the occurrence of shallow subduction earthquakes exists. We present preliminary results of hypocenter determinations, founded on about 300 localisable events based on the OBH/S recordings. The distribution of hypocenters shows a considerable seismic activity within the 15 km - 50 km depth range. The special focus on the transitional domain of the slope allowed us to map in detail the seaward termination of the seismogenic zone. In addition, we used seismological land data, recorded from the Central Chilean Network (CCN) and a number of temporary landstations to supplement the marine data set. Comparative and joint hypocenter analysis from both marine and land data, increases the precision of locations and allows an assessment of systematic errors. We can show the need of both, on- and offshore data sets, to determine offshore earthquake locations with high precision. The seismological investigations are in close collaboration with the active seismic studies carried out during the scope of the SPOC experiment.

  15. Insulin resistance in Chileans of European and indigenous descent: evidence for an ethnicity x environment interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Celis-Morales

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effects of urbanisation on diabetes risk appear to be greater in indigenous populations worldwide than in populations of European origin, but the reasons are unclear. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine whether the effects of environment (Rural vs. Urban, adiposity, fitness and lifestyle variables on insulin resistance differed between individuals of indigenous Mapuche origin compared to those of European origin in Chile. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 123 Rural Mapuche, 124 Urban Mapuche, 91 Rural European and 134 Urban European Chilean adults had blood taken for determination of HOMA-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA(IR and underwent assessment of physical activity/sedentary behaviour (using accelerometry, cardiorespiratory fitness, dietary intake and body composition. General linear models were used to determine interactions with ethnicity for key variables. There was a significant "ethnicity x environment" interaction for HOMA(IR (Mean±SD; Rural Mapuche: 1.65±2.03, Urban Mapuche: 4.90±3.05, Rural European: 0.82±0.61, Urban European: 1.55±1.34, p((interaction = 0.0003, such that the effect of urbanisation on HOMA(IR was greater in Mapuches than Europeans. In addition, there were significant interactions (all p<0.004 with ethnicity for effects of adiposity, sedentary time and physical activity on HOMA(IR, with greater effects seen in Mapuches compared to Europeans, an observation that persisted after adjustment for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Urbanisation, adiposity, physical activity and sedentary behaviour influence insulin resistance to a greater extent in Chilean Mapuches than Chileans of European descent. These findings have implications for the design and implementation of lifestyle strategies to reduce metabolic risk in different ethnic groups, and for understanding of the mechanisms underpinning human insulin resistance.

  16. Breaking patient confidentiality: comparing Chilean and French viewpoints regarding the conditions of its acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Olivari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the conditions under which lay people and health professionals living in Chile find it acceptable for a physician to break confidentiality to protect the wife of a patient with a sexually transmitted disease (STD. One hundred sixty-nine lay persons, 10 physicians, 17 psychologists, and 11 paramedical professionals indicated the acceptability of breaking confidentiality in 48 scenarios. The scenarios were all possible combinations of five factors: disease severity (severe, lethal; time taken to discuss this with the patient (little time, much time; patient’s intent to inform his spouse about the disease (none, one of these days, immediately; patient’s intent to adopt protective behaviors (no intent, intent; and physician’s decision to consult an STD expert (yes, no, 2 x 2 x 3 x 2 x 2. The study also compared Chilean and French views, using data gathered previously in France. A cluster analysis conducted on the overall set of raw data revealed groups of participants that found breaking confidentiality “always acceptable” (9%, requiring “consultation with an expert” (5%, “depending on the many circumstances” (70%, and “never acceptable” (11%”. Despite clear differences in legislation and official codes of ethics between their two countries, Chilean and French lay people did not differ much in their personal convictions regarding the circumstances in which patient confidentiality can be broken or must not be broken. By contrast, Chilean physicians, in agreement with their code of ethics, were much less supportive than French physicians of complete respect of patient confidentiality in all cases

  17. Oral disorders in Chilean rodeo horses submitted for dental evaluation between 2010 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Guerra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental disorders are common in horses. The objetive of the study was determined the frequency of dental problems in Chilean Rodeo Horses and described the most common dental treatments used in Chile. Oral examinations were performed on 456 Chilean rodeo horses and the disorders were observed as follows: Oral soft tissues, 259 horses (56% presented lacerations and/or ulcers. Regarding the first premolar, it was present in 32% of the horses, all maxillary positioned. In canines, 245 (54% were present and overlong tooth. Disorders found in incisors show supererupted (Tooth overlong in 147 (32%; ventral curvature in 116 (25%, nevertheless 102 (22% horses showed no abnormalities. About the diseases found in cheek teeth (premolars and molars, the more prevalent ones was enamel points in 426 (93%, rostral or caudal hooks in 354 (78%, and ramps in 231 (51%. Confidence intervals between all dental diseases found in the study showed no statistical significance when was analyzed for age or gender. When age groups were made, statistical significance appear X² Pearson (p=0,01, were mostly malocclusion type I was the more common in young, mature and geriatric horses. Other disorders such as problems at the time of eruption, development and periodontal disease are statiscally similar X² (p=0,07. About the treatments it is important to mention that in 453 (99% horses received odontoplasty and 147 (32% first premolar extraction. This study shows that Chilean rodeo horses have dental disorders similar to other horse breeds, except by small increase in soft tissue damage and incisors problems.

  18. Memory, Citizenship and the Public Sphere in the Development of the Recent Past in the Chilean Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Rubio

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The research gets into to the studies of historical memory by performing a hermeneutic analysis of the discourse of memory and history narratives that the Chilean public discussion has used to develop its dictatorial recent past in the period 1991-2004. Press sources, editorial inserts, interviews with the social and political actors and specially Truth and Reconciliation Reports were reviewed. We reflect on the current oligarchic long and short term frames made for the representation of the public sphere and the citizenship, emphasizing the impossibility of forgiveness as a restorative category of the political community.It consolidates the symbolic weakness of the recovered democracyin recent Chilean history.

  19. High-resolution climate of the past ∼7300 years of coastal northernmost California: Results from diatoms, silicoflagellates, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, John D.; Heusser, Linda E.; Addison, Jason A.; Alexander, Clark R.

    2017-01-01

    Piston core TN062-O550, collected about 33 km offshore of Eureka, California, contains a high-resolution record of the climate and oceanography of coastal northernmost California during the past ∼7.34 kyr. Chronology established by nine AMS ages on a combination of planktic foraminifers, bivalve shell fragments, and wood yields a mean sedimentation rate of 103 cm kyr−1. Marine proxies (diatoms and silicoflagellates) and pollen transported by the nearby Eel River reveal a stepwise development of both modern offshore surface water oceanography and coastal arboreal ecosystems. Beginning at ∼5.4 cal ka the relative abundance of coastal redwood pollen, a proxy for coastal fog, displays a two fold increase suggesting enhanced coastal upwelling. A decline in the relative contribution of subtropical diatoms at ∼5.0 cal ka implies cooling of sea surface temperatures (SSTs). At ∼3.6 cal ka an increase in the relative abundance of alder and oak at the expense of coastal redwood likely signals intensified riverine transport of pollen from inland environments. Cooler offshore SSTs and increased precipitation characterize the interval between ∼3.6 and 2.8 cal ka. A rapid, stepwise change in coastal climatology and oceanography occurs between ∼2.8 and 2.6 cal ka that suggests an enhanced expression of modern Pacific Decadal Oscillation-like (PDO) cycles. A three-fold increase in the relative abundance of the subtropical diatom Fragilariopsis doliolus at 2.8 cal ka appears to mark an abrupt warming of winter SSTs. Soon afterwards at 2.6 cal ka, a two fold increase in the relative abundance of coastal redwood pollen is suggestive of an abrupt intensification of spring upwelling. After ∼2.8 cal ka a sequence of cool-warm, PDO-like cycles occurs wherein cool cycles are characterized by relative abundance increases in coastal redwood pollen and decreased contributions of subtropical diatoms, whereas opposite proxy trends distinguish warm cycles.

  20. Free Trade Agreements and Firm-Product Markups in Chilean Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamorgese, A.R.; Linarello, A.; Warzynski, Frederic Michel Patrick

    In this paper, we use detailed information about firms' product portfolio to study how trade liberalization affects prices, markups and productivity. We document these effects using firm product level data in Chilean manufacturing following two major trade agreements with the EU and the US...... at the firm-product level. On average, adjustment on the profit margin does not appear to play a role. However, for more differentiated products, we find some evidence of an increase in markups, suggesting that firms do not fully pass-through increases in productivity on prices whenever they have enough...

  1. A chromosomal analysis of four species of Chilean Chrysomelinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Four species of Chilean leaf beetles in the subfamily Chrysomelinae have been cytogenetically analyzed, Blaptea elguetai Petitpierre, 2011, Henicotherus porteri Bréthes, 1929 and Jolivetia obscura (Philippi, 1864 show 2n = 28 chromosomes and a 13 + Xyp male meioformula, and Pataya nitida (Philippi, 1864 has the highest number of 2n = 38 chromosomes. The karyotype of H. porteri is made of mostly small meta/submetacentric chromosomes, and that of Jolivetia obscura displays striking procentric blocks of heterochromatin at pachytene autosomic bivalents using conventional staining. These findings are discussed in relation to previous cytogenetic data and current taxonomy of the subfamily.

  2. Genotypic characterization of Chilean llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) pestivirus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, I M; Fuentes, R; Celedón, M O

    2014-01-31

    Llamas and alpacas are domesticated South American camelids (SACs) important to ancestral population in the Altiplano region, and to different communities worldwide where they have been introduced. These ungulates have shown to be susceptible to several livestock viral pathogens such as members of the Pestivirus genus, in particular Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVDV), but there is little data available on Pestivirus infections in SACs. In this study we aimed to detect and identify Pestivirus genotypes and subgroups infecting SACs in both wild and confined environments. Samples were collected from 136 llamas and 30 alpacas from different areas in the Chilean Altiplano (wild animals), and from 22 llamas and 26 alpacas diagnosed as Pestivirus positive from the Metropolitana region in Chile (confined animals). Seroneutralization tests showed titers lower than 2 in all 166 samples from Chilean Altiplano. These samples were also negative to BVDV isolation, indicating that these animals have not been exposed to Pestivirus. After reactivation of positive samples from the Metropolitana region, the 5' non-codifying region (5'NCR) and E2 glycoprotein were amplified by RT-PCR from the Pestivirus genome. Viral sequences were pairwise compared and phylogenetic trees were constructed. The 5'NCR analysis showed that all 12 sequenced isolates belonged to BVDV-1. Of particular interest, isolates from eight llama and two alpaca were BVDV-1j and two alpacas were BVDV-1b. In agreement with these results, E2 phylogenetic analysis rendered a similar grouping indicating that all 16 isolates belong to BVDV-1. However, the lower availability of E2 sequences determines the creation of a smaller number of sub-groups than the 5'NCR sequences. Based on the E2 sequences, the 5'NCR BVDV 1j group consisting of all the llamas and 3 alpacas are completely included in the E2 BVDV 1e group. Due to the universal availability of the 5'NCR segment, we propose the classification of these Chilean llamas and

  3. Misconceptions of the p-value among Chilean and Italian Academic Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes-Ribera, Laura; Frias-Navarro, Dolores; Iotti, Bryan; Bonilla-Campos, Amparo; Longobardi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Common misconceptions of p-values are based on certain beliefs and attributions about the significance of the results. Thus, they affect the professionals' decisions and jeopardize the quality of interventions and the accumulation of valid scientific knowledge. We conducted a survey on 164 academic psychologists (134 Italian, 30 Chilean) questioned on this topic. Our findings are consistent with previous research and suggest that some participants do not know how to correctly interpret p-values. The inverse probability fallacy presents the greatest comprehension problems, followed by the replication fallacy. These results highlight the importance of the statistical re-education of researchers. Recommendations for improving statistical cognition are proposed. PMID:27602007

  4. Mano a Mano-Mujer: an effective HIV prevention intervention for Chilean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; Norr, Kathleen F; Miner, Sarah; Irarrazabal, Lisette; Bernales, Margarita; Peragallo, Nilda; Levy, Judith; Norr, James L; McElmurry, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    The impact of a professionally facilitated peer group intervention for HIV prevention among 400 low-income Chilean women was examined using a quasiexperimental design. At 3 months postintervention, the intervention group had higher HIV-related knowledge, more positive attitudes toward people living with HIV, fewer perceived condom use barriers, greater self- efficacy, higher HIV reduction behavioral intentions, more communication with partners about safer sex, and decreased depression symptoms. They did not, however, have increased condom use or self-esteem. More attention to gender barriers is needed. This intervention offers a model for reducing HIV for women in Chile and other Latin American countries.

  5. Border dimension of Chilean foreign policies: Immobility and urgency of new dynamics

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    Cristian Ovando Santana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The following article draws the priorities of border public policy that define the Chilean foreign policy. Through a theoretical framework from the rational–reflective approach of International Relations, we argue that despite of the increasing openness, internationalization of the country, and the emergence of new actors and subnational initiatives; the views and options between the actors of this new area and the definitions of foreign policy not always match. We propose the need to establish mechanisms that settle the positions among regional social–political actors, intermediate agencies and the central level.

  6. Chilean Student Movement of 2011 and their impact on citizen claims from the regionalist margins

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    Javier Ramos Galleguillos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant social conflicts in Chile in 2011, was the student movement, which together with various social actors, promoted the slogan of democracy and quality in public education. Under this argument, this paper aims to analyze and describe how the Chilean Student Movement started in 2011, triggers citizen empowerment against political and economic system in favor of a welfare state transverse to the different social sectors. We explore also the repercussions in this movement for the formulation of new demands from regionalist margins in order to interpret the growing discontent and need oriented organizational break with the inequality gap in Chile.

  7. [Attitudes regarding the delivery of formal and informal care: comparison of French and Chilean adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, J; Deschamps, J P; Romero, M I; Zubarew, T; Billot, L; Crema, D; Mouchtouris, A

    2002-12-01

    The representations that youth have of health professionals and young people's demands in terms of the operation and administration of services create an original and complex problematic. Clearly, this originality implies the important differences from one culture to another. For this very reason, it seemed that a comparative study relating the representations and attitudes confronted when care is sought by young people from countries with different cultural contexts would assist in comprehending why adolescents have such particular ways of using--or not using--formal and self-administered health services. An original open-ended response questionnaire was jointly designed and validated by a French and Chilean team. A mutually agreed upon sample of 957 school children, adolescents aged from 14 to 19, participated in the study in France and in Chili. The following correlations were found. In the event of a sleeping problem (or other general worry that is physically manifested), the mother is the privileged confidant, and in the specific case of a relationship or emotional problem, it is usually one of the adolescents' friends. The general practitioner is the favoured professional person in the event of a purely physical problem. When confronted with an emotional problem, one-third of adolescents say that they would not consider going to a consultation. The expectations of the French toward health professionals are more often within the "emotional" arena than those of the Chileans which generally concern the "medical/technical" field. The practice of self-administered care is qualitatively similar but the French prefer taking medication whereas the Chileans prefer the "little home remedies". The use of natural medicine is more widespread among young Chileans, but the types of medicine used are similar, namely herbal teas and other plant-based remedies and homeopathy. These results have a variety of implications, especially in terms of the need for training health

  8. Dynamics of the Cold Water Event off the Southeast Coast of the United States in the Summer of 2003: An Application of NASA's Remote Sensing Data to Coastal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dongliang; Savtchenko, Andrey; Li, Chunyan,

    2004-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments onboard of Terra and Aqua satellites provide, for the first time, concurrent measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean color, which are suitable for coastal upwelling studies. The accuracy, the 1-km spatial resolution, and the almost complete daily coverage of the MODIS data compared with historical measurements make it advantageous for resolving important coastal fronts of chlorophyll concentration and temperature. The cold SST anomaly during summer 2003 off the coast of the South Atlantic Bight is an event that is comprehensively covered by NASA's MODIS and SeaWinds satellite observations. These data combined with in situ tide gauge, mooring, and ship measurements can be used to identify important dynamics responsible for the anomalous cold water event. The analysis of the data suggests that coastal upwelling occurs in the climatological summer forced by the climatological southerlies over the South Atlantic Bight area in summer. However, the strong buoyancy barrier in summer prevents the cold water below the thermocline from reaching the ocean surface. In summer 2003, the southwesterlies in July through August were extraordinarily strong and persistent, which generated the upwelling currents strong enough to overcome the buoyancy resistance. The results of this analysis demonstrate the possibility of monitoring and forecasting the event using combination of the satellite and in situ observations. The MODIS data are archived and distributed by the NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data can be accessed via the URL http://wwv.daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/MODIS.

  9. Bleaching susceptibility and recovery of Colombian Caribbean corals in response to water current exposure and seasonal upwelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Pizarro, Valeria; Eidens, Corvin; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP) in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34%) compared to the exposed site (8%). Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs.

  10. Bleaching susceptibility and recovery of Colombian Caribbean corals in response to water current exposure and seasonal upwelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Bayraktarov

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events are globally occurring more frequently and with higher intensity, mainly caused by increases in seawater temperature. In Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP in the Colombian Caribbean, local coral communities are subjected to seasonal wind-triggered upwelling events coinciding with stronger water currents depending on location. This natural phenomenon offers the unique opportunity to study potential water current-induced mitigation mechanisms of coral bleaching in an upwelling influenced region. Therefore, coral bleaching susceptibility and recovery patterns were compared during a moderate and a mild bleaching event in December 2010 and 2011, and at the end of the subsequent upwelling periods at a water current-exposed and -sheltered site of an exemplary bay using permanent transect and labeling tools. This was accompanied by parallel monitoring of key environmental variables. Findings revealed that in 2010 overall coral bleaching before upwelling was significantly higher at the sheltered (34% compared to the exposed site (8%. Whereas 97% of all previously bleached corals at the water current-exposed site had recovered from bleaching by April 2011, only 77% recovered at the sheltered site, but 12% had died there. In December 2011, only mild bleaching (<10% at both sites was observed, but corals recovered significantly at both sites in the course of upwelling. No differences in water temperatures between sites occurred, but water current exposure and turbidity were significantly higher at the exposed site, suggesting that these variables may be responsible for the observed site-specific mitigation of coral bleaching. This indicates the existence of local resilience patterns against coral bleaching in Caribbean reefs.

  11. Climatic Impacts and resilience of coastal ecosystems and fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, F.

    2012-12-01

    Marine and coastal ecosystems and human communities around the world are impacted by local anthropogenic pressures and by climate change, resulting in decreased ocean productivity, altered food web dynamics, habitat degradation, economic losses, and health and safety risks as a consequence of the changing and more variable climate. Climatic impacts occur both through altered physical conditions and variability, e.g., seawater temperature and sea level, and through a suite of chemical changes, including ocean acidification and hypoxia. In particular, time series analyses have highlighted declines in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the ocean over the last several decades. In addition to these global trends of decreasing DO, hypoxic conditions have been documented at several coastal locations within productive upwelling-driven ecosystems, including the California Current region, resulting in high mortality of ecologically and commercially important nearshore marine species and significant economic losses. The capacity of local ecosystems and associated human communities to adapt to these pressures depends on their resilience, that is the ability of ecosystems to absorb disturbance while retaining function and continuing to provide ecosystem services, and the ability of people to adapt to change in their environment by altering their behaviors and interactions. I will present global assessments of the cumulative impacts of climatic and local anthropogenic pressures on marine ecosystems, and results of interdisciplinary research investigating the current impacts of climate change on coastal marine ecosystems and human communities of the Pacific coast of Baja California, Mexico, and the influences of local and global feedbacks on the resilience and adaptive capacity of these systems.

  12. Neotropical coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.; Batzer, Darold P.; Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropical region, which includes the tropical Americas, is one of the world's eight biogeographic zones. It contains some of the most diverse and unique wetlands in the world, some of which are still relatively undisturbed by humans. This chapter focuses on the northern segment of the Neotropics (south Florida, the Caribbean islands, Mexico, and Central America), an area that spans a latitudinal gradient from about 7 N to 29 N and 60 W to 112 W. Examples of coastal wetlands in this realm include the Everglades (Florida, USA), Ten Thousand Islands (Florida, USA), Laguna de Terminos (Mexico), Twin Cays (Belize), and Zapata Swamp (Cuba). Coastal wetlands are dominated by mangroves, which will be emphasized here, but also include freshwater swamps and marshes, saline marshes, and seagrass beds. The aim of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of Neotropical coastal wetlands of the North American continent, with an emphasis on mangroves, since this is the dominant vegetation type and because in-depth coverage of all wetland types is impossible here. Instead, the goal is to describe the environmental settings, plant and animal communities, key ecological controls, and some conservation concerns, with specific examples. Because this book deals with wetlands of North America, this chapter excludes coastal wetlands of South America. However, much of the information is applicable to mangrove, marsh, and seagrass communities of other tropicaI regions.

  13. Recife: Coastal protection plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kibrit, B.; Imambaks, R.; Anijs, M.; Tarigheh, A.S.; Mungar, S.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decades the north-eastern coast of Brazil has been degrading due to erosion. This degradation has both natural- and men-made causes. Brazil has no specific laws and acts which relate to coastal protection and management up to this date. Beaches in the metropolitan area of Recife show v

  14. Environmental Impacts - Coastal Ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.; Baas, Andreas C.W.; Bartholdy, Jesper; Jones, Laurence; Ruessink, B.G.; Temmerman, Stijn; van de Pol, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the impacts of climate change on the natural coastal ecosystems in the North Sea region. These comprise sandy shores and dunes and salt marshes in estuaries and along the coast. The chapter starts by describing the characteristic geomorphological features of these systems and t

  15. Dietary habits and normal body mass index association in Chilean soldiers

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    Samuel Durán-Agüero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eating habits of various age and professional groups has been evaluated. However, there is little information on the dietary habits of soldiers. The aim of this study is to associate eating habits with the normal body mass index (BMI in Chilean soldiers from Buin Regiment. Material and Methods: 412 soldiers were evaluated. Food survey and anthropometric evaluation was applied to each soldier. It was considered a normal BMI when the subject was between 18.5-24.9kg/m2, overweight between 25.0-29.9kg/m2 and obesity ≥30.0kg/m2, according to the WHO recommendations. Results: 41.2% of the soldiers show a normal BMI, 43.1% present overweight and 15.7% exhibit obesity. Only 5% meet the dairy and fruit Chilean recommendations, however almost 40% of them consume 1time/day (OR:0.41; IC95%:0.19-0.88 and legume consumption (>1time/week (OR:0.29; IC95%:0.14-0.60. Conclusions: A low consumption of dairy products, fruits, vegetables and legumes is noted, and a high consumption of sweetened beverages. In addition, intake of dairy products and legumes is related with a normal BMI.

  16. Synaptic effects of low molecular weight components from Chilean Black Widow spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Jorge; Romero, Fernando

    2008-11-01

    alpha-Latrotoxin is the principal component of the venom from the euroasiatic Black Widow spider and has been studied for its pharmacological use as a synaptic modulator. Interestingly, smaller molecular weight fractions have been found to be associated with this toxin, but their cellular actions have not been studied in detail. The venom from the Chilean Black Widow spider (Latrodectus mactans) does not produce alpha-latrotoxin, however it does contain several small polypeptides. We have recently demonstrated cellular effects of these peptides at the synaptic level using whole-cell patch clamp techniques. Purified venom from the glands of L. mactans was studied in 12 DIV rat hippocampal neuronal cultures. Venom at a concentration of 10nM was able to decrease neuronal conductance thereby increasing membrane resistance. This effect on the passive properties of the neurons induced a change in action potential kinetics simulating the action of classic potassium channel blockers. These changes produced an increase in spontaneous synaptic activity in rat hippocampal cultures in the presence of the venom in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These results indicate that venom from Chilean spider L. mactans is capable of increasing cell membrane resistance, prolonging the action potential and generating an increase in synaptic activity demonstrating an interesting pharmacological effect of these low molecular weight fragments.

  17. Associations between different components of fitness and fatness with academic performance in Chilean youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the associations between different components of fitness and fatness with academic performance, adjusting the analysis by sex, age, socio-economic status, region and school type in a Chilean sample. Methods Data of fitness, fatness and academic performance was obtained from the Chilean System for the Assessment of Educational Quality test for eighth grade in 2011 and includes a sample of 18,746 subjects (49% females). Partial correlations adjusted by confounders were done to explore association between fitness and fatness components, and between the academic scores. Three unadjusted and adjusted linear regression models were done in order to analyze the associations of variables. Results Fatness has a negative association with academic performance when Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist to Height Ratio (WHR) are assessed independently. When BMI and WHR are assessed jointly and adjusted by cofounders, WHR is more associated with academic performance than BMI, and only the association of WHR is positive. For fitness components, strength was the variable most associated with the academic performance. Cardiorespiratory capacity was not associated with academic performance if fatness and other fitness components are included in the model. Conclusions Fitness and fatness are associated with academic performance. WHR and strength are more related with academic performance than BMI and cardiorespiratory capacity. PMID:27761345

  18. The Epidemiology of Sleep Quality and Consumption of Stimulant Beverages among Patagonian Chilean College Students

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    Juan Carlos Vélez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 To assess sleep patterns and parameters of sleep quality among Chilean college students and (2 to evaluate the extent to which stimulant beverage use and other lifestyle characteristics are associated with poor sleep quality. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among college students in Patagonia, Chile. Students were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire to provide information about lifestyle and demographic characteristics. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI was used to evaluate sleep quality. In addition, students underwent a physical examination to collect anthropometric measurements. Results. More than half of students (51.8% exhibited poor sleep quality. Approximately 45% of study participants reported sleeping six hours or less per night and 9.8% used medications for sleep. In multivariate analysis, current smokers had significantly greater daytime dysfunction due to sleepiness and were more likely to use sleep medicines. Students who reported consumption of any stimulant beverage were 1.81 times as likely to have poor sleep quality compared with those who did not consume stimulant beverages (OR:1.81, 95% CI:1.21–2.00. Conclusions. Poor sleep quality is prevalent among Chilean college students, and stimulant beverage consumption was associated with the increased odds of poor sleep quality in this sample.

  19. METABOLIC SYNDROME AND PHYSICA L ACTIVITY IN CHILEAN IMMIGRANTS LIVING IN RIO GALLEGOS, SANTA CRUZ, ARGENTINA

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    Inger Sally Padilla

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To study the frequencyof metabolic syndrome, its components and its relationshipwithphysical activityin Chilean immigrants living inRío Gallegos, SantaCruz, Argentina.314 Chilean immigrants (165womenand 149men were interviewed in RioGallegos in2010,with healthy status in medical records(2000.Anthropometry,blood pressurecontrol,blood testto measureglucose,triglycerides andHDL cholesterol weredetermined.Metabolic syndromewasestablished bycriteria of theNCEPATPIII.Themetabolic syndromehad anoverall prevalenceof 28.9% (95%CI: 23.9 to 34.Metabolicsyndromeprevalence was larger in women(32.1%than in men(25.5%.The prevalence ofits componentswere:abdominalobesity56%,low levels ofHDL cholesterol 48.3%, highlevels of triglycerides68.1%,hypertension46.1%and high levels of glucose 72.5%.Inadequate physical activitywas 66.2% (95%CI:60.1 to 71.5.Immigrantshadmorelikelihoodof metabolic syndromeliving in Río Gallegos for 15 yearsormore(β:5.74,95%CI:2,81-11,73,p=0.000and withinadequate physical activity(β:3.36,95%CI:1.57to7.21,p=0.002.The prevalenceof metabolic syndrome inChileanimmigrantsliving in RíoGallegosis higherthan that reportedin Argentina andChile.

  20. Depressed mood and speech in Chilean mothers of 5½-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Katy M; Su, Jing; Kaciroti, Niko; Castillo, Marcela; Millan, Rebeca; Rule, Heather; Lozoff, Besty

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on maternal speech and depression has focused almost exclusively on how depressed mothers talk to their infants and toddlers in the U.S. and U.K., two English-speaking countries. This study considered how depressed Spanish-speaking mothers from a Latin American country talk about their preschool-age children. Five-minute speech samples were provided by 178 Chilean mothers who were asked to talk about their 5½-year-old children to a project psychologist. Maternal depressive symptomatology was measured by the Spanish-language version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). In multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), higher maternal depressed mood showed statistically significant associations with the following maternal speech characteristics: more criticisms, less laughter, fewer medium pauses, less positive satisfaction with the child's behavior or characteristics, a rating of a negative overall relationship with the child, and more crying (suggestive trend). A structural equation model confirmed these findings and found an indirect effect between laughter and criticisms: mothers with higher depressed mood who laughed less criticized their children less. The findings illustrate that depressed mood adversely affects how a group of Chilean mothers speak about their children.