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Sample records for childhood leukaemia fallon

  1. Childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The debate on whether there is any link between leukaemia clusters and nuclear installations has been raging since the early eighties. A Government Inquiry found no link between childhood leukaemia and residence near Seascale, an area near British Nuclear Fuels Sellafield plant. Research in the 1980s linked childhood leukaemia to fathers' occupations prior to conception in the Seascale plant but also to workers in the iron, steel, farming and chemical industries. This article reviews research findings to date. (UK)

  2. Indoor radon and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the epidemiological literature on domestic exposure to radon and risk for childhood leukaemia. The results of 12 ecological studies show a consistent pattern of higher incidence and mortality rates for childhood leukaemia in areas with higher average indoor radon concentrations. Although the results of such studies are useful to generate hypotheses, they must be interpreted with caution, as the data were aggregated and analysed for geographical areas and not for individuals. The seven available case - control studies of childhood leukaemia with measurement of radon concentrations in the residences of cases and controls gave mixed results, however, with some indication of a weak (relative risk < 2) association with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The epidemiological evidence to date suggests that an association between indoor exposure to radon and childhood leukaemia might exist, but is weak. More case - control studies are needed, with sufficient statistical power to detect weak associations and based on designs and methods that minimise misclassification of exposure and provide a high participation rate and low potential selection bias. (authors)

  3. Childhood leukaemia in Wessex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following claims by an anti-nuclear group that there is an excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children in Dorset the incidence and geographical distribution of the disease was studied in Dorset, Hampshire and Wiltshire. In large urban centres there is a gradient of incidence from lowest in urban centres to highest in surrounding commuter communities and in the smaller towns the distribution tends to be peripheral. The widespread pattern makes it unlikely that the explanation lies with the presence of the Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith. Three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia have occurred in the vicinity of Winfrith in the past 30 years: the expected number was 2.4. No abnormal levels of radiation were found in association with the occurrence of leukaemia, nor was there any association between leukaemia and water supplies. The temporal distribution of incidence in Dorset shows a peak of incidence in 1980/81 with a subsequent decline, and data for Wiltshire and Hampshire suggest a similar pattern there, with a peak of incidence in 1979. (author)

  4. Childhood leukaemia around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 2007 the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) published a report on the incidence of childhood cancers among children living in the vicinity of 16 German nuclear power plants. The results show a significantly enhanced risk of leukaemia in children aged below 5 years, who live within 5 km from a nuclear power plant. The study is known as KiKK (Epidemiologische Studie zu Kinderkrebs in der Umgebung von Kernkraftwerken) and stirred considerable concern about the safety of nuclear installations. In this review we summarise the present state-of-the art regarding childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations and present the main results of the KiKK study with a critical evaluation

  5. Childhood leukaemia around nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcik, Andrzej (Centre for Radiation Protection Research, GMT Dept., Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)); Feychting, Maria (Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    In December 2007 the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) published a report on the incidence of childhood cancers among children living in the vicinity of 16 German nuclear power plants. The results show a significantly enhanced risk of leukaemia in children aged below 5 years, who live within 5 km from a nuclear power plant. The study is known as KiKK (Epidemiologische Studie zu Kinderkrebs in der Umgebung von Kernkraftwerken) and stirred considerable concern about the safety of nuclear installations. In this review we summarise the present state-of-the art regarding childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations and present the main results of the KiKK study with a critical evaluation

  6. Nuclear power and childhood leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimston, M. (AEA Technology, London (UK))

    1991-06-19

    The possibility of illness caused by exposure to emissions from nuclear power plants continues to raise enormous public concern. Nowhere is this more evident than in the debate over the aetiology of childhood leukaemias. This review explores the evidence in relation to this and other diseases which are linked in the public's mind to nuclear power. The scientific evidence presented suggests that these links are more tenuous than is commonly believed. (author).

  7. Childhood leukaemia in Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to professional and public concern about health consequences, in particular cancer risk, from previous and current levels of ionising radiation in the Irish Sea, a study of incidence and mortality from acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) and other lymphoid malignancies in children was undertaken. Overall rates were similar to those found in other western populations and distribution of high rates was quite random over the country as a whole. There was a small but significant excess in incidence of ALL for the years 1974-76 in a narrow three mile strip along the east coast. it is not possible in the context of this study to postulate aetiological factors which might explain this finding. (author)

  8. Childhood leukaemia and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been considerable scientific and media interest in the question of whether the risk of childhood leukemia is raised near nuclear facilities, and, if so, the reasons why. Serious consideration of this issue was initiated by a media report of an unusually large number of cases around the Sellafield installation in England, and reports of excess cases in the vicinity of other facilities in Britain have followed. Detailed radiological assessments have demonstrated that radioactive discharges are most unlikely to have been the cause of these reported excess cases, seemingly contradicting the epidemiological evidence. However, epidemiology is an observational (non-experimental) science, and the results of such studies must be interpreted with considerable care. The influence of prior knowledge of data upon the structure of a study has been a particular inferential problem. Furthermore, there are indications that non-radiological factors may be important in communities near nuclear facilities. Recently, a study has shown an association between childhood leukaemia cases near Sellafield and the recorded occupational radiation doses received by fathers before the conception of these children; but this novel finding has received little independent scientific support. At present, the British childhood leukaemia findings have not been replicated in studies based in other countries, and the reasons for the reported case excesses around British nuclear facilities remain unclear

  9. Childhood leukaemia clusters around Sellafield and Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983, a television programme identified a striking cluster of childhood leukaemia in the coastal village of Seascale, adjacent to the Sellafield nuclear complex in England. Excesses of childhood leukaemia near certain other nuclear installations in Britain were later reported during the 1980s, notably a cluster in west Thurso near Dounreay in Scotland. Detailed radiological investigations demonstrated that radiation exposures from discharged radioactive material were most unlikely to be the cause of these excesses and no serious deficiencies in these assessments have been discovered despite exhaustive searches. In 1990, a report was published suggesting that occupational radiation exposure of men before the conception of their children could be responsible for the Seascale cluster. Extensive research has not supported a causal link between paternal preconceptional radiation dose and childhood leukaemia, and the idea that radiation exposure of fathers materially increases the risk of leukaemia in offspring and could account for the clusters has now effectively been abandoned. In contrast, evidence has mounted that childhood leukaemia has an infectious basis and that unusual population mixing increases the risk of the disease. It now seems that population mixing is the explanation for the excesses of childhood leukaemia near nuclear sites and at other locations with no enhanced exposure to radiation. (author)

  10. Causes of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childhood cancer is rare comprising less than 1% of all malignancies diagnosed each year in developed countries. Leukaemia is the commonest form of cancer in children accounting for around a third of all childhood cancer, with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) being the most prevalent. Biologically specific subtypes of ALL and acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML), the other major morphological type of childhood leukaemia, are characterised by chromosomal changes. Whilst over 200 genes have been associated with chromosomal translocations, to date, only MLL, TEL, and AML1 have been linked with childhood leukaemia. Interestingly, there is increasing evidence to support the theory that gene rearrangements such as these may originate in utero. As with many other human diseases, both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the aetiology of the disease. Although much has been documented with regard to diet, smoking, alcohol consumption and recreational and prescription drug use during pregnancy, there is no consistent evidence to support a link with any of these factors and childhood leukaemia. However, findings from studies investigating prenatal and early life exposures are often based on small numbers of cases as both the type of cancer and exposure are rare. Furthermore, accurate information relating to past exposures can be difficult to obtain and is often reliant on self-reporting. To further our understanding of the aetiology of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma, there are areas which clearly warrant investigation. These include collection of parental dietary folate data combined with genetic analysis of the folate related genes, in utero exposure to DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors, and the possible effects of assisted reproduction technology on disease susceptibility

  11. An investigation into childhood leukaemia in Northamptonshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been written specifically for the families of children who have had leukaemia in Northamptonshire. It gives the Health Authority's answers to the questions and worries that they raised at a meeting we had on 22nd September 1995. The report will also be circulated to other people who have been concerned by this problem and will, therefore, include some background information as well. The report thus has several different purposes: to give a brief summary of what is known about leukaemia and its causes; to explain the implications of having five cases of childhood leukaemia in a small area over a number of years; to let people know what Northamptonshire Health Authority has done in response to their concerns; to explain why a local epidemiological study of these cases could not tell us what caused leukaemia in the affected children; to reassure residents in the Pembroke Road area that we have found no reason to be concerned that their children are at an increased risk of developing leukaemia; to give information to the families about the current scientific evidence on the relationship between several potential environmental hazards they have identified and childhood leukaemia; to let people know that the important questions about what causes leukaemia in children are being addressed in several important and well-designed scientific studies. We hope that this report can be understood by people who are not familiar with medical jargon. Sometimes it has been necessary to use medical and technical terms, so at the back of this report there is a glossary which gives the meaning of any medical terms used

  12. Residential exposures to pesticides and childhood leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Like many chemicals, carcinogenicity of pesticides is poorly characterised in humans, especially in children, so that the present knowledge about childhood leukaemia risk derives primarily from epidemiological studies. Overall, case–control studies published in the last decade have reported positive associations with home use of insecticides, mostly before the child's birth, while findings for herbicides are mixed. Previous studies relied solely on self-reports, therefore lacking information ...

  13. Residential exposures to pesticides and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Like many chemicals, carcinogenicity of pesticides is poorly characterised in humans, especially in children, so that the present knowledge about childhood leukaemia risk derives primarily from epidemiological studies. Overall, case-control studies published in the last decade have reported positive associations with home use of insecticides, mostly before the child's birth, while findings for herbicides are mixed. Previous studies relied solely on self-reports, therefore lacking information on active ingredients and effects of potential recall bias. Few series to date have examined the influence of children's genetic susceptibility related to transport and metabolism of pesticides. To overcome these limitations, investigators of the Northern California Childhood Leukaemia Study (NCCLS) have undertaken, in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team, a comprehensive assessment of residential pesticide exposure, including: (1) quality control of self-reports; (2) home pesticide inventory and linkage to the Environmental Protection Agency to obtain data on active ingredients; (3) collection and laboratory analyses of ∼600 home dust samples for over 60 pesticides and (4) geographic information studies using California environmental databases to assess exposure to agricultural pesticides. The NCCLS is also conducting large-scale geno-typing to evaluate the role of genes in xenobiotic pathways relevant to the transport and metabolism of pesticides. A better quantification of children's exposures to pesticides at home is critical to the evaluation of childhood leukaemia risk, especially for future gene-environment interaction studies. (authors)

  14. Childhood leukaemia and socioeconomic status: What is the evidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this systematic review are to summarise the current literature on socioeconomic status (SES) and the risk of childhood leukaemia, to highlight methodological problems and formulate recommendations for future research. Starting from the systematic review of Poole et al. (Socioeconomic status and childhood leukaemia: a review. Int. J. Epidemiol. 2006;35(2):370-384.), an electronic literature search was performed covering August 2002-April 2008. It showed that (1) the results are heterogeneous, with no clear evidence to support a relation between SES and childhood leukaemia; (2) a number of factors, most importantly selection bias, might explain inconsistencies between studies; (3) there is some support for an association between SES at birth (rather than later in childhood) and childhood leukaemia and (4) if there are any associations, these are weak, limited to the most extreme SES groups (the 10-20% most or least deprived). This makes it unlikely that they would act as strong confounders in research addressing associations between other exposures and childhood leukaemia. Future research should minimise case and control selection bias, distinguish between different SES measures and leukaemia subtypes and consider timing of exposures and cancer outcomes. (authors)

  15. Aetiology of childhood acute leukaemias: Current status of knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute leukaemia is a consequence of malignant transformation of a haematopoietic progenitor cell. Molecular studies have revealed a prenatal origin of many childhood leukaemias. According to current models, a pre-leukaemic stem cell clone is generated by a first mutation in utero which, in a minority of children, progresses to leukaemia after receiving further postnatal genetic hits. The nature of pre- and postnatal events involved in leukemogenesis in children is not well understood. Although genetic predisposition and specific environmental exposures may account for individual cases, the bulk of childhood leukaemia cannot be explained by any of these factors. The higher incidence of the most common leukaemia subtype in affluent societies, as well as the age peak between 2-5 y, suggest a contributory role of socioeconomic factors. An abnormal immune response during delayed exposure to common infections provides a plausible mechanism for malignant progression of pre-leukaemic clones in a subgroup of children. As highlighted in this review, a common cause for all types and subtypes of childhood leukaemia is highly unlikely. Deeper insights into the pathogenesis of childhood leukaemia will rely on large-scale and combined epidemiological and bio-molecular studies. (authors)

  16. Fallout, radiation doses near Dounreay, and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible explanations for the recently reported increased incidence of childhood leukaemia around Dounreay were examined in the light of changes in the national incidence of leukaemia that occurred during the period of exposure to fallout from international testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere. It was concluded that the increase could not be accounted for by underestimate of the risk of leukaemia per unit dose of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, nor by underestimate of the relative biological efficiency of high compared with low linear energy transfer radiation. One possible explanation was underestimation of doses to the red bone marrow due to the discharges at Dounreay relative to dose from fallout, though investigation of ways in which this might have occurred did not suggest anything definite. Other explanations included a misconception of the site of origin of childhood leukaemia, outbreaks of an infectious disease and exposure to other, unidentified environmental agents. These findings weigh against the hypothesis that the recent increase in childhood leukaemia near Dounreay might be accounted for by radioactive discharges from nuclear plants, unless the doses to the stem cells from which childhood leukaemia originates have been grossly underestimated. (author)

  17. Childhood leukaemia, fallout and radiation doses near Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible explanations of the recently reported increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia around Dounreay are examined in the light of the changes in national leukaemia incidence that occurred during the period of exposure to fallout from international atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. It is concluded that the increase cannot be due to underestimation of the risk of leukaemia per unit dose of radiation, nor to an underestimate of the relative biological efficiency of high as compared with low LET radiation. Possible explanations of the increase include an underestimate of the red bone marrow doses due to the Dounreay discharges relative to those from fallout, a misconception of the site of origin of childhood leukaemia, epidemics of infectious disease and exposure to some other unidentified environmental agent. (author)

  18. Cluster of childhood leukaemia in Elbmarsch, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cluster of leukaemia cases in the four villages making up the community of Elbmarsch occurred within less than 24 months. Five children and one young adult were taken ill with leukaemia and one child with aplastic anemia, which can develop into leukaemia. During the search for possible causes, all of the known exogenic risk factors, especially of a chemical and pharmacological nature, were investigated. 1 ref., 3 figs, 1 tab

  19. An analysis of childhood leukaemia and natural radiation in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following claims that indoor radon may be responsible for a significant proportion of leukaemia cases, a correlation study has been performed of childhood leukaemia and levels of natural radiation in small areas throughout Britain. Analysis at the district level showed no statistically significant results. Based on larger geographical areas (counties) there were indications of a statistically significant positive trend in the leukaemia risk with indoor radon level and of a significant negative trend with indoor gamma level, under an analysis that included radon and gamma terms simultaneously. However, these trends were reversed (but were not significant) for an analysis at the district level adjusted for county. This discrepancy could not be explained by random errors in the measurement of natural radiation levels, and seems likely to have been caused by confounding factors affecting the analysis based on larger areas (counties). Consequently this study does not support the claims of a measurable link between radon exposure and leukaemia. (author)

  20. Childhood leukaemia in Romania and the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the WHO recommendations, we focused our study on short-term consequence of the Chernobyl accident on childhood leukaemia. The present study was designed to show whether the frequency of leukaemia has increased during the time period following the nuclear accident. We studied the frequency of childhood leukaemia, its geographical distribution in Romania, and the possible changes of this distribution after the Chernobyl accident. For the period before the accident (1981-1985), the distribution of the cumulative mortality from leukaemia is shown. The mortality for the entire country was 13.54/100,000 for all age-groups (14.92 for the 0-4 years old age group, 15.68 for the 5-9, and 10.13 for 10-14). After the Chernobyl accident, the geographical distribution of cumulative mortality from childhood leukaemia has somewhat changed. The rate for the entire country was 13.24/100,000 (13.72 for 0-4 years old, 16.64 for 5-9 years old, and 9.83 for 10-14 years old). Four districts showed a greater increase of the mortality rate. The age distribution of the mortality in these districts during the two time periods, is shown. (author)

  1. Statistical frequency of childhood leukaemia-clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based upon the Poisson statistics we have estimated the probability for statistically significant accumulations (clusters) of leukaemia diseases in children. Considering the distribution of the time intervals between succeeding events we have found that in larger countries with some 107 inhabitants there is to be expected an average of one or more leukaemia clusters with an exceptionally high frequency of diseases of e.g. 5 or more cases of leukaemia in communities with som 100 children within a relatively short period of one or a few years. This frequency of diseases is much greater than the expectation value. The probability for at least one such cluster to occur within a follow-up period of approximately 10 years is >0.5. As examples we have analyzed the leukaemia clusters observed in children in Elbmarsch, in Seascale near Sellafield and in Scotland. The occurence of clusters of leukaemia can be statistically explained in principle but the possible existence of specific causes for the emergence of leukaemia clusters cannot be excluded by statistical considerations. (orig.)

  2. Variable detection of myeloid antigens in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, M R; Thomas, L; Reid, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To determine whether the use of different sources of anti-CD13 and anti-CD33 monoclonal antibodies leads to discrepant results in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), which might contribute to the wide variation in the reported incidence of myeloid antigen expressing ALL in childhood. METHODS--Stored leukaemic cells from 10 children with previously defined myeloid positive ALL were examined. A range of commercially available anti-CD13 and anti-CD33 monoclonal antibodies, direc...

  3. Maternal and birth characteristics in relation to childhood leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podvin, Danise; Kuehn, Carrie M; Mueller, Beth A; Williams, Michelle

    2006-07-01

    Our objective was to investigate the association of childhood leukaemia with selected maternal and birth characteristics by conducting a population-based case-control study using linked cancer registry and birth certificate records for Washington State. We compared maternal and infant characteristics of 595 Washington-born residents neonatal jaundice (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.1, 2.1), and Down's syndrome (OR 31.3; 95% CI 6.4, 153.4) were associated with an increased risk of leukaemia. Among women with 2+ pregnancies, having at least two prior early (knowledge of inherent and possibly prenatal influences on the occurrence of this disease. PMID:16879503

  4. Are maternal fertility problems related to childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted in the Netherlands, from a nationwide register of childhood leukaemia (1973-1980). Controls were matched with cases for year of birth, sex and place of residence. Information about exposures of the mother to potential risk factors in the year before and during pregnancy was collected via mailed questionnaires. Analyses concerned data on 519 patients with acute lymphocytic leukaemia and 507 controls. An association between maternal subfertility and childhood leukaemia might be suggested by several findings. A history of two or more miscarriages (OR 1.6; 95% Cl 1.0-2.7) and fertility problems (OR 6.0; 95% Cl 0.9-38.2) were more frequently reported among mothers of cases. Use of oral contraceptives (OC) was significantly higher (OR 1.3; 95% Cl 1.0-1.8) and the duration between discontinuation of OC and the relevant pregnancy was significantly longer. The OR for threatened abortion during the relevant pregnancy was 1.6 (95% Cl 1.0-2.6) and the related use of 'drugs to maintain pregnancy' was 1.9; 95% Cl 1.0-3.5. Among known risk factors, an increased OR for diagnostic irradiation was confirmed (OR 2.2; 95% Cl 1.2-3.8). No association between childhood leukaemia and prenatal viral infections, smoking and alcohol was found. (author)

  5. Studies on power frequency magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1979 an epidemiological study in Denver, Colorado by Wertheimer and Leeper reported an excess incidence of leukaemia in children residing near high- current configurations, i.e. power lines, transformers and other devices characterised by a high electrical current. Since then, a large number of epidemiological studies have been conducted investigating a range of diseases and exposure conditions to further investigate this unexpected result. The most intensive epidemiological effort has focused on residential power frequency magnetic field exposure and childhood malignancy, especially leukaemia. To date, more than 25 epidemiological studies in different countries have investigated this topic, with significant improvements in study designs and methods of exposure assessment over time. Early research focused on quantifying magnetic field exposure by electrical wiring configurations (wire codes) and determining whether these were accurate surrogates for exposure. Later research used other exposure assessment methods including distance between power lines and residences and historical calculation of magnetic field levels. More recently, studies have used direct measurements to quantify exposure including residential area measurements (either spot-measurements or long-term averages, 24- or 48- hour) and personal exposure measurements. Although there has been variation in the results of individual studies the overall pattern of results is suggestive of an association between childhood leukaemia and the top percentiles of magnetic field exposure. However, it cannot be ruled out that these associations are caused by bias or confounding. A history of epidemiological studies on power frequency magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia will be presented highlighting the methodological evolution in the studies.

  6. The risk of childhood leukaemia near nuclear establishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childhood leukaemia has been reported to be increased in communities living near a number of nuclear sites in the United Kingdom. The National Radiological Protection Board has, over the last three and a half years, published the results of a series of studies giving radiation doses and risks calculated for some of these populations. The studies have all indicated that it is most unlikely that radiation doses arising from releases of radioactive materials into the environment could have contributed to any increase in the leukaemia incidence in local communities. In the absence of any other obvious causative agent, however, there remains some concern that the radiation doses and risks of leukaemia have been underestimated. This report, therefore, summarises the methods used in the analyses by the Board, examines possible sources of uncertainty in the calculations, and considers the extent to which more information is required. (author)

  7. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prompted by findings of increased occurrence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of some nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom, this study aimed to investigate whether the frequency of leukaemia among children born to mothers living near nuclear facilities in Ontario differed from the provincial average. The Ontario Cancer Registry was used to identify 1894 children aged 0 to 14 years who died from leukaemia between 1950 and 1987, and 1814 children who were diagnosed with leukaemia between 1964 and 1986. Residence at birth and death was obtained from birth and death certificates. Analyses were performed separately for nuclear research and development facilities; uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; and, nuclear generating stations; and for areas within the same county as the facility and 'nearby' - within a 25-km radius of the facility. Risk estimates were calculated as the ratio of the observed (O) number of events over the expected (E) number. In the vicinity of nuclear research and development facilities the rate of leukaemia was less than expected and within the bound of chance variation. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities and nuclear power plants leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected, but due to small frequencies these differences may have arisen due to chance. Large differences between observed and expected rates were not detected around any of the Ontario facilities. This study was large enough to detect excess risks of the magnitude reported in the United Kingdom, but it was not large enough to discriminate between the observed relative risks and a chance finding. Levels of leukaemia detected near nuclear generating stations indicate the need for further investigation. (20 tabs., 15 figs., 32 refs.)

  8. Higher risk for acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia in Swedish population centres 1973-94

    OpenAIRE

    Hjalmars, U; G. Gustafsson; . .

    1999-01-01

    A population-based sample of acute childhood leukaemia cases in Sweden 1973–94 was analysed by a geographical information system (GIS) for spatial leukaemia distribution in relation to population density. The annual incidence rate for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 3.6, and for acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia (ANLL) 0.7, cases per 100 000 children. Incidence rates in population centres, constituting 1.3% of Sweden's land area and approximately 80% of the population, compared with t...

  9. Probability estimates for the unique childhood leukemia cluster in Fallon, Nevada, and risks near other U.S. Military aviation facilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmaus, Craig; Lu, Meng; Todd, Randall L; Smith, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    A unique cluster of childhood leukemia has recently occurred around the city of Fallon in Churchill County, Nevada. From 1999 to 2001, 11 cases were diagnosed in this county of 23,982 people. Exposures related to a nearby naval air station such as jet fuel or an infectious agent carried by naval aviators have been hypothesized as potential causes. The possibility that the cluster could be attributed to chance was also considered. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Resul...

  10. Leukaemia clusters in childhood: geographical analysis in Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, E.G.

    1994-08-01

    Study objective - To validate previously demonstrated spatial clustering of childhood leukaemias by showing relative proximities of selected map features to cluster locations, compared with control locations. If clusters are real, then they are likely to be close to a determining hazard. Design -Cluster postcode loci and partially matched control postcodes were compared in terms of distances to railways, main roads, churches, surface water, woodland areas, and railside industrial installations. Further supporting comparisons between non-clustered cases and random postcode controls with those map features representable as single grid points were made. Setting -England, Wales, and Scotland 1966-83. Subjects - Grid referenced registrations of 9406 childhood leukaemias and non-Hodgkin`s lymphomas, including 264 pairs (or more) separated by <150 m, and grid references of random postcodes in equal numbers. Main results - the 264 clusters showed relative proximities (or the inverse) to several map features, of which the most powerful was an association with railways. The non-railway associations seemed to be statistically indirect. Some railside industrial installations, identified from a railway atlas, also showed relative proximities to leukaemia clusters, as well as to non-clustered cases, but did not ``explain`` the railway effect. These installations, with seemingly independent geographical associations, included oil refineries, petrochemical plants, oil storage and oil distribution depots, power stations, and steelworks. Conclusions - The previously shown childhood leukaemia clusters are confirmed to be non-random through their systematic associations with certain map features when compared with the control locations. The common patterns of close association of clustered and non-clustered cases imply a common aetiological component arising from a common environmental hazard - namely the use of fossil fuels, especially petroleum. (UK)

  11. What Role for Angiogenesis in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Schneider

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of angiogenesis in acute leukaemia has been discussed since the cloning of the gene of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF from the acute myelogenous leukemia cell line (HL60 and, thereafter, when the first studies reported increased bone marrow vascularity and elevation of angiogenic cytokines in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF are the major proangiogenic cytokines that have been studied, and evaluation of their prognostic impact in childhood ALL has been reported in several studies, though with controversial results. The antiangiogenic response, contributing to the angiogenic balance, has scarcely been reported. The origin of the factors, their prognostic value, and their relevance as good markers of what really happens in the bone marrow are discussed in this paper. The place of antiangiogenic drugs in ALL has to be defined in the global treatment strategy.

  12. Scottish validation study of cancer registration data childhood leukaemia 1968-1981: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a review of central leukaemia registration data for Scottish children 1968-1981 a retrospective assessment of leukaemia type was made by inspection of bone marrow slides. Only 57% of slides were still available and in 72% of these the review panel confirmed the initial diagnosis of leukaemia and its type. In eight cases the panel disagreed with the diagnosis or the type of leukaemia designated. Central slide review at diagnosis in childhood leukaemia is essential if subsequent epidemiological studies are to be meaningful. (author)

  13. Survival in France after childhood acute leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (1990-2000).

    OpenAIRE

    Goubin, Aurélie; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Auvrignon, Anne; Patte, Catherine; Bergeron, Christophe; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the survival after childhood acute leukaemia (AL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of French population aged less than 15 years. The French National Registry of Childhood Leukaemia and Lymphoma recorded 3995 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 812 of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 1137 of NHL over the period from 1990 to 2000. Overall survival rates at 5 years were 82% (95% CI 80-83), 58% (95% CI 54-61) and 87% (95% CI 85-89) for ALL, AML and NHL, respectiv...

  14. The risk of childhood leukaemia following exposure to ionising radiation—a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early years of follow-up of the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, it has been apparent that childhood leukaemia has a particular sensitivity to induction by ionising radiation, the excess relative risk (ERR) being expressed as a temporal wave with time since exposure. This pattern has been generally confirmed by studies of children treated with radiotherapy. Case-control studies of childhood leukaemia and antenatal exposure to diagnostic x-rays, a recent large cohort study of leukaemia following CT examinations of young people, and a recent large case-control study of natural background γ-radiation and childhood leukaemia have found evidence of raised risks following low-level exposure. These findings indicate that an ERR/Sv for childhood leukaemia of ∼50, which may be derived from risk models based upon the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, is broadly applicable to low dose or low dose-rate exposure circumstances. (paper)

  15. Uranium-235 and childhood leukaemia around Greenham Common airfield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been considerable publicity recently concerning the possible release of enriched uranium from the Greenham Common USAF base near Newbury in Berkshire. Evidence for the release relies on an internal report of the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment at Aldermaston, the authors of which postulated that it resulted from a fire in 1958 involving a B47 bomber standing on the runway. Their report contained a much publicised contour map of excess 235U levels estimated from the ratio of 235U to 238U in 26 evergreen leaf samples examined. The current concern of the inhabitants of Newbury centres mostly on the incidence of leukaemia, which was known beforehand to be slightly elevated in parts of West Berkshire, at least for young children. A number of cases have received considerable press publicity, with suggestions that their homes are located close to the base or the flight-path. The reports are, however, anecdotal and are not based on a complete register of cases. We have examined the evidence for this putative association by re-analysing the uranium data and determining the spatial relationship to the base of cases of childhood leukaemia diagnosed in the years 1966-87. We conclude that, although the excess uranium found has a non-random distribution, it does not support the pattern depicted by the contours and bears no relation to the incidence of childhood leukaemia for the period we examined. In any case, the increase in level of environmental radiation as a result of the putative release must be very small and is at variance with the reporting in some of the national press. (author)

  16. Overview of recent studies on childhood leukaemia, intra-uterine growth and diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies have looked at the association between birth weight and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children, but few have been able to examine the growth by incorporating estimates of gestational age. Recent results suggest that increased growth is associated with increased risk of childhood leukaemia. Evidence is also gathering that certain dietary intakes, possibly folate, in mothers, are also related to leukaemia occurrence. If these associations are real, they may be operating through growth factor pathways. (authors)

  17. Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurier, D [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses cedex (France); Hemon, D; Clavel, J [INSERM Unit 754, Villejuif (France)], E-mail: Dominique.laurier@irsn.fr

    2008-09-01

    A recent study indicated an excess risk of leukaemia among children under the age of 5 years living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present results relating to the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results do not indicate an excess risk of leukaemia in young children living near French nuclear power plants. (note)

  18. IRSN-ANCCLI partnership. Information day: Childhood leukaemia around French nuclear power plants - April 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an epidemiological study performed by the INSERM highlighted an excess of childhood leukaemia within 5 km around nuclear power plants during the 2002-2007 period, this meeting has been organised to discuss this issue. After a presentation of these results, a contribution discusses the context and research perspectives on the relationship between childhood leukaemia and nuclear sites. After the reported debate, a contribution presents the conclusion of a work-group on childhood leukaemia and ASN works, and a last one presents the activities of a work-group gathering the ANCCLI, IRSN and InVS on the health impact of nuclear installations. A debate on these issues is reported

  19. Risk of childhood leukaemia from the radiation exposure of fathers before conception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 1983, a television documentary claimed to have found an excess of childhood leukaemia cases in the coastal village of Seascale near the Sellafield nuclear complex in West Cumbria, England. This excess was confirmed by an independent scientific inquiry which consequently recommended that further detailed investigations be carried out. One recommendation was that a case-control study of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma in West Cumbria should be conducted. The most notable finding was a positive statistical association between relatively high radiation doses measured on film badges worn by men employed at Sellafield before the conception of their children and the incidence of leukaemia among these children. 13 refs

  20. Risk factors of childhood leukaemia with a focus on environmental hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukaemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. In Germany, there are annually about 620 new cases of childhood leukaemia among 13.2 million children. The causes of most leukaemias are still not known. Previous studies suggested a major role of environmental factors like low doses of ionizing radiation as well as electric and magnetic fields or pesticides. But recent studies contradict these assumptions. While weak associations between such factors and childhood leukaemia can not be ruled out, it can be estimated that they contribute at most to a minor fraction of leukaemias. Since leukaemia incidence is much higher in developed countries and since space-time clustering seems to be established for this disease, hypotheses involving a role of infectious agents have been put forward. Recent studies are suggestive that children with an appropriately modulated immune system have a lower risk of developing a leukaemia during childhood. As international collaborations emerge, it must be an aim that preventive actions are not only wishful thinking. (orig.)

  1. Seasonal variations in the onset of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Westerbeek, R. M.; Blair, V; Eden, O B; Kelsey, A M; Stevens, R. F.; Will, A. M.; Taylor, G M; Birch, J M

    1998-01-01

    Infection has long been suspected as a possible factor in the aetiology of leukaemia and lymphoma. If seasonal variation in the onset of disease could be shown in any of the diagnostic subgroups of leukaemia or lymphoma, this would provide supportive evidence of an aetiology linked to exposure to infection. All cases in the Manchester Children's Tumour Registry (aged 0-14 years at diagnosis) with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (ANLL), Hodgkin's disease (H...

  2. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall aim of this study was a comprehensive assessment of the nature and severity of the late effects of treatment in a group of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the absence of damage preceding treatment, late effects could be ascribed to treatment. Cranial irradiation, methotrexate, L-asparaginase and cytosine arabinoside are therapeutic modalities most likely to cause injury to the central nervous system. Survivors of childhood leukaemia also showed an increase in weight-for-height during and after therapy which appeared to be the consequence of a loss in statural growth as well as increasing weight-for-age. Assessment of endocrine function in leukaemia survivors indicated abnormalities in the regulation of growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone in some patients. Survivors of childhood leukaemia were shown to have an intellectual deficit compared with their siblings and a high incidence of visual-perceptual defects. The intellectual effects of lower doses of cranial irradiation are as yet unknown. A variety of minor neurological abnormalities were detected among leukaemia survivors and thought to be related to preceding central nervous system 'prophylactic' chemotherapy and irradiation. A new instrument, the functional deficit score, was derived to reflect overall outcome in survivors of childhood leukaemia. With few exceptions, leukaemia survivors in this study had received 2400 rads of deep x-ray therapy as cranial irradiation. This dosage has since been reduced world-wide. Current cranial irradiation 'prophylaxis' consists of 1800 rad of megavoltage radiotherapy

  3. The UK Childhood Cancer Study: Maternal occupational exposures and childhood leukaemia and lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risks of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma were investigated for specific work-related exposures of mothers in the UK Childhood Cancer Study. Interviews with parents of 1881 leukaemia and lymphoma cases (0-14 years) and 3742 controls collected job histories recording exposure to eight specific agents. Exposure was (1) self-reported and (2) reviewed, based mainly on exposure probability and exposure level. Completeness, consistency and sufficiency evaluated data quality. Of all job exposures which were self-reported as exposed, 33% cases and 34% controls remained classified as exposed after review, with the remainder designated as partially exposed or unexposed. No review of underreporting of exposure was made. Data quality was 'good' for 26% of cases and 24% of controls. For self-reported exposure, significant risks of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) were observed for solvents and petrol in all time windows. For reviewed exposure, solvents remained significant for ALL during pregnancy and post-natality. Restricting analyses to good-quality information removed all significant results. Refinement of exposure assessment revealed misclassification of self-reported exposures and data quality influenced risk assessment. Maternal exposure to solvents should further be investigated. These findings must invoke caution in the interpretation of risks reliant on self-reported occupational data. (authors)

  4. Childhood leukaemia following medical diagnostic exposure to ionizing radiation in utero or after birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistical association between childhood leukaemia and an abdominal X-ray examination of the pregnant mother was first reported in 1956 from a case-control study of childhood cancer mortality conducted in Great Britain. This study, later called the Oxford Survey of Childhood Cancers (OSCC), was continued and eventually showed a highly statistically significant ∼50% proportional increase in the risk of childhood leukaemia associated with antenatal diagnostic radiography. The association has been confirmed by many case-control studies carried out around the world, the appropriately combined results of which show a highly statistically significant increase in risk that is compatible with the OSCC finding. There is no doubt about the reality of the statistical association, but a causal interpretation has been questioned. On balance, however, the evidence points to low-level irradiation of the fetus increasing the risk of leukaemia in childhood, with an excess relative risk coefficient of around 50 Gy-1 (equivalent to an excess absolute risk coefficient of about 3% Gy-1), although the uncertainty associated with these coefficients is considerable and they are likely to be overestimates. In contrast to exposure in utero, the evidence from case-control studies for an association between childhood leukaemia and postnatal exposure to medical diagnostic irradiation is equivocal and sometimes conflicting. Since standard radiation risk models predict that low-level exposure in the early years of life should produce an increased risk of childhood leukaemia that is roughly similar to that arising from fetal exposure, this absence of persuasive evidence is likely to be due to various problems with the studies. This is unfortunate given the rise in relatively high dose diagnostic procedures (e.g. paediatric CT scans) that would be predicted to materially increase the relative risk of childhood leukaemia. (authors)

  5. Childhood leukaemia and low-level radiation - are we underestimating the risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Seascale childhood leukaemia 'cluster' can be interpreted as indicating that the risk of childhood leukaemia arising from low-level exposure to ionising radiation has been underestimated. Indeed, several variants of such an interpretation have been advanced. These include exposure to particular radionuclides, an underestimation of the radiation risk coefficient for childhood leukaemia, and the existence of a previously unrecognized risk of childhood leukaemia from the preconceptional irradiation of fathers. However, the scientific assessment of epidemiological associations is a complex matter, and such associations must be interpreted with caution. It would now seem most likely that the Seascale 'cluster' does not represent an unanticipated effect of the exposure to ionising radiation, but rather the effect of unusual population mixing generated by the Sellafield site which has produced an increase in the infection-based risk of childhood leukaemia. This episode in the history of epidemiological research provides a timely reminder of the need for great care in the interpretation-of novel statistical associations. (author)

  6. Personalization of dexamethasone therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rosanna K; Irving, Julie A E; Veal, Gareth J

    2016-04-01

    Dexamethasone is a key component in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Despite playing a key role in the improved survival of ALL over several decades, intensification of dexamethasone therapy has also contributed to the increased toxicity associated with treatment, which is now seen to be at unacceptable levels given the favourable disease prognosis. Therefore the focus for treatment is now shifting towards reducing toxicity whilst maintaining current survival rates. As approximately 50% of patients were successfully treated on less intensive protocols of the 1980s, it has been questioned whether therapy intensification is necessary in all patients. Furthermore, there remains a subset of children who are still not cured of their disease. New strategies are therefore needed to identify patients who could benefit from dose reduction or intensification. However, adjusting a potentially life threatening therapy is a challenging task, particularly given the heterogeneous nature of ALL. This review focuses on the potential for patient stratification based on our current knowledge of dexamethasone pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics and the action of dexamethasone at the cellular level. A carefully designed, combined approach is needed if we are to achieve the aim of improved personalization of dexamethasone therapy for future patients. PMID:26729065

  7. Exposure to electromagnetic fields and the risk of childhood leukaemia: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans, mainly based on epidemiological studies consistently showing an association between long-term average exposures to magnetic fields above 0.3/0.4 μT and the risk of childhood leukaemia. No mechanism to explain this finding has been established and no support for a causal link emerged from experimental studies. Chance or bias cannot be ruled out with reasonable confidence as an explanation for the observed association. If the association is causal, it explains only a small fraction of childhood leukaemia cases. There were some reports of childhood leukaemia clusters in the vicinity of high-power radio and television broadcast transmitters in studies in Australia and Italy. However, recent large-scale systematic studies in Korea and Germany show no association between exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields emitted from broadcast towers and childhood leukaemia risk. Studies on mobile phone use and leukaemia risk in adolescents and young adults may be indicated. (authors)

  8. Childhood leukaemia around Canadian nuclear facilities. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ninefold excess risk of leukaemia, as observed in vicinity of the Sellafield facility, was not observed amongst children born to mothers residing in the areas around nuclear research facilities and uranium mining, milling and refining facilities in Ontario. In the vicinity of nuclear research facilities, the rate of leukaemia was, in fact, less than expected. In the areas around the uranium mining, milling and refining facilities; leukaemia occurred slightly more frequently than expected; however, due to small frequencies these results may have risen by chance. A slightly greater than expected occurrence of leukaemia was also detected, which may well have been due to chance, in an exploratory study of the areas around nuclear power generating stations in Ontario

  9. Space-time clustering of childhood leukaemia in Greece: evidence supporting a viral aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, E.; Revinthi, K.; Alexander, F. E.; Haidas, S.; Koliouskas, D.; Kosmidis, H.; Piperopoulou, F.; Tzortzatou, F.; Trichopoulos, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method introduced by Knox for evaluation of space-time clustering has been applied to 872 cases of childhood (0-14 year old) leukaemia diagnosed in Greece over the 10 year period 1980-89. Greek towns are characterised by substantial population mixing due to internal migration, whereas there is relative isolation in mountainous rural areas. Predetermined space (5 km) and time (1 year) limits were used on the basis of previous reports in order to define the clustering cell. There is highly significant evidence for clustering of childhood leukaemia in Greece as a whole, the observed number of pairs that are close in both spaces and time exceeding the expected number by 5.2% (P = 0.004). The excess is particularly evident for leukaemia cases in 0 to 4-year-old children, among whom the observed number of pairs that are close in both space and time exceeded the expected number by 9.4% (P = 0.004). There is no evidence of space-time clustering for leukaemia cases older than 5 years. The overall pattern is descriptively similar in urban and semiurban areas and is especially marked for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at the childhood peak ages (2-4 years) with an excess of 19% (P = 0.0006). In the rural population there is evidence for clustering of cases belonging to older and broader age groups, a phenomenon compatible with a delay in the development of herd immunity against putative infectious aetiological agents. The findings of the present study provide support for the hypothesis that a substantial proportion of cases of childhood leukaemia may arise as a rare sequel to exposure to an agent or agents, most probably viral in nature. PMID:8630293

  10. Preconception paternal occupational radiation exposure and the risk of childhood leukaemia: a paradox within an enigma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is given of the evidence leading to the theory that preconception paternal occupational radiation exposure is a factor involved in the incidence of childhood leukaemia near nuclear facilities. Evidence is also presented which casts doubt on this theory (UK)

  11. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 and...

  12. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 and...... towards patients at risk. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  13. Childhood leukaemia: Radiological changes caused by the disease and by treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological changes caused by acute lymphatic leukaemia in childhood, and by the treatment of this condition, are described for the individual organ systems. Of particular importance are changes in the skeleton, thoracic organs, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and central nervous system. Changes in the skeleton and mediastinal tumours are important for the initial diagnosis. (orig.)

  14. Childhood leukaemia risks: from unexplained findings near nuclear installations to recommendations for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent findings related to childhood leukaemia incidence near nuclear installations have raised questions which can be answered neither by current knowledge on radiation risk nor by other established risk factors. In 2012, a workshop was organised on this topic with two objectives: (a) review of results and discussion of methodological limitations of studies near nuclear installations; (b) identification of directions for future research into the causes and pathogenesis of childhood leukaemia. The workshop gathered 42 participants from different disciplines, extending widely outside of the radiation protection field. Regarding the proximity of nuclear installations, the need for continuous surveillance of childhood leukaemia incidence was highlighted, including a better characterisation of the local population. The creation of collaborative working groups was recommended for consistency in methodologies and the possibility of combining data for future analyses. Regarding the causes of childhood leukaemia, major fields of research were discussed (environmental risk factors, genetics, infections, immunity, stem cells, experimental research). The need for multidisciplinary collaboration in developing research activities was underlined, including the prevalence of potential predisposition markers and investigating further the infectious aetiology hypothesis. Animal studies and genetic/epigenetic approaches appear of great interest. Routes for future research were pointed out. (review)

  15. Childhood leukaemia incidence around French nuclear installations using geographic zoning based on gaseous discharge dose estimates.

    OpenAIRE

    Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Hémon, Denis; Morin, Aline; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Backe, Jean-Claude; Chartier, Michel; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated for the first time the incidence of childhood leukaemia (1990–2001) around French nuclear installations using a geographic zoning based on estimated doses to the red bone marrow due to gaseous radioactive discharges. The observed number of cases of acute leukaemia (O=750) in 40 km2 centred on 23 French nuclear installations between 1990 and 2001 was lower than expected (E=795.01), although not significantly so (standardised incidence ratio SIR=0.94, 95% confiden...

  16. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit;

    2016-01-01

    toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall......Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi...... method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis...

  17. Trends in childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Darby, S. C.; Olsen, J. H.; Doll, R.; Thakrar, B.; Brown, P. D.; Storm, H H; Barlow, L.; Langmark, F.; Teppo, L; H. Tulinius

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To obtain further information about the risks of childhood leukaemia after exposure to ionising radiation at low doses and low dose rates before or after birth or to the father's testes shortly before conception. DESIGN--Observational study of trends in incidence of childhood leukaemia in relation to estimated radiation exposures due to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1950s and 1960s. SETTING--Nordic countries. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 15 years. MAI...

  18. Exposure to infections through day-care attendance and risk of childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing evidence supporting a role for infections in the aetiology of childhood leukaemia. Hypotheses proposed by both Greaves and Kinlen describe childhood leukaemia to be a rare response to one or more common infections acquired through personal contacts. Previous epidemiological studies have used day-care attendance as an indicator of the increased likelihood of early and frequent exposure to infections. It is well-documented that in developed countries, exposures to common infections occur more frequently in this type of setting. Within the Northern California Childhood Leukaemia Study, the role of social contact has been assessed and a unique 'child-hours' summary measure incorporating information on the number of months attending a day-care, mean hours per week at this day-care and the number of children in the day-care setting was constructed. In this review, the previously reported day-care results have been described, showing that in non-Hispanic White children, children in the highest category of total child-hours of exposure had a reduced risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), particularly common B-cell precursor ALL (c-ALL), compared with children without such exposures, with evidence of a dose-response effect. In addition, a literature review of relevant studies has been conducted, examining the relationship between day-care attendance and risk of childhood ALL. Overall, the 14 studies identified provided consistent support for this hypothesis, with the majority of studies reporting some evidence of a reduced risk. A meta-analysis is currently underway, which will provide a quantitative evaluation of the overall consistency and strength of the association between day-care attendance or social contact and risk of childhood ALL. (authors)

  19. Childhood leukaemia in Great Britain and fallout from nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible effects of radiation from fallout on childhood leukaemia mortality from 1950 to 1987 and registrations from 1963 to 1987 were assessed using a division of Great Britain into regions with higher rainfall and a consequently higher fallout radiation dose in the 1960s and regions with lower rainfall and a lower radiation dose. Childhood leukaemia mortality rates declined and registration rates increased throughout the period. For ages 0-14 years, the differences between rates in wet regions and dry regions were small and appeared unrelated to periods of low, medium and high radiation exposure based on dose equivalent to the red bone marrow after birth. For the 0-4 years age group the highest ratios of leukaemia death rates and registration rates in the wet compared with the dry part of Great Britain occurred in the period of highest radiation exposure after birth. The death rate ratio was significantly raised in the period of high exposure compared with the surrounding medium exposure periods, but the difference in registration rate ratios between the high exposure period and the medium exposure period following was not statistically significant. The results might be explained by survival and registration changes, or chance in the case of registrations, but do not exclude the possibility that low doses of radiation from fallout were responsible for an increased risk of leukaemia in young children in Great Britain. (author)

  20. Childhood leukaemia and ordnance factories in west Cumbria during the Second World War

    OpenAIRE

    Kinlen, L

    2006-01-01

    Much evidence has accumulated that childhood leukaemia (CL) is a rare response to a common, but unidentified, infection and in particular that situations involving the unusual mixing of urban and rural groups (approximating to, respectively, groups infected with, and susceptible to, the relevant microorganism) can produce localised epidemics with consequent increases of the infrequent leukaemic complication. During the Second World War, explosives production factories were built and operated ...

  1. Quantifying the effect of population mixing on childhood leukaemia risk: the Seascale cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, H O; Parker, L.

    1999-01-01

    A statistical model was developed based on Poisson regression of incidence of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) in relation to population mixing among all 119 539 children born 1969–1989 to mothers living in Cumbria, north-west England, (excluding Seascale). This model was used to predict the number of cases in Seascale (the village adjacent to the Sellafield nuclear installation) children, born 1950–1989 and diagnosed before 1993. After allowing for age, the incidence of a...

  2. Host genome variations and risk of infections during induction treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Lausen, Birgitte;

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate association of host genomic variation and risk of infections during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Methods: We explored association of 34 000 singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related primarily to pharmacogenomics and immune function...... to risk of infections among 69 ALL patients on induction therapy. Results: Forty-eight (70%) patients experienced infectious events including 23 with positive blood cultures. Infectious events and positive blood cultures were associated significantly with 24 and 21 SNPs, respectively (P

  3. Scottish validation study of cancer registration data childhood leukaemia 1968-1981: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study attempted to validate central registration data on all childhood leukaemia cases in Scotland between 1968 and 1981 in line with the Black Enquiry concerning West Cumbria. Missing files precluded a complete verification, but minor errors of registration were found in 44% of cases. A small number of important mistakes of omission (eight cases), wrong diagnosis (six cases) and postal code errors (nine cases) were found which might affect epidemiological studies of these relatively rare diseases. Precise and verified prospective data collection at the time of diagnosis is essential if the spatial distribution of childhood cancers is being studied. (author)

  4. Leukaemia following childhood radiation exposure in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in medically exposed groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidence and mortality risks of radiation-associated leukaemia are surveyed in the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors exposed in early childhood and in utero. Leukaemia incidence and mortality risks are also surveyed in 16 other studies of persons who received appreciable doses of ionizing radiation in the course of treatment in childhood and for whom there is adequate dosimetry and cancer incidence or mortality follow-up. Relative risks tend to be lower in the medical series than in the Japanese A-bomb survivors. The relative risks in the medical studies tend to diminish with increasing average therapy dose. After taking account of cell sterilisation and dose fractionation, the apparent differences between the relative risks for leukaemia in the Japanese A-bomb survivors and in the medical series largely disappear. This suggests that cell sterilisation largely accounts for the discrepancy between the relative risks in the Japanese data and the medical studies. Excess absolute risk has also been assessed in four studies, and there is found to be more variability in this measure than in excess relative risk. In particular, there is a substantial difference between the absolute risk in the Japanese atomic bomb survivor data and those in three other (European) populations. In summary, the relative risks of leukaemia in studies of persons exposed to appreciable doses of ionizing radiation in the course of treatment for a variety of malignant and non-malignant conditions in childhood are generally less than those in the Japanese A-bomb survivor data. The effects of cell sterilisation can largely explain the discrepancy between the Japanese and the medical series. (authors)

  5. Spatial variation of natural radiation and childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an analysis of the geographical variation of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain over a 15 year period in relation to natural radiation (gamma and radon). Data at the level of the 459 district level local authorities in England, Wales and regional districts in Scotland are analysed in two complementary ways: first, by Poisson regressions with the inclusion of environmental covariates and a smooth spatial structure; secondly, by a hierarchical Bayesian model in which extra-Poisson variability is modelled explicitly in terms of spatial and non-spatial components. From this analysis, we deduce a strong indication that a main part of the variability is accounted for by a local neighbourhood 'clustering' structure. This structure is furthermore relatively stable over the 15 year period for the lymphocytic leukaemias which make up the majority of observed cases. We found no evidence of a positive association of childhood leukaemia incidence with outdoor or indoor gamma radiation levels. There is no consistent evidence of any association with radon levels. Indeed, in the Poisson regressions, a significant positive association was only observed for one 5-year period, a result which is not compatible with a stable environmental effect. Moreover, this positive association became clearly non-significant when over-dispersion relative to the Poisson distribution was taken into account. (author)

  6. Spatial variation of natural radiation and childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Sylvia; Monfort, Christine [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Villejuif, 94 (France); Green, Martyn; Muirhead, Colin [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Draper, Gerald [Oxford Univ., Childhood Cancer Research Group, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an analysis of the geographical variation of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain over a 15 year period in relation to natural radiation (gamma and radon). Data at the level of the 459 district level local authorities in England, Wales and regional districts in Scotland are analysed in two complementary ways: first, by Poisson regressions with the inclusion of environmental covariates and a smooth spatial structure; secondly, by a hierarchical Bayesian model in which extra-Poisson variability is modelled explicitly in terms of spatial and non-spatial components. From this analysis, we deduce a strong indication that a main part of the variability is accounted for by a local neighbourhood `clustering` structure. This structure is furthermore relatively stable over the 15 year period for the lymphocytic leukaemias which make up the majority of observed cases. We found no evidence of a positive association of childhood leukaemia incidence with outdoor or indoor gamma radiation levels. There is no consistent evidence of any association with radon levels. Indeed, in the Poisson regressions, a significant positive association was only observed for one 5-year period, a result which is not compatible with a stable environmental effect. Moreover, this positive association became clearly non-significant when over-dispersion relative to the Poisson distribution was taken into account. (author).

  7. Childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma near large rural construction sites, with a comparison with Sellafield nuclear site.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinlen, L. J.; Dickson, M; Stiller, C A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether population mixing produced by large, non-nuclear construction projects in rural areas is associated with an increase in childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. DESIGN--A study of the incidence of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among children living near large construction projects in Britain since 1945, situated more than 20 km from a population centre, involving a workforce of more than 1000, and built over three or more calendar years. For perio...

  8. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  9. SETIL: Italian multicentric epidemiological case–control study on risk factors for childhood leukaemia, non hodgkin lymphoma and neuroblastoma: study population and prevalence of risk factors in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Magnani, Corrado; Mattioli, Stefano; Miligi, Lucia; Ranucci, Alessandra; Rondelli, Roberto; Salvan, Alberto; Bisanti, Luigi; Masera, Giuseppe; Rizzari, Carmelo; Zambon, Paola; Cannizzaro, Santina; Gafà, Lorenzo; Luzzatto, Lia Lidia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Michelozzi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background Aetiology of childhood leukaemia and childhood neoplasm is poorly understood. Information on the prevalence of risk factors in the childhood population is limited. SETIL is a population based case–control study on childhood leukaemia, conducted with two companion studies on non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and neuroblastoma. The study relies on questionnaire interviews and 50 Hz magnetic field (ELF-MF) indoor measurements. This paper discusses the SETIL study design and includes descript...

  10. Childhood Leukaemia Incidence in Hungary, 1973-2002. Interpolation Model for Analysing the Possible Effects of the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of childhood leukaemia in Hungary has yet to be reported, although data are available since the early 70s. The Hungarian data therefore cover the time before and after the Chernobyl nuclear accident (1986). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the Chernobyl accident on childhood leukaemia incidence in Hungary. A population-based study was carried out using data of the National Paediatric Cancer Registry of Hungary from 1973 to 2002. The total number of cases was 2204. To test the effect of the Chernobyl accident the authors applied a new approach called 'Hypothesized Impact Period Interpolation'-model, which takes into account the increasing trend of childhood leukaemia incidence and the hypothesized exposure and latency times. The incidence of leukaemia in the age group 0-14 varied between 33.2 and 39.4 per million person-years along the observed 30 year period, and the incidence of childhood leukaemia showed a moderate increase of 0.71% annually (p=0.0105). In the period of the hypothesized impact of the Chernobyl accident the incidence rate was elevated by 2.5% (95% CI: -8.1%; +14.3%), but this change was not statistically significant (p=0.663). The age standardised incidence, the age distribution, the gender ratio, and the magnitude of increasing trend of childhood leukaemia incidence in Hungary were similar to other European countries. Applying the presented interpolation method the authors did not find a statistically significant increase in the leukaemia incidence in the period of the hypothesized impact of the Chernobyl accident

  11. Translating microarray data for diagnostic testing in childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent findings from microarray studies have raised the prospect of a standardized diagnostic gene expression platform to enhance accurate diagnosis and risk stratification in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, the robustness as well as the format for such a diagnostic test remains to be determined. As a step towards clinical application of these findings, we have systematically analyzed a published ALL microarray data set using Robust Multi-array Analysis (RMA) and Random Forest (RF). We examined published microarray data from 104 ALL patients specimens, that represent six different subgroups defined by cytogenetic features and immunophenotypes. Using the decision-tree based supervised learning algorithm Random Forest (RF), we determined a small set of genes for optimal subgroup distinction and subsequently validated their predictive power in an independent patient cohort. We achieved very high overall ALL subgroup prediction accuracies of about 98%, and were able to verify the robustness of these genes in an independent panel of 68 specimens obtained from a different institution and processed in a different laboratory. Our study established that the selection of discriminating genes is strongly dependent on the analysis method. This may have profound implications for clinical use, particularly when the classifier is reduced to a small set of genes. We have demonstrated that as few as 26 genes yield accurate class prediction and importantly, almost 70% of these genes have not been previously identified as essential for class distinction of the six ALL subgroups. Our finding supports the feasibility of qRT-PCR technology for standardized diagnostic testing in paediatric ALL and should, in conjunction with conventional cytogenetics lead to a more accurate classification of the disease. In addition, we have demonstrated that microarray findings from one study can be confirmed in an independent study, using an entirely independent patient cohort

  12. Incidence, time trends and regional variation of childhood leukaemia in Germany and Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on the German and Europe-wide incidence, time trends and regional variations of childhood leukaemia. Data were provided by the German Childhood Cancer Registry (GCCR), a population-based cancer registry recording all cases of malignant diseases in children under 15 y of age residing in Germany and by the Automated Childhood Cancer Information System (ACCIS) co-ordinated at International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, that combines and evaluates data from several European population-based cancer registries. The incidence of leukaemia (44.0 per million) has increased in Europe as well as in Germany in the last decades (0.6% annually on average). Germany shows no systematic aggregation of regions with low or high cancer incidence in terms of regional clustering. Incidence rates differ between European regions with the highest rates in Northern Europe (48.0 per million) and the lowest rates in Eastern Europe (39.1). Altogether, the results from ACCIS and the GCCR show good agreement. (authors)

  13. Childhood leukaemia near British nuclear installations: Methodological issues and recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2008, the German Childhood Cancer Registry published the results of the Kinderkrebs in der Umgebung von Kernkraftwerken (KiKK) study of childhood cancer and leukaemia around German nuclear power stations. The positive findings appeared to conflict with the results of a recent British analysis carried out by the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE), published in 2005. The present paper first describes the COMARE study, which was based on data from the National Registry of Children's Tumours (NRCT); in particular, the methodology used in this study is described. Although the results of the COMARE study were negative for childhood leukaemia, this apparent discrepancy could be accounted for by a number of differences in approach, especially those relating to the distances from the power stations and the ages of the children studied. The present study was designed to match the KiKK study as far as possible. The incidence observed (18 cases within 5 km against 14.58 expected, p = 0.21) was not significantly raised. The risk estimate for proximity in the regression fitted was actually negative, though the confidence intervals involved are so wide that the difference from that reported in the KiKK study is only marginally statistically significant (p = 0.063). (authors)

  14. Space-time clustering of childhood leukaemia in Greece: evidence supporting a viral aetiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Petridou, E.; Revinthi, K.; Alexander, F E; Haidas, S; Koliouskas, D.; Kosmidis, H; Piperopoulou, F.; Tzortzatou, F.; Trichopoulos, D

    1996-01-01

    The method introduced by Knox for evaluation of space-time clustering has been applied to 872 cases of childhood (0-14 year old) leukaemia diagnosed in Greece over the 10 year period 1980-89. Greek towns are characterised by substantial population mixing due to internal migration, whereas there is relative isolation in mountainous rural areas. Predetermined space (5 km) and time (1 year) limits were used on the basis of previous reports in order to define the clustering cell. There is highly ...

  15. Nuclear installations and childhood leukaemia - testing the hypotheses, exploring the implications - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main thesis of this paper has been to demonstrate the particular phenomenology of the nuclear installations/childhood leukaemia sagas and to infer the scientific and public policy implications of the experience of investigation of these hypotheses and their confounders. If, as appears to be the case, we live in a period where science policy is more populist and thus liable to be impacted more directly and immediately by 'public concern' issues, it follows that there may also be new challenges for public information and understanding and new requirements for the operation of the process of public science policy. (author)

  16. Negative trends for in utero Chernobyl exposure and early childhood leukaemia in Western Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent report in Nature linked increased incidence of early infant leukaemia in Greece with 137Cs fallout density, attributing the effect to an increased in utero exposure to ionizing radiation from the Chernobyl accident. As a validation exercise in a similarly affected region, we performed an analysis based on the data of the Childhood Cancer Registry for Western Germany. Using the same definitions as Petridou et al. we also observed an increased incidence of infant leukaemia in a cohort of children who were born after the Chernobyl accident. More detailed analyses of embryonic/foetal doses regarding areas of different contamination levels and dose rate gradients with time since the accident showed non-significant negative trends with exposure. Therefore, we conclude that the observed effect was not caused by exposure to ionizing radiation due to the Chernobyl accident. Dosimetric considerations per se, based on careful assessment of in utero doses in three different exposure categories, show doses much too small relative to natural radiation exposures to account for a significant effect on leukaemia rates. (author)

  17. Childhood leukaemia and exposure to ELF-FM fields: using epidemiological studies in guiding standard setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence for harmful effects of ELF-EM fields below current standards, comes chiefly from epidemiological studies of childhood leukaemia and magnetic fields in the home. The pooled analyses of many of their data led the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to classify ELF-EM fields as 'possibly carcinogenic to humans', the next level up from 'unclassifiable'. This classification is based on 'limited' evidence in humans and 'less than sufficient' evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. The main rationale for the indecisive classification was the lack of a plausible mechanism of action, but there are many examples from the past where epidemiological evidence has preceded evidence of mechanisms. Since the IARC report, there have been some more large epidemiological studies that have produced results consistent with those from the pooled analyses. Combining results from these more recent studies into a combined estimate, still gave an estimated relative risk of 1.7 (95% C11.3-2.2) for exposure above 0.3 .T. More rigorous studies such as TransExpo are planned, but there still does not appear to be any new convincing evidence as to possible mechanisms for the increased risks. Assignment of causality between EMF and childhood leukaemia is still therefore not possible. Because of the consistency of the epidemiological findings, regulators must monitor new evidence as it arises and can only adopt a 'precautionary' approach in setting limits.

  18. Exposure assessment and other challenges in non-ionizing radiation studies of childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of electromagnetic fields (EMF) and the development of childhood leukaemia face unique difficulties. EMF are imperceptible, ubiquitous, have multiple sources, and can vary greatly over time and distances. Childhood leukaemia and high average exposures to magnetic fields are both quite rare. Thus, a major challenge in EMF epidemiology is the small number of highly exposed cases and the necessity for retrospective assessment of exposure. Only studies designed to minimize bias while maximizing our ability to detect an association, should one exist, would have a potential to contribute to our understanding. New approaches are needed; the most promising in the extremely low-frequency range involves a study of a highly exposed cohort of children who have lived in apartments next to built-in transformers or electrical equipment rooms. Another promising avenue is an investigation of possible joint effects of environmental exposures and genetic co-factors. An exposure assessment methodology for residential radiofrequency fields is still in its infancy. Rapid changes in technology and exponential increases in its use make exposure assessment more difficult and urgent. (authors)

  19. Outcome of treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with rearrangements of the 11q23 chromosomal region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pui, CH; Gaynon, PS; Boyett, JM; Chessells, JM; Baruchel, A; Kamps, W; Silverman, LB; Biondi, A; Harms, DO; Vilmer, E; Schrappe, M; Camitta, B

    2002-01-01

    Background The prognosis and optimum treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with abnormalities of chromosomal band 11q23 are controversial. We aimed to identify prognostic factors that might help in planning future therapy, and to assess the effectiveness of haemopoietic stem-cel

  20. Mercaptopurine metabolite levels are predictors of bone marrow toxicity following high-dose methotrexate therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Sophia Ingeborg; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Frandsen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) courses with concurrent oral low-dose MTX/6-mercaptopurine (6MP) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are often followed by neutro- and thrombocytopenia necessitating treatment interruptions. Plasma MTX during HD-MTX therapy guides folinic acid rescue ...

  1. Up-to-date monitoring of childhood cancer long-term survival in Europe: Leukaemias and lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Brenner (Hermann); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); D.M. Parkin; I. Izarzugaza; J. Clavel; V. Arndt (Volker); E. Steliarova-Foucher

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In recent decades, following the introduction of effective chemotherapy, the prognosis of children with leukaemia and lymphoma has dramatically improved, but data reflecting further possible improvement achieved in the 1990s are scarce. Methods: Using the Automated Childhood

  2. Trends in childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to obtain further information about the risks of childhood leukaemia after exposure to ionising radiation at low doses and low dose rates before or after birth or to the father's testes shortly before conception. Trends were studied in the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the Nordic countries in relation to estimated radiation exposures due to fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing during the 1950s and 1960s. During the high fallout period the average estimated dose equivalent to the fetal red bone marrow was around 140 μSv and the average annual testicular dose 140 μSv. There was little evidence of increased incidence of leukaemia among children born in these years. Doses to the red bone marrow of a child after birth were higher, and during the high exposure period children would have been subjected to an additional dose equivalent of around 1500 μSv, similar to doses received by children in several parts of central and eastern Europe owing to the Chernobyl accident and about 50% greater than the annual dose equivalent to the red bone marrow of a child from natural radiation. Leukaemia incidence and red marrow dose was not related overall, but rates of leukaemia in the high exposure period were slightly higher than in the surrounding medium exposure period. (Author)

  3. TESTIN Induces Rapid Death and Suppresses Proliferation in Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Weeks

    Full Text Available Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children. Despite high cure rates, side effects and late consequences of the intensive treatments are common. Unquestionably, the identification of new therapeutic targets will lead to safer, more effective treatments. We identified TES promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing as a very common molecular abnormality in childhood ALL, irrespective of molecular subtype. The aims of the present study were to demonstrate that TES promoter methylation is aberrant, to determine the effects of TES re-expression in ALL, and to determine if those effects are mediated via TP53 activity.Normal fetal and adult tissue DNA was isolated and TES promoter methylation determined by Sequenom MassARRAY. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot were used to confirm re-expression of TES in ALL cell lines after 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine exposure or transfection with TES expression plasmids. The effects of TES re-expression on ALL cells were investigated using standard cell proliferation, cell death and cell cycle assays.In this study, we confirm that the TES promoter is unmethylated in normal adult and fetal tissues. We report that decitabine treatment of ALL cell lines results in demethylation of the TES promoter and attendant expression of TES mRNA. Re-expression of TESTIN protein in ALL cells using expression plasmid transfection results in rapid cell death or cell cycle arrest independent of TP53 activity.These results suggest that TES is aberrantly methylated in ALL and that re-expression of TESTIN has anti-leukaemia effects which point to novel therapeutic opportunities for childhood ALL.

  4. Chemical risk factors and childhood leukaemia: A review of recent studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for chemical risks factors as determinants of childhood leukaemia has been ongoing for over two decades. Results of epidemiological studies, published from 1998 to the present, evaluating parental smoking, outdoor sources of pollution, indoor contaminants and chemicals from drinking water are reported. Overall, results were mostly negative. This may be due to the relatively small study sizes to detect environmental effects, usually measured imprecisely. Another reason may be that such effects, which may be revealed among the genetically susceptible, have rarely accounted for genetic susceptibility. The few studies that have are also reported here. Suggestions are made for work in the immediate future, which include pooling of data and of analyses, as well as carrying out in-depth reviews of studies with the goal of understanding the reasons for discrepant results. (authors)

  5. High white blood cell count at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Forestier, Erik; Hellebostad, Marit;

    2011-01-01

    Prognostic impact of peripheral blood white blood cell count (WBC) at the diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was evaluated in a population-based consecutive series of 2666 children aged 1-15 treated for ALL between 1992 and 2008 in the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland......, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). Ten-year event-free (pEFS(10 y)) survival and overall (pOS(10 y)) survival were 0.75 ± 0.01 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively. Although treatment intensity was determined by WBC, non-remission and relapsed patients still had significantly higher WBC than those in remission for B-cell...

  6. Comparison of three methods of central-nervous-system prophylaxis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective comparison was made of three methods of central-nervous-system prophylaxis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; (1) intrathecal methotrexate only; (2) intermediate-dose methotrexate infusion and intrathecal methotrexate and; (3) 2400 rads cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate. The incidence of primary meningeal relapse was statistically significantly lower in both standard-risk patients (age > 24 months and 120 months and/or white-cell count > 20 000) whose central-nervous-system prophylaxis included cranial irradiation. The disease-free and overall survival of irradiated increased-risk patients was significantly better than that of unirradiated increased-risk patients. The disease-free survival of standard-risk patients who received intermediate-dose methotrexate was statistically superior to that of the remaining standard-risk patients. There were no significant differences in overall survival between the three groups of standard-risk patients. (author)

  7. Assessment of environmental exposures from agricultural pesticides in childhood leukaemia studies: Challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesticides are ubiquitous in environments of many rural communities due to drift from agricultural applications and home/garden use. Studies of childhood leukaemia predominantly relied on retrospective pesticide exposure assessment and parental recall of use or proximity to fields or pesticide applications. Sample size requirements mostly preclude the collection of individual-level exposure information, bio-markers or environmental measurements of pesticides prospectively in cohorts. Yet such measures can be used in nested case-control approaches or for validating exposure models that can be applied to large populations. Recently developed models incorporate geographic information system technology and environmental databases of pesticide and/or crop data to assess exposure. Models developed in California to estimate residential exposures are presented by linking addresses to agricultural pesticide application data and land-use maps. Results from exposure validation and simulation studies and exposure measurement error issues are discussed. (authors)

  8. The risk profile of childhood leukaemia in Greece: a nationwide case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, E; Trichopoulos, D; Kalapothaki, V; Pourtsidis, A; Kogevinas, M; Kalmanti, M; Koliouskas, D; Kosmidis, H; Panagiotou, J P; Piperopoulou, F; Tzortzatou, F

    1997-01-01

    The risk profile of childhood leukaemia in Greece was studied through a case-control investigation that included all 153 incident cases of the disease, ascertained throughout the country during 1993 and 1994, and two hospital controls for every case matched for gender, age and place of residence. The data were analysed using conditional logistic regression and the associations are expressed in terms of adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals. Cases were born to mothers of a higher standard education, the OR for an increment of four schooling years being 1.48 (1.17-1.87) and had higher birth weight, the OR for an increment of 500g being 1.36 (1.04-1.77). Pet ownership and birth after a pregnancy with anaemia were associated with increased risk, the ORs being 2.18 (1.14-4.16) and 2.60 (1.39-4.86) respectively. From the frequency analyses, indicative inverse associations were found with birth order, household crowding and previous hospitalization with allergic diseases, whereas indicative positive associations were found with diabetes mellitus during pregnancy and with neonatal jaundice. Substantial or significant elevations were not found with respect to maternal smoking and coffee drinking during pregnancy, diagnostic radiography and ultrasonographic examinations or blood transfusions. A significant inverse association with maternal consumption of alcohol could be due to multiple comparisons, but a detrimental effect can probably be excluded. A non-significant positive association with total shots of viral vaccinations and a weak non-significant inverse association with breast feeding were also found. We interpret the findings of this study as being compatible with acute childhood leukaemia being linked with delayed development of herd immunity to fairly common infectious agents, in conjunction with accelerated perinatal and early post-natal growth. PMID:9365177

  9. The novel RASSF6 and RASSF10 candidate tumour suppressor genes are frequently epigenetically inactivated in childhood leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Eamonn R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras-assocation family (RASSF of tumour suppressor genes (TSGs contains 10 members that encode proteins containing Ras-assocation (RA domains. Several members of the RASSF family are frequently epigenetically inactivated in cancer, however, their role in leukaemia has remained largely uninvestigated. Also, RASSF10 is a predicted gene yet to be experimentally verified. Here we cloned, characterised and demonstrated expression of RASSF10 in normal human bone marrow. We also determined the methylation status of CpG islands associated with RASSF1–10 in a series of childhood acute lymphocytic leukaemias (ALL and normal blood and bone marrow samples. Results COBRA and bisulphite sequencing revealed RASSF6 and RASSF10 were the only RASSF members with a high frequency of leukaemia-specific methylation. RASSF6 was methylated in 94% (48/51 B-ALL and 41% (12/29 T-ALL, whilst RASSF10 was methylated in 16% (8/51 B-ALL and 88% (23/26 T-ALL. RASSF6 and RASSF10 expression inversely correlated with methylation which was restored by treatment with 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5azaDC. Conclusion This study shows the hypermethylation profile of RASSF genes in leukaemias is distinct from that of solid tumours and represents the first report of inactivation of RASSF6 or RASSF10 in cancer. These data show epigenetic inactivation of the candidate TSGs RASSF6 and RASSF10 is an extremely frequent event in the pathogenesis of childhood leukaemia. This study also warrants further investigation of the newly identified RASSF member RASSF10 and its potential role in leukaemia.

  10. Updated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionising radiation, such as was experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan or from radiotherapy, is an established cause. Risk models based primarily upon studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors imply that low-level exposure to ionising radiation, including to ubiquitous natural background radiation, also raises the risk of childhood leukaemia. In a recent paper (Wakeford et al 2009 Leukaemia 23 770-6) we estimated the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain attributable to natural background radiation to be about 20%. In this paper we employ the two sets of published leukaemia risk models used previously, but use recently published revised estimates of natural background radiation doses received by the red bone marrow of British children to update the previous results. Using the newer dosimetry we calculate that the best estimate of the proportion of cases of childhood leukaemia in Great Britain predicted to be attributable to this source of exposure is 15-20%, although the uncertainty associated with certain stages in the calculation (e.g. the nature of the transfer of risk between populations and the pertinent dose received from naturally occurring alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides) is significant. The slightly lower attributable proportions compared with those previously derived by Wakeford et al (Leukaemia 2009 23 770-6) are largely due to the lower doses (and in particular lower high LET doses) for the first year of life.

  11. Updated estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionising radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Mark P [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Imperial College, London W2 1PG (United Kingdom); Wakeford, Richard [Dalton Nuclear Institute, University of Manchester, Pariser Building-G Floor, PO Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Kendall, Gerald M [Childhood Cancer Research Group, Richards Building, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Oxford OX3 7LG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mark.little@imperial.ac.uk

    2009-12-01

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionising radiation, such as was experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan or from radiotherapy, is an established cause. Risk models based primarily upon studies of the Japanese A-bomb survivors imply that low-level exposure to ionising radiation, including to ubiquitous natural background radiation, also raises the risk of childhood leukaemia. In a recent paper (Wakeford et al 2009 Leukaemia 23 770-6) we estimated the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain attributable to natural background radiation to be about 20%. In this paper we employ the two sets of published leukaemia risk models used previously, but use recently published revised estimates of natural background radiation doses received by the red bone marrow of British children to update the previous results. Using the newer dosimetry we calculate that the best estimate of the proportion of cases of childhood leukaemia in Great Britain predicted to be attributable to this source of exposure is 15-20%, although the uncertainty associated with certain stages in the calculation (e.g. the nature of the transfer of risk between populations and the pertinent dose received from naturally occurring alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides) is significant. The slightly lower attributable proportions compared with those previously derived by Wakeford et al (Leukaemia 2009 23 770-6) are largely due to the lower doses (and in particular lower high LET doses) for the first year of life.

  12. Childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma near large rural construction sites, with a comparison with Sellafield nuclear site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to determine whether population mixing produced by large, non-nuclear construction projects in rural areas is associated with an increase in childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A study was undertaken of the incidence of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among children living near large construction projects in Britain since 1945, situated more than 20 km from a population centre, involving a workforce of more than 1000, and built over three or more calendar years. A 37% excess of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at 0-14 years of age was recorded during construction and the following calendar year. The excesses were greater at times when construction workers and operating staff overlapped (72%), particularly in areas of relatively high social class. For several sites the excesses were similar to or greater than that near the nuclear site of Sellafield (67%), which is distinctive in its large workforce with many construction workers. Seascale, near Sellafield, with a ninefold increase had an unusually high proportion of residents in social class I. The findings support the infection hypothesis and reinforce the view that the excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma near Sellafield has a similar explanation. (author)

  13. DNA incorporation of 6-thioguanine nucleotides during maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedeland, Rikke L; Hvidt, Kristian; Nersting, Jacob;

    2010-01-01

    To explore the DNA incorporation of 6-thioguanine nucleotide levels (DNA-6TGN) during 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and its relation to erythrocyte levels of their metabolites: 6-thioguanine-nucleotides (E-6TGN), met......), methylated metabolites (E-MeMP), Methotrexate polyglutamates (E-MTX), and to thiopurine methyltransferase activity (TPMT)....

  14. DNA incorporation of 6-thioguanine nucleotides during maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hedeland, Rikke L.; Hvidt, Kristian; Nersting, Jacob; Rosthøj, Susanne; Dalhoff, Kim; Lausen, Birgitte; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To explore the DNA incorporation of 6-thioguanine nucleotide levels (DNA-6TGN) during 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and its relation to erythrocyte levels of their metabolites: 6-thioguanine-nucleotides (E-6TGN), methylated metabolites (E-MeMP), Methotrexate polyglutamates (E-MTX), and to thiopurine methyltransferase activity (TPMT). ...

  15. Up-to-date monitoring of childhood cancer long-term survival in Europe: Leukaemias and lymphomas

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Hermann; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Parkin, D M; Izarzugaza, I.; Clavel, J; Arndt, Volker; Steliarova-foucher, E.

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In recent decades, following the introduction of effective chemotherapy, the prognosis of children with leukaemia and lymphoma has dramatically improved, but data reflecting further possible improvement achieved in the 1990s are scarce. Methods: Using the Automated Childhood Cancer Information (ACCIS) database, we carried out a period analysis of 10-year survival for the 1995-99 period. Analyses were carried out by diagnostic groups, age-group at diagnosis, sex and fou...

  16. Nuclear power plant and childhood leukaemia - Report by the pluralist working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    nuclear power plant and the risk of leukaemia in children? There is no official answer to this question, barring that exposure to high doses or to high dose rates increases the risk. Many other genetic and environmental causes must also be taken into consideration, in order to prevent any misunderstanding. The molecular heterogeneity of leukaemia must also be taken into account when interpreting the data. Despite this complexity, the general public needs objective, comprehensible information. Scientists are under the obligation to meet the legitimate expectations of a society that is not only fully aware of its 'right to know', but is also eager for greater humanity and trust. For the reasons listed above, an independent, pluralist, technical working group composed of French and foreign experts with complementary skills and interests was created with the following mandate: - Issue an opinion on the available epidemiological knowledge of the effects of nuclear power plant (NPP), focusing in particular on the risk of childhood leukaemia; - Define the research needed to improve the existing data; - Help to deliver clear, transparent and regular information to the general public.; - Draw up guidelines for improving the existing knowledge on the link between childhood leukaemia and nuclear power plant (especially the impact of very low doses of ionising radiations). These guidelines will be made public. - Present the progress of this work to a national committee tasked with planning and monitoring the measures needed to improve the available knowledge of the effects of discharge from the nuclear industry on the health of people living nearby

  17. Risk assessment demonstrated for the example of childhood leukaemia and exposure to power transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of a connection existing between electric or magnetic fields in the extremely low frequency range (50 Hz in Europe, 60 Hz in the USA) and cancer has been a topic of discussion for more than 20 years. The debate was first triggered by a case control study in Denver published in 1979, in which children living close to power transmission lines were found to be at a threefold higher risk of dying of leukaemia. Since then numerous studies have been carried out worldwide on this controversial topic. The scientific controversy lies in the fact that magnetic flux densities which epidemiologists classify as a burden in most cases above 0.2 microtesla (μ) are only a fraction of the 100 μT recommended as a limit value by the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). This limit value in turn is many times lower than the magnetic flux densities at which biological effects such as oscillopsia or nerve irritation have been demonstrated. There is no known mechanism to explain how such very weak magnetic fields could have a cancerogenic effect. Two independent meta-analyses on EMF and the risk of childhood leukaemia, both based on the original data of all studies known at the time of publication, came to mutually consistent conclusions. Ahlboom et al., after pooling the results of the methodologically superior studies, found a twofold higher risk of leukaemia from 0.4 μT upward, but not below this exposure level. Greenland et al., after pooling the results of all available studies, reported a statistically significant odds ratio of 1.7 at magnetic flux densities greater than 0.3 μT. This led an expert committee commissioned by the ''International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)'', in the spring of 2001, to classify extremely low frequency magnetic fields as ''possibly carcinogenic to humans''. Static fields and extremely low frequency electric fields, by contrast, were considered ''not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity

  18. Childhood leukaemia in the West Berkshire and Basingstoke and North Hampshire District Health Authorities in relation to nuclear establishments in the vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These data indicate that in the two district health authorities studied there was an excess incidence of childhood leukaemia during 1972-85 in the vicinity of the nuclear establishments. In the West Berkshire and Basingstoke and North Hampshire District Health Authorities an average of 60 000 children aged 0-14 lived within a 10 km radius of a nuclear establishment each year. The normal expectation of leukaemia in these children was two cases a year, whereas the recorded incidence was three cases per year, representing one extra case of leukaemia each year among these 60 000 children. (author)

  19. Birth characteristics and the risk of childhood leukaemias and lymphomas in New Zealand: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dockerty John D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies have found that lower parity and higher or lower social class (depending on the study are associated with increased risks of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. Such findings have led to suggestions that infection could play a role in the causation of this disease. An earlier New Zealand study found a protective effect of parental marriage on the risk of childhood ALL, and studies elsewhere have reported increased risks in relation to older parental ages. This study aimed to assess whether lower parity, lower social class, unmarried status and older parental ages increase the risk of childhood ALL (primarily. These variables were also assessed in relation to the risks of childhood acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease. Methods A case control study was conducted. The cases were 585 children diagnosed with leukaemias or lymphomas throughout New Zealand over a 12 year period. The 585 age and sex matched controls were selected at random from birth records. Birth records from cases (via cancer registration record linkage and from controls provided accurate data on maternal parity, social class derived from paternal occupation, maternal marital status, ages of both parents, and urban status based on the address on the birth certificate. Analysis was by conditional logistic regression. Results There were no statistically significant associations overall between childhood ALL and parity of the mother, social class, unmarried maternal status, increasing parental ages (continuous analysis, or urban status. We also found no statistically significant associations between the risks of childhood acute non-lymphoblastic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or Hodgkin's disease and the variables studied. Conclusion This study showed no positive results though of reasonable size, and its record linkage design minimised bias. Descriptive studies (eg of time trends of ALL show that

  20. Childhood leukaemia and ordnance factories in west Cumbria during the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlen, L

    2006-07-01

    Much evidence has accumulated that childhood leukaemia (CL) is a rare response to a common, but unidentified, infection and in particular that situations involving the unusual mixing of urban and rural groups (approximating to, respectively, groups infected with, and susceptible to, the relevant microorganism) can produce localised epidemics with consequent increases of the infrequent leukaemic complication. During the Second World War, explosives production factories were built and operated at Drigg and Sellafield, and a shell filling factory at Bootle, in west Cumbria, England, requiring substantial numbers of construction workers to be brought into this remote and isolated area. Following the design of an earlier study of CL near large (post-war) rural construction sites, mortality from this disease was investigated with the help of the Office of National Statistics, in the area around these Cumbrian factories where local workers largely lived, during the construction period and with particular reference to the overlapping construction and operational phase when the mixing of local and migrant workers would have been greatest. An excess of leukaemia deaths at ages 1-14 was found during the construction period (observed 3; observed/expected (O/E) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 6.0), which was more marked and statistically significant during the overlap with operations (O 3; O/E 4.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 12.2), especially at ages 1-4 (O 2; O/E 7.1, CI: 1.2, 23.6). A previous investigation did not detect this excess because it considered only a small part of west Cumbria that omitted the communities where most of the workforce lived, having incorrectly attributed the post-war expansion of the village of Seascale (situated between Drigg and Sellafield) to the wartime ordnance factories. The present findings are consistent with the results of the earlier study of rural construction projects and with the general evidence that marked rural-urban population mixing

  1. Plasma high sensitivity troponin T levels in adult survivors of childhood leukaemias: determinants and associations with cardiac function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu-fai Cheung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We sought to quantify plasma high sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTnT levels, their determinants, and their associations with left ventricular (LV myocardial deformation in adult survivors of childhood acute leukaemias. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred adult survivors (57 males of childhood acute leukaemias, aged 24.1 ± 4.2 years, and 42 age-matched controls (26 males were studied. Plasma cTnT was determined using a highly sensitive assay. Genotyping of NAD(PH oxidase and multidrug resistance protein polymorphisms was performed. Left ventricular function was assessed by conventional, three-dimensional, and speckle tracking echocardiography. The medians (interquartile range of hs-cTnT in male and female survivors were 4.9 (4.2 to 7.2 ng/L and 1.0 (1.0 to 3.5 ng/L, respectively. Nineteen survivors (13 males, 6 females (19% had elevated hs-cTnT (>95(th centile of controls. Compared to those without elevated hs-TnT levels, these subjects had received larger cumulative anthracycline dose and were more likely to have leukaemic relapse, stem cell transplant, and cardiac irradiation. Their LV systolic and early diastolic myocardial velocities, isovolumic acceleration, and systolic longitudinal strain rate were significantly lower. Survivors having CT/TT at CYBA rs4673 had higher hs-cTnT levels than those with CC genotype. Functionally, increased hs-cTnT levels were associated with worse LV longitudinal systolic strain and systolic and diastolic strain rates. CONCLUSIONS: Increased hs-cTnT levels occur in a significant proportion of adult survivors of childhood acute leukaemias and are associated with larger cumulative anthracycline dose received, history of leukaemic relapse, stem cell transplant, and cardiac irradiation, genetic variants in free radical metabolism, and worse LV myocardial deformation.

  2. Risk factors of childhood leukaemia with a focus on environmental hazards; Leukaemien im Kindesalter und die Rolle von Umwelteinfluessen bei deren Entstehung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuez, J. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik (IMBEI), Univ. Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Leukaemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. In Germany, there are annually about 620 new cases of childhood leukaemia among 13.2 million children. The causes of most leukaemias are still not known. Previous studies suggested a major role of environmental factors like low doses of ionizing radiation as well as electric and magnetic fields or pesticides. But recent studies contradict these assumptions. While weak associations between such factors and childhood leukaemia can not be ruled out, it can be estimated that they contribute at most to a minor fraction of leukaemias. Since leukaemia incidence is much higher in developed countries and since space-time clustering seems to be established for this disease, hypotheses involving a role of infectious agents have been put forward. Recent studies are suggestive that children with an appropriately modulated immune system have a lower risk of developing a leukaemia during childhood. As international collaborations emerge, it must be an aim that preventive actions are not only wishful thinking. (orig.) [German] Leukaemie ist die haeufigste Krebserkrankung im Kindesalter. In Deutschland erkranken von 13,2 Millionen Kindern unter 15 Jahren etwa 620 jaehrlich neu an Leukaemie. Die Ursachen von Leukaemien im Kindesalter sind auch heute noch weitgehend unklar. Umwelteinfluesse wie niedrige Dosen ionisierender Strahlung sowie nicht-ionisierende Strahlung oder Pestizide wurden lange verdaechtigt, einen Grossteil kindlicher Leukaemien zu verursachen. Inzwischen hat sich fuer die meisten Umweltfaktoren gezeigt, dass selbst wenn ein schwacher Zusammenhang mit dem Auftreten von Leukaemien im Kindesalter nicht ausgeschlossen werden kann, der Anteil dadurch verursachter Faelle doch eher gering ist. Die hoehere Inzidenz an Kinderleukaemie in den Industrielaendern sowie wiederholte Beobachtungen zeitlich begrenzter, regionaler Haeufungen an Leukaemieerkrankungen haben zu Hypothesen gefuehrt, die infektioesen Erregern eine

  3. Unusual space-time patterning of the Fallon, Nevada leukemia cluster: Evidence of an infectious etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Stephen S; Selvin, Steve; Yang, Wei; Buffler, Patricia A; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2012-04-01

    The town of Fallon within Churchill County, Nevada exhibited an unusually high incidence of childhood leukemia during the years 1997-2003. We examined the temporal and spatial patterning of the leukemia case homes in comparison to the distribution of the general population at risk, other cancer incidence, and features of land use. Leukemia cases were predominantly diagnosed during the early to mid summer, exhibiting a seasonal bias. Leukemia cases lived outside of the "developed/urban" area of Fallon, predominantly in the "agriculture/pasture" region of Churchill County, circumscribing downtown Fallon. This pattern was different from the distribution of the underlying population (p-valuespace-time patterning of childhood leukemia is consistent with the involvement of an infectious disease. A possible mode of transmission for such an infectious disease is by means of a vector, and mosquitoes are abundant in Churchill County outside of the urban area of Fallon. This region harbors a US Navy base, and a temporally concordant increase in military wide childhood leukemia rates suggests the base a possible source of the virus. Taken together, our current understanding of the etiology of childhood leukemia, the rural structure combined with temporal and geospatial patterning of these leukemia cases, and the high degree of population mixing in Fallon, suggest a possible infectious cause. PMID:21352818

  4. Neurofibromatosis and childhood leukaemia/lymphoma: a population-based UKCCSG study.

    OpenAIRE

    Stiller, C A; Chessells, J M; Fitchett, M

    1994-01-01

    There is a well-known raised risk of leukaemia in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). We carried out the first detailed population-based study of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with NF-1 in order to estimate the risk and elucidate the relationship between these conditions. Over the 17 year study period there were five cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) in patients with NF-1 (relative risk 221; 95% CI 71-514), 12 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukae...

  5. Temporal association between childhood leukaemia and population growth in Swiss municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupatsch, Judith E; Kreis, Christian; Zwahlen, Marcel; Niggli, Felix; Ammann, Roland A; Kuehni, Claudia E; Spycher, Ben D

    2016-08-01

    The population mixing hypothesis proposes that childhood leukaemia (CL) might be a rare complication of a yet unidentified subclinical infection. Large population influxes into previously isolated rural areas may foster localised epidemics of the postulated infection causing a subsequent increase of CL. While marked population growth after a period of stability was central to the formulation of the hypothesis and to the early studies on population mixing, there is a lack of objective criteria to define such growth patterns. We aimed to determine whether periods of marked population growth coincided with increases in the risk of CL in Swiss municipalities. We identified incident cases of CL aged 0-15 years for the period 1985-2010 from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. Annual data on population counts in Swiss municipalities were obtained for 1980-2010. As exposures, we defined (1) cumulative population growth during a 5-year moving time window centred on each year (1985-2010) and (2) periods of 'take-off growth' identified by segmented linear regression. We compared CL incidence across exposure categories using Poisson regression and tested for effect modification by degree of urbanisation. Our study included 1500 incident cases and 2561 municipalities. The incident rate ratio (IRR) comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of 5-year population growth was 1.18 (95 % CI 0.96, 1.46) in all municipalities and 1.33 (95 % CI 0.93, 1.92) in rural municipalities (p value interaction 0.36). In municipalities with take-off growth, the IRR comparing the take-off period (>6 % annual population growth) with the initial period of low or negative growth (<2 %) was 2.07 (95 % CI 0.95, 4.51) overall and 2.99 (1.11, 8.05) in rural areas (p interaction 0.52). Our study provides further support for the population mixing hypothesis and underlines the need to distinguish take-off growth from other growth patterns in future research. PMID:27251152

  6. Effect of azole antifungal therapy on vincristine toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, R.M. van; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Loo, D.M. te

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vincristine is one of the cornerstones of the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Constipation, and peripheral and central neurotoxicities are the most common side effects. A comparative study exploring vincristine toxicity in individual patients receiving vin

  7. Estimation of X ray overexposure in a childhood leukaemia cluster by means of chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only multiple X ray diagnostics could be identified as a common risk factor in a leukaemia cluster that appeared between 1985-1989 in the municipality of Sittensen in northern Germany. In order to judge if the effect could be explained by irradiation dose, estimates were done in two of the leukaemia cases and seven former patients of a practice where some of the leukaemia cases had been treated for orthopaedic reasons. The methods used for the reconstruction of doses were physical simulation and biological dosimetry by dicentric chromosomes in peripheral lymphocytes. Compared to the Bremen laboratory control the mean frequency of dicentric chromosomes in the lymphocytes of the seven volunteers was significantly elevated. An overexposure of about 12-fold could be derived compared to state of the art X raying. At least two cases of the leukaemia cluster in Sittensen can therefore be correlated to an overexposure by diagnostic X rays. (author)

  8. Vincristine pharmacokinetics and response to vincristine monotherapy in an up-front window study of the Dutch Childhood Leukaemia Study Group (DCLSG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E; Meeuwsen-de Boer, T; Koopmans, P; Uges, D; Sluiter, W; Veerman, A; Kamps, W

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between vincristine pharmacokinetics and its antileukaemic effect in children is unknown. Since vincristine plays a key role in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), it is worthwhile to explore if efficacy can be improved by individual dose adjustment. Ther

  9. Vincristine pharmacokinetics and response to vincristine monotherapy in an up-front window study of the Dutch Childhood Leukaemia Study Group (DCLSG).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E.; Boer, T. de; Koopmans, P.P.; Uges, D.R.A.; Sluiter, W.J.; Veerman, A.; Kamps, W.; Graaf, S.S.N. de

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between vincristine pharmacokinetics and its antileukaemic effect in children is unknown. Since vincristine plays a key role in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), it is worthwhile to explore if efficacy can be improved by individual dose adjustment. Ther

  10. Risk of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations: Findings and recent controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of a local excess of cancer cases, possibly associated with ionizing radiation, always receives substantial media coverage and communication about clusters is difficult. We reviewed studies that examined the risk of leukaemia among young people near nuclear installations. An excess of leukaemia exists near some nuclear installations, at least for the reprocessing plants at Sellafield and Dounreay and the nuclear power plant Kruemmel. Nonetheless, the results of multi-site studies invalidate the hypothesis of an increased risk of leukaemia related to nuclear discharge. Up until now, analytic studies have not found an explanation for the leukaemia clusters observed near certain nuclear installations. The hypothesis of an infectious aetiology associated with population mixing has been proposed, but needs to be investigated further. The review illustrates two recent examples in France (La Hague reprocessing plant) and in Germany (Kruemmel power plant), where controversies developed after reports of increased leukaemia risks. These examples show the importance of recalling the current epidemiological knowledge and of using systematic recording of cases to replace the alleged excesses in a more general framework. Some elements should also be suggested from the recent French and German experiences to reinforce credibility in the results

  11. The Seascale childhood leukaemia cases - the mutation rates implied by paternal preconceptional radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies have demonstrated that paternal preconceptional radiation exposure is an insufficient explanation of the excess of leukaemia cases among children born in the West Cumbrian village of Seascale. Less than 10% of the children whose fathers were employed at the Sellafield nuclear installation and received a dose of radiation prior to their conception were born in Seascale; but the statistical association between paternal preconceptional radiation dose and leukaemia is apparent only in these Seascale-born children. This paper explores the speculative proposition that the Seascale leukaemia cases are caused by a strong interaction between paternal preconceptional irradiation and exposure after conception to a specific co-factor which is confined to Seascale. This hypothesis is demonstrated to be biologically implausible, the implied rate of transmitted radiation-induced leukaemogenic mutations being far beyond the established rates for hereditary effects. (Author)

  12. Vincristine in childhood leukaemia : no pharmacokinetic rationale for dose reduction in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, BM; Lonnerholm, G; Koopmans, P; Abrahamsson, J; Behrendtz, M; Castor, A; Forestier, E; Uges, DRA

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there is any pharmacokinetic rationale for the common practice of administering vincristine to adolescents at relatively lower doses than those to younger children. Methods: A total of 98 children, aged 1.3-17.3 y, with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) were studied on

  13. Prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia : a question of maturation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; Kamps, WA; Vellenga, E; de Vries, EGE; de Bont, ESJM

    2004-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a disease diagnosed in children as well as adults. Progress in the treatment of ALL has led to better survival rates, however, children have benefited more from improved treatment modalities than adults. Recent evidence has underscored that the difference in ch

  14. A comparison between the risks of childhood leukaemia from parental exposure to radiation in the Sellafield workforce and those displayed among the Japanese bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cases of childhood leukaemia found near the Sellafield plant and those observed in the offspring of the Japanese bomb survivors are analysed using a relative risk model. The leukaemia relative risk coefficients for total paternal (whole-body) pre-conception exposure for the Sellafield children are found to be about 50 to 80 times higher than the (gonadal) coefficients applying to the offspring of the bomb survivors. This difference is statistically significant, and in particular the risk coefficients for the Sellafield cohort are significantly positive, unlike those for the Japanese. If the assumption is made that the excess relative risk estimated from the Sellafield data lasts for the whole of the life of the offspring, the apparent population leukaemia risk to the first-generation offspring (for an England and Wales population) would be between 4% Sv-1 and 5% Sv-1. (author)

  15. Another leukaemia theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable publicity was given to an article 'Evidence for an infective cause of childhood leukaemia: comparison of a Scottish new town with nuclear reprocessing sites in Britain', at the end of 1988 which asserted that increases of leukaemia in young people near Dounreay and Sellafield may be caused by a virus. However, the choice of the new town taken as a comparison is criticised and hence the evidence is considered inconclusive. It is suggested that the risk of leukaemia did increase due to fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests in areas of high rainfall. (author)

  16. Detection of prognostically relevant genetic abnormalities in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: recommendations from the Biology and Diagnosis Committee of iBFM-SG

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Christine J; Haas, Oskar A.; Harbott, W; Biondi, Andrea; Stanulla, Martin; Trka, Jan; Izraeli, Shai

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) has improved considerably in recent years. A contributing factor has been the improved stratification for treatment according to a number of factors including genetic determinants of outcome. Here we review the current diagnostic criteria of genetic abnormalities in precursor B-ALL (BCP-ALL), including the relevant technical approaches and the application of the most appropriate methods for the detection of each ab...

  17. After the chemotherapy: potential mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced delayed skeletal muscle dysfunction in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Celena eScheede-Bergdahl; R Thomas Jagoe

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that survivors of childhood cancers, such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), have increased rates of longterm skeletal muscle dysfunction. This places them at higher risk of physical restriction and functional impairment as well as potentially contributing to observed increases in cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance in later life. The mechanisms underlying these changes in skeletal muscle are unknown but chemotherapy drugs used in treatment for ALL are strong...

  18. Rural population mixing and childhood leukaemia: effects of the North Sea oil industry in Scotland, including the area near Dounreay nuclear site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine if any excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was associated with certain striking examples of population mixing in rural Scotland produced by the North Sea oil industry. Details were traced for over 30 000 workers (25 yrs old) involved in the construction of the large oil terminals in the Shetland and Orkney islands in northern Scotland or employed offshore. Home addresses of the 17160 Scottish residents were postcoded, integrated with census data, and then classified as urban or rural. Rural postcode sectors, ranked by proportion of oil workers, were grouped into three categories with similar numbers of children but contrasting densities of oil workers. The incidence of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was examined in these rural (and also in urban) categories in the periods 1974-8, 1979-83 and 1984-8. A significant excess of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found in 1979-83 in the group of rural home areas with the largest proportion of oil workers, following closely on large increases in the workforce. The area near the Dounreay nuclear installation, where an excess of leukaemia is already well known, was within the rural high oil category. (Author)

  19. Spatial regression analysis between air pollution and childhood leukaemia in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to investigate whether known carcinogenic chemical elements in atmospheric deposition might be associated with child mortality due to leukemia in the Portuguese population. A Bayesian hierarchical model was used to explore the association between lichen biomonitoring measurements of four elements - As, Hg, Ni, Pb - and childhood leukemia death counts taken at small administrative units. This geographical epidemiological study found a non-significant positive association between the risk of childhood leukemia and levels of arsenic, mercury and lead, and a non-significant negative association between the disease and the level of nickel. Lead seems to show a weaker association with childhood leukemia than arsenic and mercury. (author)

  20. The excess of childhood leukaemia near Sellafield: a commentary on the fourth COMARE report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems in investigating disease clusters are illustrated by the latest (fourth) report of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) on the excess of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma among young people living near the Sellafield nuclear installation in West Cumbria, England. COMARE found no evidence that exposure to radiation could account for this excess and examined alternative explanations. The Report discusses inter alia the hypothesis that these diseases have an infective aetiology promoted by population mixing and considers the relevance of such mixing to the Sellafield area. It concludes that infection cannot be the sole explanation for the excess of cases, implying that some other causative factor (possibly radiation) must also be operating. This conclusion is, however, largely the result of arbitrarily concentrating attention on the village of Seascale (where the excess had initially been observed) rather than the entire vicinity of Sellafield, the putative cause of the excess. This well known pitfall exaggerates the significance of the Seascale excess. The Report then contrasts the magnitude of this excess in Seascale with those in much larger study areas away from Sellafield that were chosen (independently of leukaemia data) because of their relevance to population mixing; but this is not a comparison of like with like. When the Report does consider an area that includes Sellafield, the area chosen is so large (over 700 sq miles) as to ''dilute out'' localised excesses. COMARE underestimates the special factors that would account, under the infection hypothesis, for the unusually large excess in Seascale, and pays insufficient attention to other communities near Sellafield which may have been affected by population mixing. (Author)

  1. Human Parvovirus B19 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in basrah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the association of human parvovirus B19 infection with the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and its effect on TEL-AML-1 fusion gene and the presence of mutant P53. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at Basrah Hospital for Paediatrics and Gynaecology, Basrah, Iraq, from May 2009 to April 2010. A total of 100 blood samples were collected from 40 newly diagnosed cases and 60 healthy children to serve as control matched by age and gender. Human parvovirus B19-IgG and anti-P53 antibody were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and TEL-AML-1 fusion gene was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction on extracted ribonucleic acid from fresh blood samples using specified primers. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Results: A higher proportion of human parvovirus B19-positive cases was found in leukaemic patients (n=19; 47.5%) compared to 12 (20%) in the control group (p<0.05). There was significant association between Tel-Amyl-1 translocation and human parvovirus-B19 infection as 10 (71.4%) of TEL-AML-1 translocation-positive cases had human parvovirus-B19 IgG. On the other hand, there was no association between such infections and P53 gene mutation in the patients. Conclusion: Human parvovirus-B19 infection is common in the population, with higher prevalence among leukaemic patients with significant association between human parvovirus-B19 and TEL-AML-1 fusion gene in patients of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. (author)

  2. Low level leukaemia link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The debate over whether cases of childhood leukaemia recorded in the vicinity of nuclear installations are radiation induced is discussed. The damage caused by alpha-beta and gamma radiation is explained. The United Kingdom National Radiological Protection Board claims that exposure to plutonium is not the cause of the larger-than-average number of cases of leukaemia round nuclear sites. Low doses of radium have been shown to cause bone cancer but not leukaemia possibly because the dose levels used kill off potential leukaemia forming cells. Experiments on mice seem to bear this out. Evidence from Sellafield suggests that the greatest risk from radiation is to in utero foetuses. Risk estimates need to be revised and the questions raised need to be answered. (UK)

  3. Drawing the line with leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cluster of cases of childhood leukaemia near nuclear installations in the United Kingdom are considered. The paper examines whether these clusters have occurred by chance, or are an artefact of the statistical methodology, or the result of variability in the reporting of these leukaemias, or the result of some local agent, such as radiation. Statistical methodology including tests of significance involve choices available to researchers when boundaries of the test cells are selected. Choice of the wrong boundaries can lead to misleading results, such as in the town of Lydney, Gloucestershire where an apparent cluster of leukaemias was reported in 1987. The quality of data is also a problem, and there is evidence that some registration of childhood leukaemia is 'missed'. The authors conclude that it is easy to manipulate data and produce scare stories, and research workers on clusters of leukaemia near nuclear installations must be vigilant about the methods they employ. (U.K.)

  4. Risk-adapted stratification and treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic enrolment of children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) into clinical trials has allowed the establishment of prognostic parameters derived from initial diagnostic findings. More important, these trials have significantly contributed to the reduction of disease recurrence as much as to the reduction of acute and late side effects. Some problems that are related to the specificity of the parameters used for risk assessment were not overcome: high tumour load by white blood cell count (WBC), age and (rare) cytogenetic subtypes (e.g. t9;22) may characterise a significant proportion of children and adolescents with high-risk ALL. Most patients who will eventually relapse do not present with characteristic features at initial diagnosis. It appears feasible through careful response assessment to identify these patients at risk of relapse, who present initially without specific features. Earlier trials of the ALL-BFM (Berlin/Frankfurt/Muenster) study group and others have demonstrated that inadequate leukaemic blast reduction in the peripheral blood or bone marrow after the first few days of therapy is highly predictive of treatment failure. Using clone-specific polymerase chain reaction-based detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) as done in trial AIEOP-BFM ALL 2000 allowed a close surveillance of specific treatment elements when applied in MRD positive patients. This may facilitate innovative chemotherapy approaches and a more rational use of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In addition, genetic signatures of treatment response or failure have been identified. (authors)

  5. Distance to high-voltage power lines and risk of childhood leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira; Rod, Naja Hulvej;

    2014-01-01

    significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon regarding risk of childhood leukemia (p = 0.01) when using the median radon level as cut-off point but not when using the 75th percentile (p = 0.90). We found no evidence of an interaction between distance to nearest power line...

  6. Neurotoxicity during induction treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. During chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, children sometimes exhibit neurological disturbances. Chemiotherapeutic regimens include methotrexate, administered either intravenously or via intrathecal route. Although multiple drugs are used in addition to methotrexate, the acute neurotoxicity reported in patients is usually attributed to methotrexate. The acute neurotoxicity usually results in stroke-like symptoms such as aphasia, weakness, sensory deficits, ataxia and seizures. Outline of Cases. From 2002 until January 2008, 32 children with ALL were diagnosed and treated at the Children's Hospital in Niš. The patients' age ranged from 1.5 to 16 years. They were treated in accordance with the protocol ALL IC-BFM 2002 (ALL Intercontinental Berlin Frankfurt M'nster 2002. Two of the patients (6.25% exhibited neurotoxicity. After the occurrence of neurological symptoms, the patients were ophthalmologically and neurologically examined. In addition, the magnetic resonance (MR imaging, computerized tomography and electroencephalography were applied. The paper presents two patients, aged 9 and 15 years respectively, who exhibited acute neurotoxicity - methotrexate encephalopathy during ALL treatment. Both patients had tonic-clonic seizures and neurological symptoms in the course of the induction therapy. Neurotoxicity occurred 7 days after the third, and 3 days after the fourth intrathecal methotrexate therapy. MR images confirmed multi-focal morphological changes of brain density in one of the patients, while the other patient had normal CT reading. Even though the development significantly differed, the changes were reversible in both patients. Conclusion. The neurotoxicity in patients with ALL can be combined with significant structural changes of the brain, but also morphological changes can be absent. Several questions concerning aetiology and treatment of neurological events are raised.

  7. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: experience from a single tertiary care facility of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the demographic features, outcome and prognostic factors seen in children with acute lymphoplastic leukaemia at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The retrospective descriptive study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, comprising data related to children below 15 years of age and treated between January 1997 and December 2006. Kaplan Meir survival curves were used to describe overall and event-free survival rates. Cox Proportional Hazards model was used to describe factors associated with death and relapse. SPSS 16 was the main statistical tool. Results: Of the total 121 children diagnosed with the condition, 79 (65.3%) were males; 86 (71.1%) patients were between 1-9 years of age; Immunophenotyping was done in 99 (81.81%) patients: 86 (87%) cases had precursor B and 13 (13.13%) had precursor T. Of the total, 106(87.6%) patients opted for treatment, while 15 (11.6%) were lost to follow-up. Besides, 26(21.7%) patients had at least one relapse; the most common site being bone marrow in 13 (50%) followed by central nervous system in 9 (36.6%). There were 20(16.5%) deaths in the sample. Infection was the most frequent cause of death. The event-free survival and overall survival was 63% (n=76) and 65% (n=79) respectively. Conclusion: Through the clinical characteristics of children with acute lymphoblastic leukamia were similar to those reported in literature, the outcomes were inferior. The high rate of infections and relapse warrant better supportive care and risk-based approach. (author)

  8. Leukaemia morbidity in Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a contribution to the discussion as to whether there might be any positive relation between low level radiation of natural origin or even of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the increase in leukaemia morbidity, the Federal Health Office carried out a study on leukaemia mortality in Bavaria. The results of this study suggest that there is a need for morbidity studies for various reasons - e.g. because of te changes and improvements that have been achieved in therapy, especially for childhood leukaemia, as a result of which morbidity patterns might possibly differ from those of mortality. As with the mortality study, the morbidity study was not limited to radiation effects only but did also include other environmental factors relevant for leukaemia. The purpose of our study is to prepare a map of leukaemia in Bavaria and to find out whether there are regional differences in morbidity and, if so, whether the environmental factors influencing morbidity may be identified. For epidemiological studies on the potential effects of lowlevel radiation it is very helpful that there are considerable differences in the levels of natural radiation in different regions of Bavaria. In addition an NPP is located in the regions of Bavaria which has been in operation for more than 15 years. This is the longest time of operation of an NPP in the Federal Republic of Germany, and it is equal to the maximum latency period of leukaemia (according to surveys on the Japanese atom bomb survivors). (Author)

  9. Leukaemia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February 1990 Martin Gardner and colleagues published the results of their study of the apparent excess cases of childhood leukaemia near the nuclear waste reprocessing plant at Sellafield, West Cumbria. Their suggestion is that the excess is due to the increased risk to children of fathers working at the plant. That conclusion, however, is questioned. Comparisons between the relative risks of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for occupations at Sellafield and for those with other industries have often been ignored. But there are some findings that suggest an excess of childhood cancers among offspring of workers exposed to certain organic chemicals such as benzene, a known leukaemogen. For radiation workers, external radiation exposure is measured by a film badge, and it is this that allows a more detailed analysis of the Sellafield workers as opposed to those in the other industries. It is argued that there is no evidence that childhood leukaemia is associated with an inherited single gene and overall the evidence that an inherited mutational change produced by low doses of radiation is a cause of the excess leukaemia among the offspring of radiation workers is still inconclusive. Possible explanations for the excess could be chance or chemical agents. (author)

  10. Multi-model inference of adult and childhood leukaemia excess relative risks based on the Japanese A-bomb survivors mortality data (1950-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Linda; Kaiser, Jan Christian

    2011-03-01

    Some relatively new issues that augment the usual practice of ignoring model uncertainty, when making inference about parameters of a specific model, are brought to the attention of the radiation protection community here. Nine recently published leukaemia risk models, developed with the Japanese A-bomb epidemiological mortality data, have been included in a model-averaging procedure so that the main conclusions do not depend on just one type of model or statistical test. The models have been centred here at various adult and young ages at exposure, for some short times since exposure, in order to obtain specially computed childhood Excess Relative Risks (ERR) with uncertainties that account for correlations in the fitted parameters associated with the ERR dose-response. The model-averaged ERR at 1 Sv was not found to be statistically significant for attained ages of 7 and 12 years but was statistically significant for attained ages of 17, 22 and 55 years. Consequently, such risks when applied to other situations, such as children in the vicinity of nuclear installations or in estimates of the proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence attributable to background radiation (i.e. low doses for young ages and short times since exposure), are only of very limited value, with uncertainty ranges that include zero risk. For example, assuming a total radiation dose to a 5-year-old child of 10 mSv and applying the model-averaged risk at 10 mSv for a 7-year-old exposed at 2 years of age would result in an ERR=0.33, 95% CI: -0.51 to 1.22. One model (United Nations scientific committee on the effects of atomic radiation report. Volume 1. Annex A: epidemiological studies of radiation and cancer, United Nations, New York, 2006) weighted model-averaged risks of leukaemia most strongly by half of the total unity weighting and is recommended for application in future leukaemia risk assessments that continue to ignore model uncertainty. However, on the basis of the analysis

  11. Leukaemia near british nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An excess of childhood leukaemia has been seen near some British nuclear installations, especially near the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The same result was found in a more general study including a large number of nuclear sites. Similar studies made in USA, Canada and France have been negative. Moreover, epidemiological studies made in England have discovered other childhood leukaemia clusters in areas far from nuclear facilities, and especially near potential sites of nuclear installations. Several explanations are suggested but no definite conclusion is yet possible. Doses from radioactive releases seem to be too low to account for the additional deaths from leukaemia by environmental contamination. A virus activation, which might be associated with population influx into rural isolated areas, has been considered. The hypothesis of genetic mutation induced by ionising radiation in the fathers of children with leukaemia has been made because a higher risk of leukaemia was observed for children of fathers employed at Sellafield. No firm conclusion is possible considering the small number of observed cases and the lack of excess leukaemias in the offspring of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. The possibility of internal contamination, chemicals or even radon is discussed as other causes. Studies in progress might allow to find an answer to the problem of leukaemia in the vicinity of British nuclear installations

  12. Evidence for an infective cause of childhood leukaemia: comparison of a Scottish new town with nuclear reprocessing sites in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increases of leukaemia in young people that cannot be explained in terms of radiation have been recorded near both of Britain's nuclear reprocessing plants at Dounreay and Sellafield. These were built in unusually isolated places where herd immunity to a postulated widespread virus infection (to which leukaemia is a rare response) would tend to be lower than average. The large influxes of people in the 1950s to those areas might have been conducive to epidemics. The hypothesis has been tested in Scotland in an area identified at the outset as the only other rural area that received a large influx at the same time, when it was much more cut off from the nearest conurbation than at present - the New Town of Glenrothes. A significant increase of leukaemia below age 25 was found (10 observed, expected 3.6), with a greater excess below age 5 (7 observed, expected 1.5). (author)

  13. Leukaemia and nuclear power in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the YTV programme, 'Windscale, the Nuclear Laundry' (November 1983) showed a tenfold excess of childhood leukaemia near the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant, there has been debate about the possible connection between nuclear power and leukaemia. In this chapter the authors look at the evidence published so far and give the results of an investigation into young leukaemia death rates around fourteen nuclear installations in England and Wales in the period 1963 to 1980. (author)

  14. Evidence from population mixing in British New Towns 1946-85 of an infective basis for childhood leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortality from leukaemia under age 25 was studied in British New Towns to test the hypothesis that leukaemia represents a rare response to a much commoner (unrecognised) infection, the transmission of which is facilitated when large numbers of people come together. The density of children was higher in the rural, but lower in the overspill, New Towns than in areas from which their incomers originated. Residents of the rural New Towns had greater diversity of origin than those of overspill towns of London and Glasgow. These two factors would encourage a greater rise in the postulated underlying infection in the rural towns, and in these a significant excess of leukaemia at ages 0-4 was found in 1946-65. In both sets there was a significant deficit in other age groups consistent with immunising effects of the relevant infection. There are parallels with feline leukaemia virus infection, in which contrasting leukaemogenic and immunising effects occur in different social settings owing mainly to differences in intensity of viral exposure. (author)

  15. Evidence from population mixing in British New Towns 1946-85 of an infective basis for childhood leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinlen, L.J.; Clarke, K. (Edinburgh Univ. (UK). CRC Cancer Epidemiology Unit); Hudson, C. (Oxford Univ. (UK). CRC Cancer Epidemiology Research Group)

    1990-09-08

    Mortality from leukaemia under age 25 was studied in British New Towns to test the hypothesis that leukaemia represents a rare response to a much commoner (unrecognised) infection, the transmission of which is facilitated when large numbers of people come together. The density of children was higher in the rural, but lower in the overspill, New Towns than in areas from which their incomers originated. Residents of the rural New Towns had greater diversity of origin than those of overspill towns of London and Glasgow. These two factors would encourage a greater rise in the postulated underlying infection in the rural towns, and in these a significant excess of leukaemia at ages 0-4 was found in 1946-65. In both sets there was a significant deficit in other age groups consistent with immunising effects of the relevant infection. There are parallels with feline leukaemia virus infection, in which contrasting leukaemogenic and immunising effects occur in different social settings owing mainly to differences in intensity of viral exposure. (author).

  16. High white blood cell count at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: biological background and prognostic impact. Results from the NOPHO ALL-92 and ALL-2000 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkeviciene, G; Forestier, E; Hellebostad, M;

    2011-01-01

    Prognostic impact of peripheral blood white blood cell count (WBC) at the diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was evaluated in a population-based consecutive series of 2666 children aged 1–15 treated for ALL between 1992 and 2008 in the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland......, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). Ten-year event-free (pEFS10y) survival and overall (pOS10y) survival were 0.75 ± 0.01 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively. Although treatment intensity was determined by WBC, nonremission and relapsed patients still had significantly higher WBC than those in remission for B-cell...

  17. After the chemotherapy: potential mechanisms for chemotherapy-induced delayed skeletal muscle dysfunction in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celena eScheede-Bergdahl

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that survivors of childhood cancers, such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, have increased rates of longterm skeletal muscle dysfunction. This places them at higher risk of physical restriction and functional impairment as well as potentially contributing to observed increases in cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance in later life. The mechanisms underlying these changes in skeletal muscle are unknown but chemotherapy drugs used in treatment for ALL are strongly implicated. Normal skeletal muscle growth, development and function are dependent on correctly functioning muscle satellite cells, muscle motor neurons and muscle mitochondria. Each of these key components is potentially susceptible to damage by chemotherapy in childhood, particularly prolonged courses including repeated administration of combination chemotherapy. If this chemotherapy-induced damage is not fully reversible, impairment of satellite cells, muscle motor innervation and mitochondria could, either singly or together, lead to the emergence of delayed or persistent skeletal muscle dysfunction many years later. The known effects of individual drugs used in the treatment of ALL are outlined and the need for specific targeted studies to investigate the mechanisms underlying persistent muscle dysfunction in survivors of childhood cancers is highlighted.

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presenting with arthritis in an adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Usalan, C.; Ozarslan, E; Zengin, N.; Buyukayk, Y.; Gullu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The earliest manifestations of leukaemia often include rheumatic signs and symptoms. Arthritis is a well recognised complication of leukaemia in children, but acute and chronic leukaemia may also cause arthritis in adults. Leukaemic arthritis may occur at any time during the course of leukaemia and may be the presenting manifestation. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of both childhood and adult rheumatic disease. We present an adult patient presenting with arthr...

  19. Development of remedial process options: Phase II, Feasibility study: Installation Restoration Program, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronk, T.A.; Smuin, D.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schlosser, R.M. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This technical memorandum develops process options which are appropriate for environmental restoration activities at Naval Air Station Fallon (NAS Fallon), Nevada. Introduction of contaminants to the environment has resulted from deliberate disposal activities (both through dumping and landfilling) and accidental spills and leaks associated with normal activities at NAS Fallon over its lifetime of operation. Environmental sampling results indicate that the vast majority of contaminants of concern are petroleum hydrocarbon related. These contaminants include JP-4, JP-5, leaded and unleaded gasoline, waste oils and lubricants, hydraulic fluids, and numerous solvents and cleaners. The principal exposure pathways of concern associated with NAS Fallon contaminants appear to be the surface flows and shallow drainage systems to which the base contributes. Available data indicate NAS Fallon IR Program sites are not contributing excessive contamination to surface flows emanating from the base. Contaminants appear to be contained in a relatively immobile state in the shallow subsurface with little or no contaminant migration off site.

  20. Incidence of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the vicinity of nuclear sites in Scotland, 1968-93.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, L.; Black, R J; Harkness, E. F.; McKinney, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The primary aims were to investigate the incidence of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children resident near seven nuclear sites in Scotland and to determine whether there was any evidence of a gradient in risk with distance of residence from a nuclear site. A secondary aim was to assess the power of statistical tests for increased risk of disease near a point source when applied in the context of census data for Scotland. METHODS: The study data set comprised 1287 cases o...

  1. The impact of therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia on intelligence quotients; results of the risk-stratified randomized central nervous system treatment trial MRC UKALL XI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargha-Khadem Faraneh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MRC UKALLXI trial tested the efficacy of different central nervous system (CNS directed therapies in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. To evaluate morbidity 555/1826 randomised children underwent prospective psychological evaluations. Full Scale, verbal and performance IQs were measured at 5 months, 3 years and 5 years. Scores were compared in; (1 all patients (n = 555 versus related controls (n = 311, (2 low-risk children (presenting white cell count (WCC 9/l randomised to intrathecal methotrexate (n = 197 versus intrathecal and high-dose intravenous methotrexate (HDM (n = 202, and (3 high-risk children (WCC ≥ 50 × 109/l, age ≥ 2 years randomised to HDM (n = 79 versus cranial irradiation (n = 77. Results There were no significant differences in IQ scores between the treatment arms in either low- or high-risk groups. Despite similar scores at baseline, results at 3 and 5 years showed a significant reduction of between 3.6 and 7.3 points in all three IQ scores in all patient groups compared to controls (P Conclusion Children with ALL are at risk of CNS morbidity, regardless of the mode of CNS-directed therapy. Further work needs to identify individuals at high-risk of adverse CNS outcomes. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN16757172

  2. Slower early response to treatment and distinct expression profile of childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with DNA index < 1.16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliova, Marketa; Hovorkova, Lenka; Vaskova, Martina; Hrusak, Ondrej; Stary, Jan; Zuna, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (ALL) with 51-67 chromosomes are defined as high hyperdiploid (HHD) and are generally associated with good prognosis. However, several studies show heterogeneity in HHD ALL and suggest that the favourable prognosis is associated rather with higher ploidy defined by DNA index (DNAi) ≥ 1.16 or with a presence of specific single or combined trisomies. HHD ALL with DNAi < 1.16 are only rarely studied separately. Using single nucleotide polymorphism array, we analysed 89 childhood HHD ALL patients divided into groups with lower (<1.16; n = 34) and higher (≥1.16; n = 55) DNAi. We assessed treatment response, presence of secondary aberrations, mutations in RAS pathway genes and CREBBP and also gene expression profile (GEP) to reveal differences between the two subgroups. Cases with 51-54 chromosomes had DNAi 1.1-1.16 and cases with 55-67 chromosomes had DNAi ≥ 1.16. The groups with lower and higher DNAi had distinct response to early treatment and distinct GEP. The better response of the group with higher DNAi was associated with specific trisomies (trisomy of chromosome 10 or combined with trisomies 4 and/or 17). Our results suggest that cytogenetically defined HHD ALL can in fact be divided into two biologically distinguishable subgroups and that DNAi 1.16 is a relevant value to separate between the two. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27163296

  3. A comparison of the apparent risks of childhood leukaemia from parental exposure to radiation in the six months prior to conception in the Sellafield workforce and the Japanese bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cases of childhood leukaemia found among children of the Sellafield workforce and those observed in the offspring of the Japanese bomb survivors are analysed using both exponential and linear forms of a relative risk model and employing dose estimates for the period 6 months pre-conception. The leukaemia relative risk coefficients for paternal (whole-body) exposure in this pre-conception period for children of Sellafield workers are found to be statistically incompatible with the (gonadal dose) coefficients applying to the offspring of the bomb survivors born in the period May 1946 to December 1946, i.e. born 9 to 16 months after the bombings. The incompatibility does not depend on whether the risks in the Japanese children are assumed to be a function simply of paternal gonadal dose or of combined paternal and maternal gonadal dose. (author)

  4. Treatment on leukaemia in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, S.R. (St. James' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland))

    1984-06-01

    Since the late 1960s it has become clear that significant numbers of children may achieve long term remissions from acute leukaemia and that substantial numbers are probably cured of their disease. Results in most European countries and North America have failed to demonstrate any improvement on the early ''success'' rates and more than 50% of children will still ultimately die from their diseases. This review will attempt to outline the results of current approaches and treatment, to highlight prognostic factors and to examine the role of bone marrow transplantation in a onetime invariably fatal disease. For the purpose of this review, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) only, will be dealt with in detail, as this accounts for 85% of cases of childhood acute leukaemia. 27 refs.

  5. Leukaemia incidence and survival in children and adolescents in Europe during 1978-1997. Report from the Automated Childhood Cancer Information System project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coebergh, J. W. W.; Reedijk, A. M. J.; de Vries, E.; Martos, C.; Jakab, Z.; Steliarova-Foucher, E.; Kamps, W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Leukaemias constitute approximately one-third of cancers in children (age 0-14 years) and 10% in adolescents (age 15-19 years). Geographical patterns (1988-1997) and time trends (1978-1997) of incidence and survival from leukaemias in children (n = 29,239) and adolescents (n = 1929) were derived fro

  6. Infant leukaemia after in utero exposure to radiation from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been no documented increase in childhood leukaemia following the Chernobyl accident. However, different forms of childhood leukaemia may not be equally susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis. Infant leukaemia is a distinct form associated with a specific genetic abnormality. Outside the former Soviet Union, contamination resulting from the Chernobyl accident has been highest in Greece and Austria and high also in the Scandinavian countries. All childhood leukaemia cases diagnosed throughout Greece since 1 January 1980 have been recorded. Here we report that infants exposed in utero to ionizing radiation from the Chernobyl accident had 2.6 times the incidence of leukaemia compared to unexposed children (95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 5.1; P ∼ 0.003), and those born to mothers residing in regions with high radioactive fallout were at higher risk of developing infant leukaemia. No significant difference in leukaemia incidence was found among children aged 12 to 47 months. Preconceptional irradiation had no demonstrable effect on leukaemia risk at any of the studied age groups. (author)

  7. Leukaemia [near Dounreay and COMARE statement of advice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report of the case study of leukaemia in the Dounreay area of Scotland, near to the Dounreay reactor site is discussed. The report concludes that the observed excess incidence of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the area within 25 km of Dounreay cannot be explained by paternal exposure to ionising radiations prior to conception. The study has been referred to the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) which concluded that the study does not identify an explanation for the excess childhood leukaemia around Dounreay. However it is considered that there is enough evidence to recommend an intensified programme of investigation. (UK)

  8. The usefulness of growth hormone treatment for psychological status in young adult survivors of childhood leukaemia: an open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Coeverden Silvia CCM

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce the risk of brain damage children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL are nowadays mainly treated with intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC instead of central nervous system (CNS radiation therapy (CRT to prevent CNS relapse. However, chemotherapy may also lead to cognitive deficits. As growth hormone deficiency (GHD or impaired growth hormone secretion are frequently found in ALL patients treated with cranial radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy, we hypothesized that GH therapy may reduce cognitive deficits in these patients. Methods Twenty young adult survivors of childhood ALL with reduced bone mineral density ( IQ and neuropsychological performance were assessed at pre-treatment (T1 and after one (T2 and two (T3 years. ANOVA was performed with assessment at T1, T2 and T3 as repeated measurements factor. Relations between test score changes and changes of IGF-I levels were determined by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Scores on the cognitive tests were in the normal range. Verbal short- and long-term memory performance decreased between T1 and T2, and increased between T2 and T3. Performance at T3 was not significantly different from that at T1. Performance for sustained attention improved from T1 to T2 and from T1 to T3. Visual-spatial memory was improved after one year of GH treatment. A significant positive correlation was found for Δ IGF-I (T2-T1 with difference scores of visual-spatial memory (T2-T1 and T3-T1, indicating that IGF-I increase after one year of GH treatment is associated with increase in cognitive-perceptual performance at month 12 and 24. Conclusion Since the level of intellectual functioning of our patient cohort was in the normal range the present finding that GH treatment has negative effects on verbal memory and positive on attention and visual-spatial memory warrants similar studies in other groups of ALL survivors. Also, a lower dose of GH should be determined

  9. Adjuvant low dose radiation in childhood T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (report from the United Kingdom Childrens' Cancer Study Group--UKCCSG).

    OpenAIRE

    Mott, M G; Chessells, J M; Willoughby, M L; Mann, J R; Morris-Jones, P H; Malpas, J S; Palmer, M K

    1984-01-01

    From November 1977 to July 1983, 82 children with T leukaemia/lymphoma entered a randomised trial of combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Twenty-five were designated T lymphoma and 57 T leukaemia, 28 having greater than 100 x 10(9)1(-1) blasts in peripheral blood at diagnosis. Twenty-seven patients with mediastinal primaries who were treated on the companion non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) trial were comparable in all respects to the T lymphoma patients and the results of treatment were ther...

  10. Leukaemia clusters around Sellafield and Dounreay. Dosimetry and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983, a television programme identified a striking cluster of childhood leukaemia in the coastal village of Seascale, adjacent to the Sellafield nuclear complex in England. Excesses of childhood leukaemia near certain other nuclear installation in Britain were later reported during the 1980s. Detailed radiological investigations demonstrated that radiation exposures from discharged radioactive material were most unlikely to be the cause of these excesses and no serious deficiencies in these assessments have been discovered despite exhaustive searches. In 1990, a report was published suggesting that occupational radiation exposure of men before the conception of their children could be responsible for the Seascale cluster. Extensive research has not supported a causal link between paternal preconceptional radiation dose and childhood leukaemia, and the idea that radiation exposure of fathers materially increases the risk of leukaemia in offspring and could account for the clusters has now effectively been abandoned. In contrast, evidence has mounted that childhood leukaemia has an infectious basis and that unusual population mixing increases the risk of the disease. It now seems that population mixing is the explanation for the excesses of childhood leukaemia near nuclear sites and at other locations with no enhanced exposure to radiation. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear power and leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet describes the nature of leukaemia, disease incidence in the UK and the possible causes. Epidemiological studies observing rates of leukaemia near nuclear power stations in the UK and other parts of the world are discussed. Possible causes of leukaemia excesses near nuclear establishments include radioactive discharges into the environment, paternal radiation exposure and viral causes. (UK)

  12. Outcome of ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO-ALL-1992 protocol: frequent late relapses but good overall survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Andersen, Mette K; Autio, Kirsi; Blennow, Elisabeth; Borgström, Georg; Golovleva, Irina; Heim, Sverre; Heinonen, Kristina; Hovland, Randi; Johannsson, Johann H; Kerndrup, Gitte; Nordgren, Ann; Rosenquist, Richard; Swolin, Birgitta; Johansson, Bertil

    2008-01-01

    The prognostic impact of t(12;21)(p13;q22) [ETV6/RUNX1 fusion] in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) has been extensively debated, particularly with regard to the frequency of late relapses and appropriate treatment regimens. We have retrospectively collected 679 ALLs with known ETV6/...

  13. In vitro drug resistance and prognostic impact of p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B) deletions in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers-van Woerden, NL; Pieters, R; Slater, RM; Loonen, A.H.; Beverloo, HB; van Drunen, E; Heyman, M; Moreno, TC; Rots, MG; van Wering, ER; Kamps, WA; Janka-Schaub, GE; Veerman, AJP

    2001-01-01

    p16 gene deletions are present in about 70% of primary paediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and 20% of common/precursor B-cell ALL cases. It is not clear what the impact of the frequent p16 deletions is within the subgroup of T-lineage ALL. We studied the relationship between p16/

  14. Leukaemia and lymphoma near the Sellafield reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have shown an excess of childhood leukaemia near nuclear establishments but have been unable to establish whether known causes or factors associated with the nuclear plants themselves are responsible for the observed excess. Such an association has, however, been discovered in a study where the recorded external dose of whole-body ionizing radiation to fathers working at Sellafield is associated with the development of leukaemia among their children. A circle, centered on the Sellafield nuclear plant, of radius 5 kilometers contained a cluster of 5 cases of leukaemia and 3 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children. All the leukaemias and 2 of the 3 lymphomas occurred in children born to parents living in Seascale, a village some 3 kilometers from the nuclear plant. Taking the national incidence of childhood leukaemia, less than one case of leukaemia would be expected in Seascale. The finding that 'exposure of fathers to ionising radiation before conception is related to the development of leukaemia in their offspring' is the first such finding with human data

  15. Acute lymphocytic leukaemia in children in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some features, present at diagnosis in children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia, investigated during the period 1973-1975, and the results of treatment according to protocol AL II of the Dutch Childhood Leukaemia Study Group (SNWLK), are described. This report concerns the results of induction treatment, elective treatment of the central nervous system, and also of the prospective comparative study on the influence of the addition of cyclophosphamide to maintenance treatment with 6-mercaptopurine and methotrextate. In the context of the investigation of long-term side effects of disease and treatment, the immunocompetence of children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia in continuous remission after cessation of therapy was studied. (Auth.)

  16. Case-control study of leukaemia among young people near La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant: the environmental hypothesis revisted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to investigate the association between childhood leukaemia and established risk factors or other factors related to La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant. There is some convincing evidence in childhood leukaemia of a causal role for environmental radiation exposure from recreational activities on beaches. New methods for identifying the environmental pathways, focusing on marine ecosystems, are warranted. (author)

  17. Antibiotic use from conception to diagnosis of child leukaemia as compared to the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Kaerlev, Linda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of infection in the aetiology of childhood leukaemia is unknown. We used prescriptions of antibiotics from Danish pharmacies as a proxy measure for the occurrence of infections. PROCEDURE: We investigated the association between exposure to antibiotics, from conception to...... leukaemia diagnosis, and the risk of leukaemia. Incident cases of leukaemia among children in Denmark, 1995-2008, with mothers having their earliest conception date in 1995, were individually matched to population controls by age, sex and municipality. Conditional logistic regression analyses assessed...... antibiotic redemptions in different time periods from conception up to 6 months before the diagnoses of all leukaemia types, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia [ALL] and ALL in 2- to 5-year-old children, adjusting for several potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 120/360 (33.3%) leukaemia mothers and 1...

  18. Cytochemical studies in leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Neelam

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred cases of acute leukaemia were studied, by Romanowsky stains and by cytochemical stains such as Sudan Black B, Periodic Acid Schiff, Alkaline phosphatase and Peroxidase stains. Cases difficult to diagnose by Romanowsky stained smears were easily classified by these supplementary stains. Their importance as supplements to the routine Romanowsky staining in the diagnosis of leukaemia is emphasized and the division of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia based on these patterns is suggested.

  19. Epidemiological and immunological characteristics of childhood leukaemia in the Netherlands: population-based data from a nationwide co-operative group of paediatricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reviewed from several population-based epidemiological and immunological studies of children with leukaemia in The Netherlands, who were diagnosed between 1973 and 1982 through a nationwide co-operative group of paediatricians. From 1973 till 1980 annual incidence rates appeared to be 3.1 per 105 person-yr. No significant trend was observed in this period. However a preliminary analysis of patients in the 1980-1982 period showed an increase. Mortality rates are decreasing since 1973, as expected. Incidence rates and proportions of different morphological and immunological subtypes reflect the pattern of occurrence in populations with a high standard of living. A relatively high incidence rate of acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) is observed with a peak at the age of 3-5. The proportion of patients with T-cell phenotype among ALL-patients, immunologically typed between 1979 and 1982, appeared to increase with age, while the proportion of common ALL decreased. Statistical analysis of the data of patients with ALL in the Western part of the country including areas with nuclear plants, gave no indication for the presence of clustering. (author)

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A;

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The...

  1. Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization deletion analysis of the 9p21 region and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchinskaya, Ekaterina; Heyman, Mats; Nordgren, Ann;

    2011-01-01

    Interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied on diagnostic BM smears from 519 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in order to establish the frequency and prognostic importance of 9p21 deletion in children enrolled in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and...... Oncology (NOPHO) - 2000 treatment protocol. Among the patients, 452 were diagnosed with B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL and 66 with T-ALL. A higher incidence of 9p21 deletions was found in T-ALL (38%) compared to BCP-ALL (15·7%). Homozygous deletions were found in 19·7% of T-ALL and 4·0% of BCP-ALL; hemizygous...

  2. Outcome of ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO-ALL-1992 protocol: frequent late relapses but good overall survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forestier, E.; Heyman, M.; Andersen, Mette Klarskov;

    2008-01-01

    The prognostic impact of t(12;21)(p13;q22) [ETV6/RUNX1 fusion] in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) has been extensively debated, particularly with regard to the frequency of late relapses and appropriate treatment regimens. We have retrospectively collected 679 ALLs with known ETV6....../RUNX1 status, as ascertained by fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology -ALL-1992 protocol. The assigned risk groups/treatment modalities for the 171 (25%) patients with t(12...... almost 50% of all relapses occurring > or = 5 years after diagnosis. Of all relapses after 6 years, 80% occurred in the t(12;21)-positive group. The overall survival was 94% at 5 years and 88% at 10 years; thus, the treatment of patients in second or later remission is usually successful. As yet, there...

  3. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in...

  4. Leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in young persons resident in small areas of West Cumbria in relation to paternal preconceptional irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Wakeford, R.; Parker, L.

    1996-01-01

    The results of a previous study suggested that an association between childhood leukaemia and the radiation dose received occupationally by a father before the conception of his child might provide the explanation for the marked excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the village of Seascale, West Cumbria. The present study identifies other small areas (electoral wards) in West Cumbria where excess cases of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in young people have occurred...

  5. Leukaemia in East Suffolk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was conducted by the East Suffolk Health Authority to determine whether there were any geographical variations in the incidence of leukaemia over the last fifteen years in East Suffolk suggesting an environmental hazard, e.g. Sizewell Power Station. No areas were found to have a statistically significant increased incidence of leukaemia cases although there did appear to be a cluster of cases in the Leiston area. (U.K.)

  6. Regenerating normal B-cell precursors during and after treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia : implications for monitoring of minimal residual disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wering, ER; Van der Linden-Schrever, BEM; Szczepanski, T; Willemse, MJ; Baars, EA; Van Wijngaarde-Schmitz, HM; Kamps, WA; Van Dongen, JJM

    2000-01-01

    We studied 57 childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients who remained in continuous complete remission after treatment according to the Dutch Childhood Leukaemia Study Group ALL-8 protocols. The patients were monitored at 18 time points during and after treatment [640 bone marrow (BM) an

  7. Outcome of central nervous system relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia--prospective open cohort analyses of the ALLR3 trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Narayan Masurekar

    Full Text Available The outcomes of Central Nervous System (CNS relapses in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL treated in the ALL R3 trial, between January 2003 and March 2011 were analysed. Patients were risk stratified, to receive a matched donor allogeneic transplant or fractionated cranial irradiation with continued treatment for two years. A randomisation of Idarubicin with Mitoxantrone closed in December 2007 in favour of Mitoxantrone. The estimated 3-year progression free survival for combined and isolated CNS disease were 40.6% (25·1, 55·6 and 38.0% (26.2, 49.7 respectively. Univariate analysis showed a significantly better survival for age <10 years, progenitor-B cell disease, good-risk cytogenetics and those receiving Mitoxantrone. Adjusting for these variables (age, time to relapse, cytogenetics, treatment drug and gender a multivariate analysis, showed a poorer outcome for those with combined CNS relapse (HR 2·64, 95% CI 1·32, 5·31, p = 0·006 for OS. ALL R3 showed an improvement in outcome for CNS relapses treated with Mitoxantrone compared to Idarubicin; a potential benefit for matched donor transplant for those with very early and early isolated-CNS relapses.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN45724312.

  8. Academic career after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, A; Rammeloo, LAJ; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Rekers-Mombarg, L; Postma, A

    2000-01-01

    Aim-To evaluate academic career in long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), in comparison to their healthy siblings. Patients-Ninety four children treated for ALL with cranial irradiation 18 or 25 Gy and intrathecal methotrexate as CNS prophylaxis. Median age at evaluati

  9. Environmental factors and leukaemia risks of children: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukaemia is the most common malignancy in childhood, with an incidence rate in Germany of 5.5 per 100,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per year. Overall, epidemiological studies suggest a rather minor role of environmental factors in the development of childhood leukaemia. Ionising radiation is the only established risk factor; however, it is currently unclear at which doses effects occur. Low doses from terrestrial exposures or related to living close to a nuclear power plant show weak associations in recent epidemiological studies, but the findings can at present not be explained with mechanistic models from radiation biology. The consistent association observed in epidemiological studies between extremely low-frequency magnetic fields and childhood leukaemia risk also lacks a good explanation and it is still not known whether this observation displays an artefact or a causal link. Some pesticides appear to be carcinogenic in experiments, but the results from epidemiological studies are inconsistent. No substantial risk appears to be related to air pollution from road traffic. Recent research focused on working hypotheses related to patterns of infections, in particular that an isolation from infectious stimulation in infancy leads to an immature immune system reacting inappropriately to later common infections. While children being at day care at an early age appear to have a reduced risk of childhood leukaemia, more work needs to be done to clearly identify the agents involved in a putative mechanism. (orig.)

  10. Leukaemia incidence in Somerset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis I confirms two previous studies. There is a high rate of leukaemia incidence (all ages) in the MPH catchment area, compared with rates found by the Leukaemia Research Fund (LRF) for a large part of the country. LRF rates are only available for 1984-1986. For 1971-1987, local rates are 24% higher than LRF rates for 1984-1986. Limiting analysis to the three-year period for which LRF rates are available reveals a local rate for 1984-1986 that is 61% higher than the LRF rate. Analysis II thus identifies an unusual pattern of leukaemia and non-Hodgkins Lymphoma incidence in the vicinity of Hinkley Point. A relatively high rate exists for the period 1964-1986 but excess cases are concentrated in the period 1964-1973; after 1973, the rate is unremarkable. There is no ready explanation for this pattern. If radioactive emissions from Hinkley Point are responsible, large unreported releases would need to have occurred in the 1960's. This possibility needs to be explored. There are other possible explanations but current knowledge about causes of leukaemia is insufficient to offer definite answers. (Author)

  11. Birthweight and Childhood Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltiel, Ora; Tikellis, Gabriella; Linet, Martha; Golding, Jean; Lemeshow, Stanley; Phillips, Gary; Lamb, Karen; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Håberg, Siri E; Strøm, Marin; Granstrøm, Charlotta; Northstone, Kate; Klebanoff, Mark; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Milne, Elizabeth; Pedersen, Marie; Kogevinas, Manolis; Ha, Eunhee; Dwyer, Terence

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence relating childhood cancer to high birthweight is derived primarily from registry and case-control studies. We aimed to investigate this association, exploring the potential modifying roles of age at diagnosis and maternal anthropometrics, using prospectively collected data from...... the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium. METHODS: We pooled data on infant and parental characteristics and cancer incidence from six geographically and temporally diverse member cohorts [the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (UK), the Collaborative Perinatal Project (USA......). Childhood cancer (377 cases diagnosed prior to age 15 years) risk was analysed by type (all sites, leukaemia, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and non-leukaemia) and age at diagnosis. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) from Cox proportional hazards models stratified by cohort...

  12. Leukaemia near british nuclear installations. Leucemies autour des installations nucleaires anglaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, D. (Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (FR))

    1991-01-01

    An excess of childhood leukaemia has been seen near some British nuclear installations, especially near the Sellafield reprocessing plant. The same result was found in a more general study including a large number of nuclear sites. Similar studies made in USA, Canada and France have been negative. Moreover, epidemiological studies made in England have discovered other childhood leukaemia clusters in areas far from nuclear facilities, and especially near potential sites of nuclear installations. Several explanations are suggested but no definite conclusion is yet possible. Doses from radioactive releases seem to be too low to account for the additional deaths from leukaemia by environmental contamination. A virus activation, which might be associated with population influx into rural isolated areas, has been considered. The hypothesis of genetic mutation induced by ionising radiation in the fathers of children with leukaemia has been made because a higher risk of leukaemia was observed for children of fathers employed at Sellafield. No firm conclusion is possible considering the small number of observed cases and the lack of excess leukaemias in the offspring of Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. The possibility of internal contamination, chemicals or even radon is discussed as other causes. Studies in progress might allow to find an answer to the problem of leukaemia in the vicinity of British nuclear installations.

  13. Dicentric chromosome in the bone marrow of a child with megakaryoblastic leukaemia and Down's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkie, A O; Kitchen, C.; Oakhill, A; Howell, R T; Berry, P J

    1988-01-01

    A two year old girl with Down's syndrome (constitutional karyotype: 47 + 21), presenting with pancytopenia, developed acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL). Her bone marrow contained an abnormal clone with a novel dicentric chromosome derived from chromosomes 5 and 7 (karyotype 46, XX, -5, -7, +dic (5;7) (p 13; p 11.2), +21. This case provides further evidence for a connection between chromosome 21 and this unusual form of childhood leukaemia, and raises questions about the loss of short ar...

  14. Leukaemia and lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is presented of the Leukaemia Research Fund Data Collection Study of haematological malignancies undertaken from 1984 to 1988. It is the largest single survey carried out in Britain into the incidence of leukaemia, lymphoma and related diseases. In Chapter 1, the background to the study is given, followed by a summary of the geographical areas covered and the methods used for registration and for cross-checking with other data sources. Fuller details of the areal breakdown and of the broad statistical approaches used in calculating and comparing disease incidence are given in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, the results of the study are presented in tables, graphs and colour maps, showing the incidence of all the main groups of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms at County and Administrative District levels. Chapter 4 discusses the results with some consideration of possible causative factors for areal differences. (UK)

  15. Department of Energy's John O'Fallon Begins New Position; Robin Staffin Appointed Acting HEP Director

    CERN Multimedia

    Baggett, N

    2003-01-01

    Officials of the DOE's Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics have announced that after 15 years as Director of the Division of High Energy Physics, Dr. John R. O'Fallon has accepted the position of Executive Assistant for International and Interagency Planning, in the Office of the Associate Director for High Energy and Nuclear Physics, effective March 24, 2003 (1 page).

  16. Chilblain-like leukaemia cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chi; McEwen, Gary; Fraga, Garth Robert

    2016-01-01

    Chilblain, also known as pernio, is an abnormal inflammatory response to cold, moist environmental conditions. Persistent or atypical lesions should prompt investigation to exclude underlying systemic illness. We describe a case of acute myeloid leukaemia that presented with chilblain-like leukaemia cutis. PMID:27095810

  17. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge, Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Refuge Narrative Report: 1977, 1978, 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Stillwater WMA, Anaho Island NWR, and Fallon NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977-1979. The report begins with an...

  18. Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, *Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon NWR: Refuge Narrative Report: Calendar Year 1972

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Stillwater WMA, Anaho Island NWR, and Fallon NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins...

  19. Age of onset and type of leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors that influence leukaemia type are complex and differ for various leukaemogenic agents. Some leukaemogens increase the age-related risk of specific leukaemia, whereas other induce several or a single leukaemia type without age correlation. In most situations, age has no influence on leukaemia type. Consequently, other factors may explain the pronounced age-related differences seen for ''spontaneously'' occurring leukaemias in human beings. (author)

  20. CD10 is a marker for cycling cells with propensity to apoptosis in childhood ALL

    OpenAIRE

    G. Cutrona; Tasso, P; Dono, M; Roncella, S; M. ULIVI; Carpaneto, E M; Fontana, V; Comis, M; F. Morabito; Spinelli, M.; Frascella, E.; Boffa, L C; G. Basso; Pistoia, V.; Ferrarini, M.

    2002-01-01

    CD10 constitutes a favourable prognostic marker for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Since correlations between CD10, cell cycle and apoptotic abilities were demonstrated in various cell types, we investigated whether differences existed in the cycling/apoptotic abilities of CD10-positive and CD10-negative B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Twenty-eight cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (mean age of 6.8 years) were subdivided into two groups according to high (17 ca...

  1. The chronic leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jacobs

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The slow progression of both chronic granulocytic and lymphocytic leukaemia, when compared to their acute counterparts, has been used as an argument to support less aggressive therapy or even, in some instances, a watch-and-wait policy. This conservative approach is bolstered by a number of observations including the ease with which haematologic control can initially be achieved, the older age of patients with the lymphocytic variant and the paucity of controlled data showing that long disease-free survival or cure can result from the use of aggressive treatment. Given these circumstances, it is not surprising that many such individuals are managed outside specialised centres using a variety of agents and schedules, both of which may, on occasions, be inappropriate. Accumulating evidence suggests a need to reconsider these practices since cure is now possible in selected patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia while the use of multi-drug regimens in the lymphatic form can significantly improve survival. These advances are the result of carefully conducted clinical trials involving many individuals the world over and constitute the basis fo r advocating early referral to those institutions where all the necessary expertise is available.

  2. Case-control study of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children in Caithness near the Dounreay nuclear installation.

    OpenAIRE

    Urquhart, J. D.; Black, R J; Muirhead, M. J.; Sharp, L; Maxwell, M.; Eden, O B; Jones, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine whether the observed excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the area around the Dounreay nuclear installation is associated with established risk factors, or with factors related to the plant, or with parental occupation in the nuclear industry. DESIGN--Case-control study. SETTING--Caithness local government district. SUBJECTS--14 cases of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma occurring in children aged under 15 years diagnosed in the area between 197...

  3. Case-control study of leukaemia among young people near La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant: the environmental hypothesis revisited.

    OpenAIRE

    Pobel, D.; Viel, J F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between childhood leukaemia and established risk factors or other factors related to La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Area within a 35 km radius of La Hague, Normandy, France. SUBJECTS: Twenty seven cases of leukaemia diagnosed during the period 1978-93 in people aged under 25 years and 192 controls matched for sex, age, place of birth, and residence at time of diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Antenatal ...

  4. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  5. Lung function after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for leukaemia or lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysom, K; Holm, K; Hesse, B;

    1996-01-01

    Longitudinal data were analysed on the lung function of 25 of 29 survivors of childhood leukaemia or lymphoma, who had been conditioned with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, to test whether children are particularly vulnerable to pulmonary...

  6. Epidemiological studies of leukaemia in children and young adults around nuclear facilities: a critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    An epidemiological study published in late 2007 described an increased risk of leukaemia in children under 5 living within 5 kilometres of German nuclear power plants. A great deal of research has been carried out on this subject since the early 1980's. The aim of this report was to provide a synthesis and critical analysis of results related to the risk of leukaemia in children and young adults aged under 25 living close to nuclear facilities. The report is structured in three sections: - a reminder of the main characteristics of childhood leukaemia and a description of the methods used to conduct epidemiological studies; - the most exhaustive review possible of epidemiological studies published in the international literature describing the frequency of leukaemia close to nuclear facilities in different countries around the world. A critical analysis is made of the published results. Some results from studies not focused on nuclear facilities are also presented. The methodological limitations associated with descriptive studies are explained and discussed; - the last section discusses the possible causes of childhood leukaemia and the main hypotheses explored to explain certain clusters of cases observed locally close to some nuclear sites. Appendices at the end of the document provide additional explanations of the concepts and methods used in epidemiology and statistics, and of the classification of malignant hemopathies. (authors)

  7. Childhood cancer and nuclear installations: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many epidemiological studies of childhood cancer around nuclear installations have been conducted in recent years. This article reviews results from Great Britain and elsewhere. Geographical studies have indicated raised risks of childhood leukaemia around some British nuclear installations. However, environmental assessments suggest that the findings are unlikely to be due to radioactive releases from the sites. Case-control studies have allowed more detailed investigation of putative risk factors than is possible from geographical studies. In particular, a recent national study in Britain does not support the hypothesis raised by an earlier study in West Cumbria that paternal radiation exposure prior to conception may increase the risk of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in offspring. Other studies suggest that childhood leukaemia may have an infective basis, although there is still uncertainty about whether this would explain the findings around nuclear installations. The UK Childhood Cancer Study may provide more information on the causes of these diseases. (author)

  8. Incidence of leukaemia in young people around the La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant: a sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives are to investigate the incidence of childhood leukaemia in young people around the French nuclear waste reprocessing plant (La Hague, Normandy) for the period 1978-1992, and to check the sensitivity of the results to the choice of disease clustering tests and reference rates. The performance of three statistical procedures are compared: a conventional approach; a Poisson maximum test, and an extraction mapping technique. The results are in general agreement and demonstrate the apparent existence of a distinct cluster of childhood leukaemia, contiguous and south-east of the La Hague nuclear facility. (author)

  9. A four-point clinical criteria distinguishes immune thrombocytopenia from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, S H; How, S J; Ariffin, H; Krishnan, S

    2016-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is the most common diagnosis of isolated thrombocytopenia. The dilemma encountered by paediatricians is missing diagnosis of acute leukaemia in children with isolated thrombocytopenia. We demonstrated childhood ITP could be diagnosed using a four point clinical criteria without missing a diagnosis of acute leukaemia. Hence, bone marrow examination is not necessary in children with typical features compatible with ITP prior to steroid therapy. This can encourage paediatricians to choose steroid therapy, which is cheaper and non-blood product, as first line platelet elevating therapy in children with significant haemorrhage. PMID:27130741

  10. MR features of isolated uterine relapse in an adolescent with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novellas, Sebastien; Fournol, Maude; Geoffray, Anne; Chevallier, Patrick [Regional Hospital Centre and University of Nice, Medical Imaging Service, Archet 2 Hospital, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Deville, Anne [Regional Hospital Centre and University of Nice, Paediatric Service, Archet 2 Hospital, Nice (France); Kurzenne, Jean-Yves [Regional Hospital Centre and University of Nice, Paediatric Surgery Service, Archet 2 Hospital, Nice (France)

    2008-03-15

    Relapses of lymphoblastic leukaemia traditionally involve the central nervous system and testes in boys. Involvement of the female pelvic organs is frequently found at autopsy; however, involvement of the cervical uterus is rare and even less commonly symptomatic. A 13-cm uterine mass was discovered in a 15-year-old adolescent with a history of lymphoblastic leukaemia during childhood. Pelvic MRI was the best tool to assess the size, characteristics and invasive nature of this lesion of the uterine cervix. To our knowledge, this is a unique case in that we describe the MRI appearance of a relapsing lymphoblastic leukaemic mass both before and after treatment. (orig.)

  11. Breast cancers and leukaemias after irradiation. Cancers du sein et leucemies apres irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vathaire, F. de (Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France))

    1994-01-01

    The influence of new data or recent re-analysis concerning the risks of breast cancer and leukaemia after irradiation is summarized in this article. The risk of breast cancer, particularly after irradiation during childhood, seems to be more important than estimated previously. Because the pattern of risk after irradiation seems to be multiplicative and since breast cancer is very frequent among western populations, these new findings may have important consequences in public health. Despite leukaemias have been known for a long time to be a radioinduced tumour, very little information is available about the effects of age at irradiation and dose rate. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Genetic variegation of clonal architecture and propagating cells in leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristina; Lutz, Christoph; van Delft, Frederik W; Bateman, Caroline M; Guo, Yanping; Colman, Susan M; Kempski, Helena; Moorman, Anthony V; Titley, Ian; Swansbury, John; Kearney, Lyndal; Enver, Tariq; Greaves, Mel

    2011-01-20

    Little is known of the genetic architecture of cancer at the subclonal and single-cell level or in the cells responsible for cancer clone maintenance and propagation. Here we have examined this issue in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in which the ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion is an early or initiating genetic lesion followed by a modest number of recurrent or 'driver' copy number alterations. By multiplexing fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for these mutations, up to eight genetic abnormalities can be detected in single cells, a genetic signature of subclones identified and a composite picture of subclonal architecture and putative ancestral trees assembled. Subclones in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia have variegated genetics and complex, nonlinear or branching evolutionary histories. Copy number alterations are independently and reiteratively acquired in subclones of individual patients, and in no preferential order. Clonal architecture is dynamic and is subject to change in the lead-up to a diagnosis and in relapse. Leukaemia propagating cells, assayed by serial transplantation in NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice, are also genetically variegated, mirroring subclonal patterns, and vary in competitive regenerative capacity in vivo. These data have implications for cancer genomics and for the targeted therapy of cancer. PMID:21160474

  13. High-dose vincristine, fractionated total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide as conditioning regimen in allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in second remission: a 7-year Italian multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of high-dose vincristine (4 mg/m2 over 4 d) combined with fractionated total body irradiation (F-TBI) (200 cGy x 2 over 3 d) and cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg for 2 d) as a preparative regimen in allogeneic (AlloBMT) and autologous (ABMT) bone marrow transplantation for 75 consecutive children (median age at transplant 8.5 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in second complete remission (CR). Median duration of first CR was 26 and 25 months in the AlloBMT and ABMT group, respectively. We conclude that the conditioning regimen with high-dose vincrostine combined with cyclophosphamide and F-TBI is feasible and promising although its therapeutic advantage should be tested in larger series of patients enrolled in randomized studies. (author)

  14. Control of feline leukaemia virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Weijer (Kees); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractFeline leukaemia virus (FeLV) usually occurs in its natural species, the domestic cat. FeLV is also important to human individuals as a comparative model, as it may cause a variety of diseases, some malignant and some benign, such as immunosuppression, which bears a resemblance to AIDS (

  15. Epidemiology of childhood cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Terracini Benedetto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract At least in economically developed countries, in the last decades, the incidence of childhood cancer has increased and the increase is unlikely to be an artefact. Causes of the increase have not been identified: a role of preventable environmental exposures is possible. Changes have also occurred in the age distribution of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Currently, children with cancer can be successfully treated and cured. However, access to the best therapy differs widely among coun...

  16. An analysis of leukaemia, lymphoma and other malignancies together with certain categories of non-cancer mortality in the first generation offspring (F1) of the Japanese bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absence of any significant excess of childhood leukaemia in the offspring of the Japanese bomb survivors has provided strong evidence against a causal interpretation of the association between paternal preconception radiation dose and the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the offspring of employees at the Sellafield nuclear installation, West Cumbria. The use of the Japanese data has, however, been questioned on the basis that leukaemia cases may have been under-recorded in the years immediately following the bombings. In order to investigate possible misdiagnoses of leukaemia cases in the first generation offspring (F1) of the Japanese bomb survivors, analyses have been undertaken of cases of leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and all other malignancies, together with deaths due to blood diseases, deaths due to infectious diseases and deaths from unknown causes. (author)

  17. Chronic myeloid leukaemia occurring in a patient with hairy cell leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wandroo, F; Bareford, D; El-Jehani, F

    2000-01-01

    Occurrences of second malignancies in hairy cell leukaemia are well recognised. Most of these malignancies are either solid tumours or lymphoproliferative disorders. The association of myeloproliferative disorders with hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is very rare. This report describes a case of a patient with HCL who after remaining in remission developed Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), which rapidly transformed to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with further cytog...

  18. Evaluation of management options for disposal of salt and trace element laden agricultural drainage water from the Fallon Indian Reservation, Fallon, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Benson, S.

    1991-03-01

    This is the final report describing work performed on the Fallon Indian Reservation by the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during FY90. These investigations were initiated at the request of the United States Bureau of Reclamation in response to recent concerns regarding disposal of agriculture drainage water from the Reservation. The Reservation is transected by numerous irrigation and drainage canals, including the TJ Drain. Recent investigations by the US Fish and Wildlife Service have demonstrated that water in the TJ Drain is toxic to several aquatic indicator organisms, including bluegills, fathead minnows and daphnids. This information, coupled with recent die-offs of fish and birds, has lead to concern about continued discharge of TJ Drain water into local surface waters. In late 1990, plans for closing the TJ Drain and providing for alternative drainage were initiated. We aim to provide information for assessing options fro disposal of agricultural drainage water from the Reservation. In particular, our studies focuses on irrigation and drainage of lands currently serviced by the TJ Drain. Options for continued irrigation and drainage of the Reservation fall broadly into two categories: options that provide an alternative to drain water disposal into the SWMA; and options that include continuing the current practice of drain water disposal into the SWMA. Other options include elements of both of these alternatives. Additional discussion of specific options will follow a brief summary of the technical work supporting our assessment of drainage related issues at the Reservation. 67 refs., 57 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. The eye in acute leukaemia. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose to the ocular lens during standard cranial irradiation prophylaxis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) has been studied both in patients and in an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses to the lens depend on patient set-up and in order that this is minimised, a simple immobilisation technique is recommended. Surface thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements seriously underestimate the dose received by the ocular lens. Previous measurements made in a phantom have used a large volume ionisation chamber and therefore the minimum cataractogenic dose of 400 cGy for a fractionated treatment is an underestimate. The exact position of the anterior orbital field margin and thus its distance behind the surface of the eye is also important as regards lens dose. Data from the phantom demonstrate accurately the dose gradient through the eye during standard cranial prophylaxis and may explain the lower incidence of leukaemic relapse in the posterior segment of the eye, and yet explain the persistence of isolated anterior chamber relapses. 17 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Dexamethasone in the maintenance phase of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: is the risk of lethal infections too high?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poele, E.M. Te; Bont, E.S. de; Boezen, H.M.; Revesz, T.; Bokkerink, J.P.M.; Beishuizen, A.; Nijhuis, I.J.M.; Oude Nijhuis, C.S.; Veerman, A.J.P.; Kamps, W.A.

    2007-01-01

    We report an increased incidence of infectious deaths during maintenance treatment of the ninth protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG-ALL-9). The main difference in maintenance treatment between DCOG-ALL-9 and the DCOG-ALL-7 and DCOG-ALL-8 protocols i

  1. Dexamethasone in the maintenance phase of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment : Is the risk of lethal infections too high?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Te Poele, Esther M; de Bont, Eveline S J M; Boezen, Hendrika; Revesz, Tom; Bökkerink, Jos P M; Beishuizen, Auke; Nijhuis, Ilse J M; Oude Nijhuis, Claudi S M; Veerman, Anjo J P; Kamps, Willem A

    2007-01-01

    We report an increased incidence of infectious deaths during maintenance treatment of the ninth protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG-ALL-9). The main difference in maintenance treatment between DCCG-ALL-9 and the DCOG-ALL-7 and DCOG-ALL-8 protocols i

  2. Vincristine induced apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells: A mitochondrial controlled pathway regulated by reactive oxygen species?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E.; Boer, A.W. de; Graaf, S.S.N. de; Kamps, W.A.; Bont, E.S. de

    2002-01-01

    Vincristine (VCR), a microtubule interfering anti-cancer agent, plays a key role in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The route of VCR induced apoptosis in ALL cells is not well defined. In this study we demonstrated caspase-9 and -3 activation in vivo in bone marrow le

  3. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in...

  4. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in...

  5. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge including Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Fallon National Wildlife Refuge, and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Stillwater NWR and WMA, Fallon NWR, and Anaho Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report...

  6. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge, Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge and Fallon National Wildlife Refuge: Narrative Report: 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fallon, Stillwater and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuges are located in northwest Nevada and are administered by the refuge administrative office in...

  7. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge including Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Fallon National Wildlife Refuge, and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Stillwater NWR and WMA, Fallon NWR, and Anaho Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report...

  8. Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge including Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Fallon National Wildlife Refuge, and Anaho Island National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Stillwater NWR and WMA, Fallon NWR, and Anaho Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report...

  9. Leukaemia incidents after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romania and especially its Eastern territory were among the most heavily affected area after Chernobyl accident. The objective of our study was to investigate whether or not the nuclear accident determined an increased number of leukaemia cases. The specific rates of leukaemia incidents by age group were calculated in 588167 children aged 0-6 years in April 1986 and 99917 children which have been exposed 'in utero'. The rates of 1989-1994 period were compared with the rates of 1980-1985 period. The incidence rates were lower in the exposed group than that in controls for children under 1 year (20.52/105 inh vs 23.11/105 inh), 1-3 years (13.26/105 inh vs 16.11/105 inh) and 4-6 years (9.58/105 inh vs 10.58/105 inh). The cohort of 'in utero' exposed children presented a leukaemia incidences insignificantly higher than that before the accident (23.10/105 inh vs 15.93/105 inh)

  10. Summary curves for patients transplanted for chronic myeloid leukaemia salvaged by a donor lymphocyte infusion: the current leukaemia-free survival curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, John P.; Keiding, Niels; Shu, Youyi;

    2000-01-01

    CML, donor lymphocyte infusion, leukaemia-free survival, current leukaemia-free survival, statistical methods......CML, donor lymphocyte infusion, leukaemia-free survival, current leukaemia-free survival, statistical methods...

  11. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulhadiye Avcu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised patients.

  12. Difficult diagnosis of invasive fungal infection predominantly involving the lower gastrointestinal tract in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Avcu, Gulhadiye; Karapinar, Deniz Yilmaz; Yazici, Pinar; Duyu, Muhterem; Polat, Suleyha Hilmioglu; Atabay, Berna; Doganavsargil, Basak; Karapinar, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are most commonly seen in immunocompromised patients and usually affect the respiratory system. Gastrointestinal system involvement of mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis is rarely reported in childhood. Here we describe a 5 year old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed invasive fungal infection particularly affecting the lower gastrointestinal system to emphasise the difficulties in diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in immun...

  13. Individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine increments during high-dose methotrexate consolidation treatment of lower risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. A Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Thomas L; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Lausen, Birgitte;

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and toxicity of individualized toxicity-titrated 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) dose increments during post-remission treatment with High-dose methotrexate (HDM) (5000 mg/m(2), ×3) in 38 patients with Childhood (ALL). Patients were increased in steps of 25 mg 6MP/m(2......) per day if they did not develop myelotoxicity within 2 weeks after HDM. 6MP could be increased in 31 patients (81%). Toxicity was acceptable and did not differ significantly between groups. Patients receiving 75 mg/m(2) per day had significantly shorter duration of treatment interruptions of 6MP than...

  14. Occupational exposure of fathers to ionizing radiation and the risk of leukaemia in offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An epidemiologic study was performed to determine whether there was an association between childhood leukaemia and the occupational exposure of fathers in the nuclear industry to ionizing radiation prior to the child's conception. The study employed a case-control design. Children with cancer ('cases') and children who did not develop cancer ('controls') were compared with respect to their exposure history. The cases, which occurred from 1950 to 1988, consisted of children aged 0 to 14 years who died from or were diagnosed with leukaemia and were born to mothers who lived near an operating nuclear facility in Ontario. Eight controls were matched to each case according to date of birth and mother's residence. There were 112 cases and 890 controls (six controls died before the development of the associated case's leukaemia). Data on the occupational exposure of the 1002 fathers were obtained from the Canadian National Dose Registry (NDR) and examination of employer records. Links to the NDR were found for 95 fathers. For each father doses were obtained regarding whole body external dose, tritium dose, and (for uranium miners) internal exposures to the lungs due to radon and radon daughters. Radiation exposures were estimated (a) over the father's lifetime before the child's conception; (b) during the six months prior to the child's conception; (c) during the three months prior to the child's conception; and (d) over the father's lifetime, ending in the month of the child's diagnosis. There was no evidence of an elevated leukaemia risk in relation to any exposure period or exposure type, and there was no apparent gradient of effect with increasing radiation dose. It is concluded that there was no association between childhood leukaemia and the occupational exposure of fathers to ionizing radiation prior to conception or diagnosis. Odds ratios were close to 1.0 for all radiation dose categories and occupations except for uranium mining, which had a larger but not

  15. Results of case-control study of leukaemia and lymphoma among young people near Sellafield nuclear plant in West Cumbria.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, M. J.; Snee, M P; Hall, A J; Powell, C A; Downes, S; Terrell, J D

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine whether the observed excess of childhood leukaemia and lymphoma near the Sellafield nuclear plant is associated with established risk factors or with factors related to the plant. DESIGN--A case-control study. SETTING--West Cumbria health district. SUBJECTS--52 Cases of leukaemia, 22 of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 23 of Hodgkin's disease occurring in people born in the area and diagnosed there in 1950-85 under the age of 25 and 1001 controls matched for sex and date of b...

  16. Leukaemia incidence after iodine-131 exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukaemia is one of the most prominent late effects of exposure to ionising radiation. We have studied the incidence of leukaemia among 46 988 Swedish patients exposed to iodine-131 (131I) for diagnostic reasons or to treat hyperthyroidism or thyroid cancer. The observed number of leukaemias was compared with that expected based on incidence data from the general population. The mean absorbed dose to the bone marrow was estimated as 14 mGy. 195 leukaemias occurred more than 2 years after exposure, and the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.09. Similar increased risks were seen for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) (SIR = 1.08), a malignant condition not found to be increased after irradiation, and for non-CLL (SIR = 1.09). The risk of leukaemia did not vary by sex, age, time, or radiation dose from 131I. One reason for the absence of a radiation effect includes the possible lowering of risk when exposure is protracted over time as occurs with 131I. Excess leukaemia risks of more than 25% could thus be excluded with high assurance in this population of mainly adults. These results should be reassuring to patients exposed to 131I in medical practice and to most individuals exposed to the fall-out from the Chernobyl accident. (Author)

  17. Leukaemia incidence after iodine-131 exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Per (Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology); Boice, J.D. Jr. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States). Div. of Cancer Etiology); Berg, Gertrud (Sahlgren' s Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of General Oncology) (and others)

    1992-07-04

    Leukaemia is one of the most prominent late effects of exposure to ionising radiation. We have studied the incidence of leukaemia among 46 988 Swedish patients exposed to iodine-131 ([sup 131]I) for diagnostic reasons or to treat hyperthyroidism or thyroid cancer. The observed number of leukaemias was compared with that expected based on incidence data from the general population. The mean absorbed dose to the bone marrow was estimated as 14 mGy. 195 leukaemias occurred more than 2 years after exposure, and the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was 1.09. Similar increased risks were seen for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) (SIR = 1.08), a malignant condition not found to be increased after irradiation, and for non-CLL (SIR = 1.09). The risk of leukaemia did not vary by sex, age, time, or radiation dose from [sup 131]I. One reason for the absence of a radiation effect includes the possible lowering of risk when exposure is protracted over time as occurs with [sup 131]I. Excess leukaemia risks of more than 25% could thus be excluded with high assurance in this population of mainly adults. These results should be reassuring to patients exposed to [sup 131]I in medical practice and to most individuals exposed to the fall-out from the Chernobyl accident. (Author).

  18. Hospitalisation for infection prior to diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Therese Risom; Rostgaard, Klaus; Grau, Katrine;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that infections in infancy and early childhood are associated with a reduced risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We tested this hypothesis in a register-based study of hospitalisations for infectious diseases prior to diagnosis of childhood ALL....... PROCEDURE: A nation-wide cohort encompassing all Danish children aged 0-14 years and born between 1977 and 2008 (N = 1,778,129) was established and followed for hospitalisations for infectious diseases and risk of childhood ALL. The exposure was lagged 1 year to limit reverse causality. In the statistical...... hospitalisations for infectious diseases before (incidence rate ratio = 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.78-1.07) nor at/after 2 years of age (incidence rate ratio = 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.81-1.32). This also applied to subsets of ALL supposedly initiated prenatally. CONCLUSION: The absence of association...

  19. Leukaemia near La Hague nuclear plant; and replies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An article published in 1997 finding associations between childhood leukaemia and the use of beaches around La Hague nuclear fuel reprocessing plant by pregnant women and children has prompted six letters about this study. Three of these letters criticize the study suggesting that a selection bias could have been introduced into the study, the study design regarding cases and controls is questionable and insufficient attention has been given to the scientific content of their results. The fourth letter compares the results of a similar case-control study preferred in Britain. The fifth letter reports a connection between low level radiation from nuclear plants in Switzerland and malformation in leafbugs. The sixth letter is from the author of the study who attempts to provide additional information to convince the authors of the first two letters that selection or recall biases are unlikely. (UK)

  20. Characterization of surface-water quality in the S-Line Canal and potential geochemical reactions from storage of surface water in the Basalt aquifer near Fallon, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Lico, Michael S.; McCormack, John K.

    2005-01-01

    The Fallon basalt aquifer serves as the sole source of municipal water supply for the Lahontan Valley in west-central Nevada. Principal users include the City of Fallon, Naval Air Station Fallon, and the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe. Pumpage from the aquifer increased from about 1,700 acre-feet per year in the early 1970's to more than 3,000 acre-feet per year in the late 1990's, and has been accompanied by declines in water levels and changes in water quality. Storage of surface water in the basalt may mitigate the effects of pumpage, but may cause undesirable changes in water chemistry. In May 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study, in cooperation with the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, to characterize the surface-water quality of the S-Line Canal, a likely source of water for augmenting recharge. Because arsenic concentrations in ground water of the basalt aquifer exceed drinking water standards, the potential for arsenic release to artificial recharge was explored by using geochemical modeling. Model results suggest that arsenic release may increase concentrations to levels that could limit the use of artificial recharge. Field-based experiments are needed to evaluate the underlying model assumptions.

  1. Attentional ability among survivors of leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, J; Horrocks, J; Britton, P.; Kernahan, J

    1999-01-01

    Attentional ability in 19 survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and 19 sibling controls was assessed using a neuropsychological model of attention. Analysis revealed that children who had received treatment for leukaemia exhibited significantly poorer performance on measures of the "focus encode" and "focus execute" elements of attention and on measures of the ability to respond to external cues and feedback. No significant differences in performance were found for m...

  2. Host, family and community proxies for infections potentially associated with leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three hypotheses have proposed the involvement of infections in the aetiology of childhood leukaemia, suggesting either a specific leukemogenic infection or a series of common infections that lead to a dys-regulation of the immune system. Much of the evidence for the link with infections has been based on epidemiological observations, often using proxy measures of infection. Proxy measures include population mixing, parental occupation, age distribution of incidence, spatial and space-time clustering of cases, birth order and day care during infancy. This paper discusses the proxies used and examines to what extent a commonly used proxy measure, birth order, is a fair representation of either specific infections or general infectious load. It is clear that although leukaemia, and other diseases, may be linked with infections, one needs to (1) measure specific and general infections with more accuracy and (2) understand how proxy measures relate to real infections in the population. (authors)

  3. Unraveling the volcanic and post-volcanic history at Upsal Hogback, Fallon, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E.; Cousens, B.

    2013-12-01

    Upsal Hogback is a < 25 ka phreatomagmatic volcanic center situated near Fallon, Nevada. The volcano neighbors two other young volcanic complexes: the Holocene Soda Lakes maars and Rattlesnake Hill, a ~ 1 Ma volcanic neck (Shevenell et al., 2005). These volcanoes lie on the transition between the Sierra Nevada and the Basin and Range province, as well as on the edge of the Walker Lane. Upsal Hogback includes two to four vents, fewer than mapped by Morrison (1964), and can be divided into north (one vent) and south (three potential vents) complexes. The vents all produced phreatomagmatic eruptions resulting in tuff rings composed primarily of coarse, indurated lapilli tuffs with abundant volcanic bombs. Ash tuffs are infrequent, as are structures such as crossbedding. The bombs and lapilli include olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts. The basalts are alkaline and have intraplate-type normalized incompatible element patterns. Both complexes are enriched in LREE compared to HREE, though the north complex overall has lower concentrations of the REE. The flat HREE pattern is indicative of spinel peridotite mantle source. Epsilon Nd values for the north complex are +2.50+/-0.02 and for the south complex are +2.83+/-0.02. The magmas appear to have an enriched asthenospheric mantle source. Bomb samples show that eruptions from the two complexes are geochemically distinguishable both in major and trace elements, suggesting that the two complexes tapped different magma types during eruptions that likely occurred at slightly different times. The proximity of Upsal Hogback to Fallon makes constraining its age important to characterize the hazard to the city. It lies above the Wono ash bed, dated at 25,000 years (Fultz et al., 1983), and tufa deposited over the edifice is dated at 11,100 +/- 100 and 8,600 +/- 200 years (Benson et al., 1992; Broecker and Kaufman, 1965). 40Ar/39Ar total gas age by Shevenell et al. (2005) dated the volcano at 0.60 +/- 0.09 Ma, but with no plateau

  4. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia: Case reports of two paediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujić Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia is an uncommon type of leukaemia whose blasts co-express myeloid and B-or T-lymphoid antigens. Case report. We describe two cases of paediatric patients with biphenotypic acute leukaemia. A four-year-old female patient was found to have myeloid and B-lymphoid associated antigens in the same blast cells. Cytogenetic analysis showed a Philadelphia (Ph positivity t (9;22 (q34;q11 with rearrangements of M.bcr-Abl (p210. She was treated with combined acute myeloid leukaemia/acute lymphoblastic leukaemia induction therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient died due to the complications of stem cell transplantation procedure. Another patient was a 20-month-old girl with myeloid and T-lymphoid associated antigens in the blast cells and with normal karyotype. She received acute myeloid leukaemia induction therapy. She has never achieved remission. Discussion. Immunophenotype is essential to establish the diagnosis of biphenotypic acute leukaemia according to the scoring system adopted by the European Group of Immunological Classification of Leukaemia. There is no agreement about uniformity in treatment for the patients with this type of leukaemia. Biphenotypic acute leukaemia is a high risk leukaemia which requires a more intensive treatment. Conclusion. Therapy for every patient with biphenotypic acute leukaemia should depend on their immunophenotype and gene rearrangement profiles.

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia of Donor Cell Origin Developing 17 Years after Allogenic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Pilar; Alvarez, J. Carlos; Garrido, Pilar; Lorente, J. Antonio; Palacios, Jorge; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Donor cell leukaemia (DCL) is a rare complication of allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We report the case of a female patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), FAB type M3, who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) type M5 of donor origin 17 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her HLA-matched sister. Morphology and immunophenotyping showed differences with the initial leukaemia, and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis confirmed donor-type ha...

  6. Significance of Phi bodies in acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardullo, L de S; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1981-01-01

    Material from 39 patients with acute leukaemia was investigated with the peroxidase cytochemical reaction using 3,3'diaminobenzidine (DAB) and other substrates in order to test their sensitivity in detecting myeloid differentiation. The proportion of positive blasts and of cases with Auer rods in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) was significantly greater with DAB than with benzidine. In addition, Phi bodies were demonstrated in AML blasts only when DAB was used; Phi bodies were also observed in two out of seven cases of chronic granulocytic leukaemia in "myeloid" blast crisis but were not seen in any case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Phi bodies were more numerous when the reaction was carried out at pH 9.7, and their number was significantly reduced in the presence of 3-amino 1,2,4-triazole. Both findings suggest that the Phi bodies derive from catalase-containing granules (microperoxisomes) and are distinct from Auer rods, which derive from peroxidase-containing (primary) granules. Like Auer rods, Phi bodies appear to be characteristics of immature myeloid cells in leukaemia but are seen with a higher frequency than Auer rods in acute myeloid leukemia. Images p154-a PMID:6262384

  7. Long-term therapy related side effect on endocrine system among survivor with paediatric brain tumour and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Shu-wing, Sophia; 陳舒穎

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and brain tumours are frequently seen in childhood malignancies. With the improved effectiveness of treatments, approximately 70–80% patients can be cured of their primary illness. However, therapy-related long-term sequelae among survivors are becoming a major concern. Traditional treatments include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, and these have been shown to have prolonged side effects on the endocrine system, and symptoms may develop mon...

  8. Case-control study of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in children in Caithness near the Dounreay nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case-control study was performed to examine whether the observed excess of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the area around the Dounreay nuclear installation is associated with established risk factors, or with factors related to the plant, or with parental occupation in the nuclear industry. No raised relative risks were found for prenatal exposure to X-rays, social class of parents, employment at Dounreay before conception or diagnosis, father's dose of ionising radiation before conception, or child's residence within 50 m of the path of microwave transmission beams. Results also proved negative for all lifestyle factors except an apparent association with use of beaches within 25 km of Dounreay. However, this result was based on small numbers, arose in the context of multiple hypothesis testing, and is certainly vulnerable to possible systematic bias. It was concluded that the raised incidence of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma around Dounreay cannot be explained by paternal occupation at Dounreay or by paternal exposure to external ionising radiation before conception. The observation of an apparent association between the use of beaches around Dounreay and the development of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma might be an artefact of multiple testing and influenced by recall bias. (author)

  9. Acute leukaemia: making sense of a complex blood cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meenaghan, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Acute leukaemia represents a diverse group of blood cancers that affect both children and adults. Treatment schedules for these haematology cancers are often prolonged, with many associated side effects and complications. Nurses caring for patients with acute leukaemia require an anticipatory approach, where care is aimed at minimizing the side effects of treatment and being constantly vigilant for any impending adverse effects. Moreover, patients require support for the psychosocial issues that can arise for patients during their illness. This article provides an overview of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Nursing considerations in the care of patients being treated for acute leukaemia are also explored.

  10. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Raheel A; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Albertsen, BK;

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Treatment is associated with several toxicities, including acute pancreatitis. Clinical course, presentation, re-exposure to L-asparginase after pancreatitis and risk of recurrent pancreatitis...... within an asparaginase-intensive protocol has been poorly reported. Children (1-17 years) on the ongoing Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL2008 protocol with asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) diagnosed between 2008 and 2012 were identified through the online NOPHO...

  11. Height and weight pattern up to 20 years after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Birkebak, N; Clausen, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess height and body mass index standard deviation scores up to 20 years after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Height and body mass index standard deviation scores were measured in 33 patients (14 boys and 19 girls) with childhood ALL at diagnosis, after the end of treatment, at final height, and at follow up 10-20 years (median, 16.2) after diagnosis. Eleven patients were treated with chemotherapy only and 22 patient...

  12. Annotated bibliography on childhood leukaemia near nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bibliography includes peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed scientific articles as well as letters to editors appearing in the scientific press, but does not include newspaper or magazine articles. The author has included brief notes on each article but readers are invited to comment on papers or on interpretations given. The papers and articles are presented in alphabetical order. Anonymous or un attributed editorial or comment papers are listed alphabetically by article title

  13. Giant Molluscum Contagiosum In Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Sivaraman

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14 year old female with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia had a tumoral lesion over the face of 3 months duration. Excision biopsy of the lesion confirmed it to be molluscum contagiosum. Giant molluscum contagiosum attaining polypoidal character as seen in our patient is an uncommon presentation and hence being reported for its rarity.

  14. Leukaemia and lymphoma among Czech uranium miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasek, L.; Malatova, I. [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    Leukaemia is one of the most sensitive cancers in relation to ionizing radiation. It is surprising that in studies of uranium miners, no risk of leukaemia in relation to cumulated radon exposure was observed (Darby et al, 1995). However, when the risk among Czech uranium miners was analyzed in dependence on duration of exposure, the trend was significant. These results were based on 10 cases (Tomasek, 1993). Since then the original cohort of 4320 miners has been extended by another cohort, now including nearly 10 000 uranium miners and the follow-up is longer by 10 years. The present report aims to analyze the risk of haemopoietic cancers in the Czech cohort accounting for both external and internal doses, similarly as reported by Jacobi and Roth (1995), and using available data on metal content and airborne particulates for dose estimates.The present results of follow-up show that increased risk of leukaemia among uranium miners is significantly associated with cumulated equivalent red bone marrow doses which is dominated by exposures to long lived alpha radionuclides in airborne particulates. The increased mortality is mainly observed decades after exposure and is consistent with estimated internal dose to red bone marrow. The estimated risk coefficient for leukaemia is consistent with results from other studies, however, further studies are needed to reduce uncertainty in the risk estimates. (N.C.)

  15. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects...

  16. An algorithm for leukaemia immunophenotype pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovecki, M; Marusić, M; Dezelić, G

    1993-01-01

    Since leukaemia-specific leucocyte antigen has not been identified to date, the immunological diagnosis of leukaemia is achieved through the application of a wide set of monoclonal antibodies specific for surface markers on leukaemic cells. Thus, the interpretation of leukaemia immunophenotype seems to be a mathematically determined comparison of 'what we found' and 'what we know' about it. The objective of this study was to establish an algorithm for transformation of empirical rules into mathematical values to achieve proper decisions. Recognition of leukaemia phenotype was performed by comparison of phenotyping data with reference data, followed by scoring of such comparisons. Systematic scoring resulted in the formation of new numerical variables allocated to each state, whereas a most significant variable was described as a complex measure of compatibility. A system of recognized states was described by mathematical variables measuring the confidence of information systems, i.e. maximal, total and relative entropy. The entire algorithm was derived by matrix algebra and coded in a high-level program language. The list of the states recognized appeared to be especially helpful in differential diagnosis, occasionally pointing to states that had not been in the scientist's mind at the start of the analysis. PMID:8366688

  17. Leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear installations - a review; Leukaemiehaeufigkeit in der Umgebung kerntechnischer Anlagen - eine Uebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosche, B. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Aussenstelle Oberschleissheim, Fachbereich Strahlung und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Based on the finding of an increased leukaemia risk among young people (aged 0-24) in the small village of Seascale, south of the Sellafield reprocessing plant, a discussion started on whether there is in general an elevated number of leukaemia cases to be observed in the vicinity of nuclear power plants. An overview on existing findings leads to the conclusion that this is not the case among adults. Among children and juveniles, a slight increase can be observed, which is most pronounced among the youngest age groups in the nearest vicinity of the plants. Estimates of radiation exposures to the public make a causal relationship between the radioactive discharges and the cases implausible. Other explanations are discussed, namely that population influx into a relatively sparsely populated area, e.g. due to new industry settlements, might lead to an altered infection situation in the respective area which than causes an increased leukaemia rate. Recent results are indicative for a causative role of infections in relation to childhood leukaemias. This explanation is opposed by the finding, that elevated rates have also been observed around potential nuclear sites where there was no population influx. Overall, current findings have to be considered as not fully understood. (orig.)

  18. Cytogenetics of Post-Irradiation Mouse Leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interrelationship between radiation, cytogenetic abnormalities, and viruses in leukaemogenesis has been studied in the RF/Un mouse which develops a high incidence of granulocytic leukaemia on radiation exposure. A virus-like agent has been demonstrated in such leukaemic animals and the disease has been transmitted by passage of apparently acellular materials from irradiated primary animals to normal recipients. Pilot cytogenetic studies revealed consistent abnormal chromosome markers and modal shifts in both irradiated leukaemic animals and in non-irradiated animals developing leukaemia after passage injection. To define better the relationship between consistent bone-marrow chromosome aberrations and postirradiation primary and passaged leukaemia, 100 RF/Un mice were studied which were irradiated with 300 R of 250-kVp X-rays at 100 weeks of age and subsequently developed leukaemia. Eighty-seven had granulocytic leukaemia and in 72 of these, bone-marrow cytogenetic abnormalities were found. The distribution of-numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in 3225 cells studied are reviewed in derail. The correlation of specific aberrations to clinical and histopathologic findings has been attempted: Sequential passages of apparently cell-free material from the post-irradiation leukaemic mice into unirradiated RE/Un recipients and subsequent passages from leukaemic recipients were performed to observe the evolution of any initial chromosome markers and shifts in modal chromosome number in the passage generations. Two-hundred-thirty-six mice were inoculated with the material obtained either from primary post-irradiation leukaemic mice or from serially-passaged leukaemia cases. In the most extensive passaged line, 22 transfer generations containing 129 leukaemic mice were examined by clinical, histopathologic, -haematologic and cytogenetic procedures. Evolution of abnormal chromosome modes from 41 in the early passages to 39 chromosomes consistently after the 4

  19. Leukaemia among Czech uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study presents recent findings in an extended cohort of miners, now including nearly 10 000 uranium and 2 000 tin miners and followed up to 1999. A total of 30 cases of leukaemia were observed among Czech uranium miners, corresponding to standardized mortality ratio of 1.5, 90% CI: 1.0-2.1. The risk is analyzed in relation to cumulated dose from radon, external gamma radiation and alpha radiation from long lived radionuclides contained in mining aerosol. Doses to red bone marrow were estimated using measurements of external gamma activities since the early 1960s and measurements of long lived radionuclides in the aerosol since the 1970s. The red bone marrow dose from inhaled long lived radionuclides is estimated by applying respiratory tract model and relevant biokinetic models. The substantial point is that the dose is cumulated even after the underground work has stopped. Another important point is the difference of the exposure by job category. By extrapolating available exposure data and applying models based on ICRP-66 and ICRP-68, individual doses were estimated using working histories, job matrix, and time since exposure. The cumulated red bone marrow dose includes external gamma radiation, dose from radon and its progeny, and committed equivalent dose from long lived alpha-emitters in dependence on the individual length of follow-up. The mean cumulated dose is 158 mSv. Among uranium miners, about 52% of the total dose is due to inhalation of uranium and its decay products with aerosol in mines, about 33% is due to gamma radiation, and some 15% of the dose is from radon and its progeny. The risk coefficient (excess relative risk per sievert) corresponding to these estimates in the present study is 3.1 (90% CI: 1.3 - 5.4). The estimated risk is subject to a considerable uncertainty, due to small numbers and the uncertainty in the estimated dose. However, the magnitude of the risk is consistent with estimates from other studies. (orig.)

  20. Comparison of monitored natural attenuation with other alternatives for remediation of contaminated groundwater at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and several other potential alternatives were evaluated for remediation of dissolved-phase groundwater contamination at Site 1, the former crash crew training area at NAS Fallon. The contaminants of concern at the site are petroleum hydrocarbon constituents and chlorinated ethenes. Remedial action objectives were developed using a conceptual model for the site, applicable regulatory action levels, site contaminants, and a point-of-compliance. A field evaluation of MNA was conducted at Site 1. Monitored natural attenuation was compared to other potential remedial alternatives for achieving the RAOs including: plume containment using pumping wells, interceptor drain, or slurry wall; and active restoration with enhanced in situ bioremediation, pump and treat using wells, or pump and treat using an interceptor drain. Alternatives were comparatively evaluated using three criteria, effectiveness, ability to implement and cost. The evaluation indicates that MNA is a viable and cost-effective remedial alternative for Site 1

  1. A comparison of the risks of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the first generation offspring (F1) of the Danish Thorotrast patients with those observed in other studies of parental pre-conception irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high doses of alpha-particle radiation which Thorotrast delivers to the testes makes the study of offspring of patients, who were administered this diagnostic contrast medium, particularly relevant to the controversy regarding childhood leukaemia in the offspring of the male Sellafield workforce, as it has been suggested that the alpha-particle dose from actinides may, in part, account for the observed association between paternal pre-conception external irradiation and leukaemia. The risks of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphona found among the offspring of the male Danish cohort of neurosurgical patients injected with Thorotrast for cerebral arteriography are compared with those observed in the offspring of the Sellafield (western Cumbria), Ontario and Scottish radiation workers and in the offspring of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Risks are compared using linear and exponential forms of a relative risk model. (author)

  2. Childhood cancer and nuclear power plants in Switzerland: a census-based cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Spycher, Ben D.; Feller, Martin; Zwahlen, Marcel; Röösli, Martin; von der Weid, Nicolas X.; Hengartner, Heinz; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies on childhood cancer and nuclear power plants (NPPs) produced conflicting results. We used a cohort approach to examine whether residence near NPPs was associated with leukaemia or any childhood cancer in Switzerland. METHODS: We computed person-years at risk for children aged 0-15 years born in Switzerland from 1985 to 2009, based on the Swiss censuses 1990 and 2000 and identified cancer cases from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. We geo-coded place...

  3. Analysis of images of acute human and animal leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis first proposes a review of the development of stereology: historical backgrounds, basic principles. It discusses the choices regarding instrumentation: Coulter counter (principle and theory), quantitative analysis of particles, image analyser (optical microscope, epidiascope, scanners, detection, electronic pencil, computers, programming and data processing system), and stereo-logical parameters. The author then reports the stereo-logical study of acute human leukaemia: definition, classification, determination of spherical particle size distribution, lympho-blast size distributions. He reports the comparative study of rat L 5222 leukaemia and Brown Norway rat acute myelocytic leukaemia, and discusses their relationship with acute human leukaemia

  4. Leukaemia in the vicinity of two tritium-releasing nuclear facilities: a comparison of the Kruemmel Site, Germany, and the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991, an increased rate of childhood leukaemia was reported from the small northern German community of Elbmarsch, which is located on the banks of the River Elbe opposite the Kruemmel nuclear power plant. Owing to the fact that the increase occurred six years after the start-up of the plant, radioactive discharges were suspected as being implicated in the development of the cases. Previous investigations have failed to identify any exposure which might be associated with the cluster. Nonetheless, concern regarding the increased tritium burden in the environment remains. To further assess the impact of tritium releases to the environment upon population cancer rates, the releases and leukaemia rates at the Savannah River site, USA, were compared with the Kruemmel site. Based on the data from 1991 to 1995, the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of the Savannah River site was non-significantly less than expected compared with the significantly higher than expected rates close to the German plant. In contrast, tritium releases from the Savannah River site exceed those from the Kruemmel site by several orders of magnitude. The results of this observational study suggest that factors other than environmental tritium releases are associated with the increased number of leukaemia cases near the Kruemmel site. (author)

  5. DNA instability, paternal irradiation and leukaemia in children around Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical instability of DNA under physiological conditions requires that cells have highly developed processes for repairing stochastic single-strand damage. It is proposed here that provided ionising-radiation-induced single-strand damage does not occur at a rate sufficient to perturb the dynamic steady state between degradation and repair, it can be regarded as 'irrelevant' to biological effect, leaving double-strand damage and DNA-protein crosslinks as 'relevant' damage to biological effect. At dose rates of ∼ 0.05 Gy/min low-LET radiation the rate of induced single-strand damage equals that of the spontaneous damage, and in this region a transition, with increasing dose-rate, from constant effect to increasing effect, will be expected. This is observed in studies of specific locus mutation by radiation in the male mouse. The application of this biophysical principle governing the influence of radiation dose-rate, to the association observed between paternal preconceptional dose to Sellafield workers and childhood leukaemia in their offspring, shows that the likelihood of a casual relationship is extremely remote. (author)

  6. Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(1;19)(q23;p13): clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of 47 cases from the Nordic countries treated according to NOPHO protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Autio, Kirsi; Barbany, Gisela;

    2011-01-01

    The translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13)/der(19)t(1;19) is a risk stratifying aberration in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP ALL) in the Nordic countries. We have identified 47 children/adolescents with t(1;19)/der(19)t(1;19)-positive BCP ALL treated on two successive Nordic...

  7. Leukaemia cluster in the Dueren district

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whenever a sudden increase in the local leukaemia rate occurs, the underlying causes are frequently searched for in vain. In the absence of scientific research, speculation abounds. How clusters come about is a question difficult to answer, in the marshes of the river Elbe, where an allegedly unreported accident at the Kruemmel Nuclear Power Station was said to have been the cause, as in Sellafield, where a connection was said to exist with BNFL and has meanwhile been disproved, or in the Dueren District, where the geographical distribution of the cases encountered makes the nuclear installations of the Juelich Research Center an unlikely culprit. The reasons for the diseases summarized under the generic term of leukaemia can vary just as much as the symptoms. No valid statistical survey is possible because of the very small number of cases generally encountered. (orig.)

  8. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, S; Morace, G; La Rocca, L M; Etuk, B; Di Mario, A; Pagano, L; Zini, G; Rutella, S; Leone, G

    1993-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who developed rhinocerebral zygomycosis during the aplastic phase induced by antineoplastic chemotherapy. The patient was treated with fluconazole intravenously (400 mg daily) for 30 days and underwent surgical debridement. As a result of this treatment a complete remission of the zygomycosis-associated symptoms was observed. The possibility of treating zygomycosis with fluconazole is discussed. PMID:8015558

  9. Leukoencephalopathy after prophylactic radiation for leukaemia in ataxia telangiectasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, J A; Gardner-Medwin, D; Summerfield, G P

    1988-01-01

    Children with ataxia telangiectasia have a high probability of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy and irradiation. We report a 51/2 year old boy who had undiagnosed ataxia telangiectasia when he presented with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He subsequently developed a chemoradiation induced leukoencephalopathy after conventional central nervous system prophylaxis.

  10. Defective monocyte function in Legionnaires' disease complicating hairy cell leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Rechnitzer, C;

    1986-01-01

    We describe a case of Legionnaires' disease in a 64-year-old man, in which hairy cell leukaemia was diagnosed after the onset of the infection. Immunological studies revealed a complete suppression of blood monocyte chemotactic and oxidative burst activities. We suggest that in hairy cell leukaemia...

  11. Estimation of current cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients and current leukaemia-free survival in chronic myeloid leukaemia in the era of modern pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trněný Marek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current situation in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML presents a new challenge for attempts to measure the therapeutic results, as the CML patients can experience multiple leukaemia-free periods during the course of their treatment. Traditional measures of treatment efficacy such as leukaemia-free survival and cumulative incidence are unable to cope with multiple events in time, e.g. disease remissions or progressions, and as such are inappropriate for the efficacy assessment of the recent CML treatment. Methods Standard nonparametric statistical methods are used for estimating two principal characteristics of the current CML treatment: the probability of being alive and leukaemia-free in time after CML therapy initiation, denoted as the current cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients; and the probability that a patient is alive and in any leukaemia-free period in time after achieving the first leukaemia-free period on the CML treatment, denoted as the current leukaemia-free survival. The validity of the proposed methods is further documented in the data of the Czech CML patients consecutively recorded between July 2003 and July 2009 as well as in simulated data. Results The results have shown a difference between the estimates of the current cumulative incidence function and the common cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients, as well as between the estimates of the current leukaemia-free survival and the common leukaemia-free survival. Regarding the currently available follow-up period, both differences have reached the maximum (12.8% and 20.8%, respectively at 3 years after the start of follow-up, i.e. after the CML therapy initiation in the former case and after the first achievement of the disease remission in the latter. Conclusions Two quantities for the evaluation of the efficacy of current CML therapy that may be estimated with standard nonparametric methods have been proposed in

  12. Trace elements in scalp hair of leukaemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Khuder Ali; Bakir Mohammad Adel; Hasan Reem; Mohammad Ali; Habil Khozama

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb in scalp hair of leukaemia patients and healthy volunteers, using the optimised XRF method. Leukaemia hair samples were classifi ed corresponding to type, growth and age of the participants. The results showed that the studied trace elements (TEs) in both of leukaemia and control groups were positively skewed. In comparison with the control group, lower Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb and higher of Ni medians were found in al...

  13. Unilateral parotid gland swelling as the sole presenting symptom of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatiee Swany Lahuri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL in infants below 1 year of age contributed 2.5–5% of childhood ALL incidence. Children with ALL commonly presented with fever, bruising, mucosal bleeding, bone pain, pallor, hepatosplenomegaly, and lymphadenopathy. Common extra medullary leukaemic infiltration has also been reported at diagnosis of ALL to sites such as the liver, spleen, lymph nodes, brain, testes and even nephromegaly. However ALL presented with parotid infiltration is exceedingly rare. We herein present a case of unilateral parotid enlargement in a child with newly diagnosed ALL. This unusual presentation focuses on the importance of considering ALL in the differential diagnosis of parotid enlargement especially when associated with abnormal blood counts.

  14. Trace elements in scalp hair of leukaemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuder Ali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb in scalp hair of leukaemia patients and healthy volunteers, using the optimised XRF method. Leukaemia hair samples were classifi ed corresponding to type, growth and age of the participants. The results showed that the studied trace elements (TEs in both of leukaemia and control groups were positively skewed. In comparison with the control group, lower Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb and higher of Ni medians were found in all studied leukaemia patients. The median rank obtained by Mann-Whitney U-test revealed insignifi cant differences between the leukaemia patients subgroups and the controls. An exact probability (α 0.70 in the scalp hair of control group were observed between Ni/Fe-Ni, Cu/Fe-Cu, Zn/Fe-Zn, Pb/Fe-Pb, Cu/Ni-Zn/Ni, Cu/Ni-Pb/Ni, Zn/Ni-Pb/Ni, Zn/Fe-Zn/Cu, Pb/Ni-Ni and Ni/Fe-Pb/Ni, whereas only very strong positive ratios in the scalp hair of leukaemia patients group were observed between Ni/Fe-Ni, Cu/Fe-Cu, Zn/Fe-Zn and Pb/Fe-Pb, all correlations were signifi cant at p < 0.05. Other strong and signifi cant correlations were also observed in scalp hair of both groups. Signifi cant differences between grouping of studied TEs in all classifi ed leukaemia groups and controls were found using principal component analysis (PCA. The results of PCA confi rmed that the type and the growth of leukaemia factors were more important in element loading than the age factor.

  15. Oxidative Stress Responses and NRF2 in Human Leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Amina Abdul-Aziz; MacEwan, David J; Bowles, Kristian M.; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress as a result of elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been observed in almost all cancers, including leukaemia, where they contribute to disease development and progression. However, cancer cells also express increased levels of antioxidant proteins which detoxify ROS. This includes glutathione, the major antioxidant in human cells, which has recently been identified to have dysregulated metabolism in human leukaemia. This suggests that critical balance of intra...

  16. Adult T-cell leukaemia lymphoma in an aborigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, M A; Frasca, J; Bastian, I

    1991-10-01

    A 44-year-old Aborigine with Adult T-cell Leukaemia/Lymphoma (ATLL) due to HTLV-I is reported. He presented with transverse myelitis of subacute onset, and subsequently developed frank T-cell leukaemia complicated by splenomegaly and hypercalcaemia. Cell surface marker studies showed a phenotype of CD3+ CD4+ CD8- CD25+, and serological and molecular studies confirmed HTLV-I infection. This is the first report of ATLL in an Australian Aborigine. PMID:1759923

  17. Clinicopathological features of transient myeloproliferative syndrome and congenital leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study were to determine the spectrum of the clinical and pathological findings, the management and prognosis of patients of transient myeloproliferative syndrome (TMS) and congenital leukaemia. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted over a period of 8 years, from January 2000 to December 2007, at the Children's Hospital and the Institute of Child Health, Lahore. Methodology: Suspected patients presenting with fever, pallor, bruises and hepatosplenomegaly and diagnosed as either transient myeloproliferative disorder or congenital leukaemia were studied. The complete blood count, reticulocyte count, leukocyte alkaline phosphatase score, liver function tests, karyotyping studies and bone marrow aspiration biopsy were performed in all of those patients. Management and out come was noted. Results were described as frequency percentages. Results: Out of 10,000 patients presenting during this period, 24 patients were diagnosed as either of transient myeloproliferative syndrome or congenital leukaemia. Fifteen of these were diagnosed as patients of TMS and 9 as patients of congenital leukaemia. Down syndrome (DS) was diagnosed in 75% of these patients. TMS patients were put on supportive treatment and recovered spontaneously. One DS patient with congenital leukaemia went into spontaneous remission and 2 of DS patients with congenital leukaemia responded to chemotherapy while rest of them either died or lost to follow-up. Conclusion: TMS and congenital leukaemia were not very uncommon in the studied population. Majority had Down syndrome. It is important to differentiate their clinical and pathological presentations for proper management. TMS may resolve with supportive treatment while congenital leukaemia is a fatal condition requiring chemotherapy. (author)

  18. Case-control study of leukaemia among young people near La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant: the environmental hypothesis revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between childhood leukaemia and established risk factors or other factors related to La Hague nuclear waste reprocessing plant. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Area within a 35 km radius of La Hague, Normandy, France. SUBJECTS: Twenty seven cases of leukaemia diagnosed during the period 1978-93 in people aged under 25 years and 192 controls matched for sex, age, place of birth, and residence at time of diagnosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Antenatal and postnatal exposure to x rays and viral infections, occupational exposure of parents (particularly ionising radiation), living conditions, lifestyle of parents and children. RESULTS: Increased trends were found for use of local beaches by mothers and children (P < or = 0.01); relative risks 2.87 (95% confidence intervals 1.05 to 8.72) and 4.49 (1.52 to 15.23) when categories were aggregated in two levels (more or less than once a month). Consumption of local fish and shellfish also showed an increased trend (P 0.01); relative risk 2.66 (0.91 to 9.51) when categories were grouped in two levels (more or less than once a week). A relative risk of 1.18 a year (1.03 to 1.42) was observed for length of residence in a granite-built house or in a granitic area. No association was shown with occupational radiation exposure in parents. CONCLUSIONS: There is some convincing evidence in childhood leukaemia of a causal role for environmental radiation exposure from recreational activities on beaches. New methods for identifying the environmental pathways, focusing on marine ecosystems, are warranted

  19. Incidence of childhood cancer in Preston and South Ribble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatrell, A.C.; Whitelegg, J.

    1993-09-01

    Using data from the Manchester Childrens Tumour Register, extending back to 1954, the authors have examined the evidence for clustering of various childhood cancers in Preston and South Ribble, and conclude that incidence in the Penwortham district of Preston is not detectably higher than in other parts of the study areas. Neoplasms studied were leukaemias, lymphomas and those affecting the central and sympathetic nervous system, kidneys, liver and bone and soft tissues. (Author).

  20. Distribution of HLA antigens in families of patients with leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since the discovery of major histocompatihility complex influence on manse leukaemia in 1964, an HLA association with leukaemia in humans has been considered as a possible genetic risk factor that contributes to development of leukaemia. In addition to associations of several IILA antigens with leukaemias, it has been observed that patients with leukaemia have an increase in the frequency of HLA identical siblings, higher degree of HLA compatibility with their parents as well as higher parental HLA sharing rate in comparison to the families without patients suffering from leukaemia. Material and methods. To test hypothesis that susceptibility to leukaemia can be caused bv influence of a recessive genes associated with the major histocompatibilily complex in man, we analyzed the distribution of I class HLA antigens in 77 families of patients suffering from different types of leukaemia. In the affected families and in 72 families of healthy controls, we investigated HLA identical sibling frequency, parental sharing of one, two or three HLA antigens and degree of compatibility of parents and off springs: existence of haploidentity, compatibility in l' and 4/4 HLA antigens of A and B loci. Results We have found that in families with affected persons there is a statistically significant difference in number of HLA identical siblings in comparison to the group of healthy controls (t=2,63. Also the results have shown that among the parents of affected persons there is a statistically significant difference in mutual compatibility in one (t=3,012 and two ft= 2,4 HLA antigens. In addition, we observed an increase in the frequency of higher rate of compatibility between patients and their parents (t=3,88 in l' HLA antigens, to their mothers (t=2,83 and to their fathers (t=2,55, respectively, in comparison to the healthy control group. Conclusion The results of this study show that in families with persons suffering from leukaemia there are

  1. Potential for formation of disinfection by-products from storage of chlorinated surface water in the Basalt aquifer near Fallon, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Miranda S.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Lico, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    Increased pumpage from a basalt aquifer near Fallon, Nevada, has caused its water levels to decline and has induced changes in the quality of water pumped from the basalt. The aquifer is the sole source of water for municipal supply to the city of Fallon, the Naval Air Station Fallon, and the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe. These changes may be mitigated by storage of surface water in the basalt for subsequent use. Because chlorination of the surface water may be required for storage, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe, made laboratory tests using laboratory carbon-organic-free water, surface-water, ground-water, and basaltic-rock samples to determine the potential for formation of disinfection by-products. Experiments with water samples only (no rock and no chlorine) indicated no change in dissolved-organic-carbon (DOC) concentrations over a 20-day reaction period; whereas, all experiments using rock, water, and no chlorine indicated an increase in DOC concentrations. The greatest increase in DOC concentrations for all three water samples occurred in experiments with the rock samples from outcrops on Rattlesnake Hill. Experiments with water only and chlorine yielded a total trihalomethane (THM) concentration of 97.4 ?g/L for the ground-water sample and 347 ?g/L for the surface-water sample. Experiments with mixtures of water, rocks, and chlorine indicated that reactions with the rock consumed chlorine and released significant amounts of organic carbon from the rock, increasing the DOC concentration in the water. The organic carbon in the rocks likely is associated with the secondary clay minerals that line vesicles and fractures in the rocks. THM concentrations were greatest, from 335 to 909 ?g/L, for surface water equilibrated with rock samples from Rattlesnake Hill. However, the concentration of chlorine required to produce these high THM concentrations ranged from 18 to 84 mg/L. The results of the experiments suggest

  2. Reduced activity of TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) in acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, JCM; Oudijk, EJD; Mosnier, LO; Nieuwenhuis, HK; Fijnheer, R; Bouma, Bonno N.; Bos, R

    2000-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a disease that is distinguished from other leukaemias by the high potential for early haemorrhagic death. Several processes are involved, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation and hyperfibrinolysis. Recently, TAFI (thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inh

  3. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to large bowel infiltration by chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, J.; Cachia, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    A 66 year old woman with a 9 year history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia developed intermittent rectal bleeding for 9 months; sigmoidoscopic biopsy proved that this was due to large bowel infiltration by leukaemia. This is a very rare occurrence.

  4. Further statement on the incidence of childhood cancer in Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1999 the Welsh Office asked COMARE to examine two unpublished studies. The first by Busby et al of ''Green Audit'' concluded that there was a significant excess of childhood leukaemia in North Wales associated with residential proximity to the coast. The second study, carried out by Steward et al of the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit (WCISU), did not support this conclusion. We were asked to advise as to whether we considered that there was a real raised incidence of childhood leukaemia near the coast of North Wales and whether further study was required. To do this we initially organised a comparison of the figures quoted by both the Green Audit and WCISU with the database held by the Childhood Cancer Research Group (CCRG) in Oxford. This group maintains the National Registry of Childhood Tumours (NRCT), data for which are supplied from a variety of sources including cancer registries but also directly from medical cancer specialists as well as from death certificates. As a consequence this provides an independent check on much of the data on childhood cancer held by cancer registries in Great Britain and is clinically validated. After carrying out the independent check on the number of cases of childhood leukaemia in these Welsh counties it was immediately apparent that the data held by Green Audit, on which the analysis by Busby et al was based, were incorrect. These data were received from the Welsh Cancer Registry (WCR) in 1995. A further data set was received from WCR in 1996 but was not used in the analysis by Busby et al. In June 1999 we issued a statement to the Welsh Office. In that statement we noted that Dr Busby and his colleagues appeared to have used erroneous data in their study. On the basis of the Steward et al data, COMARE also stated that we found no evidence to support the contention that there is an increased incidence of childhood leukaemia or other childhood cancers amongst the Welsh population living close to the

  5. Immunization against primary, transplanted and spontaneous murine leukaemia using a live Moloney sarcoma virus vaccine.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, A. M.; Basombrio, M. A.; Pasqualini, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an immunization protocol with Moloney sarcoma virus (MSV-M) as active immunogen against exogenous and endogenous leukaemia. The s.c. route was chosen since it offered advantages over the i.m. route: the primary sarcomas were smaller, the regression faster, there were fewer recurrences and there was good persistent immunity. Strong protection was obtained against primary leukaemias induced by Friend leukaemia virus (FLV), Moloney leukaemia virus (MLV), Raus...

  6. Discrimination between leukaemia and non-leukaemia-related chromosomal abnormalities in the patient's lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inability to measure precancer-related genetic damage accurately in blood cells of patients with leukaemia or lymphoma has prevented the use in such patients of available biodosimetric methods to determine prior exposure to clastogenic agents. This is because a substantial amount of disease-related genetic damage appears in the blood cells of these patients, thus masking genetic damage that may have been caused prior to the disease. We describe a new approach that may be used to measure pre-cancer-related chromosomal aberrations in such patients by totally separating the affected T lymphocytes from the malignant B lymphocytes. The approach employs stable chromosome translocations and will detect prior exposures above the detection limit of ∼ 0.05-0.1 Gy. The utility of this approach is illustrated by using blood lymphocytes from a nuclear dockyard worker who claims his B cell leukaemia was induced by work-related radiation exposures. Blood lymphocytes were obtained after diagnosis of the disease, but prior to therapy, and measurements were made of the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes without prior separation of T and B cells and in T lymphocytes after complete separation from B cells using a rosetting technique. Results show that the separation of T cells prior to PHA stimulation eliminates the cancer-related chromosomal damage and thus appears to facilitate biodosimetry of pre-cancer in such patients. (Author)

  7. Structural studies on leukaemia inhibitory factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, R.S.; Maurer, T.; Smith, D.K. [Biomolecular Research Institute, Parville (Australia); Nicola, N.A. [Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-01

    Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on a wide range of target cells, including mega-karyocytes, osteoblasts, hepatocytes, adipocytes, neurons, embryonic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. Many of its activities are shared with other cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, oncostatin-M, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Although secreted in vivo as a glycoprotein, nonglycosylated recombinant protein expressed in E. coli is fully active and has been used in our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the three-dimensional structure and structure-function relationships of LIF. With 180 amino acids and a molecular mass of about 20 kDa, OF is too large for direct structure determination by two-dimensional and three-dimensional {sup 1}HNMR. It is necessary to label the protein with the stable isotopes {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C and employ heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR in order to resolve and interpret the spectral information required for three-dimensional structure determination. This work has been undertaken with both human LIF and a mouse-human chimaera that binds to the human LIF receptor with the same affinity as the human protein and yet expresses in E. coli at much higher levels. Sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure elements for these proteins will be presented and progress towards determination of their three-dimensional structures described.

  8. Molecular therapy for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Catherine C; Tallman, Martin S; Levine, Ross L

    2016-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease that is, in general, associated with a very poor prognosis. Multiple cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities that characterize different forms of AML have been used to better prognosticate patients and inform treatment decisions. Indeed, risk status in patients with this disease has classically been based on cytogenetic findings; however, additional molecular characteristics have been shown to inform risk assessment, including FLT3, NPM1, KIT, and CEBPA mutation status. Advances in sequencing technology have led to the discovery of novel somatic mutations in tissue samples from patients with AML, providing deeper insight into the mutational landscape of the disease. The majority of patients with AML (>97%) are found to have a clonal somatic abnormality on mutational profiling. Nevertheless, our understanding of the utility of mutation profiling in clinical practice remains incomplete and is continually evolving, and evidence-based approaches to application of these data are needed. In this Review, we discuss the evidence-base for integrating mutational data into treatment decisions for patients with AML, and propose novel therapeutic algorithms in the era of molecular medicine. PMID:26620272

  9. Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. Your blood cells form in your bone ... in the bones or joints Risk factors for childhood leukemia include having a brother or sister with ...

  10. Childhood Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Childhood Stress KidsHealth > For Parents > Childhood Stress Print A A ... and feel stress to some degree. Sources of Stress Stress is a function of the demands placed ...

  11. Childhood Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Justine; Howard, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity has important consequences for health and wellbeing both during childhood and also in later adult life. The rising prevalence of childhood obesity poses a major public health challenge in both developed and developing countries by increasing the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases. Despite the urgent need for effective preventative strategies, there remains disagreement over its definition due to a lack of evidence on the optimal cut-offs linking childhood BMI to dis...

  12. Myeloid sarcoma in a child with acute myeloblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a rare occurrence of myeloid sarcoma in a 7 years old child with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML - FAB type M2). He presented with fever, generalized weakness, bilateral proptosis and left parotid swelling. CT scan revealed a mass in paranasal sinuses extending into brain and retro-orbital region. Diagnosis of AML M2 was made on bone marrow aspiration and special stains. Induction therapy for AML was given according to standard protocol. The extramedullary lesion as well as the acute leukaemia went into complete remission. (author)

  13. Childhood Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Childhood Cancer KidsHealth > For Parents > Childhood Cancer Print A A A Text Size What's ... in children, but can happen. The most common childhood cancers are leukemia , lymphoma , and brain cancer . As ...

  14. Childhood cancer and residential radon exposure - results of a population-based case-control study in Lower Saxony (Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A population-based case-control study on risk factors for childhood malignancies was used to investigate a previously reported association between elevated indoor radon concentrations and childhood cancer, with special regard to leukaemia. The patients were all children suffering from leukaemia and common solid tumours (nephroblastoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, central nervous system (CNS) tumours) diagnosed between July 1988 and June 1993 in Lower Saxony (Germany) and aged less than 15 years. Two population-based control groups were matched by age and gender to the leukaemia patients. Long-term (1 year) radon measurements were performed in those homes where the children had been living for at least 1 year, with particular attention being paid to those rooms where they had stayed most of the time. Due to the sequential study design, radon measurements in these rooms could only be done for 36% (82 leukaemias, 82 solid tumours and 209 controls) of the 1038 families initially contacted. Overall mean indoor radon concentrations (27 Bq m-3) were low compared with the measured levels in other studies. Using a prespecified cutpoint of 70 Bq m-3, no association with indoor radon concentrations was seen for the leukaemias (odds ratio (OR): 1.30; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.32-5.33); however, the risk estimates were elevated for the solid tumours (OR: 2.61; 95% CI: 0.96-7.13), mainly based on 6 CNS tumours. We did not find any evidence for an association between indoor radon and childhood leukaemia, which is in line with a recently published American case-control study. There is little support for an association with CNS tumours in the literature. (orig.)

  15. Childhood cancer and residential radon exposure - results of a population-based case-control study in Lower Saxony (Germany)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaletsch, U.; Kaatsch, P.; Meinert, R.; Schuez, J.; Michaelis, J. [Institut fuer Medizinische Statistik und Dokumentation, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55101 Mainz (Germany); Czarwinski, R. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Fachbereich ST, D-10318 Berlin (Germany)

    1999-09-01

    A population-based case-control study on risk factors for childhood malignancies was used to investigate a previously reported association between elevated indoor radon concentrations and childhood cancer, with special regard to leukaemia. The patients were all children suffering from leukaemia and common solid tumours (nephroblastoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, central nervous system (CNS) tumours) diagnosed between July 1988 and June 1993 in Lower Saxony (Germany) and aged less than 15 years. Two population-based control groups were matched by age and gender to the leukaemia patients. Long-term (1 year) radon measurements were performed in those homes where the children had been living for at least 1 year, with particular attention being paid to those rooms where they had stayed most of the time. Due to the sequential study design, radon measurements in these rooms could only be done for 36% (82 leukaemias, 82 solid tumours and 209 controls) of the 1038 families initially contacted. Overall mean indoor radon concentrations (27 Bq m{sup -3}) were low compared with the measured levels in other studies. Using a prespecified cutpoint of 70 Bq m{sup -3}, no association with indoor radon concentrations was seen for the leukaemias (odds ratio (OR): 1.30; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.32-5.33); however, the risk estimates were elevated for the solid tumours (OR: 2.61; 95% CI: 0.96-7.13), mainly based on 6 CNS tumours. We did not find any evidence for an association between indoor radon and childhood leukaemia, which is in line with a recently published American case-control study. There is little support for an association with CNS tumours in the literature. (orig.)

  16. Childhood cancer and residential exposure to highways: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Ben D; Feller, Martin; Röösli, Martin; Ammann, Roland A; Diezi, Manuel; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2015-12-01

    Children living near highways are exposed to higher concentrations of traffic-related carcinogenic pollutants. Several studies reported an increased risk of childhood cancer associated with traffic exposure, but the published evidence is inconclusive. We investigated whether cancer risk is associated with proximity of residence to highways in a nation-wide cohort study including all children aged electromagnetic fields. In time to event analysis based on 532 cases the adjusted hazard ratio for leukaemia comparing children living <100 m from a highway with unexposed children (≥500 m) was 1.43 (95 % CI 0.79, 2.61). Results were similar in incidence density analysis including 1367 leukaemia cases (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.57; 95 % CI 1.09, 2.25). Associations were similar for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (IRR 1.64; 95 % CI 1.10, 2.43) and stronger for leukaemia in children aged <5 years (IRR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.22, 3.04). Little evidence of association was found for other tumours. Our study suggests that young children living close to highways are at increased risk of developing leukaemia. PMID:26520639

  17. Childhood cancer and residential exposure to highways: a nationwide cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children living near highways are exposed to higher concentrations of traffic-related carcinogenic pollutants. Several studies reported an increased risk of childhood cancer associated with traffic exposure, but the published evidence is inconclusive. We investigated whether cancer risk is associated with proximity of residence to highways in a nation-wide cohort study including all children aged <16 years from Swiss national censuses in 1990 and 2000. Cancer incidence was investigated in time to event analyses (1990–2008) using Cox proportional hazards models and incidence density analyses (1985–2008) using Poisson regression. Adjustments were made for socio-economic factors, ionising background radiation and electromagnetic fields. In time to event analysis based on 532 cases the adjusted hazard ratio for leukaemia comparing children living <100 m from a highway with unexposed children (≥500 m) was 1.43 (95 % CI 0.79, 2.61). Results were similar in incidence density analysis including 1367 leukaemia cases (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.57; 95 % CI 1.09, 2.25). Associations were similar for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (IRR 1.64; 95 % CI 1.10, 2.43) and stronger for leukaemia in children aged <5 years (IRR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.22, 3.04). Little evidence of association was found for other tumours. Our study suggests that young children living close to highways are at increased risk of developing leukaemia

  18. First-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of imatinib just over a decade ago, there has been a dramatic change in the treatment and prognosis of early chronic phase chronic myeloid Leukaemia (CML). This review article focuses on recent advances, culminating in the approval of nilotinib by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed CML in the chronic phase.

  19. Tumour and leukaemia morbidity in infants in Germany after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years after Chernobyl, a higher incidence of infant tumours and leukaemia was observed. This corresponds to the established latency periods after the occurence of a nuclear accident. Further, the types of tumour that have a higher incidence are known to be easily induced by radiation. However, further investigations are required also in other countries to make a valid statement. (orig.)

  20. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia : recent molecular biology findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraszewska, Monika D.; Dawidowska, Malgorzata; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Witt, Michal

    2012-01-01

    For many years, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) has been considered and treated as a single malignancy, but divergent outcomes in T-ALL patients receiving uniform treatment protocols encouraged intensive research on the molecular biology of this disease. Recent findings in the field dem

  1. Tuberculosis complicating imatinib treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, J. M. A.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Janssen, J. J. W. M.; Postmus, P. E.; van Altena, R.

    2009-01-01

    Although imatinib is not considered a predisposing factor for tuberculosis (TB), the present case report describes three patients in whom imatinib treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia was complicated by TB. This raises the question of whether imatinib increases susceptibility to TB. There are sev

  2. Improved outcome after relapse in children with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Clausen, Niels; Gustafsson, Göran;

    2007-01-01

    In the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology paediatric study acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 93, event-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 66%, indicating that many patients were cured following relapse. Factors influencing outcome in children with relapsed AML were...

  3. The incidence of cancer and leukaemia in the area around the former Greenham Common Airbase. An investigation of a possible association with measured environmental radiation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) was established in November 1985 in response to the final recommendation of the report of the Independent Advisory Group chaired by Sir Douglas Black (Black, 1984). Our terms of reference are to 'assess and advise Government on the health effects of natural and man-made radiation in the environment and to assess the adequacy of the available data and the need for further research'. The Black Advisory Group had been commissioned by the Minister of Health in 1983 to investigate reports of a high incidence of leukaemia occurring in young people living in the village of Seascale, 3 km from the Sellafield nuclear site and the suggestion that there might be an association between the leukaemia incidence and the radioactive discharges from Sellafield. The Advisory Group confirmed that there was a higher incidence of leukaemia in young people resident in the area but also concluded that the estimated radiation dose from the Sellafield discharges and other sources, received by the local population, could not account for the observed leukaemia incidence on the basis of knowledge available at that time. The uncertainties in the available data led the Advisory Group to make recommendations for further research and investigation. In this our Fifth Report we examine whether there is or has been any unusual incidence of cancer in the vicinity of the former Greenham Common Airbase and whether there is or has been any association with local levels of radioactivity in the area. With regard to childhood cancer we have examined the local incidence of these diseases in the context of the geographical distribution of these malignancies nationwide

  4. Gene profiling of the erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias induced by the Graffi murine retrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-David Yaacov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias are associated with very poor prognoses and the mechanism of blastic transformation is insufficiently elucidated. The murine Graffi leukaemia retrovirus induces erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias when inoculated into NFS mice and represents a good model to study these leukaemias. Methods To expand our understanding of genes specific to these leukaemias, we compared gene expression profiles, measured by microarray and RT-PCR, of all leukaemia types induced by this virus. Results The transcriptome level changes, present between the different leukaemias, led to the identification of specific cancerous signatures. We reported numerous genes that may be potential oncogenes, may have a function related to erythropoiesis or megakaryopoiesis or have a poorly elucidated physiological role. The expression pattern of these genes has been further tested by RT-PCR in different samples, in a Friend erythroleukaemic model and in human leukaemic cell lines. We also screened the megakaryoblastic leukaemias for viral integrations and identified genes targeted by these integrations and potentially implicated in the onset of the disease. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the data obtained from this global gene profiling experiment have provided a detailed characterization of Graffi virus induced erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias with many genes reported specific to the transcriptome of these leukaemias for the first time.

  5. Immunological and ultrastructural studies in acute biphenotypic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, V; Chitale, A; Matutes, E; Buccheri, V; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To compare the sensitivity of the ultrastructural method to detect myeloperoxidase (MPO) with light microscopy and immunocytochemistry using an anti-MPO antibody; to examine the expression of lymphoid antigens in relation to MPO activity in blast cells from cases of biphenotypic leukaemia. METHODS--Blast cells from 14 cases of biphenotypic acute leukaemia were analysed. Immunological markers were performed by single or double immunofluorescence staining on a flow cytometer. The presence of MPO was determined by light microscopy, electron microscopy on fixed and unfixed cells, and by immunoalkaline phosphatase with an anti-MPO antibody. The immunogold method was applied at the ultrastructural level to assess the expression of lymphoid and myeloid antigens at the same time as the MPO activity. RESULTS--Six of the 14 cases were initially classified as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and eight as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). MPO activity was shown at the ultrastructural level in 4-99% blasts from all cases. Six of the 14 were MPO negative by light microscopy and three of these were negative with the antibody anti-MPO. Coexpression of lymphoid antigens (CD19, CD10, or CD2) and MPO was shown by the immunogold method in four out of 11 cases; in seven cases the blasts coexpressed myeloid antigens (CD13, CD33) and MPO. CONCLUSIONS--Electron microscopy is more sensitive for showing MPO than light microscopy and immunocytochemistry; the immunogold method combined with MPO used at the ultrastructural level can help to define the cell lineage involved in biphenotypic leukaemia by highlighting the myeloid component defined by MPO. Images PMID:8227405

  6. Association of 1800 cGy cranial irradiation with intellectual function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial radiation therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has been associated with adverse neuropsychological effects, such as low intelligence. We evaluated 203 children for six years in a multi-centre European study. The patients were divided into two groups: 129 children treated with 1800 cGy of cranial radiation therapy and 74 children who received high-dose methotrexate but no radiation therapy. We found a significant decline in full scale intelligence quotient in the irradiated group that increased with the length of time from diagnosis. Younger age at diagnosis was associated with lower full scale intelligence quotient in the radiated group. Our results indicate that a radiation dose of 1800 cGy can have negative effects on neurocognitive function and we continue to question the benefit of low-dose cranial radiation therapy. (author)

  7. New genetics and diagnosis of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Harrison

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 50 years, while significant advances have been made in the successful treatment of childhood leukaemia, similar progress has been made in understanding the genetics of the disease. In childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL, the incidences of individual chromosomal abnormalities are well established and cytogenetics provides a reliable tool for risk stratification for treatment. In spite of this role, a number of patients will relapse. Increasing numbers of additional genetic changes, including deletions and mutations, are being discovered. Their associations with established cytogenetic subgroups and with each other remain unclear. Whether they have a link to outcome is the most important factor in terms of refinement of risk factors in relation to clinical trials. For a number of newly identified abnormalities, appropriately modified therapy has significantly improved outcome. Alternatively, some of these aberrations are providing novel molecular markers for targeted therapy.

  8. Value of monoclonal anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO7) for diagnosing acute leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Storr, J; Dolan, G.; Coustan-Smith, E; Barnett, D.; Reilly, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    The expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was studied in 100 cases of acute leukaemia (83 with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 17 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) by both a conventional cytochemical method and the immunocytochemical antiperoxidase (APAAP) technique using the monoclonal antibody MPO7. In each case the staining was evaluated by light microscopical examination (percentage of positive cells). Of the 83 cases of AML, 78 (93.9%) were positive for MPO7 compared with 70 (84.3%) by...

  9. A meta-analysis of leukaemia risk from protracted exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, R D; Schubauer-Berigan, M K

    2010-01-01

    Context More than 400 000 workers annually receive a measurable radiation dose and may be at increased risk of radiation-induced leukaemia. It is unclear whether leukaemia risk is elevated with protracted, low-dose exposure. Objective We conducted a meta-analysis examining the relationship between protracted low-dose ionising radiation exposure and leukaemia. Data sources Reviews by the National Academies and United Nations provided a summary of informative studies published before 2005. PubM...

  10. Childhood Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Ahmet; Koca, Fahrettin; Fıçıcıoğlu, Can; Çam, Halit; Mıkla, Şerare

    1995-01-01

    Management of childhood obesity and its early and late complications are among the most difficult problems confronted by pediatricians and practitioners The purpose of this review is to provide information for the evaluation and treatment of childhood obesity Key nbsp;words: nbsp;Child Obesity Etiology Management Complications

  11. Frequency of various types of leukaemias diagnosed at PAF hospital mianwali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequencies of various types of leukaemias in a secondary care hospital. Study Design: Descriptive Place and Duration of Study: PAF Hospital Mianwali, from Jan 2009 to Dec 2012. Material and Methods: Record of all the cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) diagnosed during the period of study was retrieved from the laboratory and total number of leukaemia cases were counted. The ages and the genders of the patients were noted. Median age at diagnosis for each type of leukaemia was worked out. Frequency of each leukaemia type was noted and relative frequency was calculated as percentage. Results: Out of a total of 67 patients, AML was diagnosed in 22 (32.8%), CML in 16 (23.8%), ALL in 15 (22.4%) and CLL in 14 (20.9%) cases. Median age at diagnosis for ALL, AML, CLL and CML was 5, 41, 70 and 40 years respectively while male to female ratio was 2.7, 1.4, 1.3 and 1.5 respectively. Conclusion: AML was the commonest leukaemia type, followed by CML, ALL and CLL. In children, ALL was found to be four times more common than AML. (author)

  12. Seasonal variations in the diagnosis of childhood cancer in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, J A; Severson, R K; Swensen, A R; Pollock, B H; Gurney, J G; Robison, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    Seasonal trends in month of diagnosis have been reported for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). This seasonal variation has been suggested to represent an underlying viral aetiology for these malignancies. Some studies have shown the highest frequency of diagnoses in the summer months, although this has been inconsistent. Data from the Children's Cancer Group and the Pediatric Oncology Group were analysed for seasonal incidence patterns. A total of...

  13. Childhood cancer and paternal employment in agriculture: the role of pesticides.

    OpenAIRE

    Fear, N T; E. ROMAN; G. Reeves; Pannett, B

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the offspring of men potentially exposed to pesticides at work may be at increased risk of kidney cancer (Wilms' tumour), brain tumours, Ewing's bone sarcoma and acute leukaemia. This paper examines the association between potential occupational exposure of fathers to pesticides and offspring's death from cancer in a large national database. Records for 167703 childhood deaths occurring during 1959-63, 1970-78 and 1979-90 in England and Wales have been ana...

  14. The Role of HDACs Inhibitors in Childhood and Adolescence Acute Leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Riccardo Masetti; Salvatore Serravalle; Carlotta Biagi; Andrea Pession

    2011-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia,...

  15. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Raheel A; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Albertsen, Birgitte K; Prunsild, Kaie; Zeller, Bernward; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Heyman, Mats; Taskinen, Mervi; Harila-Saari, Arja; Kanerva, Jukka; Frandsen, Thomas L

    2014-04-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Treatment is associated with several toxicities, including acute pancreatitis. Clinical course, presentation, re-exposure to L-asparginase after pancreatitis and risk of recurrent pancreatitis within an asparaginase-intensive protocol has been poorly reported. Children (1-17 years) on the ongoing Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL2008 protocol with asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) diagnosed between 2008 and 2012 were identified through the online NOPHO ALL toxicity registry. NOPHO ALL2008 includes eight or 15 doses of intramuscular pegylated L-asparginase (PEG-asparaginase) 1000 iu/m(2) /dose at 2-6 weeks intervals, with a total of 30 weeks of exposure to PEG-asparaginase (clinicaltrials.gov no: NCT00819351). Of 786 children, 45 were diagnosed with AAP with a cumulative risk of AAP of 5·9%. AAP occurred after a median of five doses (range 1-13), and 11 d (median) from the latest administration of PEG-Asparaginase. Thirteen patients developed pseudocysts (30%) and 11 patients developed necrosis (25%). One patient died from pancreatitis. Twelve AAP patients were re-exposed to L-asparginase, two of whom developed mild AAP once more, after four and six doses respectively. In conclusion, re-exposure to PEG-asparaginase in ALL patients with mild AAP seems safe. PMID:24428625

  16. The potential of clofarabine in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpel, Dominique J P M; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in infants is the most difficult-to-treat type of childhood ALL, displaying a chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, and unique histone modifications, gene expression signatures and DNA methylation patterns. MLL-rearranged infant ALL responds remarkably well to nucleoside analogue drugs in vitro, such as cytarabine and cladribine, and to the demethylating agents decitabine and zebularine as measured by cytotoxicity assays. These observations led to the inclusion of cytarabine into the treatment regimens currently used for infants with ALL. However, survival chances for infants with MLL-rearranged ALL do still not exceed 30-40%. Here we explored the in vitro potential of the novel nucleoside analogue clofarabine for MLL-rearranged infant ALL. Therefore we used both cell line models as well as primary patient cells. Compared with other nucleoside analogues, clofarabine effectively targeted primary MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells at the lowest concentrations, with median LC50 values of ∼25 nM. Interestingly, clofarabine displayed synergistic cytotoxic effects in combination with cytarabine. Furthermore, at concentrations of 5-10nM clofarabine induced demethylation of the promoter region of the tumour suppressor gene FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad), a gene typically hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged ALL. Demethylation of the FHIT promoter region was accompanied by subtle re-expression of this gene both at the mRNA and protein level. We conclude that clofarabine is an interesting candidate for further studies in MLL-rearranged ALL in infants. PMID:26188848

  17. Developing "Care Assistant": A smartphone application to support caregivers of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Fen; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Caring for children with ALL is an uncommon experience for parents without medical training. They urgently need professional assistance when their children are recovering at home. This paper documents the process of developing an Android application (app) "Care Assistant" for family caregivers of children with ALL. Key informant interviews and focus group studies were used before programming the app. The key informants and focus group members included: caregivers of children with ALL, cancer care physicians and nurses, and software engineers. We found several major challenges faced by caregivers: limited access to evidence-based clinic information, lack of financial and social assistance, deficient communications with doctors or nurses, lack of disease-related knowledge, and inconvenience of tracking treatments and testing results. This feedback was used to develop "Care Assistant". This app has eight modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, financial and social assistance, knowledge centre, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform, and reminders. We have also developed a web-based administration portal to manage the app. The usability and effectiveness of "Care Assistant" will be evaluated in future studies. PMID:26271029

  18. Immunoglobulin genes and T-cell receptors as molecular markers in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is a malignant clonal disease, one of the most common malignancies in childhood. Contemporary protocols ensure high remission rate and long term free survival. The ability of molecular genetic methods help to establish submicroscopic classification and minimal residual disease (MRD follow up, in major percent responsible for relapse. Objective. The aim of the study was to detect the frequency of IgH and TCR gene rearrangements and their correlation with clinical parameters. Methods. Forty-one children with ALL were enrolled in the study group, with initial diagnosis of IgH and TCR gene rearrangements by polimerase chain reaction ( PCR. MRD follow-up was performed in induction phase when morphological remission was expected, and after intensive chemiotherapy. Results. In the study group IgH rearrangement was detected in 82.9% of children at the diagnosis, while TCR rearrangement was seen in 56.1%. On induction day 33, clonal IgH rearrangements persisted in 39% and TCR rearrangements in 36.5% of children. Conclusion. Molecular analysis of genetic alterations and their correlation with standard prognostic parameters show the importance of risk stratification revision which leads to new therapy intensification approach. MRD stands out as a precise predictive factor for the relapse of disease.

  19. High-flow priapism in acute lymphatic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Vogt, Susanna; Kaiser, Werner A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07740, Jena (Germany); Kentouche, Karim; Doerfel, Claus; Zintl, Felix [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Priapism is defined as prolonged and persistent erection of the penis without sexual stimulation. It is associated with excessive hyperleukocytosis (e.g. in acute or chronic leukaemia); however, this complication is rarely seen in the pediatric population. We report a 12-year-old boy suffering from acute leukaemia presenting with, at first intermittent, but increasingly persistent erection. Doppler US revealed signs of high-flow priapism. MRI excluded intrapelvic tumour masses, and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography could not demonstrate an arteriovenous fistula or thrombosis. Cavernosal blood-gas measurement was in agreement with high-flow priapism. On the basis of the imaging findings, invasive therapeutic management was avoided in our patient with a successful outcome. (orig.)

  20. Extramedullary Myeloid Cell Tumour Presenting As Leukaemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa Devinder Mohan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We herewith report a case of extramedullary myeloid cell tumour presenting as leukaemia cutis for its rarity. It occurred in a 50 year old male patient who presented to us with a 40 days history of painless raised solid skin swellings over the trunk. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy and bone marrow biopsy showed features suggestive of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Immunophenotyping on skin biopsy specimens and bone marrow biopsy found tumour cells expressing CD43 and Tdt but were negative for CD3 and CD20. These features were consistent with extramedullary myeloid cell tumour involving skin and subcutis (cutaneous manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia.

  1. Depleted uranium and radiation - induced lung cancer and leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports of leukaemias and other cancers among servicemen who took part in the 1991 Gulf war or in the more recent operations in the Balkans are of continuing interest, as is the possibility, however slight, that depleted uranium (DU) is one of the causative factors. This commentary includes the results of a UK epidemiological study on the mortality of Gulf war veterans and , although not containing information on DU exposure, gives data on overall levels of mortality and therefore carries more weight than anecdotal reports. Also included are brief summaries on radiation-induced lung cancer in uranium workers as well as radiation-induced leukaemia in Japanese atomic bomb survivors and patients ankylosing spondylitis treated using x-rays. This commentary concludes with a critique of Iraqi cancer statistics as well as giving information on environmental contamination in Kosovo and the use of DU ammunition. (author)

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia: Optimal Management and Recent Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Villela, Luis; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2011-01-01

    The current treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia yields poor results, with expected cure rates in the order of 30–40% depending on the biological characteristics of the leukaemic clone. Therefore, new agents and schemas are intensively studied in order to improve patients’ outcomes. This review summarizes some of these new paradigms, including new questions such as which anthracycline is most effective and at what dose. High doses of daunorubicin have shown better responses in y...

  3. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G M; Chesner, I M; Asquith, P; Leyland, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a study to assess the possible contribution of lymphoid infiltration of the gastrointestinal mucosa to occult blood loss or malabsorption 20 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) had a lactulose hydrogen breath test. In 10 cases (50%) a small intestinal peak was detected, suggesting small bowel bacterial overgrowth, and this was confirmed in seven patients by the positive culture of jejunal aspirate. Of the patients with a positive hydrogen breath test, radiological exa...

  4. Oral mucositis in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Pels, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Oral mucositis is the most commonly reported side effect observed in neoplastic patients treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy of the head and neck region as well as in patients who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant. The aim of the study was to assess the oral mucosa status in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) during antineoplastic therapy. Material and methods The clinical examination included 78 children aged 2-18 with ALL. The clinica...

  5. Autografting as first line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, I O; Franklin, I M

    1998-01-01

    Interest in autografting for chronic myeloid leukaemia and its clinical relevance has revived in recent years. This followed observations that with various chemotherapeutic regimens it was possible to achieve, temporarily at least, peripheral blood and bone marrow that were Philadelphia negative. Bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells could then be harvested and reinfused following a high dose procedure, hopefully eliminating any residual disease, and resulting in prolonged disease ...

  6. Risk of leukaemia and other cancers in Seascale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    NRPB has recently published revised estimates of the radiation dose and the risk of radiation-induced leukaemias and other cancers in children and young persons living in Seascale, Cumbria. The work was undertaken at the request of the Committee on the Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environmental (COMARE) and close liaison was maintained with COMARE and its working groups during the study. This short article outlines the approach adopted and summarises the results. (Author).

  7. Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia with Trisomy 13: a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-yu Hu; Chao-hui Yuan; Kui Tan; Zhen-zhen Chen

    2011-01-01

    ATYPICAL chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML),which shows both myeloproliferative and myeIodysplastic features,is a type of myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disease as defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of the myeloid neoplasms.1 Because of the presence of neutrophilic leukocytosis,aCML may resemble chronic myeIogenous leukemia (CML).However,in contrast with CML,aCML does not have the Philadelphia chromosome or the bcr/abl fusion gene.

  8. Leukaemia and low dose radiation. Is there an association between leukaemia and cumulative external dose amongst the British Nuclear Fuel plc. (BNFL) workers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed examination of the BNFL leukaemia data is presented, for the period 1941-1995, using the recently assembled company wide BNFL epidemiological database and the BNFL leukaemia case-control data set. The association of this occupationally exposed cohort is examined with respect to both leukaemia mortality and leukaemia morbidity. The excess relative risk for total leukaemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukaemia amongst the BNFL radiation workers was found to be 3.64 Sv-1 (90% CI -0.13-11.22); for Sellafield and Springfields this figure was 7.99 Sv-1 (90% CI 1.50-29.5) and -1.97 Sv-1 (90% CI<-2.23-6.11) respectively. A 14-20% increase in risk is noted when dosimetry adjusted for measurement error, is used to determine the excess relative risk. The association between leukaemia and cumulative external radiation is found to be particularly associated with the Sellafield plant; the Springfields plant gave consistently negative risk estimates. (author)

  9. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrander Fiona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE, and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1. Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease.

  10. Molecular mechanisms involved in chemoresistance in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common paediatric cancer. Despite cure rates approaching 80%, resistance to treatment and disease relapse remain a significant clinical problem. Identification of the genes and biological pathways responsible for chemoresistance is therefore crucial for the design of novel therapeutic approaches aiming to improve patient survival. Mutations in the membrane transporter P-glycoprotein genes, genetic variations in drug-metabolising enzymes and defects in apoptotic pathways are mechanisms of chemoresistance common to a wide spectrum of cancers and also play a role in paediatric ALL. In addition, several recent microarray studies have identified transcriptional profiles specifically associated with chemoresistance and pointed to a number of potentially novel therapeutic targets. These microarray studies have shown that genes discriminating between clinically responsive and resistant leukaemias tend to be involved in cellular processes such as regulation of cell cycle, proliferation, and DNA repair. Here we review the outcomes of these microarray studies and also present our own investigations into apoptotic resistance to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in paediatric ALL. We present stratification of paediatric ALL by the profile of DNA damage response following ionising radiation (IR in vitro. This approach allows classification of ALL tumours at presentation into IR-apoptotic sensitive and IR-apoptotic resistant. Furthermore, apoptotic resistant leukaemias exhibit abnormal response of NFkB pathway following irradiation and inhibition of this pathway can sensitise leukaemic cells to IR-induced DSBs.

  11. Feline leukaemia virus and its clinical effects in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, L

    1975-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection is common among cats where contact is high. The virus can be transmitted readily between cats. It causes a variety of haemopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms; the most common types are alimentary, multicentric and thymic lymphosarcoma and lymphatic leukaemia. The virus is involved in the aetiology of certain other diseases including anaemia, glomerulonephritis and an immunosuppressive syndrome which predisposes cats to intercurrent infections. Many infected cats mount an immune response and do not suffer from any of these. The immune status is shown by serum antibody levels to feline leukaemia virus associated cell membrane antigens. Cats with a titre of 32 or more are most unlikely to suffer any ill effects and may eliminate the virus infection. The outcome of infection in an individual cat depends on the immunological competence of the cat, the dose of virus received and its ability to induce immunosuppression. FeLV infection can be detected by examination of tissues by electron microscopy, and by culture of virus from plasma and other tissues. In the United States, a method is now in use for the detection of leukaemia virus antigen in peripheral blood leukocytes; this is carried out on ordinary blood films. Successful prototype vaccines have been developed against FeLV. This paper describes the natural history of the virus, the diseases in which it is implicated and discusses recently developed diagnostic methods. PMID:163515

  12. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting...... responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). So far, eleven clinical trials including 99 CLL and ALL patients treated with CAR T cells targeting CD19 have been published, and the results from these trials are promising with impressive clinical...... responses in heavily pretreated patients. Thus, CAR T cell therapy has induced complete responses in both CLL and ALL, and surprisingly, current results indicate that patients with ALL are more prone to respond than are CLL patients. Importantly, the majority of CAR cell studies have observed severe therapy...

  13. Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) 4. report. The incidence of cancer and leukaemia in young people in the vicinity of the Sellafield site, West Cumbria: Further studies and an update of the situation since the publication of the report of the Black Advisory Group in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fourth Report of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (COMARE) updates the information on the incidence of cancer and leukaemia in young people in the vicinity of the Sellafield site since the publication of the Black Advisory Group report in 1984. Data are reviewed on radiation exposure and the risk of radiation-induced leukaemia and cancer in young people living in Seascale; possible effects of paternal preconception irradiation in cancer; exposure to chemicals used at and discharged from the Sellafield site and the risk to the general population and offspring of site workers; and the infectious aetiology of childhood cancer. The history of the Royal Ordnance Factories sited at Sellafield and Drigg in the 1940s and a historical review of childhood cancer in Seascale is also given. (UK)

  14. Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  15. Acute leukaemia after exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, T T; Palva, I P

    1980-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is known to develop in many cases of benzene-induced pancytopenia [1]. This is a report of the development of acute leukaemia in a patient who had apparently recovered from pancytopenia after chronic exposure to a weed killer, 2-methyl-4-chlorphenoxyacetic acid. PMID:6769284

  16. CBL mutations do not frequently occur in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Eva A.; Driessen, Emma M. C.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Stary, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; de Haas, Valerie; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2012-01-01

    RAS-pathway mutations, causing a proliferative advantage, occur in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and MLL-rearranged leukaemia. Recently, mutations in the Casitas B lineage lymphoma (CBL) gene were reported to be involved in RAS-pathway activation in various myeloid malignancies, but their role in pa

  17. Leukaemia induction in man by radionuclides and some relevant experimental and human observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific differences in induction of specific kinds of leukaemia are found in Thorotrast-containing subjects, in males occupationally exposed to Ra isotopes, in bomb survivors and in patients with ankylosing spondylitis after a single course of X-ray treatment. Analyses of leukaemia induction by ionizing radiation simply in terms of total numbers of leukaemia must be inadequate. Deaths from marrow failure have been nearly as frequent as from leukaemias in 3 groups only, Thorotrast-containing subjects, patients given cancericidal radiotherapy with Sulphur-35, and U.S. radiologists beginning their occupational exposure in the 1920's. In them severe radiation damage to the marrow may be an important contributor to leukaemia induction. Dosimetry of focal α-particle irradiation of the bone marrow, polycytic microdisometry, seems essential for an understanding of leukaemia induction by high LET irradiation. The regional distribution of Thorotrast deposits in relation to the active marrow content of different bones seems to be an unexplored but relevant issue. Induction of acute myeloid leukaemia in the laboratory mouse provides a model allowing experimental analysis of interaction biological and radiological factors in radiation induction of this specific type of leukaemia. (orig.)

  18. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors in leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux eDeynoux

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite huge improvements in the treatment of leukaemia, the percentage of patients suffering relapse still remains significant. Relapse most often results from a small number of leukaemic stem cells (LSCs within the bone marrow, which are able to self-renew and therefore re-establish the full tumour. The marrow microenvironment contributes considerably in supporting the protection and development of leukaemic cells. LSCs share specific niches with normal haematopoietic stem cells with the niche itself being composed of a variety of cell types including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, bone cells, immune cells, neuronal cells and vascular cells. A hallmark of the haematopoietic niche is low oxygen partial pressure, indeed this hypoxia is necessary for the long-term maintenance of HSCs. Hypoxia is a strong signal, principally maintained by members of the hypoxia-inducible factor family. In solid tumours, it has been well-established that hypoxia triggers intrinsic metabolic changes and microenvironmental modifications, such as the stimulation of angiogenesis, through activation of HIFs. As leukaemia is not considered a solid tumour, the role of oxygen in the disease was presumed to be inconsequential and remained long overlooked. This view has now been revised since hypoxia has been shown to influence leukaemic cell proliferation, differentiation and resistance to chemotherapy. However, the role of HIF proteins remains controversial with HIFs being considered as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes, depending on the study and model. The purpose of this review is to highlight our knowledge of hypoxia and HIFs in leukaemic development and therapeutic resistance, and to discuss the recent hypoxia-based strategies proposed to eradicate leukaemias.

  19. Quantitative variation of superoxide dismutase levels in leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongothai A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxde dismutase is dimeric antioxidant enzyme responsible for quenching of superoxide radicals which are released during the chemical reactions of the various metabolic pathways .The enzyme levels of SOD are altered to a considerable extent in various diseased states exhibiting either elevation or depletion in their enzymatic activity.As this phenomenon was found to be more evident in leukaemias, we have estimated the Cu-Zn SOD levels in the red cells of the leukaemic patients in order to evaluate the efficiency of anti oxidant system and its relation to leukaemiogenesis. The overall mean SOD levels in the leukaemic patients (AML, ALL and CML were significantly low (124.97±6.46 as compared to that of the normal controls (287.08±6.79. In respect to the age, the mean SOD levels were found to be elevated indicating the extent of the free radicals might have stimulated the production of the antioxidants.In response to chemotherapy, the mean SOD levels were observed to be elevated but not the extent of the normal levels among the treated groups in AML(127.40±8.67 and CML (174.73±53.59 types of leukaemias as compared to that of the untreated groups. In general the stage of leukaemia did not cause any variation in the SOD levels. However, the L2 in ALL (107.49±4.88, blast crisis in CML (154.00±19.86 showed reduced levels of SOD.

  20. Radiation-associated chronic myelogenous leukaemia in younger people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) is known to be induced by exposure to ionizing radiation, as is acute leukaemia. However, CML has been recorded only rarely as a complication of radiation exposure early in life. During the period from 1973 to 1976, 75 patients with CML were admitted to Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI). In addition, 64 patients admitted to RPMI previously were also available for study in 1973. Among 79 patients who were born after 1925, information regarding radiation exposure was obtained in 89%; 49 were interviewed and 21 responded to a mailed questionnaire. Consultation with parents was achieved in 52 of the 70 responding cases (74%). Replies were obtained from 15 of the 18 patients below the age of 25, and were confirmed by parents or siblings in all instances. Replies to the mailed questionnaire were obtained from 45 age- and sex-matched controls. In addition to two patients already known to have radiation exposure for treatment of malignant neoplasms, these inquiries yielded a total of nine patients with histories of radiation exposure for benign conditions. Three had therapeutic irradiation, two for thymic enlargement and one for eczema. Three had exposure in utero by pelvimetry. Two had diagnostic exposure during the perinatal period and one had occupational exposure as a nurse. Four of these patients were below the age of 25. All nine patients had the Ph' chromosome. The course of CML in these patients was not different from that of other patients with Ph' chromosome-positive CML without a history of radiation exposure. A history of radiation exposure was elicited in one-fourth of the younger patients (<25) in this study, compared with one of 45 age- and sex-matched controls without leukaemia (p<0.02)

  1. Inhibition of histone deacetylases in cancer therapy: lessons from leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccacci, Elena; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a key component of the epigenetic machinery regulating gene expression, and behave as oncogenes in several cancer types, spurring the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) as anticancer drugs. This review discusses new results regarding the role of HDACs in cancer and the effect of HDACi on tumour cells, focusing on haematological malignancies, particularly acute myeloid leukaemia. Histone deacetylases may have opposite roles at different stages of tumour progression and in different tumour cell sub-populations (cancer stem cells), highlighting the importance of investigating these aspects for further improving the clinical use of HDACi in treating cancer. PMID:26908329

  2. Oral squamous cell carcinoma following treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With substantially increased survival after most paediatric cancers over the past decades have come the late sequelae of treatment. Of all late complications of treatment, second malignancies are generally considered to be the most serious. We report on a 20-year-old man with an oral squamous cell carcinoma 17 years after initial chemotherapy and irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Although occurrence of the oral malignancy in this patient could have been treatment-related, one should keep in mind that the occurrence of second tumours may also be based on a shared genetic aetiology. (au) 9 refs

  3. The Effects of Herbs and Fruits on Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Azam Saedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, herbal therapy is the first and basis form of treatment for most types of diseases. About 75–80% of the world’s population prefers herbal therapy as a major treatment due to its better adequacy and satisfactoriness, which enhance human body’s symmetry with minimal side effects. Fruits and plants have been presented from the past as promising tools in becoming a natural anticancer agents. Many of these plant extracts are currently used in cancer therapy and prevention. This review paper will particularly explore and emphasize on herbs and fruits used in the treatment of the leukaemia.

  4. Oral squamous cell carcinoma following treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waal, R.I.F. van der; Waal, I. van der [Univ. Hospital Vrije Univ., Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veerman, A.J.P. [Univ. Hospital Vrije Univ., Dept. of Paediatric Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Snow, G.B. [Univ. Hospital Vrije Univ., Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-02-01

    With substantially increased survival after most paediatric cancers over the past decades have come the late sequelae of treatment. Of all late complications of treatment, second malignancies are generally considered to be the most serious. We report on a 20-year-old man with an oral squamous cell carcinoma 17 years after initial chemotherapy and irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Although occurrence of the oral malignancy in this patient could have been treatment-related, one should keep in mind that the occurrence of second tumours may also be based on a shared genetic aetiology. (au) 9 refs.

  5. [Disseminated fusariosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, N.E.; Ralfkiaer, E.M.; Kjeldsen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive mould infections are a major cause of infectious mortality in highly immunosuppressed patients. Incidence in this high risk group is 10-20% with a death rate in excess of 50%. Most invasive moulds are Aspergillus spp. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic...... leukaemia who developed a rare disseminated mould infection with Fusarium solani during induction chemotherapy. We present the case story and discuss the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics and treatment of invasive fusariosis Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/8...

  6. [Characteristic of the yeast isolated from patients with leukaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorovskaia, E A; Rybal'skaia, A P; Skachkova, N K; Mel'nik, E A; Nemirovskaia, L N; Nagornaia, S S; Babich, T V; Polishchuk, L V

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that biotopes of upper respiratory system and intestine were contaminated with yeast in 44.6% of patients with leukaemia (of 112 examined ones). Their quantity exceeds the boundary value for practically healthy people and is > or = 10(2) KOE/ml in the nasal activity and fauces and leucemia the mycotic complications are mainly caused by anamorphous yeast of ascomycetic affinity. Candida albicans, as well as C. glabrata, C. rugosa and Candida sp. play the leading role. The Candida genus species are mainly sensitive to amphotericine B, clotrisamol and nistatin. PMID:19044007

  7. Expression of partial tandem duplication of mixed lineage leukaemia in patients with acute leukaemia and their relatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Yi; Wang Dongning; Li Xudong; Hu Yuan; Wang Wenwen; Huang Renwei

    2014-01-01

    Background Partial tandem duplication of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL-PTD) is detected both in patients with acute leukemia and in healthy people.However,MLL-PTD in relatives of patients with MLL-PTD has not been reported.The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of MLL-PTD in patients with acute leukemia and in their relatives.Methods The bone marrow or peripheral blood was collected from patients with acute leukaemia and their relatives.Nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was applied to detect the mRNA expression of the MLL-PTD fused gene,and further confirm in genomic DNA level.Results Analysing MLL-PTD in case 1,the patient's older brother and his younger brother were positive,while his mother and his son were negative.The exon type in case 1 was e9/3 fusion,but in his older brother,it was e9/3 and e11/3 fusion,and in his younger brother,it was e9/3,e10/3,and e11/3 fusion.MLL-PTD in case 2 was negative,but in the patient's older sister was positive,and the exon type was e9/3,e10/3,and e11/3.Conclusions The expression of MLL-PTD was present in cases with acute leukaemia with a single expression type.However,various expression types were detected in their healthy relatives.MLL-PTD can couple with other chromosome aberrations,and its impact on disease prognosis remains to be studied further.

  8. Childhood obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Koplan, Jeffrey; Lissner, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress toward assuring the health of today's young population, the 21(st) century began with an epidemic of childhood obesity. There is general agreement that the situation must be addressed by means of primary prevention, but relatively little is known about how to intervene effectively....... The evidence behind the assumption that childhood obesity can be prevented was discussed critically in this roundtable symposium. Overall, there was general agreement that action is needed and that the worldwide epidemic itself is sufficient evidence for action. As the poet, writer, and scholar...

  9. Traffic-related air pollution and risk for leukaemia of an adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ketzel, Matthias; Harbo Poulsen, Aslak; Sørensen, Mette

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution causes lung cancer, but associations with other cancers have not been established. We investigated whether long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution is associated with the risk of the general population for leukaemia. We identified 1,967 people in whom leukaemia was diagnosed in 1992-2010 from a nation-wide cancer registry and selected 3,381 control people at random, matched on sex and year of birth, from the entire Danish population. Residential addresses since 1971 were traced in a population registry, and outdoor concentrations of NOx and NO2 , as indicators of traffic-related air pollution, were calculated at each address in a dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the risk for leukaemia after adjustment for income, educational level, cohabitation status and co-morbidity. In linear analyses, we found odds ratios for acute myeloid leukaemia of 1.20 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.38) per 20 µg/m(3) increase in NOx and 1.31 (1.02-1.68) per 10 µg/m(3) increase in NO2 , calculated as time-weighted average exposure at all addresses since 1971. We found no association with chronic myeloid or lymphocytic leukaemia. This study indicates an association between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and acute myeloid leukaemia in the general population, but not for other subtypes of leukaemia. PMID:26415047

  10. Adult leukaemia: what is the role of currently known risk factors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukaemias are a heterogeneous group of tumours including acute and chronic forms. Considerable efforts have been made to identify risk factors for these diseases, but only a minority of leukaemia cases can currently be attributed to identified or hypothesized factors. This review highlights recent epidemiological literature concerning adult leukaemia, discussing in detail the hereditary, environmental and medical risks. Chromosomal syndromes and genetically based diseases carry a high risk of leukaemia, but rarely occur in the population. Environmental and occupational exposures to chemicals including pesticides have been widely studied, although the results are not consistent, with the exception of benzene. Smoking seems to be a weak causal risk factor. The risk of ionizing radiation has further been quantified in recent studies, although the effects of low doses have not yet been clarified. The results for non-ionizing radiation continue to be inconsistent, but a large effect of electromagnetic fields on the risk of leukaemia appears to be unlikely. Medically applied radio- and chemotherapy are clearly associated with subsequent leukaemia development, and there are links between leukaemia and viral infections. Future research should emphasize the shortcomings in exposure assessment that pervade many studies, and interactions between different risk factors need to be taken into consideration. (orig.)

  11. Adult leukaemia: what is the role of currently known risk factors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeeb, H. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abt. Epidemiologie, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Blettner, M. [International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Unit of Carcinogen Identification and Evaluation, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69372 Lyon (France)

    1998-02-01

    Leukaemias are a heterogeneous group of tumours including acute and chronic forms. Considerable efforts have been made to identify risk factors for these diseases, but only a minority of leukaemia cases can currently be attributed to identified or hypothesized factors. This review highlights recent epidemiological literature concerning adult leukaemia, discussing in detail the hereditary, environmental and medical risks. Chromosomal syndromes and genetically based diseases carry a high risk of leukaemia, but rarely occur in the population. Environmental and occupational exposures to chemicals including pesticides have been widely studied, although the results are not consistent, with the exception of benzene. Smoking seems to be a weak causal risk factor. The risk of ionizing radiation has further been quantified in recent studies, although the effects of low doses have not yet been clarified. The results for non-ionizing radiation continue to be inconsistent, but a large effect of electromagnetic fields on the risk of leukaemia appears to be unlikely. Medically applied radio- and chemotherapy are clearly associated with subsequent leukaemia development, and there are links between leukaemia and viral infections. Future research should emphasize the shortcomings in exposure assessment that pervade many studies, and interactions between different risk factors need to be taken into consideration. (orig.) With 1 fig., 5 tabs., 114 refs.

  12. Childhood exposures to Rn-222 and background gamma radiation in the uranium provinces of south Kazakhstan and northern Kyrgyzstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project was undertaken in southern Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. It was speculated that the radiation doses in these areas would be sufficiently high and dispersed to facilitate a case–control study where the radiation doses to leukaemia subjects/their siblings could be compared with those received by control children. As a precursor a pilot project was undertaken to confirm radiation exposures in the region. This was undertaken in association with regional childhood cancer treatment centres. Children from families affected by childhood leukaemia were monitored for 1 month for external γ-radiation dose and for exposure to radon gas. 28 children from families in Kazakhstan and from 31 families in Kyrgyzstan were monitored. The median measured radon in air concentration recorded in Kazakhstan was 123 Bq m−3 and in Kyrgyzstan was 177 Bq m−3. These represent 24-h average indoor/outdoor values. In the case of the γ-doses the mean annual dose was 1.2 mGy for Kazakhstan and 2.1 mGy for Kyrgyzstan. Overall, the results suggest that the populations studied receive similar annual radiation doses to those received by populations living in other areas with enhanced natural radioactivity and that further study of Kazakh and Kyrgyz populations would not facilitate a successful case–control study for childhood leukaemia

  13. Using multistage models to describe radiation-induced leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Armitage-Doll model of carcinogenesis is fitted to data on leukaemia mortality among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors with the DS86 dosimetry and on leukaemia incidence in the International Radiation Study of Cervical Cancer patients. Two different forms of model are fitted: the first postulates up to two radiation-affected stages and the second additionally allows for the presence at birth of a non-trivial population of cells which have already accumulated the first of the mutations leading to malignancy. Among models of the first form, a model with two adjacent radiation-affected stages appears to fit the data better than other models of the first form, including both models with two affected stages in any order and models with only one affected stage. The best fitting model predicts a linear-quadratic dose-response and reductions of relative risk with increasing time after exposure and age at exposure, in agreement with what has previously been observed in the Japanese and cervical cancer data. However, on the whole it does not provide an adequate fit to either dataset. The second form of model appears to provide a rather better fit, but the optimal models have biologically implausible parameters (the number of initiated cells at birth is negative) so that this model must also be regarded as providing an unsatisfactory description of the data. (author)

  14. Current standard treatment of adult acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo-Coco, Francesco; Cicconi, Laura; Breccia, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) has dramatically improved over the last two decades, due to the introduction of combined all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy regimens and, more recently, to the advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO). ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy remains a widely used strategy, providing cure rates above 80%, but it is associated with risk of severe infections and occurrence of secondary leukaemias. ATO is the most effective single agent in APL and, used alone or in combination with ATRA or ATRA and reduced-intensity chemotherapy, results in greater efficacy with considerably less haematological toxicity. The toxic profile of ATO includes frequent, but manageable, QTc prolongation and increase of liver enzymes. Two large randomized studies have shown that ATRA + ATO is superior to ATRA + chemotherapy for newly diagnosed low-risk APL resulting in 2-4 year event-free survival rates above 90% and very few relapses. According to real world data, the spectacular progress in APL outcomes reported in clinical trials has not been paralleled by a significant improvement in early death rates, this remains the most challenging issue for the final cure of the disease. PMID:26687281

  15. MicroRNAs as Potential Biomarkers in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imilia Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is an M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. This classification is based on the morphology of promyelocytic cell. The clinical characteristics of APL can be recognized by haemorrhagic episodes, a differentiation block at the promyelocytic stage, and sensitivity to the differentiation response to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA. Cytogenetically, APL is characterized by a balanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 15 and 17, which results in the production of PML/RARα fusion protein. Recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs have also been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of APL. miRNAs have been associated with the pathogenesis of cancer and their involvement as oncogenic and tumour suppressor activities have been identified. They are involved in various biological processes including the cell proliferation, differentiation, growth and development, metabolism, apoptosis, and haematopoiesis. The new discovery of miRNAs as possible therapeutic markers will provide new insight for the diagnosis and therapeutic entries for the treatment of APL. This review highlights the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in APL.

  16. Leukaemia and lymphoma in Belarus after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As it was known Belarus is the country mostly affected by the Chernobyl disaster. The content of incorporated Cs-137 in tissues and Sr-90 in bones of exposed people of Belarus has increased several times. Long - live bone marrow doses per person was expected as: 8.8 mSv in Belarus, 2,8 mSv in Ukraine and 1,0 mSv in Russia. That why it was believed that one of the adverse effects of the Chernobyl radiation would be the increase of leukaemia and lymphoma incidence rates among the population (first of all among the children) of Belarus. Registration of leukaemia and lymphoma has been compulsory in Belarus since 1988 by the special training team at the Research Institute of Haematology. The information includes the name and address of the patients, age, date and place of diagnosis, ICD-number of the diagnosis, and diagnostic method (biopsy, autopsy, myelogram, immunohistochemical method used ect.). It was established that before the Chernobyl accident (1979 - 1985 ) the incidence rates of the child leukaemia was 4,16+0,22; after the accident: in 1986-1992 - 4,35 = 0,08; in 1993-2001 - 3,35 = 0,18 per 100.000 children, aged 0-14 years. Among the adult population of Belarus (aged 15-90) during the periods of 1979-85, 1986 - 92, and 1993 - 1999 correspondingly: 2,8, 3,24 and 2,94%ooo (p<0,05); for Chll and Chml - 6,10; 8,12 and 8,21%ooo; for MM - 1,44; 1,86 and 2,30%ooo; for lymphomas - 2,84; 4,07; 5,22%ooo; for HL - 3,11; 3,46 and 3,18%ooo. So, we found no suggestion an increase in risk of child leukaemia after Chernobyl. It's hardly possible to attribute child leukaemia and lymphoma incidence rate only to the level of the radionuclide contamination territory. At the same time, some preliminary our date allow to anticipate that the incidence rates correlate rather with levels of chemical pollution in the atmosphere and its compounds. Adults demonstrate a more significant increase of hemoblastoses morbidity after Chernobyl disaster in comparison with children

  17. The U.K. radium luminiser survey: Significance of a lack of excess leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we examine the U.K. survey for deaths from leukaemia in relation to radium content. A proportion of the survey population was measured for radium content and found to contain amounts generally small compared to their counterparts who worked in the USA. Whether the absence of leukaemia in this population is significant in terms of the more general question of man exposed to low levels of bone seeking radionuclides is discussed with particular reference to the claims made recently concerning the excess of leukaemia among young people living close to the nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield. (orig./MG)

  18. Issues in the estimation of leukaemia risks from the atomic bomb survivor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the fact that an elevated risk of leukaemia was one of the earliest and most closely studied findings of the atomic bomb survivor studies there remain a number of problems and unanswered questions associated with the nature and description of the risks. Questions considered are: - a) How can useful simple summaries of radiation-related leukaemia risk in the life span study be provided? (b) Do the life span study data provide evidence of excess leukaemia risks in recent years? (c) Are there differences in the level of pattern of type-specific risks in the life span study? (UK)

  19. Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuca, Sevil Ari, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book aims to provide readers with a general as well as an advanced overview of the key trends in childhood obesity. Obesity is an illness that occurs due to a combination of genetic, environmental, psychosocial, metabolic and hormonal factors. The prevalence of obesity has shown a great rise both in adults and children in the last 30 years.…

  20. Childhood Obesity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-06

    In this podcast, Dr. Tom Frieden, CDC Director, discusses the decrease in childhood obesity rates and what strategies have been proven to work to help our children grow up and thrive.  Created: 8/6/2013 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.   Date Released: 3/6/2014.

  1. Intellectual Abilities Among Survivors of Childhood Leukaemia as a Function of CNS Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, Christine

    1978-01-01

    Available from: British Medical Journal, 1172 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02134. In order to determine whether Central Nervous System irradiation effects intellectual abilities, 28 children in remission at least 2 years after completing chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia were assessed on standardized psychological tests…

  2. Childhood leukaemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Hodgkin diseases in Eastern Romania between 1980 and 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposure of children during the first 3 years following the Chernobyl accident (May 1986 - April 1989) was expressed in terms of effective dose, the dosimetric quantity recommended by I.C.R.P. in Publication 60. The effective doses resulted from internal radiation by ingestion of contaminated food were estimated from the radioactive content of foodstuffs (134 - Cs, 137 - Cs determined by high-resolution gammaspectrometric techniques and 90 - Sr by a sensitive radiochemical methods). The average annual food consumption and the corresponding I.C.R.P. dose factors. 15 refs, 3 figs, 8 tabs

  3. Estimation of dynamic treatment strategies for maintenance therapy of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an application of history-adjusted marginal structural models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosthøj, Susanne; Keiding, Niels; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2012-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is treated with long-term intensive chemotherapy. During the latter part of the treatment, the maintenance therapy, the patients receive oral doses of two cytostatics. The doses are tailored to blood counts measured on a weekly basis, and the treatment is...... therefore highly dynamic. In 1992-1996, the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) conducted a randomised study (NOPHO-ALL-92) to investigate the effect of a new and more sophisticated dynamic treatment strategy. Unexpectedly, the new strategy worsened the outcome for the girls......, whereas there were no treatment differences for the boys. There are as yet no general guidelines for optimising the treatment. On basis of the data from this study, our goal is to formulate an alternative dosing strategy. We use recently developed methods proposed by van der Laan et al. to obtain...

  4. Investigation of spacial clustering of rare diseases: childhood malignancies in North Humberside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, F.; Cartwright, R.; McKinney, P.A.; Ricketts, T.J. (Leukaemia Research Fund Centre for Clinical Epidemiology, Leeds (UK))

    1990-03-01

    The study aims were (1) to test for uniformity of distribution of childhood leukaemias and other malignancies; and (2) to consider aetiological implications of unusual distributions. 144 children under 15 years old with a diagnosis of malignant disease known to the Yorkshire Regional Chilhood Tumour Registry between 1974 and 1986 were included in the analysis. Of these 53 had leukaemias and nine lymphomas. Significant localised clustering was found in North Humberside, though not in the whole Yorkshire Health Region. A number of clustered cases were identified, some of whom were in a post code sector, Hull 10 to the west of Kingston-upon-Hull, about which concern had been expressed since 1985. There was however no evidence that disease clustering was confined to this area. Four previously suggested hypotheses about causation in this area were examined but results were negative or inconclusive. (author).

  5. Cell-targeted 114Inm and drug (BCNU) combination therapy in a rat acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proportion of syngeneic female rats inoculated intramuscularly with a lethal T-cell lymphoblastic (Roser) leukaemia are cured by a single intraperitoneal injection of bischloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU) (Carmustine)(10 mg kg-1) given towards the end of the preleukaemic phase (day 7). Additional therapy on day 4, using intravenous leukaemia cells lethally labelled with the radionuclide 114Inm, enhanced the overall cure rate by 30%. The spleen is a major site of indium concentration from the targeting cells so that the continuous local radiation field appears to result in a substantial reduction of the body load of leukaemia cells in the enlarged spleen particularly, thus enhancing the curative potential of the drug. The results demonstrate in principle that in patients in remission a single dose of targeted radiotherapy in the spleen combined sequentially with an appropriate drug might provide considerable aid in eliminating a residual population of leukaemia cells. (author)

  6. The incidence of and mortality from leukaemias in the UK: a general population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKeever Tricia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The acute and chronic leukaemias constitute about 2.5% of all newly diagnosed malignancies and kill over 4000 people/year in the UK, yet there is little accurate up-to-date data on how the incidence of and mortality from leukaemias vary with socio-economic status in the UK. We aimed to quantify the incidence of and mortality from leukaemias in the UK and their variation with gender, age, year of diagnosis as well as socio-economic status. Methods All incident cases of leukaemia were identified in 'The Health Improvement Network' (THIN General Practice dataset. Crude incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (using Poisson Regression stratified by age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic status were calculated. Median survival and hazard ratios for risk of death (using Cox regression were then calculated, and stratified in a similar manner. Results A total of 4162 cases of leukaemia were identified, 2314 (56% of whom were male. The overall incidence of leukaemia was 11.25 per 100 000 person-years. The age and gender distributions of ALL, AML, CLL and CML were similar to UK cancer registry data. The incidence of leukaemias was independent of socio-economic class. Median survival from leukaemia was 6.58 years and mortality increased with increasing age at diagnosis. The prognosis in AML was dismal and worsened with increasing socio-economic deprivation. For other leukaemias mortality was independent of socio-economic status. Conclusion This is the first general population study to describe the incidence of and mortality from leukaemias in the UK by socio-economic status. Similar mortality across socio-economic gradients in the leukaemias studied suggests equal access to and uptake of services. The exception to this was in AML, where poorer survival in AML patients from lower socio-economic classes may represent a class bias in treatment offered and/or greater co-morbidity in these patients, and warrants further

  7. Childhood vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Palit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood vitiligo is often encountered in dermatological practice. When present in infancy or early childhood, various nevoid and hereditary disorders are to be differentiated. In many cases, familial aggregation of the disease is seen and other autoimmune disorders may be associated. Segmental presentation is more common, and limited body surface area involvement is usual in this age group. Children with vitiligo often suffer from anxiety and depression because of their unusual appearance. Management of vitiligo in children is difficult as therapeutic options are restricted when compared to that in adult patients. Selection of treatment should be careful in these patients with the aim to achieve best results with minimal side effects as well as relieving patients′ and parents′ anxiety.

  8. Oral methotrexate is as effective as intramuscular in maintenance therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Chessells, J M; Leiper, A D; Tiedemann, K.; Hardisty, R. M.; Richards, S.

    1987-01-01

    It has been postulated that variations in methotrexate absorption may influence the outcome of treatment in lymphoblastic leukaemia. One hundred and forty four children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia not of the T cell type were randomised to receive continuing treatment with daily 6-mercaptopurine, vincristine, and prednisolone six weekly and methotrexate once weekly, either as a single oral dose or an intramuscular injection. Analysis of results with a minimum follow up of three and a ha...

  9. Characterizing and optimizing immune responses to leukaemia antigens after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rezvani, Katayoun; Lecturer, Clinical Senior; Barrett, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains a curative treatment for haematological malignancies resistant to other treatment approaches through the unique graft-versus-leukaemia effect (GvL). However, the lack of specificity of this response results in the targeting of normal tissue, and the morbidity and mortality associated with graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Further improvements in exploiting the GvL effect to prevent relapse in high-risk leukaemias while minimizing toxicity have focu...

  10. Birth weight in offspring and leukaemia risk in parents-A nation-wide register-based cohort study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, Maria; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Lisa;

    2013-01-01

    Spurred by previous observations we assessed the relationship between offspring birth weight and parental leukaemia risk in a register-based investigation including 2.4 million parents of 2 million Danish children. Regardless of analytical approach, offspring birth weight was not associated with...... parental risk of leukaemia overall or of leukaemia subtypes except for a twofold increased acute lymphatic leukaemia risk in fathers of high birth weight offspring and an increasing paternal risk of chronic myeloid leukaemia with increasing offspring birth weight. These may both be chance findings. Our...... investigation indicates that offspring birth weight is not strongly associated with parental leukaemia risk....

  11. Childhood psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Dogra Sunil; Kaur Inderjeet

    2010-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common dermatosis in children with about one third of all patients having onset of disease in the first or second decade of life. A chronic disfiguring skin disease, such as psoriasis, in childhood is likely to have profound emotional and psychological effects, and hence requires special attention. Psoriasis in children has been reported to differ from that among adults being more frequently pruritic; plaque lesions are relatively thinner, softer, and less scaly; face and flexu...

  12. Childhood Traumatic Grief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Resources for Kids and Teens Childhood Traumatic Grief What is Childhood Traumatic Grief? Children grieve in their own way following the ... child may have a condition called Childhood Traumatic Grief (CTG). Thinking about the person who died—even ...

  13. Childhood Cancer Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shop With CureSearch Blog Donate Now Select Page Childhood Cancer Statistics Home > Understanding Children’s Cancer > Childhood Cancer Statistics Childhood Cancer Statistics – Graphs and Infographics Number of Diagnoses ...

  14. Orbital mass secondary to infantile acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ibtesham Tausif; Moosajee, Mariya; Abou-Rayyah, Yassir; Pavasovic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    An 8-month-old Asian infant girl was referred with a 1-week history of left periorbital swelling on a background of a narrowed left palpebral aperture over the preceding 8 weeks. There was no history of chronic illness, fever or other systemic features. Examination revealed a tender and fluctuant medial canthal swelling with associated periorbital haematoma. There were no other ophthalmic findings and neurological examination was normal. A MRI scan of the brain and orbit demonstrated abnormal soft tissue with features of an aggressive tumour in the left orbital region with no globe invasion. Peripheral blood smear revealed blast cells, confirmed by bone marrow aspirate. A diagnosis of infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was made. The patient was started on risk-stratified chemotherapy according to the Interfant-06 Protocol The periorbital swelling resolved by day eight following a course of prednisolone, the patient continues on chemotherapy and is currently in molecular remission. PMID:27143162

  15. Leukaemia inhibitory factor--an exercise-induced myokine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    contributing factors in muscle homeostasis and muscle adaptation to exercise training. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is produced and released from muscle cells in vitro and from intact skeletal muscle in vivo. During exercise, skeletal muscle potently up-regulates LIF mRNA expression, likely due to......During and following exercise skeletal muscle synthesises and releases a number of myokines that exert their effects either systemically or locally within the muscle. Several of these myokines influence metabolism, regeneration and/or hypertrophy and are therefore considered to be important...... oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. However, circulating levels of LIF are not increased with exercise suggesting that LIF exerts its effect locally. LIF stimulates muscle satellite cell proliferation and is involved in muscle hypertrophy and regeneration. Thus, LIF may be produced by skeletal...

  16. Leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk among Chernobyl liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Chernobyl liquidators were workers involved in the clean-up of contaminated areas around the Chernobyl power plant following the accident on 26 April 1986. These workers form a potentially important population for evaluation of the effects of protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. A collaborative case-control study of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was set-up, nested within cohorts of Belarus, Russian and Baltic countries liquidators. The objective was to evaluate the radiation-induced risk of these diseases in this population and to study the effect of exposure protraction and radiation type on the risk of radiogenic cancer in the low to medium (0-500 mSv) radiation dose range. The study population consisted of approximately 66,000 Belarus, 65,000 Russian and 15,000 Baltic countries liquidators who took part in the clean-up activities between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 1987. In Belarus and Russia, liquidators are followed through the Chernobyl Registries and must undergo regular health check-ups, while in the Baltic countries their migration, vital and cancer status are assessed through population, death and cancer registries. The case ascertainment period ranged from 1990 to 2000 with minor differences among the countries. Information on study subjects was obtained through a face-to-face interview with the study subject and/or a proxy (a relative or a colleague), using a standardized questionnaire on demographic factors, time, place and conditions of work as a liquidator and on potential risk and confounding factors for leukaemia. A method of analytical dose reconstruction, entitled RADRUE (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation), was developed within the study, validated and applied to estimate individual dose to the bone marrow and related uncertainties for each subject. 117 cases (69 leukaemia, 34 NHL and 14 other malignancies of lymphoid and haematopoietic tissue) and 481 matched controls were

  17. Leukaemia inhibitory factor--an exercise-induced myokine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2010-01-01

    During and following exercise skeletal muscle synthesises and releases a number of myokines that exert their effects either systemically or locally within the muscle. Several of these myokines influence metabolism, regeneration and/or hypertrophy and are therefore considered to be important...... oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. However, circulating levels of LIF are not increased with exercise suggesting that LIF exerts its effect locally. LIF stimulates muscle satellite cell proliferation and is involved in muscle hypertrophy and regeneration. Thus, LIF may be produced by skeletal...... contributing factors in muscle homeostasis and muscle adaptation to exercise training. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is produced and released from muscle cells in vitro and from intact skeletal muscle in vivo. During exercise, skeletal muscle potently up-regulates LIF mRNA expression, likely due to...

  18. Harnessing the immune system in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Rebecca; Smyth, Mark J; Lane, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer caused by the proliferation of immature myeloid cells. The genetic abnormalities underlying AML affect signal transduction pathways, transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers. In solid tumours, it is emerging that the genetic landscape of the tumour has a direct effect on the anti-tumour immune responses and response to immunotherapeutic treatment. However, there remains little information as to whether genetic abnormalities affect anti-leukemic immune responses. This review discusses current knowledge of AML antigens and immune responses to AML with a particular focus on the role of T cells and natural killer cells. Understanding immune responses to AML has implications for the development and use of immunotherapies to treat AML patients with distinct genetic abnormalities. PMID:27247119

  19. SIRT2 activates G6PD to enhance NADPH production and promote leukaemia cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuang-Nian; Wang, Tian-Shi; Li, Xi; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Like most other types of cancer cells, leukaemia cells undergo metabolic reprogramming to support rapid proliferation through enhancing biosynthetic processes. Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) plays a pivotal role in meeting the anabolic demands for cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which PPP contributes to leukaemia remains elusive. Here, we report that leukaemia cell proliferation is dependent on the oxidative branch of PPP, in particular the first and rate-limiting enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Knockdown of G6PD reduces NADPH level in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines. Exogenous lipid supplements partially restore the proliferation of G6PD-depleted cells. Deacetylase SIRT2 promotes NADPH production through deacetylating G6PD at lysine 403 (K403). Activation of G6PD by SIRT2 supports the proliferation and clonogenic activity of leukaemia cells. Chemical inhibitors against SIRT2 suppress G6PD activity, leading to reduced cell proliferation of leukaemia cells, but not normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, SIRT2 is overexpressed in clinical AML samples, while K403 acetylation is downregulated and G6PD catalytic activity is increased comparing to that of normal control. Together, our study reveals that acetylation regulation of G6PD is involved in the metabolic reprogramming of AML, and SIRT2 serves as a promising target for further therapeutic investigations. PMID:27586085

  20. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human serum to leukaemia clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study metabolism of phospholipid and lipoprotein and lactic acid by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and investigate the feasibility in leukaemia clinical study, serum sample of leukaemia patients and healthy controls were collected and measured with MSL-300 MHz spectrometer. The phospholipid contents were known by contrast relatively integral area of PC signal and (PE + SM) signal with 31P-NMRS. A lineshape fitting model was used to analyze various lipoprotein and lactic acid changes by methyl and methylene groups in 1H-NMR spectrum of leukaemia serum. In spectra of serum of leukaemia patients, the phospholipid signals strength were significantly decreased. It reflected lower phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin content in serum of leukemia patients, especially for original un-treatment patient. The various lipoprotein contents were difference and lactic acid was significantly higher than normal control. NMR technique is a convenience method. It can primely reflect the difference of phospholipid and lipoprotein and lactic acid between leukaemia patients and normal control from molecule level. It provided a new method for study of leukaemia and is worthy to further study

  1. SWI/SNF Subunits SMARCA4, SMARCD2 and DPF2 Collaborate in MLL-Rearranged Leukaemia Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruickshank, V Adam; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Sankar, Aditya;

    2015-01-01

    tumour-suppressor function in many solid tumours; recently however, it has been reported to sustain leukaemogenic transformation in MLL-rearranged leukaemia in mice. Here we further explore the role of SMARCA4 and the two SWI/SNF subunits SMARCD2/BAF60B and DPF2/BAF45D in leukaemia. We observed the...... selective requirement for these proteins for leukaemic cell expansion and self-renewal in-vitro as well as in leukaemia. Gene expression profiling in human cells of each of these three factors suggests that they have overlapping functions in leukaemia. The gene expression changes induced by loss of the...

  2. Hospital contacts for endocrine disorders in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS): a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Sofie; Winther, Jeanette Falck; Gudmundsdottir, Thorgerdur;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pattern of endocrine disorders in long-term survivors of childhood cancer has not been investigated comprehensively. Here, we aimed to assess the lifetime risk of these disorders in Nordic survivors of childhood cancer. METHODS: From the national cancer registries of Denmark...... were linked to the national hospital registries, and observed numbers of first-time hospital contacts for endocrine disorders in survivors of childhood cancer were compared with the expected numbers derived from the population comparison cohort. We calculated the absolute excess risks attributable...... to status as a childhood cancer survivor and standardised hospitalisation rate ratios (SHRRs). FINDINGS: Of the childhood cancer survivors, 3292 had contact with a hospital for an endocrine disorder, yielding a SHRR of 4·8 (95% CI 4·6-5·0); the highest risks were in survivors of leukaemia (SHRR 7·3 [95% CI...

  3. Pattern of childhood malignancies at combined military hospital, rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To document distribution of childhood malignancies among Paediatric Oncology patients. Study design: Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Department of Paediatric Oncology, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from June 2006 to May 2007. Methodology: We collected data of 141 consecutive newly diagnosed paediatric oncology patients. Demographics (age and gender) and types of malignancy (diagnosed on histopathology) were collected in all cases. Results: Of the total patients 90 were male, 51 female with a male to female ratio of 1.76. Childhood malignancies found were leukaemia (60.3%) lymphomas (11.3%), bone tumours (4.3%), brain tumours (2.8%), germ cell tumours (3.5%), retinoblastoma (7.1%), neuroblastoma (3.5%), Wilms tumour (2.8%), rhabdomyosarcoma (2.1%), hepatoblastoma (1.4%) and synovial sarcoma(0.7%).Mean age at diagnosis was 5.4 +- 3.05 years. 24 (17%) patients were from Punjab, 9 (6.4%) from Sindh, 82 (58.2%) from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 5 (3.5%) from Baluchistan and 21 (14.9%) from Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK). Conclusion: This study showed that distribution varies according to gender, age and geography. Leukemia is the commonest childhood malignancy. Our research findings are useful for prioritizing future childhood cancer research needs. (author)

  4. Childhood psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a common dermatosis in children with about one third of all patients having onset of disease in the first or second decade of life. A chronic disfiguring skin disease, such as psoriasis, in childhood is likely to have profound emotional and psychological effects, and hence requires special attention. Psoriasis in children has been reported to differ from that among adults being more frequently pruritic; plaque lesions are relatively thinner, softer, and less scaly; face and flexural involvement is common and guttate type is the characteristic presentation. Whether onset in childhood predicts a more severe form of psoriasis is a matter of controversy, it may cause significant morbidity particularly if it keeps relapsing. Most children have mild form of psoriasis which can be generally treated effectively with topical agents such as emollients, coal tar, corticosteroids, dithranol, calcipotriol etc. according to age and the sites affected. Narrow band UVB is the preferred form of phototherapy in children for moderate to severe disease or in patients not responding to topical therapy alone. Systemic therapies are reserved for more severe and extensive cases that cannot be controlled with topical treatment and/or phototherapy such as severe plaque type, unstable forms like erythrodermic and generalized pustular psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. There are no controlled trials of systemic therapies in this age group, most experience being with retinoids and methotrexate with favorable results. Cyclosporine can be used as a short-term intermittent crisis management drug. There is an early promising experience with the use of biologics (etanercept and infliximab in childhood psoriasis. Systemic treatments as well as phototherapy have limited use in children due to cumulative dose effects of drugs, low acceptance, and risk of gonadal toxicity. More evidence-based data is needed about the effectiveness and long-term safety of topical

  5. Childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Joan C; Lawlor, Debbie A; Kimm, Sue Y S

    2010-05-15

    Worldwide prevalence of childhood obesity has increased greatly during the past three decades. The increasing occurrence in children of disorders such as type 2 diabetes is believed to be a consequence of this obesity epidemic. Much progress has been made in understanding of the genetics and physiology of appetite control and from these advances, elucidation of the causes of some rare obesity syndromes. However, these rare disorders have so far taught us few lessons about prevention or reversal of obesity in most children. Calorie intake and activity recommendations need reassessment and improved quantification at a population level because of sedentary lifestyles of children nowadays. For individual treatment, currently recommended calorie prescriptions might be too conservative in view of evolving insight into the so-called energy gap. Although quality of research into both prevention and treatment has improved, high-quality multicentre trials with long-term follow-up are needed. Meanwhile, prevention and treatment approaches to increase energy expenditure and decrease intake should continue. Recent data suggest that the spiralling increase in childhood obesity prevalence might be abating; increased efforts should be made on all fronts to continue this potentially exciting trend. PMID:20451244

  6. Chemotherapy in a transplantable myeloid leukaemia in brown Norway rats : studies on BNML as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.P. Colly

    1980-01-01

    textabstractLeukaemia accounts for less than 5% of the total number of malignant diseases in the USA {McCredie et al., 1976),· while about 9% of all neeplasros in the Netherlands originate in the lymphatic and blood forming organs. Because of the relatively easy accessibility of the turnoor cells in

  7. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    1999-01-01

    -impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region...

  8. Granulocytic sarcoma of the femur in a patient with acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Granulocytic sarcoma, chloroma or myeloblastoma are observed in 3% to7% of acute myeloid leukaemia and represents localized tumour composed of collection of immature leukaemic cells. It appears most frequently in patients with M2, M4 and M5 subtypes of acute myeloid leukaemia Case Outline. A 58-year-old female presented with pain and oedema of the right upper limb in November 2009. After two months the patinet had fracture dislocation and numerous osteolytic lesions of the right femur. Immunohistochemistry of tumour biopsy showed megakaryoblastic granulocytic sarcoma which was CD31++, F-XIII++, CD34-, FVIII+++, S100-, aktin-, EMA++, Bcl2++, CD43++, with positive proliferative marker measured with Ki-67 positivity in more of 50% of cells. Aspirate of bone marrow and immunophenotyping with flowcytometry revealed diagnosis of acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia. The course of the disease was rapid and the patient died before commencing chemotherapy, five months after first complaints. Conclusion. Granulocytic sarcoma is extramedullary localization of collection of leukaemia cells which can proceed, to arise concomitantly with leukaemia, or may be the only manifestation of the disease. The diagnosis can be established only with immunohystochemistry.

  9. Leukaemia mortality in three UK nuclear industry workforces: comparison with the BEIR V model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous comparison of risk of death from leukaemia associated with external radiation dose in over 75000 UK nuclear industry workers with that for adult Japanese atomic bomb survivors reported by UNSCEAR in 1988, suggested that the estimated excess relative risk per Sv in the two populations was similar (ratio of risks = 1.1, 90% confidence interval +0.2 to +3.1). The further analysis described here, which compares leukaemia risk in the workers with that predicted by the linear term of the BEIR V model for leukaemia, resulted in a ratio of 1.3 (90% confidence interval -0.2 to +4.5). Leukaemia risk in this population of nuclear industry workers is therefore consistent with that predicted by the BEIR V model. That our data are also compatible with risks from zero to around five times those predicted by this model demonstrates that even a very substantial occupational cohort such as ours can provide only a limited amount of information about the magnitude of leukaemia risks in adults exposed to low doses of external radiation relative to those exposed to high doses and high dose rates. (author)

  10. Living with the Diagnosis and Treatment of Leukaemia in a Child with Down's Syndrome: A Mother's Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Donna

    2008-01-01

    In this article I will discuss the impact of my 2-year-old son's diagnosis and treatment of leukaemia. I will outline the background to being told he had leukaemia before describing the family dynamics that emerged during this time for me, my husband and our other child. My story will focus on managing the practicalities of a long stay in hospital…

  11. Childhood cancer and exposure to corona ions from power lines: an epidemiological test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported an association between childhood leukaemia in Britain and proximity of the child’s address at birth to high-voltage power lines that declines from the 1960s to the 2000s. We test here whether a ‘corona-ion hypothesis’ could explain these results. This hypothesis proposes that corona ions, atmospheric ions produced by power lines and blown away from them by the wind, increase the retention of airborne pollutants in the airways when breathed in and hence cause disease. We develop an improved model for calculating exposure to corona ions, using data on winds from meteorological stations and considering the whole length of power line within 600 m of each subject’s address. Corona-ion exposure is highly correlated with proximity to power lines, and hence the results parallel the elevations in leukaemia risk seen with distance analyses. But our model explains the observed pattern of leukaemia rates around power lines less well than straightforward distance measurements, and ecological considerations also argue against the hypothesis. This does not disprove the corona-ion hypothesis as the explanation for our previous results, but nor does it provide support for it, or, by extension, any other hypothesis dependent on wind direction. (paper)

  12. A Hypothetical-Mathematical Model of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Cucuianu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia is defined by the expansion of a mutated haematopoietic stem cell clone, with the inhibition of surrounding normal clones. Haematopoiesis can be seen as an evolutionary tree, starting with one cell that undergoes several divisions during the expansion phase, afterwards losing functional cells during the aging-related contraction phase. During divisions, offspring cells acquire ‘variations’, which can be either normal or abnormal. If an abnormal variation is present in more than 25% of the final cells, a monoclonal, leukemic pattern occurs. Such a pattern develops if: (A1 The abnormal variation occurs early, during the first or second divisions; (A2 The variation confers exceptional proliferative capacity; (B A sizable proportion of the normal clones are destroyed and a previously non-significant abnormal clone gains relative dominance over a depleted environment; (C The abnormal variation confers relative ‘immortality’, rendering it significant during the contraction phase. Combinations of these pathways further enhance the leukemic risk of the system. A simple mathematical model is used in order to characterize normal and leukemic states and to explain the above cellular processes generating monoclonal leukemic patterns.

  13. L-asparaginase induced hyperlipidaemia in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate hyperlipidaemia in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) receiving L-asparaginase. Methods: A case-control study carried out between October 2007 and October 2010 with 77 patients undergoing chemotherapy at a teaching children hospital in Babol, Iran. Patients were treated with anti-leukaemic agents according to the protocols for standard-risk and high-risk ALL. Those patients who received asparaginase represented the cases and those who did not receive it were the controls. Biochemical markers were checked during the induction phase chemotherapy. Lipid profile of patients was recorded. Data was analysed using SPSS 16. Results: Of the 77 patients, 37 (48.05%) received asparaginase therapy and 40 (51.94%) patients did not. The mean peak triglyceride and cholesterol levels during asparaginase therapy in the first group were significantly higher than the levels in the second group. Conclusion: Severe hyperlipidaemia may be the cause of some morbidity in children receiving asparaginase. Asparaginase-induced hyperlipidaemia should be monitored in ALL patients during the induction phase of treatment. (author)

  14. The cribriform plate: a sanctuary site for meningeal leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial irradiation is an effective prophylactic treatment for subclinical meningeal infiltration in lymphoblastic leukaemia, but, central nervous system (CNS) relapse still occurs in 6-10% of cases overall and as many as 30% of cases with a poor prognosis in some series. These recurrences may be due in part to inadvertent underdosage of the cribriform plate, centrally situated between the orbits and projected over their upper third in a lateral view. The dose to the adjacent meninges may thus be reduced by shielding of the radiosensitive lenses. This problem is exacerbated if conventional lateral fields centred on the mid-skull are used, because the eyes will not then project over one another. If the field centre is moved to the edge of the orbit, this problem of beam divergence can be overcome. Central axis beam blocking of both lenses is possible, in some patients the cribriform plate can be adequately irradiated. In most children the geometry of the orbit is such that it is necessary to add an anterior electron beam to ensure homogeneous dosage. These refinements in technique might prevent meningeal relapse with a lower whole-brain dose and, hence, fewer neurophyschological sequelae. (author)

  15. The clinical implications of gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-04-12

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease as revealed by recent genomic studies. Among genetic lesions that are recurrent in CLL, few clinically validated prognostic markers, such as TP53 mutations and 17p deletion, are available for the use in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Recently, several novel molecular markers have been identified in CLL. Though these mutations have not yet gained the qualification of predictive factors for treatment tailoring, they have shown to be promising to refine the prognostic stratification of patients. The introduction of targeted drugs is changing the genetics of CLL, and has disclosed the acquisition of previously unexpected drug resistant mutations in signalling pathway genes. Ultra-deep next generation sequencing has allowed to reach deep levels of resolution of the genetic portrait of CLL providing a precise definition of its subclonal genetic architecture. This approach has shown that small subclones harbouring drug resistant mutations anticipate the development of a chemorefractory phenotype. Here we review the recent advances in the definition of the genomic landscape of CLL and the ongoing research to characterise the clinical implications of old and new molecular lesions in the setting of both conventional chemo-immunotherapy and targeted drugs. PMID:27031852

  16. Clofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krawczyk, Janusz

    2010-09-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.

  17. Present and future of molecular monitoring in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Mancini, Manuela; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Currently, physicians treating chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients can rely on a wide spectrum of therapeutic options: the best use of such options is essential to achieve excellent clinical outcomes and, possibly, treatment-free remission (TFR). To accomplish this, proper integration of expert clinical and laboratory monitoring of CML patients is fundamental. Molecular response (MR) monitoring of patients at defined time points has emerged as an important success factor for optimal disease management and BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutation screening is useful to guide therapeutic reassessment in patients who do not achieve optimal responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Deeper MRs might be associated with improved long-term survival outcomes. More importantly, they are considered a gateway to TFR. In molecular biology, novel procedures and technologies are continually being developed. More sophisticated molecular tools and automated analytical solutions are emerging as CML treatment endpoints and expectations become more and more ambitious. Here we provide a critical overview of current and novel methodologies, present their strengths and pitfalls and discuss what their present and future role might be. PMID:26947577

  18. Epidural spinal cord compression as initial clinical presentation of an acute myeloid leukaemia: case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dominique N'Dri Oka; Alpha Boubacar Bah; André Valentin Tokpa; Louis Derou

    2016-01-01

    Epidural localization of myeloid leukaemia is rarely reported.Spinal cord compression as an initial presentation of acute myeloid leukaemia is extremely rare.This is a report of a 17-year-old black boy who presented to emergency department with neurological symptoms of spinal cord compression.Imaging modalities showed multiple soft tissue masses in the epidural space.After surgical treatment,histopathological examination of the epidural mass showed myeloid leukaemia cells infiltration.Literature review on Medline and "scholar Google" database was done.The characteristics and management of extra-medullary leukaemia are discussed.Granulocytic sarcoma,myeloid sarcoma or chloroma with acute myeloid leukaemia should be considered as part of epidural spinal cord compression.Therefore surgery is indicated on an emergent basis.

  19. Childhood cancer mortality in relation to the St Lucie nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unusual county-wide excess of childhood cancers of brain and other nervous tissue in the late 1990s in St Lucie County, Florida, prompted the Florida Department of Health to conduct a case-control study within the county assessing residential chemical exposures. No clear associations were found, but claims were then made that the release of radioactive substances such as strontium 90 from the St Lucie nuclear power station, which began operating in 1976, might have played a role. To test the plausibility of this hypothesis, we extended by 17 years a previous study of county mortality conducted by the National Cancer Institute. Rates of total cancer, leukaemia and cancer of brain and other nervous tissue in children and across all ages in St Lucie County were evaluated with respect to the years before and after the nuclear power station began operation and contrasted with rates in two similar counties in Florida (Polk and Volusia). Over the prolonged period 1950-2000, no unusual patterns of childhood cancer mortality were found for St Lucie County as a whole. In particular, no unusual patterns of childhood cancer mortality were seen in relation to the start-up of the St Lucie nuclear power station in 1976. Further, there were no significant differences in mortality between the study and comparison counties for any cancer in the time period after the power station was in operation. Relative rates for all childhood cancers and for childhood leukaemia were higher before the nuclear facility began operating than after, while rates of brain and other nervous tissue cancer were slightly lower in St Lucie County than in the two comparison counties for both time periods. Although definitive conclusions cannot be drawn from descriptive studies, these data provide no support for the hypothesis that the operation of the St Lucie nuclear power station has adversely affected the cancer mortality experience of county residents

  20. A Ten Year Descriptive Study of Adult Leukaemia at Al-Jomhori Teaching Hospital in Sana'a, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel Al-Ghazaly

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is scarcity of data of the epidemiology of leukaemia in Arab countries including Yemen. Understanding patterns of leukaemia underpins epidemiology and can provide insight into disease etiology. The aim of this research is to determine the epidemiologic pattern of adult leukaemia in Yemen. Methods: The research is a descriptive cross-sectional study. We analyzed the data of 702 adult patients with leukaemia, who were newly diagnosed over a ten-year period between October 1999 and October 2009 at the referral haematology centre in Sana’a at Al-Jomhori Teaching Hospital, according to type of leukaemia, age, sex, geographic distribution and time of diagnosis. Results: Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML was found to be the most common (45.1% followed by Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML (26.5%, Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia (ALL (17.7% and Chronic Lymphoid Leukaemia (CLL (10.7%, respectively. There was an almost equal prevalence of AML and CML for males and females but males had significantly more cases of ALL and CLL (p =0.008. A significant variation in geographic pattern showed that the highest number of cases is seen the Central mountainous region and the least number of cases in the South-eastern region which is coastal and lowland (p<0.001. The seasonal variation showed that higher number of ALL cases was seen in the summer months (33% compared with other seasons (21% in the spring, 24.2% in autumn and 21.8% in winter. Conclusions: The pattern of adult leukaemia in Yemen is different from that seen in western countries which could be attributed to different environmental exposure. The geographic pattern indicates a possible role of certain environmental factors which warrant further investigations. The pattern of seasonal variation needs further studies for evaluating the seasonality.

  1. The induction by 224Ra of myeloid leukaemia and osteosarcoma in male CBA mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radium-224 was injected into 12-week-old male CBA mice in the range 2-64 kBq per mouse either as a single injection or as eight injections spaced at 3.5 day intervals over 4 weeks. Small but significant yields of myeloid leukaemia or osteosarcoma were obtained in all but the control groups. An effect of mode of administration (single or multiple injections) could not be demonstrated but the combined results showed: (1) a maximum yield of myeloid leukaemia in the region 8-16 kBq 224Ra; (2) a greater yield of osteosarcoma than myeloid leukaemia at 64 kBq 224Ra injected. (author)

  2. Leukaemia and lymphoma mortality in the vicinity of nuclear power stations in Japan, 1973-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many countries, studies have been carried out on cancer mortality near nuclear facilities. In the present paper, we examine the standardised mortality ratios (SMR) and the relative risks (RR) of five malignant neoplasms (leukaemia, malignant lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma and acute non-lymphatic leukaemia) for two age groups (0-14 years and all ages) during different periods (1973-1977), 1978-1982, 1983-1987 and 1973-1987) in the 18 site municipalities and in the four control municipalities selected near each nuclear power station site in Japan. For some sites, as well as for control groups, SMRs of certain malignant neoplasms were sometimes high, even before the startup of a nuclear power station. It is concluded that leukaemia and lymphoma mortality in the Japanese municipalities containing nuclear power stations is not significantly different from the control areas. (author)

  3. Chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and plasma cell-related neutrophilic leukaemoid reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Barbara J; Ahmad, Shahzaib

    2015-11-01

    Many cases reported as 'chronic neutrophilic leukaemia' have had an associated plasma cell neoplasm. Recent evidence suggests that the great majority of such cases represent a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction to the underlying multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We have analysed all accessible reported cases to clarify the likely diagnosis and to ascertain whether toxic granulation, Döhle bodies and an increased neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score were useful in making a distinction between chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction. We established that all these changes occur in both conditions. Toxic granulation and Döhle bodies are more consistently present in leukaemoid reactions but also occur quite frequently in chronic neutrophilic leukaemia. The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score is increased in both conditions and is of no value in making a distinction. PMID:26218186

  4. How Are Childhood Cancers Found?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic How are childhood cancers treated? How are childhood cancers found? Screening for childhood cancers Screening is testing for a disease such ... in people who don’t have any symptoms. Childhood cancers are rare, and there are no widely ...

  5. Impact on learning of an e-learning module on leukaemia: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgulis Yuri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background e-learning resources may be beneficial for complex or conceptually difficult topics. Leukaemia is one such topic, yet there are no reports on the efficacy of e-learning for leukaemia. This study compared the learning impact on senior medical students of a purpose-built e-learning module on leukaemia, compared with existing online resources. Methods A randomised controlled trial was performed utilising volunteer senior medical students. Participants were randomly allocated to Study and Control groups. Following a pre-test on leukaemia administered to both groups, the Study group was provided with access to the new e-learning module, while the Control group was directed to existing online resources. A post-test and an evaluation questionnaire were administered to both groups at the end of the trial period. Results Study and Control groups were equivalent in gender distribution, mean academic ability, pre-test performance and time studying leukaemia during the trial. The Study group performed significantly better than the Control group in the post-test, in which the group to which the students had been allocated was the only significant predictor of performance. The Study group’s evaluation of the module was overwhelmingly positive. Conclusions A targeted e-learning module on leukaemia had a significant effect on learning in this cohort, compared with existing online resources. We believe that the interactivity, dialogic feedback and integration with the curriculum offered by the e-learning module contributed to its impact. This has implications for e-learning design in medicine and other disciplines.

  6. Response rate of Pakistani children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia to medical research council acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 97 chemotherapy protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), a malignancy of lymphoid lineage cells, has excellent prognosis in children. In Pakistan, a few studies highlighted the response of ALL to chemotherapy. The Present study was planned to see the response rate of Pakistani children with ALL to Medical Research Council ALL 97 (MRCALL97) chemotherapy protocol. This descriptive case series was conducted at the Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and the Department of Paediatric Oncology, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from February 16, 2007 to August 16, 2007. Methods: Diagnosed children with ALL fulfilling the inclusion criteria were interviewed regarding history of the present, past illnesses, and family history. Physical examination was performed. Presenting clinical features, blood counts and blood and bone marrow blasts percentage were used to see the response on day 29 post chemotherapy. The data was recorded on a structured proforma for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 33 patients were studied including 26 males and 7 females. Twenty-five patients belonged to age group 2-9 years, and 8 to 9 years, median age being 4.5 years. Presenting WBC count was 50 X 10/sup 9/L in 3 patients. At the end of induction, complete remission was achieved in 31 out of 33 (94%) patients while two patients did not achieve remission. Conclusion: Response rate of Pakistani children with ALL to chemotherapy was superior to the previously reported figures from Pakistan. (author)

  7. Leukaemia among uranium miners - late effects of exposure to uranium dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with on recent observations among Czech uranium miners by 1999. Results of leukaemia study in a cohort of nearly 10 000 uranium miners based on 29 observed cases show significant association to chronic exposure. The largest contribution is from the uranium dust. Although there are estimates to the red bone marrow, it seems to be more practical to use a model based on modified duration of exposure, where non-hewer exposure are accounted by 50%. The evaluation of leukaemia subtypes is limited by low numbers. More accurate results can be expected in an extended follow-up or by pooling several studies. (authors)

  8. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N;

    1998-01-01

    bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to identify DNA replicating cells. The leukaemia progressed slowly until day 27 after which a rapid deterioration could be observed leading to severe changes over the following 5 d. In whole blood there was evidence of progressing metabolic acidosis. In bone marrow the fraction of......The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats...

  9. Aplastic anaemia preceding acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult with isolated deletion of chromosome 9q.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2008-12-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) can precede acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in 2% of children but this is rarely reported to occur in adults. A 21-year-old male presented with bone marrow failure and bone marrow biopsy showed a profoundly hypocellular marrow. He recovered spontaneously but represented 2 months later when he was diagnosed with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Chromosomal examination revealed 46,XY,del(9)(q13q34). To the best of our knowledge this is the first case to be reported of aplasia preceding ALL with 9q minus as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

  10. The molecular biology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis: thymic lymphoma, myeloid leukaemia and osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janowski, M. (Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium)); Cox, R. (Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit); Strauss, P.G. (GSF, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Molekulare Zellpathologie)

    1990-04-01

    In mice, external X- or {gamma}-irradiation may induce thymic lymphomas or myeloid leukaemias, while bone-seeking {alpha}-emitters may induce osteosarcomas, and to a lesser extent acute myeloid leukaemia. The paper reviews briefly some experimental data in respect to molecular mechanisms underlying these radio-carcinogenic processes. Thymic lymphomagenesis proceeds by an indirect mechanism in which recombinant proviruses could be involved. Myeloid leukaemogenesis is characterized by a very early putative initiating event, consisting of non-random rearrangements and/or deletions of chromosome 2. Osteosarcomagenesis in mice is often associated with the expression of proviruses, and the tumors often contain somatically acquired proviruses. (UK).

  11. Childhood medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Gandola, Lorenza; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Gatta, Gemma; Giangaspero, Felice; Poggi, Geraldina; Rutkowski, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Medulloblastoma accounts for 15-20% of childhood nervous system tumours. The risk of dying was reduced by 30% in the last twenty years. Patients are divided in risk strata according to post-surgical disease, dissemination, histology and some molecular features such as WNT subgroup and MYC status. Sixty to 70% of patients older than 3 years are assigned to the average-risk group. High-risk patients include those with disseminated and/or residual disease, large cell and/or anaplastic histotypes, MYC genes amplification. Current and currently planned clinical trials will: (1) evaluate the feasibility of reducing both the dose of craniospinal irradiation and the volume of the posterior fossa radiotherapy (RT) for those patients at low biologic risk, commonly identified as those having a medulloblastoma of the WNT subgroup; (2) determine whether intensification of chemotherapy (CT) or irradiation can improve outcome in patients with high-risk disease; (3) find target therapies allowing tailored therapies especially for relapsing patients and those with higher biological risk. PMID:27375228

  12. Splenic irradiation before bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 229 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in chronic phase were randomized between 1986 and 1990 to receive or not receive additional splenic irradiation as part of their conditioning prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both groups, 115 patients with and 114 patients without splenic irradiation, were very similar regarding distribution of age, sex, donor/recipient sex combination, conditioning, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prevention method and blood counts at diagnosis or prior to transplant. 135 patients (59%) are alive as of October 1995 with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 52 patients have relapsed (23%), 26 patients in the irradiated, 26 patients in the non-irradiated group (n.s.) with a relapse incident at 6 years of 28%. The main risk factor for relapse was T-cell depletion as the method for GvHD prevention, and an elevated basophil count in the peripheral blood prior to transplant. Relapse incidence between patients with or without splenic irradiation was no different in patients at high risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with T-cell-depleted marrows (P = n.s.) and in patients with low risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with non-T-cell-depleted transplants and basophil counts 3% basophils in peripheral blood). In this patient group, relapse incidence was 11% at 6 years with splenic irradiation but 32% in the non-irradiated group (P = 0.05). Transplant-related mortality was similar whether patients received splenic irradiation or not. This study suggests an advantage in splenic irradiation prior to transplantation for CML in this subgroup of patients and illustrates the need for tailored therapy. (Author)

  13. Radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ample epidemiological studies of human populations implicate ionizing radiation as a carcinogen and these quantitative studies provide the foundation for the core estimates of radiation cancer risk. The majority of the epidemiological data originate from situations of radiation exposure at high dose and high dose rate. The relevance of risk estimates based on such exposures to the more commonly encountered low dose and dose rate situation has been questioned frequently. Thus, there is a need to investigate and quantitate low dose and dose rate effects. A number of approaches may be considered, for example, very large scale epidemiology, very large scale animal experimentation; however, both of these present problems of a practical and/or ethical nature. A further possible approach is that of mechanistic modelling. This requires a fairly detailed understanding of neoplastic disease and how it develops post-irradiation. Many factors and variables have to be taken into consideration in mechanistic modelling approaches. Testing of mechanistic modelling schemes is best carried out using animal model systems. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a radiogenic cancer of significance in man and several good mouse models of the disease are available. Here, recent studies conducted at NRPB with the aim of elucidating the post-irradiation development of AML will be discussed. In particular three areas critical for developing a sound mechanistic model will be covered, definition of the initiating event; study of disease progression, this addresses the question of the frequency of conversion of initiated cells into the neoplastic state and the influence of genetic background on leukaemogenesis. (author)

  14. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They are among the most common types of childhood cancers. Some are benign tumors, which aren't ... can still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches ...

  15. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  16. Childhood Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood Obesity Facts The prevalence of obesity among low-income children aged 2 through 4 years, by state ... Obesity now affects 1 in 6 children and adolescents in the United States. Childhood Obesity Facts How ...

  17. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... page please turn Javascript on. The We Can! childhood obesity-prevention program involves parents, caregivers, and community leaders ...

  18. Growth of transplantable melanoma and leukaemia and prevention of virus-induced leukaemia in long lived radiation chimeras constructed with unmanipulated bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haemopoietic radiation chimeras across the H-2 barrier (BALB/c → C57B1/6; H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b) chimeras and vice versa) have been studied for their capacity to suppress the growth, or to reject, transplantable B16 melanotic melanoma and radiation leukaemia virus-induced, transplantable leukaemia. Also, radiation leukaemia virus (RadLV) obtained from the thymus of leukaemic C57B1/6 mice was injected i.p. into established chimeras (H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b)). As expected, long lived, graft versus host disease free allogeneic chimeras constructed with intact bone marrow were unable to reject the tumours both when recipients were BALB/c → C57B1/6 or C57B1/6 → BALB/c chimeras. However, inoculation of a large number of immunocompetent cells from normal BALB/c mice into BALB/c → C57B1/6 chimeras failed to promote a rejection of the tumours. On the contrary, the same amount of syngeneic (BALB/c) immunocompetent cells prevented growth of melanoma when transferred into athymic nude BALB/c mice, while the tumour grew unimpaired in untreated athymic nude BALB/c mice. The same type of H-2sup(d) → H-2sup(b) chimeras displayed complete resistance to inoculation of leukaemogenic H-2sup(b) restricted RadLV while all H-2sup(b) → H-2sup(b), syngeneically reconstituted mice developed disseminated leukaemia. (author)

  19. Effect of dexamethasone on quality of life in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspers Gert Jan L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are important in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, cyclic administration of high dose glucocorticoids may cause rapid and substantial changes in quality of life (QoL. The maintenance phase of the Dutch ALL-9 protocol consisted of alternating two weeks on and five weeks off dexamethasone (6 mg/m2/day. The present study was performed to assess the effect of dexamethasone on QoL during treatment for ALL according to this protocol. Methods In a multicentre prospective cohort study, QoL was assessed halfway (T1 and at the end of the two-year treatment (T2. A generic (Child Health Questionnaire and disease specific (PedsQL™ cancer version QoL questionnaire were used to assess QoL in two periods: on and off dexamethasone, respectively. Results 41 children (56% males were evaluated, mean age at diagnosis was 5.6 years. The CHQ physical and psychosocial summary scores were significantly lower than population norms. At T1 and T2, overall QoL showed no significant change. However, regarding specific domains (pain, cognitive functioning, emotion/behaviour and physical functioning QoL decreased over time. QoL was significantly more impaired during periods on dexamethasone. Conclusion Dexamethasone was associated with decreased QoL. At the end of treatment, reported QoL during dexamethasone deteriorated even more on certain scales (pain, cognitive functioning, emotion/behaviour and physical functioning. Knowledge of the specific aspects of QoL is essential to improve counselling and coping in paediatric oncology. Adverse effects of specific drugs on QoL should be taken into account when designing treatment protocols.

  20. Autoimmune diseases in Adult Life after Childhood Cancer in Scandinavia (ALiCCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmqvist, Anna Sällfors; Olsen, Jørgen H.; Mellemkjaer, Lene;

    2015-01-01

    all autoimmune diseases combined, corresponding to an AER of 67 per 100 000 person-years. The SHRRs were significantly increased for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (16.3), Addison's disease (13.9), polyarteritis nodosa (5.8), chronic rheumatic heart disease (4.5), localised scleroderma (3......OBJECTIVES: The pattern of autoimmune diseases in childhood cancer survivors has not been investigated previously. We estimated the risk for an autoimmune disease after childhood cancer in a large, population-based setting with outcome measures from comprehensive, nationwide health registries.......6), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (3.4), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3.1), pernicious anaemia (2.7), sarcoidosis (2.2), Sjögren's syndrome (2.0) and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (1.6). The SHRRs for any autoimmune disease were significantly increased after leukaemia (SHRR 1.6), Hodgkin's lymphoma (1...

  1. Feedback mechanisms control coexistence in a stem cell model of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Helena L; MacLean, Adam L; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-07-21

    Haematopoietic stem cell dynamics regulate healthy blood cell production and are disrupted during leukaemia. Competition models of cellular species help to elucidate stem cell dynamics in the bone marrow microenvironment (or niche), and to determine how these dynamics impact leukaemia progression. Here we develop two models that target acute myeloid leukaemia with particular focus on the mechanisms that control proliferation via feedback signalling. It is within regions of parameter space permissive of coexistence that the effects of competition are most subtle and the clinical outcome least certain. Steady state and linear stability analyses identify parameter regions that allow for coexistence to occur, and allow us to characterise behaviour near critical points. Where analytical expressions are no longer informative, we proceed statistically and sample parameter space over a coexistence region. We find that the rates of proliferation and differentiation of healthy progenitors exert key control over coexistence. We also show that inclusion of a regulatory feedback onto progenitor cells promotes healthy haematopoiesis at the expense of leukaemia, and that - somewhat paradoxically - within the coexistence region feedback increases the sensitivity of the system to dominance by one lineage over another. PMID:27130539

  2. Effect of glutathione S-transferases on the survival of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Judith; Hokland, Peter; Pedersen, Lars;

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases (GST) on the survival of acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving adriamycin induction therapy. A total of 89 patients were included in the study. Patients who carried at least one GSTM...

  3. Two consecutive immunophenotypic switches in a child with immunogenotypically stable acute leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierings, M; Szczepanski, T; van Wering, ER; Willemse, MJ; Langerak, AW; Revesz, T; van Dongen, JJM

    2001-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with a CD33(+) precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and seemed to respond well to ALL treatment. However. 2 weeks after diagnosis her leucocyte count rose rapidly with a predominance of myeloid blasts with M5b morphology and CD19(+) myeloid immunophenotype. Ac

  4. Evaluation of natural transmission of bovine leukaemia virus within dairy herds of Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.; Jong, de M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of seroconversion to bovine leukaemia virus and to estimate the main parameters needed for future model building. A longitudinal study was carried out between February 1999 and November 2001 in seven commercial dairy farms in Argentina using 1535 la

  5. Cases of leukaemia in the Sellafield area: the ''Sir Douglas Black'' report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report of this Advisory Group was published in the summer of 1984. Its conclusions can be summarised as follows: 1. Epidemiological surveys, although still incomplete, show that the incidence of cases of leukaemia and deaths caused by leukaemia in persons under 25 years of age is ''unusual'' in the village of Seascale and the Millom rural district. However, they are not unique and the same phenomenon can be found in comparable population groups located far away from any nuclear plants. 2. Taking all children born Seascale since 1950 who lived in the village up until 1980, their equivalent dose in the red marrow of the bone caused by Sellafield nuclear waste and the Windscale reactor fire of 1957 is only 13% of the equivalent dose due to background radiation. 3. The excessive leukaemia mortality rate at Seascale cannot be explained by radioactive waste. For this, a factor of 40 to 400 would be necessary. However, since doubts remain with respect to Sellafield nuclear waste, it must be temporarily concluded that the hypothesis of a connexion between the proximity of the nuclear plant and the excessive leukaemia rate cannot be fully eliminated. But neither can it be easily proven. The advisory Group recommendations are relating to: the surveys to be carried on; the inspection to be improved around the Sellafield plant; the incumbent regulations to be taken into consideration

  6. Clinical relevance of molecular aberrations in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia at first relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachas, Costa; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Creutzig, Ursula; Kwidama, Zinia J.; Zwaan, C. Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; De Bont, Evelina S. J. M.; Elitzur, Sarah; Rizzari, Carmelo; de Haas, Valerie; Zimmermann, Martin; Cloos, Jacqueline; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Outcome for relapsed paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remains poor. Strong prognostic factors at first relapse are lacking, which hampers optimization of therapy. We assessed the frequency of molecular aberrations (FLT3, NRAS, KRAS, KIT, WT1 and NPM1 genes) at first relapse in a large set (n

  7. Studies on the role of RNA tumour viruses in human leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search has been made for an etiological role of retroviruses in human leukemia and cocultivation studies have led to the isolation of a presumed human type C virus which appeared to be oncogenic for experimental animals. The experimental procedures and results are fully discussed. The parallels between irradiation induced lymphomas in mice and leukaemias in man are explored. (C.F.)

  8. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana;

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were...

  9. Massive retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy as a terminal event in hairy cell leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, A B; Catovsky, D; O'Brien, C J; Lott, M; Bowley, N; Hemmingway, A

    1983-01-01

    A case of hairy cell leukaemia complicated as a terminal event by massive retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy is described. The patient had recently been treated with lithium carbonate and had previously been demonstrated to suffer from a systemic vasculitis, either or both of which may have contributed to the development of this rare complication. PMID:6360496

  10. Investigation of the possible increased incidence of leukaemia in young people near the Dounreay Nuclear Establishment, Caithness, Scotland. 2. report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given by the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment investigating the possible increased incidence of leukaemia in young people near the Dounreay Nuclear Establishment in Scotland. After describing the environment in which the site is situated, subsequent chapters examine the known epidemiological data available on leukaemia incidence in young people in the area, the radioactive discharges and the radiation doses to the population calculated from these discharges and recommendations for further studies. On present knowledge, the report is unable to ascribe the observed incidence of leukaemia to specific causes. (U.K.)

  11. Levels of expression of CD19 and CD20 in chronic B cell leukaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginaldi, L; De Martinis, M; Matutes, E; Farahat, N; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether the antigen levels of the B cell lineage markers CD19 and CD20 can distinguish between normal and neoplastic B cells or characterise distinct expression patterns among the chronic B cell leukaemias. METHODS: Peripheral blood cells from 70 patients with B cell disorders and 17 healthy donors were analysed by quantitative flow cytometry. Direct immunofluorescence staining was performed with phycoerythrin conjugated CD19 and CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Standard microbeads with different capacities to bind mouse immunoglobulins were used to convert the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values into number of antigen molecules/cell, expressed as antibody binding capacity (ABC). RESULTS: CD19 and CD20 ABC values in leukaemic B cells differed from those of normal blood B lymphocytes. The results identified distinct profiles of CD19 and CD20 expression in the various types of B cell leukaemias. In all leukaemias studied except hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), CD19 expression was significantly lower than the mean (SD) value in normal B cells (22 (7) x 10(3) molecules/cell), as follows: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), 13 (7) x 10(3); B prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL), 16 (9) x 10(3); splenic lymphoma with villous lymphocytes (SLVL), 15 (11) x 10(3); mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 10 (7) x 10(3). In HCL there was strong CD19 expression (38 (16) x 10(3)). In contrast, the level of expression of membrane CD20 was higher than the mean (SD) value in normal B cells (94 (16) x 10(3) molecules/cell) in MCL (123 (51) x 10(3)); B-PLL (129 (47) x 10(3)); SLVL (167 (72) x 10(3)); and HCL (312 (110) x 10(3)); while it was significantly lower (65 (11) x 10(3)) in CLL compared with normal B cells and the other B cell leukaemias. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative determination of CD19 and CD20 may provide useful diagnostic information for the study of B lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:9708202

  12. Transgenerational induction of leukaemia following parental irradiation. Genomic instability and the bystander in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal radiation from small amounts of bone-incorporated plutonium-239 has been shown to result in long-term perturbation to haemopoiesis - in particular to the pluripotent bone marrow stem and progenitor cells - in mice. Associated with these changes is a small but finite induction of myeloid leukaemia. Preliminary experiments showed some instabilities in haemopoiesis following preconception, paternal irradiation (PPI) with 239Pu and these studies were extended to consider whether similar sensitivity to leukaemia induction might also arise in these offspring. Male mice were injected with 0, 128 or 256 Bq/g bodyweight with plutonium-239 citrate, 12 weeks before mating with normal untreated females. Bone marrow assays were conducted on their male offspring at 6-18 weeks after birth. Female offspring were injected with 50 mg/kg methyl nitrosourea (MNU), or irradiated with 3.3 Gy γ-rays, at 10 weeks of age and observed continuously for onset of dysfunction when they were immediately sacrificed. In a parallel study set up by Stones and Humphreys (personal communication) incorporating significant numbers of offspring from PPI only, no case of leukaemia was observed. However, in this study, offspring of fathers treated with 239Pu showed significantly greater sensitivity than normal mice to treatment with known inducers of lympho-myeloid leukaemia such as MNU (or irradiation). Although a somewhat greater frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was seen in bone marrow of PPI offspring, the estimated mutation rates were insufficient to account for the degree of leukaemia induction and suggested an indirect mechanism. Detailed study of the bone marrow in individual offspring showed subtle changes in their stem cell content and in their haemopoietic inductive microenvironment, a component seen to be damaged also in the earlier radiation studies. It will be argued that low-dose radiation is rarely a direct cause of leukaemia (in mice). Rather that damage caused by radiation

  13. Childhood proptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proptosis in children is a hallmark of orbital diseases which can present a diagnostic challenge requiring thoughtful investigation. The aim of this review is to provide the reader an overview of the subject of childhood proptosis with an emphasis on the systematic and practical approach for the work-up of proptosis in children. Use of proper imaging studies is essential for the correct diagnosis. Computed tomography is a good screening test for any space occupying lesion of the orbit. Proptosis describes eye prominence due to space occupying orbital lesions. Congenital lesions usually present in the first decade of life. Acquired orbital lesions such as lymphangiomas, orbital varix, rhabdomyosarcoma and neural tumors may present at the end of the first decade of life. Metastatic tumors to the orbit, adenocarcinoma of lacrimal gland and rapidly growing masses may present with proptosis associated with pain. Visual loss can be the presenting symptoms in the patients with optic nerve (ON) gliomas, orbital meningiomas and posteriorly located tumors. Cystic lesions of the orbit may be congenital or acquired, dermoid cysts being the most common congenital orbital lesions. Some of the vascular lesions of the orbit include capillary hemangiomas, lymphangiomas, orbital varix, and arteriovenous malformations. Inflammatory process of the orbit in children include cellulitis and pseudotumor. Neural tumors such as neurofibromas, ON gilomas and meningiomas are less common causes of proptosis in children. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common primary orbital malignancy in children which can present with acute proptosis and is one of the few life-threatening diseases seen initially by an ophthalmologist. Secondary orbital tumors invade the orbit from adjacent sinuses, cranium or extended from the eye itself. The most common distant metastases in children include neuroblastoma and Ewing's sarcoma. Although many orbital processes can be diagnosed based on history, clinical

  14. Importance of genotyping of Thiopurine S-methyltransferase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia during maintenance therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokmanović Lidija

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT is an enzyme that catalyses the inactivation of mercaptopurine (MP which is widely used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL of childhood. Potentially fatal myelotoxicity may develop after standard doses of MP in TPMT deficient patients. OBJECTIVES To establish if individually tailored doses of MP can reduce myelotoxicity in ALL patients carrying mutations in the TPMT gene. To establish if variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR genotype influences the treatment effects of MP. METHOD Fifty randomly selected patients treated according to ALL IC-BFM 2002 protocol were tested for most frequent TPMT gene mutations using PCR based methods. VNTR genotype was determined in 20 children by PCR methods. During the maintenance phase, we recorded the number of weeks when therapy was applied in either full doses, reduced doses or when patients were without any therapy. RESULTS Fifty children were examined, 29 boys (58% and 21 girls (42%; age ranged from 1.8-17.3 years (median 6.2 years. Four patients (8% were heterozygous for TPMT mutations, all of them carrying the TPMT*3A variant. After 12, 14, 16 and 19 weeks of therapy with reduced doses of MP, the patients switched to full doses due to good tolerance. There was no therapy omission. Cumulative dose of MP was reduced for 7.8%, 7.4%, 11.2% and 16.6%, respectively, in patients with TPMT mutations. No significant difference was found between children with no mutations and TPMT heterozygotes regarding full dose therapy (53.6 vs. 55.7 weeks, respectively and reduced dose therapy (19.9 vs. 15.2 weeks respectively. The number of detected VNTRs ranged from four to seven. The majority of patients had different number of VNTRs on homologous chromosomes. Most frequently detected polymorphism was VNTR*5. No correlation was found between TPMT and VNTR genotype inheritance. CONCLUSION Obeying pharmacogenetic principles in the treatment of childhood ALL

  15. Magnetic fields and childhood cancer: an epidemiological investigation of the effects of high-voltage underground cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, K J; Swanson, J; Vincent, T J; Murphy, M F G

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence of increased risks for childhood leukaemia from magnetic fields has implicated, as one source of such fields, high-voltage overhead lines. Magnetic fields are not the only factor that varies in their vicinity, complicating interpretation of any associations. Underground cables (UGCs), however, produce magnetic fields but have no other discernible effects in their vicinity. We report here the largest ever epidemiological study of high voltage UGCs, based on 52,525 cases occurring from 1962-2008, with matched birth controls. We calculated the distance of the mother's address at child's birth to the closest 275 or 400 kV ac or high-voltage dc UGC in England and Wales and the resulting magnetic fields. Few people are exposed to magnetic fields from UGCs limiting the statistical power. We found no indications of an association of risk with distance or of trend in risk with increasing magnetic field for leukaemia, and no convincing pattern of risks for any other cancer. Trend estimates for leukaemia as shown by the odds ratio (and 95% confidence interval) per unit increase in exposure were: reciprocal of distance 0.99 (0.95-1.03), magnetic field 1.01 (0.76-1.33). The absence of risk detected in relation to UGCs tends to add to the argument that any risks from overhead lines may not be caused by magnetic fields. PMID:26344172

  16. French “real life” experience of clofarabine in children with refractory or relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Trioche, Pascale; Nelken, Brigitte; Michel, Gérard; Pellier, Isabelle; Petit, Arnaud; Bertrand, Yves; Rohrlich, Pierre; Schmitt, Claudine; Sirvent, Nicolas; Boutard, Patrick; Margueritte, Geneviève; Pautard, Brigitte; Ducassou, Stéphane; Plantaz, Dominique; Robert, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Clofarabine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide has shown a good efficacy and a tolerable toxicity profile in previous studies of children with relapsed or refractory leukaemia. This report describes a retrospective study of 38 French patients who received clofarabine as a monotherapy or in combination for relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) outside of clinical trials after marketing authorization. Methods We retrospectively analysed d...

  17. Proposals for the classification of chronic (mature) B and T lymphoid leukaemias. French-American-British (FAB) Cooperative Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, J M; Catovsky, D.; Daniel, M T; Flandrin, G; Galton, D A; Gralnick, H R; Sultan, C.

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral blood, bone marrow films, and bone marrow biopsy specimens from 110 patients, well characterised by clinical and laboratory studies, including electron microscopy, were reviewed, to determine proposals for the classification of chronic (mature) B and T cell leukaemias. On the basis of cytology and membrane phenotype the following disorders were defined: (i) B cell type: chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); CLL of mixed cell type, which includes cases with more than 10% and less tha...

  18. Childhood trauma and childhood urbanicity in relation to psychotic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frissen, Aleida; Lieverse, Ritsaert; Drukker, Marjan; van Winkel, Ruud; Delespaul, Philippe; Cahn, W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urban upbringing and childhood trauma are both associated with psychotic disorders. However, the association between childhood urbanicity and childhood trauma in psychosis is poorly understood. The urban environment could occasion a background of social adversity against which any effect

  19. MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia stem cell interactions with bone marrow stroma promote survival and therapeutic resistance that can be overcome with CXCR4 antagonism

    OpenAIRE

    Sison, Edward Allan R; Rau, Rachel E.; McIntyre, Emily; LI Li; Small, Donald; Brown, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-R) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have a dismal prognosis. While most patients achieve remission, approximately half of patients recur with a short latency to relapse. This suggests that chemotherapy-resistant leukaemia stem cells (LSCs) survive and can recapitulate the leukaemia. We hypothesized that interactions between LSCs and the bone marrow microenvironment mediate survival and chemotherapy resistance in MLL-R ALL. Using primary samples of infant ML...

  20. Childhood as a value

    OpenAIRE

    EWELINA PIECUCH

    2011-01-01

    The article encompasses the problems of childhood and its influence on the rest of one's life. I have concentrated on this crucial and specific time in life. It is demonstrated by biology, medicine, psychology, and psychoanalysis that human habits are formed in childhood. Health, hygiene and aesthetic behaviour determine one's further fate and influence life in its entirety. It is that phase of human life that determines the rest of it. In childhood children manifest their cogn...

  1. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Research Childhood Cancer Survivor Study: An Overview In 2016, it ... Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer .) The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study ( CCSS ), funded by the National ...

  2. Lower-limb MRI in the staging and re-staging of osteonecrosis in paediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, D.; Masetto, A.; Franzesi, C.T.; Bonaffini, P.A.; Sironi, S. [University of Milano-Bicocca Milan, School of Medicine, Monza (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. San Gerardo, Monza (Italy); Sala, A.; Biondi, A. [University of Milano-Bicocca Milan, School of Medicine, Monza (Italy); H. San Gerardo, Department of Paediatric Haematology, Monza (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI examination in detecting and monitoring osteonecrotic lesions (ON) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) after chemotherapy (CHT) and/or bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Seventy-three patients (37 males, mean age 12.4 years old) with ALL after treatment underwent a lower-limb MR examination between November 2006 and March 2012. In 47 there was clinical suspicion of ON, 26 were asymptomatic. Studies were performed with a 1 T and a 1.5 T scanner, acquiring short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted sequences in coronal plane from the hips to the ankles. The average acquisition time was 18 min. Considering baseline and follow-up examinations, the overall number of MRI studies was 195. Fifty-four of 73 patients showed ON at MRI study, with an overall number of 323 ON (89 involving articular surface, 24 with joint deformity, JD). Twenty-five of 47 symptomatic patients showed subchondral ON lesions, 11 developed JD. Three of 26 asymptomatic patients showed subchondral bone ON at baseline examination but no JD at follow-up. Twenty-two of 28 BMT, 32/45 CHT patients developed ON. Our MRI protocol proved to be feasible in evaluating ON in paediatric patients. Studies should be addressed only to symptomatic patients. (orig.)

  3. 9-O-acetylated sialic acids differentiating normal haematopoietic precursors from leukemic stem cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Suchandra; Chandra, Sarmila; Mandal, Chitra

    2014-10-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) originates from mutations in haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). For high-risk patients, treated with intensified post-remission chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is considered. Autologous HSC transplantation needs improvisation till date. Previous studies established enhanced disease-associated expression of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycoproteins (Neu5,9Ac2-GPs) on lymphoblasts of these patients at diagnosis, followed by its decrease with clinical remission and reappearance with relapse. Based on this differential expression of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs, identification of a normal HPC population was targeted from patients at diagnosis. This study identifies two distinct haematopoietic progenitor populations from bone marrow of diagnostic ALL patients, exploring the differential expression of Neu5,9Ac2-GPs with stem cell (CD34, CD90, CD117, CD133), haematopoietic (CD45), lineage-commitment (CD38) antigens and cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Normal haematopoietic progenitor cells (ALDH(+)SSC(lo)CD45(hi)Neu5,9Ac2 -GPs(lo)CD34(+)CD38(-)CD90(+)CD117(+)CD133(+)) differentiated into morphologically different, lineage-specific colonies, being crucial for autologous HSC transplantation while leukemic stem cells (ALDH(+)SSC(lo)CD45(lo)Neu5,9Ac2 -GPs(hi)CD34(+)CD38(+)CD90(-)CD117(-)CD133(-)) lacking this ability can be potential targets for minimal residual disease detection and drug-targeted immunotherapy. PMID:25283637

  4. Lower-limb MRI in the staging and re-staging of osteonecrosis in paediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the diagnostic value of MRI examination in detecting and monitoring osteonecrotic lesions (ON) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) after chemotherapy (CHT) and/or bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Seventy-three patients (37 males, mean age 12.4 years old) with ALL after treatment underwent a lower-limb MR examination between November 2006 and March 2012. In 47 there was clinical suspicion of ON, 26 were asymptomatic. Studies were performed with a 1 T and a 1.5 T scanner, acquiring short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and T1-weighted sequences in coronal plane from the hips to the ankles. The average acquisition time was 18 min. Considering baseline and follow-up examinations, the overall number of MRI studies was 195. Fifty-four of 73 patients showed ON at MRI study, with an overall number of 323 ON (89 involving articular surface, 24 with joint deformity, JD). Twenty-five of 47 symptomatic patients showed subchondral ON lesions, 11 developed JD. Three of 26 asymptomatic patients showed subchondral bone ON at baseline examination but no JD at follow-up. Twenty-two of 28 BMT, 32/45 CHT patients developed ON. Our MRI protocol proved to be feasible in evaluating ON in paediatric patients. Studies should be addressed only to symptomatic patients. (orig.)

  5. Activation of NF-ĸB in leukemic cells in response to initial prednisone therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: relation to other prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamieńska, Elżbieta; Ociepa, Tomasz; Wysocki, Mariusz; Kurylak, Andrzej; Matysiak, Michał; Urasiński, Tomasz; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Domagała, Wenancjusz

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor ĸB (NF-ĸB) is a transcription regulator of proliferation and cell death. Increased activation of NF-ĸB may be responsible for treatment failure in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). This study aimed to assess changes in NF-ĸB activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells prior to and after 6 and 12 h of prednisone administration in relation to age, initial WBC count at diagnosis and early treatment response in childhood ALL. The study comprised 55 children with de novo ALL. Cells were stained with mouse anti-NF-ĸB (p65) antibody followed by goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with FITC and measured by laser scanning cytometer. The nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio of NF-ĸB reflecting activation of NF-ĸB was decreased 12 h after treatment in the standard risk group patients, whereas it remained statistically unchanged in the non-standard risk group patients. Changes in the N/C ratio of NF-ĸB were not associated with age and early treatment response; however, in children with an initial WBC count higher than 20 000/μl at diagnosis, this ratio was increased after 6 and 12 h from prednisone administration. The association of higher activation of NF-ĸB with an elevated initial WBC count suggests that activation of NF-ĸB may be responsible for treatment failure in children with ALL. PMID:21574100

  6. Treatment-related toxicities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia predisposition syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) do not harbor germline mutations that strongly predispose them to development of this malignancy, large syndrome registries and detailed mapping of exomes or whole genomes of familial leukaemia kindreds have revealed that 3-5% of all...... anticancer agents, while others are not. This review summarises our current knowledge on the risk of acute toxicities for these ALL patients and provides guidance for treatment adjustments....... patients is important in order to adjust therapy and offer genetic counseling and cancer surveillance to mutation carriers in the family. In the coming years large genomic screening projects are expected to reveal further hitherto unrecognised familial ALL syndromes. The treatment of ALL cases harboring...

  7. Minor changes on cranial MRI during treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeaekkoe, E. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Vainionpaeae, L. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Pyhtinen, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Lanning, M. [Dept. of Paediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    1996-04-01

    Cranial MRI was used to study treatment-related changes in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Nineteen children (18 with ALL, 1 with lymphoma) underwent MRI at the beginning of treatment and at intervals during it, to a total of 105 imaging studies and a minimum of 3 per case. Nine patients had finished all therapy, all received consolidation treatment. No patient had central nervous system (CNS) leukaemia at diagnosis or developed a CNS relapse. Mild treatment-related white matter changes were observed in only 2 patients after consolidation therapy with three 5 g/m{sup 2} pulses of intravenous methotrexate. Transient enlargement of the ventricles and cortical sulci was observed in 13 patients, always temporally related to steroid treatment. These preliminary data suggest that treatment-related white matter changes are rare and no routine MRI follow-up is needed during treatment in asymptomatic children after a baseline assessment. (orig.)

  8. Unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of unusual fungal sepsis of Alternaria alternata in a patient of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in 62-year-old male who presented with complaints of 'off and on' fever with decreased oral intake. On evaluation, haemogram showed low platelet count and 68% blast cells in peripheral blood. On flow cytometry of peripheral blood, the gated blasts (approximately 55% highly express CD45, CD10, CD19, CD22 and condition was diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. He was started on standard induction treatment along with supportive therapies. During the course of treatment, two sets of paired blood cultures were sent 48 h apart. All of blood cultures were done on Bac-T alert 3D system. All of them yielded fungus. The fungus was then grown on Sabouraud's Dextrose agar media. It was identified as A. alternata. The patient condition worsened and later had cardiac arrest in ICU and could not be revived.

  9. Minor changes on cranial MRI during treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial MRI was used to study treatment-related changes in children undergoing therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Nineteen children (18 with ALL, 1 with lymphoma) underwent MRI at the beginning of treatment and at intervals during it, to a total of 105 imaging studies and a minimum of 3 per case. Nine patients had finished all therapy, all received consolidation treatment. No patient had central nervous system (CNS) leukaemia at diagnosis or developed a CNS relapse. Mild treatment-related white matter changes were observed in only 2 patients after consolidation therapy with three 5 g/m2 pulses of intravenous methotrexate. Transient enlargement of the ventricles and cortical sulci was observed in 13 patients, always temporally related to steroid treatment. These preliminary data suggest that treatment-related white matter changes are rare and no routine MRI follow-up is needed during treatment in asymptomatic children after a baseline assessment. (orig.)

  10. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: contemporary conceptions of etiology, pathogenesis and peculiarities of clinical manifestations (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesnokova N.P.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research work presents an analysis of literature review and results of investigations on the problems of etiology, pathogenesis, classification and peculiarities of clinical manifestations of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Special attention is paid to both contemporary conceptions of carcinogenesis, reflecting the role of proto-oncogenes activation, an-tioncogenes and apoptosis genes suppression in mechanisms of neoplasia development and «specific mechanisms» of oncogenic transformation induction of B-lymphocytes and the subsequent development of the stages of promotion, progression and marked clinical manifestations of formation. Possibility of further improvement of use of immune phe-notype character and oncomarkers in diagnostics of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia clinical variants and in evaluation of effectiveness of its therapy has been indicated in the article

  11. Femoral diaphyseal stress fracture as the initial presentation of acute leukaemia in an adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Helen Emily; Pang, Joe Hwong; Sanghrajka, Anish Pradip

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy was referred to the orthopaedic clinic by his general practitioner, reporting of a 6-week history of left thigh pain. Clinical examination was unremarkable. Radiographs demonstrated a periosteal reaction at the proximal femur. MRI scans demonstrated a stress fracture of the femur, with no associated sinister features and no evidence of a pathological lesion. As the fracture healed and symptoms improved, the patient became unwell with weight loss, lethargy, chest and jaw pain and fevers. After multiple blood tests over a 25-day period, including five full blood counts and two normal blood films, a third blood film finally demonstrated blasts in keeping with acute leukaemia. We discuss a literature review of musculoskeletal manifestations of leukaemia and the often atypical presentations found. PMID:27353177

  12. Chronic myelogenous leukaemia with persistent neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Seki, Takahiro; Nakahara, Yoshitaka; Tomita, Akitada; Takahashi, Masashi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukaemia was diagnosed in a 7-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat. Leukocytosis (74,900/µl)--mature neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia--was observed. Bone marrow aspiration revealed hypercellularity with proliferation of cells of myeloid lineage. An underlying condition leading to leukocytosis was not identified. The severe leukocytosis did not respond to antibiotic therapy. Based on these findings, chronic myelogenous leukaemia was diagnosed. Because of the absence of clinical signs, the cat was monitored without treatment until 7 months after diagnosis, when it developed pruritic skin lesions. Pruritus was controlled with oral prednisolone. Forty-two months after diagnosis, the cat developed nasal lymphoma, which was treated with radiation therapy, resulting in complete remission. The cat was still in good physical condition 63 months after diagnosis, despite the persistence of marked neutrophilia, eosinophilia and basophilia. PMID:24108200

  13. The GIT–PIX complexes regulate the chemotactic response of rat basophilic leukaemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gavina, Manuela; Za, Lorena; Molteni, Raffaella; Pardi, Ruggero; Curtis, Ivan de

    2010-01-01

    Background information. Cell motility entails the reorganization of the cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking for effective protrusion. The GIT–PIX protein complexes are involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion and in the endocytic traffic of members of the family of G-protein-coupled receptors. We have investigated the function of the endogenous GIT complexes in the regulation of cell motility stimulated by fMLP (formyl-Met-Leu-Phe) peptide, in a rat basophilic leukaemia RBL-...

  14. The pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Slevin, M L; Piall, E M; Aherne, G.W.; Johnston, A.; Sweatman, M C; Lister, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside were compared with bolus intravenous injection and intravenous infusion in five patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia. 2 Subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside was rapidly absorbed and then declined biexponentially with initial and terminal half-lives similar to intravenous bolus injection. 3 Cytosine arabinoside levels declined rapidly after intravenous bolus and subcutaneous bolus injection, and fell below steady state infusion leve...

  15. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus in peninsular Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Bande Faruku; Arshad Siti; Hassan Latiffah; Zakaria Zunita; Sapian Nurul; Rahman Noor; Alazawy Amer

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in domestic and wild felids. Despite the clinical importance of feline retroviruses and the growing interest in cats as pets, information about FeLV and FIV in Malaysia is presently insufficient to properly advise veterinarians and pet owners. A cross-sectional study was carried out from January 2010 to December 2010 to determine the prevalence and risk factors...

  17. Leukaemia complicating treatment for Hodgkin's disease: the experience of the British National Lymphoma Investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Devereux, S; Selassie, T G; Vaughan Hudson, G.; Vaughan Hudson, B; Linch, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the incidence of and risk factors for the development of secondary acute leukaemia and myelodysplasia in patients treated in British National Lymphoma Investigation's studies of Hodgkin's disease since 1970. PATIENTS--2676 Patients entered into Hodgkin's disease studies between February 1970 and November 1986. Data accrued up to November 1988 were analysed, ensuring a minimum follow up period of two years. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis of multicentre trial data by cas...

  18. The effect of scheduling in children undergoing prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, A.S.; Jones, R.D.; Barrett, A. (Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Beatson Oncology Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-09-01

    Control of central nervous system disease and overall survival have been analysed in a group of 829 children with leukaemia entered into the UKALL VIII trial to determine whether scheduling of the cranial irradiation is of prognostic significance. It is shown that short gaps in treatment do not influence prognosis and that current radiotherapy practice need not be modified. (author). 20 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Competitive PCR for quantification of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvold, C; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P;

    2000-01-01

    A very precise and reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed in order to quantify minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A clone-specific competitor was constructed by introducing a restriction site in a PCR product identical to...... at least one malignant cell in 10(5) normal cells. This method may be used for treatment stratification based on the early response to antileukaemic therapy. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-13...

  20. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  1. Caffeine-hydrazones as anticancer agents with pronounced selectivity toward T-lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplánek, R.; Jakubek, M.; Rak, J.; Kejik, Z.; Havlík, M.; Dolenský, B.; Frydrych, I.; Hajduch, M.; Kolář, M.; Bogdanová, K.; Králová, Jarmila; Dzubak, P.; Král, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, Jun (2015), s. 19-29. ISSN 0045-2068 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0060; GA MŠk CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0041; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Anticancer agents * Cancer treatment * Caffeine-hydrazones * Leukaemia * Selectivity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.152, year: 2014

  2. Early stem cell transplantation for chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: a chance for cure?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreger, P; von Neuhoff, N.; Kuse, R.; Sonnen, R.; GLASS, B.; Uharek, L.; Schoch, R.; Löffler, H.; Schmitz, N.

    1998-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cannot be cured by conventional therapy. To improve the prognosis of patients with CLL, we have designed a sequential treatment strategy that comprises intensive chemotherapy for mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) and induction of minimal disease, followed by high-dose radiochemotherapy with stem cell reinfusion and post-transplant molecular monitoring by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the complementary determ...

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia among Spanish children and mothers' occupation: a case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Infante-Rivard, C; Mur, P.; Armstrong, B; ALVAREZ-DARDET, C.; Bolumar, F

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim was to investigate the association between mothers' occupational exposure during pregnancy and the incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children. DESIGN: The study was a case-control investigation. A face to face interview was used to assess exposures at work and relevant confounding variables. SETTING: The study was community based and was carried out in five provinces of Spain. SUBJECTS: 128 cases less than 15 years of age were interviewed (91% of those eli...

  4. Effects of epigenetic-based anti-cancer drugs in leukaemia and multiple myeloma cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jugová, Alžbeta; Galiová-Šustáčková, Gabriela; Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Kozubek, Stanislav; Bártová, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 12 (2011), 1195-1203. ISSN 1065-6995 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06027; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 919; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA MŠk(CZ) LD11020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : epigenetics * histone code * leukaemia cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.482, year: 2011

  5. Development of Drugs Targeting the PI3K Signalling Pathway in Leukaemias and Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Arcaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K family of signalling enzymes play a key role in the transduction of signals from activated cell surface receptors controlling cell growth and proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. The intracellular signalling pathway from activated receptors to PI3K and its downstream targets v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is very frequently deregulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in human cancer, including leukaemia and lymphoma. In the past decade, an arsenal of small molecule inhibitors of key enzymes in this pathway has been developed and evaluated in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials in cancer patients. These include pharmacological inhibitors of Akt, mTOR, and PI3K, some of which are approved for the treatment of leukaemia and lymphoma. The PI3K family comprises eight different catalytic isoforms in humans, which have been subdivided into three classes. Class I PI3K isoforms have been extensively studied in the context of human cancer, and the isoforms p110α and p110δ are validated drug targets. The recent approval of a p110δ-specific PI3K inhibitor (idelalisib/Zydelig® for the treatment of selected B cell malignancies represents the first success in developing these molecules into anti-cancer drugs. In addition to PI3K inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors are intensively studied in leukaemia and lymphoma, and temsirolimus (Torisel® is approved for the treatment of a type of lymphoma. Based on these promising results it is hoped that additional novel PI3K pathway inhibitors will in the near future be further developed into new drugs for leukaemia and lymphoma.

  6. Cognitive outcome in children and adolescents treated for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with chemotherapy only

    OpenAIRE

    Lofstad, G Elisabeth; Reinfjell, Trude; Hestad, Knut; Diseth, Trond H

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine cognitive outcome in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in remission, treated with central nervous system prophylactic chemotherapy only. Method: Thirty-five children and adolescents, age 8.4–15.3 years in long-term remission from ALL, 4.2–12.4 years post diagnosis, without relapse and no prediagnosis history of neurodevelopmental disorder were compared with 35 healthy controls matched for gender and age, on measures of intellectual functio...

  7. Early molecular diagnosis of aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, R; Mancini, N.; Peccatori, J.; Cieri, N.; Vago, L.; F. Giglio; Morelli, M; Ghidoli, N; Carletti, S; Levati, G; Crucitti, L; E. Sala; Lupo Stanghellini, M T; Lorentino, F; Forcina, A

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of invasive fungal infection remains challenging. Here we report a case of early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in a neutropenic patient affected by acute myeloid leukaemia, achieved through the detection of Aspergillus fumigatus species-specific ribonucleic acid sequences by a sensitive multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based molecular assay. Thanks to the early diagnosis, targeted therapy was promptly established and the severe fungal infection controlled, allowin...

  8. PLZF/RARalpha binding partners and their influence on the induction of acute promyelocytic leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Frech, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) accounts for 10% of the adult AML patients. APL patients carry chromosomal translocations involving the rarα gene on chromosome 17. The most frequent translocations lead to the expression of the fusion proteins PML/RARα (98%; t(15;17)) and PLZF/RARα (1%; t(11;17)) (X-RARα). The APL is characterised by a differentiation block at the promyelocytic stage and leads to an increased amount of myel...

  9. Combined Bezafibrate and Medroxyprogesterone Acetate: Potential Novel Therapy for Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Khanim, Farhat L.; Hayden, Rachel E.; Jane Birtwistle; Alessia Lodi; Stefano Tiziani; Davies, Nicholas J; Ride, Jon P.; Viant, Mark R.; Gunther, Ulrich L.; Mountford, Joanne C; Heinrich Schrewe; Green, Richard M.; Murray, Jim A.; Drayson, Mark T; Chris M Bunce

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The majority of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients are over sixty years of age. With current treatment regimens, survival rates amongst these, and also those younger patients who relapse, remain dismal and novel therapies are urgently required. In particular, therapies that have anti-leukaemic activity but that, unlike conventional chemotherapy, do not impair normal haemopoiesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate the potent anti-leukaemic activity of the combination of t...

  10. Dopamine inhibits proliferation, induces differentiation and apoptosis of K562 leukaemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qun; YUAN Lin-bo

    2007-01-01

    Background Dopamine exerts its effects mainly in nervous system through D1, D2 or D3 receptors. There are few reports dealing with the effects of dopamine on leukaemia cells. However, some dopamine agonists or antagonists do show biological effects on some types of leukaemia cells. Here, we report the effects of dopamine on the proliferation,differentiation and apoptosis of K562 leukaemia cells.Methods Proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell counting both in liquid and semisolid cultures.Differentiation was verified by morphology, benzidine staining and flow cytometry. Apoptosis was checked by Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry. The two groups were untreated group and treated group (dopamine 10-9 mol/L-10-4mol/L).Results In liquid culture, MTT assay and colony assay, dopamine inhibited proliferation of K562 cells. Inhibition rate was 29.28% at 10-6 mol/L and 36.10% at 10-5 mol/L after culture for 5 days in MTT assay. In benzidine staining and CD71 expression, dopamine induced K562 cells toward erythroid differentiation by increased 155% at 10-6 mol/L and by 171% at 10-5 mol/L after culture for 5 days in benzidine staining. In Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry,dopamine induced K562 cells toward apoptosis. The sub G1 peak stained by PI was 14.23% at 10-4 mol/L dopamine after culture for 3 days compared with the control (0.81%) in flow cytometry.Conclusion Dopamine inhibites proliferation and induces both differentiation and apoptosis of K562 leukaemia cells.

  11. The effect of game-based exercise on infant acute lymphocytic leukaemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Édgar Cortés-Reyes; Paola Escobar-Zabala; Laura González-García

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To establish the effect of a game-based exercise programme on Physical Deconditioning Syndrome (PDS) in 5 to 12 year-old children suffering Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL). Materials and methods. This was a quasi-experimental study involving seven children being treated for ALL at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bogotá, Colombia. Fitness determinants (aerobic capacity, muscle strength, flexibility, motor skills and proprioception) were initially assessed to establish their...

  12. Transmission of bovine leukaemia virus within dairy herds by simulation modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Monti, G.E.; Frankena, K.; Jong, de, T.

    2007-01-01

    In Argentina, bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) infection is common in dairy herds. The country currently has a National Voluntary Control Programme but relatively few farms have enrolled. However, there is increased interest from authorities and farmers to implement regional compulsory programmes but there is scarce quantitative information of the transmission of BLV in cattle herds. This information is a prerequisite to develop effective BLV control strategies. Mathematical modelling offers ways...

  13. Clonal evolution in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia developing resistance to BTK inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Jan A.; Landau, Dan A.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Bozic, Ivana; Zhang, Huidan; Sarosiek, Kristopher; Wang, Lili; Stewart, Chip; Fan, Jean; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Sivina, Mariela; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Fraser, Cameron; Han, Yulong; Li, Shuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib has been attributed solely to mutations in BTK and related pathway molecules. Using whole-exome and deep-targeted sequencing, we dissect evolution of ibrutinib resistance in serial samples from five chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients. In two patients, we detect BTK-C481S mutation or multiple PLCG2 mutations. The other three patients exhibit an expansion of clones harbouring del(8p) with additional driver mutations (EP300...

  14. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  15. BRAF mutation detection in hairy cell leukaemia from archival haematolymphoid specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carla; Amanuel, Benhur; Finlayson, Jill; Grieu-Iacopetta, Fabienne; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Erber, Wendy N

    2015-06-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a rare, indolent chronic B-cell leukaemia accounting for approximately 2% of all adult leukaemias. The recent association of the BRAF p.Val600Glu (V600E) mutation in HCL makes it a valuable molecular diagnostic marker. We compared the ability of Sanger sequencing, fluorescent single-strand conformational polymorphism (F-SSCP) and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect BRAF mutations in 20 cases of HCL consisting of four archival Romanowsky stained air-dried peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate smears, 12 mercury fixed decalcified bone marrow trephine biopsies, three formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) splenectomy samples and one fresh peripheral blood sample. DNA was amplified and BRAF mutation status determined by the three methods above. V600E mutation was identified in 94%, 89% and 72% of HCL cases by F-SSCP, HRM and Sanger sequencing, respectively. In one case, in addition to the p.Val600Glu mutation, a p.Lys601Thr (K601T) mutation was identified. DNA from archival slide scrapings, mercury-fixed and FFPE tissue can be used to identify BRAF mutations with high sensitivity, especially using HRM/F-SSCP. The V600E mutation can be used as a supplementary molecular marker to aid in the diagnosis of HCL and the presence of the mutation may provide a target for therapy. PMID:25938346

  16. The 1957 MRC report on leukaemia and aplastic anaemia in patients irradiated for ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimation of the carcinogenic effects of exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has depended primarily on extrapolation from effects seen in two populations exposed to relatively high doses-the survivors of the atomic bomb explosions in Japan and patients treated in the UK with x-rays for the arthritic condition ankylosing spondylitis. The study of the leukaemia risk in over 14000 irradiated spondylitis patients was completed in an astonishingly short period of time in the mid-1950s. The full report of the original study has been difficult to access because it was not published in a journal but only as a Special Report of the UK Medical Research Council. To mark 50 years since this publication this full report is reproduced in this issue of the Journal. This accompanying review describes the background to the study, the principal findings and the further follow-up of the population that documented the risks of cancers in addition to leukaemia associated with the x-ray treatment. The architects of the study were a radiobiologist, Michael Court-Brown, and an epidemiologist, Richard Doll. Their very productive study of the leukaemia risk among spondylitics spawned a lifelong collaboration including further seminal studies of the carcinogenic effects of radiation exposure, which are also summarised in the review. (review)

  17. Breaking bad news--parents' experience of learning that their child has leukaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Oshea, J

    2012-02-03

    This study aimed to seek parents\\' experiences of how they learned their child had leukaemia and therefore identify ways of improving this process. To achieve this task a questionnaire was designed to ask parents about specific elements of the initial interview and give them opportunity to add their thoughts and feelings on the subject. All children with a diagnosis of leukaemia over an eighteen-year period were identified and parents of those children still alive were invited to partake in the study. 49 out of 50 families agreed to participate of which 35 (72%) returned completed questionnaires. The majority 29 (83%) expressed overall satisfaction. Their replies confirmed some findings of previous studies, and also offered some new insights. Examples of new findings or expansion on previous findings include observations on the presence of young children at the initial interview; the importance of the language used in conveying the diagnosis and prognostic information, and a preference for actuarial terms when discussing prognosis. Telling parents their child has leukaemia is a challenging and important task. The experience of parents gives us valuable insights into our own communication skills and highlights areas of possible improvement in this difficult area.

  18. Demonstration of cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens in acute leukaemia using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, N; van der Plas, D; Praxedes, M; Morilla, R; Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To detect cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens using flow cytometry in acute leukaemia and to use this technique for double marker combinations. METHODS--Cytoplasmic staining was carried out in samples from 40 cases of acute leukaemia with monoclonal antibodies against the myeloid antigen CD13, the lymphoid antigens CD3, CD22, mu chain and the enzymes terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The cells were fixed with paraformaldehyde and permeabilised with Tween 20 and Becton Dickinson's FACS lysing solution. Flow cytometry results were compared in the same cases with immunocytochemistry results using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase method. RESULTS--The gentle permeabilisation induced by this method permitted preservation of the membrane antigens and the size and morphology of the cells. The results using flow cytometry were comparable with those obtained using immunocytochemistry, with nearly complete concordance in most cases. CONCLUSIONS--This technique is simple, rapid, sensitive and reproducible and it is suitable for double staining procedures, such as nuclear and cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane, or cytoplasmic and membrane. It therefore provides a powerful tool for extending the use of immunophenotyping for the diagnosis and follow up of acute leukaemia. It could also be used for the investigation of minimal residual disease. PMID:7962655

  19. Total lymphoid irradiation preceding bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between August 1985 and October 1987 35 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) were treated by high dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation (TBI) (1000 or 1200 cGy, n=31) and total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) (800 or 600 cGy, n=35) preceding allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both TBI and TLI were given at 200 cGy/fraction. Twenty-three patients had HLA-identical sibling donors, nine patients had HLA-matched but unrelated donors, and three partially HLA-mismatched donors. Twenty-two patients received T-cell depleted marrow. TLI did not add greatly to the toxicity. Four patients had recurrent leukaemia before engraftment was evaluable. The other 31 patients engrafted and no graft failed. Twenty-two patients survive at a median time from transplant of 305 days (range 81-586 days). Fourteen have no evidence of disease; eight have or had only cytogenetic evidence of leukaemia. It is concluded that addition of TLI to pretransplant immunosuppression increases the probability of reliable engraftment in patients receiving T-cell depleted marrow. This is not associated with significantly increased toxicity. (author)

  20. Distinctive patterns of microRNA expression associated with karyotype in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Dixon-McIver

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is the most common acute leukaemia in adults; however, the genetic aetiology of the disease is not yet fully understood. A quantitative expression profile analysis of 157 mature miRNAs was performed on 100 AML patients representing the spectrum of known karyotypes common in AML. The principle observation reported here is that AMLs bearing a t(15;17 translocation had a distinctive signature throughout the whole set of genes, including the up regulation of a subset of miRNAs located in the human 14q32 imprinted domain. The set included miR-127, miR-154, miR-154*, miR-299, miR-323, miR-368, and miR-370. Furthermore, specific subsets of miRNAs were identified that provided molecular signatures characteristic of the major translocation-mediated gene fusion events in AML. Analysis of variance showed the significant deregulation of 33 miRNAs across the leukaemic set with respect to bone marrow from healthy donors. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation analysis using miRNA-specific locked nucleic acid (LNA probes on cryopreserved patient cells confirmed the results obtained by real-time PCR. This study, conducted on about a fifth of the miRNAs currently reported in the Sanger database (microrna.sanger.ac.uk, demonstrates the potential for using miRNA expression to sub-classify cancer and suggests a role in the aetiology of leukaemia.

  1. Childhood Obesity. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Liane M.

    In this discussion of childhood obesity, the medical and psychological problems associated with the condition are noted. Childhood obesity most likely results from an interaction of nutritional, psychological, familial, and physiological factors. Three factors--the family, low-energy expenditure, and heredity--are briefly examined. Early…

  2. Reframing Early Childhood Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamopoulos, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Rapid changes in Australian education have intensified the role of early childhood leaders and led to unprecedented challenges. The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2011), mandated Australian "National Quality Framework" (NQF) for Early Childhood Education & Care (DEEWR, 2010b) and the "National Early Years Learning Framework" (EYLF) (DEEWR, 2009)…

  3. Medical Research Council leukaemia trial--UKALL V: an attempt to reduce the immunosuppressive effects of therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Report to the Council by the Working Party on Leukaemia in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessells, J M; Durrant, J; Hardy, R M; Richards, S

    1986-12-01

    The Medical Research Council UKALL V trial for children with standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (aged 1 to 14 years, leucocyte count less than 20 X 10(9)/L) was designed to determine whether the immunosuppressive effects of treatment could be reduced without sacrifice of antileukemic effect by alterations in the type of continuing therapy or in fractionation of cranial irradiation. Remission was achieved in 496 children on standard induction therapy, and 309 children received 24 Gy of cranial irradiation in ten to 16 fractions over 21 days, and 174 received 21 Gy in five to nine fractions over 21 days. The type of radiotherapy administered had no influence on relapse at any site or rate of death in remission. All 496 children were randomized to receive chemotherapy for 2 or 3 years with 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate either as a continuous (group C) or a semicontinuous (group G) regimen or as a five-day pulse every 3 weeks (group I). All groups also received vincristine and prednisolone every 6 weeks. With a minimum follow-up of almost 7 years, patients in group I had significantly fewer remission deaths (P = .025) but a much higher rate of bone marrow relapse than those in group C or G (P = .002). There was an overall benefit for 3 years of chemotherapy compared with 2 years, which in contrast to previous studies, was more apparent in girls and in patients in groups C and G. Testicular relapse occurred in 37 boys, including 19 patients off therapy, with a previously negative biopsy. The overall results confirmed the prognostic significance of initial leucocyte count, even among these standard-risk patients, while girls had a superior rate of disease-free survival, but not of hematologic remission. It is concluded that, even among standard-risk patients, the prognosis is influenced by the height of the initial leukocyte count. While alterations in the fractionation of cranial irradiation do not appear to have influenced disease-free survival, intermittent continuing chemotherapy, although less immunosuppressive, is less effective than conventional continuous therapy in the treatment of ALL. In this study, 3 years of chemotherapy appeared superior to 2 years. PMID:3537216

  4. Childhood trauma and childhood urbanicity in relation to psychotic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Frissen, Aleida; Lieverse, Ritsaert; Drukker, Marjan; van Winkel, Ruud; Delespaul, Philippe; [...

    2015-01-01

    Background Urban upbringing and childhood trauma are both associated with psychotic disorders. However, the association between childhood urbanicity and childhood trauma in psychosis is poorly understood. The urban environment could occasion a background of social adversity against which any effect of childhood trauma increases. Also, any impact of the urban environment on likelihood of exposure to childhood trauma could be stronger in children who later develop psychotic disorder. The aim of...

  5. Childhood trauma and childhood urbanicity in relation to psychotic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Frissen, Aleida; Lieverse, Ritsaert; Drukker, Marjan; van Winkel, Ruud; Delespaul, Philippe; Cahn, W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urban upbringing and childhood trauma are both associated with psychotic disorders. However, the association between childhood urbanicity and childhood trauma in psychosis is poorly understood. The urban environment could occasion a background of social adversity against which any effect of childhood trauma increases. Also, any impact of the urban environment on likelihood of exposure to childhood trauma could be stronger in children who later develop psychotic disorder. The aim o...

  6. EDRP public local inquiry, UKAEA/BNFL precognition on: Concern about childhood leukaemia in the West of Scotland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date relating to the West of Scotland Cancer Registry Region, comprising 26 local government districts and containing 4 nuclear installations, are presented. The data relate to children aged 0-14 years. (UK)

  7. Genome‐wide analysis of cytogenetic aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1‐positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borst, Louise; Wesolowska, Agata; Joshi, Tejal;

    2012-01-01

    , and gains of 10 and 21) seemed independent of each other. Finally, we identified the most common regions with recurrent gains and losses, which comprise microRNA clusters with known oncogenic or tumour‐suppressive roles. The present study sheds further light on the genetic diversity of ETV6/RUNX1‐positive...

  8. ZEB2 drives immature T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia development via enhanced tumour-initiating potential and IL-7 receptor signalling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Goossens (Steven); E. Radaelli (Enrico); O. Blanchet (Odile); K. Durinck (Kaat); J. van der Meulen (Joni); S. Peirs (Sofie); T. Taghon (Tom); C.S. Tremblay (Cedric S.); M. Costa (Magdaline); M.F. Ghahremani; J. De Medts (Jelle); S. Bartunkova (Sonia); K. Haigh (Katharina); C. Schwab (Claire); N. Farla (Natalie); T. Pieters (Tim); F. Matthijssens (Filip); N. van Roy (Nadine); J.A. Best (J. Adam); K. Deswarte (Kim); P. Bogaert (Pieter); C. Carmichael (Catherine); A. Rickard (Adam); S. Suryani (Santi); L.S. Bracken (Lauryn S.); R. Alserihi (Raed); K. Canté-Barrett (Kirsten); L. Haenebalcke (Lieven); E. Clappier; P. Rondou (Pieter); K. Slowicka (Karolina); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); A.W. Goldrath (Ananda W.); V. Janzen (Viktor); M.P. McCormack (Matthew P.); R.B. Lock (Richard B.); D.J. Curtis (David J.); C.J. Harrison (Christine); G. Berx (Geert); F. Speleman (Franki); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules); J. Soulier (Jean); P. van Vlierberghe (Pieter); K. Haigh (Katharina)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractEarly T-cell precursor leukaemia (ETP-ALL) is a high-risk subtype of human leukaemia that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we report translocations targeting the zinc finger E-box-binding transcription factor ZEB2 as a recurrent genetic lesion in immature/ETP-ALL. Using

  9. Childhood cancer in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Mariana; Hendricks, Marc; Davidson, Alan; Stefan, Cristina D; van Eyssen, Ann L; Uys, Ronelle; van Zyl, Anel; Hesseling, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The majority of children with cancer live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with little or no access to cancer treatment. The purpose of the paper is to describe the current status of childhood cancer treatment in Africa, as documented in publications, dedicated websites and information collected through surveys. Successful twinning programmes, like those in Malawi and Cameroon, as well as the collaborative clinical trial approach of the Franco-African Childhood Cancer Group (GFAOP), provide good models for childhood cancer treatment. The overview will hopefully influence health-care policies to facilitate access to cancer care for all children in Africa. PMID:24214130

  10. Childhood CT scans and cancer risk: impact of predisposing factors for cancer on the risk estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journy, N; Roué, T; Cardis, E; Le Pointe, H Ducou; Brisse, H; Chateil, J-F; Laurier, D; Bernier, M-O

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the role of cancer predisposing factors (PFs) on the associations between paediatric computed tomography (CT) scan exposures and subsequent risk of central nervous system (CNS) tumours and leukaemia. A cohort of children who underwent a CT scan in 2000-2010 in 23 French radiology departments was linked with the national childhood cancers registry and national vital status registry; information on PFs was retrieved through hospital discharge databases. In children without PF, hazard ratios of 1.07 (95% CI 0.99-1.10) for CNS tumours (15 cases) and 1.16 (95% CI 0.77-1.27) for leukaemia (12 cases) were estimated for each 10 mGy increment in CT x-rays organ doses. These estimates were similar to those obtained in the whole cohort. In children with PFs, no positive dose-risk association was observed, possibly related to earlier non-cancer mortality in this group. Our results suggest a modifying effect of PFs on CT-related cancer risks, but need to be confirmed by longer follow-up and other studies. PMID:26878249

  11. Child leukaemia and low frequency electromagnetic fields; Les leucemies de l'enfant et les champs electromagnetiques basse frequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavel, J.

    2009-07-01

    The author discusses the possible causes of child leukaemia: exposure to natural ionizing radiation (notably radon), to pesticides, and to hydrocarbons emitted by road traffic. Some studies suggested that an inadequate reaction of the immune system to an ordinary infection could result in leukaemia. Other factors are suspected, notably extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields, the influence of which is then discussed by the author. She evokes and discusses results of different investigations on this topic which have been published since the end of the 1970's. It appears that a distance less than 50 meters from high voltage lines or the vicinity of transformation stations may double the risk of child leukaemia

  12. Obstructive Jaundice Due to a Pancreatic Mass: A Rare Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in an Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin Varghese Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context To highlight a rare presentation of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Case report A 39-year-old man presented with a 4 month history of weight loss and a 6 week history of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back with nausea and vomiting. Liver function tests showed an obstructive picture, full blood count was normal and on computerised tomography there was diffuse enlargement of the pancreas, with dilatation of the common bile duct and intra hepatic biliary radicles. Four weeks after presenting, the white cell count became elevated with blasts on the blood film and bone marrow biopsy revealed a precursor B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. After induction chemotherapy his jaundice resolved, the pancreatic mass reduced in size and he is now in a complete remission. Conclusion Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may mimic common causes of a pancreatic mass such as adenocarcinoma and should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis when atypical features are present.

  13. A review of epidemiological studies concerning leukaemia and lymphoma among young people and the genetic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review seeks to identify consistent patterns of results between 30 epidemiological studies of low dose parental exposure to radiation and leukaemia etc. in their offspring. Eight of the studies show significant increases in leukaemia but most are unreliable because they have flawed methodologies and several analyse the same basic data. Two studies free from major criticism do show an association with parental irradiation but both contain data from Seascale and are not independent. Two well conducted studies based on other areas (Canada and Scotland) are claimed by their authors to have sufficient statistical power to test the Seascale findings and do not confirm an association with paternal irradiation. It is concluded that there is little reliable evidence from epidemiological studies for a causal association between pre-conception, paternal or maternal, irradiation and an increase in the frequency of leukaemia or malignancies among offspring. (author)

  14. Cardiovascular Conditions of Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This childhood illness can result in long-term heart complications. Learn the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment for Kawasaki disease. Rheumatic Fever This inflammatory infection can occur after strep ...

  15. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Ga. were the first three We Can! cities. Obesity Research: A New Approach The percentage of children ...

  16. Childhood Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get the ... See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of age ...

  17. Childhood vitiligo: Treatment paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrinder Jit Kanwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood vitiligo differs from the adults by showing a higher incidence in females, segmental vitiligo being more common and less frequent association with other systemic autoimmune and endocrine disorders.Childhood vitiligo is often associated with a marked psychosocial and long lasting effect on the self-esteem of the affected children and their parents, hence an adequate treatment is very essential. Treatment of vitiligo is indeed a tough challenge for the dermatologists′ more so in the background of childhood vitiligo. Although multiple therapeutic modalities are available in the therapeutic armamentarium, not all can be used in children. This brief report updates regarding various therapies available in the treatment of childhood vitiligo.

  18. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  19. Tooth decay - early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ribeiro NM, Ribeiro MA. Breastfeeding and early childhood caries: a critical review. J Pediatr (Rio J) . 2004;80:S199-S210. Sexton S, Natale R. Risks and benefits of pacifiers. Am Fam Physician . 2009; ...

  20. Early Childhood Caries

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashita, Yumiko; Kitamura, Masayasu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most common childhood diseases, and people continue to be susceptible to it throughout their lives. Although dental caries can be arrested and potentially even reversed in its early stages, it is often not self-limiting and progresses without proper care until the tooth is destroyed. Early childhood caries (ECC) is often complicated by inappropriate feeding practices and heavy infection with mutans streptococci. Such children should be targeted with a professional ...

  1. Endobronchial tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endobronchial tumours are rare in childhood and are not often considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent pneumonitis and atelectasis. We present the clinical and radiological features of seven cases of childhood bronchial 'adenoma' seen at our hospital over a 16-year period. Because they are relatively slow growing, prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment offer the best chance of cure in these patients. A review of the literature is given

  2. Abdominal MRI in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI provides diagnostic information in multiple abdominal diseases in childhood. Additional information to sonographic findings can be achieved in the diagnosis of abdominal malformation as well as in several inflammatory processes. In childhood cancer imaging MRI is essential at the beginning as well as during therapy to assess response to therapy. Because of radiation protection MRI has to replace CT in abdominal imaging in children. Some technical details have to be considered when children are examined. (orig.)

  3. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (MHP) is extremely rare in childhood. Mean age at diagnosis is between 38 and 43 years. We present an 8-year-old boy with MHP of the middle cranial fossa. Imaging findings were indistinguishable from an aggressive bone tumor such as Ewing's sarcoma. Imaging findings are presented and discussed. Our case indicates that MHP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of skull-base tumors despite the fact that MHP is extremely rare in childhood. (orig.)

  4. Endobronchial tumours in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endobronchial tumours are rare in childhood and are not often considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent pneumonitis and atelectasis. We present the clinical and radiological features of seven cases of childhood bronchial 'adenoma' seen at our hospital over a 16-year period. Because they are relatively slow growing, prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment offer the best chance of cure in these patients. A review of the literature is given. (Copyright (c) Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Fractures in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical diagnosis of fractures in childhood can be very difficult. Therefore imaging, not only x-rays but also ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are of special importance. There are typical pediatric types of fractures due to epiphyseal plates and high flexibility of the bone. Fractures heal faster and dislocations can be spontaneously corrected better but also growth disturbance can occur. The second part of the article describes the special types of fractures with special attention to the characteristics in childhood.

  6. Stress and childhood epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Campen, J.S. van

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood, characterized by the enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. Children with epilepsy and their parents often report seizures precipitated by stress. In order to increase our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of stress on seizures in childhood epilepsy, we performed a variety of studies, which are described in this thesis. In part I we evaluate the extent of stress sensitivi...

  7. Early childhood aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Alink, Lenneke Rosalie Agnes

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the development, stability, and correlates of early childhood aggression were investigated. The normative development was examined in a general population sample using questionnaires completed by the parents of 12-, 24-, and 36-month-old children and again one year later. Results showed an early childhood aggression curve, with increasing rates of aggression in the second year of life and decreasing rates in the fourth year. One-year stabilities were moderate for 12-month-olds ...

  8. Pesticides and childhood cancers.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, J L; Olshan, A.F.; Savitz, D A

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between pesticides and the risk of childhood cancers, epidemiologic studies published between 1970 and 1996 were critically reviewed. Thirty-one studies investigated whether occupational or residential exposure to pesticides by either parents or children was related to increased risk of childhood cancer. In general, the reported relative risk estimates were modest. Risk estimates appeared to be stronger when pesticide exposure was measured in more detail. ...

  9. Childhood Ovarian Malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadik, Kalpana; Ghorpade, Kanchanmala

    2014-01-01

    Objective of this article is to appraise diagnostic aspects and treatment modalities in childhood ovarian tumor in background of available evidence. Literature search on Pubmed revealed various aspects of epidemiology, histopathological diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric ovarian tumor. 85 % of childhood tumors are germ cell tumors. The varied histopathological picture in germ cell tumors poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Immunohistochemistry and newer genetic markers like SALL4...

  10. BoLA antigens are associated with increased frequency of persistent lymphocytosis in bovine leukaemia virus infected cattle and with increased incidence of antibodies to bovine leukaemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stear, M J; Dimmock, C K; Newman, M J; Nicholas, F W

    1988-01-01

    The association between bovine major histocompatibility system (BoLA) type and persistent lymphocytosis in cattle with antibodies to bovine leukaemia virus was examined by comparing antigen frequencies in cattle with persistent lymphocytosis to controls matched for age, sex, breed and presence of antibodies to BLV. The cattle came from nine dairy herds in south-east Queensland, Australia; six herds were Australian Illawarra Shorthorn (AIS), two herds were Jersey and one herd was Friesian. Antigen W6 and Eu28R were more common in cattle with persistent lymphocytosis than in controls. Antigen W8 was less common in AIS cattle with persistent lymphocytosis. A study of 24 offspring from one sire, heterozygous for W10 and Eu28R, showed that offspring inheriting Eu28R from the sire were significantly more likely to have antibodies to BLV than offspring inheriting the opposing W10 haplotype. PMID:2843067

  11. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Denmark. A national population-based retrospective study on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Denmark 1998-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nina; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Klausen, Tobias W;

    2012-01-01

    Since July 2008, children and adults 1-45 years, diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in Denmark have been treated according to the common Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol. To explore whether this strategy will improve survival compared with...... intended treatment, the pEFS(5y) and pOS(5y) were 36·6% and 44·1%, respectively, with a significantly higher pOS(5y) for patients 15-35 years compared with patients 36-65 years (50·7% vs. 38·9%, P = 0·006). Cox multiple regression analysis identified age (Hazard Ratio = 1·7, P ...

  12. Paternal preconceptional radiation exposure in the nuclear industry and leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in young people in Scotland.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinlen, L. J.; Clarke, K; Balkwill, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine if a relation exists between paternal exposure to relatively high levels of radiation in the Scottish nuclear industry and the risk of leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is subsequently conceived children. DESIGN--Matched case-control study with three controls for each case. SETTING--The whole of Scotland. SUBJECTS--The fathers of 1024 children with leukaemia and 237 children with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma diagnosed in Scotland below the age of 25 among those born in Sc...

  13. Evolution of resistance to Aurora kinase B inhibitors in leukaemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy W Failes

    Full Text Available Aurora kinase inhibitors are new mitosis-targeting drugs currently in clinical trials for the treatment of haematological and solid malignancies. However, knowledge of the molecular factors that influence sensitivity and resistance remains limited. Herein, we developed and characterised an in vitro leukaemia model of resistance to the Aurora B inhibitor ZM447439. Human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells, CCRF-CEM, were selected for resistance in 4 µM ZM447439. CEM/AKB4 cells showed no cross-resistance to tubulin-targeted and DNA-damaging agents, but were hypersensitive to an Aurora kinase A inhibitor. Sequencing revealed a mutation in the Aurora B kinase domain corresponding to a G160E amino acid substitution. Molecular modelling of drug binding in Aurora B containing this mutation suggested that resistance is mediated by the glutamate substitution preventing formation of an active drug-binding motif. Progression of resistance in the more highly selected CEM/AKB8 and CEM/AKB16 cells, derived sequentially from CEM/AKB4 in 8 and 16 µM ZM447439 respectively, was mediated by additional defects. These defects were independent of Aurora B and multi-drug resistance pathways and are associated with reduced apoptosis mostly likely due to reduced inhibition of the catalytic activity of aurora kinase B in the presence of drug. Our findings are important in the context of the use of these new targeted agents in treatment regimes against leukaemia and suggest resistance to therapy may arise through multiple independent mechanisms.

  14. PCR-based clonality assessment in patients with lymphocytic leukaemias: a single-institution experience

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bojana M. Cikota; Ljiljana J. Tukić; Olivera T. Tarabar; Dragana T. Stamatović; Marija N. Elez; Zvonko M. Magić

    2009-12-01

    PCR-based clonality testing can be performed in all lymphoproliferations by analysing gene rearrangements of antigen receptors, rearrangements that are unique for each kind of lymphocyte. Reactive lymphoproliferations have polyclonally rearranged Ig/TCR genes, whereas malignant proliferations (leukaemias and lymphomas) show clonal rearrangements. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical benefits of clonality testing with previously evaluated consensus primers in leukaemia patients. The study included peripheral blood and bone marrow samples of 67 leukaemia patients (32 B-CLL, 24 B-ALL and 11 T-ALL). Clonality testing was based on PCR amplification of rearranged I$_{\\text{gH}}$ and TCR genes. During diagnosis, monoclonal pattern was found in all analysed B-CLL and T-ALL samples. Testing in B-ALL patients showed positive results in all bone marrow and one peripheral blood samples. Results of clonality testing in B-CLL patients during follow-up were concordant between peripheral blood and bone marrow. Obtained results corresponded to clinical course in all but one patient. In B-ALL group, results of molecular testing in peripheral blood and bone marrow confirmed remission estimated according to clinical criteria in all except one patient. Before any clinical sign of relapse, monoclonal pattern was found in six/seven patients by bone marrow and in three/seven patients by peripheral blood analysis, respectively. Results of molecular monitoring in T-ALL patients did not confirme clinical evaluation in two patients. Obtained results indicate high accuracy of re-evaluated primers for clonality assessment in ALL and CLL patients at the time of diagnosis. Results of clonality testing in B-ALL patients indicate that bone marrow analysis has higher sensitivity compared to analysis of peripheral blood.

  15. Abscopal induction of leukaemia and osteosarcoma following administration of alpha-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, B.I. (Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    Alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides can induce leukaemia and/ or osteosarcoma in mice. Furthermore, plutonium-239, given to male mice before mating with normal females, while not directly leading to leukaemia in the progeny does lead to enhanced susceptibility to leukaemogenic agents. In the first case, the amounts of radionuclide are very small in experimental terms; and zero in the case of transgenerational activity. In both cases, the development of the disorders is remote in time and location relative to that of the contaminating radionuclide, making interpretation of the mechanisms and estimation of radiation risk problematic. It is necessary, then, to address questions involving the basis of haemopoiesis itself. Cellular kinetics of the development of blood from the pluripotent stem cells to the mature functional cells are outlined, describing compensatory proliferation mechanisms and extensive movement of cells throughout the marrow space. The locations of potential oncogenic target cells are identified and the nature of the stromal microenvironment that regulates haemopoiesis is defined. Plutonium-239, given to male mice, targets spermatogenesis at the stem cell level leaving unidentified damage that is inherited by his offspring. This leaves the offspring susceptible to a leukaemogenic agent encountered later in life. The characteristics of this, corroborated by consideration of the cellular kinetics, are of an inherited genomic instability. Cells of the microenvronment, inheriting the same genetic damage, probably act in the role of an enhancing 'bystander'. In adult mice, the mechanisms are different. Bone turnover results in radioactivity being gradually transported through the marrow by long-lived macrophages. A model based on temporal microdistributions of activity, defining specific target cell regions, is able to illustrate that considering bone marrow as a uniform mass of cells is inadequate to describe the observed

  16. Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-irradiation used for systemic radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for high-risk leukaemia and lymphoma. In bone marrow-selective radioimmunotherapy, beta-irradiation is applied using iodine-131, yttrium-90 or rhenium-188 labelled radioimmunoconjugates. However, the mechanisms by which beta-irradiation induces cell death are not understood at the molecular level. Here, we report that beta-irradiation induced apoptosis and activated apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells depending on doses, time points and dose rates. After beta-irradiation, upregulation of CD95 ligand and CD95 receptor was detected and activation of caspases resulting in apoptosis was found. These effects were completely blocked by the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. In addition, irradiation-mediated mitochondrial damage resulted in perturbation of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-9 activation and cytochrome c release. Bax, a death-promoting protein, was upregulated and Bcl-xL, a death-inhibiting protein, was downregulated. We also found higher apoptosis rates and earlier activation of apoptosis pathways after gamma-irradiation in comparison to beta-irradiation at the same dose rate. Furthermore, irradiation-resistant cells were cross-resistant to CD95 and CD95-resistant cells were cross-resistant to irradiation, indicating that CD95 and irradiation used, at least in part, identical effector pathways. These findings demonstrate that beta-irradiation induces apoptosis and activates apoptosis pathways in leukaemia cells using both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. Understanding the timing, sequence and molecular pathways of beta-irradiation-mediated apoptosis may allow rational adjustment of chemo- and radiotherapeutic strategies. (orig.)

  17. Site- and allele-specific polycomb dysregulation in T-cell leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro, Jean-Marc; Touzart, Aurore; Pradel, Lydie C.; Loosveld, Marie; Koubi, Myriam; Fenouil, Romain; Le Noir, Sandrine; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Morgado, Ester; Gregoire, Claude; Jaeger, Sebastien; Mamessier, Emilie; Pignon, Charles; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Malissen, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (T-ALL) are aggressive malignant proliferations characterized by high relapse rates and great genetic heterogeneity. TAL1 is amongst the most frequently deregulated oncogenes. Yet, over half of the TAL1+ cases lack TAL1 lesions, suggesting unrecognized (epi)genetic deregulation mechanisms. Here we show that TAL1 is normally silenced in the T-cell lineage, and that the polycomb H3K27me3-repressive mark is focally diminished in TAL1+ T-ALLs. Sequencing reve...

  18. Splenic Trapping of Heat-Treated Erythrocytes in Leukaemia and Allied Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a trial to find whether or not the enlarged spleen plays a role in the production of the form of anaemia commonly encountered in leukaemias and allied conditions, 44 patients suffering from these disease states were studied using 51Cr-labelled erythrocytes heated at 50°C for 60 min. Cells altered in this manner have been shown by various workers to be selectively sequestered by the spleen. As a control, the test was performed on 24 normal subjects. In these normals, the disappearance half-time of radioactivity from the circulation (T½ amounted to 172 ± 69 min (mean ± 1 S.D.), the lowest limit being 74 min. Accordingly, patients with less than 74 min were considered to have an abnormally rapid disappearance of heat-treated erythrocytes from the circulation and consequently exaggerated splenic sequestration of these altered cells. Splenic trapping of heat-treated erythrocytes was most marked in acute leukaemia (four out of six patients). However, three had associated normoblastic hypoplasia of the sternal marrow. Corticosteroids induced a remission with reversion of both processes responsible for the anaemia in two out of the four patients. In chronic myeloid leukaemia, exaggerated splenic sequestration of altered cells was seen in four of the 15 cases examined. This condition was of extra-erythrocytic origin, since repetition of the test using normal donor heat-treated erythrocytes did not significantly alter the disappearance half-time. However, there was no correlation between the size of the spleen and its avidity for trapping the altered cells. Follow-up studies showed that therapy caused prolongation of the half-time of heat-treated erythrocytes, the effect being more apparent after corticosteroids than with X-rays or Endoxan, In Hodgkin’s disease, increased red cell trapping was observed in two out of the seven patients studied. In contrast, five cases of chronic lymphatic leukaemia, six lymphosarcoma and five reticulum cell sarcoma had normal

  19. [Dasatinib. A novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, I.H.; Stentoft, J.; Hasselbalch, H.C.;

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia is characterized by an abnormal tyrosin kinase in the cytoplasm of the clonal cells. The enzyme is derived from a fusion gene on the Philadelphia-chromosome, evolved by a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. Understanding the biology of the tyrosin kinase led to t...... targeted therapy, inhibiting the ATP-binding site by a small molecule--imatinib (Glivec). A novel 2nd generation tyrosin kinase inhibitor--dasatinib (Sprycel)--is now available in cases of insufficient response or intolerance to imatinib Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/28...

  20. A Clinicopathological Correlation of Acute Leukaemias in relation to Immunophenotyping and Cytogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Pazhayanur Venkateswaran

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leukemia accounts for 0.15 – 0.6% of the total medical admissions in many general hospitals in India. Frequency of leukemia seen in India of Acute Myeloid leukaemia (AML is 20 - 25% and Acute Lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is 15-25%. The Annual incidence rate of AML and ALL are 5.6 and 30.9 per million population respectively. Aims: To study the clinicopathological correlation in Acute myeloid and Acute Lymphoblastic leukaemias in relation to immunophenotyping and cytogenetics. Materials & Methods: All newly diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukaemia that presented to our hospital from January 2007 to July 2009 were included in this study. The peripheral blood and bone marrow were tested for surface membrane, cytoplasmic and nuclear antigens and were classified by the French-American- British (FAB Cooperative Group Classification by using Romanowsky (Leishman and May Grunwald Giemsa[MGG] stained smears and cytochemical stains. Results & Summary: A series of available 100 cases of Acute Leukemia diagnosed during a period of 30 months (January 2007 to July 2009 were reviewed and various clinical, biochemical, immunophenotypic and cytogenetic parameters were assessed. 88 cases were subject to immunophenotyping and 60 cases were subject to cytogenetic analysis either by conventional Karyotyping, FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization and RT-PCR (Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The antigen expressions by immunophenotype in acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias were compared with age, Haemoglobin, Total WBC count, Platelet counts, Lactate dehydrogenase levels and abnormal karyotypes. Analytical statistics showed a significant correlation in the expressions of CD13, CD33, CD117 and CD64 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and CD10, CD19, CD20 and CD22 in Acute Lymphoblastic leukemia and the expressions of CD13/CD117, CD3/CD10/CD22,CD3/CD5/CD2 and CD117/CD11c were related to the age, Haemoglobin, WBC count and Lactate