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Sample records for childhood acute myeloid

  1. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Cardiac function in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarfelt, Marianne; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Glosli, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We report cardiac function of patients treated for Childhood acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy only according to three consecutive Nordic protocols. METHODS: Ninety-eight of 138 eligible patients accepted examination with standardized echocardiography. Results were compared...

  3. Definition of Cure in Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Inaba, Hiroto; Leung, Wing; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Campana, Dario; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Background A better understanding of when cure can be declared in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) would reduce anxiety and improve quality of life of AML survivors. We determined the likelihood of patients with AML to maintain long-term remission after completion of therapy. Patients and Methods The cumulative risk of relapse, time to relapse, event-free survival and overall survival were analyzed for 604 patients with AML enrolled in seven successive clinical trials, divided into 3 treatment eras (1976–1991, 1991–1997, 2002–2008). Results The median time to relapse did not change over time (0.93 years vs. 0.76 vs. 0.8 years for each consecutive era, P = .22) but the risk of relapse decreased significantly (5-year cumulative incidence of relapse 52.6% ± 3.1% vs. 31.5% ± 3.9% vs. 22.0% ± 3.0%, P < .001). Among patients who were in remission 4 years from diagnosis, the probabilities of relapse were 1.7%, 2.9%, and 0.9%, respectively. In the most recent era, all 44 relapses except one occurred within four years of diagnosis. Conclusion Children with AML who are treated with contemporary therapy and remain in remission four years from diagnosis are likely cured. Although late relapses and late deaths from other causes are rare, long-term follow up of survivors is necessary for timely management of late adverse effects. PMID:24798038

  4. Somatic PTPN11 mutations in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Marco; Martinelli, Simone; Iavarone, Ivano; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Spinelli, Monica; Giarin, Emanuela; Petrangeli, Valentina; Carta, Claudio; Masetti, Riccardo; Aricò, Maurizio; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Sorcini, Mariella; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    Somatic mutations in PTPN11, the gene encoding the transducer SHP-2, have emerged as a novel class of lesions that upregulate RAS signalling and contribute to leukaemogenesis. In a recent study of 69 children and adolescents with de novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), we documented a non-random distribution of PTPN11 mutations among French-American-British (FAB) subtypes. Lesions were restricted to FAB-M5 cases, where they were relatively common (four of 12 cases). Here, we report on the results of a molecular screening performed on 181 additional unselected patients, enrolled in participating institutions of the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica-AML Study Group, to provide a more accurate picture of the prevalence, spectrum and distribution of PTPN11 mutations in childhood AML and to investigate their clinical relevance. We concluded that PTPN11 defects do not represent a frequent event in this heterogeneous group of malignancies (4.4%), although they recur in a considerable percentage of patients with FAB-M5 (18%). PTPN11 lesions rarely occur in other subtypes. Within the FAB-M5 group no clear association of PTPN11 mutations with any clinical variable was evident. Nearly two third of the patients with this subtype were found to harbour an activating mutation in PTPN11, NRAS, KRAS2 or FLT3.

  5. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  6. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  7. Favorable prognostic impact of NPM1 gene mutations in childhood acute myeloid leukemia, with emphasis on cytogenetically normal AML.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, I.H.; Zwaan, C.M.; Zimmermann, M.; Arentsen-Peters, T.C.; Pieters, R.; Cloos, J.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Graaf, S.S.N. de; Harbott, J.; Creutzig, U.; Reinhardt, D.; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den; Thiede, C.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations occur frequently in adult cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) and confer favorable outcome. We investigated the frequency and prognostic significance of NPM1 mutations in childhood AML (n=298), specifically focusing on the CN-AML subgroup (n=100). Mu

  8. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  9. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  10. The frequency of NPM1 mutations in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamolegou Kalliopi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the nucleophosmin (NPM1 gene have been solely associated with childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. We evaluated the frequency of NPM1 mutations in childhood AML, their relation to clinical and cytogenetic features and the presence of common FLT3 and RAS mutations. Results NPM1 mutations were found in 8% of cases. They involved the typical type 'A' mutation and one novel mutation characterized by two individual base pair substitutions, which resulted in 2 amino acid changes (W290 and (S293 in the NPM protein. FLT3/ITD mutations were observed in 12% of the cases and in one NPM1-mutated case bearing also t(8;21 (q22;q22. No common RAS mutations were identified. Conclusions A relatively consistent NPM1 mutation rate was observed, but with variations in types of mutations. The role of different types of NPM1 mutations, either individually or in the presence of other common gene mutations may be essential for childhood AML prognosis.

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  13. Pubertal development and fertility in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Skou, Anne-Sofie; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings.......More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings....

  14. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Residual disease detected by flow cytometry is an independent predictor of survival in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia; results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierens, Anne; Bjørklund, Elizabeth; Siitonen, Sanna;

    2016-01-01

    Early response after induction is a prognostic factor for disease outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Residual disease (RD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) was performed at day 15 and before consolidation therapy in 101 patients enrolled in the Nordic Society...

  18. Renal, gastrointestinal, and hepatic late effects in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only--a NOPHO-AML study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Anne-Sofie; Glosli, Heidi; Jahnukainen, Kirsi;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the spectrum, frequency, and risk factors for renal, gastrointestinal, and hepatic late adverse effects in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without relapse treated with chemotherapy alone according to three consecutive AML trials by the Nordic Society...... with chemotherapy only experienced few renal, gastrointestinal, and hepatic late effects....

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  20. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. High resolution melting curve analysis, a rapid and affordable method for mutation analysis in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin eLiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetic alterations with prognostic significance have been described in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The aim of this study was to establish cost-effective techniques to detect mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1, and a partial tandem duplication within the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-PTD genes in childhood AML. Procedure: Ninety-nine children with newly diagnosed AML were included in this study. We developed a fluoresent dye SYTO-82 based high resolution melting curve (HRM anaylsis to detect FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD, FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations. MLL-PTD was screened by real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The HRM methodology correlated well with gold standard Sanger sequencing with less cost. Among the 99 patients studied, the FLT3-ITD mutation was associated with significantly worse event free survival (EFS. Patients with the NPM1 mutation had significantly better EFS and overall survival. However, HRM was not sensitive enough for minimal residual disease monitoring. Conclusions: HRM was a rapid and efficient method for screening of FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations. It was both affordable and accurate, especially in resource underprivileged regions. Our results indicated that HRM could be a useful clinical tool for rapid and cost effective screening of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in AML patients.

  2. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  5. Quality of health in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only: A NOPHO-AML study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Glosli, Heidi; Jahnukainen, Kirsi;

    2011-01-01

    More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors, and approximately 50% are cured with chemotherapy only. Limited data exist about their long-term morbidity and social outcomes. The aim of the study was to compare the self-reported use of health care services...

  6. Quality of health in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only: A NOPHO-AML study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Glosli, Heidi; Jahnukainen, Kirsi;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors, and approximately 50% are cured with chemotherapy only. Limited data exist about their long-term morbidity and social outcomes. The aim of the study was to compare the self-reported use of health...

  7. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML - Acute... myeloblastic leukaemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemias; Acute... Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelocytic Leukemias; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemias; Acute... granulocytic leukaemia; Acute myeloblastic leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia - category; Acute... myeloid leukaemia, disease; Acute myeloid leukemia; Acute myelo

  8. The clinical importance of myeloid antigen coexpression and TEL-AML1 mutation in patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşen Türedi Yıldırım

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship,if any, between clinical features, prognosis, and thecoexpressions and TEL-AML1 mutation in patients withacute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.Methods: Eigthy-three patients with acute lymphoblasticleukemia were retrospectively examined. Age, gender,White blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count,ALL subtypei (B or T ALL, risk groups, surface antigensdeteceted by flow cytometry, existence of TEL-AML1 mutations,response, remission and relapse status at 8., 15.ve 33. Days of treatment were recorded and analyzed.Results: 15 (18% out of 83 were identified with aberrantantigen expression. Of these patients, twelve (14.4%had myeloid antigen coexpression (CD13 and/or CD33,two with B cell ALL had CD2 and CD7 coexpressions respectively,one with T cell ALL had CD19 coexpression.No significant differences were found between patientswith and without myeloid antigen coexpression in terms ofhemoglobin levels, white blood cells and platelet counts,responses given on the 8th, 15th, and 30th days on the treatment,risk groups, and relapse (p>0.05. Myeloid antigencoexpression was found in 4 of 13 patients who were identifiedwith TEL-AML1 mutation. No significant relationshipwas found between this mutation and coexpressions. Norelapse and exitus were observed in four patients with coexpressionand TEL-AML1.Conclusion: The prognosis and clinical features showsno statistically significant relationship with the presence ofneither Myeloid antigen expression nor TEL-AML1 mutation.We believe, however, the future studies involving biggersample sizes will prove to be useful in terms of moreconvincing results. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4(1: 90-94Key words: Acute lenfoblastic leukemia, coexpression,TEL-AML1 mutation, prognosis

  9. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Collaborative efforts driving progress in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zwaan (Michel); E.A. Kolb (Edward A.); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); J. Abrahamsson; S. Adachi (Susumu); R. Aplenc (Richard); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. Gibson (Brenda); H. Hasle (Henrik); G. Leverger (Guy); F. Locatelli (Franco); C. Ragu (Christine); R.C. Ribeiro (Raul C.); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); L. Sung (Lillian); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); U. Creutzig; G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, nati

  13. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and int

  14. Novel prognostic subgroups in childhood 11q23/MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia: results of an international retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, Brian V; Raimondi, Susana C; Harbott, Jochen; Zimmermann, Martin; Alonzo, Todd A; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H Berna; Chang, Myron; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael N; Forestier, Erik; Gibson, Brenda; Hasle, Henrik; Harrison, Christine J; Heerema, Nyla A; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Leszl, Anna; Litvinko, Nathalia; Nigro, Luca Lo; Morimoto, Akira; Perot, Christine; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Smith, Franklin O; Stary, Jan; Stasevich, Irina; Strehl, Sabine; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Webb, David; Zemanova, Zuzana; Zwaan, C Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2009-09-17

    Translocations involving chromosome 11q23 frequently occur in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. In most cases, the MLL gene is involved, and more than 50 translocation partners have been described. Clinical outcome data of the 11q23-rearranged subgroups are scarce because most 11q23 series are too small for meaningful analysis of subgroups, although some studies suggest that patients with t(9;11)(p22;q23) have a more favorable prognosis. We retrospectively collected outcome data of 756 children with 11q23- or MLL-rearranged AML from 11 collaborative groups to identify differences in outcome based on translocation partners. All karyotypes were centrally reviewed before assigning patients to subgroups. The event-free survival of 11q23/MLL-rearranged pediatric AML at 5 years from diagnosis was 44% (+/- 5%), with large differences across subgroups (11% +/- 5% to 92% +/- 5%). Multivariate analysis identified the following subgroups as independent prognostic predictors: t(1;11)(q21;q23) (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.1, P = .004); t(6;11)(q27;q23) (HR = 2.2, P < .001); t(10;11)(p12;q23) (HR = 1.5, P = .005); and t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) (HR = 2.5, P = .005). We could not confirm the favorable prognosis of the t(9;11)(p22;q23) subgroup. We identified large differences in outcome within 11q23/MLL-rearranged pediatric AML and novel subgroups based on translocation partners that independently predict clinical outcome. Screening for these translocation partners is needed for accurate treatment stratification at diagnosis.

  15. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed.

  19. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  20. Value of routine bone marrow examination in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) : A study of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, Ilse M. G.; Peek, Annemarie M. L.; de Haas, Valerie; Damen-Korbijn, Carin M.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The outcome of the treatment of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still disappointing, due to relatively high treatment-related mortality and relapse rates (3040%). Past treatment protocols have called for routine screening via bone marrow aspiration (BMA) after achievement of fir

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference [Genetics Home Reference (Conditions)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Acute Myeloid...te myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA Fanconi anemia You may also search Genetics Home Reference for Acut...e Myeloid Leukemia for additional information. Published : October 27, 2014 Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference ...

  2. Cytogenetics of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2009-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for 15-20% of all childhood acute leukemias, while it is responsible for more than half of the leukemic deaths in these patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in pediatric AML supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow-up and treatment selection in childhood AML. It reviews in detail the types and frequencies of most common chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with French American British (FAB) subtypes and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some less frequent or rare chromosome aberrations in which the prognostic classification has not been determined yet owning to the small number of patients and the variable treatment modalities used in different study groups. Furthermore, it discusses the association of specific chromosome rearrangements with prenatal exposure to carcinogenic agents or therapeutic agents and highlights the ongoing and future research on pediatric AML in the evolving field of Cytogenetics.

  3. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Busulfan, Etoposide, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Myeloid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  8. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  13. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  14. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was re...

  15. Azacitidine and Sonidegib or Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant Engl

  17. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  18. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Biemond, Bart J.; Gratwohl, Alois; de Greef, Georgine E.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Gregor, Michael; Theobald, Matthias; Schanz, Urs; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  19. NKAML: A Pilot Study to Determine the Safety and Feasibility of Haploidentical Natural Killer Cell Transplantation in Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Inaba, Hiroto; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Pounds, Stanley; Rooney, Barbara; Bell, Teresa; Pui, Ching-Hon; Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a pilot study to determine the safety, feasibility, and engraftment of haploidentical natural killer (NK) cell infusions after an immunosuppressive regimen in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Ten patients (0.7 to 21 years old) who had completed chemotherapy and were in first complete remission of AML were enrolled on the Pilot Study of Haploidentical Natural Killer Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia (NKAML) study. They received cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg on day −7) and fludarabine (25 mg/m2/d on days −6 through −2), followed by killer immunoglobulin-like receptor–human leukocyte antigen (KIR-HLA) mismatched NK cells (median, 29 × 106/kg NK cells) and six doses of interleukin-2 (1 million U/m2). NK cell chimerism, phenotyping, and functional assays were performed on days 2, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after transplantation. Results All patients had transient engraftment for a median of 10 days (range, 2 to 189 days) and a significant expansion of KIR-mismatched NK cells (median, 5,800/mL of blood on day 14). Nonhematologic toxicity was limited, with no graft-versus-host disease. Median length of hospitalization was 2 days. With a median follow-up time of 964 days (range, 569 to 1,162 days), all patients remain in remission. The 2-year event-free survival estimate was 100% (95% CI, 63.1% to 100%). Conclusion Low-dose immunosuppression followed by donor-recipient inhibitory KIR-HLA mismatched NK cells is well tolerated by patients and results in successful engraftment. We propose to further investigate the efficacy of KIR-mismatched NK cells in a phase II trial as consolidation therapy to decrease relapse without increasing mortality in children with AML. PMID:20085940

  20. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. KEGG DISEASE / Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H00003 Entry H00003Disease Name Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Description Acute.... Category Cancer Brite Human diseases [BR:br08402] Cancers Cancers of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues H00003Acute...atopoietic and related tissue C92Myeloid leukaemia H00003Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Cancer-accociated carb...ohydrates [br08441.html] H00003 Pathway hsa05221Acute myeloid leukemiahsa05202Transcriptional misregulation ... or t(16; 16)(p13, q22), (CBF-beta/MYH11) ICD-O: 9866/3, Tumor type: Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (AML with

  2. Acute hemiplegia in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Takehiko; Takao, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Konishi, Yukuo; Nakano, Shozo (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-04-01

    The results of CT in 100 patients with acute hemiplegia in childhood are reported here. The etiology was various: 2 patients had infratentorial brain tumors, 56 had cerebral vascular diseases, 3 had head injuries, 16 had intracranial infectious diseases, one had postinfectious encephalomyelitis, one had multiple sclerosis, 2 had epilepsy, and the diagnosis of 19 were unknown. Eleven patients had a normal CT and a good prognosis. As for the type of onset, there were patients of type 1 with fever and 42 with convulsions and unconsciousness; those of type 2 with convulsions and unconsciousness were 12, and those of type 3 without fever and convulsions were 46. This classification is assumed to be useful, as the type of onset is characteristic of the etiology. Six patients were diagnosed correctly by repeated examinations, although the first CT did not reveal any remarkable findings. Capsular infarction, occlusion of the posterior cerebral artery in acute hemiplegia in childhood, abnormal findings of the internal capsule, thalamus, and midbrain in a patient with postinfectious encephalomyelitis, and a diffuse low density in the CT of the unilateral hemisphere in the patients with acute encephalopathy and acute hemiplegia of an obscure origin have been found after the introduction of computerized tomography.

  3. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Prolonged remission maintenance in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, A S; Goldman, J M; Catovsky, D; Costello, C; Galton, D A; Pitcher, C S

    1977-08-27

    Twenty-five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia were treated with three quadruple drug combinations in predetermined rotation: TRAP (thioguanine, daunorubicin, cytarabine, prednisolone); COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, prednisolone); and POMP (prednisolone, vincristine, methotrexate, mercaptopurine). Fifteen patients (60%) achieved complete remission and five (20%) partial remission. For maintenance, five-day courses of drugs were administered every 14 to 21 days and doses were increased to tolerance. The median length of complete remission was 66 weeks. In eight patients remission maintenance treatment was discontinued and some remained in complete remission for over two years. In this series the remission induction rate was comparable with that reported for other regimens and complete remission lasted longer with this intensive maintenance regimen than with others. Nevertheless, the TRAP programme must still be regarded as only palliative treatment for acute myeloid leukaemia.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia in the pregnant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mostly occurs in older patients, it could be seen in women of childbearing age. It is therefore not surprising that in some patients, the management of AML will be complicated by a coexistent pregnancy. However, the association of leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000-100,000 pregnancies. During pregnancy, most leukemias are acute: two-thirds are myeloid and one-third are lymphoblastic. There is no standard approach for this clinical dilemma, in part because of variables such as the type of AML, the seriousness of the symptoms, and the patient's personal beliefs. In many cases, the diagnostic workup has to be altered because of the pregnancy, and often available treatments have varying risks to the fetus. While chemotherapy is reported to have some risks during the first trimester, it is admitted that it can be administered safely during the second and the third trimesters.

  6. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Cooperating gene mutations in childhood acute myeloid leukemia with special reference on mutations of ASXL1, TET2, IDH1, IDH2, and DNMT3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Der-Cherng; Liu, Hsi-Che; Yang, Chao-Ping; Jaing, Tang-Her; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hou, Jen-Yin; Huang, Ying-Jung; Shih, Yu-Shu; Huang, Yu-Hui; Lin, Tung-Huei; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2013-04-11

    Gene mutations involving epigenetic regulators recently have been described in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Similar studies are limited in children. We analyzed gene mutations and cooperation in pediatric AML with special reference on mutated epigenetic regulators. Nineteen gene mutations, including 8 class I genes, 4 class II genes, WT1 and TP53 (class III), and 5 epigenetic regulator genes (class IV), were analyzed in 206 children with de novo AML. Mutational analysis was performed with polymerase chain reaction-based assay followed by direct sequencing. One hundred seventeen of 206 patients (56.8%) had at least one mutation: 51% class I, 13% class II, 6.8% class III, and 5.6% class IV. FLT3-internal tandem duplication was most frequent, and 29% of patients had more than one gene mutation. Two patients carried ASXL1 mutations, both with t(8;21), 2 had DNMT3A mutations, 2 had IDH1 mutations, 1 had IDH2 mutation, and 3 had TET2 mutations. Both patients with IDH1 mutations had AML-M0 subtype and MLL-partial tandem duplication. Cooperating mutations with mutated epigenetic regulators were observed in 8 of 10 patients. We conclude that mutated epigenetic regulators were much less than those in adult AML but with frequent cooperating mutations. ASXL1, TET2, and IDH1 mutations were associated with specific genetic subtypes.

  8. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition.

  11. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  12. Liver Involvement with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mathews

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver involvement with acute myeloid leukemia (AML is rarely reported. The majority of published cases suggest a cholestatic picture and obstructive jaundice at presentation. On the contrary, our patient presented with transaminitis without cholestasis. Elevated liver function tests persisted in our patient despite cholecystectomy; however, they normalized with chemotherapy administration, suggesting that AML was the causative effect of the hepatitis-like picture. Our review of the literature revealed that most reported cases of AML with liver involvement had short-lived remissions and an overall ominous prognosis. In our opinion, patients who have liver involvement with AML should be offered alternative investigational therapies with a low hepatic toxicity profile.

  13. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission.

  14. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute ... Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Past treatment for cancer and certain genetic conditions affect the ...

  15. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Emotional Functioning and School Contentment in Adolescent Survivors of Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Infratentorial Astrocytoma, and Wilms Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Jóhannsdóttir, Inga M.; Moum, Torbjørn; Hjermstad, Marianne J.; Wesenberg, Finn; Hjorth, Lars; Schrøder, Henrik; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M.; Jónmundsson, Gudmundur; Loge, Jon H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer in childhood may disrupt normal developmental processes and cause psychosocial problems in adolescent survivors of childhood cancers (ACCSs). Previous studies report inconsistent findings. Study aims were to assess subjective well-being (SWB), psychological distress, and school contentment in survivors of three dissimilar childhood cancers. Patients and methods: Nordic patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), infratentorial astrocytoma (IA), and Wilms tumor (WT) in c...

  17. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  18. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  19. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-na; ZHOU Jin; Jan Jacob Schuringa; Edo Vellenga

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1991 to 2009.Study selection Articles regarding the risk stratification and therapeutic options of AML, as well as the characteristics of leukemic stem cells were selected.Results AML is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome dependent on several prognostic factors,including age, cytogenetics and molecular markers. The advances in the understanding of AML pathogenesis and development will generate potential novel agents that might improve the treatment results of standard chemotherapy.Conclusion Deeper insight into the multiple transforming events of AML may aid us in designing combinations of small molecule inhibitors based on the individual patient characteristics.

  20. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  1. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    model to investigate the role of telomerase in AML, we were able to translate the observed effect into human AML patients and identify specific genes involved, which also predict survival patterns in AML patients. During these studies we have applied methods for investigating differentially expressed......Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects....... Here GEPs from purified healthy haematopoietic populations, with different levels of differentiation, form the basis for comparison with diseased samples. We present a mathematical transformation of mRNA microarray data to make it possible to compare AML samples, carrying expanded aberrant...

  2. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  4. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other criteri

  5. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  7. Monosomy 7 and deletion 7q in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia: an international retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Alonzo, Todd A; Auvrignon, A

    2007-01-01

    Monosomy 7 (-7) and deletion 7q \\del(7q)] are rare in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We retrospectively collected data on 258 children with AML or refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEB-T) and -7 or del(7q) with or without other cytogenetic aberrations \\+/- other...

  8. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  11. Targeting the acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Alexandre; Luciana, M; Krause, Fontanari; Rego, Eduardo M

    2010-02-01

    The idea that within the bulk of leukemic cells there are immature progenitors which are intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and able to repopulate the tumor after treatment is not recent. Nevertheless, the term leukemia stem cells (LSCs) has been adopted recently to describe these immature progenitors based on the fact that they share the most relevant features of the normal hematopoetic stem cells (HSCs), i.e. the self-renewal potential and quiescent status. LSCs differ from their normal counterparts and from the more differentiated leukemic cells regarding the default status of pathways regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, telomere maintenance and transport pumps activity. In addition, unique features regarding the interaction of these cells with the microenvironment have been characterized. Therapeutic strategies targeting these unique features are at different stages of development but the reported results are promising. The aim of this review is, by taking acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a bona fide example, to discuss some of the mechanisms used by the LSCs to survive and the strategies which could be used to eradicate these cells.

  12. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

  13. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  15. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this may be restricted to the case of double mutations in CEBPA in adult acute myeloid leukemia. In pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, data on the impact of these mutations are limited to one series, ...

  16. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Aberrant signal transduction and protein expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Hein

    2007-01-01

    Het proces van hematopoiese voorziet het lichaam van miljarden bloedcellen per dag. Het is een strak geregisseerd proces. Acute myeloide leukemie (AML) is een afwijking in de bloedcelontwikkeling. Behandeling van deze en andere vormen van leukemie is veelal gebaseerd op het principe van de geprogram

  20. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and WHO Performance Status (PS) on achievement...

  1. Occupational exposure to solvents and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS: Altogether, this study comprises 15 332 incident cases of AML diagnosed in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland from 1961-2005 and 76...

  2. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  3. Adrenal crisis in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wang; Okwuwa, Ikemefuna; Toledo-Frazzini, Karla; Alhomosh, Alaaedin

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal crisis is a group of clinical manifestation predominantly with hypotensive shock, electrolyte imbalance in a patient with adrenal insufficiency or in a patient who was abruptly withdrawn from glucocorticoid treatment acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is one of the most common acute leukaemia in adults. Though the above diseases are commonly seen in individual patients, the coexistence of both conditions in the same patient is rare. We reported a 64-year-old African-American man with a his...

  4. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  5. Stages of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against ... may include the following: Combination chemotherapy plus central nervous system sanctuary therapy with intrathecal chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  6. [Acute benign ataxia in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, J; Arroyo, H A; Rocco, R D; Iraola, J

    1979-01-01

    The patogenesis and etiology of acute ataxia in childhood is not well known. It may occur without previous symptoms or may be the expression of specific infectious diseases. Forty patients hospitalized at the Hospital de Niños de Buenos Aires en 1972-1978, were studied. The neurological manifestations showed an acute onset, being ataxia the main sign, associate to tremor, nystagmus, dysartria, oculo-motor paresia, muscular weakness, and hyporeflexia. Most of the patients (82%) became cured within the first four weeks. It is advisable to establish a follow-up with periodic controls, mainly in those patients in whom an association with previous infectious diseases did not exist to be able to detect an association with degenerative or desmyelinizing diseases.

  7. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  8. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  11. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  13. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: prevalence and prognostic value

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for clinical decision-making. We analyzed 882 well-characterized acute myeloid leukemia cases to determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of ASXL1 exon12 mutations. Truncating ASXL1 mutations were present i...

  15. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  16. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Peeters, Justine K.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Balgobind, Brian V.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Creutzig, Ursula; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zwaan, C. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this m

  17. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.W. Verhaak (Roel); B.J. Wouters (Bas); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); S. Abbas (Saman); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); S. Lugthart (Sanne); B. Löwenberg (Bob); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific mol

  18. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.I.M. Hollink (Iris); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); S.T.C.J.M. Arentsen-Peters (Susan); M. Zimmermann (Martin); J. Peeters (Justine); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B.V. Balgobind (Brian); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); J. Trka (Jan); A. Baruchel (André); U. Creutzig (Ursula); R. Pieters (Rob); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); C.M. Zwaan (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but th

  19. Effect of age and body weight on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is very toxic and the association between outcome and age and Body Mass Index is unclear. We investigated effect of age and Body Mass Index on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. We studied all patients who completed first indu...

  20. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Genital Infection as a First Sign of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oiso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fournier’s gangrene is a life-threatening disorder caused by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infection. We report a case of genital infection as the initial warning sign of acute myeloid leukemia. We were able to prevent progression to Fournier’s gangrene in our patient by immediate intensive therapy with incision, blood transfusions and intravenous administration of antibiotics. This case suggests that hematologists and dermatologists should keep in mind that genital infection can be a first sign of hematologic malignancy.

  2. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia: conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and moleculocentric methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic abnormalities. However, it has become evident that genetic aberrations are central to the genesis of AML and have assumed an increasingly relevant role in the classification of AML. Here we discuss hallmark recurrent translocations that define specific World Health Organization (WHO) entities and other frequently encountered genetic aberrations that do not (yet) define specific entities. Additionally, we discuss emerging technologies and their application to the discovery of new abnormalities and to their potential role in the future diagnosis and classification of AML.

  4. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  5. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  6. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  7. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  9. BIRC6 (APOLLON is down-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia and its knockdown attenuates neutrophil differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schläfli Anna M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs were intensively investigated in the context of cancer where they promote tumor growth and chemoresistence. Overexpression of the IAP BIRC6 is associated with unfavorable clinical features and negatively impacts relapse-free survival in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Currently, BIRC6 levels in adult primary AML have not been compared to the expression in normal myeloid cells. Thus, we compared for the first time BIRC6 levels in adult primary AML patient samples to normal myeloid cells and studied its regulation and function during neutrophil differentiation. Findings We found significantly lower BIRC6 levels in particular AML subtypes as compared to granulocytes from healthy donors. The lowest BIRC6 expression was found in CD34+ progenitor cells. Moreover, BIRC6 expression significantly increased during neutrophil differentiation of AML cell lines and knocking down BIRC6 in NB4 acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL cells significantly impaired neutrophil differentiation, but not cell viability. Conclusion Together, we found an association of low BIRC6 levels with an immature myeloid phenotype and describe a function for BIRC6 in neutrophil differentiation of APL cells.

  10. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  11. DNA sequencing of a cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Timothy J; Mardis, Elaine R; Ding, Li; Fulton, Bob; McLellan, Michael D; Chen, Ken; Dooling, David; Dunford-Shore, Brian H; McGrath, Sean; Hickenbotham, Matthew; Cook, Lisa; Abbott, Rachel; Larson, David E; Koboldt, Dan C; Pohl, Craig; Smith, Scott; Hawkins, Amy; Abbott, Scott; Locke, Devin; Hillier, Ladeana W; Miner, Tracie; Fulton, Lucinda; Magrini, Vincent; Wylie, Todd; Glasscock, Jarret; Conyers, Joshua; Sander, Nathan; Shi, Xiaoqi; Osborne, John R; Minx, Patrick; Gordon, David; Chinwalla, Asif; Zhao, Yu; Ries, Rhonda E; Payton, Jacqueline E; Westervelt, Peter; Tomasson, Michael H; Watson, Mark; Baty, Jack; Ivanovich, Jennifer; Heath, Sharon; Shannon, William D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Walter, Matthew J; Link, Daniel C; Graubert, Timothy A; DiPersio, John F; Wilson, Richard K

    2008-11-06

    Acute myeloid leukaemia is a highly malignant haematopoietic tumour that affects about 13,000 adults in the United States each year. The treatment of this disease has changed little in the past two decades, because most of the genetic events that initiate the disease remain undiscovered. Whole-genome sequencing is now possible at a reasonable cost and timeframe to use this approach for the unbiased discovery of tumour-specific somatic mutations that alter the protein-coding genes. Here we present the results obtained from sequencing a typical acute myeloid leukaemia genome, and its matched normal counterpart obtained from the same patient's skin. We discovered ten genes with acquired mutations; two were previously described mutations that are thought to contribute to tumour progression, and eight were new mutations present in virtually all tumour cells at presentation and relapse, the function of which is not yet known. Our study establishes whole-genome sequencing as an unbiased method for discovering cancer-initiating mutations in previously unidentified genes that may respond to targeted therapies.

  12. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syn...

  13. Conventional chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Borgia Barbosa Pagnano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Young patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieve complete remission (CR using conventional chemotherapy in about 55-85%. However, 30% of patients fail to achieve CR and the remission duration is often only about 12 months. More intensive treatment after CR seems to be necessary in order to maintain CR and obtain a definitive cure. In Brazil, few reports have been published on this important subject. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe a Brazilian experience in the treatment of "de novo" acute myeloid leukemia (AML in younger adult patients (age < 60 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: University Hospital, Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, State University of Campinas, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Newly diagnosed cases of "de novo" AML in the period from January 1994 to December 1998 were evaluated retrospectively, in relation to response to treatment, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Cases with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were also included in this analysis. RESULTS: On the basis of an intention to treat, 78 cases of AML, including 17 cases of APL, were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 272 days. The complete remission (CR rate was 63.6% in the AML group (excluding APL and 78% in the APL group. The 5-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS was 80% for the APL group and 34% for the AML group (P = 0.02. The 5-year estimated overall survival (OS was 52% for the APL group and 20.5% for the AML group, respectively (P = NS. Relapse was observed in 12/39 (30.7% patients with AML and 1/11 (9% with APL. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to those reported in the literature. However, relapse and mortality rates remain high, and a search for more aggressive strategies in order to prevent relapse is recommended.

  14. Treatment and prognostic assessment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannur Ramanna Nandeesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogeneous group of clonal malignant myeloid neoplasms. Malignant transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cell leads to clonal expansion and replacement of normal bone marrow cells with malignant cells leading to suppression of normal haematopoiesis. Advancements in our understanding of disease biology have allowed AML to be classified based on its gene expression profile, which includes previously identified cytogenetic subgroups, and distinct novel subgroups which have prognostic significance. Identification of mutations in DNMT3A and IDH 1 genes in cytogenetically normal AML (by gene sequencing helps to identify patients with poor prognosis. Redesigning the treatment regimen consisting of cytarabine and daunorubicin has improved the treatment outcomes without increase in the treatment-related mortality. Increasing the dose of daunorubicin to 90 mg/m2 improves complete remission rates without increasing treatment-related complications both in young and elderly patients. Cytarabine (200 mg/m2 in cycle I and 2 g/m2 in cycle 2 is shown to be as effective as high dose cytarabine (1000 mg/m2 twice daily in cycle 1and 2 g/m2 twice daily in cycle 2 and is associated with less treatment-related toxicities. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 579-586

  15. Transformation of myelodysplastic syndromes into acute myeloid leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 刘鸿; 白洁; 曹燕然; 何广胜; 凃梅峰; 王秀丽; 郝玉书; 杨天楹; 杨崇礼

    2004-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), also called preleukemias, are a group of myeloid hematopoietic malignant disorders. We studied the transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Methods Leukemic transformation in 151 patients with MDS was dynamically followed up. The clinical manifestation, peripheral blood and bone marrow condition, karyotypes, immunophenotypes, response to treatment, and prognosis of AML evolution from MDS (MDS-AML) were also observed.Results During the course of this study, over the past eight years and seven months, 21 (13.91%) of 151 MDS patients progressed to overt leukemia, with a median interval of 5 (1-23) months. There were no significant differences between rates of leukemic transformation in comparison with the refractory anemia (RA), RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), and RAEB in transformation (RAEB-t) patient groups. Transformation occurred either gradually or rapidly. There were five parameters positively correlated to leukemic transformation: under 40 years of age, pancytopenia of 3 lineages, more than 15% blasts in the bone marrow, at least two abnormal karyotypes, and treatment with combined chemotherapy. All of the 21 patients with leukemia suffered from MDS-AML, and most of them were M2, M4, or M5. Two (9.52%) MDS-AML patients developed extramedullary infiltration. Leukopenia was found in 47.62% of these patients. Two thirds of these patients, whose bone marrows were generally hypercellular, suffered from neutropenia. After developing AML, 8 (47.06%) patients developed abnormal karyotypes. High expression of immature myeloid antigens, including CD33 [(49.83±24.50)%], CD13 [(36.38±33.84)%], monocytic antigen CD14 [(38.50±24.60)%], and stem cell marker CD34 [(34.67±30.59)%], were found on bone marrow mononuclear cells from MDS-AML patients after leukemic transformation. In some cases, lymphoid antigens, such as CD5, CD7, CD9, and CD19, coexisted with myeloid antigens. A low complete remission rate (31

  16. Angiogenesis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Opportunities for Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML arises from neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and relapsed disease remains one of the greater challenges in treating this hematologic malignancy. This paper focuses on angiogenic aspects of AML including the significance and prognostic value of bone marrow microvessel density and circulating cytokine levels. We show three general mechanisms whereby AML exploits angiogenic pathways, including direct induction of angiogenesis, paracrine regulation, and autocrine stimulation. We also present early evidence that leukemia cells contribute directly to vascular endothelia. Novel treatment strategies are proposed, and a review of relevant antiangiogenic clinical trials is presented. By understanding how blood vessels can serve as a reservoir for refractory and relapsed AML, new diagnostics and promising treatment strategies can be developed.

  17. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  18. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  19. Clinical activity of alvocidib (flavopiridol) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Joshua F; Karp, Judith E

    2015-12-01

    There have been minimal therapeutic advancements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the past 4 decades and outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Alvocidib (formerly flavopiridol) is a multi-serine threonine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with demonstrable in vitro and clinical activity in AML when combined in a timed sequential chemotherapy regimen, FLAM (alvocidib followed by cytarabine continuous infusion and mitoxantrone). FLAM has been evaluated in sequential phase 1 and phase 2 studies in 149 and 256 relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed non-favorable risk AML patients, respectively, with encouraging findings in both patient populations warranting further investigation. This review highlights the mechanism of action of alvocidib, pre-clinical studies of alvocidib in AML, and the clinical trials evaluating alvocidib alone and in combination with cytotoxic agents (FLAM) in AML.

  20. Current findings for recurring mutations in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Shinichiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a multistep process that requires at least two genetic abnormalities for the development of the disease. The identification of genetic mutations in AML has greatly advanced our understanding of leukemogenesis. Recently, the use of novel technologies, such as massively parallel DNA sequencing or high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, has allowed the identification of several novel recurrent gene mutations in AML. The aim of this review is to summarize the current findings for the identification of these gene mutations (Dnmt, TET2, IDH1/2, NPM1, ASXL1, etc., most of which are frequently found in cytogenetically normal AML. The cooperative interactions of these molecular aberrations and their interactions with class I/II mutations are presented. The prognostic and predictive significances of these aberrations are also reviewed.

  1. Relapsing acute myeloid leukemia presenting as hypopyon uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna P Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML presenting as hypopyon uveitis is very rare. We report this case as an uncommon presentation in a patient on remission after bone marrow transplant for AML. In addition to the hypopyon, the patient presented with "red eye" caused by ocular surface disease due to concurrent graft-versus-host disease and glaucoma. The classical manifestations of masquerade syndrome due to AML were altered by concurrent pathologies. Media opacities further confounded the differential diagnosis. We highlight the investigations used to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. In uveitis, there is a need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, as early diagnosis in ocular malignancy can save sight and life.

  2. MicroRNA expression profiling in relation to the genetic heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); S.M. Sun; M.K. Dijkstra; P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly diverse disease characterized by various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that show variable expression during myeloid differentiation. MicroRNA expression in marrow blasts in 215 cases of newly diagnosed

  3. Absence of mutations in the RET gene in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M; Hofstra, RMW; Stulp, RP; Wu, Y; Buys, CHCM; Willemze, R; Landegent, JE

    1997-01-01

    Expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor RET has previously been detected in normal hematopoietic cells, and especially in cells of the myeloid lineage. Furthermore, RET was shown to be differentially expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a disease characterized by excessive cell growth and a

  4. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: Prevalence and prognostic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pratcorona (Marta); S. Abbas (Saman); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); J.E. Koenders (Jasper); F.G. Kavelaars (Francois); C.A.J. Erpelinck-Verschueren (C. A J); A. Zeilemakers (Annelieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for

  5. CBL mutations do not frequently occur in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Eva A.; Driessen, Emma M. C.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Stary, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; de Haas, Valerie; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2012-01-01

    RAS-pathway mutations, causing a proliferative advantage, occur in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and MLL-rearranged leukaemia. Recently, mutations in the Casitas B lineage lymphoma (CBL) gene were reported to be involved in RAS-pathway activation in various myeloid malignancies, but their role in pa

  6. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Baruchel, Andre; Devidas, Meenakshi; Escherich, Gabriele; Gibson, Brenda; Heydrich, Christiane; Horibe, Keizo; Ishida, Yasushi; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Michel, Gérard; Pieters, Rob; Piette, Caroline; Pui, Ching-Hon; Raimondi, Susana; Silverman, Lewis; Stanulla, Martin; Stark, Batia; Winick, Naomi; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. Patients and Methods We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980 and 2007. Results Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival estimates for AML were 11.2% ± 2.9% for 125 patients diagnosed before 2000 and 34.1% ± 6.3% for 61 patients diagnosed after 2000 (P < .001); 5-year survival estimates for MDS were 17.1% ± 6.4% (n = 36) and 48.2% ± 10.6% (n = 33; P = .005). Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation failed to improve outcome of secondary myeloid malignancies after adjusting for waiting time to transplantation. Five-year survival rates were above 90% for patients with meningioma, Hodgkin lymphoma, thyroid carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and parotid gland tumor, and 68.5% ± 6.4% for those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Eighty-nine percent of patients with brain tumors had received cranial irradiation. Solid tumors were associated with cyclophosphamide exposure, and myeloid malignancy was associated with topoisomerase II inhibitors and starting doses of methotrexate of at least 25 mg/m2 per week and mercaptopurine of at least 75 mg/m2 per day. Myeloid malignancies with monosomy 7/5q− were associated with high hyperdiploid ALL karyotypes, whereas 11q23/MLL-rearranged AML or MDS was associated with ALL harboring translocations of t(9;22), t(4;11), t(1;19), and t(12;21) (P = .03). Conclusion SMNs, except for brain tumors, AML, and MDS, have outcomes similar to their primary counterparts. PMID:23690411

  7. Acute myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia with specific cutaneous involvement: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, M; Gallardo, F; Ferrer, A M; Salar, A; Pérez-Vila, E; Juanpere, N; Salgado, R; Espinet, B; Orfao, A; Florensa, L; Pujol, R M

    2008-05-01

    Myeloid or type 1 dendritic cell leukaemia is an exceedingly rare haematopoietic neoplasm characterized by a specific immunophenotypic profile close to plasmacytoid dendritic cell and acute myelogenous leukaemia. A 77-year-old man presenting specific cutaneous infiltration by myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia is reported. The clinical features as well as the cutaneous histopathological and immunohistochemical features led to the initial diagnosis of CD4+/CD56+ haematodermic neoplasm. However, extensive immunophenotypic studies performed from peripheral blood blasts disclosed that leukaemic cells expressed myeloid dendritic cell markers, confirming the diagnosis. The diagnostic difficulties of specific cutaneous involvement by myeloid dendritic cell leukaemia on the basis of routine histopathological and immunohistochemical features are highlighted.

  8. Elevated frequencies of leukemic myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in acute myeloid leukemia with the FLT3 internal tandem duplication

    OpenAIRE

    Rickmann, Mareike; Krauter, Juergen; Stamer, Kathrin; Heuser, Michael; Salguero, Gustavo; Mischak-Weissinger, Eva; Ganser, Arnold; Stripecke, Renata

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Some 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients display an internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation in the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene. FLT3-ITDs are known to drive hematopoietic stem cells towards FLT3 ligand independent growth, but the effects on dendritic cell (DC) differentiation during leukemogenesis are not clear. We compared the frequency of cells with immunophenotype of myeloid DC (mDC: Lin?, HLA-DR+, CD11c+, CD86+) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC: Lin?, HL...

  9. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abel Study of Sargramostim Among Patients Receiving Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelog...g Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number...r disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute ...Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1...r investigation E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level PT E.1.2Classification code 10000880 E.1.2Term Acute

  11. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact.......Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  12. Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Treatment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...tment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...on(s) being investigated Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia... language Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide re...arbazina nei pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide recidivata/refrattaria i cui blasti esprimono bassi

  13. Detection of FLT3 Oncogene Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    FLT3 (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. FLT3 is also expressed on leukemia blasts in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In order to determine the frequency of FLT3 oncogene mutations, we analyzed genomic DNA of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and...

  14. Acute myeloid leukaemia after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in girl with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Madeleine; Jenney, Meriel; Lazarou, Laz; White, Rhian; Birdsall, Sanda; Staab, Timo; Schindler, Detlev; Meyer, Stefan

    2013-09-18

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an inherited genomic instability disorder caused by disruption of the BLM helicase and confers an extreme cancer predisposition. Here we report on a girl with BS who developed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at age nine, and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-AML) aged 12. She was compound heterozygous for the novel BLM frameshift deletion c.1624delG and the previously described c.3415C>T nonsense mutation. Two haematological malignancies in a child with BS imply a fundamental role for BLM for normal haematopoiesis, in particular in the presence of genotoxic stress.

  15. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaak, Roel G W; Wouters, Bas J; Erpelinck, Claudia A J; Abbas, Saman; Beverloo, H Berna; Lugthart, Sanne; Löwenberg, Bob; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J M

    2009-01-01

    We examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific molecular subtypes. The favorable cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, i.e., acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;21), t(15;17) or inv(16), were predicted with maximum accuracy (positive and negative predictive value: 100%). Mutations in NPM1 and CEBPA were predicted less accurately (positive predictive value: 66% and 100%, and negative predictive value: 99% and 97% respectively). Various other characteristic molecular acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, i.e., mutant FLT3 and RAS, abnormalities involving 11q23, -5/5q-, -7/7q-, abnormalities involving 3q (abn3q) and t(9;22), could not be correctly predicted using gene expression profiling. In conclusion, gene expression profiling allows accurate prediction of certain acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, e.g. those characterized by expression of chimeric transcription factors. However, detection of mutations affecting signaling molecules and numerical abnormalities still requires alternative molecular methods.

  16. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Brendel

    Full Text Available RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML, generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1 in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16 and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies.

  17. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  18. Diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukemia in children and adolescents: recommendations from an international expert panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzig, Ursula; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Gibson, Brenda; Dworzak, Michael N; Adachi, Souichi; de Bont, Eveline; Harbott, Jochen; Hasle, Henrik; Johnston, Donna; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Leverger, Guy; Mejstrikova, Ester; Meshinchi, Soheil; Pession, Andrea; Raimondi, Susana C; Sung, Lillian; Stary, Jan; Zwaan, Christian M; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Reinhardt, Dirk

    2012-10-18

    Despite major improvements in outcome over the past decades, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a life-threatening malignancy in children, with current survival rates of ∼70%. State-of-the-art recommendations in adult AML have recently been published in this journal by Döhner et al. The primary goal of an international expert panel of the International BFM Study Group AML Committee was to set standards for the management, diagnosis, response assessment, and treatment in childhood AML. This paper aims to discuss differences between childhood and adult AML, and to highlight recommendations that are specific to children. The particular relevance of new diagnostic and prognostic molecular markers in pediatric AML is presented. The general management of pediatric AML, the management of specific pediatric AML cohorts (such as infants) or subtypes of the disease occurring in children (such as Down syndrome related AML), as well as new therapeutic approaches, and the role of supportive care are discussed.

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cian’s Choice in Patients ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid L....1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute... Myeloid Leukemia (AML) E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute My... condition or disease under investigation E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000886 E.1.2Term Acute

  20. [Clinical and genetic background of familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Péter Attila; Kállay, Krisztián; Marosvári, Dóra; Benyó, Gábor; Szőke, Anita; Csomor, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia are mainly sporadic diseases, however, rare familial cases exist. These disorders are considered rare, but are likely to be more common than currently appreciated, and are characterized by the autosomal dominant mutations of hematopoietic transcription factors. These syndromes have typical phenotypic features and are associated with an increased risk for developing overt malignancy. Currently, four recognized syndromes could be separated: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA, familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2, familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy with RUNX1 mutations, and telomere biology disorders due to mutations of TERC or TERT. Furthermore, there are new, emerging syndromes associated with germline mutations in novel genes including ANKRD26, ETV6, SRP72 or DDX41. This review will discuss the current understanding of the genetic basis and clinical presentation of familial leukemia and myelodysplasia.

  1. Acute isoniazid neurotoxicity in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Agop; Kaya, Ozlen; Uçsel, Raif; Karaböcüoğlu, Metin; Uzel, Nedret

    2002-01-01

    Acute isoniazid (INH) poisoning is uncommon in children. Although most physicians are aware of INH hepatotoxicity, acute INH poisoning and its treatment are not well recognized. INH is increasingly being used to control the spread of tuberculosis, and physicians should know its potentially fatal effects. INH overdose is known to result in rapid onset of seizures, metabolic acidosis and prolonged obtundation. We report two cases of obtundation secondary to INH overdose that was immediately reversed by pyridoxine. Parenteral pyridoxine administration is an effective method in INH intoxication. The intravenous form of pyridoxine must be available in the emergency care units, and INH toxicity should be suspected in any patient with refractory seizures and metabolic acidosis.

  2. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...... estimates for AML were 11.2% ± 2.9% for 125 patients diagnosed before 2000 and 34.1% ± 6.3% for 61 patients diagnosed after 2000 (P survival estimates for MDS were 17.1% ± 6.4% (n = 36) and 48.2% ± 10.6% (n = 33; P = .005). Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation failed to improve outcome...

  3. FLT3 inhibitors: clinical potential in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Marie-Anne; Green, Alexa S; Maciel, Thiago T; Moura, Ivan C; Leung, Anskar Y; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy that is cured in as few as 15%–40% of cases. Tremendous improvements in AML prognostication arose from a comprehensive analysis of leukemia cell genomes. Among normal karyotype AML cases, mutations in the FLT3 gene are the ones most commonly detected as having a deleterious prognostic impact. FLT3 is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, and alterations of the FLT3 gene such as internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD) deregulate FLT3 downstream signaling pathways in favor of increased cell proliferation and survival. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) emerged as a new therapeutic option in FLT3-ITD AML, and clinical trials are ongoing with a variety of TKI either alone, combined with chemotherapy, or even as maintenance after allogenic stem cell transplantation. However, a wide range of molecular resistance mechanisms are activated upon TKI therapy, thus limiting their clinical impact. Massive research efforts are now ongoing to develop more efficient FLT3 TKI and/or new therapies targeting these resistance mechanisms to improve the prognosis of FLT3-ITD AML patients in the future. PMID:28223820

  4. Clofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krawczyk, Janusz

    2010-09-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.

  5. TP53 mutations in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Yukiya; Iba, Sachiko; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Tokuda, Masutaka; Morishima, Satoko; Kanie, Tadaharu; Mizuta, Shuichi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Masataka; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The net benefits of induction therapy for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain controversial. Because AML in older adults is a heterogeneous disease, it is important to identify those who are unlikely to benefit from induction therapy based on information available at the initial assessment. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze TP53 mutation status in AML patients aged 60 years or older, and evaluated its effects on outcomes. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 77 patients (16 %), and there was a significant association between TP53 mutations and monosomal karyotype. Patients with TP53 mutations had significantly worse survival than those without (P = 0.009), and multivariate analysis identified TP53 mutation status as the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Neverthelsess, TP53-mutated patients had a 42 % chance of complete remission and a median survival of 8.0 months, which compares favorably with those who did not undergo induction therapy, even in the short term. These results suggest that screening for TP53 mutations at diagnosis is useful for identifying older adults with AML who are least likely to respond to chemotherapy, although the presence of this mutation alone does not seem to justify rejecting induction therapy.

  6. Immunohistochemistry predicts nucleophosmin (NPM) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falini, Brunangelo; Martelli, Maria Paola; Bolli, Niccolò; Bonasso, Rossella; Ghia, Emanuela; Pallotta, Maria Teresa; Diverio, Daniela; Nicoletti, Ildo; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Galletti, Barbara Verducci; Mannucci, Roberta; Roti, Giovanni; Rosati, Roberto; Specchia, Giorgina; Liso, Arcangelo; Tiacci, Enrico; Alcalay, Myriam; Luzi, Lucilla; Volorio, Sara; Bernard, Loris; Guarini, Anna; Amadori, Sergio; Mandelli, Franco; Pane, Fabrizio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Saglio, Giuseppe; Pelicci, Pier-Giuseppe; Martelli, Massimo F; Mecucci, Cristina

    2006-09-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) exon-12 mutations occur in 50% to 60% of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal karyotype and are predictors of favorable prognosis. We evaluated bone marrow or peripheral blood samples from 450 adult patients with AML of the GIMEMA (Gruppo Italiano Malattie Ematologiche Maligne dell'Adulto)/AML12 EORTC (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) trial to (1) search for new exon-12 NPM mutations; (2) determine whether NPM immunostaining on paraffin-embedded biopsies predicts NPM mutations; and (3) investigate altered nucleocytoplasmic NPM traffic in primary AML cells. Fourteen NPM mutations, including 8 new variants, were identified. All 200 AML cases expressing cytoplasmic NPM (NPMc(+) AML) carried NPM mutations. None of the 250 cases with nucleus-restricted NPM (NPMc(-) AML) was mutated. At the C-terminus, NPM leukemic mutants carried mutations of only tryptophan 290 or of both tryptophans 288 and 290 and a new nuclear export signal (NES) motif, which appear to underlie their nuclear export. The specific Crm1/exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin-B relocated NPM mutants from cytoplasm to nucleus of primary NPMc(+) AML cells, demonstrating that nuclear export is NES dependent. NPM mutants bound and recruited wild-type NPM into leukemic cell cytoplasm. Because alterations at C-terminus of leukemic NPM mutants are similar, immunohistochemistry detects all exon-12 NPM mutations and is a valuable, inexpensive tool in the diagnostic-prognostic work-up of patients with AML with normal karyotype.

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia with DNMT3A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Zhu, Baosheng

    2014-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a type of blood cancer, is characterized by an increase in the number of abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow, frequently causing hematopoietic insufficiency. It is a heterogeneous disease featuring cytogenetic aberrations, recurrent somatic mutations and alterations in gene expression. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) is closely associated with epigenetic modifications in mammalian development and disease. More recent studies have identified recurrent somatic mutations in DNMT3A in AML, most of which are heterozygous. The DNMT3A R882 codon is a mutational hotspot. The frequency of DNMT3A mutations varies among different countries, but mutations have been found to be associated with cytogenetics, age, white blood cell (WBC) count, prognosis and response of patients to chemotherapy. The normal function of DNMT3A can be disrupted by these mutations, which subsequently results in an abnormality of epigenetic modification. These data suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene represent a novel class of mutations in AML with distinct biological and clinical features. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact molecular mechanism and function of DNMT3A mutations in leukemogenesis.

  8. Gene mutations of acute myeloid leukemia in the genome era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Tomoki; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Ten years ago, gene mutations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were conceptually grouped into class I mutation, which causes constitutive activation of intracellular signals that contribute to the growth and survival, and class II mutation, which blocks differentiation and/or enhance self-renewal by altered transcription factors. A cooperative model between two classes of mutations has been suggested by murine experiments and partly supported by epidemiological findings. In the last 5 years, comprehensive genomic analysis proceeded to find new gene mutations, which are found in the epigenome-associated enzymes and the molecules never noticed so far. These new mutations apparently increase the complexity and heterogeneity of AML. Although a long list of gene mutations might have been compiled, the entire picture of molecular pathogenesis in AML remains to be elucidated because gene rearrangement, gene copy number, DNA methylation and expression profiles are not fully studied in conjunction with gene mutations. Comprehensive genome research will deepen the understanding of AML to promote the development of new classification and treatment. This review focuses on gene mutations that were recently discovered by genome sequencing.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of dicentric chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarova, Iveta; Brezinova, Jana; Zemanova, Zuzana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Izakova, Silvia; Svobodova, Karla; Pavlistova, Lenka; Berkova, Adela; Cermak, Jaroslav; Jonasova, Anna; Siskova, Magda; Michalova, Kyra

    2016-04-01

    Dicentric chromosomes (DCs) have been described in many hematological diseases, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They are markers of cancer and induce chromosomal instability, leading to the formation of other chromosomal aberrations and the clonal evolution of pathological cells. Our knowledge of the roles and behavior of human DCs is often derived from studies of induced DCs and cell lines. It is difficult to identify all the DCs in the karyotypes of patients because of the limitations of metaphase cytogenetic methods. The aim of this study was to revise the karyotypes of 20 AML patients in whom DCs were found with conventional G-banding or multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) with (multi)centromeric probes and to characterize the DCs at the molecular cytogenetic level. FISH analyses confirmed 23 of the 29 expected DCs in 18 of 20 patients and identified 13 others that had not been detected cytogenetically. Fourteen DCs were altered by other chromosomal changes. In conclusion, karyotypes with DCs are usually very complex, and we have shown that they often contain more than one DC, which can be missed with conventional or mFISH methods. Our study indicates an association between number of DCs in karyotype and very short survival of patients.

  10. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  11. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  12. Multiplex high-throughput gene mutation analysis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Jennifer; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Fleming, William H; Loriaux, Marc; Heinrich, Michael C; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Kelemen, Katalin; Leeborg, Nicky; Gatter, Ken; Braziel, Rita M; Press, Richard; Corless, Christopher L; Fan, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Classification of acute myeloid leukemia increasingly depends on genetic analysis. However, the number of known mutations in acute myeloid leukemia is expanding rapidly. Therefore, we tested a high-throughput screening method for acute myeloid leukemia mutation analysis using a multiplex mass spectrometry-based approach. To our knowledge, this is the first reported application of this approach to genotype leukemias in a clinical setting. One hundred seven acute myeloid leukemia cases were screened for mutations using a panel that covers 344 point mutations across 31 genes known to be associated with leukemia. The analysis was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for mutations in genes of interest followed by primer extension reactions. Products were analyzed on a Sequenom MassARRAY system (San Diego, CA). The multiplex panel yielded mutations in 58% of acute myeloid leukemia cases with normal cytogenetics and 21% of cases with abnormal cytogenetics. Cytogenetics and routine polymerase chain reaction-based screening of NPM1, CEBPA, FLT3-ITD, and KIT was also performed on a subset of cases. When combined with the results of these standard polymerase chain reaction-based tests, the mutation frequency reached 78% in cases with normal cytogenetics. Of these, 42% harbored multiple mutations primarily involving NPM1 with NRAS, KRAS, CEBPA, PTPN11, IDH1, or FLT3. In contrast, cases with abnormal cytogenetics rarely harbored more than 1 mutation (1.5%), suggesting different underlying biology. This study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of broad-based mutation profiling of acute myeloid leukemia in a clinical setting. This approach will be helpful in defining prognostic subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia and contribute to the selection of patients for enrollment into trials with novel inhibitors.

  13. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  14. Acute myeloid leukaemia presenting as bilateral proptosis in a young child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charudutt Kalamkar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. Aims We are reporting a paediatric case presenting with bilateral proptosis, which we were able to diagnose with peripheral blood smear (PBS examination. Methods Case Report Results This case highlights the utility of simple routinely available PBS test in diagnosing this rare disease. Conclusion Our case highlights the importance of haemogram and peripheral blood smear in the initial evaluation of proptosis. Correct diagnosis of this rare entity is vital especially in cases where (myeloid sarcoma MS is the presenting feature of AML.

  15. pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available emia in children and adolescent protocollo per la leucemia acuta mieloide in età pediatrica A.3.2Name or abb...pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia pazienti in età pediatrica affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide ...te myeloid leukemia pazienti in età pediatrica affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Di

  16. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations - mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation - is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (Pgene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

  17. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  18. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in a patient treated for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Peripartum cardiomyopathy usually presents with systolic heart failure during the last months of pregnancy and up to five months postpartum. The disease is rare and can be fatal. Case Outline. We report a 30-year-old female who was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, with maturation and cytogenetic finding of t(8;21(q22;q22,del(9(q22 in January 2004. She was treated with chemotherapy and achieved complete remission that lasts to date. She became pregnant and delivered a healthy newborn with caesarean section in 2009. Seven months later, she again became pregnant and delivered the second child with caesarean section in January 2011. Seven days after delivery she developed symptoms and signs of heart failure. Electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, low voltage and negative T-waves in inferior and lateral leads. Echocardiography revealed global left ventricular dysfunction with ejection fraction of 15%, with mobile thrombotic mass of 12 mm attached to the left ventricle wall. She was treated with both unfractionated and low-molecular heparin, diuretics, cardiotonics, and beta-blockers. Within six following weeks left ventricle systolic function improved up to 25-30%. The full clinical recovery was achieved in September 2013, resulting in absence of heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction of 54%. Conclusion. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare condition. The cause of cardiomyopathy is unknown, but it is believed that it could be triggered by various conditions and risk factors. Although the patient was treated with cardiotoxic drugs (doxorubicin and mitoxantrone in permitted doses, they could have been contributory factors of myocardial damage. Close monitoring of cardiac function in the peripartal period might be beneficial in patients treated with cardiotoxic drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175080 I br. OI 175034

  19. Rare myeloid sarcoma/acute myeloid leukemia with adrenal mass after allogeneic mobilization peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Fei Wang; Qian Li; Wen-Gui Xu; Jian-Yu Xiao; Qing-Song Pang; Qing Yang; Yi-Zuo Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare hematological neoplasm that develops either de novo or concurrently with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This neoplasm can also be an initial manifestation of relapse in a previously treated AML that is in remission. A 44-year-old male patient was diagnosed with testis MS in a local hospital in August 2010. Atfer one month, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration conifrmed the diagnosis of AML. Allogeneic mobilization peripheral blood stem cell transplantation was performed, with the sister of the patient as donor, after complete remission (CR) was achieved by chemotherapy. Five months after treatment, an adrenal mass was detected by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Radiotherapy was performed for the localized mass after a multidisciplinary team (MDT) discussion. hTe patient is still alive as of May 2013, with no evidence of recurrent MS or leukemia.

  20. Nucleophosmin mutations in childhood acute myelogenous leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dell'Oro, Maria Grazia; Mecucci, Cristina; Giarin, Emanuela; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Falini, Brunangelo

    2005-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, and it regulates the alternate reading frame (ARF)-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway. Recently, it has been demonstrated that mutations of the NPM1 gene alter the protein at its C-terminal, causing its cytoplasmic localization. Cytoplasmic NPM was detected in 35% of adult patients with primary non-French-American-British (FAB) classification M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), associated mainly with normal karyotype. We evaluated the prevalence of the NPM1 gene mutation in non-M3 childhood AML patients enrolled in the ongoing Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP-AML02) protocol in Italy. NPM1 mutations were found in 7 (6.5%) of 107 successfully analyzed patients. NPM1-mutated patients carried a normal karyotype (7/26, 27.1%) and were older in age. Thus, the NPM1 mutation is a frequent abnormality in AML patients without known genetic marker; the mutation may represent a new target to monitor minimal residual disease in AML and a potential candidate for alternative and targeted treatments.

  1. A one-mutation mathematical model can explain the age incidence of acute myeloid leukemia with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Liso (Arcangelo); F. Castiglione (Filippo); A. Cappuccio (Antonio); F. Stracci (Fabrizio); R.F. Schlenk (Richard); S. Amadori (Sergio); C. Thiede (Christian); S. Schnittger (Susanne); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); K. Döhner (Konstanze); M.F. Martelli (Massimo F.); M. Schaich (Markus); J. Krauter; A. Ganser (Arnold); N. Bolli (Niccolò); B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Haferlach (Torsten); G. Ehninger (Gerhard); F. Mandelli (Franco); F. Michor (Franziska); B. Falini

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia with mutated NPM1 gene and aberrant cytoplasmic expression of nucleophosmin (NPMc+acute myeloid leukemia) shows distinctive biological and clinical features. Experimental evidence of the oncogenic potential of the nucleophosmin mutant is, however, still lacking, an

  2. [Research Advances of IDH2 Gene Mutation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Shen, Xu-Liang

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignant clonal hematologic disease from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. The isocitrate dehychogenase 2 (IDH2) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be associated with the course of AML. The incidence of IDH2 gene mutation in the patients with acute myeloid leukemia is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtypes of IDH2 mutation, or companing other molecular biology, will make different influence on clinical features and progress of patients with AML. IDH2 mutation is stable, which can be used as the test sign of AML and minimal residual disease (MRD), and for guiding the clinical treatment and predicting the progress. In this article, the research progress of IDH2 mutation in acute myeloid leukemia is reviewed.

  3. Phenotypical difference in deamination of cytarabine is not evident in induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Mikkel; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Jensen, Morten Krogh;

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the uracil arabinoside/cytarabine (Ara-U/Ara-C) ratios with the lower dose in adult acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) induction therapy (100 mg/m2 Ara-C) where no enzyme saturation is expected. Methods A precise and robust high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method...... for simultaneous determination of Ara-C and its main inactive metabolite Ara-U in human plasma was developed and validated. Nineteen patients with acute myeloid leukaemia were treated with Ara-C in a dose of 100 mg/m2 together with daunorubicin and etoposide. Plasma concentrations were used to construct...

  4. A Case of Abdominal Sarcoidosis in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadsala Baskaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The allogeneic bone marrow transplantation usually preceded by induction chemotherapy, in fit patients, represents the gold standard in the acute myeloid leukaemia. In the last years, many trials have been set up with the view of improving the number of remissions during the induction by adding new drugs. Several early or late side effects have been described in the literature. We herein present a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia patient who, after chemotherapy, developed ascites that turned out to be abdominal sarcoidosis.

  5. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  6. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations prime the all-trans retinoic acid myeloid differentiation pathway in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutzen, Héléna; Saland, Estelle; Larrue, Clément; de Toni, Fabienne; Gales, Lara; Castelli, Florence A; Cathebas, Mathilde; Zaghdoudi, Sonia; Stuani, Lucille; Kaoma, Tony; Riscal, Romain; Yang, Guangli; Hirsch, Pierre; David, Marion; De Mas-Mansat, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Vallar, Laurent; Delhommeau, François; Jouanin, Isabelle; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Le Cam, Laurent; Linares, Laetitia K; Junot, Christophe; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vergez, François; Récher, Christian; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel

    2016-04-04

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of malignant blasts with impaired differentiation programs caused by recurrent mutations, such as the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations found in 15% of AML patients. These mutations result in the production of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), leading to a hypermethylation phenotype that dysregulates hematopoietic differentiation. In this study, we identified mutant R132H IDH1-specific gene signatures regulated by key transcription factors, particularly CEBPα, involved in myeloid differentiation and retinoid responsiveness. We show that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) at clinically achievable doses markedly enhanced terminal granulocytic differentiation in AML cell lines, primary patient samples, and a xenograft mouse model carrying mutant IDH1. Moreover, treatment with a cell-permeable form of 2-HG sensitized wild-type IDH1 AML cells to ATRA-induced myeloid differentiation, whereas inhibition of 2-HG production significantly reduced ATRA effects in mutant IDH1 cells. ATRA treatment specifically decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis of mutant IDH1 blasts in vitro. ATRA also reduced tumor burden of mutant IDH1 AML cells xenografted in NOD-Scid-IL2rγ(null)mice and markedly increased overall survival, revealing a potent antileukemic effect of ATRA in the presence of IDH1 mutation. This therapeutic strategy holds promise for this AML patient subgroup in future clinical studies.

  7. Sequential Administration of Methotrexate and Asparaginase in Relapsed or Refractory Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaboonnam, Jassada; Cao, Xueyuan; Pauley, Jennifer L.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Inaba, Hiroto

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy of combination chemotherapy with methotrexate (MTX) and asparaginase is not well known in relapsed and refractory acute leukemia after contemporary therapy. Procedure A retrospective study of pediatric patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who received MTX and asparaginase as a salvage therapy at St. Jude Children Research Hospital was performed. MTX was given intravenously followed by a dose of asparaginase intramuscularly or intravenously 24 hours later. The chemotherapy cycle was repeated every 7-10 days. Response, survival, and toxicities were evaluated. Results Fifteen patients, median age 10.5 years (range, 1.1-18.5 years), were treated. Median number of previous therapeutic regimens was 3 (range, 1-4). Six patients responded to treatment (3 had morphologic complete remission with incomplete blood count recovery, 2 had partial remission, and 1 had stable disease for 16 months), and 4 are still alive. Three of 6 responders had monoblastic leukemia, and also developed tumor lysis syndrome. The 1- and 2-year overall survival rates are 35.6% and 17.8%, respectively. The most common adverse event was transient elevation of transaminases (9 patients). Two patients developed pancreatitis. Episodes of febrile neutropenia were rare (2 patients), and most courses (75 out of 93 total courses) were given in an outpatient setting. Conclusions Combination chemotherapy with MTX and asparaginase appears to be an effective salvage therapy and well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory childhood AML, even in those heavily pretreated with contemporary frontline or salvage therapy. PMID:23335430

  8. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  9. Assessment of oxidative stress in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esfahani A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Many chemotherapeutic regimens used in the treatment of cancer generate free radicals that may be a part of their beneficial effects. The aim of this study was to assess the oxidative status in patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML."n "nMethods: Thirty-eight patients with AML (17 female and 21 male patients with a mean age 34.05±12.49 years were included in the study. All the patients received cytarabine and daunorubicin as their standard induction therapy. Serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, and also the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured before and 14 days after chemotherapy."n "nResults: Plasma malondialdehyde concentrations increased significantly (from a former 2.68±0.89 nmol/ml to 3.14±1.29 nmol/ml 14 days post chemotherapy (p=0.04. Moreover, the total plasma antioxidant capacity changed from 1.09±0.15 mmol/L to 1.02±0.14 mmol/L (p=0.005. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity decreased over time from 1157.24±543.61 U/gHb to 984.01±419.09 U/gHb (p=0.04 and 46.96±13.70 U/gHb to 41.40±6.44 U/gHb (p=0.02, respectively."n "nConclusion: In this study, an increase in malondialdehyde levels and a decrease in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity were observed. It seems that chemotherapy by cytarabine and daunorubicin generates enormous amounts of free radicals in patients undergoing the treatment for AML. Use of antioxidant supplementation during chemotherapy i is discouraged as it may interfere with the generation of free radicals that may be a part of the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs.

  10. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  11. Acute acquired comitant esotropia of childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesgaard, Helena; Vinding, Troels

    2015-01-01

    acute onset of comitant esotropia, available data on ophthalmologic, orthoptic and neurologic examinations. Children with neurological signs, AACE recurrence or hyperopia computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients without imaging were followed. RESULTS...... no obvious neurological signs at onset. Four significant risk factors for intracranial disease were identified as follows: larger esodeviation at distance, recurrence of AACE, neuro signs (papilledema) and older age at onset (>6 years). CONCLUSION: In a large case series of children with AACE and by review...... of literature, we identified seven cause-specific types of AACE. Intracranial disease was present in 6%, and four risk factors were identified to guide clinicians when to perform brain imaging. Findings suggest AACE of childhood to be differentiated from AACE of adulthood....

  12. Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in children with cancer: A single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragiannidis, Athanasios; Gombakis, Nikolaos; Papageorgiou, Maria; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Papageorgiou, Theodotis; Hatzistilianou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating early or late complication of treatment for childhood cancer related with a significant morbidity and mortality. We retrospectively studied survivors of childhood cancer. Overall, 287 patients were recorded in the databases and we identified three (1.04%) with t-MDS. The primary cancer diagnoses were Langerhans cell histiocytosis (one patient) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; two patients). The mean age of patients was 12.1 years. All patients had received systemic antifungal treatment for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis successfully treated with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B before diagnosis of t-MDS. Two patients (66%) remain alive after a median follow-up period of 3.5 years.

  13. Epigenetic regulators and their impact on therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Friederike; Levine, Ross L

    2016-03-01

    Genomic studies of hematologic malignancies have identified a spectrum of recurrent somatic alterations that contribute to acute myeloid leukemia initiation and maintenance, and which confer sensitivities to molecularly targeted therapies. The majority of these genetic events are small, site-specific alterations in DNA sequence. In more than two thirds of patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia mutations epigenetic modifiers are detected. Epigenetic modifiers encompass a large group of proteins that modify DNA at cytosine residues or cause post-translational histone modifications such as methylations or acetylations. Altered functions of these epigenetic modifiers disturb the physiological balance between gene activation and gene repression and contribute to aberrant gene expression regulation found in acute myeloid leukemia. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic modifiers mutated in acute myeloid leukemia, their clinical relevance and how a deeper understanding of their biological function has led to the discovery of new specific targets, some of which are currently tested in mechanism-based clinical trials.

  14. Breast cancer as second malignant neoplasm after acute myeloid leukemia: A rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer survivors after successful treatment of hematological and lymphoid malignancies are at an increased risk for second malignant neoplasms. As the overall survival has increased in these cancers, solid tumors are emerging as a serious long-term complication. In this article, we describe such a rare occurrence, in literature, of breast cancer after the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  15. Expression level of CDX2 gene in acute myeloid leukemia and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆瀆

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression and clinical significance of Caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2(CDX2) gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Methods Real time quantitative PCR(RQ-PCR) was used to test the expression level of CDX2 gene in 108 de novo AML patients and the clinical features

  16. Downregulation of the Wnt inhibitor CXXC5 predicts a better prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kühnl (Andrea); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); A. Ivey (Adam); R.K. Hills (Robert); K. Mills (Ken); R.E. Gale (Rosemary); M.F. Kaiser (Martin F.); R. Dillon (Richard); M. Joannides (Melanie); A. Gilkes (Amanda); T. Haferlach (Torsten); S. Schnittger (Susanne); E. Duprez (Estelle); D.C. Linch (David); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); B. Löwenberg (Bob); C.D. Baldus (Claudia D.); E. Solomon (Ellen); A.K. Burnett (Alan); D. Grimwade (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe gene CXXC5 on 5q31 is frequently deleted in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with del(5q), suggesting that inactivation of CXXC5 might play a role in leukemogenesis. Here, we investigated the functional and prognostic implications of CXXC5 expression in AML.CXXC5 mRNA was downregulated i

  17. Addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction chemotherapy improves survival in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Russell, Nigel H; Hills, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little survival improvement in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the last two decades. Improving induction treatment may improve the rate and quality of remission and consequently survival. In our previous trial, in younger patients, we showed improved sur...

  18. Defining the dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan; Cavenagh, Jamie; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Arecent source data meta-analysis of randomized trials in adults assessing the immunoconjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with standard chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia showed a significant survival benefit in patients without an adverse karyotype. It is not clear whether the optimal do...

  19. Common and Overlapping Oncogenic Pathways Contribute to the Evolution of Acute Myeloid Leukemias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvinlaug, Brynn T.; Chan, Wai-In; Bullinger, Lars; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Sears, Christopher; Foster, Donna; Lazic, Stanley E.; Okabe, Rachel; Benner, Axel; Lee, Benjamin H.; De Silva, Inusha; Valk, Peter J. M.; Delwel, Ruud; Armstrong, Scott A.; Doehner, Hartmut; Gilliland, D. Gary; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Fusion oncogenes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) promote self-renewal from committed progenitors, thereby linking transformation and self-renewal pathways. Like most cancers, AML is a genetically and biologically heterogeneous disease, but it is unclear whether transformation results from common or

  20. CONTINUOUS-INFUSION OF CEFTAZIDIME IN FEBRILE NEUTROPENIC PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAENEN, S; ERJAVEC, Z; UGES, DRA; DEVRIESHOSPERS, HG; DEJONGE, P; HALIE, MR

    1995-01-01

    Twelve febrile patients with severe neutropenia, who had undergone aggressive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia, were treated empirically with a continuous infusion of ceftazidime 100 mg/kg/day after a 500 mg loading dose, in order to study the pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime after continuous

  1. Pretransplant HLA mistyping in diagnostic samples of acute myeloid leukemia patients due to acquired uniparental disomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, V.; Sloan-Bena, F.; Cesbron, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Gagne, K.; Gimelli, S.; Heim, D.; Tichelli, A.; Delaunay, J.; Drouet, M.; Jendly, S.; Villard, J.; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Although acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) has been reported in relapse acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pretransplant aUPD involving chromosome 6 is poorly documented. Such events could be of interest because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from aUPD in leukemic cells may lead to erroneous res

  2. Effect of glutathione S-transferases on the survival of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Judith; Hokland, Peter; Pedersen, Lars;

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases (GST) on the survival of acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving adriamycin induction therapy. A total of 89 patients were included in the study. Patients who carried at least one GSTM...

  3. Raman spectroscopy for the assessment of acute myeloid leukemia: a proof of concept study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanna, R.; Tresoldi, C.; Lenferink, A.T.M.; Ronchi, P.; Morasso, C.; Mehn, D.; Bedoni, M.; Pignatari, C.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Ciceri, F.; Otto, C.; Gramatica, F.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a proliferative neoplasm, that if not properly treated can rapidly cause a fatal outcome. The diagnosis of AML is challenging and the first diagnostic step is the count of the percentage of blasts (immature cells) in bone marrow and blood sample, and their morphologic

  4. Study of nucleophosmin (NPM) gene mutation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张悦

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate nucleophosmin (NPM) gene mutations in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal cytogenetics and primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Methods Genomic DNA corresponding to exon 12 of NPM gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 40 AML patients (28 case untreated and 12 in first remission) and

  5. Evaluation of gene expression signatures predictive of cytogenetic and molecular subtypes of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balgobind, Brian V.; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; De Menezes, Renee X.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. J. C. M.; van Wering, Elisabeth R.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; de Bont, Evelien S. J. M.; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Baruchel, Andre; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Beverloo, H. Berna; Pieters, Rob; Zwaan, C. Michel; den Boer, Monique L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease characterized by non-random genetic aberrations related to outcome. The genetic subtype is currently detected by different diagnostic procedures which differ in success rate and/or specificity. Design and Methods We examined the

  6. Clinical relevance of molecular aberrations in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia at first relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachas, Costa; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Creutzig, Ursula; Kwidama, Zinia J.; Zwaan, C. Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; De Bont, Evelina S. J. M.; Elitzur, Sarah; Rizzari, Carmelo; de Haas, Valerie; Zimmermann, Martin; Cloos, Jacqueline; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Outcome for relapsed paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) remains poor. Strong prognostic factors at first relapse are lacking, which hampers optimization of therapy. We assessed the frequency of molecular aberrations (FLT3, NRAS, KRAS, KIT, WT1 and NPM1 genes) at first relapse in a large set (n

  7. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction of h...

  8. [Abnormal reaction for anaesthetics in a critically ill child with acute myeloid leukemia--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujok, Grzegorz; Knapik, Piotr; Macioł, Zbigniew

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a case report of an abnormal reaction for anaesthetics correlated with cytostatic therapy in the course of preparation time for bone marrow transplantation due to acute myeloid leukemia. Problems of pharmacological interaction of ketamine and benzodiazepines are emphasized. Special attention was paid to the risk of abnormal drug reactions during general anaesthesia in children with leukemia.

  9. Integrative prognostic risk score in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Damm (Frederik); M. Heuser (Michael); H.M. Morgan (Helen); K. Wagner (Katharina); K. Görlich (Kerstin); A. Großhennig (Anika); I. Hamwi (Iyas); F. Thol (Felicitas); E. Surdziel (Ewa); W. Fiedler (Walter); M. Lübbert (Michael); L. Kanz (Lothar); C. Reuter (Christoph); G. Heil (Gerhard); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); J. Krauter; A. Ganser (Arnold)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTo integrate available clinical and molecular information for cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients into one risk score, 275 CN-AML patients from multicenter treatment trials AML SHG Hannover 0199 and 0295 and 131 patients from HOVON/SAKK protocols as external c

  10. High-Dose Daunorubicin in Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Maertens, Johan; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Biemond, Bart J.; Vellenga, Edo; Kooy, Marinus van Marwijk; Verdonck, Leo F.; Beck, Joachim; Doehner, Hartmut; Gratwohl, Alois; Pabst, Thomas; Verhoef, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    Background A complete remission is essential for prolonging survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Daunorubicin is a cornerstone of the induction regimen, but the optimal dose is unknown. In older patients, it is usual to give daunorubicin at a dose of 45 to 50 mg per square meter o

  11. Infectious events prior to chemotherapy initiation in children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Portwine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary objective was to describe infectious complications in children with acute myeloid leukemia from presentation to the healthcare system to initiation of chemotherapy and to describe how these infections differ depending on neutropenia. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, population-based cohort study that included children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia diagnosed and treated at 15 Canadian centers. We evaluated infections that occurred between presentation to the healthcare system (for symptoms that led to the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia until initiation of chemotherapy. RESULTS: Among 328 children, 92 (28.0% were neutropenic at presentation. Eleven (3.4% had sterile-site microbiologically documented infection and four had bacteremia (only one Gram negative. Infection rate was not influenced by neutropenia. No child died from an infectious cause prior to chemotherapy initiation. CONCLUSION: It may be reasonable to withhold empiric antibiotics in febrile non-neutropenic children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia until initiation of chemotherapy as long as they appear well without a clinical focus of infection. Future work could examine biomarkers or a clinical score to identify children presenting with leukemia and fever who are more likely to have an invasive infection.

  12. Central diabetes insipidus preceding acute myeloid leukemia with t(3;12)(q26;p12)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; Vellenga, E; Adriaanse, R; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    2000-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with polyuria and polydipsia. ii diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus (DI) was made, which turned out to be the first sign of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a balanced translocation between chromosome 3 and 12 t(3;12)(q26;p12). The patien

  13. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing

  14. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome, in Adults; AML (Adult) With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; AML (Adult) With Del(5q); AML (Adult) With Inv(16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(16;16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary AML (Adult); Untreated AML (Adult)

  15. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  16. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Xiong; Jiangwei Yan; Songnian Hu; Xiangdong Fang; Yadong Yang; Hai Wang; Jie Li; Shaobin Wang; Yanming Li; Yaran Yang; Kan Cai; Xiuyan Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequenc-ing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facil-itated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppres-sors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expres-sion patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phag-ocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress dif-ferentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  17. Acute isolated appendicitis due to Aspergillus carneus in a neutropenic child with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decembrino, Nunzia; Zecca, Marco; Tortorano, Anna Maria; Mangione, Francesca; Lallitto, Fabiola; Introzzi, Francesca; Bergami, Elena; Marone, Piero; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Cavanna, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of isolated acute appendicitis due to Aspergillus carneus in a neutropenic child with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated according to the AIEOP AML 2002/01 protocol. Despite prophylaxis with acyclovir, ciprofloxacin and fluconazole administered during the neutropenic phase, 16 days after the end of chemotherapy the child developed fever without identified infective foci, which prompted a therapy shift to meropenem and liposomial amphotericin B. After five days of persisting fever he developed ingravescent abdominal lower right quadrant pain. Abdominal ultrasound was consistent with acute appendicitis and he underwent appendectomy with prompt defervescence. PAS+ fungal elements were found at histopathology examination of the resected vermiform appendix, and galactomannan was low positive. A. carneus, a rare species of Aspergillus formerly placed in section Flavipedes and recently considered a member of section Terrei, was identified in the specimen. Treatment with voriconazole was promptly started with success. No other site of Aspergillus localization was detected. Appendicitis is rarely caused by fungal organisms and isolated intestinal aspergillosis without pulmonary infection is unusual. To our knowledge, this is the first report of infection due to A. carneus in a child and in a primary gastrointestinal infection.

  18. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  19. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Mayur D; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S; Kota, Vamsi K

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with constitutional 47,XXY karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla M. Jalbut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (KS, a 47,XXY chromosomal abnormality, has been shown to be associated with a number of malignancies, but has not been linked to acute leukemias to date. We present a case of a 54-year-old male diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with monocytic differentiation, whose cytogenetic and subsequent FISH analyses revealed a constitutional 47,XXY karyotype. We also review and discuss relevant prior literature.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inical trial with GRASPA, Red Blood cells encapsulating L-Asparaginase, in patients affected by Acute Myeloi...ndition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...ion E.1.2Version 14.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000886 E.1.2Term Acute...old and less than 85 years old- Newly diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or post myelodysplastic syndrom

  2. Detection of FLT3 Oncogene Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdooh Gari

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available FLT3 (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. FLT3 is also expressed on leukemia blasts in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. In order to determine the frequency of FLT3 oncogene mutations, we analyzed genomic DNA of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE were used for FLT3 exons 11, 14, and 15, followed by direct DNA sequencing. Two different types of functionally important FLT 3 mutations have been identified. Those mutations were unique to patients with inv(16, t(15:17 or t(8;21 and comprised fifteen cases with internal tandem duplication (ITD mutation in the juxtamembrane domain and eleven cases with point mutation (exon 20, Asp835Tyr. The high frequency of the flt3 proto-oncogene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia AML suggests a key role for the receptor function. The association of FLT3 mutations with chromosomal abnormalities invites speculation as to the link between these two changes in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemiaAML. Furthermore, CSGE method has shown to be a rapid and sensitive screening method for detection of nucleotide alteration in FLT3 gene. Finally, this study reports, for the first time in Saudi Arabia, mutations in the human FLT3 gene in acute myeloid leukemia AML patients.

  3. Pseudo-Guillain–Barré syndrome masking acute myeloid leukemia relapse: Brief report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi El Karak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS relapse is not a rare presentation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML as its incidence ranges between 2% and 9%. It manifests with meningeal leukemia, cranial nerve palsies or cerebral mesenchymal myeloid sarcoma. We herein report the case of a 69 year-old female that presented a pseudo-Guillain–Barré syndrome masking an AML CNS relapse. Her symptoms completely resolved upon administration of a tailored treatment. This case suggests that puzzling neurological manifestations in patients with a history of AML should be considered as a CNS recurrence and investigated accordingly even in the context of normal imaging findings.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Different Approaches to Measure Treatment Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley B.; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Wang, Kathleen Y.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Onciu, Mihaela; Jacobsen, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Dahl, Gary V.; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Degar, Barbara; Leung, Wing; Downing, James R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Campana, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), initial treatment response by morphologic analysis of bone marrow predicts long-term outcome. Response can now be assessed by minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring with flow cytometry or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We determined the relation among the results of these approaches and their prognostic value. Patients and Methods In the multicenter AML02 study, follow-up bone marrow samples from 203 children and adolescents with newly diagnosed AML were examined by flow cytometry (n = 1,514), morphology (n = 1,382), and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts (n = 508). Results were correlated with treatment outcome. Results Among 1,215 samples with less than 5% leukemic myeloblasts by morphology, 100 (8.2%) were MRD positive (≥ 0.1%) by flow cytometry, whereas 96 (57.5%) of the 167 samples with ≥ 5% blasts were MRD negative. Virtually all (308 of 311; 99.0%) MRD-negative samples by PCR were also MRD negative by flow cytometry. However, only 19 (9.6%) of the 197 PCR-positive samples were flow cytometry positive, with analyses of AML1-ETO and CBFβ-MYH11 accounting for most discrepancies, whereas eight of 13 MLL-positive samples had detectable MRD by flow cytometry. MRD by flow cytometry after induction 1 or 2 predicted lower event-free survival and higher relapse rate (P < .001) and was an independent prognostic factor in a multivariable analysis; prediction was not improved by morphologic information or molecular findings. Conclusion In childhood AML, morphologic assessment of treatment response has limited value if MRD is measured by flow cytometry. MLL fusion transcripts can provide prognostic information in some patients, whereas monitoring of AML1-ETO and CBFβ-MYH11 transcripts is largely uninformative. PMID:22965955

  5. IGK with conserved IGΚV/IGΚJ repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Xia, Miaoran; Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yin, C Cameron

    2015-11-17

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig κ light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy.

  6. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Dong (Fan); R.K. Brynes; N. Tidow; K. Welte (Karl); B. Löwenberg (Bob); I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. In severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction

  7. Decreased PARP and procaspase-2 protein levels are associated with cellular drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Amy; den Boer, Monique L; Kazemier, Karin M; Beverloo, H Berna; von Bergh, Anne R M; Janka-Schaub, Gritta E; Pieters, Rob

    2005-09-01

    Drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with impaired ability to induce apoptosis. To elucidate causes of apoptotic defects, we studied the protein expression of Apaf-1, procaspases-2, -3, -6, -7, -8, -10, and poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in cells from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; n = 43) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 10). PARP expression was present in all B-lineage samples, but absent in 4 of 15 T-lineage ALL samples and 3 of 10 AML cases, which was not caused by genomic deletions. PARP expression was a median 7-fold lower in T-lineage ALL (P < .001) and 10-fold lower in AML (P < .001) compared with B-lineage ALL. PARP expression was 4-fold lower in prednisolone, vincristine and L-asparaginase (PVA)-resistant compared with PVA-sensitive ALL patients (P < .001). Procaspase-2 expression was 3-fold lower in T-lineage ALL (P = .022) and AML (P = .014) compared with B-lineage ALL. In addition, procaspase-2 expression was 2-fold lower in PVA-resistant compared to PVA-sensitive ALL patients (P = .042). No relation between apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf-1), procaspases-3, -6, -7, -8, -10, and drug resistance was found. In conclusion, low baseline expression of PARP and procaspase-2 is related to cellular drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  8. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  9. Emotional Functioning and School Contentment in Adolescent Survivors of Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Infratentorial Astrocytoma, and Wilms Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóhannsdóttir, Inga M; Moum, Torbjørn; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Wesenberg, Finn; Hjorth, Lars; Schrøder, Henrik; Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Jónmundsson, Gudmundur; Loge, Jon H

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Cancer in childhood may disrupt normal developmental processes and cause psychosocial problems in adolescent survivors of childhood cancers (ACCSs). Previous studies report inconsistent findings. Study aims were to assess subjective well-being (SWB), psychological distress, and school contentment in survivors of three dissimilar childhood cancers. Patients and methods: Nordic patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), infratentorial astrocytoma (IA), and Wilms tumor (WT) in childhood from 1985 to 2001, aged ≥1 year at diagnosis, and aged 13-18 years at the time of study were eligible for this questionnaire-based survey that included items on SWB, psychological distress, school contentment, self-esteem, and personality traits; 65% (151/231) responded. An age-equivalent group from a Norwegian health survey (n=7910) served as controls. Results: The median age of ACCSs was 16 years; 52% were males. ACCSs reported better SWB (p=0.004) and self-esteem (p<0.001). They had fewer social problems in school (p=0.004) and their school contentment tended to be higher than controls. SWB and school contentment were positively influenced by self-esteem. However, ACCSs reported higher levels of psychological distress (p=0.002), mostly attributable to general worrying. No significant differences in outcomes were found across diagnoses, and time since diagnosis did not significantly affect the results. Conclusion: The overall emotional functioning of ACCSs was good, possibly due to changes in their perception of well-being after having survived a life-threatening disease. However, they seemed more worried than their peers. This may cause an additional strain at a vulnerable period in life.

  10. High syndecan-1 levels in acute myeloid leukemia are associated with bleeding, thrombocytopathy, endothelial cell damage, and leukocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Mette Vestskov; Leinøe, Eva Birgitte; Johansson, Pär I;

    2013-01-01

    The risk of hemorrhage is influenced by multiple factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We investigated whether hemorrhage in AML patients was associated with endothelial perturbation, potentially caused by thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction and leukocytosis. Biomarkers of endothelial...

  11. Results of a randomized trial in children with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia : Medical Research Council AML12 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Webb, David K. H.; Howman, Andrew J.; De Graaf, Siebold S. N.; Harrison, Christine J.; Wheatley, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The Medical Research Council Acute Myeloid Leukaemia 12 (MRC AML12) trial (children) addressed the optimal anthracenedione/anthracycline in induction and the optimal number of courses of consolidation chemotherapy. 504 children (

  12. The study on relationship between age and cytogenetic subgroups in 640 patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cytogenetic characteristicsof different age subgroups in patients with acute myeloid leukemia(AML),and to explore the relationship between age and cytogenetics.Methods Between

  13. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic...... syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients...... conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required....

  14. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  15. Histone deacetylases: a common molecular target for differentiation treatment of acute myeloid leukemias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minucci, S; Nervi, C; Lo Coco, F; Pelicci, P G

    2001-05-28

    Recent discoveries have identified key molecular events in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), caused by chromosomal rearrangements of the transcription factor RAR (resulting in a fusion protein with the product of other cellular genes, such as PML). Oligomerization of RAR, through a self-association domain present in PML, imposes an altered interaction with transcriptional co-regulators (NCoR/SMRT). NCoR/SMRT are responsible for recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDACs), which is required for transcriptional repression of PML-RAR target genes, and for the transforming potential of the fusion protein. Oligomerization and altered recruitment of HDACs are also responsible for transformation by the fusion protein AML1-ETO, extending these mechanisms to other forms of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) and suggesting that HDAC is a common target for myeloid leukemias. Strikingly, AML1-ETO expression blocks retinoic acid (RA) signaling in hematopoietic cells, suggesting that interference with the RA pathway (genetically altered in APL) by HDAC recruitment may be a common theme in AMLs. Treatment of APLs with RA, and of other AMLs with RA plus HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), results in myeloid differentiation. Thus, activation of the RA signaling pathway and inhibition of HDAC activity might represent a general strategy for the differentiation treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  16. A novel application of furazolidone: anti-leukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Jiang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common malignant myeloid disorder of progenitor cells in myeloid hematopoiesis and exemplifies a genetically heterogeneous disease. The patients with AML also show a heterogeneous response to therapy. Although all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA has been successfully introduced to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, it is rather ineffective in non-APL AML. In our present study, 1200 off-patent marketed drugs and natural compounds that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA were screened for anti-leukemia activity using the retrovirus transduction/transformation assay (RTTA. Furazolidone (FZD was shown to inhibit bone marrow transformation mediated by several leukemia fusion proteins, including AML1-ETO. Furazolidone has been used in the treatment of certain bacterial and protozoan infections in human and animals for more than sixty years. We investigated the anti-leukemic activity of FZD in a series of AML cells. FZD displayed potent antiproliferative properties at submicromolar concentrations and induced apoptosis in AML cell lines. Importantly, FZD treatment of certain AML cells induced myeloid cell differentiation by morphology and flow cytometry for CD11b expression. Furthermore, FZD treatment resulted in increased stability of tumor suppressor p53 protein in AML cells. Our in vitro results suggest furazolidone as a novel therapeutic strategy in AML patients.

  17. Risk factors for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: After successful treatment of malignant diseases, therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia have emerged as significant problems. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to investigate outcome and risk factors in patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Between 1981 and 2006, 461 patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome o...

  18. Characteristics and Prognosis of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Internal Tandem Duplication in the FLT3 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Constitutive activation of the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) receptor by internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the juxtamembrane region has been described in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. FLT3/ITDs are present in about 20-30% of all acute myeloid leukemia cases. It has been shown that the mutation is correlated with worse prognosis. However, none of the previous studies investigated which FAB subtype is associated with higher percentage of FLT3/ITD, thus the reason for ...

  19. Cyanobacteria from terrestrial and marine sources contain apoptogens able to overcome chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81) cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemi...

  20. Epidural spinal cord compression as initial clinical presentation of an acute myeloid leukaemia: case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dominique N'Dri Oka; Alpha Boubacar Bah; André Valentin Tokpa; Louis Derou

    2016-01-01

    Epidural localization of myeloid leukaemia is rarely reported.Spinal cord compression as an initial presentation of acute myeloid leukaemia is extremely rare.This is a report of a 17-year-old black boy who presented to emergency department with neurological symptoms of spinal cord compression.Imaging modalities showed multiple soft tissue masses in the epidural space.After surgical treatment,histopathological examination of the epidural mass showed myeloid leukaemia cells infiltration.Literature review on Medline and "scholar Google" database was done.The characteristics and management of extra-medullary leukaemia are discussed.Granulocytic sarcoma,myeloid sarcoma or chloroma with acute myeloid leukaemia should be considered as part of epidural spinal cord compression.Therefore surgery is indicated on an emergent basis.

  1. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Acute Panmyelosis with Myelofibrosis - A Rare Subtype of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathagata Chatterjee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One case of acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis (APMF is being reported. A 45 year old male presented with abrupt onset of rapidly progressing low backache, weakness and pancytopenia. On examination there was no organomegaly. Peripheral blood examination revealed normocytic normochromic red blood cells with 10% circulating blasts. Flowcytometric examination of peripheral blood revealed blasts which were positive for CD 34 ,HLA- DR and myeloid associated antigens (i.e. CD13 and CD33.Blasts were negative for anti MPO. Bone marrow aspirate resulted in a dry tap. Bone marrow biopsy revealed panmyeloid proliferation with scattered blasts which were CD 34 positive on imunohistochemistry and negative for anti MPO. Reticulin stain showed grade III myelofibrosis (WHO. Differential diagnosis considered included AML-M7, MDS-RAEB II and AML with myelodysplasia . He was started on chemotherapy [idarubicin and cytarabine; 3+7 induction regimen followed by three cycles of HIDAC (High dose cytosine arabinoside] after which patient was in complete morphological remission with markedly reduced bone marrow fibrosis. He is now being worked up for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Patient is asymptomatic at eight months of diagnosis. In conclusion these patients should be managed aggressively with AML therapy and this case report reaffirms the fact that APMF is subtype of AML.

  3. Effect and Prognostic Analysis of Treatment for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Chinese Drugs Combined with Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓梅; 刘锋; 郑春梅; 李柳; 刘池; 张姗姗; 肖海燕; 杨晓红; 王洪志; 许勇钢; 胡乃平; 麻柔

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical efficacy of Chinese drugs combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia(AML) and to investigate the prognostic relevance of the main parameters in AML treated with integrative medicine.Methods:Forty AML patients hospitalized at the authors' hospital were treated with Chinese drugs and chemotherapy.The routine examination,immunophenotype and karyotype analyses were carried out.The clinical efficacy was observed and the prognostic factors were analy...

  4. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  5. Nucleophosmin mutation analysis in acute myeloid leukaemia: Immunohistochemistry as a surrogate for molecular techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Chopra; Sushant Soni; Haraprasad Pati; Dev Kumar; Rahul Diwedi; Deepak Verma; Garima Vishwakama; Sameer Bakhshi; Suman Kumar; Ajay Gogia; Rajive Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mutation of nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene in the absence of FLT3-ITD (FMS related tyrosine kinase 3 - internal tandem duplications) mutation carries a good prognosis in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). NPM1, a multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm, gets trapped in the cytoplasm when mutated. Immunohistochemical (IHC) demonstration of its aberrant cytoplasmic location (NPMc+) has been suggested as a simple...

  6. SAMHD1 is a biomarker for cytarabine response and a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Constanze; Oellerich, Thomas; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Thomas, Dominique; Flick, Robert; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Kaderali, Lars; Stegmann, Lena; Cremer, Anjali; Martin, Margarethe; Lohmeyer, Julian; Michaelis, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Schliemann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoside analog cytarabine (Ara-C) is an essential component of primary and salvage chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After cellular uptake, Ara-C is converted into its therapeutically active triphosphate metabolite, Ara-CTP, which exerts antileukemic effects, primarily by inhibiting DNA synthesis in proliferating cells. Currently, a substantial fraction of patients with AML fail to respond effectively to Ara-C therapy, and reliable biomarkers for predicting the th...

  7. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia.

  8. Shortcomings in the clinical evaluation of new drugs: acute myeloid leukemia as paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Roland B.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Weiss, Noel S.; Larson, Richard A.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2010-01-01

    Drugs introduced over the past 25 years have benefitted many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and provided cure for some. Still, AML remains difficult to treat, and most patients will eventually die from their disease. Therefore, novel drugs and drug combinations are under intense investigation, and promising results eagerly awaited and embraced. However, drug development is lengthy and costs are staggering. While the phase 1–phase 2–phase 3 sequence of clinical drug testing has rem...

  9. [Necrotizing tonsillitis and renal vein thrombosis due to acute myeloid leukaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Javed; Josefsson, Pernilla; Rømeling, Frans

    2012-09-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with severe tonsillitis with unilateral necrotizing tonsillitis. She suddenly got fever, malaise, difficulties swallowing, pain in the throat and deterioration despite four days of penicillin treatment. During hospitalisation, she experienced abdominal pain, and blood tests showed pancytopenia. She was transferred to a haematological department, where a bone marrow biopsy showed acute myeloid leukaemia. Subsequently, an abdominal computed tomography with intravenous contrast revealed bilateral renal vein thrombosis, probably because of coagulopathy due to leukaemia.

  10. Monosomal karyotype among adult acute myeloid leukemia: clinical characteristic and prognostic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯茹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics and prognostic value of monosomal karyotype(MK)patients in adult acute myeloid leukemia(AML).Methods We retrospectively studied 45 patients of MK+in newly-diagnosed adult AML in our center from Oct 2000 to Dec2012.Clinical characteristics,cytogenetic data and prognostic features were analyzed in the cohort of MK+patients.Results MK was found in 45 patients(19.0%)

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia with basophilic differentiation in a 3-year-old Standardbred gelding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, Mary Catherine; Setlakwe, Emile; Sallaway, John; Wood, Darren; Fromstein, Jordan; Arroyo, Luis G.

    2016-01-01

    A 3-year-old Standardbred gelding with a history of pyrexia, persistent hemorrhage from the oral cavity, and a large, soft swelling at the junction of the caudal aspect of the mandibular rami and proximal neck was evaluated. The horse had neutropenia and anemia, with atypical granulated cells in a blood smear. Additional tests confirmed acute myeloid leukemia with basophilic differentiation, which has been reported in humans, cats, dogs, and cattle but not horses. PMID:27708445

  12. Wnt/ß-Catenin: A New Therapeutic Approach to Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown genetic and epigenetic aberrations resulting in aberrant activation of the Wingless-Int (Wnt pathway, thus influencing the initiation and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Of major importance, these findings may lead to novel treatment strategies exploiting targeted modulation of Wnt signaling. This paper comprises the latest status of knowledge concerning the role of Wnt pathway alteration in AML and outlines future lines of research and their clinical perspectives.

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: a case-control study in Yorkshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C; McKinney, P A; Roberts, B; Richards, I D; Bird, C C

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a case-control analysis of 161 cases of acute myeloid leukemia and 310 matched hospital controls. The patients were interviewed between 1982 and 1986. The study shows a weak association for cases with previous malignant disease. Furnace workers show excess risks. Urticaria and vertigo are in excess, as well as some aspects of family medical histories, including multiple sclerosis and cases of leukemia/lymphoma in blood relations.

  14. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna; Österroos, Albin; Hassan, Sadia Bashir; Gullbo, Joachim; Rickardson, Linda; Jarvius, Malin; Nygren, Peter; Fryknäs, Mårten; Höglund, Martin; Larsson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 mu M drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low...

  15. [Key molecular mechanisms associated with cell malignant transformation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, N N; Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer, along with cardiovascular disorders, is one of the most important problems of healthcare. Pathologies of the hematopoietic system are the most prevalent in patients under 30 years of age, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is widespread and difficult to treat. The review considers the mechanisms that play a significant role in AML cell malignant transformation and shows the contributions of certain genes to both remission and resistance of AML cells to various treatments.

  16. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  17. INCIDENCE OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA AFTER BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giovanna Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women and the leading cause of death among middle-aged women. Early detection by mammography screening and improvement of therapeutic options have increased breast cancer survival rates, with the consequence that late side effects of cancer treatment become increasingly important. In particular, patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, commonly including alkylating agents and anthracyclines, are at increased risk of developing leukemia, further enhanced by the use of radiotherapy. In the last few years also the use of growth factors seems to increase the risk of secondary leukemia. The purpose of this review is to update epidemiology of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms occurring in breast cancer patients

  18. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana;

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform ...

  19. [Advances of study on prognostic factors of molecular biology in acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian-Jie; Xu, Xiao-Ping

    2010-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a group of diseases with a conspicuous heterogeneity. Following the development of cytogenetics, multiple reproducible chromosome aberrations have been discovered in AML, many of which not only are diagnostic markers for specific AML subtypes but also significant prognostic factors for determining complete remission (CR), relapse risk, and overall survival (OS). However, with the foundation of available chromosome analysis, a large group of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, 40% to 49% of adults and 25% of children had not been found abnormality of chromosome karyotype under microscope. These so-called cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients have usually been classified in an intermediate-risk prognostic category. Nevertheless, the outcome of the CN-AML patients are varied in clinical studies, likely because there exist diverse gene mutations in these patients according to recent researches. Those mutations at the molecular level, on basis of which AML could be further classified, are significantly associated with CN-AML patients and offer potential targets for specific therapeutic studies. The review focuses on research advances abroad in this field including gene mutations suggesting bad prognosis such as FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 gene mutation, Baalc gene and ETS-related gene hyperexpression, Wilms' tumor gene mutation and other gene mutations as well as gene mutations suggesting good prognosis such as nucleophosmin gene mutation, mixed lineage leukemia-partial tandem duplication, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α gene mutation.

  20. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR IN CHILDHOOD ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; LIAO Qing-kui; LUO Chun-hua

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship among glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) level, immunological classification and clinical efficacy of chemotherapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) children. Methods: The GCR level of venous blood lymphocytes was measured by receptor radioligand binding assay in 50 cases with childhood ALL and 41 normal children. The immunological classification of 32 children with ALL was analyzed by ABC immunoenzymatic method. Results: The GCR number in venous blood lymphocytes of normal children was 4651±1617 binding sites/cell. The normal range (95%) was 1482-7800 binding sites/cell. The GCR level of 50 cases with ALL (6695±5256 binding sites/cell) was significantly higher than that of the normal ones (t=2.50, P<0.05). The GCR level of the ALL children with good prognosis was significantly higher than that of bad prognosis (t=4.39,P<0.001). The relationship between immunological classification and GCR level of 32 cases with children ALL was as follows: GCR level of T-ALL and B-ALL were significantly lower than AUL, C-ALL and pre-B-ALL; the prognosis of T-ALL and B-ALL was also bad; the GCR level of the group with good prognosis was significantly higher than that with bad prognosis in all immunological types. Conclusion: The GCR level of the peripheral venous blood lymphocytes in children ALL may be an important biochemistry indicator and used to predict prognosis and guide combination chemotherapy. The relationship between GCR and immunological classification can be useful to the expectation of prognosis.

  1. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities and alteration of microRNAs in acute myeloid leukemia and response to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahjahani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with.

  2. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Salehi Omran MR, Nooreddini H, Baghdadi F. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2:51-54. AbstractAcute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC is an atypical disease followed by respiratory or gastrointestinal infection, high fever, which is accompanied with rapid alteration of consciousness and seizures. This disease is seen nearly exclusively in East Asian infants and children who had previously a good health. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. This disease has a poor prognosis, often culminating in profound morbidity and mortality. A 22-month infant with ANEC hospitalized in Amirkola Children Hospital has been evaluated. References1. Mizuguchi M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a novel form of acute encephalopathy prevalent in Japan and Taiwan. Brain Dev. 1997 Mar;19(2:81-92. Review.2. Wang HS, Huang SC. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood. Chang Gung Med J 2001 Jan;24(1:1-10.3. Campistol J, Gassió R, Pineda M, Fernandez-Alvarez E. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (infantile bilateral  thalamic necrosis: two non-Japanese cases. Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Nov;40(11:771-4.4. Ito Y, Ichiyama T, Kimura H, Shibata M, Ishiwada N, Kuroki H, Furukawa S, Morishima T. Detection of influenza virus RNA by reverse transcription-PCR and proinflammatory cytokines in influenza-virus-associated encephalopathy. J Med Virol 1999 Aug;58(4:420-5.5. Sugaya N. Influenza-associated encephalopathy in Japan. Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 2002 Apr;13(2:79-84. Review.6. Skelton BW, Hollingshead MC, Sledd AT, Phillips CD, Castillo M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease. Pediatr Radiol 2008 Jul; 38(7:810-3.7. Wong AM, Simon EM, Zimmerman RA, Wang HS, Toh CH, Ng SH. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood

  3. Treatment and long-term results in children with acute myeloid leukaemia treated according to the AIEOP AML protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pession, A; Rondelli, R; Basso, G; Rizzari, C; Testi, A M; Fagioli, F; De Stefano, P; Locatelli, F

    2005-12-01

    Since 1982, four consecutive studies on childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (namely LAM-82, -87, -87M and -92) have been conducted in Italy by the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) group. The induction therapy of the first three studies consisted of daunorubicin and cytarabine structured in a 3+7 backbone. In the most recent protocol (LAM92), patients received two induction courses including idarubicin, cytarabine and etoposide. Patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (20% of diagnoses) were included in LAM-87 and 87M studies. Postremissional therapy significantly changed over time, with an ever-increasing role given to stem cell transplantation (SCT). The long-term outcome of patients enrolled in the LAM-82, 87 and 87M studies was comparable, whereas that of children treated according to LAM-92 study was significantly better (P<0.005). Either allogeneic or autologous SCT was employed as consolidation therapy in more than 75% of cases enrolled in this latter study. Patients enrolled in the LAM-92 study were stratified in standard and high-risk groups with different outcome (67 vs 47%, respectively, P=0.04). Altogether, the results obtained in these four studies have permitted a progressive refinement of treatment, contributing to the structure of the ongoing LAM-2002 protocol that stratifies patients according to the presence of definite genetic anomalies and response to induction therapy.

  4. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. In severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction pathways for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may play a part in the progression to acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS. We isolated genomic DNA and RNA from hematopoietic cells obtained from two patients with acute m...

  5. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  6. Acquired hemoglobin H disease in a patient with aplastic anemia evolving into acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Figueiredo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The prognosis of severe aplastic anemia has improved since the introduction of bone marrow transplantation and treatment with antithymocyte globulin. In contrast to the success of these protocols, studies with long term follow-up have shown the occurrence of clonal diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia in aplastic anemia. CASE REPORT: We report the first case of a Brazilian patient with aplastic anemia who developed myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia showing acquired hemoglobin H and increased fetal hemoglobin.

  7. Novel targeted therapy for acute myeloid leukemia with a dual FLT3 and JAK2 inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-jun LOU

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly malignant hematopoietic tumor.The use of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide,which began from China,has resulted in revolution of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) that appears curable in more than 70% of patients[1].However,the treatment regimen for nonAPL AML particularly in older patients has progressed little in the past two decades.Intensive efforts have been made toward the development of novel target agents,which are based on newfound pathophysiological events crucial for cancers.

  8. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Isolated Trisomy 19 Associated with Diffuse Myelofibrosis and Osteosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stelling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary myelofibrosis (PMF, per WHO criteria, is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm that usually presents with a proliferation of granulocytic and megakaryocytic lineages with an associated fibrous deposition and extramedullary hematopoiesis. The bone marrow histologic findings of this disorder are typically characterized by the presence of myeloid metaplasia with an associated reactive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and osteosclerosis. However, marked myelofibrosis is not solely confined to PMF and may also be associated with other conditions including but not limited to acute megakaryoblastic leukemias (FAB AML-M7. Here, we describe a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with marked myelofibrosis with osteosclerosis and an isolated trisomy 19. A 19-year-old male presented with severe bone pain of one week duration with a complete blood cell count and peripheral smear showing a mild anemia and occasional circulating blasts. A follow up computed tomography (CT scan showed diffuse osteosclerosis with no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Subsequently, the bone marrow biopsy showed markedly sclerotic bony trabeculae and a hypercellular marrow with marked fibrosis and intervening sheets of immature myeloid cells consistent with myeloblasts with monocytic differentiation. Importantly, these myeloblasts were negative for megakaryocytic markers (CD61 and vWF, erythroid markers (hemoglobin and E-cadherin, and lymphoid markers (CD3, CD19, and TdT. Metaphase cytogenetics showed an isolated triosomy 19 with no JAK2 V617F mutation. The patient was treated with induction chemotherapy followed by allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which subsequently resulted in a rapid resolution of bone marrow fibrosis, suggesting graft-anti-fibrosis effect. This is a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis with trisomy 19 that may provide insights into the prognosis and

  10. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.;

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis......--that proposes that the risk of childhood ALL is reduced when early childhood infections induce qualitative and quantitative changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis that increase plasma cortisol levels. This may directly eliminate leukemic cells as well as preleukemic cells for the ALL subsets...

  11. Therapy-induced secondary acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in a pediatric patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Daniel N; Morris, Heather D; Feusner, James H; Koduru, Prasad; Wilson, Kathleen; Timmons, Charles F; Cavalier, MaryEllen; Luu, Hung S

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is classified based upon recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. The t(15;17)(q24.1;q21.1) abnormality is found in 5% to 8% of de novo acute myeloid leukemia and is diagnostic of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The translocation results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor-α (RARA) gene at 17q21.1 and the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene at 15q24.1. Standard APL therapy is a combination of all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Anthracycline treatment is associated with secondary clonal chromosomal aberrations that can lead to therapy-related secondary myeloid neoplasms. We present a pediatric case of relapsed APL coexistent with treatment-associated secondary myeloid neoplasm with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1).

  12. Small Intestinal Obstruction with Intussusception due to Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Kini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is known to precede the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML and can be the only clinical manifestation. Gastrointestinal involvement by AML is rare with the commonest site being small intestine. Patients present with vague abdominal pain and/or obstruction. Prognosis is usually poor as most of them rapidly progress to AML. We report a case of 25-year-old man with complaints of abdominal pain and vomiting of one-year duration. OGD scopy revealed infiltration of lesser curvature of stomach. Subsequently patient came back within a week with signs and symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction for which an ileal resection was done. Although the histology of stomach biopsy and ileal segments showing similar features were thought to be non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma. Bone marrow investigations confirmed involvement by AML. Patient succumbed to the disease due to extensive involvement of AML. This case highlights the primary gastrointestinal manifestation of AML which can often prove to be a diagnostic difficulty clinically and histologically. Prompt diagnosis is essential to hasten the management.

  13. Hematopoietic stem cells express multiple myeloid markers: implications for the origin and targeted therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Taussig, David C.; Pearce, Daniel J; Simpson, Catherine; Rohatiner, Ama Z; Lister, T. Andrew; Kelly, Gavin; Luongo, Jennifer L.; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn-aël H.; Bonnet, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generally regarded as being devoid of the markers expressed by differentiated blood cells, the lineage-specific antigens. However, recent work suggests that genes associated with the myeloid lineage are transcribed in mouse HSCs. Here, we explore whether myeloid genes are actually translated in human HSCs. We show that CD33, CD13, and CD123, well-established myeloid markers, are expressed on human long-term repopulating cells from cord blood and bone ...

  14. EFFECTS OF CURCUMIN ON PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA CELLS HL-60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the curcumin killing leukemia cells in vitro,. Methods: The myeloid leukemic cell line HL-60 was studied by using cell culture, flow cytometrydetermining DNA content and TUNEL method measuring apoptotic cell percentage. Results: The data showed that curcumin selectively inhibited proliferation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) HL-60 cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth inhibition rate was gradually increased and reached the peak at concentration of 25 m mol/L curcumin at 24h. The sub-G1 peak appeared after 12h treatment and was increased to 34.4% at 24h. The TUNEL method further certified that apoptotic cells reached 41% at the same phase. Conclusion: curcumin possesses obvious potent of anti-leukemia cell proliferation, which is contributed to the induction of HL-60 cells apoptosis. The concentration and action time of curcumin in vitro provide some reference for clinical use.

  15. In vivo RNAi screening for the identification of oncogenes and tumor suppressors in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Ying

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by uncontrolled expansion of immature myeloid cells in the hematopoietic tissues. Alternative splicing and epigenetic regulation are two mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of AML. In order to identify the essential...... splicing factors or epigenetic regulators for AML maintenance, we used a pool-based shRNA in vivo screens in a mouse model of human CEBPA mutated AML. Through these approaches, we found the splicing factor RBM25, and the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 are of functional importance in AML progression....... Characterization of RBM25 indicates that low expression of RBM25 promotes expansion of both murine and human leukemic cells. Mechanistic studies show that RBM25 regulate splicing dysregulation of several crucial genes in AML. In particular, we demonstrate that RBM25 knockdown leads to the accumulation of the anti...

  16. Recurrent DNMT3A R882 Mutations in Chinese Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations of DNMT3A gene have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the entire coding sequences of DNMT3A gene by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing in Chinese patients with myeloid malignancies. R882 mutations were found in 12/182 AML and in 4/51 MDS, but not in either 79 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), or 57 myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or 4 chronic monomyelocytic leukemia. No other DNMT3A mutation...

  17. Association of acute myeloid leukemia’s most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jonathan M.; Zeidner, Joshua F.; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L.; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D.; Rosner, Gary L.; Smith, B. Douglas; Jones, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the “gold standard” immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone’s most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34+CD38− leukemia cells. The CD34+CD38− leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34+CD38− leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34+ leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34+CD38− leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone’s most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for “clinically-relevant” leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. PMID:26819054

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against ... may include the following: Combination chemotherapy plus central nervous system sanctuary therapy with intrathecal chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  19. General Information about Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against ... may include the following: Combination chemotherapy plus central nervous system sanctuary therapy with intrathecal chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  20. Pharmacogenetics influence treatment efficacy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Dalhoff, Kim; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2008-01-01

    in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate...

  1. Pharmacogenetics Influence Treatment Efficacy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devidsen, M.L.; Dalhoff, K.; Schmiegelow, K.

    2008-01-01

    in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far Focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate...

  2. Results of the AIEOP AML 2002/01 multicenter prospective trial for the treatment of children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pession, Andrea; Masetti, Riccardo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Putti, Maria Caterina; Casale, Fiorina; Fagioli, Franca; Luciani, Matteo; Lo Nigro, Luca; Menna, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Santoro, Nicola; Testi, Anna Maria; Zecca, Marco; Biondi, Andrea; Pigazzi, Martina; Rutella, Sergio; Rondelli, Roberto; Basso, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Franco

    2013-07-11

    We evaluated the outcome of 482 children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 trial. Treatment was stratified according to risk group; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was used in high-risk (HR) children. Patients with core binding factor leukemia achieving complete remission (CR) after the first induction course were considered standard risk (SR; 99 patients), whereas the others (n = 383) were assigned to the HR group. Allogeneic (ALLO) or autologous (AUTO) HSCT was employed, respectively, in 141 and 102 HR patients after consolidation therapy. CR, early death, and induction failure rates were 87%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. Relapse occurred in 24% of patients achieving CR. The 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were 68%, 55%, and 63%, respectively. OS, EFS, and DFS for SR and HR patients were 83%, 63%, and 66% and 64%, 53%, and 62%. DFS was 63% and 73% for HR patients given AUTO-HSCT and ALLO-HSCT, respectively. In multivariate analysis, risk group, white blood cell >100 × 10(9)/L at diagnosis, and monosomal karyotype predicted poorer EFS. Risk-oriented treatment and broad use of HSCT result in a long-term EFS comparing favorably with previously published studies on childhood AML.

  3. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  4. Prognostic implication of N-RAS gene mutations in Egyptian adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghannam, Doaa M; Abousamra, Nashwa Khayrat; Shahin, Doaa A; Goda, Enas F; Azzam, Hanan; Azmy, Emad; El-Din, Manal Salah; El-Refaei, Mohamed F

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involves the cooperation of mutations promoting proliferation/survival and those impairing differentiation. Point mutations of the N-RAS gene are the most frequent somatic mutations causing aberrant signal-transduction in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of the present work is to study the frequency and prognostic significance of N-RAS gene mutations (N-RASmut) in de novo Egyptian adult AML. Bone marrow specimens from 150 patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia and controls were analyzed by genomic PCR-SSCP at codons 12, 13 (exon 1), and 61 (exon 2) for N-RAS mutations. In 12.7% (19/150) AML cases, N-RAS gene mutations were found and were observed more frequently in the FAB subtype M4eo (P = 0.028) and with codon 12, 13 (14 of 19; 73.7%). Patients with N-RAS mutation had a significant lower peripheral and marrow blasts (P = 0.004, P = 0.03) and clinical outcome did not improve more than in patients without mutation. In patients with N-RAS gene mutation vs. those without, complete remission rate was (63.2% vs. 56.5%; P = 0.46), resistant disease (15.8% vs. 23.6%; P = 0.51), three years overall survival (44% vs 42%; P= 0.85) and disease free survival (42.1% vs. 38.9%, P = 0.74). Multivariate analysis showed that age was the strongest unfavorable factor for overall survival (relative risk [RR], 1.9; P = 0.002), followed by cytogenetics (P = 0.004). FAB types, N-RAS mutation and leukocytosis were the least important. In conclusion, the frequency and spectrum of N-RAS gene mutation differ between biologically distinct subtypes of AML but do not significantly influence prognosis and clinical outcome in patients with AML.

  5. Expression of ETV6 rearrangement in a subject with acute myeloid leukemia-M4Eo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Na; LI Zhi-hong; DING Bu-tong; CHEN Yun; WANG Yun-shan; QIAO Ying; GUO Nong-jian

    2008-01-01

    @@ Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M4Eo type is a hematological malignancy with abnormal eosinophilia,which is often accompanied by inv(16).The Ets variant gene 6 (ETV6),mapped to 12p13,is an ETS family transcription factor that is essential for hematopoietic processes,1 The ETV6 gene-involved chromosomal translocations have been found in many hematological malignancies characterized by fusing to a number of different partner genes;mainly coding for tyrosine kinases or transcription factors which are important for the initiation,progress and prognosis of disease.2 In particular,the ETV6 gene has been reported to be fused to ABL in acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL),3 and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML).4 However,there have been few domestic reports of ETV6 fusion genes,especially in cases of acute leukemia.We investigated 3 cases of AML-M4Eo patients using Split-signal Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and found one case with a translocation between 12p13 and 1q25 co-occurring with an inv(16).The ETV6/ARG (ABL-related gene) fusion transcript was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).This is the report of ARG involvement in a translocation in a human malignancy.

  6. ZFX Controls Propagation and Prevents Differentiation of Acute T-Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemia

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    Stuart P. Weisberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-propagating cells in acute leukemia maintain a stem/progenitor-like immature phenotype and proliferative capacity. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL originate from different lineages through distinct oncogenic events such as MLL fusions and Notch signaling, respectively. We found that Zfx, a transcription factor that controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, controls the initiation and maintenance of AML caused by MLL-AF9 fusion and of T-ALL caused by Notch1 activation. In both leukemia types, Zfx prevents differentiation and activates gene sets characteristic of immature cells of the respective lineages. In addition, endogenous Zfx contributes to gene induction and transformation by Myc overexpression in myeloid progenitors. Key Zfx target genes include the mitochondrial enzymes Ptpmt1 and Idh2, whose overexpression partially rescues the propagation of Zfx-deficient AML. These results show that distinct leukemia types maintain their undifferentiated phenotype and self-renewal by exploiting a common stem-cell-related genetic regulator.

  7. CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Margaret L; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Riddell, Stanley R; Boeckh, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival.

  8. Osteogenic toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. te Winkel (Mariël Lizet)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBone mineral density (BMD) Our multi-center study in children treated according to the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG)-ALL9 protocol showed a three-years cumulative incidence of fractures of 18%. BMD of ALL patients was lower than of healthy peers. The year after treatment disconti

  9. Chronic meningitis by histoplasmosis: report of a child with acute myeloid leukemia

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    G.H. Pereira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is a common evolution in progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in children, and is asymptomatic in many cases. In leukemia, the impaired of the T cells function can predispose to the disseminated form. The attributed mortality rate in this case is 20%-40% and the relapse rate is as high as 50%; therefore, prolonged treatment may be emphasized. We have described a child with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, that developed skin lesions and asymptomatic chronic meningitis, with a good evolution after prolonged treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate followed by fluconazole.

  10. MicroRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Blood Disorders

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    Yao Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common blood disorders include hematopoietic cell malignancies or leukemias and plasma cell dyscrasia, all of which have associated microRNA abnormalities. In this paper, we discuss several leukemias including acute myeloid leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and identify altered microRNAs and their targets. Immune disorders with altered blood levels of antibodies include autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with associated anti-self-autoantibodies and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN also have related microRNA abnormalities. The alterations in microRNAs may serve as therapeutic targets in these blood disorders.

  11. BAG1: The Guardian of Anti-Apoptotic Proteins in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanja Aveic; Martina Pigazzi; Giuseppe Basso

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, M...

  12. Impaired nutritional status during intensive chemotherapy in Russian and Norwegian cohorts with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Per Ole; Ukrainchenko, Ekaterina; Afanasyev, Boris; Hulbekkmo, Kristin; Choukah, Amal; Gulbrandsen, Nina; Wisløff, Finn; Tangen, Jon-Magnus

    2008-10-01

    Intensive chemotherapy is mandatory in curative treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but whether the nutritional status deteriorates during treatment, is unknown. We therefore prospectively examined anthropometric and biochemical nutritional markers during intensive chemotherapy in 26 Russian and 19 Norwegian AML patients during 9 months from diagnosis. Although the body mass index remained unchanged in both cohorts, hand grip strength and triceps skinfold thickness declined (Pchemotherapy for AML, leading to impaired nutritional status, hypofunction of the pituitary-gonadal axis and decreased health-related quality of life.

  13. [Prognostic significance of cytogenetics in aged patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; Zhu, Hong-Li

    2015-04-01

    Aged patients with acute myeloid leukemia accounted for more than half of the adult AML patients, which has characteristics of low complete remission rate, short overall survival and poor prognosis. Recently, the importance of cytogenetics in AML was gradually realized. The diagnosis and typing, prognosis stratification and guide for treatment are performed on the basis of cytogenetics, but the research on influence of cytogenetics on adged patients with AML are relatively few. This review briefly summarizes the prognostic significance of cytogenetics in aged patients with AML.

  14. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  15. Haematologic and immunophenotypic profile of acute myeloid leukemia : an experience of Tata Memorial Hospital

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    Ghosh S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : To study the hematologic and immunophenotypic profile of 260 cases of acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS : This is a retrospective analysis of 260 cases of AML diagnosed at our institution between 1998 and 2000. Diagnosis was based on peripheral blood and bone marrow examination for morphology cytochemistry and immunophenotypic studies. SPSS software package, version 10, was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS : Seventy-six percent of our cases were adults. The age of the patients ranged from one year to 78 years with a median age of 27.2 years. There were 187 males and 73 females. The commonest FAB subtype, in both children and adults, was AML-M2. The highest WBC counts were seen in AML-M1 and the lowest in AML-M3 (10-97 x 10(9/L, mean 53.8 x 10(9/L. The mean values and range for hemoglobin was 6.8 gm/l (1.8 gm/l to 9.2 gm/l, platelet count 63.3 x 10(9/L (32-83 x 10(9/L, peripheral blood blasts 41.4% (5 to 77% and bone marrow blasts 57.6% (34-96%. Myeloperoxidase positivity was highest in the M1, M2 and M3 subtypes. CD13 and CD33 were the most useful markers in the diagnosis of AML. CD14 and CD36 were most often seen in monocytic (38% and myelomonocytic (44% leukemias. Lymphoid antigen expression was seen in 15% of cases. CD7 expression was the commonest (11%. CONCLUSION : AML accounted for 39.8% of all acute leukemias at this institution. The most common subtype was AML-M2. Myeloperoxidase stain was a useful tool in the diagnosis of myeloid leukemias. CD13 and CD33 were the most diagnostic myeloid markers.

  16. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia of Donor Cell Origin Developing 17 Years after Allogenic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Pilar; Alvarez, J. Carlos; Garrido, Pilar; Lorente, J. Antonio; Palacios, Jorge; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Donor cell leukaemia (DCL) is a rare complication of allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We report the case of a female patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), FAB type M3, who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) type M5 of donor origin 17 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her HLA-matched sister. Morphology and immunophenotyping showed differences with the initial leukaemia, and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis confirmed donor-type haematopoiesis. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) showed an 11q23 deletion. Given that the latency period between transplant and development of leukaemia was the longest reported to date, we discuss the mechanisms underlying delayed leukaemia onset. PMID:23675279

  17. Obesity in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

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    Iughetti Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. Continuous progress in risk-adapted treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has secured 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% and 8-year survival rates approaching 90%. Almost 75% of survivors, however, have a chronic health condition negatively impacting on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity can be considered one of the most important health chronic conditions in the general population, with an increasing incidence in patients treated for childhood cancers and especially in acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors who are, at the same time, more at risk of experiencing precocious cardiovascular and metabolic co-morbidities. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation and chemotherapy or to primary tumor together with lifestyle modifications and genetic factors could affect long-term outcomes. Nevertheless, the etiology of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia is not yet fully understood. The present review has the aim of summarizing the published data and examining the most accepted mechanisms and main predisposing factors related to weight gain in this particular population.

  18. The role of TLR8 signaling in acute myeloid leukemia differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatz-Hoover, J J; Wang, H; Moreton, S A; Chakrabarti, A; Agarwal, M K; Sun, K; Gupta, K; Wald, D N

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive disease with a poor 5-year survival of 21% that is characterized by the differentiation arrest of immature myeloid cells. For a rare subtype of AML (acute promyeloctyic leukemia, 5-10% of cases), all-trans retinoic acid therapy removes the differentiation block, yielding over a 90% cure rate. However, this treatment is not effective for the other 90-95% of AML patients, suggesting that new differentiation strategies are needed. Interestingly, differentiation is induced in normal hematopoietic cells through Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation and TLRs are expressed on AML cells. We present evidence that the TLR8 activation promotes AML differentiation and growth inhibition in a TLR8/MyD88/p38-dependent manner. We also show that that TLR7/TLR8 agonist, R848, considerably impairs the growth of human AML cells in immunodeficient mice. Our data suggests TLR8 activation has direct anti-leukemic effects independent of its immunomodulating properties that are currently under investigation for cancer therapy. Taken together, our results suggest that treatment with TLR8 agonists may be a promising new therapeutic strategy for AML.

  19. Association between MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk: a meta-analysis.

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    Yu-Tao Qin

    Full Text Available Previous observational studies investigating the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to derive a more precise estimation of the association between MTHFR (C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk. PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies from their inception to August 2013. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were the metric of choice. Thirteen studies were selected for C677T polymorphism (1838 cases and 5318 controls and 9 studies (1335 patients and 4295 controls for A1298C polymorphism. Overall, pooled results showed that C677T polymorphism was not significant associated with AML risk(OR, 0.98-1.04; 95% CI, 0.86-0.92 to 1.09-1.25. Similar results were observed for the A1298C polymorphism and in subgroup analysis. All comparisons revealed no substantial heterogeneity nor did we detect evidence of publication bias. In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with AML risk. Further investigations are needed to offer better insight into the role of these polymorphisms in AML carcinogenesis.

  20. Prognostic significance of DNMT3A mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahem, Lamia; Mahfouz, Rabab; Elhelw, Loie; Abdsalam, Eman M; Soliman, Rehan

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with great variability in clinical course and response to therapy. Several molecular markers have been described that help to classify AML patients into risk groups. Mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) gene were recently demonstrated in AML. Approximately 20% patients with AML carry DNMT3A gene mutations and were associated with a poor clinical outcome but its clinical implications in Egyptian AML patients are largely unknown. The aim of the study was to study the incidence and prognostic impact of DNMT3A mutations in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia. A total of 120 patients with de novo AML were examined for mutations in DNMT3A by sequencing. DNMT3A mutations were identified in 34/120 (28%) of AML patients. 15 patients with M4, 14 patients with M5, 3 patient with M2 and 2 patient with M6. DNMT3A mutations were more frequently associated with older age, higher platelet counts and intermediate risk. DNMT3A-mutated patients did not differ regarding complete remission (CR) and disease-free survival (DFS), but had shorter overall survival (OS; P=0.048) than DNMT3A-wild-type patients. Mutations in DNMT3A independently predicted a shorter OS (P=0.049) by multivariate analysis. We concluded that DNMT3A mutations are highly frequent in Egyptian patients with AML and are associated with an unfavorable prognosis.

  1. Extramedullary Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML: Leukemic Pleural Effusion, Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Naveen ePemmaraju

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance: Malignant pleural effusions occur in the setting of both solid and hematologic malignancies. Pleural effusion caused by leukemic infiltration is an unusual extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with fewer than 20 cases reported.1-11 We report a case of pericardial and pleural effusions in a patient with AML and review the literature. Clinical presentation: In this case, a 55 year old man with previous history of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN experienced transformation AML, heralded by appearance of leukemic pleural effusions. The patient was identified to have leukemic pleural effusion based upon extended cytogenetic analysis of the pleural fluid, as morphologic analysis alone was insufficient. Intervention: The patient was treated with hypomethylator-based and intensive chemotherapy strategies, both of which maintained resolution of the effusions in the remission setting. Conclusion: Due to the rarity of diagnosis of leukemic pleural effusions, both cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH testing are recommended. Futhermore, systemic chemotherapy directed at the AML can lead to complete resolution of leukemic pleural effusions. Objective and ImportancePleural effusion caused by leukemic infiltration is an unusual extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, but may be more common than previously thought. Fewer than 20 cases have been reported.1-11 We report a case of pericardial and pleural effusions in a patient with AML and review the literature.

  2. Secondary Philadelphia chromosome and erythrophagocytosis in a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Katalin; Galani, Komal; Conley, Christopher R; Greipp, Patricia T

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) as a secondary change during the course of hematopoietic malignancies is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Few cases of secondary Ph have been reported after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A secondary Ph at relapse is of clinical importance because it provides a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors along with or in replacement of chemotherapy. We describe a case of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after HCT that developed a BCR-ABL1 translocation along with erythrophagocytosis by blasts as a secondary change at the time of relapse. The progression of this patient's myeloid neoplasm from myelodysplastic syndrome to AML to relapsed AML after HCT was accompanied by a stepwise cytogenetic evolution: A deletion 20q abnormality subsequently acquired a deletion 7q and, finally, at relapse after HCT, a secondary Ph was gained. The relationship between the secondary Ph and the erythrophagocytosis by blasts is not clear. We review the possible pathogenesis and cytogenetic associations of erythrophagocytosis by blasts, a rare feature in acute leukemias.

  3. Over-Expression of Catalase in Myeloid Cells Confers Acute Protection Following Myocardial Infarction

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    E. Bernadette Cabigas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  4. Impact of MLL5 expression on decitabine efficacy and DNA methylation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Haiyang; Damm, Frederik; Yap, Damian; Schwarzer, Adrian; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Jyotsana, Nidhi; Lübbert, Michael; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Geffers, Robert; Aparicio, Samuel; Humphries, R Keith; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Hypomethylating agents are widely used in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, it is not well understood why only some patients respond to hypomethylating agents. We found previously that the effect of decitabine on hematopoietic stem cell viability differed between Mll5 wild-type and null cells. We, therefore, investigated the role of MLL5 expression levels on outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients who were treated with decitabine. MLL5 above the median expression level predicted longer overall survival independent of DNMT3A mutation status in bivariate analysis (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 292 vs. 167 days; P=0.026). In patients who received three or more courses decitabine, high MLL5 expression and wild-type DNMT3A independently predicted improved overall survival (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 468 vs. 243 days; P=0.012). In transformed murine cells, loss of Mll5 was associated with resistance to low-dose decitabine, less global DNA methylation in promoter regions, and reduced DNA demethylation upon decitabine treatment. Together, these data support our clinical observation of improved outcome in decitabine-treated patients who express MLL5 at high levels, and suggest a mechanistic role of MLL5 in the regulation of DNA methylation.

  5. The clinical significance of γ-catenin in acute myeloid leukemia

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    Xu J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jiadai Xu,1 Wei Wu,1 Wenyi Shen,1 Peng Liu2 1Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Department of Hematology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Dysregulation of γ-catenin may function as an oncogenic factor in various malignancies. We investigated γ-catenin expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML and explored its role in the pathogenesis of AML. γ-Catenin was significantly overexpressed in AML patients compared to healthy donors. The γ-catenin expression in AML patients with lower white blood cells (<30×109/L was significantly higher than those with higher white blood cells (≥30×109/L. The expression levels of γ-catenin in AML patients with mutated CEBPα were significantly higher than those with unmutated CEBPα. AML patients with lower γ-catenin levels were more likely to achieve complete remission compared with patients who have higher γ-catenin levels. In K562 cells, γ-catenin knockdown suppressed cellular proliferation, while the cellular migration was greatly enhanced. Moreover, knocking down of γ-catenin enhanced the cytotoxicity of decitabine in K562 cells. Our investigation has indicated a potential role of γ-catenin in the pathogenesis of AML. Keywords: γ-catenin, acute myeloid leukemia, AML, decitabine, prognosis, bone marrow, shRNA

  6. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  7. KIAA1524: A novel MLL translocation partner in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Eva A; Zwaan, C Michel; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Pieters, Rob; van der Veken, Lars T; Beverloo, H Berna; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2011-01-01

    The Mixed Lineage Leukemia gene on chromosome 11q23 is a frequent site of recurrent translocations in acute leukemias. Its promiscuous character is reflected by the more than 60 different translocation partners described in literature. Prompted by karyotype and atypical FISH results, we identified a new translocation partner in infant acute myeloid leukemia, KIAA1524 on 3q13.13, also known as 'Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A)'. This gene was recently identified as a proto-oncogene stabilizing MYC protein in gastric carcinoma. KIAA1524 has never been related to hematologic malignancies before, and the current AML case is the first case in which an MLL-KIAA1524 fusion was described.

  8. Integrated genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling reveals BCL11B as a putative oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia with 14q32 aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Saman; Sanders, Mathijs A; Zeilemaker, Annelieke; Geertsma-Kleinekoort, Wendy M C; Koenders, Jasper E; Kavelaars, Francois G; Abbas, Zabiollah G; Mahamoud, Souad; Chu, Isabel W T; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Peeters, Justine K; van Drunen, Ellen; van Galen, Janneke; Beverloo, H Berna; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by recurrent molecular aberrations traditionally demonstrated by cytogenetic analyses. We used high density genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling to reveal acquired cryptic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. By genome-wide genotyping of 137 cases of primary acute myeloid leukemia, we disclosed a recurrent focal amplification on chromosome 14q32, which included the genes BCL11B, CCNK, C14orf177 and SETD3, in two cases. In the affected cases, the BCL11B gene showed consistently high mRNA expression, whereas the expression of the other genes was unperturbed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on 40 cases of acute myeloid leukemia with high BCL11B mRNA expression [2.5-fold above median; 40 out of 530 cases (7.5%)] revealed 14q32 abnormalities in two additional cases. In the four BCL11B-rearranged cases the 14q32 locus was fused to different partner chromosomes. In fact, in two cases, we demonstrated that the focal 14q32 amplifications were integrated into transcriptionally active loci. The translocations involving BCL11B result in increased expression of full-length BCL11B protein. The BCL11B-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias expressed both myeloid and T-cell markers. These biphenotypic acute leukemias all carried FLT3 internal tandem duplications, a characteristic marker of acute myeloid leukemia. BCL11B mRNA expression in acute myeloid leukemia appeared to be strongly associated with expression of other T-cell-specific genes. Myeloid 32D(GCSF-R) cells ectopically expressing Bcl11b showed decreased proliferation rate and less maturation. In conclusion, by an integrated approach involving high-throughput genome-wide genotyping and gene expression profiling we identified BCL11B as a candidate oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia.

  9. Myeloid Sarcoma of the Uterine Cervix as Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia after Treatment with Low-Dose Radioiodine for Thyroid Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sophie Weingertner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute myeloid leukaemia after low-dose radioiodine therapy and its presentation as a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix are both rare events. We report a case of acute myeloid leukaemia revealed by a myeloid sarcoma of the uterine cervix in a 48-year-old woman, 17 months after receiving a total dose of 100 mCi 131I for papillary thyroid cancer. A strict hematological follow-up of patients treated with any dose of 131I is recommended to accurately detect any hematological complications which might have been underestimated. Unusual presentations, such as chloroma of the uterine cervix, may reveal myeloid malignancy and should be kept in mind.

  10. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a Turkish case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Unver

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC is a rare form of acute encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by typical symmetrical lesions in the thalami, with variable involvement of the white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. Clinically there is a rapid neurologic deterioration after a short period of a nonspecific viral-like illness associated with gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Asian children are especially affected. Here we present a 3-year-old boy admitted to our hospital with fever and deterioration of consciousness. The diagnosis of ANEC was made by radiologic findings [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 641-645

  11. Azathioprine-associated acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with Crohn's disease and thiopurine S-methyltransferase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yenson, P.R.; Forrest, D.; Schmiegelow, K.;

    2008-01-01

    risk of hematologic toxicity and leukemogenesis. We present such a patient who was a slow metabolizer for azathioprine, and developed a rapidly lethal form acute myeloid leukemia after relatively low dose exposure to the drug. There was prominent hemophagocytic activity in the bone marrow...

  12. miR-125b promotes proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia cells by targeting Bak1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾巧慧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate miR-125b regulation mechanism by identifying miR-125b target genes and itsfunction in acute myeloid leukemia(AML).Methods The bioinformatics software and database were applied to predict and analyze target genes of miR-125b.The vector contained the target gene 3’-UTR portion cloned into a luciferase reporter

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia with t( 11; 22 )( q23; q11.2) : two cases report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彤

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report two de novo acute myeloid leukemia(AML)patients with t(11;22)(q23;q11.2)and summarize the clinical and biological characteristics.Methods Bone marrow cells morphology,immunophenotype,chromosome karyotype,fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH),PCR and gene sequencing were performed.Clinical manifestation and routine laboratory tests

  14. Dysregulation of survival and apoptosis pathways in acute myeloid leukemia : Targeting of NF-κB in AML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, Matthieu Cornelis Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloide leukemie is een vorm van kanker van een bepaalde type witte bloedcel. Hierdoor functioneren wiite bloedcellen niet goed, terwijl de productie van rode bloedcellen en bloedplaatjes onderdrukt kan zijn. De oorzaak ligt bij het ontstaan van leukemische stamcellen uit normale bloedstamcel

  15. Genome-wide epigenetic analysis delineates a biologically distinct immature acute leukemia with myeloid/T-lymphoid features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. Figueroa (Maria Eugenia); B.J. Wouters (Bas); L. Skrabanek (Lucy); J. Glass (Jacob); Y. Li (Yushan); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); A.W. Langerak (Anton); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M. Fazzari (Melissa); J.M. Greally (John); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); A. Melnick (Ari); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease from the molecular and biologic standpoints, and even patients with a specific gene expression profile may present clinical and molecular heterogeneity. We studied the epigenetic profiles of a cohort of patients who shared a common gene e

  16. Label-free imaging and identification of typical cells of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome by Raman microspectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanna, R.; Ronchi, P.; Lenferink, A.T.M.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.; Tresoldi, C.; Morasso, C.; Mehn, D.; Bedoni, M.; Ciceri, F.; Otto, C.; Gramatica, F.

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) start from the manual examination of stained smears of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) by using an optical microscope. This step is subjective and scarcely reproducib

  17. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  18. Two novel methods for rapid detection and quantification of DNMT3A R882 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Melissa; Hasan, Syed Khizer; Ottone, Tiziana; Lavorgna, Serena; Ciardi, Claudia; Angelini, Daniela F; Agostini, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    DNMT3A mutations represent one of the most frequent gene alterations detectable in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype. Although various recurrent somatic mutations of DNMT3A have been described, the most common mutation is located at amino acid R882 in the methyltransferase domain of the gene. DNMT3A mutations have been reported to be stable during disease progression and are associated with unfavorable outcome in acute myeloid leukemia patients with normal karyotype. Because of their prognostic significance and high stability during disease evolution, DNMT3A mutations might represent highly informative biomarkers for minimal residual disease monitoring. We describe a new rapid diagnostic RT-PCR assay based on TauI restriction enzyme reaction to identify DNMT3A R882 mutations at diagnosis. In addition, we developed a sensitive and specific test based on peptide nucleic acid real-time PCR technology to monitor DNMT3A R882H mutation. We identified 24 DNMT3A R882H mutated patients out of 134 acute myeloid leukemia screened samples and we analyzed in these patients the kinetics of minimal residual disease after induction and consolidation therapy. This assay may be useful to better assess response to therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia bearing the DNMT3A R882H mutation.

  19. G-CSF receptor (CSF3R) mutations in X-linked neutropenia evolving to acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows for the first time that patients with X-linked neutropenia, caused by mutations in the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome gene, developed myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia with acquisition of mutations in the CSF3R gene and loss of chromosome 7. See related perspective article on page 1333.

  20. Characterization of gene mutations and copy number changes in acute myeloid leukemia using a rapid target enrichment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolli, Niccolò; Manes, Nicla; McKerrell, Thomas; Chi, Jianxiang; Park, Naomi; Gundem, Gunes; Quail, Michael A; Sathiaseelan, Vijitha; Herman, Bram; Crawley, Charles; Craig, Jenny I O; Conte, Natalie; Grove, Carolyn; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J; Varela, Ignacio; Costeas, Paul; Vassiliou, George S

    2015-02-01

    Prognostic stratification is critical for making therapeutic decisions and maximizing survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Advances in the genomics of acute myeloid leukemia have identified several recurrent gene mutations whose prognostic impact is being deciphered. We used HaloPlex target enrichment and Illumina-based next generation sequencing to study 24 recurrently mutated genes in 42 samples of acute myeloid leukemia with a normal karyotype. Read depth varied between and within genes for the same sample, but was predictable and highly consistent across samples. Consequently, we were able to detect copy number changes, such as an interstitial deletion of BCOR, three MLL partial tandem duplications, and a novel KRAS amplification. With regards to coding mutations, we identified likely oncogenic variants in 41 of 42 samples. NPM1 mutations were the most frequent, followed by FLT3, DNMT3A and TET2. NPM1 and FLT3 indels were reported with good efficiency. We also showed that DNMT3A mutations can persist post-chemotherapy and in 2 cases studied at diagnosis and relapse, we were able to delineate the dynamics of tumor evolution and give insights into order of acquisition of variants. HaloPlex is a quick and reliable target enrichment method that can aid diagnosis and prognostic stratification of acute myeloid leukemia patients.

  1. Diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukemia in children and adolescents : recommendations from an international expert panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creutzig, Ursula; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Gibson, Brenda; Dworzak, Michael N.; Adachi, Souichi; de Bont, Eveline; Harbott, Jochen; Hasle, Henrik; Johnston, Donna; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Leverger, Guy; Mejstrikova, Ester; Meshinchi, Soheil; Pession, Andrea; Raimondi, Susana C.; Sung, Lillian; Stary, Jan; Zwaan, Christian M.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Reinhardt, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Despite major improvements in outcome over the past decades, acute myeloid leukemia (AML)remains a life-threatening malignancy in children, with current survival rates of similar to 70%. State-of-the-art recommendations in adult AML have recently been published in this journal by Dohner et al. The p

  2. Risk factors for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, N.; Brand, R.; Biezen, A. van; Zander, A.; Dierlamm, J.; Niederwieser, D.; Devergie, A.; Ruutu, T.; Cornish, J.; Ljungman, P.; Gratwohl, A.; Cordonnier, C.; Beelen, D.; Deconinck, E.; Symeonidis, A.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After successful treatment of malignant diseases, therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia have emerged as significant problems. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to investigate outcome and risk factors in patients with therapy-related myelodysplast

  3. Effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on the outcome of chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, B; van Putten, W; Theobald, M; Gmur, J; Verdonck, L; Sonneveld, P; Fey, M; de Greef, G; Ferrant, A; Kovacsovics, T; Gratwohl, A; Daenen, S; Huijgens, P; Boogaerts, M

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitization of leukemic cells with hematopoietic growth factors may enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS In a multicenter randomized trial, we assigned patients (age range, 18 to 60 years) with newly diagnosed AML to receive cytarabine plus i

  4. Class II-associated invariant chain peptide as predictive immune marker in minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. van Luijn (Marvin M.); W. van den Ancker (Willemijn); S.M. van Ham (Marieke); A.A. van de Loosdrecht (Arjan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reach complete remission after high-dose chemotherapy. Still, half of these patients experience a relapse due to presence of minimal residual disease (MRD). Here we discuss the poor prognostic role of class II-associated invarian

  5. Class II-associated invariant chain peptide as predictive immune marker in minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    van Luijn, Marvin M.; van den Ancker, Willemijn; van Ham, S Marieke; Arjan A. van de Loosdrecht

    2014-01-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reach complete remission after high-dose chemotherapy. Still, half of these patients experience a relapse due to presence of minimal residual disease (MRD). Here we discuss the poor prognostic role of class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP) expression on residual leukemic cells.

  6. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  7. Characteristics and Prognosis of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Internal Tandem Duplication in the FLT3 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhra Al-Mawali

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Constitutive activation of the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3 receptor by internal tandem duplication (ITD of the juxtamembrane region has been described in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. FLT3/ITDs are present in about 20-30% of all acute myeloid leukemia cases. It has been shown that the mutation is correlated with worse prognosis. However, none of the previous studies investigated which FAB subtype is associated with higher percentage of FLT3/ITD, thus the reason for undertaking the current study.Methods: The prevalence and the potential prognostic impact of FLT3 mutations in 39 acute myeloid leukemia patients were analyzed by genomic polymerase chain reaction. Twelve samples with FLT3/ITDs and 27 acute myeloid leukemia samples without the mutations were compared with respect to clinical prognosis and FAB subtype. Results were correlated with cytogenetic data and the clinical response.Results: FLT3/ITD mutations were found in 31% of patients. FLT3/ITD was associated with similar clinical characteristics and was more prevalent in patients with normal karyotype (83%. Interestingly, half of the FLT3/ITD aberrations were found in patients with FAB M1 (50%, and fewer were found in patients with FAB M2 (8%, M4 (8%, and M5 (8%. Although less frequent in patients with cytogenetic aberrations, FLT3/ITDs were found in 17% of patients with t(15;17. Although the study was powered to 80%, patients with FLT3/ITD mutation did not show shorter complete remission duration or a higher relapse rate.Conclusion: The data confirm that FLT3/ITD mutations represent a common alteration in adult acute myeloid leukemia, mainly with normal karyotype (83% and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (75%, as compared to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (25% (p<0.001. It also showed that half of the M1-FAB subtype is FLT3/ITD positive. Therefore, FLT3/ITD is a therapeutic target, and thus inhibition of FLT3 tyrosine kinase activity may provide a new approach in

  8. Impact of graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, F; Labopin, M; Niederwieser, D;

    2012-01-01

    This report investigated the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on transplantation outcomes in 1859 acute myeloid leukemia patients given allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC allo-SCT). Grade I acute GVHD was associated with a lower risk of rela...... of relapse (hazards ratio (HR)=0.7, P=0.02) translating into a trend for better overall survival (OS; HR=1.3; P=0.07). Grade II acute GVHD had no net impact on OS, while grade III-IV acute GVHD was associated with a worse OS (HR=0.4, P...

  9. Prognostic value of immunophenotyping and gene mutations in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Harry; Jiang, Allan; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Brandwein, Joseph; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia generally have a poor prognosis and a highly heterogeneous clinical outcome. Prognostic indicators are required for and aid in patient stratification. However, the prognostic value of genetic mutations and immunophenotypic features in elderly normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia, the largest cytogenetic risk group, remains unclear. We investigated the genetic mutations NPM1, FLT3-ITD, and FLT3-TKD and expression of the membrane antigens CD7, CD15, CD34, and CD56 in 144 elderly patients with de novo normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia to retrospectively analyze the prognostic and clinical relevance of these parameters. CD7, CD15, CD34, and CD56 were expressed in 24%, 47%, 52%, and 15% of patients, respectively. NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations were detected in 51% and 17% of patients, respectively. Complete remission was obtained in 94 patients (65%), and the median overall survival was 16.5 months. Univariate analysis detected 5 markers with prognostic relevance: high leukocyte count, FLT3-ITD mutations, NPM1 mutations, CD34 expression, and CD56 expression in acute myeloid leukemia blasts. In multivariate analysis, patients with NPM1 predicted a higher complete remission (CR) rate (P = .016), longer event-free survival (P = .008), and longer overall survival (P = .049). FLT3-ITD mutations predicted a shorter event-free survival (P = .002) and shorter overall survival (P acute myeloid leukemia. By combining genetic and immunophenotypic markers, we can divide patients into distinct prognostic groups with important implications for prognostic stratification and risk-adapted therapy.

  10. Ciprofloxacin versus colistin prophylaxis during neutropenia in acute myeloid leukemia: two parallel patient cohorts treated in a single center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlen, Michele; Marx, Julia; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Mesters, Rolf M.; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Schliemann, Christoph; Lenz, Georg; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Büchner, Thomas; Krug, Utz; Stelljes, Matthias; Karch, Helge; Peters, Georg; Gerth, Hans U.; Görlich, Dennis; Berdel, Wolfgang E.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia are at high risk for bacterial infections during therapy-related neutropenia. However, the use of specific antibiotic regimens for prophylaxis in afebrile neutropenic acute myeloid leukemia patients is controversial. We report a retrospective evaluation of 172 acute myeloid leukemia patients who received 322 courses of myelosuppressive chemotherapy and had an expected duration of neutropenia of more than seven days. The patients were allocated to antibiotic prophylaxis groups and treated with colistin or ciprofloxacin through 2 different hematologic services at our hospital, as available. The infection rate was reduced from 88.6% to 74.2% through antibiotic prophylaxis (vs. without prophylaxis; P=0.04). A comparison of both antibiotic drugs revealed a trend towards fewer infections associated with ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (69.2% vs. 79.5% in the colistin group; P=0.07), as determined by univariate analysis. This result was confirmed through multivariate analysis (OR: 0.475, 95%CI: 0.236–0.958; P=0.041). The prophylactic agents did not differ with regard to the microbiological findings (P=0.6, not significant). Of note, the use of ciprofloxacin was significantly associated with an increased rate of infections with pathogens that are resistant to the antibiotic used for prophylaxis (79.5% vs. 9.5% in the colistin group; P<0.0001). The risk factors for higher infection rates were the presence of a central venous catheter (P<0.0001), mucositis grade III/IV (P=0.0039), and induction/relapse courses (vs. consolidation; P<0.0001). In conclusion, ciprofloxacin prophylaxis appears to be of particular benefit during induction and relapse chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. To prevent and control drug resistance, it may be safely replaced by colistin during consolidation cycles of acute myeloid leukemia therapy. PMID:27470601

  11. The MDM-2 Antagonist Nutlin-3 Promotes the Maturation of Acute Myeloid Leukemic Blasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The small-molecule inhibitor of murine double minute (MDM-2, Nutlin-3, induced variable apoptosis in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML blasts, promoted myeloid maturation of surviving cells, as demonstrated by analysis of CD11 b, CD14 surface antigens, by morphologic examination. Although the best-characterized activity of Nutlin-3 is activation of the p53 pathway, Nutlin-3 induced maturation also in one AML sample characterized by p53 deletion, as well as in the p53-/- human myeloblastic HL-60 cell line. At the molecular level, the maturational activity of Nutlin-3 in HL-60 cells was accompanied by the induction of E2F1 transcription factor, it was significantly counteracted by specific gene knockdown with small interfering RNA for E2F1. Moreover, Nutlin-3, as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF α, potentiated the maturational activity of recombinant TNF-related apoptosis-inducing lig, (TRAIL in HL-60 cells. However, although TNF-α significantly counteracted the proapoptotic activity of TRAIL, Nutlin-3 did not interfere with the proapoptotic activity of TRAIL. Taken together, these data disclose a novel, potentially relevant therapeutic role for Nutlin-3 in the treatment of both p53 wild-type, p53-/- AML, possibly in association with recombinant TRAIL.

  12. Matrine induces apoptosis in human acute myeloid leukemia cells via the mitochondrial pathway and Akt inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghui Zhang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a hematological malignancy characterized by a rapid increase in the number of immature myeloid cells in bone marrow. Despite recent advances in the treatment, AML remains an incurable disease. Matrine, a major component extracted from Sophora flavescens Ait, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects on various cancer cell lines. However, the effects of matrine on AML remain largely unknown. Here we investigated its anticancer effects and underlying mechanisms on human AML cells in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that matrine inhibited cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in AML cell lines as well as primary AML cells from patients with AML in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Matrine induced apoptosis by collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential, inducing cytochrome c release from mitochondria, reducing the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, increasing activation of caspase-3, and decreasing the levels of p-Akt and p-ERK1/2. The apoptotic effects of matrine on AML cells were partially blocked by a caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK and a PI3K/Akt activator IGF-1, respectively. Matrine potently inhibited in vivo tumor growth following subcutaneous inoculation of HL-60 cells in SCID mice. These findings indicate that matrine can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of AML cells and may be a novel effective candidate as chemotherapeutic agent against AML.

  13. In vitro evaluation of triazenes: DNA cleavage, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingues, Vanessa O.; Hoerner, Rosmari; Reetz, Luiz G.B.; Kuhn, Fabio, E-mail: rosmari.ufsm@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas; Coser, Virginia M.; Rodrigues, Jacqueline N.; Bauchspiess, Rita; Pereira, Waldir V. [Hospital Universitario de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Hematologia-Oncologia; Paraginski, Gustavo L.; Locatelli, Aline; Fank, Juliana de O.; Giglio, Vinicius F.; Hoerner, Manfredo, E-mail: hoerner.manfredo@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The asymmetric diazoamines 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-(4-carboxyphenyl)triazene (1), 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-carboxyphenyl)triazene (2) and 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-amidophenyl) triazene (3) were evaluated for their ability to cleave pUC18 and pBSKII plasmid DNA, antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia cells and normal leukocytes using the bioassay of reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The triazenes showed ability to cleave the two types of plasmid DNA: triazene 1 at pH 8.0 and 50 deg C; triazene 2 at pH 6.5 and 37 and 50 deg C; triazene 3 at pH 6.5 and 37 deg C. The compounds presented cytotoxic activity against myeloid leukemia cells. Compound 1 showed high activity against B. cereus (MIC = 32 {mu}g mL{sup -1}). The observation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid state of compound 3, based on the structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, as well as the results of IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic analyses of compounds 1, 2 and 3 are discussed in the present work. (author)

  14. Lack of noncanonical RAS mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Christoph W M; Krauter, Jürgen; Onono, Fredrick O; Bunke, Tania; Damm, Frederik; Thol, Felicitas; Wagner, Katharina; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Heuser, Michael; Ganser, Arnold; Morgan, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Transforming mutations in RAS genes are commonly found in human malignancies, including myeloid leukemias. To investigate the incidence, spectrum, and distribution of activating K- and N-RAS mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients, 204 CN-AML patients were screened. Activating K- and N-RAS mutations were detected in 3 of 204 (1.5 %) and 22 of 204 (10.8 %) CN-AML samples, respectively. RAS mutated patients presented with a lower percentage of bone marrow blasts (65 vs 80 %, P = 0.022). RAS mutations tended to occur with nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) mutations (P = 0.079), and all three samples containing K-RAS mutations had concomitant NPM1 mutations. There was no significant overlap between K-RAS mutations and N-RAS, FLT3, CEBPA, IDH1/2, WT1 or MLL mutations. RAS mutation status did not impact relapse-free or overall survival of CN-AML patients. In contrast to reports of noncanonical RAS mutations in other cancers, including some leukemia subtypes, we only observed K- and N-RAS mutations in codons 12, 13, or 61 in CN-AML samples. Our findings suggest that while K-RAS mutations are infrequent in CN-AML, activating K-RAS mutations may cooperate with mutated NPM1 to induce leukemia.

  15. Therapeutic reactivation of protein phosphatase 2A in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha eRamaswamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is required for normal cell growth and development. PP2A is a potent tumor suppressor, which is inactivated in cancer cells as a result of genetic deletions and mutations. In myeloid leukemias, genes encoding PP2A subunits are generally intact. Instead, PP2A is functionally inhibited by post-translational modifications of its catalytic C subunit, and interactions with negative regulators by its regulatory B and scaffold A subunits. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of genetic and functional inactivation of PP2A in human cancers, with a particular focus on human acute myeloid leukemias (AML. By analyzing expression of genes encoding PP2A subunits using transcriptome sequencing, we find that PP2A dysregulation in AML is characterized by silencing and overexpression of distinct A scaffold and B regulatory subunits, respectively. We review the mechanisms of functional PP2A activation by drugs such as fingolimod, forskolin, OP449, and perphenazine. This analysis yields two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for therapeutic PP2A re-activation: i allosteric activation of the phosphatase activity, and ii stabilization of active holo-enzyme assembly and displacement of negative regulatory factors from A and B subunits. Future studies should allow the development of specific and potent pharmacologic activators of PP2A, and definition of susceptible disease subsets based on specific mechanisms of PP2A dysregulation.

  16. U2AF1 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Qian

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of U2AF1 gene have recently been identified in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. In this study, we analyzed the frequency and clinical impact of U2AF1 mutations in a cohort of 452 Chinese patients with myeloid neoplasms. Mutations in U2AF1 were found in 2.5% (7/275 of AML and 6.3% (6/96 of MDS patients, but in none of 81 CML. All mutations were heterozygous missense mutations affecting codon S34 or Q157. There was no significant association of U2AF1 mutation with blood parameters, FAB subtypes, karyotypes and other gene mutations in AML. The overall survival (OS of AML patients with U2AF1 mutation (median 3 months was shorter than those without mutation (median 7 months (P = 0.035. No difference in the OS was observed between MDS patients with and without U2AF1 mutations. Our data show that U2AF1 mutation is a recurrent event at a low frequency in AML and MDS.

  17. Concurrent acute myeloid leukemia and T lymphoblastic lymphoma in a patient with rearranged PDGFRB genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concurrent hematologic malignancies are relatively rare. We encountered a case of concurrent acute myeloid leukemia (AML and T lymphoblastic lymphoma. The bone marrow chromosome analysis showed the karyotype 46, XY, t(5;12(q33;p13, which indicated presence of PDGFRB gene translocations. Therefore, this disease belongs to the new WHO category of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with abnormalities in PDGFRA, PDGFRB and FGFR1 genes. Although such genetic mutations are prone to multi-lineage differentiation, the present case is in fact the first report of concurrent AML and T lymphoblastic lymphoma involving PDGFRB mutations. The patient was treated with cytarabine and daunomycin in combination with high dose dexamethasone. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation was performed after successful remission induction for both entities. The patient eventually died of chronic graft-versus-host-disease related infection. Based on such an experience, we suggest the decision of stem cell transplantation should be weighed carefully against the risks, especially when tyrosine kinase inhibitors are safe and potentially effective in dealing with such entities.

  18. Minimal PU.1 reduction induces a preleukemic state and promotes development of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Britta; Vogler, Thomas O; Narayanagari, Swathi; Bartholdy, Boris; Todorova, Tihomira I; da Silva Ferreira, Mariana; Chen, Jiahao; Yu, Yiting; Mayer, Jillian; Barreyro, Laura; Carvajal, Luis; Neriah, Daniela Ben; Roth, Michael; van Oers, Johanna; Schaetzlein, Sonja; McMahon, Christine; Edelmann, Winfried; Verma, Amit; Steidl, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Modest transcriptional changes caused by genetic or epigenetic mechanisms are frequent in human cancer. Although loss or near-complete loss of the hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 induces acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice, a similar degree of PU.1 impairment is exceedingly rare in human AML; yet, moderate PU.1 inhibition is common in AML patients. We assessed functional consequences of modest reductions in PU.1 expression on leukemia development in mice harboring DNA lesions resembling those acquired during human stem cell aging. Heterozygous deletion of an enhancer of PU.1, which resulted in a 35% reduction of PU.1 expression, was sufficient to induce myeloid-biased preleukemic stem cells and their subsequent transformation to AML in a DNA mismatch repair-deficient background. AML progression was mediated by inhibition of expression of a PU.1-cooperating transcription factor, Irf8. Notably, we found marked molecular similarities between the disease in these mice and human myelodysplastic syndrome and AML. This study demonstrates that minimal reduction of a key lineage-specific transcription factor, which commonly occurs in human disease, is sufficient to initiate cancer development, and it provides mechanistic insight into the formation and progression of preleukemic stem cells in AML.

  19. An operational definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia allowing early identification of patients who may benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferguson, Paul; Hills, Robert K; Grech, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Up to 30% of adults with acute myeloid leukemia fail to achieve a complete remission after induction chemotherapy - termed primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. There is no universally agreed definition of primary refractory disease, nor have the optimal treatment modalities been defined. We.......0001) cohorts. The utilization of REF1 criteria permits the early identification of patients whose outcome after one course of induction chemotherapy is very poor, and informs a novel definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that allogeneic stem cell...

  20. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author’s Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M. Cervantes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author’s institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  1. Characterization of children with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the AIEOP AML-2002 study group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, E; Basso, G; Zampini, M; Buldini, B; Tregnago, C; Rondelli, R; Masetti, R; Bisio, V; Frison, M; Polato, K; Cazzaniga, G; Menna, G; Fagioli, F; Merli, P; Biondi, A; Pession, A; Locatelli, F; Pigazzi, M

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent molecular markers have been routinely used in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for risk assessment at diagnosis, whereas their post-induction monitoring still represents a debated issue. We evaluated the prognostic value and biological impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) and of the allelic ratio (AR) of FLT3-internal-tandem duplication (ITD) in childhood AML. We retrospectively screened 494 children with de novo AML for FLT3-ITD mutation, identifying 54 harboring the mutation; 51% of them presented high ITD-AR at diagnosis and had worse event-free survival (EFS, 19.2 versus 63.5% for low ITD-AR, <0.05). Forty-one percent of children with high levels of MRD after the 1st induction course, measured by a patient-specific real-time-PCR, had worse EFS (22.2 versus 59.4% in low-MRD patients, P<0.05). Next, we correlated these parameters with gene expression, showing that patients with high ITD-AR or persistent MRD had characteristic expression profiles with deregulated genes involved in methylation and acetylation. Moreover, patients with high CyclinA1 expression presented an unfavorable EFS (20.3 versus 51.2% in low CyclinA1 group, P<0.01). Our results suggest that ITD-AR levels and molecular MRD should be considered in planning clinical management of FLT3-ITD patients. Different transcriptional activation of epigenetic and oncogenic profiles may explain variability in outcome among these patients, for whom novel therapeutic approaches are desirable.

  2. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis.

  3. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Asano, Shigetaka, E-mail: asgtkmd@waseda.jp [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  4. Current Approaches in the Treatment of Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor R. Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The limited sensitivity of the historical treatment response criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML has resulted in a different paradigm for treatment compared with most other cancers presenting with widely disseminated disease. Initial cytotoxic induction chemotherapy is often able to reduce tumor burden to a level sufficient to meet the current criteria for “complete” remission. Nevertheless, most AML patients ultimately die from their disease, most commonly as clinically evident relapsed AML. Despite a variety of available salvage therapy options, prognosis in patients with relapsed or refractory AML is generally poor. In this review, we outline the commonly utilized salvage cytotoxic therapy interventions and then highlight novel investigational efforts currently in clinical trials using both pathway-targeted agents and immunotherapy based approaches. We conclude that there is no current standard of care for adult relapsed or refractory AML other than offering referral to an appropriate clinical trial.

  5. Auricular Oedema and Dyshidrotic Eczema in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Treated with Cytarabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Brandt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytarabine is an effective drug in the treatment of haematological malignancies. The therapy is associated with various complications. Frequencies of dermatological side-effects range from 2–72% and occur most commonly after high-dose regimens. Although most cutaneous reactions are mild and resolve spontaneously within several days, they may result in an increased risk of infection and alterations in comfort. In some cases, severe life-threatening reactions have been reported. Here we describe the case of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia, who developed severe exceptional skin toxicity in terms of auricular oedema and palmar dyshidrotic eczema after the application of low-dose cytarabine. Re-administration of the drug resulted in reduced skin toxicity during further cycles of chemotherapy. Negative epicutaneous patch-testing supported the existence of cytarabine-provoked toxicity.

  6. Single institute study of FLT3 mutation in acute myeloid leukemia with near tetraploidy in Serbia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vladimir Jurišić; Sonja Povlović; Nataša Čolović; Vesna Djordjevic; Vera Bunjevački; Gradimir Janković; Milica Čolović

    2009-08-01

    Patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and near-tetraploid or completely tetraploid karyotype at presentation are rare. We present four patients with near-tetraploidy/tetraploidy in a cohort of 426 consecutive AML patients (0.98%) in respect to their cytogenetic findings, immunophenotype pattern, response to chemotherapy, course of disease and molecular analyses including tyrosine kinase receptor FLT3 gene, NRAS gene, and tumour suppressor gene, p53. We have found FLT3/ITD mutation only in one patient among the four with near-tetraploidy. The main finding is that these patients had a variable clinical course, with two having a long period of remission (36 and 12 months) and two died, not having achieved remission.

  7. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N;

    1998-01-01

    cells (from about 45% to 25%), evidently as a result of the severely changed microenvironment. In this study we have demonstrated in vivo the development of an acidic and hypoxic bone marrow hampering normal haemopoiesis during leukaemic growth. Our data support the notion of BNML as a valuable tool......The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats....... Here we have investigated how the development and progression of this leukaemia affect oxygenation, pH and proliferation of normal and leukaemic cells in vivo. Bone marrow pH was measured by a needle electrode. Nitroimidazol-theophylline (NITP) was used to identify hypoxic cells, and we applied...

  8. Partial remission of acute myeloid leukemia complicating multiple myeloma following COAP chemotherapy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Man; Sun, Wan-Jun; Huang, Zhong-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Jia; An, Na; Li, Xin

    2015-03-01

    A 77-year-old male was admitted to hospital after complaining of fever and a cough for three days. A diagnosis of multiple myeloma was confirmed following M protein identification and a bone marrow biopsy. The patient received chemotherapy regimens of bortezomib plus dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, thalidomide and dexamethasone, and thalidomide and dexamethasone, and was prescribed thalidomide (100 mg/d) to be taken orally for maintenance therapy. After a further two years the patient was subsequently diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Chemotherapy regimens of cytarabine, aclacinomycin and daunorubicin, homoharringtonine and etoposide, and mitoxantrone and cytarabine resulted in no remission. Partial remission was obtained with a course of ifosfamide, vindesine, cytarabine and prednisone chemotherapy. This therapy may be an alternative treatment for secondary leukemia, particularly in elderly patients.

  9. Recent Advance in Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimitsu Kadowaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapse after chemotherapy is inevitable in the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Thus, it is necessary to develop novel therapies that have different antileukemic mechanisms. Recent advances in immunology and identification of promising leukemia-associated antigens open the possibilities for eradicating minimal residual diseases by antigen-specific immunotherapy after chemotherapy. Several methods have been pursued as immunotherapies for AML: peptide vaccines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting tumor vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, and adoptive T cell therapy. Whereas immunogenicity and clinical outcomes are improving in these trials, severe adverse events were observed in highly avid engineered T cell therapies, indicating the importance of the balance between effectiveness and side effects in advanced immunotherapy. Such progress in inducing antitumor immune responses, together with strategies to attenuate immunosuppressive factors, will establish immunotherapy as an important armament to combat AML.

  10. NPM1 mutations in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with uncharacteristic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Tolstrup; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Christiansen, D.H.;

    2008-01-01

    Frameshift mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) were recently reported as a frequently occurring abnormality in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To evaluate the frequency of NPM1 mutations in patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS) and therapy-related AML (t......-AML), and their possible association to type of previous therapy and to other gene mutations, 140 patients with t-MDS or t-AML were analyzed for mutations of NPM1. NPM1 mutations were observed in 7 of 51 patients presenting as overt t-AML, as compared to only 3 of 89 patients presenting as t-MDS (P=0.037). The mutations...

  11. Trisomy 8 in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia. A NOPHO-AML Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anne Cathrine Lund; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2016-01-01

    and to investigate its prognostic impact. Complete cytogenetic data were available in 596 patients (98%) aged 0-18 years, diagnosed from 1993 to 2012, and treated according to the NOPHO-AML 1993 and 2004 protocols in the Nordic countries and Hong Kong. We identified 86 patients (14%) with +8. Trisomy 8 was combined...... with other cytogenetic aberrations in 68 patients (11%) (+8 other) and in 18 patients (3%), it was the sole abnormality (+8 alone). Trisomy 8 was associated with FAB M5 (36%) but otherwise clinically comparable with non-trisomy 8 patients. Trisomy 8 was favorable in patients of young age and with t(9......Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML...

  12. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N;

    1998-01-01

    The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats....... Here we have investigated how the development and progression of this leukaemia affect oxygenation, pH and proliferation of normal and leukaemic cells in vivo. Bone marrow pH was measured by a needle electrode. Nitroimidazol-theophylline (NITP) was used to identify hypoxic cells, and we applied...... bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to identify DNA replicating cells. The leukaemia progressed slowly until day 27 after which a rapid deterioration could be observed leading to severe changes over the following 5 d. In whole blood there was evidence of progressing metabolic acidosis. In bone marrow the fraction...

  13. MLL3 is a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Yu; Rappaport, Amy R; Kitzing, Thomas; Schultz, Nikolaus; Zhao, Zhen; Shroff, Aditya S; Dickins, Ross A; Vakoc, Christopher R; Bradner, James E; Stock, Wendy; LeBeau, Michelle M; Shannon, Kevin M; Kogan, Scott; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-05-12

    Recurring deletions of chromosome 7 and 7q [-7/del(7q)] occur in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant tumor suppressors on 7q remains unclear. Using RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, we show that an ∼50% reduction in gene dosage of the mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) gene, located on 7q36.1, cooperates with other events occurring in -7/del(7q) AMLs to promote leukemogenesis. Mll3 suppression impairs the differentiation of HSPC. Interestingly, Mll3-suppressed leukemias, like human -7/del(7q) AMLs, are refractory to conventional chemotherapy but sensitive to the BET inhibitor JQ1. Thus, our mouse model functionally validates MLL3 as a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor and suggests a therapeutic option for this aggressive disease.

  14. SETBP1 and miR_4319 dysregulation in primary myelofibrosis progression to acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular pathogenesis underlying the primary myelofibrosis (PMF progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML is still not well defined. The involvement of microRNA (miRNA is actually helping to shed light on an important issue in the occurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. However, the role of intronic miRNA, derived from the intron regions of gene transcripts, has never been reported in MPNs. In this study, we describe a PMF case evolved to AML with a t(12;18(p13;q12 rearrangement showing the downregulation of the intronic miR_4319 and the overexpression of its host gene, SET binding protein (SETBP1. A possible molecular mechanism regulating the PMF progression to AML is discussed.

  15. Pulmonary mucormycosis with embolism: two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, Yasunori; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko; Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Nannya, Yasuhito; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important cause of morbidity and mortality for patients with hematological malignancies. The diagnosis of mucormycosis usually requires mycological evidence through tissue biopsy or autopsy because the signs and symptoms are nonspecific and there are currently no biomarkers to identify the disease. We herein present two autopsied cases of acute myeloid leukemia with prolonged neutropenia who developed invasive mucormycosis accompanied by pulmonary artery embolism. Our cases were featured by unexplained fever and rapidly progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan detected nodular lesions or nonspecific consolidations in the lungs. Cultures, cytological study, and serum fungal markers consistently gave negative results. Autopsy revealed embolism of the pulmonary artery which consisted of fibrin clots by filamentous fungi. Genomic DNA was extracted from the paraffin-embedded clots and was applied to polymerase chain reaction amplification, leading to the diagnosis of infection by Rhizopus microsporus. We should carefully search for life-threatening pulmonary embolism when patients with hematological malignancies develop pulmonary mucormycosis.

  16. Treatment-related Myelodysplastic Syndrome in a Child With Acute Myeloid Leukemia and TPMT Heterozygosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensman, Lars M; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We describe a patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and low activity of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) who developed secondary myelodysplastic syndrome after treatment. OBSERVATION: A 10-year-old boy presented with AML-M2 with t(8;21)(q22;q22) and genotyping......-related myelodysplastic syndrome with ring chromosome 6. DISCUSSION: The clinical course of this patient raises the possibility that low-activity TPMT genotypes may influence 6TG toxicity in patients with AML and lead to an increased risk of developing secondary malignant neoplasms....... revealing 3*B TPMT heterozygosity. The patient was treated according to the NOPHO-AML 2004 protocol. Two years after the treatment, the patient presented with neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow, including fluorescent in situ hybridization and retrospective aCGH analysis, verified therapy...

  17. Therapy related acute myeloid leukemia with t(10:16: a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldeep K. Uppal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML are well known complications after chemotherapy for various hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies. Alkylating agents and Topoisomerase inhibitors are most widely studied in this regard. There is growing concern about occurrence of t-MDS, t- MDS/AML and t-AML in patients of CLL treated with nucleoside analogues especially in combination with alkylating agents. Exact incidence and pathogenesis of nucleoside analogue related MDS/AML is not clear at this time. We hereby report a case of t-AML in a patient treated with Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide and Rituximab (FCR for CLL. The cytogenetic studies revealed a unique translocation t (10:16, that has been reported in very few cases of therapy related AML and pediatric AML.

  18. Screening features to improve the class prediction of acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaishi; Yang, Meixue; Sablok, Gaurav; Fan, Jianping; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2013-01-10

    After more than three decades of intensive investigations, the underpinning mechanism of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis still remains largely uncharacterized, and their diagnosis relies heavily on the subjective factors. Recently gene expression profiling technique showed significant improvement in classifying some subtypes of AML, but the model's discriminating power of MDS from AML is still in its infancy. Feature selection plays an important role in the classification of the samples on the basis of the gene expression profiles. Our hypothesis explains that a better choice of features could improve the classification of the diseased and normal stage samples, and the potential application of feature screening to produce feature sets, with better accuracies and lowest number of embedded features. The observed results suggest that feature selection proves to be an essential and affirmative step in the biomedical data mining models based on gene expression profiles.

  19. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Dong (Fan); R.K. Brynes; N. Tidow; K. Welte (Karl); B. Löwenberg (Bob); I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction pathways for granulocyte colony-stimulati

  20. Engagement of SIRPα inhibits growth and induces programmed cell death in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahban Irandoust

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies show the importance of interactions between CD47 expressed on acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells and the inhibitory immunoreceptor, signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRPα on macrophages. Although AML cells express SIRPα, its function has not been investigated in these cells. In this study we aimed to determine the role of the SIRPα in acute myeloid leukemia. DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of SIRPα, both on mRNA and protein level in AML patients and we further investigated whether the expression of SIRPα on two low SIRPα expressing AML cell lines could be upregulated upon differentiation of the cells. We determined the effect of chimeric SIRPα expression on tumor cell growth and programmed cell death by its triggering with an agonistic antibody in these cells. Moreover, we examined the efficacy of agonistic antibody in combination with established antileukemic drugs. RESULTS: By microarray analysis of an extensive cohort of primary AML samples, we demonstrated that SIRPα is differentially expressed in AML subgroups and its expression level is dependent on differentiation stage, with high levels in FAB M4/M5 AML and low levels in FAB M0-M3. Interestingly, AML patients with high SIRPα expression had a poor prognosis. Our results also showed that SIRPα is upregulated upon differentiation of NB4 and Kasumi cells. In addition, triggering of SIRPα with an agonistic antibody in the cells stably expressing chimeric SIRPα, led to inhibition of growth and induction of programmed cell death. Finally, the SIRPα-derived signaling synergized with the activity of established antileukemic drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that triggering of SIRPα has antileukemic effect and may function as a potential therapeutic target in AML.

  1. Software Application for Data Collection and Analysis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca BACÂREA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: It is important in the context of the informatics development and also of medical research, that new software technology to be integrated in order to achieve easier research. The aim of this study was to develop a software application that uses few resources, and that enable data collection, their primary processing in statistical terms (e.g. mean, median, etc., drawing of survival curves and survival Log Rank statistic testing according to the collected parameters. Material and Method: For this purpose, a database in SQLite3 was developed. Because the database engine is embedded in the Database Management System (DBMS this program allows absolute portability. Graphical interface was made in wxWidgets. Statistical calculations were obtained using R software (the `addons` E1071 was used for descriptive statistics and the `Survival `for testing survival and Northest for Kaplan Meier survival curve. Patients were cases admitted and treated in the Hematology Department of County Emergency Hospital Tîrgu Mureş hospitalized and treated during 2007-2010. Results: We created a GUI in wxWidgets to collect the desired medical data: age, date of diagnosis, date of death, blood count values, and the CD leukocyte markers detected by flow cytometry. Entwining of medical data collection and processing statistics (for acute myeloid leukemia - survival, prognostic factors evaluation is a further step in medical research. Conclusion: The tool presented is a useful for research. Application in acute myeloid leukemia derives from the author's interest in the subject; development of this tool in other directions is possible and desirable.

  2. IL-32θ gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia suppresses TNF-α production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man Sub; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Jeon, Jae-Sik; Kim, Jae Kyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Hong, Jintae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2015-12-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α is highly expressed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has been demonstrated to induce rapid proliferation of leukemic blasts. Thus suppressing the production of TNF-α is important because TNF-α can auto-regulate own expression through activation of NF-κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In this study, we focused on the inhibitory effect of IL-32θ on TNF-α production in acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately 38% of patients with AML express endogenous IL-32θ, which is not expressed in healthy individuals. Furthermore, plasma samples were classified into groups with or without IL-32θ; then, we measured proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels. TNF-α production was not increased in patients with IL-32θ expression than that in the no-IL-32θ group. Using an IL-32θ stable expression system in leukemia cell lines, we found that IL-32θ attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced TNF-α production. IL-32θ inhibited phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, inhibitor of κB (IκB), and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which are key positive regulators of TNF-α expression, and inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Moreover, the presence of IL-32θ attenuated TNF-α promoter activity and the binding of NF-κB with the TNF-α promoter. In addition, IL-32γ-induced TNF-α production has no correlation with inhibition of TNF-α via IL-32θ expression. Thus, IL-32θ may serve as a potent inhibitor of TNF-α in patients with AML.

  3. Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, Dawn M; Frei-Lahr, Debra A; Hall, Philip D

    2005-08-01

    Fortunately, the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during pregnancy is rare. We report a case of successful fetal outcome with standard induction and consolidation treatment in the second and third trimesters, respectively. A 37-year-old woman in her second trimester (21 wks) of pregnancy was found to have acute myeloid leukemia. She elected to maintain the pregnancy and underwent induction with cytarabine and idarubicin. Her hospital course was complicated by Pseudomonas vesicularis and gram-positive bacilli (not Bacillus anthracis) septicemia, but she obtained complete remission. After discharge, a fetal echocardiogram at 26 weeks revealed a mildly dilated right ventricle with mild systolic dysfunction, and the left ventricle appeared smaller than normal with mild systolic dysfunction. The patient then received consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine. On day 14 of consolidation, filgrastim 16 mug/kg was added to improve stem cell mobilization. A total of 19.8x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were collected with a single apheresis session. At 37 weeks, she delivered a viable female infant weighing 3 lbs 12 oz. Fetal abnormalities included acrocyanosis, shallow sacral dimple, short digits and limbs, and prominent frontal skull with mild macrognathia. A postnatal echocardiogram revealed a moderate-sized membranous ventricular septal defect. The ventricular septal defect proved significant and required surgical repair at 5 months. Approximately 4 weeks after delivery, the mother underwent autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation. Unfortunately, 100 days after transplantation, she had a relapse of AML. After a brief remission from a second induction, the patient died.

  4. Influence of Chemotherapy on the Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Sanaat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic agents used in patients with cancer cause to generate the enormous amounts of free radicals associated with cell injury. In this study we assess the effects of chemotherapy regimen on oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. 38 newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia were recruited in this study. All patients received cytarabine and daunorubicin as chemotherapy regimen. Plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant status (TAS, and the levels of erythrocyte activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were determined before chemotherapy and 14 days after chemotherapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin. Plasma MDA concentrations increased significantly (from 2.68±0.89 nmol/L to 3.14±1.29 nmol/L during the 14days post-chemotherapy period (P=0.04. Plasma TAS concentrations changed with chemotherapy from 1.09±0.15 mmol/L to 1.02±0.14 mmol/L with P=0.005. Erythrocyte SOD and GPX activity decreased overtime from 1157.24±543.61 U/g Hb to 984.01±419.09 U/g Hb (P=0.04 and 46.96±13.70 U/g Hb to 41.40±6.44 U/g Hb (P=0.02 respectively. We report here that there is an increase in malondialdehyde levels and a decrease in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant status. This suggests that chemotherapy causes these changes as a result of enormous production of reactive oxygen species in the patients with AML. Antioxidant supplementation must be approached with caution because of the probability of reduction the therapeutic efficacy of these cytotoxic drugs.

  5. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia after kidney transplantation: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cardarelli

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of malignancy is greater in kidney transplant recipients compared to the general population, though the higher risk is not equally distributed to all types of cancers. In face of the increased longevity of renal transplant recipients, certain cancers, such as acute leukemias, are becoming more prevalent. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML typically presents with cytopenias and infections, both common findings after kidney transplantation. Therefore, the diagnosis of AML may be initially overlooked in these patients. We report the case of a 33-year-old man who presented with fever, pancytopenia and acute worsening of his renal allograft function 9 years after a living unrelated kidney transplant. After initial negative infectious work-up, a kidney biopsy revealed C4d-positive antibody-mediated rejection in combination with scattered atypical inflammatory cells. A subsequent bone marrow biopsy confirmed AML. He underwent successful induction chemotherapy with daunorubucin and cytarabine and ultimately achieved a complete remission. However, he developed a Page kidney with worsening renal function and abdominal pain three weeks after biopsy in the setting of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Herein, we discuss the prevalence, risk factors, presentation and management of leukemia after kidney transplantation.

  7. Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Myeloid and Lymphoid Leukemia in Children: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jee Young Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Extramedullary relapse (EMR is a recurrence of leukemia in sites other than the bone marrow, and it exhibits a relatively rare presentation of relapse of acute leukemia. However, EMR is an important cause of treatment failure among patients with acute leukemia. Therefore, early detection of these relapses may improve the prognosis. Objectives To describe the disease-related demographic and clinical features and radiologic findings for children diagnosed with EMR in acute leukemia. Patients and Methods The study was based on 22 children (M: F = 14: 8; mean age 7.30 (2.1 - 15.7 years with 8 acute myeloid leukemia (AML and 14 acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL who had experienced an EMR. Age, gender, clinical symptoms, initial extramedullary disease (EMD, French-American-British (FAB morphology, cytogenetics, time to and site of EMR, concurrent bone marrow relapse (BMR, radiologic findings, and outcomes were evaluated. Results No definite relationship was found between initial EMD and EMR. A predilection for AML to relapse in the central nervous system (CNS, except for the CSF and bone, and for ALL to relapse in the CSF and kidney seemed to occur. Patients with EMR had a significantly higher incidence of t(8: 21 cytogenetics and FAB M2 and L1 morphologies. EMR accompanied with concurrent BMR occurred in 31.8% of the patients, who exhibited a relatively grave clinical course. Radiologic findings were nonspecific and had a great variety of structure involved, including bulging enhancing mass in the CT scan, hypoechoic mass in the US, and enhanced mass-like lesion in the MRI. Conclusions Knowledge of the potential sites of EMR, their risk factors, and their clinical and radiologic features may be helpful in the early diagnosis of relapse and planning for therapy.

  8. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against ... may include the following: Combination chemotherapy plus central nervous system sanctuary therapy with intrathecal chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  9. PROGNOSIS AND THERAPY WHEN ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND OTHER “GOOD RISK” ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIAS OCCUR AS A THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Larson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment for a pre-existing condition using chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunosuppressive therapy, or a combination of these modalities may lead to the devastating complication of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/t-AML, collectively known as therapy-related myeloid neoplasm (t-MN. This disorder arises as a direct consequence of mutational events induced by the primary treatment.  The outcomes for these patients have been historically poor compared to people who develop AML de novo.  Currently comprising 10-20% of all cases of AML, t-MN is relatively resistant to conventional leukemia therapies, and is associated with short survival times. Median life expectancy from diagnosis is about 8-10 months in most series. Although the spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities in t-AML is similar to AML de novo, the frequency of unfavorable cytogenetics, such as a complex karyotype or deletion or loss of chromosomes 5 and/or 7, is considerably higher in t-MN.  Two distinct groups of patients with t-MN have been described. The more common subtype, seen in about 75% of patients, typically occurs 5-7 years after first exposure to alkylating agents or radiation, is often preceded by a myelodysplastic syndrome, and is frequently accompanied by clonal cytogenetic abnormalities such as the loss of all or part of chromosomes 5 or 7. Mutations of the P53 tumor suppressor gene are also common.  The risk is related to total cumulative exposure over time to alkylating agents. In contrast, among individuals who develop t-AML after treatment with topoisomerase II inhibitors, the latency period to the development of t-AML is often only 1-3 years, antecedent MDS is rare, and gene rearrangements involving MLL at 11q23 or RUNX1/AML1 at 21q22 are common. It is now well recognized that acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and other subtypes of AML with balanced translocations sometimes occur as a t-MN in patients who have previously

  10. Aurora kinases in childhood acute leukemia: The promise of aurora B as therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Hartsink-Segers (S.); C.M. Zwaan (Michel); C. Exalto (Carla); M.W.J. Luijendijk (M. W J); V. Calvert (V.); E.F. Petricoin (Emanuel F.); W.E. Evans (William); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); V. de Haas (Valerie); M. Hedtjärn (M.); B.R. Hansen (B.); T. Koch (T.); H.N. Caron (Huib); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the effects of targeting the mitotic regulators aurora kinase A and B in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aurora protein expression levels in pediatric ALL and AML patient samples were determined by western blot and reverse ph

  11. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    countries. RESULTS: The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients......BACKGROUND: Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. PROCEDURE: We investigated disease characteristics and outcome...

  12. Nucleophosmin (NPM1) Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: An Ongoing (Cytoplasmic) Tale of Dueling Mutations and Duality of Molecular Genetic Testing Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This Commentary highlights two articles that focus on molecular techniques to identify mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1), which is the most frequently mutated gene in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML)

  13. Thrombopoietin/MPL participates in initiating and maintaining RUNX1-ETO acute myeloid leukemia via PI3K/AKT signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Pulikkan (John); D. Madera (Dmitri); L. Xue (Liting); P. Bradley (Paul); S.F. Landrette (Sean Francis); Y.-H. Kuo (Ya-Huei); S. Abbas (Saman); L.J. Zhu (Lihua Julie); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); L.H. Castilla (Lucio)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOncogenic mutations in components of cytokine signaling pathways elicit ligand-independent activation of downstream signaling, enhancing proliferation and survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene, MPL, a homodimeric receptor activated by th

  14. The expression of CD56 antigen is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

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    Ana Paula Alegretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The expression of CD56 is considered a bad prognostic factor for overall survival, lower rates or short complete remission and extramedullary invasion but the results are controversial. The importance of validating new prognostic parameters in acute leukemias was the reason to investigate the CD56 expression in blast cells of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: A cohort of 48 patients treated at Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre and diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia as classified by the French-American-British group (FAB criteria using cell morphology, cytochemistry and flow cytometry were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight cases (16.7% were CD56 positive without correlation to age or gender. The highest incidence of CD56 positivity was in FAB subtypes M4 and M5. The death rate during induction was not significantly different between patients with and without CD56 expression (62.5% vs. 27.5%; p-value = 0.097. However, patients that expressed CD56 had significantly lower overall survival than those who did not (mean 4.0 months vs. 14.5 months; p-value = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that expression of CD56 in acute myeloid leukemia may be indicative of poor prognosis because it is associated with a shorter overall survival. The death rate during induction was not significantly different despite an apparent difference in proportions between groups.

  15. Impact of postremission consolidation chemotherapy on outcome after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeshurun, Moshe; Labopin, Myriam; Blaise, Didier;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the role of postremission consolidation chemotherapy before reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1).......The objective of the current study was to investigate the role of postremission consolidation chemotherapy before reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1)....

  16. Flow cytometry assay of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) in peripheral blood during acute hepatitis C: Possible pathogenetic mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Perrella; Oreste Perrella; Luigi Atripaldi; Pasquale Bellopede; Tommaso Patarino; Costanza Sbreglia; Giovanni Tarantino; Paolo Sorrentino; Paolo Conca; Luca Ruggiero

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To asses the expression of myeloid dendritic cells (CD11c+) subset during acute HCV hepatitis and its possible involvement in natural history of the infection.METHODS: We enrolled 11 patients with acute hepatitis C (AHC) (Group A), 10 patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA) (as infective control-Group B) and 10 healthy donors (group C) in this study. All patients underwent selective flow cytometry gating strategies to assess the peripheral number of the myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs)to understand the possible role and differences during acute hepatitis.RESULTS: Eight of 11 patients with acute HCV hepatitis did not show any increase of mDCs compared to healthy individuals, while a significant decrease of mDCs was found in absolute cell count (z=-2.37; P<0.05) and percentage (z=-2.30; P<0.05) as compared with AHA.On the contrary, The remaining three patients of the group A had a higher mDCs number and percentage as occur in group B. Interestingly, after six months, those patients did not show any increase of mDCs subset were chronically infected. while the three subjects with an increase of peripheral mDCs, as in HAV acute infection,resolved the illness.CONCLUSION: The lack of increase of mDCs during acute hepatitis C might be an important factor involved in chronicization of the infection.

  17. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  18. FLT3-ITD Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsaen, Piyawan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chainansamit, Su-On; Wisanuyothin, Nittaya; Kuwatjanakul, Pichayanan; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most frequent genetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) where it is associated with a poor prognosis. The FLT3-ITD mutation could, therefore, be a potential molecular prognostic marker important for risk-stratified treatment options. We amplified the FLT3 gene at exon 14 and 15 in 52 AML patients (aged between 2 months and 74 years) from 4 referral centers (a university hospital and 3 regional hospitals in Northeast Thailand), using a simple PCR method. FLT3-ITD mutations were found in 10 patients (19.2%), being more common in adults than in children (21.1% vs. 14.3%) and more prevalent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3) than AML-non M3 (4 of 10 AML-M3 vs. 6 of 42 AML- non M3 patients). Duplication sequences varied in size-between 27 and 171 nucleotides (median=63.5) and in their location. FLT3-ITD mutations with common duplication sequences accounted for a significant percentage in AML patients in northeastern Thailand. This simple PCR method is feasible for routine laboratory practice and these data could help tailor use of the national protocol for AML.

  19. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials.

  20. Radioimmunotherapy for treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Conceptual chances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmann, I.; Helisch, A.; Bartenstein, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany); Meyer, R.G.; Herr, W. [III. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik (Haematologie), Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has improved considerably by introduction of aggressive consolidation chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, only 20-30% of patients with AML achieve long-term disease-free survival after SCT. The most common cause of treatment failure is relapse. Additionally, mortality rates are significantly increased by therapy-related causes such as toxicity of chemotherapy and complications of SCT. Including radioimmunotherapies in the treatment of AML and myelodyplastic syndrome (MDS) allows for the achievement of a pronounced antileukaemic effect for the reduction of relapse rates on the one hand. On the other hand, no increase of acute toxicity and later complications should be induced. These effects are important for the primary reduction of tumour cells as well as for the myelblative conditioning before SCT. This paper provides a systematic and critical review of the currently used radionuclides and immunoconjugates for the treatment of AML and MDS and summarizes the literature on primary tumour cell reductive radioimmunotherapies on the one hand and conditioning radioimmunotherapies before SCT on the other hand. (orig.)

  1. Allo-SCT conditioning for myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with clofarabine, cytarabine and ATG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M G; Uy, G L; Procknow, E; Stockerl-Goldstein, K; Cashen, A; Westervelt, P; Abboud, C N; Augustin, K; Luo, J; DiPersio, J F; Vij, R

    2009-07-01

    The application of myeloablative Allo-SCT is limited by its associated morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity conditioning regimens attempt to diminish these, but are associated with a higher risk of disease relapse. Given the evidence of activity of clofarabine and cytarabine in myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML), we explored a novel reduced-intensity conditioning regimen based on this backbone. Patients received clofarabine 40 mg/m(2) i.v. on days -6 to -2, cytarabine 1 g/m(2) i.v. on days -6 to -2 and anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) 1 mg/kg on day -4 and 2.5 mg/kg x 2 days on days -3 and -2. Seven patients were enrolled. Their median age was 54 years; three were with MDS and four with AML. The median duration of neutropenia was 14 days and that of thrombocytopenia was 22 days. Toxicities included hand-foot syndrome (57% grade 2), elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (57% grade 3), elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (86% grade 3) and hyperbilirubinemia (29% grade 3-5). No acute GVHD was observed. Enrollment to the trial was halted after three of the first seven patients expired on days +15, +26 and +32. Three of the four surviving patients have relapsed with a median TTP of 152 days. This regimen was not sufficiently immunosuppressive to ensure engraftment, and was associated with substantial morbidity and mortality.

  2. MYCN transgenic zebrafish model with the characterization of acute myeloid leukemia and altered hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jing Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amplification of MYCN (N-Myc oncogene has been reported as a frequent event and a poor prognostic marker in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The molecular mechanisms and transcriptional networks by which MYCN exerts its influence in AML are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduced murine MYCN gene into embryonic zebrafish through a heat-shock promoter and established the stable germline Tg(MYCN:HSE:EGFP zebrafish. N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1, negatively controlled by MYCN in human and functionally involved in neutrophil maturation, was significantly under-expressed in this model. Using peripheral blood smear detection, histological section and flow cytometric analysis of single cell suspension from kidney and spleen, we found that MYCN overexpression promoted cell proliferation, enhanced the repopulating activity of myeloid cells and the accumulation of immature hematopoietic blast cells. MYCN enhanced primitive hematopoiesis by upregulating scl and lmo2 expression and promoted myelopoiesis by inhibiting gata1 expression and inducing pu.1, mpo expression. Microarray analysis identified that cell cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, MAPK/Ras, and p53-mediated apoptosis pathways were upregulated. In addition, mismatch repair, transforming and growth factor β (TGFβ were downregulated in MYCN-overexpressing blood cells (p<0.01. All of these signaling pathways are critical in the proliferation and malignant transformation of blood cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The above results induced by overexpression of MYCN closely resemble the main aspects of human AML, suggesting that MYCN plays a role in the etiology of AML. MYCN reprograms hematopoietic cell fate by regulating NDRG1 and several lineage-specific hematopoietic transcription factors. Therefore, this MYCN transgenic zebrafish model facilitates dissection of MYCN-mediated signaling in vivo, and enables high-throughput scale screens to identify the

  3. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Manoj; Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-11-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone.

  4. TET2 mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia: clinical implications and evolutionary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Frederik; Markus, Birgit; Thol, Felicitas; Morgan, Michael; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Krauter, Jürgen; Heuser, Michael; Bernard, Olivier A; Ganser, Arnold

    2014-10-01

    Mutations of the Ten-Eleven-Translocation 2 (TET2) gene have been identified in patients with various myeloid neoplasms, but the clinical relevance of these mutations and their timing during disease development in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) remain unclear. The total coding region of TET2 was analyzed by direct sequencing in 215 CN-AML patients younger than 60 years from multicenter treatment trials AML-SHG 0199 (ClinicalTrials Identifier NCT00209833) and 0295. Associations were analyzed in the context of other molecular markers, such as CEBPA, DNMT3A, NMP1, FLT3, IDH1/2, RAS, and WT1. To investigate the order of appearance of TET2 and concomitant mutations, targeted deep resequencing was performed in six patients. At least one sequence variation with impact on TET2 protein sequence was found in 13 of the 215 CN-AML patients (6%). Patients with TET2 mutations tended to be older (P = 0.078) and had higher platelet counts (P = 0.041). TET2-mutated patients were more likely to have concomitant NPM1 (11 of 13; P = 0.047) and DNMT3A (10 of 13; P = 0.001) mutations but were mutually exclusive to partial tandem duplication of the MLL gene (MLL-PTD) and IDH1/2 mutations. TET2 mutations were identified as subclones in four of the six investigated patients by deep sequencing. Progenitor-derived colony assays suggest a stepwise acquisition of mutations during disease development, TET2 mutation being later than NPM1 and DNMT3A. The TET2 mutation status did not influence overall or relapse-free survival.

  5. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan;

    2016-01-01

    .001) if relapse occurred in the period 1992-2001. Factors independently predicting mortality after relapse included short duration of first remission, bone marrow involvement, age ten years or over, unfavorable cytogenetics, and Down syndrome. T-cell immunophenotype was not an independent prognostic factor unless......Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... included in the study. There were no statistically significant differences in outcome between the up-front protocols or between the relapse protocols used, but an improvement over time was observed. The 5-year overall survival for patients relapsing in the period 2002-2011 was 57.5±3.4%, but 44.7±3.2% (P

  6. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1,2 Fatima A Jomha,3 Ahmed H Alhammadi1,2 1Department of Pediatrics, Section of Academic General Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, 2Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Doha, Qatar; 3School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon Abstract: Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute severe asthma requiring intubation and invasive ventilation. The aim of this review is to detail evidence on the use of ketamine in childhood asthma exacerbations. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed, using different combinations of the following terms: ketamine, asthma, use, exacerbation, and childhood. In addition, we searched the references of the identified articles for additional articles. We then reviewed titles and included studies that were relevant to the topic of interest. Finally, the search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish from 1918 to June 2015. Due to the scarcity in the literature, we included all published articles. The literature reports conflicting results of ketamine use for acute severe asthma in children. Taking into consideration the relatively good safety profile of the drug, ketamine might be a reasonable option in the management of acute severe asthma in children who fail to respond to standard therapy. Furthermore, pediatricians and pediatric emergency clinicians administering ketamine should be knowledgeable about the unique actions of this drug and its potential side effects. Keywords: asthma, ketamine, children

  7. Massive Thrombosis of the Right Atrium Extended to the Superior Vena Cava at the Diagnosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bienvenu Houssou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Venous thromboembolic disease is a common complication found in 8% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The location at the right atrium is exceptional. These last fifty years, only 6 cases of thrombosis of the atrium in the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia were published on PubMed search engine. Case Presentation. 35-year-old farmer, who had been admitted by emergency department for superior vena cava syndrome and had a hyperleukocytic AML with complex karyotype associated with a significant thrombosis of the right atrium, extended all along the superior vena cava. He has been treated by the 2011 AML protocol using low molecular weight heparin and died from respiratory distress. Conclusions. If thrombosis is common in AML, the location in right atrium is rare. Its management requires surgery that is sometimes difficult to achieve.

  8. Downstream molecular pathways of FLT3 in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia: biology and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Shinichiro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase. Mutations of FLT3 comprise one of the most frequently identified types of genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia. One-third of acute myeloid leukemia patients have mutations of this gene, and the majority of these mutations involve an internal tandem duplication in the juxtamembrane region of FLT3, leading to constitutive activation of downstream signaling pathways and aberrant cell growth. This review summarizes the current understanding of the effects of the downstream molecular signaling pathways after FLT3 activation, with a particular focus on the effects on transcription factors. Moreover, this review describes novel FLT3-targeted therapies, as well as efficient combination therapies for FLT3-mutated leukemia cells.

  9. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  10. Systemic mastocytosis uncommon in KIT D816V mutation positive core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas; Preiss, Birgitte; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The KIT D816V mutation is detected in the vast majority of adult cases of systemic mastocytosis (SM). The mutation is also frequently detected in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) defined by the presence of t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or inv(16)(p13.1;q22)/t(16;16)(p...

  11. Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia 15 Years after Hydroxyurea Use in a Patient with Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We report a 41 year old male with sickle cell disease who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with complex karyotype involving chromosomes 5, 7 and 17 after 15 years of hydroxyurea treatment. He responded poorly to induction chemotherapy with cytarabine/idarubicin followed by high dose cytarabine and succumbed to neutropenic sepsis. Multiple systematic reviews, observational studies and clinical trials were conducted to identify the toxicity profile of hydroxurea. ...

  12. Efficacy and safety of the HAA regimen as induction chemotherapy in 236 de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶佩佩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the HAA regimen (homoharringtonine,cytarabine and aclarubicin) as induction chemotherapy in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) .Methods The efficacy and safety of 236 de novo AML patients who received the HAA regimen as induction chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed.The complete remission (CR) rate was assayed.Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) ,and the differ-

  13. APC2 and CYP1B1 methylation changes in the bone marrow of acute myeloid leukemia patients during chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    XIA, YONGMING; Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; YE, HUADAN; Fang, Lili; Zhou, Annan; GAO, YUTING; Jiang, Danjie; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant promoter DNA methylation is a major mechanism of leukemogenesis in hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the association between promoter methylation with chemotherapeutic outcomes remains unknown. In the present study, bone marrow samples were collected prior to and following chemotherapy in 30 AML patients. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction technology was used to examine the promoter methylation status of adenomatous polyposis col 2...

  14. Identification Of Akn-032, A Novel 2-Aminopyrazine Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, With Significant Preclinical Activity In Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna; Höglund, Martin; Lindhagen, Elin; Åleskog, Anna; Hassan, Sadia Bashir; Ekholm, Carina; Fhölenhag, Karin; Jensen, Annika Jenmalm; Löthgren, Agneta; Scobie, Martin; Larsson, Rolf; Parrow, Vendela

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant signal transduction by mutant or overexpressed protein kinases has emerged as a promising target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We here present a novel low molecular weight kinase inhibitor, AKN-032, targeting the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) and discovered in a new type of screening funnel combining the target therapy approach with sequential cellular screens. AKN-032 was identified among 150 selected hits from three different high throughput...

  15. Acute myeloid leukaemia as a cause of acute ischaemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haelst, P.L.; Schot, Bart; Hoendermis, E.S.; van den Berg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is almost invariably the result of atherosclerotic degeneration of the coronary arteries. However, other causes of ischaemic heart disease should always be considered. Here we describe two patients with a classic presentation of ischaemic heart disease resulting from acute le

  16. A comparison of toxicities in acute myeloid leukemia patients with and without renal impairment treated with decitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Lauren B; Roddy, Julianna Vf; Kim, Miryoung; Li, Junan; Phillips, Gary; Walker, Alison R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose There are limited data regarding the clinical use of decitabine for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with a serum creatinine of 2 mg/dL or greater. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 111 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had been treated with decitabine and compared the development of toxicities during cycle 1 in those with normal renal function (creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 60 mL/min) to those with renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min). Results Notable differences in the incidence of grade ≥3 cardiotoxicity (33% of renal dysfunction patients vs. 16% of normal renal function patients, p = 0.042) and respiratory toxicity (40% of renal dysfunction patients vs. 14% of normal renal function patients, p = 0.0037) were observed. The majority of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and atrial fibrillation cases occurred in the renal dysfunction group. The odds of developing grade ≥3 cardiotoxicity did not differ significantly between patients with and without baseline cardiac comorbidities (OR 1.43, p = 0.43). Conclusions This study noted a higher incidence of grade ≥3 cardiac and respiratory toxicities in decitabine-treated acute myeloid leukemia patients with renal dysfunction compared to normal renal function. This may prompt closer monitoring, regardless of baseline cardiac comorbidities. Further evaluation of decitabine in patients with renal dysfunction is needed.

  17. Cyanobacteria from terrestrial and marine sources contain apoptogens able to overcome chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Shishido, Tania Keiko; Wahlsten, Matti; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-04-03

    In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81) cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML) activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells.

  18. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81 cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells.

  19. Epigenetic Silencing of Eyes Absent 4 Gene by Acute Myeloid Leukemia 1-Eight-twenty-one Oncoprotein Contributes to Leukemogenesis in t(8;21) Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sai Huang; Meng-Meng Jiang; Guo-Feng Chen; Kun Qian; Hong-Hao Gao; Wei Guan; Jin-Long Shi

    2016-01-01

    Background:The acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML 1)-eight-twenty-one (ETO) fusion protein generated by the t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation is considered to display a crucial role in leukemogenesis in AML.By focusing on the anti-leukemia effects of eyes absent 4 (EYA4) gene on AML cells,we investigated the biologic and molecular mechanism associated with AML1-ETO expressed in t(8;21) AML.Methods:Qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR),quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR),and Western blotting analysis were used to observe the mRNA and protein expression levels of EYA4 in cell lines.Different plasmids (including mutant plasmids) of dual luciferase reporter vector were built to study the binding status of AML1-ETO to the promoter region of EYA4.Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to study the epigenetic silencing mechanism of EYA4.Bisulfite sequencing was applied to detect the methylation status in EYA4 promoter region.The influence of EYA4 gene in the cell proliferation,apoptosis,and cell clone-forming ability was detected by the technique of Cell Counting Kit-8,flow cytometry,and clonogenic assay.Results:EYA4 gene was hypermethylated in AML1-ETO+ patients and its expression was down-regulated by 6-fold in Kasumi-1 and SKNO-1 cells,compared to HL-60 and SKNO-1-siA/E cells,respectively.We demonstrated that AML1-ETO triggered the epigenetic silencing of EYA4 gene by binding at AML1-binding sites and recruiting histone deacetylase 1 and DNA methyltransferases.Enhanced EYA4 expression levels inhibited cellular proliferation and suppressed cell colony formation in AML1-ETO+ cell lines.We also found EYA4 transfection increased apoptosis ofKasumi-1 and SKNO-1 cells by 1.6-fold and 1.4-fold compared to negative control,respectively.Conclusions:Our study identified EYA4 gene as targets for AML1-ETO and indicated it as a novel tumor suppressor gene.In addition,we provided evidence that EYA4 gene might be a novel therapeutic target and a potential candidate

  20. Epigenetic Silencing of Eyes Absent 4 Gene by Acute Myeloid Leukemia 1-Eight-twenty-one Oncoprotein Contributes to Leukemogenesis in t(8;21) Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sai; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Chen, Guo-Feng; Qian, Kun; Gao, Hong-Hao; Guan, Wei; Shi, Jin-Long; Liu, An-Qi; Liu, Jing; Wang, Bian-Hong; Li, Yong-Hui; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: The acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML1)-eight-twenty-one (ETO) fusion protein generated by the t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation is considered to display a crucial role in leukemogenesis in AML. By focusing on the anti-leukemia effects of eyes absent 4 (EYA4) gene on AML cells, we investigated the biologic and molecular mechanism associated with AML1-ETO expressed in t(8;21) AML. Methods: Qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and Western blotting analysis were used to observe the mRNA and protein expression levels of EYA4 in cell lines. Different plasmids (including mutant plasmids) of dual luciferase reporter vector were built to study the binding status of AML1-ETO to the promoter region of EYA4. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to study the epigenetic silencing mechanism of EYA4. Bisulfite sequencing was applied to detect the methylation status in EYA4 promoter region. The influence of EYA4 gene in the cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell clone-forming ability was detected by the technique of Cell Counting Kit-8, flow cytometry, and clonogenic assay. Results: EYA4 gene was hypermethylated in AML1-ETO+ patients and its expression was down-regulated by 6-fold in Kasumi-1 and SKNO-1 cells, compared to HL-60 and SKNO-1-siA/E cells, respectively. We demonstrated that AML1-ETO triggered the epigenetic silencing of EYA4 gene by binding at AML1-binding sites and recruiting histone deacetylase 1 and DNA methyltransferases. Enhanced EYA4 expression levels inhibited cellular proliferation and suppressed cell colony formation in AML1-ETO+ cell lines. We also found EYA4 transfection increased apoptosis of Kasumi-1 and SKNO-1 cells by 1.6-fold and 1.4-fold compared to negative control, respectively. Conclusions: Our study identified EYA4 gene as targets for AML1-ETO and indicated it as a novel tumor suppressor gene. In addition, we provided evidence that EYA4 gene might be a novel therapeutic target

  1. Progress of Studies on Genetics of Childhood Acute Leukemia——Review%儿童急性白血病遗传学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳志霞; 郑胡镛

    2013-01-01

    This study on determination of leukemia-specific chromosomal abnormalities and their relationship with prognosis of childhood acute leukemia(AL) had an important significance for childhood acute leukemia.In recent years,the efficacy of treatment of childhood AL has been greatly improved,but relapse is still a main factor affecting prognosis.Treatment based on the risk stratification by cytogenetic abnormalities can improve the prognosis and survival rate.In the past 3 decades,the genetic techniques have developed rapidly and many new genetic abnormalities have been found.This review highlights the main chromosomal and genomic abnormalities of 3 common childhood AL,including B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia(BCP-ALL),T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia(T-ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia(AML).%白血病特异染色体异常的确定及其与预后关系的研究对儿童急性白血病(acute leukemia,AL)具有极其重要的意义.近年来,虽然儿童AL的治疗效果有了很大改善,但其复发仍然是影响预后的主要因素.根据遗传学异常进行危险度分层,并指导治疗,可以改善儿童AL预后,提高患儿生存率.在过去的30年中,遗传学检测技术有了突飞猛进的发展,发现了许多新的遗传学异常.本文就三种儿童常见AL,包括前B细胞急性淋巴细胞白血病(B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia,BCP-ALL)、T细胞急性淋巴细胞白血病(T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia,T-ALL)和急性髓系白血病(acute myeloid leukemia,AML)的最新遗传学研究进展进行综述.

  2. Identification and functional analysis of acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility associated single nucleotide polymorphisms at non-protein coding regions of RUNX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Ren, Xiuyu; Wang, Haiying; Zhao, Yao; Yi, Zhengjun; Wang, Kaifeng; Zhang, Shizhuang; Wang, Lin; Samuelson, David J; Hu, Zhenbo

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the susceptibility to acute myeloid leukemia. We aim to search non-protein coding regions of key hematopoiesis transcription factors for genetic variations associated with acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility. We genotyped SNPs of RUNX1 P1 promoter, P2 promoter, +23 enhancer, intron 5.2 enhancer, PU.1 promoter, CEBPA promoter, and CEBPE promoter from acute myeloid leukemia patients and healthy controls. Rs2249650 and rs2268276 at RUNX1 intron 5.2 enhancer were found to be associated with acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility. Artificial reporters containing different rs2249650 and rs2268276 alleles showed differential activities in the K562 cell line, a human immortalized myeloid leukemia line. Rs2249650 contributes to reporter activities more than rs2268276. Gel shift assay is consistent with the luciferase assay. Supershift assay indicated that one potential binding protein was PU.1. To sum up, rs2268276 and especially rs2249650 may be qualified as new acute myeloid leukemia susceptibility-associated SNPs.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 suppresses the apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia cells via the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaojing; Fang, Qin; Chen, Shuya; Zhe, Nana; Chai, Qixiang; Yu, Meisheng; Zhang, Yaming; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Jishi

    2015-05-01

    There are few studies on the correlation between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that HO-1 was aberrantly overexpressed in the majority of AML patients, especially in patients with acute monocytic leukemia (M5) and leukocytosis, and inhibited the apoptosis of HL-60 and U937 cells. Moreover, silencing HO-1 prolonged the survival of xenograft mouse models. Further studies demonstrated that HO-1 suppressed the apoptosis of AML cells through activating the JNK/c-JUN signaling pathway. These data indicate a molecular role of HO-1 in inhibiting cell apoptosis, allowing it to be a potential target for treating AML.

  4. [Effect of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Hui-Fei; Fu, Zheng-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Based on the representative articles in recent years, the different mechanisms of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are summarized. Decitabine improves the expression of WT1 gene to stimulate specific cytotoxic T cells which can enhance graft versus leukemia effect (GVL) and improve the expression of FOXP3 gene to stimulate regulatory T cells so as to inhibit the acute graft versus host disease (GVHD). Through the above-mentimed mechanisms, decitabine can improve both therapeutic effect and quality of life in the patients with AML after allogeneic HSCT.

  5. Myeloid antigens in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia:clinical data point to regulation of CD66c distinct from other myeloid antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madzo Jozef

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant expression of myeloid antigens (MyAgs on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells is a well-documented phenomenon, although its regulating mechanisms are unclear. MyAgs in ALL are interpreted e.g. as hallmarks of early differentiation stage and/or lineage indecisiveness. Granulocytic marker CD66c – Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 is aberrantly expressed on ALL with strong correlation to genotype (negative in TEL/AML1 and MLL/AF4, positive in BCR/ABL and hyperdiploid cases. Methods In a cohort of 365 consecutively diagnosed Czech B-precursor ALL patients, we analyze distribution of MyAg+ cases and mutual relationship among CD13, CD15, CD33, CD65 and CD66c. The most frequent MyAg (CD66c is studied further regarding its stability from diagnosis to relapse, prognostic significance and regulation of surface expression. For the latter, flow cytometry, Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR on sorted cells is used. Results We show CD66c is expressed in 43% patients, which is more frequent than other MyAgs studied. In addition, CD66c expression negatively correlates with CD13 (p Conclusion In contrast to general notion we show that different MyAgs in lymphoblastic leukemia represent different biological circumstances. We chose the most frequent and tightly genotype-associated MyAg CD66c to show its stabile expression in patients from diagnosis to relapse, which differs from what is known on the other MyAgs. Surface expression of CD66c is regulated at the gene transcription level, in contrast to previous reports.

  6. Precision oncology for acute myeloid leukemia using a knowledge bank approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstung, Moritz; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martincorena, Inigo; Bullinger, Lars; Gaidzik, Verena I; Paschka, Peter; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Bolli, Niccolo; Ganly, Peter; Ganser, Arnold; McDermott, Ultan; Döhner, Konstanze; Schlenk, Richard F; Döhner, Hartmut; Campbell, Peter J

    2017-03-01

    Underpinning the vision of precision medicine is the concept that causative mutations in a patient's cancer drive its biology and, by extension, its clinical features and treatment response. However, considerable between-patient heterogeneity in driver mutations complicates evidence-based personalization of cancer care. Here, by reanalyzing data from 1,540 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we explore how large knowledge banks of matched genomic-clinical data can support clinical decision-making. Inclusive, multistage statistical models accurately predicted likelihoods of remission, relapse and mortality, which were validated using data from independent patients in The Cancer Genome Atlas. Comparison of long-term survival probabilities under different treatments enables therapeutic decision support, which is available in exploratory form online. Personally tailored management decisions could reduce the number of hematopoietic cell transplants in patients with AML by 20-25% while maintaining overall survival rates. Power calculations show that databases require information from thousands of patients for accurate decision support. Knowledge banks facilitate personally tailored therapeutic decisions but require sustainable updating, inclusive cohorts and large sample sizes.

  7. Raman spectroscopy for the assessment of acute myeloid leukemia: a proof of concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanna, R.; Tresoldi, C.; Ronchi, P.; Lenferink, A. T. M.; Morasso, C.; Mehn, D.; Bedoni, M.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Ciceri, F.; Otto, C.; Gramatica, F.

    2014-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a proliferative neoplasm, that if not properly treated can rapidly cause a fatal outcome. The diagnosis of AML is challenging and the first diagnostic step is the count of the percentage of blasts (immature cells) in bone marrow and blood sample, and their morphological characterization. This evaluation is still performed manually with a bright field light microscope. Here we report results of a study applying Raman spectroscopy for analysis of samples from two patients affected by two AML subtypes characterized by a different maturation stage in the neutrophilic lineage. Ten representative cells per sample were selected and analyzed with high-resolution confocal Raman microscopy by scanning 64x64 (4096) points in a confocal layer through the volume of the whole cell. The average spectrum of each cell was then used to obtain a highly reproducible mean fingerprint of the two different AML subtypes. We demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy efficiently distinguishes these different AML subtypes. The molecular interpretation of the substantial differences between the subtypes is related to granulocytic enzymes (e.g. myeloperoxidase and cytochrome b558), in agreement with different stages of maturation of the two considered AML subtypes . These results are promising for the development of a new, objective, automated and label-free Raman based methods for the diagnosis and first assessment of AML.

  8. Allogeneic transplantation for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzow, Mark R; Tarima, Sergey; Pérez, Waleska S; Bolwell, Brian J; Cairo, Mitchell S; Camitta, Bruce M; Cutler, Corey S; de Lima, Marcos; Dipersio, John F; Gale, Robert Peter; Keating, Armand; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina; Marks, David I; Maziarz, Richard T; McCarthy, Philip L; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Phillips, Gordon L; Rizzo, J Douglas; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2010-03-04

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDSs) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) have a poor prognosis with conventional therapy. Encouraging results are reported after allogeneic transplantation. We analyzed outcomes in 868 persons with t-AML (n = 545) or t-MDS (n = 323) receiving allogeneic transplants from 1990 to 2004. A myeloablative regimen was used for conditioning in 77%. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) and relapse were 41% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38-44) and 27% (24-30) at 1 year and 48% (44-51) and 31% (28-34) at 5 years, respectively. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 32% (95% CI, 29-36) and 37% (34-41) at 1 year and 21% (18-24) and 22% (19-26) at 5 years, respectively. In multivariate analysis, 4 risk factors had adverse impacts on DFS and OS: (1) age older than 35 years; (2) poor-risk cytogenetics; (3) t-AML not in remission or advanced t-MDS; and (4) donor other than an HLA-identical sibling or a partially or well-matched unrelated donor. Five-year survival for subjects with none, 1, 2, 3, or 4 of these risk factors was 50% (95% CI, 38-61), 26% (20-31), 21% (16-26), 10% (5-15), and 4% (0-16), respectively (P < .001). These data permit a more precise prediction of outcome and identify subjects most likely to benefit from allogeneic transplantation.

  9. Residual Disease in a Novel Xenograft Model of RUNX1-Mutated, Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umayal Sivagnanalingam

    Full Text Available Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML patients harboring RUNX1 mutations have a dismal prognosis with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We aimed to develop an in vivo model of RUNX1-mutated, CN-AML in which the nature of residual disease in this molecular disease subset could be explored. We utilized a well-characterized patient-derived, RUNX1-mutated CN-AML line (CG-SH. Tail vein injection of CG-SH into NOD scid gamma mice led to leukemic engraftment in the bone marrow, spleen, and peripheral blood within 6 weeks. Treatment of leukemic mice with anthracycline/cytarabine-based chemotherapy resulted in clearance of disease from the spleen and peripheral blood, but persistence of disease in the bone marrow as assessed by flow cytometry and secondary transplantation. Whole exome sequencing of CG-SH revealed mutations in ASXL1, CEBPA, GATA2, and SETBP1, not previously reported. We conclude that CG-SH xenografts are a robust, reproducible in vivo model of CN-AML in which to explore mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance and novel therapeutic approaches.

  10. Frequency and Prognostic Relevance of FLT3 Mutations in Saudi Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaleb Elyamany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Mutations of FLT3 were first described in 1997 and account for the most frequent molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. AML patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutations have poor cure rates the prognostic significance of point mutations; tyrosine kinase domain (TKD is still unclear. We analyzed the frequency of FLT3 mutations (ITD and D835 in patients with AML at diagnosis; no sufficient data currently exist regarding FLT3 mutations in Saudi AML patients. This study was aimed at evaluating the frequency of FLT3 mutations in patients with AML and its significance for prognosis. The frequency of FLT3 mutations in our study (18.56% was lower than many of the reported studies, FLT3-ITD mutations were observed in 14.4%, and FLT3-TKD in 4.1%, of 97 newly diagnosed AML patients (82 adult and 15 pediatric. Our data show significant increase of FLT3 mutations in male more than female (13 male, 5 female. Our results support the view that FLT3-ITD mutation has strong prognostic factor in AML patients and is associated with high rate of relapse, and high leucocytes and blast count at diagnosis and relapse.

  11. Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Antibody Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis Associated with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Alcantara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoantibodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l. Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML.

  12. Molecular analysis of the apoptotic effects of BPA in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Pozzo Giovanna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: BPA (bisphenol A or 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-phenolpropane is present in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, which can be used in impact-resistant safety equipment and baby bottles, as protective coatings inside metal food containers, and as composites and sealants in dentistry. Recently, attention has focused on the estrogen-like and carcinogenic adverse effects of BPA. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of this compound. Methods: Cell cycle, apoptosis and differentiation analyses; western blots. Results: BPA is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in three different acute myeloid leukemias. Although some granulocytic differentiation concomitantly occurred in NB4 cells upon BPA treatment, the major action was the induction of apoptosis. BPA mediated apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred by activation of extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways modulating both FAS and TRAIL and by inducing BAD phosphorylation in NB4 cells. Finally, also non genomic actions such as the early decrease of both ERK and AKT phosphorylation were induced by BPA thus indicating that a complex intersection of regulations occur for the apoptotic action of BPA. Conclusion: BPA is able to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells via caspase activation and involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis.

  13. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia of Adults: Determination, Prognostic Impact and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Cefalo, Mariagiovanna; Consalvo, Maria Irno; Sarlo, Chiara; Conti, Consuelo; De Santis, Giovanna; De Bellis, Eleonora; Di Veroli, Ambra; Palomba, Patrizia; Attrotto, Cristina; Zizzari, Annagiulia; Paterno, Giovangiacinto; Voso, Maria Teresa; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Arcese, William; Amadori, Sergio; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Pretreatment assessment of cytogenetic/genetic signature of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been consistently shown to play a major prognostic role but also to fail at predicting outcome on individual basis, even in low-risk AML. Therefore, we are in need of further accurate methods to refine the patients’ risk allocation process, distinguishing more adequately those who are likely to recur from those who are not. In this view, there is now evidence that the submicroscopic amounts of leukemic cells (called minimal residual disease, MRD), measured during the course of treatment, indicate the quality of response to therapy. Therefore, MRD might serve as an independent, additional biomarker to help to identify patients at higher risk of relapse. Detection of MRD requires the use of highly sensitive ancillary techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and multiparametric flow cytometry(MPFC). In the present manuscript, we will review the current approaches to investigate MRD and its clinical applications in AML management. PMID:27872732

  14. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials.

  15. Distinct evolution and dynamics of epigenetic and genetic heterogeneity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Garrett-Bakelman, Francine E; Chung, Stephen S; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hricik, Todd; Rapaport, Franck; Patel, Jay; Dillon, Richard; Vijay, Priyanka; Brown, Anna L; Perl, Alexander E; Cannon, Joy; Bullinger, Lars; Luger, Selina; Becker, Michael; Lewis, Ian D; To, Luen Bik; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Döhner, Hartmut; Döhner, Konstanze; Guzman, Monica L; Hassane, Duane C; Roboz, Gail J; Grimwade, David; Valk, Peter J M; D'Andrea, Richard J; Carroll, Martin; Park, Christopher Y; Neuberg, Donna; Levine, Ross; Melnick, Ari M; Mason, Christopher E

    2016-07-01

    Genetic heterogeneity contributes to clinical outcome and progression of most tumors, but little is known about allelic diversity for epigenetic compartments, and almost no data exist for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We examined epigenetic heterogeneity as assessed by cytosine methylation within defined genomic loci with four CpGs (epialleles), somatic mutations, and transcriptomes of AML patient samples at serial time points. We observed that epigenetic allele burden is linked to inferior outcome and varies considerably during disease progression. Epigenetic and genetic allelic burden and patterning followed different patterns and kinetics during disease progression. We observed a subset of AMLs with high epiallele and low somatic mutation burden at diagnosis, a subset with high somatic mutation and lower epiallele burdens at diagnosis, and a subset with a mixed profile, suggesting distinct modes of tumor heterogeneity. Genes linked to promoter-associated epiallele shifts during tumor progression showed increased single-cell transcriptional variance and differential expression, suggesting functional impact on gene regulation. Thus, genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity can occur with distinct kinetics likely to affect the biological and clinical features of tumors.

  16. Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Salah Aref

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the prognostic impact of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML among Egyptian patients. METHODS: Exons 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, and 9 of WT1 were screened for mutations in samples from 82 CNAML patients out of 203 newly diagnosed AML patients, of age ranging from 21 to 74 years, using high-resolution capillary electrophoresis. RESULTS: Eleven patients out of 82 (13.41% harbored WT1 mutations. Mutations were detected in exon 7 (n=7, exon 9 (n=2, exon 8 (n=1, and exon 3 (n=1, but not in exons 1 or 2. There was no statistically significant difference between the WT1 mutants and wild types as regards age, sex, French-American-British subtypes, and the prevalence of success of induction remission therapy (p=0.966; 28.6% vs. 29.3%. Patients with WT1 mutations had overall survival lower than patients with the wild type (HR=1.38; 95% CI 4.79-6.86; p=0.004. CONCLUSION: CN-AML patients with WT1 mutations have poor clinical outcome. We recommend molecular testing for WT1 mutations in patients with CN-AML at diagnosis in order to improve risk stratification of those patients.

  17. Integrative meta-analysis of differential gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Brady G Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogeneous disease with an overall poor prognosis. Gene expression profiling studies of patients with AML has provided key insights into disease pathogenesis while exposing potential diagnostic and prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. A systematic comparison of the large body of gene expression profiling studies in AML has the potential to test the extensibility of conclusions based on single studies and provide further insights into AML. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we systematically compared 25 published reports of gene expression profiling in AML. There were a total of 4,918 reported genes of which one third were reported in more than one study. We found that only a minority of reported prognostically-associated genes (9.6% were replicated in at least one other study. In a combined analysis, we comprehensively identified both gene sets and functional gene categories and pathways that exhibited significant differential regulation in distinct prognostic categories, including many previously unreported associations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed a novel approach for granular, cross-study analysis of gene-by-gene data and their relationships with established prognostic features and patient outcome. We identified many robust novel prognostic molecular features in AML that were undetected in prior studies, and which provide insights into AML pathogenesis with potential diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Our database and integrative analysis are available online (http://gat.stamlab.org.

  18. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbiao; Zhou; Wee-Joo; Chng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia(AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells(LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells(HSC), LSC possess selfrenewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normalHSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC.

  19. Symptom experience and management among people with acute myeloid leukaemia in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtap, Suthisa; Nilmanat, Kittikorn

    2011-08-01

    In Thailand, haematological malignancy is one of the most common types of cancer. This cross-sectional study, conducted in Southern Thailand, aimed to describe the symptom experiences of and symptom management strategies among patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Sixty hospitalized patients with AML were recruited. The Symptom Experience Scale and two open-ended questions regarding symptom-management strategies were used to collect data via face-to-face interviews 2 weeks after the induction phase of the AML protocol. The data was analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. High fever, weakness, nausea, and anorexia were the four most prevalent symptoms reported. Other prevalent symptoms included weight loss, bleeding, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, and a cluster of psycho-emotional symptoms: worrying, fear, feeling discouraged, and feeling bored. Patients used various approaches and strategies to alleviate their symptoms, which could be categorized into five groups: preventive, direct, distraction, complementary, and restorative approaches. This study has provided important information for the development of symptom-management nursing programmes for patients with AML, particularly in Thailand.

  20. Increased fibrinogen levels at diagnosis are associated with adverse outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Martin D; Heini, Alexander D; Seipel, Katja; Mueller, Beatrice; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Pabst, Thomas

    2016-06-15

    Increased plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with shortened overall survival (OS) in some solid tumor types. In contrast, the prognostic significance of varying fibrinogen levels in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis is unknown. In this study, we assessed the prognostic significance of fibrinogen levels in AML patients. In a comprehensive retrospective single-center study, we determined the survival rates of 375 consecutive AML patients undergoing at least one cycle of intensive chemotherapy induction treatment. Patients were dichotomized between low (high fibrinogen levels (≥4.1 g/L) at diagnosis of AML before initiation of treatment. Subsequently, quartile ranges were applied to analyze the association of varying fibrinogen levels on survival. We observed that the rates of complete remission, early death, and admission to intensive care unit were equal in the low versus high fibrinogen group. However, OS was significantly better in the low fibrinogen group (27.3 vs 13.5 months; p = 0.0009) as well as progression-free survival (12.3 vs 7.8 months; p = 0.0076). This survival difference remained significant in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.003). Assessing quartiles of fibrinogen values, we further confirmed this observation. Our data suggest that high fibrinogen levels at diagnosis of AML are associated with unfavorable OS and progression-free survival but not with increased mortality during induction treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. NANOG Expression as a Responsive Biomarker during Treatment with Hedgehog Signal Inhibitor in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Seiji Kakiuchi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is involved in the maintenance of leukemic stem cell (LSCs populations. PF-0444913 (PF-913 is a novel inhibitor that selectively targets Smoothened (SMO, which regulates the Hh pathway. Treatment with PF-913 has shown promising results in an early phase study of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, a detailed mode of action for PF-913 and relevant biomarkers remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined bone marrow samples derived from AML patients under PF-913 monotherapy. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA revealed that PF-913 treatment affected the self-renewal signature and cell-cycle regulation associated with LSC-like properties. We then focused on the expression of a pluripotency factor, NANOG, because previous reports showed that a downstream effector in the Hh pathway, GLI, directly binds to the NANOG promoter and that the GLI-NANOG axis promotes stemness and growth in several cancers. In this study, we found that a change in NANOG transcripts was closely associated with GLI-target genes and NANOG transcripts can be a responsive biomarker during PF-913 therapy. Additionally, the treatment of AML with PF-913 holds promise, possibly through inducing quiescent leukemia stem cells toward cell cycling.

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

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    Shyam A. Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics.

  3. A comparison of azacitidine and decitabine activities in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines.

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    Paul W Hollenbach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cytidine nucleoside analogs azacitidine (AZA and decitabine (DAC are used for the treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Few non-clinical studies have directly compared the mechanisms of action of these agents in a head-to-head fashion, and the agents are often viewed as mechanistically similar DNA hypomethylating agents. To better understand the similarities and differences in mechanisms of these drugs, we compared their in vitro effects on several end points in human AML cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both drugs effected DNA methyltransferase 1 depletion, DNA hypomethylation, and DNA damage induction, with DAC showing equivalent activity at concentrations 2- to 10-fold lower than AZA. At concentrations above 1 microM, AZA had a greater effect than DAC on reducing cell viability. Both drugs increased the sub-G1 fraction and apoptosis markers, with AZA decreasing all cell cycle phases and DAC causing an increase in G2-M. Total protein synthesis was reduced only by AZA, and drug-modulated gene expression profiles were largely non-overlapping. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate shared mechanisms of action of AZA and DAC on DNA-mediated markers of activity, but distinctly different effects in their actions on cell viability, protein synthesis, cell cycle, and gene expression. The differential effects of AZA may be mediated by RNA incorporation, as the distribution of AZA in nucleic acid of KG-1a cells was 65:35, RNA:DNA.

  4. Impact of NOD2 polymorphisms on infectious complications following chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

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    Yomade, Olaposi; Spies-Weisshart, Bärbel; Glaser, Anita; Schnetzke, Ulf; Hochhaus, Andreas; Scholl, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    We sought to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the NOD2 gene and infectious complications following intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We hypothesised that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NOD2 gene are associated with a higher rate of infections during the phase of severe neutropenia. In 131 AML patients receiving induction therapy, the presence of the three most frequent polymorphisms of NOD2 (Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, Leu1007fsinsC) was analysed. SNP analyses by means of genomic PCR incorporating fluorescence-labelled probes with characteristic melting curves were performed using the LightCycler platform. Our data suggest a significantly lower probability of mucositis or enteritis in AML patients lacking any of the three evaluated NOD2 polymorphisms. Furthermore, bloodstream cultures of AML patients carrying either a missense or a frameshift mutation of NOD2 were significantly more frequently tested positive concerning Streptococcus spp. In contrast, the presence of NOD2 polymorphisms had no impact on such important infectious complications as systemic inflammatory response syndrome or sepsis, the rate of central venous catheter infections or the incidence of pneumonia including fungal infections. Our data represent one of the first reports investigating the impact of polymorphisms of the innate immune system on infectious complications in patients with neutropenia following chemotherapy. A correlation between NOD2 polymorphisms and infectious events in AML patients is demonstrated.

  5. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II variations predict adverse prognosis in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukaemia.

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    Silkjaer, Trine; Nyvold, Charlotte Guldborg; Juhl-Christensen, Caroline; Hokland, Peter; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell

    2013-10-01

    Alterations in the two catalytic genes cytochrome c oxidase subunits I and II (COI and COII) have recently been suggested to have an adverse impact on prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). In order to explore this in further detail, we sequenced these two mitochondrial genes in diagnostic bone marrow or blood samples in 235 patients with AML. In 37 (16%) patients, a non-synonymous variation in either COI or COII could be demonstrated. No patients harboured both COI and COII non-synonymous variations. Twenty-four (10%) patients had non-synonymous variations in COI, whereas 13 (6%) patients had non-synonymous variations in COII. The COI and COII are essential subunits of cytochrome c oxidase that is the terminal enzyme in the oxidative phosphorylation complexes. In terms of disease course, we observed that in patients with a normal cytogenetic analysis at disease presentation (CN-AML) treated with curative intent, the presence of a non-synonymous variation in the COII was an adverse prognostic marker for both overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) in both univariate (DFS; hazard ratio (HR) 4.4, P = 0.006) and multivariate analyses (DFS; HR 7.2, P = 0.001). This is the first demonstration of a mitochondrial aberration playing an adverse prognostic role in adult AML, and we argue that its role as a potentially novel adverse prognostic marker in the subset of CN-AML should be explored further.

  6. Novel agents and regimens for acute myeloid leukemia: 2009 ASH annual meeting highlights

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    Zhu Xiongpeng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prognostic markers, such as NPM1, Flt3-ITD, and cytogenetic abnormalities have made it possible to formulate aggressive treatment plans for unfavorable acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, the long-term survival of AML with unfavorable factors remains unsatisfactory. The latest data indicate that the standard dose of daunorubicin (DNR at 45 mg/m2 is inferior to high dose 90 mg/m2 for induction therapy. The rates of complete remission and overall survival are significantly better in the high dose induction regimen. New regimens exploring the new liposomal encapsulation of Ara-C and DNR as well as addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin monoclonal antibody have been studied. New agents, including the nucleoside analogues (clofarabine, sapacitabine, elacytarabine, FLT3 inhibitor (sorafenib, farnesyl-transferase inhibitor (tipifarnib, histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat, lenalidomide, as well as DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (decitabine, azacitidine, were recently reported for AML treatment in the 2009 ASH annual meeting. This review also summarizes the updates of the clinical trials on novel agents including voreloxin, AS1413, behenoylara-C, ARRY520, ribavirin, AZD1152, AZD6244, and terameprocol (EM-1421 from the 2009 ASH annual meeting.

  7. Downregulated stromal antigen 2 expression in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiaoyan; He, Xuefeng; Wu, Lili; Gao, Feng; Ye, Jinsong; Wu, Lingyu; Chen, Lu; Jiang, Xin; Sun, Miao; Chen, Suning

    2017-01-01

    The stromal antigen 2 (STAG2) gene encodes a component of the cohesin complex that participates in the regulation of sister chromatid separation during mitosis. When activated, STAG2 may act as a ‘caretaker’ tumor suppressor gene. As it is unknown whether STAG2 gene is responsible for the occurrence and associated with the prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the present study analyzed the relative expression levels of STAG2 in 127 de novo AML patients and 17 healthy volunteers using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, AML patients were divided into three risk groups using cytogenetic and molecular genetic abnormalities to define their risk status. STAG2 gene expression was found to be significantly downregulated in de novo AML patients, when compared with the healthy controls; however, the expression was not significantly different in the various gender and age subgroups. Furthermore, no significant difference between risk groups was detected in AML patients. Thus, the STAG2 gene may serve an important role in AML development, but is not associated with prognosis in AML.

  8. Molecular prognostic markers for adult acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics

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    Gregory Tara K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogenous disorder that results from a block in the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells along with uncontrolled proliferation. In approximately 60% of cases, specific recurrent chromosomal aberrations can be identified by modern cytogenetic techniques. This cytogenetic information is the single most important tool to classify patients at their initial diagnosis into three prognostic categories: favorable, intermediate, and poor risk. Currently, favorable risk AML patients are usually treated with contemporary chemotherapy while poor risk AML patients receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation if suitable stem cell donors exist. The largest subgroup of AML patients (~40% have no identifiable cytogenetic abnormalities and are classified as intermediate risk. The optimal therapeutic strategies for these patients are still largely unclear. Recently, it is becoming increasingly evident that it is possible to identify a subgroup of poorer risk patients among those with normal cytogenic AML (NC-AML. Molecular risk stratification for NC-AML patients may be possible due to mutations of NPM1, FLT3, MLL, and CEBPα as well as alterations in expression levels of BAALC, MN1, ERG, and AF1q. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm if poorer risk NC-AML patients have improved clinical outcomes after more aggressive therapy.

  9. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Alcantara, Marion; Bennani, Omar; Verdure, Pierre; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2013-05-01

    Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoanti-bodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l). Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML.

  10. Chronic FLT3-ITD Signaling in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is Connected to a Specific Chromatin Signature

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    Pierre Cauchy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is characterized by recurrent mutations that affect the epigenetic regulatory machinery and signaling molecules, leading to a block in hematopoietic differentiation. Constitutive signaling from mutated growth factor receptors is a major driver of leukemic growth, but how aberrant signaling affects the epigenome in AML is less understood. Furthermore, AML cells undergo extensive clonal evolution, and the mutations in signaling genes are often secondary events. To elucidate how chronic growth factor signaling alters the transcriptional network in AML, we performed a system-wide multi-omics study of primary cells from patients suffering from AML with internal tandem duplications in the FLT3 transmembrane domain (FLT3-ITD. This strategy revealed cooperation between the MAP kinase (MAPK inducible transcription factor AP-1 and RUNX1 as a major driver of a common, FLT3-ITD-specific gene expression and chromatin signature, demonstrating a major impact of MAPK signaling pathways in shaping the epigenome of FLT3-ITD AML.

  11. MYST3/CREBBP Rearranged Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

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    Arjun Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rare, clinicians and patients must be aware that therapy related malignancies, specifically acute myeloid leukemia (AML, can occur as a complication of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Vigilance for signs and symptoms is appropriate. AML with t (8;16 is a specific translocation leading to formation of a fusion protein (MYST3/CREBBP. The MYST3/CREBBP AML tends to develop within 2 years of adjuvant chemotherapy, especially for breast cancer, without preceding myelodysplasia. It usually presents with disseminated intravascular coagulation and osteolytic lesions and has a poor prognosis despite aggressive resuscitation and therapy. With the increasing use of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer, we are seeing a definite increase in the incidence of therapy related myelodysplastic syndromes and AML. One must keep this complication in mind while counseling and following up breast cancer patients who have received adjuvant chemotherapy. New osteolytic bone lesions in a patient with history of breast cancer do not necessarily mean metastatic disease and should be fully evaluated.

  12. Combination of Cladribine plus Topotecan for Relapsed or Refractory Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Inaba, Hiroto; Stewart, Clinton F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Yang, Shengping; Pounds, Stanley; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Razzouk, Bassem I.; Ribeiro, Raul C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prognosis after relapse of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is poor and effective salvage regimens are urgently needed. METHODS In Phase I and pilot studies, we evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of a 5-day course of cladribine (2-CDA) followed by topotecan in pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory AML. The 2-CDA dose was escalated as follows: 9.1, 13.6, 16.3, and 19.5 mg/m2 per day (8.9 mg/m2 per day in the pilot study). Outcome was analyzed according to the absence (stratum 1) vs. presence (stratum 2) of previous allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Twenty-six patients (20 in stratum 1, 6 in stratum 2) were treated. RESULTS The MTD was not reached in stratum 1, but DLT occurred at the lowest 2-CDA dosage (9.1 mg/m2 per day) in stratum 2. Febrile neutropenia was common in both strata. Nine (34.6%) of 26 patients experienced a complete response and 7 (30.4%) had a partial response; 5 (19.2%) are long-term survivors. Clinical outcome was not associated with 2-CDA or topotecan systemic exposure. CONCLUSION The combination was well tolerated in stratum 1, and the response rate is encouraging. This regimen offers a post-relapse treatment alternative for patients, especially those who have received anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. PMID:19885837

  13. Granulomatous rosacea: Like leukemid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

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    Škiljević Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skin findings in leukemias may be divided into specific lesions (leukemia cutis and non-specific lesions (leukemids which may be found in up to 80% of all patients with leukemias. The leukemids vary clinically and they are usually a manifestation of bone marrow or immunologic impairment, but also Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythroderma, maculopapular exanthema, prurigo-like papules, generalized pigmentation, follicular mucinosis, generalized pruritus may be found during the course of leukemia. Case report. We report a 70-year-old male with a 3-month history of erythema, papules and pustules on the face, ears and neck and over a month history of refractory anemia, anorexia, weight loss, malaise, and fever. Physical examination revealed symmetric erythematous, violaceous papules, papulo-nodules and plaques with slate scale and sparse, small pustules on the face, earlobes and neck. Histopathologic findings of involved skin showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with perifollicular accentuation and focal granulomatous inflammation in the papillary and upper reticular dermis. Extensive checkup revealed the presence of acute myeloid leukemia French- American-British (FAB classification subtype M2, with signs of three-lineage dysplasia. The patient was treated by L6 protocol which led to complete remission, both in bone marrow and skin, but after seven months he had relapse of leukemia with the fatal outcome. Conclusion. This case indicates the importance of skin eruptions in the context of hematological malignancies.

  14. Mutation patterns of 16 genes in primary and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML with normal cytogenetics.

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    Marta Fernandez-Mercado

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia patients with normal cytogenetics (CN-AML account for almost half of AML cases. We aimed to study the frequency and relationship of a wide range of genes previously reported as mutated in AML (ASXL1, NPM1, FLT3, TET2, IDH1/2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, NRAS, JAK2, WT1, CBL, SF3B1, TP53, KRAS and MPL in a series of 84 CN-AML cases. The most frequently mutated genes in primary cases were NPM1 (60.8% and FLT3 (50.0%, and in secondary cases ASXL1 (48.5% and TET2 (30.3%. We showed that 85% of CN-AML patients have mutations in at least one of ASXL1, NPM1, FLT3, TET2, IDH1/2 and/or RUNX1. Serial samples from 19 MDS/CMML cases that progressed to AML were analyzed for ASXL1/TET2/IDH1/2 mutations; seventeen cases presented mutations of at least one of these genes. However, there was no consistent pattern in mutation acquisition during disease progression. This report concerns the analysis of the largest number of gene mutations in CN-AML studied to date, and provides insight into the mutational profile of CN-AML.

  15. Epimutations mimic genomic mutations of DNMT3A in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Jost, E; Lin, Q; Weidner, C I; Wilop, S; Hoffmann, M; Walenda, T; Schemionek, M; Herrmann, O; Zenke, M; Brümmendorf, T H; Koschmieder, S; Wagner, W

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the genetic sequence of the DNA de novo methyltransferase DNMT3A (DNA methyltransferase 3A) are found in many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). They lead to dysfunction of DNMT3A protein and represent a marker for poor prognosis. Effects of genetic mutations can be mimicked by epigenetic modifications in the DNA methylation (DNAm) pattern. Using DNAm profiles of the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network (TCGA), we identified aberrant hypermethylation at an internal promoter region of DNMT3A, which occurred in about 40% of AML patients. Bisulfite pyrosequencing assays designed for this genomic region validated hypermethylation specifically in a subset of our AML samples. High DNAm levels at this site are particularly observed in samples without genetic mutations in DNMT3A. Epimutations and mutations of DNMT3A were associated with related gene expression changes such as upregulation of the homeobox genes in HOXA and HOXB clusters. Furthermore, epimutations in DNMT3A were enriched in patients with poor or intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in patients with shorter event-free survival and overall survival (OS). Taken together, aberrant DNA hypermethylation within the DNMT3A gene, in analogy to DNMT3A mutations, is frequently observed in AML and both modifications seem to be useful for risk stratification or choice of therapeutic regimen.

  16. Mutation patterns of 16 genes in primary and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Yip, Bon Ham; Pellagatti, Andrea; Davies, Carwyn; Larrayoz, María José; Kondo, Toshinori; Pérez, Cristina; Killick, Sally; McDonald, Emma-Jane; Odero, María Dolores; Agirre, Xabier; Prósper, Felipe; Calasanz, María José; Wainscoat, James S; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia patients with normal cytogenetics (CN-AML) account for almost half of AML cases. We aimed to study the frequency and relationship of a wide range of genes previously reported as mutated in AML (ASXL1, NPM1, FLT3, TET2, IDH1/2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, NRAS, JAK2, WT1, CBL, SF3B1, TP53, KRAS and MPL) in a series of 84 CN-AML cases. The most frequently mutated genes in primary cases were NPM1 (60.8%) and FLT3 (50.0%), and in secondary cases ASXL1 (48.5%) and TET2 (30.3%). We showed that 85% of CN-AML patients have mutations in at least one of ASXL1, NPM1, FLT3, TET2, IDH1/2 and/or RUNX1. Serial samples from 19 MDS/CMML cases that progressed to AML were analyzed for ASXL1/TET2/IDH1/2 mutations; seventeen cases presented mutations of at least one of these genes. However, there was no consistent pattern in mutation acquisition during disease progression. This report concerns the analysis of the largest number of gene mutations in CN-AML studied to date, and provides insight into the mutational profile of CN-AML.

  17. The complexity of interpreting genomic data in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazha, A; Zarzour, A; Al-Issa, K; Radivoyevitch, T; Carraway, H E; Hirsch, C M; Przychodzen, B; Patel, B J; Clemente, M; Sanikommu, S R; Kalaycio, M; Maciejewski, J P; Sekeres, M A

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous neoplasm characterized by the accumulation of complex genetic alterations responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease. Translating genomic information into clinical practice remained challenging with conflicting results regarding the impact of certain mutations on disease phenotype and overall survival (OS) especially when clinical variables are controlled for when interpreting the result. We sequenced the coding region for 62 genes in 468 patients with secondary AML (sAML) and primary AML (pAML). Overall, mutations in FLT3, DNMT3A, NPM1 and IDH2 were more specific for pAML whereas UTAF1, STAG2, BCORL1, BCOR, EZH2, JAK2, CBL, PRPF8, SF3B1, ASXL1 and DHX29 were more specific for sAML. However, in multivariate analysis that included clinical variables, only FLT3 and DNMT3A remained specific for pAML and EZH2, BCOR, SF3B1 and ASXL1 for sAML. When the impact of mutations on OS was evaluated in the entire cohort, mutations in DNMT3A, PRPF8, ASXL1, CBL EZH2 and TP53 had a negative impact on OS; no mutation impacted OS favorably; however, in a cox multivariate analysis that included clinical data, mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, CBL, EZH2 and TP53 became significant. Thus, controlling for clinical variables is important when interpreting genomic data in AML. PMID:27983727

  18. Detailed molecular characterisation of acute myeloid leukaemia with a normal karyotype using targeted DNA capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, N; Varela, I; Grove, C; Manes, N; Yusa, K; Moreno, T; Segonds-Pichon, A; Bench, A; Gudgin, E; Herman, B; Bolli, N; Ellis, P; Haddad, D; Costeas, P; Rad, R; Scott, M; Huntly, B; Bradley, A; Vassiliou, G S

    2013-09-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are giving unprecedented insights into the spectrum of somatic mutations underlying acute myeloid leukaemia with a normal karyotype (AML-NK). It is clear that the prognosis of individual patients is strongly influenced by the combination of mutations in their leukaemia and that many leukaemias are composed of multiple subclones, with differential susceptibilities to treatment. Here, we describe a method, employing targeted capture coupled with next-generation sequencing and tailored bioinformatic analysis, for the simultaneous study of 24 genes recurrently mutated in AML-NK. Mutational analysis was performed using open source software and an in-house script (Mutation Identification and Analysis Software), which identified dominant clone mutations with 100% specificity. In each of seven cases of AML-NK studied, we identified and verified mutations in 2-4 genes in the main leukaemic clone. Additionally, high sequencing depth enabled us to identify putative subclonal mutations and detect leukaemia-specific mutations in DNA from remission marrow. Finally, we used normalised read depths to detect copy number changes and identified and subsequently verified a tandem duplication of exons 2-9 of MLL and at least one deletion involving PTEN. This methodology reliably detects sequence and copy number mutations, and can thus greatly facilitate the classification, clinical research, diagnosis and management of AML-NK.

  19. New Quantitative Method to Identify NPM1 Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

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    Sarah Huet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the NPM1 gene, which encodes for nucleophosmin, have been reported to be the most frequent genetic abnormalities found in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. Their identification and quantification remain crucial for the patients’ residual disease monitoring. We investigated a new method that could represent a novel reliable alternative to sequencing for its identification. This method was based on high-resolution melting analysis in order to detect mutated patients and on an allele-specific oligonucleotide real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ASO-RQ-PCR for the identification and quantification of the transcripts carrying NPM1 mutations (NPM1m. Few patients carrying known NPM1m enabled us to set up a table with the different primers’ ΔCT values, identifying a profile for each mutation type. We then analysed a series of 337 AML patients' samples for NPM1 mutational status characterization and confirmed the ASO-RQ-PCR results by direct sequencing. We identified some mutations in 86 samples, and the results were fully correlated in 100% of the 36 sequenced samples. We also detected other rare NPM1m in two samples, that we confirmed by direct sequencing. This highly specific method provides a novel quick, useful, and costless tool, easy to use in routine practice.

  20. DNMT3A Mutations in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in South Brazil

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    Annelise Pezzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a complex and heterogeneous hematopoietic tissue neoplasm. Several molecular markers have been described that help to classify AML patients into risk groups. DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A gene mutations have been recently identified in about 22% of AML patients and associated with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor. Our aims were to determine the frequency of somatic mutations in the gene DNMT3A and major chromosomal translocations in a sample of patients with AML. We investigated in 82 samples of bone marrow from patients with AML for somatic mutations in DNMT3A gene by sequencing and sought major fusion transcripts by RT-PCR. We found mutations in the DNMT3A gene in 6 patients (8%; 3 were type R882H. We found fusion transcripts in 19 patients, namely, AML1/ETO (n=5; 6.1%, PML/RARα (n=12; 14.6%, MLL/AF9 (0; 0%, and CBFβ/MYH11 (n=2; 2.4%. The identification of recurrent mutations in the DNMT3A gene and their possible prognostic implications can be a valuable tool for making treatment decisions. This is the first study on the presence of somatic mutations of the DNMT3A gene in patients with AML in Brazil. The frequency of these mutations suggests a possible ethnogeographic variation.

  1. [Identification of novel pathogenic gene mutations in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by whole-exome resequencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio

    2015-12-01

    A new class of gene mutations, identified in the pathogenesis of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML), includes DNMT3A, IDH1/2, TET2 and EZH2. However, these mutations are rare in pediatric AML cases, indicating that pathogeneses differ between adult and pediatric forms of AML. Meanwhile, the recent development of massively parallel sequencing technologies has provided a new opportunity to discover genetic changes across entire genomes or proteincoding sequences. In order to reveal a complete registry of gene mutations, we performed whole exome resequencing of paired tumor-normal specimens from 19 pediatric AML cases using Illumina HiSeq 2000. In total, 80 somatic mutations or 4.2 mutations per sample were identified. Many of the recurrent mutations identified in this study involved previously reported targets in AML, such as FLT3, CEBPA, KIT, CBL, NRAS, WT1 and EZH2. On the other hand, several genes were newly identified in the current study, including BCORL1 and major cohesin components such as SMC3 and RAD21. Whole exome resequencing revealed a complex array of gene mutations in pediatric AML genomes. Our results indicate that a subset of pediatric AML represents a discrete entity that could be discriminated from its adult counterpart, in terms of the spectrum of gene mutations.

  2. A Rare Cytogenetic Presentation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M2

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    Hanumanthappa Vijay Raghavendra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML with t(8;21(q22;q22 generating the AML1/ETO fusion gene on 8q22 is a distinct type of AML t(8;21 category (WHO/AML-M2 (FAB, generally associated with a favourable prognosis. Variant additional chromosomal abnormalities are frequently reported. We report three adult cases of this category with unusual karyotype. Bone marrow cytogenetics of case no. 1: 45,X,-Y, t(8;21(q13;q22 with a novel breakpoint of chromosome 8 at (q13. Case no. 2: 46,X,t(X;2(q22;q37,t(3;7(q21;q36,t(5;14(p15;q11,del(8(q22 a complex rearrangement without the involvement of chromosome 21. Case no. 3: 49,XX,+5, t(8;21(q22;q22, +16, +der(21t(8;21(q22;q22 with additional der(21. Endometrial in this case which was positive for myeloperoxidase (MPO and CD117 conforming the AML infiltration. All are morphologically AML with t(8;21. Relevant literature in cytogenetic of AML-M2 is reviewed. The molecular mechanism involved in unusual rearrangements and clinical significance of them are subjected for further studies

  3. Oncogenic roles of PRL-3 in FLT3-ITD induced acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Yuen, Hiu Fung; Zhou, Jian Biao; Al-Aidaroos, Abdul Qader O; Guo, Ke; Valk, Peter J; Zhang, Shu Dong; Chng, Wee Joo; Hong, Cheng William; Mills, Ken; Zeng, Qi

    2013-09-01

    FLT3-ITD mutations are prevalent mutations in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). PRL-3, a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. This study investigates the regulation and function of PRL-3 in leukaemia cell lines and AML patients associated with FLT3-ITD mutations. PRL-3 expression is upregulated by the FLT3-STAT5 signalling pathway in leukaemia cells, leading an activation of AP-1 transcription factors via ERK and JNK pathways. PRL-3-depleted AML cells showed a significant decrease in cell growth. Clinically, high PRL-3 mRNA expression was associated with FLT3-ITD mutations in four independent AML datasets with 1158 patients. Multivariable Cox-regression analysis on our Cohort 1 with 221 patients identified PRL-3 as a novel prognostic marker independent of other clinical parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed high PRL-3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with poorer survival among 491 patients with normal karyotype. Targeting PRL-3 reversed the oncogenic effects in FLT3-ITD AML models in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we suggest that PRL-3 could serve as a prognostic marker to predict poorer survival and as a promising novel therapeutic target for AML patients.

  4. RNA-Guided CRISPR-Cas9 System-Mediated Engineering of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabetz, Oliver; Alla, Vijay; Angenendt, Linus; Schliemann, Christoph; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Arteaga, Maria-Francisca; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik

    2017-03-17

    Current acute myeloid leukemia (AML) disease models face severe limitations because most of them induce un-physiological gene expressions that do not represent conditions in AML patients and/or depend on external promoters for regulation of gene expression/repression. Furthermore, many AML models are based on reciprocal chromosomal translocations that only reflect the minority of AML patients, whereas more than 50% of patients have a normal karyotype. The majority of AML, however, is driven by somatic mutations. Thus, identification as well as a detailed molecular and functional characterization of the role of these driver mutations via improved AML models is required for better approaches toward novel targeted therapies. Using the IDH2 R140Q mutation as a model, we present a new effective methodology here using the RNA-guided clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to reproduce or remove AML-associated mutations in or from human leukemic cells, respectively, via introduction of a DNA template at the endogenous gene locus via homologous recombination. Our technology represents a precise way for AML modeling to gain insights into AML development and progression and provides a basis for future therapeutic approaches.

  5. Screening for Marine Natural Products with Potential as Chemotherapeutics for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Hansen, Espen; Andersen, Jeanette H

    2016-01-01

    Nature is an important source for anti-cancer therapeutics, and nearly half of the currently marketed cancer drugs are derived from natural products. Most of the therapeutic natural products are derived from terrestrial sources, such as paclitaxel, vincristine, epothilones, doxorubicin, etoposide and camptothecin. However, the oceans have received growing interest as a source for new useful bioactive compounds, and there are currently several drugs derived from marine natural products for the treatment of cancer on the market. The current recommended chemotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is founded on cytarabine, a molecule derived from a natural product isolated from a marine sponge. However, in order to increase the efficiency of the chemotherapy used in the treatment of AML, it is necessary to develop more targeted drugs with less pronounced side effects. In this review, we argue that marine natural products have many of the desired properties of such a drug, and that prefractionated extract libraries of marine plants, animals and microorganisms should be a part of the screening efforts for new AML chemotherapeutics.

  6. Minimal Residual Disease Diagnostics and Chimerism in the Post-Transplant Period in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Ulrike Bacher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the selection of poor-risk patients for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is associated with rather high post-transplant relapse rates. As immunotherapeutic intervention is considered to be more effective before the cytomorphologic manifestation of relapse, post-transplant monitoring gains increasing attention in stem cell recipients with a previous diagnosis of AML. Different methods for detection of chimerism (e.g., microsatellite analysis or quantitative real-time PCR are available to quantify the ratio of donor and recipient cells in the post-transplant period. Various studies demonstrated the potential use of mixed chimerism kinetics to predict relapse of the AML. CD34+-specific chimerism is associated with a higher specificity of chimerism analysis. Nevertheless, a decrease of donor cells can have other causes as well. Therefore, efforts continue to introduce minimal residual disease (MRD monitoring based on molecular mutations in the post-transplant period. The NPM1 (nucleophosmin mutations can be monitored by sensitive quantitative real-time PCR in subsets of stem cell recipients with AML, but for approximately 20% of patients, suitable molecular mutations for post-transplant MRD monitoring are not available so far. This emphasizes the need for an expansion of the panel of MRD markers in the transplant setting.

  7. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Aveic, Sanja; Pigazzi, Martina; Basso, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1) is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  8. BAG1: the guardian of anti-apoptotic proteins in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Sanja Aveic

    Full Text Available BCL2 associated Athano-Gene 1 (BAG1 is a multifunctional protein that has been described to be involved in different cell processes linked to cell survival. It has been reported as deregulated in diverse cancer types. Here, BAG1 protein was found highly expressed in children with acute myeloid leukemia at diagnosis, and in a cohort of leukemic cell lines. A silencing approach was used for determining BAG1's role in AML, finding that its down-regulation decreased expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, MCL1, and phospho-ERK1/2, all proteins able to sustain leukemia, without affecting the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. BAG1 down-regulation was also found to increase expression of BAG3, whose similar activity was able to compensate the loss of function of BAG1. BAG1/BAG3 co-silencing caused an enhanced cell predisposition to death in cell lines and also in primary AML cultures, affecting the same proteins. Cell death was CASPASE-3 dependent, was accompanied by PARP cleavage and documented by an increased release of pro-apoptotic molecules Smac/DIABLO and Cytochrome c. BAG1 was found to directly maintain BCL2 and to protect MCL1 from proteasomal degradation by controlling USP9X expression, which appeared to be its novel target. Finally, BAG1 was found able to affect leukemia cell fate by influencing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins crucial for AML maintenance.

  9. Impact of registration on clinical trials on infection risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, David; Aplenc, Richard; Bowes, Lynette; Cellot, Sonia; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Feusner, Jim; Gillmeister, Biljana; Johnston, Donna L; Lewis, Victor; Michon, Bruno; Mitchell, David; Portwine, Carol; Price, Victoria; Silva, Mariana; Stobart, Kent; Yanofsky, Rochelle; Zelcer, Shayna; Beyene, Joseph; Sung, Lillian

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of enrollment on therapeutic clinical trials on adverse event rates. Primary objective was to describe the impact of clinical trial registration on sterile site microbiologically documented infection for children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a multicenter cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. Primary outcome was microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates were compared between those registered and not registered on clinical trials. Five hundred seventy-four children with AML were included of which 198 (34.5%) were registered on a therapeutic clinical trial. Overall, 400 (69.7%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. In multiple regression, registration on clinical trials was independently associated with a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.53; p = 0.040] and viridans group streptococcal infection (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; p = 0.015). Registration on trials was not associated with Gram-negative or invasive fungal infections. Children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on clinical trials have a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection. This information may impact on supportive care practices in pediatric AML.

  10. Elevated IL-35 in bone marrow of the patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Tao, Qianshan; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Pan, Ying; Tao, Lili; Xiong, Shudao; Wang, Yiping; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common hematological malignancy in adults, but the etiology of it remains poorly understood. IL-35 is a recently described cytokine composed of an IL-12 subunit p35 and an IL-27 subunit Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 3 (EBI3), and has an immunosuppressive effect on inflammation through induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppression of Th1 and Th17. Recently, we have illustrated that concentrations of IL-35 in peripheral blood are up-regulated in newly diagnosed (ND) AML patients. However, whether IL-35 in bone marrow is increased in AML patients is not clear. In this study, we examined IL-35 in bone marrow by various methods including RT-PCR, ELISA, FCM and IHC, and found that IL-35 levels are also increased significantly in bone marrow of adult AML patients. Furthermore, we investigated that concentrations of bone marrow IL-35 in ND group were higher than that in complete remission (CR) group and control group, but there was no significant difference compared to that in relapse group. In conclusion, IL-35 was elevated in bone marrow of adult AML patients and this increase was correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy, suggesting that IL-35 is involved in pathogenesis of AML.

  11. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  12. GATA Factor-Dependent Positive-Feedback Circuit in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Koichi R. Katsumura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The master regulatory transcription factor GATA-2 triggers hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell generation. GATA2 haploinsufficiency is implicated in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML, and GATA2 overexpression portends a poor prognosis for AML. However, the constituents of the GATA-2-dependent genetic network mediating pathogenesis are unknown. We described a p38-dependent mechanism that phosphorylates GATA-2 and increases GATA-2 target gene activation. We demonstrate that this mechanism establishes a growth-promoting chemokine/cytokine circuit in AML cells. p38/ERK-dependent GATA-2 phosphorylation facilitated positive autoregulation of GATA2 transcription and expression of target genes, including IL1B and CXCL2. IL-1β and CXCL2 enhanced GATA-2 phosphorylation, which increased GATA-2-mediated transcriptional activation. p38/ERK-GATA-2 stimulated AML cell proliferation via CXCL2 induction. As GATA2 mRNA correlated with IL1B and CXCL2 mRNAs in AML-M5 and high expression of these genes predicted poor prognosis of cytogenetically normal AML, we propose that the circuit is functionally important in specific AML contexts.

  13. Serum posaconazole levels during acute myeloid leukaemia induction therapy: correlations with breakthrough invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Chiara; Panzali, Annafranca; Passi, Angela; Borlenghi, Erika; Lamorgese, Cinzia; Petullà, Marta; Re, Alessandro; Caimi, Luigi; Rossi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of posaconazole therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is still a matter of debate. A correlation between posaconazole serum levels and breakthrough invasive fungal infections (IFI) has not been clearly demonstrated so far. We analysed posaconazole serum levels in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) during induction therapy and correlated them with the incidence of breakthrough IFI and the need of systemic antifungal therapy. Overall, 77 AML patients receiving posaconazole were evaluated for serum levels; breakthrough IFI were observed in five with at least one posaconazole TDM (6.5%). Median serum level was 534 ng ml(-1) (IQ range: 298.5-750.5 ng ml(-1) ) and did not change significantly over time. Four of the 40 patients with median posaconazole levels posaconazole levels on day 7 were 384.5 ng ml(-1) (IQ range: 207-659 ng ml(-1) ) and 560.5 ng ml(-1) (IQ range: 395-756 ng ml(-1) ) in patients requiring or not systemic antifungal treatment respectively (P = 0.067). These results seem to confirm that higher median serum levels of posaconazole correlate with higher prophylactic efficacy against proven/probable IFI and with lesser need of systemic antifungal therapy.

  14. Cytotoxic activity to acute myeloid leukemia cells by Antp-TPR hybrid peptide targeting Hsp90.

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    Horibe, Tomohisa; Kawamoto, Megumi; Kohno, Masayuki; Kawakami, Koji

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that Antp-TPR hybrid peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with TPR2A and had selective cytotoxic activity discriminating between normal and cancer cells to induce cancer cell death. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of Antp-TPR peptide toward acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. It was demonstrated that Antp-TPR peptide induced AML cell death in cell lines such as U937, K562, THP-1, and HL-60 via activation of caspases 3 and 7, and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conversely, Antp-TPR peptide did not reduce the viability of normal cells including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), although both geldanamycin and 17-AAG, small-molecule inhibitors of Hsp90, mediated cytotoxicity to these normal cells at low concentrations. In addition, mutation analysis of TPR peptide demonstrated that the highly conserved amino acids Lys and Arg were critical to the cytotoxic activity. These results indicated that Antp-TPR hybrid peptide would provide potent and selective therapeutic options in the treatment of AML.

  15. Clonal architecture of secondary acute myeloid leukemia defined by single-cell sequencing.

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    Andrew E O Hughes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing has been used to infer the clonality of heterogeneous tumor samples. These analyses yield specific predictions-the population frequency of individual clones, their genetic composition, and their evolutionary relationships-which we set out to test by sequencing individual cells from three subjects diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia, each of whom had been previously characterized by whole genome sequencing of unfractionated tumor samples. Single-cell mutation profiling strongly supported the clonal architecture implied by the analysis of bulk material. In addition, it resolved the clonal assignment of single nucleotide variants that had been initially ambiguous and identified areas of previously unappreciated complexity. Accordingly, we find that many of the key assumptions underlying the analysis of tumor clonality by deep sequencing of unfractionated material are valid. Furthermore, we illustrate a single-cell sequencing strategy for interrogating the clonal relationships among known variants that is cost-effective, scalable, and adaptable to the analysis of both hematopoietic and solid tumors, or any heterogeneous population of cells.

  16. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome after hematopoietic cell transplantation for lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, S; Suzuki, R; Hatano, K; Fukushima, K; Iida, H; Morishima, S; Suehiro, Y; Fukuda, T; Uchida, N; Uchiyama, H; Ikeda, H; Yokota, A; Tsukasaki, K; Yamaguchi, H; Kuroda, J; Nakamae, H; Adachi, Y; Matsuoka, K-I; Nakamura, Y; Atsuta, Y; Suzumiya, J

    2017-04-03

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) represent severe late effects in patients receiving hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for lymphoma. The choice between high-dose therapy with autologous HCT and allogeneic HCT with reduced-intensity conditioning remains controversial in patients with relapsed lymphoma. We retrospectively analyzed incidence and risk factors for the development of t-AML/MDS in lymphoma patients treated with autologous or allogeneic HCT. A total of 13 810 lymphoma patients who received autologous (n=9963) or allogeneic (n=3847) HCT between 1985 and 2012 were considered. At a median overall survival (OS) of 52 and 46 months in autologous and allogeneic HCT groups, respectively, lymphoma patients receiving autologous HCT (1.38% at 3 years after autologous HCT) had a significant risk for developing t-AML/MDS compared to allogeneic HCT (0.37% at 3 years after allogeneic HCT, Pafter autologous and allogeneic HCT were high-stage risk at HCT (P=0.04) or secondary malignancies (P<0.001) and receiving cord blood stem cell (P=0.03) or involved field radiotherapy (P=0.002), respectively. Strategies that carefully select lymphoma patients for autologous HCT, by excluding lymphoma patients with high-stage risk at HCT, may allow the identification of individual lymphoma patients at particular high risk for t-AML/MDS.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 3 April 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.52.

  17. Hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome with myelofibrosis in acute myeloid leukemia transformation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kui; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Min

    2015-07-01

    Primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with myelofibrosis is a rare hematological disorder that should be classified as a distinct subgroup of MDS. Treatment of MDS with myelofibrosis remains problematic and the prognosis is poor in these patients, particularly following transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The current study presents the case of a 28-year-old male diagnosed with MDS associated with myelofibrosis, together with hypocellular bone marrow features. Following induction chemotherapy consisting of mitoxantrone and cytarabine, the patient achieved complete remission, but developed severe myelofibrosis. The patient relapsed and the disease transformed into AML 12 months later. However, the extent of the myelofibrosis was markedly alleviated upon administration of a FLAG regimen that consisted of fludarabine, cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during the AML transformation. After one course of the FLAG regimen, the patient achieved a second complete remission. As there was no suitable donor for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), the patient relapsed and succumbed shortly after. In conclusion, MDS with fibrosis is an aggressive disease, but the degree of myelofibrosis may not be associated with the progression of hypocellular MDS, and allogeneic HSCT remains a potentially curative option for affected patients.

  18. Role of low dose cytarabine in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia: An experience

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    Yasir Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To highlight the acceptable results seen after use of low dose cytarabine in elderly patients of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with comorbidities. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried on 30 newly diagnosed patients of AML over 60 years of age who were unfit for standard treatment regimens. We did not use azacytidine and decitabine in our patients because these therapeutic modalities being extremely costly and our patient affordability being poor. After taking patient consent and institutional ethical clearance these patients were treated with 20 mg/m 2 cytarabine subcutaneously in two divided doses 12 h apart for 4 days every week for 4 weeks which constituted a cycle before disease, re-assessment was done. A repeat cycle was administered where ever needed and after attainment of remission, we continued low dose cytarabine for 2 days/week as maintenance after complete or partial response was documented. Results: In our study, we found that around 20% of patients achieved complete remission and 30% partial remission. The remission rates were definitely influenced by counts at presentation, performance at presentation, comorbidities, underlying myelodysplastic syndrome and baseline cytogenetics. Conclusion: Low dose cytarabine is effective treatment option for elderly patients with AML when standard treatment options are not warranted.

  19. Up-front allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia arising from the myelodysplastic syndrome.

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    Choi, Yunsuk; Kim, Sung-Doo; Park, Young-Hoon; Lee, Jae Seok; Kim, Dae-Young; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung; Seol, Miee; Lee, Young-Shin; Kang, Young-Ah; Jeon, Mijin; Jung, Ah Rang; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In patients with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (s-AML) arising from the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), treatment outcome is unsatisfactory. We compared up-front allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to induction chemotherapy (IC) as an initial treatment in patients with s-AML arising from MDS. This retrospective study included 85 patients who were diagnosed with s-AML arising from MDS; 11 patients proceeded to up-front HCT without IC (HCT group) and 74 received IC (IC group) as an initial treatment for s-AML, 28 of whom subsequently underwent HCT. In the IC group, 41.9% achieved complete remission (CR) compared to 81.8% in the HCT group (p = 0.013). The HCT group showed a significantly longer event-free survival (EFS) than the IC group (median 29.2 vs. 5.2 months, p = 0.042). Overall survival of the HCT group was higher than that of the IC group, but the difference was not statistically significant (median 34.6 vs. 7.6 months, p = 0.149). After adjustment for other clinical factors, outcome in the HCT group was significantly better than in the IC group in terms of CR rate (hazard ratio, HR, 11.195; p = 0.007) and EFS (HR, 0.384; p = 0.029). Up-front HCT is a viable option in s-AML arising from MDS if an appropriate donor is available.

  20. Analyzing transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to secondary acute myeloid leukemia using a large patient database.

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    Shukron, Ofir; Vainstein, Vladimir; Kündgen, Andrea; Germing, Ulrich; Agur, Zvia

    2012-09-01

    One-third of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) progress to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), with its concomitant poor prognosis. Recently, multiple mutations have been identified in association with MDS-to-sAMLtransition, but it is still unclear whether all these mutations are necessary for transformation. If multiple independent mutations are required for the transformation, sAML risk should increase with time from MDS diagnosis. In contrast, if a single critical biological event determines sAML transformation; its risk should be constant in time elapsing from MDS diagnosis. To elucidate this question, we studied a database of 1079 patients with MDS. We classified patients according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), using either the French-American-British (FAB) or the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and statistically analyzed the resulting transformation risk curves of each group. The risk of transformation after MDS diagnosis remained constant in time within three out of four risk groups, and in all four risk groups, when patients were classified according to FAB or to the WHO-determined criteria, respectively. Further subdivision by blast percentage or cytogenetics had no influence on this result. Our analysis suggests that a single random biological event leads to transformation to sAML, thus calling for the exclusion of time since MDS diagnosis from the clinical decision-making process.

  1. Abrupt evolution of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Sakoda, Hiroto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Inano, Shojiro; Sueki, Yuki; Yanagida, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder arising from an alteration in multipotent stem cells, which lose the ability of normal proliferation and differentiation. Disease progression occurs in approximately 30% MDS cases. Specific chromosomal alterations seem responsible for each step in the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Multiple genetic aberrations occur during the clonal evolution of MDS; however, few studies report the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. We report a rare case of Ph-positive AML, which evolved during the course of low-risk MDS. The patient, a 76-year-old man with mild leukocytopenia, was diagnosed with MDS, refractory neutropenia (RN). After 1.5 yr, his peripheral blood and bone marrow were suddenly occupied by immature basophils and myeloblasts, indicating the onset of AML. A bone marrow smear showed multilineage dysplasia, consistent with MDS evolution. Chromosomal analysis showed an additional t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Because progression occurred concurrently with emergence of the Ph chromosome, we diagnosed this case as Ph-positive AML with basophilia arising from the clonal evolution of MDS. The patient was initially treated with nilotinib. A hematological response was soon achieved with disappearance of the Ph chromosome in the bone marrow. Emergence of Ph-positive AML in the course of low-risk MDS has rarely been reported. We report this case as a rare clinical course of MDS.

  2. Leukaemia relapse after allogeneic transplants for acute myeloid leukaemia: predictive role of WT1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Sarah; Geroldi, Simona; Tedone, Elisabetta; Luchetti, Silvia; Grasso, Raffaella; Colombo, Nicoletta; Di Grazia, Carmen; Lamparelli, Teresa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ibatici, Adalberto; Bregante, Stefania; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Raiola, Anna Maria; Dominietto, Alida; Varaldo, Riccardo; Signori, Alessio; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    We assessed WT1 expression (expressed as messenger copies/10(4) ABL1) from marrow cells of 122 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), before and after an unmanipulated allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). The median age was 44 years (15-69), 59% were in first remission, 74% received a myeloablative conditioning regimen and the median follow up was 865 d (34-2833). Relapse was higher in 67 patients with WT1 expression, at any time post-HSCT, exceeding 100 copies (54%), as compared to 16%, for 55 patients with post-HSCT WT1 expression <100 copies (P < 0·0001). Similarly, actuarial 5-year survival (OS) was 40% vs. 63%, respectively (P = 0·03). In multivariate Cox analysis, WT1 expression post-HSCT was the strongest predictor of relapse (Hazard Ratio [HR] 4·5, P = 0·0001), independent of disease phase (HR 2·3, P = 0·002). Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) were given to 17 patients because of increasing WT1 levels: their OS was 44%, vs. 14% for 21 patients with increasing WT1 expression who did not receive DLI (P = 0·004). In conclusion, WT1 expression post-HSCT is a strong predictor of leukaemia relapse and survival in AML; WT1 may be used as a marker for early interventional therapy.

  3. The factors affecting early death after the initial therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Yayar, Okan; Aydin, Seda; Demiroglu, Haluk; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Goker, Hakan; Aksu, Salih; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    There are some improvements in management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, induction-induced deaths still remain as a major problem. The aim of this study is to assess clinical parameters affecting early death in patients with AML. 199 AML patients, who were treated with intensive, non-intensive or supportive treatment between 2002 and 2014 in Hacettepe Hematology Department, were analyzed retrospectively. In our study early death rate for elderly was found to be lower than previous reports whereas it was similar for those who were under age of 60. Better ECOG performance (ECOG performance score 0 and 1) and non-intensive treatment associated with lower early death rates, however APL-type disease associated with higher early death rates. ECOG performance score at diagnosis was found to be the most related independent factor with higher rate of early death in 15 days after treatment (P<0.001). Therefore we decided to understand the factors which were related with ECOG. WBC count at diagnosis was found to be the only related parameter with ECOG performance score. Leucocyte count at diagnosis appears like to have an indirect effect on early death in AML patients. It maybe suggested that in recent years there is an improvement in early death rates of elderly AML patients. The currently reported findings require prospective validation and would encourage the incorporation of other next generation genomics for the prediction of early death and overall risk status of AML. PMID:26885243

  4. Critically short telomeres in acute myeloid leukemia with loss or gain of parts of chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggers, Susan J J; Kuijpers, Marianne A; de Cort, Maartje J M; Beverloo, H Berna; Zijlmans, J Mark J M

    2006-03-01

    Telomeres, nucleoprotein complexes at chromosome ends, protect chromosomes against end-to-end fusion. Previous in vitro studies in human fibroblast models indicated that telomere dysfunction results in chromosome instability. Loss of telomere function can result either from critical shortening of telomeric DNA or from loss of distinct telomere-capping proteins. It is less clear whether telomere dysfunction has an important role in human cancer development in vivo. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a good model to study mechanisms that generate chromosome instability in human cancer development because distinct groups of AML are characterized either by aberrations that theoretically could result from telomere dysfunction (terminal deletions, gains/losses of chromosome parts, nonreciprocal translocations), or aberrations that are unlikely to result from telomere dysfunction (e.g., reciprocal translocations or inversions). Here we demonstrate that AML with multiple chromosome aberrations that theoretically could result from telomere dysfunction is invariably characterized by critically short telomeres. Short telomeres in this group are not associated with low telomerase activity or decreased expression of essential telomeric capping proteins TRF2 and POT1. In contrast, telomerase activity levels are significantly higher in AML with short telomeres. Notably, short telomeres in the presence of high telomerase may relate to significantly higher expression of TRF1, a negative regulator of telomere length. Our observations suggest that, consistent with previous in vitro fibroblast models, age-related critical telomere shortening may have a role in generating chromosome instability in human AML development.

  5. Plasma Exosomes as Markers of Therapeutic Response in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Chang-Sook eHong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Exosomes isolated from the plasma of newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients have elevated protein and TGF-β1 contents and inhibit natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity. A potential role of exosomes in predicting responses to chemotherapy (CT was evaluated in AML patients undergoing treatment. Experimental Design: Plasma was obtained from AML patients at diagnosis (n=16; post induction CT (n=9; during consolidation CT (n=10; in long-term remission (LTCR, n=5; and from healthy volunteers (n=7. Exosomes were isolated by exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation. The exosomal protein, soluble TGFβ-1 levels (ELISA and the TGF-β1 profiles (western blots were compared among patients’ cohorts. The results were correlated with the patients’ cytogenetic profile, percentage of leukemic blast and outcome. Results: At diagnosis, protein and TGF-β1 levels were higher (pConclusions: Changes in exosomal protein and/or TGF-β1 content may reflect responses to CT. The exosomal TGF-β1 profile suggests the presence of residual disease in patients considered to have achieved complete remission.

  6. The hidden genomic landscape of acute myeloid leukemia: subclonal structure revealed by undetected mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodini, Margherita; Ronchini, Chiara; Giacò, Luciano; Russo, Anna; Melloni, Giorgio E M; Luzi, Lucilla; Sardella, Domenico; Volorio, Sara; Hasan, Syed K; Ottone, Tiziana; Lavorgna, Serena; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Candoni, Anna; Fanin, Renato; Toffoletti, Eleonora; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cignetti, Alessandro; Tarella, Corrado; Bernard, Loris; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Riva, Laura

    2015-01-22

    The analyses carried out using 2 different bioinformatics pipelines (SomaticSniper and MuTect) on the same set of genomic data from 133 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, sequenced inside the Cancer Genome Atlas project, gave discrepant results. We subsequently tested these 2 variant-calling pipelines on 20 leukemia samples from our series (19 primary AMLs and 1 secondary AML). By validating many of the predicted somatic variants (variant allele frequencies ranging from 100% to 5%), we observed significantly different calling efficiencies. In particular, despite relatively high specificity, sensitivity was poor in both pipelines resulting in a high rate of false negatives. Our findings raise the possibility that landscapes of AML genomes might be more complex than previously reported and characterized by the presence of hundreds of genes mutated at low variant allele frequency, suggesting that the application of genome sequencing to the clinic requires a careful and critical evaluation. We think that improvements in technology and workflow standardization, through the generation of clear experimental and bioinformatics guidelines, are fundamental to translate the use of next-generation sequencing from research to the clinic and to transform genomic information into better diagnosis and outcomes for the patient.

  7. Significance of murine retroviral mutagenesis for identification of disease genes in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkeland, Stefan J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Touw, Ivo P

    2006-01-15

    Retroviral insertion mutagenesis is considered a powerful tool to identify cancer genes in mice, but its significance for human cancer has remained elusive. Moreover, it has recently been debated whether common virus integrations are always a hallmark of tumor cells and contribute to the oncogenic process. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable response to treatment. Recurrent cytogenetic defects and acquired mutations in regulatory genes are associated with AML subtypes and prognosis. Recently, gene expression profiling (GEP) has been applied to further risk stratify AML. Here, we show that mouse leukemia genes identified by retroviral insertion mutagenesis are more frequently differentially expressed in distinct subclasses of adult and pediatric AML than randomly selected genes or genes located more distantly from a virus integration site. The candidate proto-oncogenes showing discriminative expression in primary AML could be placed in regulatory networks mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional control. Our data support the validity of retroviral insertion mutagenesis in mice for human disease and indicate that combining these murine screens for potential proto-oncogenes with GEP in human AML may help to identify critical disease genes and novel pathogenetic networks in leukemia.

  8. Addiction of t(8;21 and inv(16 Acute Myeloid Leukemia to Native RUNX1

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    Oren Ben-Ami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The t(8;21 and inv(16 chromosomal aberrations generate the oncoproteins AML1-ETO (A-E and CBFβ-SMMHC (C-S. The role of these oncoproteins in acute myeloid leukemia (AML etiology has been well studied. Conversely, the function of native RUNX1 in promoting A-E- and C-S-mediated leukemias has remained elusive. We show that wild-type RUNX1 is required for the survival of t(8;21-Kasumi-1 and inv(16-ME-1 leukemic cells. RUNX1 knockdown in Kasumi-1 cells (Kasumi-1RX1-KD attenuates the cell-cycle mitotic checkpoint, leading to apoptosis, whereas knockdown of A-E in Kasumi-1RX1-KD rescues these cells. Mechanistically, a delicate RUNX1/A-E balance involving competition for common genomic sites that regulate RUNX1/A-E targets sustains the malignant cell phenotype. The broad medical significance of this leukemic cell addiction to native RUNX1 is underscored by clinical data showing that an active RUNX1 allele is usually preserved in both t(8;21 or inv(16 AML patients, whereas RUNX1 is frequently inactivated in other forms of leukemia. Thus, RUNX1 and its mitotic control targets are potential candidates for new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Decitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik P

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Priya Malik, Amanda F CashenWashington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are elderly and have a poor prognosis despite induction therapy. Decitabine, a DNA-hypomethylating agent that induces differentiation and apoptosis of leukemic cells, is a well-tolerated alternative to aggressive chemotherapy. It is currently FDA-approved for myelodysplastic syndrome, including patients with 20%–30% bone marrow blasts. Recent clinical attention has focused on evaluating decitabine as frontline therapy for untreated high-risk elderly AML patients. A large randomized international phase III study comparing decitabine to supportive care and cytarabine in elderly AML patients demonstrated significantly improved complete remission rates, but the survival difference did not reach significance. Due to this, decitabine did not achieve FDA approval for AML, but continues to be used off-label. Current research is focused on further defining subgroups of elderly AML patients who may derive greater benefit from decitabine therapy and combining it with other low-intensity active agents for AML.Keywords: decitabine, elderly, AML

  10. SMG1 Acts as a Novel Potential Tumor Suppressor with Epigenetic Inactivation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Yahui Du

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member (SMG1 belongs to a family of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases and is the main kinase involved in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Recently, SMG1 was suggested as a novel potential tumor suppressor gene, particularly in hypoxic tumors. To investigate the function of SMG1 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, we performed methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and found that SMG1 was hypermethylated in the promoter region. SMG1 hypermethylation was found in 66% (33/50 of AML samples compared with none (0/14 of the normal controls. SMG1 mRNA was down-regulated in AML patients with hypermethylation status whereas it was readily expressed in patients without methylation. Moreover, treatment of AML cells with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine inhibited AML cell growth and induced apoptosis by reversing SMG1 methylation status and restoring SMG1 expression. On the other hand, knockdown of SMG1 by RNA interference inhibited apoptosis. We also found that mTOR expression level was negatively correlated to SMG1 expression in AML patients which indicated that SMG1 and mTOR maybe act antagonistically to regulate AML cell growth. In conclusion, our results indicate that SMG1 acts as a potential tumor suppressor with epigenetic regulation in AML.

  11. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML.

  12. Increased PRAME-specific CTL killing of acute myeloid leukemia cells by either a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor chidamide alone or combined treatment with decitabine.

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    Yushi Yao

    Full Text Available As one of the best known cancer testis antigens, PRAME is overexpressed exclusively in germ line tissues such as the testis as well as in a variety of solid and hematological malignant cells including acute myeloid leukemia. Therefore, PRAME has been recognized as a promising target for both active and adoptive anti-leukemia immunotherapy. However, in most patients with PRAME-expressing acute myeloid leukemia, PRAME antigen-specific CD8(+ CTL response are either undetectable or too weak to exert immune surveillance presumably due to the inadequate PRAME antigen expression and PRAME-specific antigen presentation by leukemia cells. In this study, we observed remarkably increased PRAME mRNA expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia cells after treatment with a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor chidamide in vitro. PRAME expression was further enhanced in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines after combined treatment with chidamide and DNA demethylating agent decitabine. Pre-treatment of an HLA-A0201(+ acute myeloid leukemia cell line THP-1 with chidamide and/or decitabine increased sensitivity to purified CTLs that recognize PRAME(100-108 or PRAME(300-309 peptide presented by HLA-A0201. Chidamide-induced epigenetic upregulation of CD86 also contributed to increased cytotoxicity of PRAME antigen-specific CTLs. Our data thus provide a new line of evidence that epigenetic upregulation of cancer testis antigens by a subtype-selective HDAC inhibitor or in combination with hypomethylating agent increases CTL cytotoxicity and may represent a new opportunity in future design of treatment strategy targeting specifically PRAME-expressing acute myeloid leukemia.

  13. Stepwise discriminant function analysis for rapid identification of acute promyelocytic leukemia from acute myeloid leukemia with multiparameter flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguo; Li, Yan; Tong, Yongqing; Gao, Qingping; Mao, Xiaolu; Zhang, Wenjing; Xia, Zunen; Fu, Chaohong

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has been accelerated by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC). However, diagnostic interpretation of MFC readouts for APL depends on individual experience and knowledge, which inevitably increases the risk of arbitrariness. We appraised the feasibility of using stepwise discriminant function analysis (SDFA) based on MFC to optimize the minimal variables needed to distinguish APL from other acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without complicated data interpretation. Samples from 327 patients with APL (n = 51) and non-APL AML (n = 276) were randomly allocated into training (243 AML) and test sets (84 AML) for SDFA. The discriminant functions from SDFA were examined by correct classification, and the final variables were validated by differential expression. Finally, additional 20 samples from patients with atypical APL and AML confusable with APL were also identified by SDFA method and morphological analysis. The weighed discriminant function reveals seven differentially expressed variables (CD2/CD9/CD11b/CD13/CD34/HLA-DR/CD117), which predict a molecular result for APL characterization with an accuracy that approaches 99% (99.6 and 98.8% for AML samples in training and test sets, respectively). Furthermore, the SDFA outperformed either single variable analysis or the more limited 3-component analysis (CD34/CD117/HLA-DR) via separate SDFA, and was also superior to morphological analysis in terms of diagnostic efficacy. The established SDFA based on MFC with seven variables can precisely and rapidly differentiate APL and non-APL AML, which may contribute to the urgent initiation of all-trans-retinoic acid-based APL therapy.

  14. Microarray analysis reveals genetic pathways modulated by tipifarnib in acute myeloid leukemia

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    Lancet Jeffrey E

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farnesyl protein transferase inhibitors (FTIs were originally developed to inhibit oncogenic ras, however it is now clear that there are several other potential targets for this drug class. The FTI tipifarnib (ZARNESTRA™, R115777 has recently demonstrated clinical responses in adults with refractory and relapsed acute leukemias. This study was conducted to identify genetic markers and pathways that are regulated by tipifarnib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Methods Tipifarnib-mediated gene expression changes in 3 AML cell lines and bone marrow samples from two patients with AML were analyzed on a cDNA microarray containing approximately 7000 human genes. Pathways associated with these expression changes were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. Results The expression analysis identified a common set of genes that were regulated by tipifarnib in three leukemic cell lines and in leukemic blast cells isolated from two patients who had been treated with tipifarnib. Association of modulated genes with biological functional groups identified several pathways affected by tipifarnib including cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, immunity, and apoptosis. Gene expression changes were verified in a subset of genes using real time RT-PCR. Additionally, regulation of apoptotic genes was found to correlate with increased Annexin V staining in the THP-1 cell line but not in the HL-60 cell line. Conclusions The genetic networks derived from these studies illuminate some of the biological pathways affected by FTI treatment while providing a proof of principle for identifying candidate genes that might be used as surrogate biomarkers of drug activity.

  15. Identification of circulating microRNAs as potential biomarkers for detecting acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Feng Zhi

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common acute leukemia in adults. The disease is characterized by various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities with distinct prognoses and gene expression profiles. Emerging evidence has suggested that circulating microRNAs (miRNAs could serve as noninvasive biomarkers for cancer detection; however, little is known about circulating miRNA profiles in AML patients. In this study, a genome-wide serum miRNA expression analysis was performed using Solexa sequencing for initial screen, followed by validation with real-time PCR assays. The analysis was conducted on training and verification sets of serum samples from 140 newly diagnosed AML patients and 135 normal adult donors. After a two-phase selection and validation process, 6 miRNAs, miR-10a-5p, miR-93-5p, miR-129-5p, miR-155-5p, miR-181b-5p and miR-320d, were found to have significantly different expression levels in AML compared with control serum samples. Furthermore, unsupervised clustering analysis revealed the remarkable ability of the 6-miRNA profile to differentiate between AML patients and normal controls. The areas under the ROC curve for the selected miRNAs ranged from 0.8129 to 0.9531. More importantly, miR-181b-5p levels in serum were significantly associated with overall survival. These data demonstrated that the expression patterns of circulating miRNAs were systematically altered in AML and miR-181b-5p may serve as a predictor for overall survival in AML patients.

  16. Acta Medica Indonesiana - The Indonesian Journal of Internal Medicine 153 Malignant Pleural Effusion in Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Hepatitis B Virus Infection

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    C Suharti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions can be the first presentation of a hematologic malignancy. The most common disorders with pleural effusion are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a frequency of 20 to 30%, especially if mediastinal involvement. Acute and chronic leukemia are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement. We describe a 46-year-old female with history of progressive dyspnoea. Physical examination was revealed massive left pleural effusion. Complete blood count revealed anemia, trombositopenia and normal leucocyte count. Viral serology test shown positive of HBsAg and total antiHBc. Chest X-ray revealed left pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was myeloblast consistent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Bone marrow aspiration smear, bone marrow biopsy smear, and flow cytometry analysis were consistent with acute myeloid leukemia without maturation (AML M0-FAB classification. Key words: Acute myeloid leukemia, pleural effusion, infection.

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia in the era of precision medicine:recent advances in diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rina Kansal

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous myeloid malignancy that occurs more commonly in adults, and has an increasing incidence, most likely due to increasing age. Precise diagnostic classification of AML requires clinical and pathologic information, the latter including morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Risk stratification in AML requires cytogenetics evaluation as the most important predictor, with genetic mutations providing additional necessary information. AML with normal cytogenetics comprises about 40%-50% of all AML, and has been intensively investigated. The currently used 2008 World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic neoplasms has been proposed to be updated in 2016, also to include an update on the classification of AML, due to the continuously increasing application of genomic techniques that have led to major advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of AML. The purpose of this review is to describe some of these recent major advances in the diagnostic classification and risk stratification of AML.

  18. Different drug sensitivity profiles of acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemia and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children with and without Down syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, CM; Kaspers, GJL; Pieters, R; Hahlen, K; Janka-Schaub, GE; van Zantwijk, CH; Huismans, DR; de Vries, E; Rots, MG; Peters, GJ; Jansen, G; Creutzig, U; Veerman, AJP

    2002-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for leukemia. The prognosis for DS acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is better than for non-DS AML, but the clinical outcome of DS acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is equal to that of non-DS ALL. Differences in prognosis may reflect differences in

  19. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF BRAIN AND ACUTE LEUKEMIA CYTOPLASMIC GENE EXPRESSION IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

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    adel abd elhaleim hagag

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract      Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML accounts for 25%-35% of the acute leukemia in children. BAALC (Brain and Acute Leukemia, Cytoplasmic gene is a recently identified gene on chromosome 8q22.3 that has prognostic significance in AML.  The aim of this work was to study the impact of BAALC gene expression on prognosis of AML in Egyptian children. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 40 patients of newly diagnosed AML who were subjected to the following: Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations including: complete blood count, LDH, bone marrow aspiration, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping, assessment of BAALC Gene by real time PCR in bone marrow aspirate mononuclear cells before the start of chemotherapy. Results: BAALC gene expression showed positive expression in 24 cases (60% and negative expression in 16 cases (40%. Patients who showed positive BAALC gene expression included 10 patients achieved complete remission, 8 patients died and 6 relapsed patients, while patients who showed negative expression include 12 patients achieved complete remission, 1 relapsed patient and 3 patients died. There was significant association between BAALC gene expression and FAB classification of patients of AML patientsas positive BAALC expression is predominantly seen in FAB subtypes M1 and M2 compared with negative BAALC gene expression that was found more in M3 and M4 (8 cases with M1, 12 cases with M2, 1 case with M3 and 3 cases with M4 in positive BAALC expression versus 2 cases with M1, 3 cases with M2, 4 cases with M3 and 7 cases with M4 in BAALC gene negative expression group with significant difference regarding FAB subtypes. As regard age, sex, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pallor, purpura, platelets count, WBCs count, and percentage of blast cells in BM, the present study showed no significant association with BAALC. Conclusion: BAALC expression is an important prognostic factor in AML

  20. Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia and accelerate phase myeloid leukemia. | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available udio in aperto di fase II per determinare la tollerabilita` e l`efficacia antileucemica di STI571 in pazienti adulti con leucemia... Ph+ incluse la leucemia linfoblastica acuta, la leucemia mieloide acuta e la leucemia ...e phase myeloid leukemia. leucemia Ph+ incluse la leucemia linfoblastica acuta, la leucemia... mieloide acuta e la leucemia mieloide cronica in fase accelerata. E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Disease

  1. Myeloid cell differentiation arrest by miR-125b-1 in myelodysplasic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with the t(2;11)(p21;q23) translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bousquet (Marina); C. Quelen (Cathy); R. Rosati (Roberto); V.M.D. Mas; R.L. Starza (Roberta); C. Bastard (Christian); E. Lippert (Eric); P. Talmant (Pascaline); M. Lafage-Pochitaloff (Marina); D. Leroux (Dominique); C. Gervais (Carine); F. Viguié (Franck); J.L. Lai; C. Terre (Christine); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); C. Sambani (Costantina); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); P. Marynen (Peter); G. Delsol (Georges); N. Dastugue (Nicole); C. Mecucci (Cristina); P. Brousset (Pierre)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMost chromosomal translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involve oncogenes that are either up-regulated or form part of new chimeric genes. The t(2;11)(p21;q23) translocation has been cloned in 19 cases of MDS and AML. In addition to this, we ha

  2. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  3. Effect of Wuguteng tablets in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yan Ren; Ying Huang

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To observe the application effect of Wuguteng tablets in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Methods: A total of 60 patients with AML who were admitted in The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University from March, 2015 to January, 2016 were included in the study and divided into the study group and the control group with 30 cases in each group according to different treatment protocols. The patients in the two groups were given routine chemotherapy regimens. On this basis, the patients in the study group were given additional Wuguteng tablets. ECOG value, blood routine examination results, and average transfusion interval before treatment and 2 months after treatment in the two groups were compared in order to estimate the therapeutic effect.Results:The comparison of WBC and Hb count after treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05). PLT count after treatment in the study group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P0.05), while PLT average transfusion interval was significantly delayed when compared with before treatment (P<0.05). ECOG after treatment in the study group was significantly elevated (P<0.05), while PLT average transfusion interval was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment (P<0.05). ECOG after treatment in the study group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05), while PLT average transfusion interval was significantly delayed when compared with the control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Wuguteng tablets in the adjuvant treatment of AML can significantly delay PLT average transfusion interval, increase PLT, and improve the clinical symptoms; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  4. Metronomic therapy with oral 6-mercaptopurine in elderly acute myeloid leukemia: A prospective pilot study

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    Akhil Kapoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in elderly patients differs biologically from that in younger patients and is known to have unfavorable chromosomal rearrangements, higher resistance, and lower tolerance to chemotherapy. In such circumstances, instead of giving full-blown chemotherapy, palliative metronomic chemotherapy (MCT could be a treatment option. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective pilot study of old AML patients (age >60 years not amenable to curative treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled into the study and were treated with daily oral 6-mercaptopurine 75 mg/m 2 . The following inclusion criteria were used: age >60 years, nonpromyelocytic AML, the absence of uncontrolled comorbidities, and patient not amenable to curative treatment. Overall survival (OS was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to calculate the hazards ratio of significant factors. Results: The median age of the patients was 69 years (range: 61-86 years with male: female ratio of 2.5:1. About 59.4% of patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 while rest had the status of 3. The median OS was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.6. Males had median OS of 7 months (95% CI: 5.4-8.6 versus females with OS of 3 months (95% CI: 1.5-4.4; P = 0.008. There was no survival difference on the basis of baseline hemoglobin or French-American-British class. There were no Grade 4 toxicities and no episode of febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: MCT with oral 6-mercaptopurine is an attractive treatment option in elderly AML patients who are not amenable to curative therapy with minimal toxicities.

  5. SAMHD1 is a biomarker for cytarabine response and a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Constanze; Oellerich, Thomas; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Thomas, Dominique; Flick, Robert; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Kaderali, Lars; Stegmann, Lena; Cremer, Anjali; Martin, Margarethe; Lohmeyer, Julian; Michaelis, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Schliemann, Christoph; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Wardelmann, Eva; Comoglio, Federico; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Yakunin, Alexander F; Geisslinger, Gerd; Ströbel, Philipp; Ferreirós, Nerea; Serve, Hubert; Keppler, Oliver T; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2017-02-01

    The nucleoside analog cytarabine (Ara-C) is an essential component of primary and salvage chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After cellular uptake, Ara-C is converted into its therapeutically active triphosphate metabolite, Ara-CTP, which exerts antileukemic effects, primarily by inhibiting DNA synthesis in proliferating cells. Currently, a substantial fraction of patients with AML fail to respond effectively to Ara-C therapy, and reliable biomarkers for predicting the therapeutic response to Ara-C are lacking. SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase that cleaves physiological dNTPs into deoxyribonucleosides and inorganic triphosphate. Although it has been postulated that SAMHD1 sensitizes cancer cells to nucleoside-analog derivatives through the depletion of competing dNTPs, we show here that SAMHD1 reduces Ara-C cytotoxicity in AML cells. Mechanistically, dGTP-activated SAMHD1 hydrolyzes Ara-CTP, which results in a drastic reduction of Ara-CTP in leukemic cells. Loss of SAMHD1 activity-through genetic depletion, mutational inactivation of its triphosphohydrolase activity or proteasomal degradation using specialized, virus-like particles-potentiates the cytotoxicity of Ara-C in AML cells. In mouse models of retroviral AML transplantation, as well as in retrospective analyses of adult patients with AML, the response to Ara-C-containing therapy was inversely correlated with SAMHD1 expression. These results identify SAMHD1 as a potential biomarker for the stratification of patients with AML who might best respond to Ara-C-based therapy and as a target for treating Ara-C-refractory AML.

  6. High DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B levels: a poor prognostic marker in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Sandrine Hayette

    Full Text Available It has been recently shown that DNA methyl transferase overexpression is correlated with unfavourable prognosis in human malignancies while methylation deregulation remains a hallmark that defines acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The oncogenic transcription factor EVI1 is involved in methylation deregulation and its overexpression plays a major role for predicting an adverse outcome. Moreover, the identification of DNMT3A mutations in AML patients has recently been described as a poor prognostic indicator. In order to clarify relationship between these key actors in methylation mechanisms and their potential impact on patient outcomes, we analysed 195 de novo AML patients for the expression of DNMT3A, 3B (and its non-catalytic variant 3B(NC and their correlations with the outcome and the expression of other common prognostic genetic biomarkers (EVI1, NPM1, FLT3ITD/TKD and MLL in adult AML. The overexpression of DNMT3B/3B(NC is (i significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival, and (ii inversely significantly correlated with event-free survival and DNMT3A expression level. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed that a high expression level of DNMT3B/3B(NC is statistically a significant independent poor prognostic indicator. This study represents the first report showing that the overexpression of DNMT3B/3B(NC is an independent predictor of poor survival in AML. Its quantification should be implemented to the genetic profile used to stratify patients for therapeutical strategies and should be useful to identify patients who may benefit from therapy based on demethylating agents.

  7. Principal results of the Medical Research Council's 8th acute myeloid leukaemia trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J K; Gray, R G; Swirsky, D; Hayhoe, F G

    1986-11-29

    Between 1978 and 1983, 1127 patients with de-novo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were entered into the Medical Research Council (MRC)'s 8th AML trial. All received the same induction therapy consisting of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and 6-thioguanine--DAT (1 + 5). The 67% who entered complete remission were randomised to consolidation with two or six further courses of DAT. Adults under the age of 55 were randomised for central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate. Finally, those still in remission after 1 year of cytarabine and 6-thioguanine (AT) maintenance were randomised to receive either late intensification with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, and prednisolone (COAP) or continued AT. The median survival for the whole group was 12 months; the median duration of first remission was 15 months, with relapse-free survival at 5 years estimated at 18%. The factors most strongly associated with poor survival were performance status and age at presentation, but even among those over 60 years of age, half went into remission. Six courses of DAT consolidation gave a small advantage over two courses in reducing the number of late relapses but no significant survival advantage. Late intensification showed a marginally significant advantage over continued AT maintenance. The incidence of CNS relapse was low and unaffected by prophylaxis. The second remission rate varied from 10% when the first remission was shorter than 6 months to 61% when it had continued for more than 2 years. 40 patients received histocompatible allogeneic bone-marrow transplants in first remission. There was a high procedure-related death rate, particularly among patients over 30 years of age. Thus, initially at least, the transplanted group had shorter survival than a comparable group of chemotherapy-treated patients. Treatment specifications remained unchanged throughout the trial but those enrolled in the later half of the trial had a better (p = 0

  8. Feasibility, efficacy, and adverse effects of outpatient antibacterial prophylaxis in children with acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Gaur, Aditya H; Cao, Xueyuan; Flynn, Patricia M; Pounds, Stanley B; Avutu, Viswatej; Marszal, Lindsay N; Howard, Scott C; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C; Hayden, Randall T; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive chemotherapy for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) incurs the risk of infectious complications, but the benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis remain unclear. METHODS In 103 children treated on the AML02 protocol between October 2002 and October 2008 at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, we retrospectively assessed the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the frequency of febrile neutropenia, clinically or microbiologically confirmed infections (including bacteremia), and antibiotic resistance, and on the results of nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Initially, patients received no prophylaxis or oral cephalosporin (Group A). Then the protocol was amended to give intravenous cefepime alone or intravenous vancomycin plus either oral cephalosporin, oral ciprofloxacin, or intravenous cefepime (Group B). RESULTS There were 334 infectious episodes. Group A had a significantly greater frequency of documented infections and bacteremia (both P < .0001) (including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteremia, P = .0003 and .001, respectively) than Group B, especially viridans streptococcal bacteremia (P = .001). The incidence of febrile neutropenia without documented infection was not different between the two groups. Five cases of bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) occurred in group B (vs. none in Group A), without related mortality. Two of these cases were preceded by positive VRE rectal surveillance cultures. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is feasible in children with AML and reduces the frequency of documented infection but not of febrile neutropenia. Despite emergence of VRE bacteremia, the benefits favor antibiotic prophylaxis. Creative approaches to shorten the duration of prophylaxis and thereby minimize resistance should be explored. PMID:24677028

  9. Effect of Body Mass Index on the Outcome of Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Surprise, Harriet C.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Howard, Scott C.; Ringwald-Smith, Karen; Buaboonnam, Jassada; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Campana, Dario; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effect of body mass index (BMI) on treatment outcome of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is unclear and needs further evaluation. METHODS Children with AML (n=314) enrolled in 4 consecutive St. Jude protocols were grouped according to BMI (underweight, <5th percentile; healthy weight, 5th to 85th percentile; and overweight/obese, ≥ 85th percentile). RESULTS Twenty-five (8.0%) patients were underweight, 86 (27.4%) overweight/obese, and 203 (64.6%) had healthy weight. Five-year overall survival of overweight/obese patients (46.5±7.3%) was lower than that of patients with healthy weight (67.1±4.3%, P < .001); underweight patients also tended to have lower survival rates (50.6±10.7%, P = .18). In a multivariable analysis adjusting for age, leukocyte count, FAB type, and study protocols, patients with healthy weight had the best survival rate among the 3 groups (P = .01). When BMI was considered as continuous variable, patients with lower or higher BMI percentiles had worse survival (P = .03). There was no difference in the occurrence of induction failure or relapse among BMI groups but underweight and overweight/obese patients had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality, especially due to infection (P = .009). CONCLUSIONS An unhealthy BMI is associated with worse survival and more treatment-related mortality in children with AML. Meticulous supportive care, with nutritional support and education, infection prophylaxis, and detailed laboratory and physical examination is required for these patients. These measures, together with pharmacokinetics-guided chemotherapy dosing may improve outcome. PMID:22648558

  10. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Estey, Elihu

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of the elderly and the numbers of these patients are increasing. Patients ≥60 years of age continue to have poor prognosis. Preliminary results suggest benefit from reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in selected patients 60-80 years of age. However, although patients in this age range comprise >50% of those with AML, they currently constitute only 17% of those offered HCT. In the absence of prospective randomized studies comparing HCT and chemotherapy, the decision to recommend HCT rests on retrospective analyses of the risks of relapse and nonrelapse mortality after each approach. There is strong evidence that pre-HCT comorbidities can predict HCT-related morbidity and mortality. Age alone does not appear predictive and, particularly if the risk of relapse with chemotherapy is high, should not be the sole basis for deciding against HCT. Use of geriatric assessment tools, inflammatory biomarkers, and genetic polymorphism data may further aid in predicting nonrelapse mortality after HCT. Disease status and pretreatment cytogenetics with FLT3-TID, NPM-1, and CEBP-α status are the main factors predicting relapse and these are likely to be supplemented by incorporation of other molecular markers and the level of minimal residual disease after chemotherapy. HLA-matched related and unrelated donor grafts seem preferable to those from other donor sources. Donor age is of no clear significance. Models combining comorbidities with AML risk factors are useful in risk assessment before HCT. In this chapter, we integrated information on AML-specific, HCT-specific, and patient-specific risk factors into a risk-adapted approach to guide decisions about HCT versus no HCT.

  11. Gene mutation patterns in patients with minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Wu, Jin-Hou; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wang, Po-Nan; Yang, Chao-Ping; Shih, Yu-Shu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Huang, Yu-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2014-06-01

    Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M0) is a rare subtype of AML with poor prognosis. Although genetic alterations are increasingly reported in AML, the gene mutations have not been comprehensively studied in AML-M0. We aimed to examine a wide spectrum of gene mutations in patients with AML-M0 to determine their clinical relevance. Twenty gene mutations including class I, class II, class III of epigenetic regulators (IDH1, IDH2, TET2, DNMT3A, MLL-PTD, ASXL1, and EZH2), and class IV (tumor suppressor genes) were analyzed in 67 patients with AML-M0. Mutational analysis was performed with polymerase chain reaction-based assays followed by direct sequencing. The most frequent gene mutations from our data were FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD (28.4%), followed by mutations in IDH1/IDH2 (28.8%), RUNX1 (23.9%), N-RAS/K-RAS (12.3%), TET2 (8.2%), DNMT3A (8.1%), MLL-PTD (7.8%), and ASXL1 (6.3%). Seventy-nine percent (53/67) of patients had at least one gene mutation. Class I genes (49.3%) were the most common mutated genes, which were mutually exclusive. Class III genes of epigenetic regulators were also frequent (43.9%). In multivariate analysis, old age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.029, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.013-1.044, P=.001) was the independent adverse factor for overall survival, and RUNX1 mutation (HR 2.326, 95% CI 0.978-5.533, P=.056) had a trend toward inferior survival. In conclusion, our study showed a high frequency of FLT3, RUNX1, and IDH mutations in AML-M0, suggesting that these mutations played a role in the pathogenesis and served as potential therapeutic targets in this rare and unfavorable subtype of AML.

  12. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

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    A. V. Vinogradov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients (pts using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M5 – 2, M6 – 1, M7 – 1, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm – 1. Total RNA was extracted from leukemic cells and subjected to reverse transcription. DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 were amplified by PCR. Detection of mutations in DNMT3A gene was performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing was realized using an automatic genetic analyzer ABI Prism 310.Results. The average frequency of functionally significant point mutations in DNMT3A gene exons 18– 26 among the treated AML pts was 5.9%. They were detected in morphological subgroups M2 and M4(according to WHO classification. The average frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations among the AML M2 and M4 pts without chromosomal aberrations and TP53 gene point mutations was 14.3%. In both cases there were samples in which DNMT3A gene mutations were accompanied by molecular lesions of NPM1, KRAS and WT1 genes. AML pts with DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations characterized by poor response to standard chemotherapeutic regimens and unfavorable prognosis.

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies against Nucleophosmin Mutants: Potentials for the Detection of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Shi Tan, Ling Zhang, Xiao-Ming Zhong, Zai-Lin Yang, Liu-Yang Zhao, Yu-Jie Gao, Hui-Yuan Shao, Feng-Xian Qin, Xian-Chun Chen, Hui-Juan Zhang, Hui Chen, Li Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin (NPM1 gene mutations resulting in cytoplasmic delocalization of Nucleophosmin (NPMc+ are the most common genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Here, we attempted to prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against NPM1 mutation A (NPM-mA and investigated the mAbs' clinical utility in immunohistochemical detection of NPMc+AML. The pET-32a-NPM-mA vector with the whole open reading frame of the NPM-mA gene was constructed. E.coli BL21 transformed with the vector were induced to express the NPM-mA recombinant protein. BALB/c mice were immunized with the recombinant NPM-mA. Positive clones were selected by indirect ELISA and the mAbs were obtained. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the NPMc+ in bone marrow smears from 10 AML patients with NPM-mA. The results showed that the pET-32a-NPM-mA vector was successfully constructed and the NPM-mA recombinant protein was used to immunize the mice. Two positive clones (2G3 and 3F9 were selected. The mAbs against NPM-mA were raised, but did cross-react with wild type NPM1. The mAbs can be used to detect the cytoplasmic dislocation of NPM1 in all AMLs carrying NPM-mA. Our results show that anti-NPM-mA mAbs were produced. Though they would cross-react with wild type NPM1, the mAbs may still have potential in the detection of NPMc+AMLs.

  14. The Frequency and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in Chinese acute myeloid leukemia patients.

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    Lixun Guan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenease 1 (IDH1 occur in various hematopoietic tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. IDH1 mutations are significant in both diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions. In the present study we determined the prevalence and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in 349 samples from newly diagnosed AML patients. RESULTS: Of the 349 AML patient specimens analyzed, 35 (10.03% were found to have IDH1 mutations including 4 IDH1 R132 mutations and 31 non-R132 mutations. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were largely concentrated within AML-M1 (35.72%, pA, p.R100Q; (2 c.311G>T, p.G104V; (3 c.322T>C, p.F108L; (4 c.356G>A, p.R119Q; and (5 c.388A>G, p.I130V. In addition, we identified three IDH1 mutations that were previously described in AML. The frequency of IDH1 mutations in AML patients with normal karyotype was 9.9%. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were concurrent with mutations in FLT3-ITD (p<0.01, CEBPA (p<0.01, and NRAS (p<0.01, as well as the overexpression of MN1 (p<0.01 and WT1(p<0.01. The overall survival (OS in the patients with IDH1 non-R132 mutations compared to patients without IDH1 mutations don't reach statistically significance (median 521 days vs median: not reached; n.s.. CONCLUSION: IDH1 non-R132 mutations occurred frequently in newly diagnosed adult Chinese AML patients, and these mutations were associated with genetic alterations. The OS was not influenced by IDH1 non-R132 mutations in the present study.

  15. Prognostic Impact of Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1 Gene Mutations in Egyptian Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

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    Magda Zidan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Somatic mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1, which alter the subcellular localization of the product, are the most frequent mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and prognostic impact of NPM1 gene mutations in adult AML patients. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP were used to screen 55 AML patients for mutations of NPM1 gene. RESULTS: NPM1 mutations were found in 12 (21.8% of 55 patients, significantly associated with higher total leukocytie count, marrow blast percentage (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively, and M5 subtype (p<0.001. Patients with NPM1 mutations had significantly higher complete remission rates (p=0.003 and a trend to lower rates of mortality, relapse and refractory disease (p=0.28, p=0.45 and p=0.08, respectively. Survival analysis showed significantly longer disease-free survival (mean 18.635±1.229 versus 11.041±1.250 months, p=0.044 and overall survival (mean 19.810±1.624 versus 12.063±1.244 months, p=0.041 in patients with NPM1 mutations compared with those without. Multivariate analyses confirmed NPM1 mutation as a significant independent predictor for disease-free survival (HR=0.066, p=0.001 and overall survival (HR=0.125, p=0.002. CONCLUSION: NPM1 mutation is a prognostic factor for a favorable outcome in Egyptian population. This finding is of major clinical importance since it strongly suggests that NPM1 mutations may allow one to divide the heterogeneous patient group of AML into prognostically different subgroups.

  16. Characterization of Common Chromosomal Translocations and Their Frequencies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients of Northwest Iran

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    Elnaz Amanollahi Kamaneh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Detection of chromosomal translocations has an important role in diagnosis and treatment of hematological disorders. We aimed to evaluate the 46 new cases of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients for common translocations and to assess the effect of geographic and ethnic differences on their frequencies. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used on 46 fresh bone marrow or peripheral blood samples to detect translocations t (8; 21, t (15; 17, t (9; 11 and inv (16. Patients were classified using the French-American-British (FAB criteria in to eight sub-groups (M0-M7. Immunophenotyping and biochemical test results of patients were compared with RT-PCR results. Results: Our patients were relatively young with a mean age of 44 years. AML was relatively predominant in female patients (54.3% and most of patients belonged to AML-M2. Translocation t (8; 21 had the highest frequency (13% and t (15; 17 with 2.7% incidence was the second most frequent. CD19 as an immunophenotypic marker was at a relatively high frequency (50% in cases with t (8; 21, and patients with this translocation had a specific immunophenotypic pattern of complete expression of CD45, CD38, CD34, CD33 and HLA-DR. Conclusion: Similarities and differences of results in Iran with different parts of the world can be explained with ethnic and geographic factors in characterizations of AML. Recognition of these factors especially in other comprehensive studies may aid better diagnosis and management of this disease.

  17. Resistance to chemotherapy is associated with altered glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN; XU, XIAOJUN; XUAN, LI; HUANG, GUINIAN; LIU, QIFA

    2016-01-01

    Altered glucose metabolism has been described as a cause of chemoresistance in multiple tumor types. The present study aimed to identify the expression profile of glucose metabolism in drug-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and provide potential strategies for the treatment of drug-resistant AML. Bone marrow and serum samples were obtained from patients with AML that were newly diagnosed or had relapsed. The messenger RNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, glucose transporter (GLUT)1, and hexokinase-II was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The levels of LDH and β subunit of human F1-F0 adenosine triphosphate synthase (β-F1-ATPase) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent and western blot assays. The HL-60 and HL-60/ADR cell lines were used to evaluate glycolytic activity and effect of glycolysis inhibition on cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-resistant HL-60/ADR cells exhibited a significantly increased level of glycolysis compared with the drug-sensitive HL-60 cell line. The expression of HIF-1α, hexokinase-II, GLUT1 and LDH were increased in AML patients with no remission (NR), compared to healthy control individuals and patients with complete remission (CR) and partial remission. The expression of β-F1-ATPase in patients with NR was decreased compared with the expression in the CR group. Treatment of HL-60/ADR cells with 2-deoxy-D-glucose or 3-bromopyruvate increased in vitro sensitivity to Adriamycin (ADR), while treatment of HL-60 cells did not affect drug cytotoxicity. Subsequent to treatment for 24 h, apoptosis in these two cell lines showed no significant difference. However, glycolytic inhibitors in combination with ADR increased cellular necrosis. These findings indicate that increased glycolysis and low efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation may contribute to drug resistance. Targeting glycolysis is a viable strategy for modulating chemoresistance in AML. PMID:27347147

  18. Chemotherapy drug scheduling for the induction treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Pefani, E; Panoskaltsis, N; Mantalaris, A; Georgiadis, M C; Pistikopoulos, E N

    2014-07-01

    Leukemia is an immediately life-threatening cancer wherein immature blood cells are overproduced, accumulate in the bone marrow (BM) and blood and causes immune and blood system failure. Treatment with chemotherapy can be intensive or nonintensive and can also be life-threatening since only relatively few patient-specific and leukemia-specific factors are considered in current protocols. We have already presented a mathematical model for one intensive chemotherapy cycle with intravenous (i.v.) daunorubicin (DNR), and cytarabine (Ara-C). This model is now extended to nonintensive subcutaneous (SC) Ara-C and for a standard intensive chemotherapy course (four cycles), consistent with clinical practice. Model parameters mainly consist of physiological patient data, indicators of tumor burden and characteristics of cell cycle kinetics. A sensitivity analysis problem is solved and cell cycle parameters are identified to control treatment outcome. Simulation results using published cell cycle data from two acute myeloid leukemia patients are presented for a course of standard treatment using intensive and nonintensive protocols. The aim of remission-induction therapy is to debulk the tumor and achieve normal BM function; by treatment completion, the total leukemic population should be reduced to at most 10(9) cells, at which point BM hypoplasia is achieved. The normal cell number should be higher than that of the leukemic, and a 3-log reduction is the maximum permissible level of population reduction. This optimization problem is formulated and solved for the two patient case studies. The results clearly present the benefits from the use of optimization as an advisory tool for treatment design.

  19. FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and normal cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Wei-lai; Meng, Hai-tao; Qian, Wen-bin; Mai, Wen-yuan; Tong, Hong-yan; Mao, Li-ping; Tong, Yin; Qian, Jie-jing; Lou, Yin-jun; Chen, Zhi-mei; Wang, Yun-gui; Jin, Jie

    2010-10-01

    Mutations of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) exon 12 genes are the most common abnormalities in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal cytogenetics. To assess the prognostic impact of the two gene mutations in Chinese AML patients, we used multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis to screen 76 AML patients with normal cytogenetics for mutations in FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3/ITD) and exon 12 of the NPM1 gene. FLT3/ITD mutation was detected in 15 (19.7%) of 76 subjects, and NPM1 mutation in 20 (26.3%) subjects. Seven (9.2%) cases were positive for both FLT3/ITD and NPM1 mutations. Significantly more FLT3/ITD aberration was detected in subjects with French-American-British (FAB) M1 (42.8%). NPM1 mutation was frequently detected in subjects with M5 (47.1%) and infrequently in subjects with M2 (11.1%). FLT3 and NPM1 mutations were significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count in peripheral blood and a lower CD34 antigen expression, but not age, sex, or platelet count. Statistical analysis revealed that the FLT3/ITD-positive group had a lower complete remission (CR) rate (53.3% vs. 83.6%). Survival analysis showed that the FLT3/ITD-positive/NPM1 mutation-negative group had worse overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). The FLT3/ITD-positive/NPM1 mutation-positive group showed a trend towards favorable survival compared with the FLT3/ITD-positive/NPM1 mutation-negative group (P=0.069). Our results indicate that the FLT3/ITD mutation might be a prognostic factor for an unfavorable outcome in Chinese AML subjects with normal cytogenetics, while NPM1 mutation may be a favorable prognostic factor for OS and RFS in the presence of FLT3/ITD.

  20. Th17 cells and interleukin-17 increase with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yixiang; Ye, Aifang; Bi, Laixi; Wu, Jianbo; Yu, Kang; Zhang, Shenghui

    2014-08-01

    Although Th17 cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, their roles in malignancies are currently under debate. The role and mechanism of Th17 cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrated that the frequency of Th17 cells was significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bone marrow mononuclear cells from AML patients compared with healthy donors. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-23, IL-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were significantly increased in blood and bone marrow in AML patients compared with healthy donors. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, but not TGF-β1 promoted the generation and differentiation of Th17 cells from naive CD4(+) T cells in humans. IL-17A, a signature cytokine secreted by Th17 cells, induced the proliferation of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R)-positive AML cells via IL-17R, in which activation of PI3K/Akt and Jak/Stat3 signaling pathway may play important roles. In addition, combination of IL-17A and IL-22 significantly reduced the generation of Th1 cells and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ from healthy donor or AML patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Patients with high Th17 cell frequency had poor prognosis, whereas patients with high Th1 cell frequency had prolonged survival. Combined analysis of Th1 and Th17 cell frequencies improved the ability to predict patient outcomes. In conclusion, Th17 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AML and may be an important therapeutic target and prognostic predictor.